industryterm:energy source

  • The Chernobyl Podcast


    RSS: https://feeds.megaphone.fm/thechernobylpodcast

    The official podcast of the miniseries Chernobyl, from HBO and Sky. Join host Peter Sagal (NPR’s “Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me!”) and series creator, writer and executive producer Craig Mazin after each episode as they discuss the true stories that shaped the scenes, themes and characters.

    Great podcast to listen to once you’ve watched the HBO series. The author explains the narrative choices he had to make and how much/when the series departs from what actually happened.

    And for good measure, two episodes of the BBC’s ’More or Less’:
    (RSS: https://podcasts.files.bbci.co.uk/p02nrss1.rss )
    1) Questioning the Chernobyl disaster death count

    The recent TV miniseries ‘Chernobyl’ has stirred up debate online about the accuracy of its portrayal of the explosion at a nuclear power plant in the former Soviet state of Ukraine. We fact-check the programme and try and explain why it so hard to say how many people will die because of the Chernobyl disaster.

    http://open.live.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/6/redir/version/2.0/mediaset/audio-nondrm-download/proto/http/vpid/p07dtdwq.mp3

    2) Is nuclear power actually safer than you think?

    We questioned the death count of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in last week’s More or Less podcast. In the end, Professor Jim Smith of Portsmouth University came up with an estimate of 15,000 deaths.

    But we wondered how deadly nuclear power is overall when compared to other energy sources? Dr Hannah Ritchie of the University of Oxford joins Charlotte McDonald to explore.

    http://open.live.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/6/redir/version/2.0/mediaset/audio-nondrm-download/proto/http/vpid/p07fgfl5.mp3

    #podcast #chernobyl #statistics

  • Rotten fish to help power #Hurtigruten cruise ships after refit | Agricultural Commodities | Reuters
    https://af.reuters.com/article/commoditiesNews/idAFL8N1XQ6SH

    The Nordic region’s most high-profile cruise fleet operator is refitting its ships to make them less polluting, and plans to use a byproduct of rotten fish to help power their new, leaner engines.

    Norway’s Hurtigruten, best known for the ships that ferry tourists along the country’s fjords and coastline and up into the Arctic, is investing 7 billion crowns ($826 million) over three years to adapt its 17-strong fleet.

    Six of its older vessels will be retrofitted to run on a combination of liquefied natural gas (LNG), electric batteries and liquefied bio gas (LBG).

    We are talking about an energy source (LBG) from organic waste, which would otherwise have gone up in the air. This is waste material from dead fish, from agriculture and forestry,” Hurtigruten CEO Daniel Skjeldam told Reuters in an interview.

    Our main aim is to improve and cut emissions,” he said.

    Hurtigruten, also the world’s biggest expedition cruise operator to destinations including Antarctica, Svalbard and Greenland, is also ordering three new ships that will run on electricity, with a diesel engine only as back-up.

  • ABB sets out electric, digital, connected approach for shipping
    http://www.abb.com/cawp/seitp202/fca3b9aaf58f70f1c12581d90017b5b3.aspx

    With this new approach, ABB focuses on harnessing the full potential of its power, control and automation solutions through a program of digital integration that will bring about a step change in vessel and fleet management.

    We are living through one of the most exciting periods in the history of the maritime industry,” says Juha Koskela, Managing Director, ABB Marine & Ports. “We believe the next generation of ships will be electric, digital and connected as the industry moves towards the use of new energy sources and automated ship operations. Electric. Digital. Connected. encapsulates ABB’s drive to deliver solutions that make the maritime industry safer, more efficient and more sustainable based on a holistic perspective.

  • Norway races Australia to fulfill Japan’s hydrogen society dream | Reuters
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-hydrogen-race-idUSKBN17U1QA

    Norway and Australia are racing each other to show they can supply Japan with hydrogen, hoping to fulfill its ambition to become the first nation significantly fueled by the super-clean energy source.

    While Australia has planned to derive liquid hydrogen from brown coal for some time, Norway could steal a march if a pilot project producing the fuel using renewable energy - a climate-friendly method more in keeping with Japan’s aims - is cheaper.

    Japan is betting heavily on becoming a “#hydrogen_society” despite the high costs and technical difficulties which have generally slowed its adoption as a carbon-free fuel.

  • Special issue: How the economic changes caused by the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy will affect world security

    Introduction: International security in the age of renewables
    http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00963402.2016.1240927

    There is, however, a class of climate change impacts that has received less attention, perhaps because their effects will be indirect. These consequences will result not from increases in world temperatures, but from the world’s attempts to limit those increases. As the international community tries to reduce and eventually eliminate greenhouse gas emissions, global energy systems will undergo a massive transformation. Whether quickly or slowly, the nations of the world will almost certainly give up reliance on the fossil fuels – coal, petroleum, and natural gas – that drove the Industrial Revolution and created wealth and power dynamics that long dictated international relations. Britannia ruled the seas for a few hundred years, and the 20th century was American, in significant part because of the military might and financial power provided by fossil-fuel-powered industrial sectors.

    Will the coming transition to energy sources with low or no carbon dioxide emissions – solar, wind, nuclear, and other – also create new geopolitical winners and losers? The general answer to that question is almost certainly, “Yes, to some degree.” Specifically how – and how greatly – the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy will affect global power dynamics are matters of less certainty, so I have asked four prominent experts to address those concerns in this issue.

    The complicated geopolitics of renewable energy
    http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00963402.2016.1240476

    #climat #géopolitique #énergie

  • Trump uses energy speech to outline general election pitch - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-to-deliver-energy-policy-speech-in-north-dakota/2016/05/26/9c232d2c-2363-11e6-b944-52f7b1793dae_story.html

    Presumptive Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump unveiled an “#America_first” energy plan he said would unleash unfettered production of oil, coal, natural gas and other energy sources to push the United States toward energy independence.

    But the speech, delivered at the annual Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, North Dakota, went far beyond energy, as Trump laid out, in his most detail to date, a populist general election pitch against likely rival Hillary Clinton.

    She’s declared war on the American worker,” Trump said of Clinton, reading from prepared remarks in a stadium packed with thousands.
    […]
    In March, Clinton said, “We’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.” She has since walked back the remark, calling it “a misstatement” and outlining a plan to help displaced coal workers.

    Trump said Thursday he would do everything he could “free up the coal” and bring back thousands of coal jobs lost amid steep competition from cheaper natural gas and regulations designed to cut air pollution and reduce greenhouse gases blamed for global warming.

    They love it,” Trump said of those who work in coal mines. “We’re going to bring it back and we’re going to help those people because that’s what they want to do.

  • Artificial wind energy may be Turkey’s answer to demand
    http://www.aaenergyterminal.com/news.php?newsid=7741127

    Produire du vent artificiel à partir des pertes d’énergie de différentes unités de productions et alimenter des éoliennes. C’est pas un peu comme si on utilisait un sèche cheveu pour produire de l’électricité ? Quelquechose m’échappe dans l’intérêt d’un tel projet !

    Turkey can meet growing energy demand from artificial wind, says innovative project owner. An innovative technology in the energy sector, which generates electricity by creating artificial wind, could provide Turkey with a much needed alternative to tackle its energy demand problem, Nurettin Aydin, the project’s patent holder, told Anadolu Agency on Thursday.

    The project utilizes energy sources which are unable to be turned into electricity by current power plants due to their low heat quality, he said, and added that these sources include, low heat geothermal energy, waste steam and hot water from industrial facilities

    #Turquie #Electricité

  • Energy minister’s comment on HDP voters draws criticism
    http://www.todayszaman.com/national_energy-ministers-comment-on-hdp-voters-draws-criticism_395523.

    Energy and Natural Resources Minister Taner Yıldız’s implication in a meeting that pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) voters will change their minds about the party if they are left without electricity for three days has drawn widespread criticism in the media.

    The minister was answering questions from members of the press after attending a meeting on Monday where the Turkish National Committee of the World Energy Council (WEC) report on energy sources and energy consumption was presented.

    Referring to the “strategic voters” of the HDP, Yıldız had said: “Our citizens realize that the actions of the HDP have been changing in the last two months. Whether there’s an early election or not, I believe the majority of the HDP’s strategic votes will disappear. I expect that when the voters are left without electricity for three days, they will begin to evaluate the situation properly.”

    The strategic voters of the HDP are composed mostly of liberals and leftists who supported the HDP in the recent general election not because of its political views but to prevent the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) from winning the majority in Parliament, which was accomplished when the HDP passed the election threshold.

    HDP voters perceived Yıldız’s statement to be a threat to leave them without electricity for three days so that they would vote for the AK Party if no coalition government is formed and an early election is held. Many Twitter users reacted to the minister’s statement, with one saying he will consider Yıldız responsible for any future power blackouts that take place in Turkey

    #Turquie #Electricité #Election

  • The Man Who Delayed D-Day - Issue 15: Turbulence
    http://nautil.us/issue/15/turbulence/the-man-who-delayed-d_day

    When Dwight D. Eisenhower was planning the invasion of Normandy, he made sure to check with Walter Munk and his colleagues first. Munk had come to the United States from Austria-Hungary to work as a banker before switching to oceanography, eventually making major advances in the science of tidal and wave forecasting. He was a defense researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1943 when his team calculated that the seas on June 5 of that year would be so rough that a delay was in order. The invasion would happen on the following day. It was just one highlight among many in Munk’s career. From explaining why we always see the same side of the moon to sending a sound signal halfway around the world, Munk is the very definition of the enterprising scientist. When I spoke to him (...)

    • #océanographie #interface_air-mer

      What would you say is the most misunderstood aspect of the oceans today?
      I’m trying to give this some thought. I think that people think of the ocean in a negative way. At this meeting yesterday, questions about having energy sources—they think that shallow water is better than offshore deep water. I think it’s the other way around. The oceans can be a friend and a foe and it’s probably more friendly in deep water at great depths. And people are afraid of great depths, the deep water, and I think have made a mistake in that way. I would think that the disaster in Japan was due to the fact that people thought that a nuclear power plant just on the coast very close to the ocean would be safer than in the ocean. It’s certainly safer than in the ocean at very shallow depth. But I think there’s a case to be made that these things would be a lot safer if you go to some other depths seaward, where the waves are not broken. When you are aboard a ship you can’t even know that there’s a tsunami passing, the dimensions are such, and I think that a better assessment of the dangers and the advantages of the ocean environment could be a useful thing to do.

      What would you say is the most misunderstood aspect of the oceans today?
      I’m trying to give this some thought. I think that people think of the ocean in a negative way. At this meeting yesterday, questions about having energy sources—they think that shallow water is better than offshore deep water. I think it’s the other way around. The oceans can be a friend and a foe and it’s probably more friendly in deep water at great depths. And people are afraid of great depths, the deep water, and I think have made a mistake in that way. I would think that the disaster in Japan was due to the fact that people thought that a nuclear power plant just on the coast very close to the ocean would be safer than in the ocean. It’s certainly safer than in the ocean at very shallow depth. But I think there’s a case to be made that these things would be a lot safer if you go to some other depths seaward, where the waves are not broken. When you are aboard a ship you can’t even know that there’s a tsunami passing, the dimensions are such, and I think that a better assessment of the dangers and the advantages of the ocean environment could be a useful thing to do.

  • Thermal power plants produce half of Turkey’s wastewater
    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/thermal-power-plants-produce-half-of-turkeys-wastewater.aspx?page

    A fresh report by the state’s statistical institute TÜİK has revealed that some 52.3 percent of the wastewater discharged into nature in 2012 came from coal power plants, a leading energy source for energy-hungry Turkey, surpassing public water waste at 34 percent.

    #Centrale_thermique
    #Charbon
    #Pollution
    #Eau
    #Turquie

  • EcoSan Toilets Transform Human Waste into Compost in Haiti | Food Tank
    http://foodtank.org/news/2013/12/ecosan-toilets-transform-human-waste-into-compost-in-haiti

    According to SOIL, Haitians commonly use plastic bags to dispose of their waste into rivers and the ocean. Combined with a lack of adequate public infrastructure, this method of waste disposal contributes to the contamination of communal groundwater with waterborne diseases, like cholera.

    Decades of destructive land use policies in Haiti—including reliance on charcoal (converted from timber) as its primary energy source— have left soils bare and devoid of nutrients. Only about two percent of Haiti’s original forests remains today.

    The EcoSan toilet is providing a way for Haitians to transform their waste into a renewable supply of compost that can be sold to nurseries, garden stores, and NGOs to promote local agriculture and reforestation. Most SOIL toilets are designed with special toilet seats and urine diversion technology that separate liquid from solid waste. In addition to preventing odor, the technology reduces the weight of the waste buckets that will be transported to composting sites, where they undergo a six-month treatment to eliminate pathogens.

    #toilettes #merde #compost #Haïti

  • Global Network Against Weapons & Nuclear Power in Space | Statement on japanese nuclear disaster
    http://space4peace.blogspot.com/2011/04/global-network-statement-on-japanese.html

    nuclear power, an energy source that must be abandoned (...) Instead there must be full implementation of safe, clean energy technologies --- which are here today.

    The Global Network Against Weapons & Nuclear Power in #Space has long challenged the use of atomic energy in space. The network has emphasized that there are safe alternatives to energize space devices. In recent times, NASA, at long last, has begun substituting solar energy for nuclear power in space. Indeed, in coming months NASA’s solar-powered Juno spacecraft will be launched on a five-year mission to Jupiter. It was not long ago that #NASA emphatically insisted that solar power could not substitute for nuclear beyond the orbit of #Mars. Suddenly, it now can be done.

    #espace #nucléaire