industryterm:printing

  • Ogawa Kazumasa’s Hand-Coloured Photographs of Flowers (1896) – The Public Domain Review
    https://publicdomainreview.org/collections/ogawa-kazumasas-hand-coloured-flower-collotypes-1896

    RP-F-2001-7-1557B-1-edit

    The stunning floral images featured here are the work of Ogawa Kazumasa, a Japanese photographer, printer, and publisher known for his pioneering work in photomechanical printing and photography in the Meiji era. Studying photography from the age of fifteen, Ogawa moved to Tokyo aged twenty to further his study and develop his English skills which he believed necessary to deepen his technical knowledge. After opening his own photography studio and working as an English interpreter for the Yokohama Police Department, Ogawa decided to travel to the United States to learn first hand the advance photographic techniques of the time. Having little money, Ogawa managed to get hired as a sailor on the USS Swatara and six months later landed in Washington. For the next two years, in Boston and Philadelphia, Ogawa studied printing techniques including the complicated collotype process with which he’d make his name on returning to Japan.

    In 1884, Ogawa opened a photographic studio in Tokyo and in 1888 established a dry plate manufacturing company, and the following year, Japan’s first collotype business, the “K. Ogawa printing factory”. He also worked as an editor for various photography magazines, which he printed using the collotype printing process, and was a founding member of the Japan Photographic Society.

    The exquisite hand-coloured flower collotypes shown here were featured in the 1896 book Some Japanese Flowers (of which you can buy a 2013 reprint here), and some were also featured the following year in Japan, Described and Illustrated by the Japanese (1897) edited by Francis Brinkley.

    #Domaine_public


  • Formatting user-defined types with {fmt} library—Wojtek Gumuła
    http://isocpp.org/feeder/?FeederAction=clicked&feed=All+Posts&seed=http%3A%2F%2Fisocpp.org%2Fblog%2F2

    The future.

    Formatting user-defined types with fmt library by Wojtek Gumuła

    From the article:

    C++ has two standardized ways of printing formatted text out already: printf-family functions inherited from C and I/O streams abstraction built on operator<<. Streams are considered more modern, providing type-safety and extensibility functionalities. However, printf have some notable advantages, too — at the cost of lost type-safety, user can use an interface that looks familiar to almost all developers, allowing for some ways of localization and more readable syntax. And then, there is fmt — yet another text formatting library, inspired by design already available in languages like Python and (...)

    #News,_Product_News,


  • Fires in the Void : The Need for Migrant Solidarity

    For most, Barcelona’s immigrant detention center is a difficult place to find. Tucked away in the Zona Franca logistics and industrial area, just beyond the Montjuïc Cemetery, it is shrouded in an alien stillness. It may be the quietest place in the city on a Saturday afternoon, but it is not a contemplative quiet. It is a no-one-can-hear-you-scream quiet.

    The area is often described as a perfect example of what anthropologist Marc Augé calls a non-place: neither relational nor historical, nor concerned with identity. Yet this opaque institution is situated in the economic motor of the city, next to the port, the airport, the public transportation company, the wholesale market that provides most of the city’s produce and the printing plant for Spain’s most widely read newspaper. The detention center is a void in the heart of a sovereign body.

    Alik Manukyan died in this void. On the morning of December 3, 2013, officers found the 32-year-old Armenian dead in his isolation cell, hanged using his own shoelaces. Police claimed that Manukyan was a “violent” and “conflictive” person who caused trouble with his cellmates. This account of his alleged suicide was contradicted, however, by three detainees. They claimed Alik had had a confrontation with some officers, who then entered the cell, assaulted him and forced him into isolation. They heard Alik scream and wail all through the night. Two of these witnesses were deported before the case made it to court. An “undetectable technical error” prevented the judge from viewing any surveillance footage.

    The void extends beyond the detention center. In 2013, nearly a decade after moving to Spain, a young Senegalese man named #Alpha_Pam died of tuberculosis. When he went to a hospital for treatment, Pam was denied medical attention because his papers were not in order. His case was a clear example of the apartheid logic underlying a 2012 decree by Mariano Rajoy’s right-wing government, which excluded undocumented people from Spain’s once-universal public health care system. As a result, the country’s hospitals went from being places of universal care to spaces of systematic neglect. The science of healing, warped by nationalist politics.

    Not that science had not played a role in perpetuating the void before. In 2007, during the Socialist government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, #Osamuyi_Aikpitanyi died during a deportation flight after being gagged and restrained by police escorts. The medical experts who investigated Aikpitanyi’s death concluded that the Nigerian man had died due to a series of factors they called “a vicious spiral”. There was an increase in catecholamine, a neurotransmitter related to stress, fear, panic and flight instincts. This was compounded by a lack of oxygen due to the flight altitude and, possibly, the gag. Ultimately, these experts could not determine what percentage of the death had been directly caused by the gag, and the police were fined 600 euros for the non-criminal offense of “light negligence”.

    The Romans had a term for lives like these, lives that vanish in the void. That term was #homo_sacer, the “sacred man”, who one could kill without being found guilty of murder. An obscure figure from archaic law revived by the philosopher #Giorgio_Agamben, it was used to incorporate human life, stripped of personhood, into the juridical order. Around this figure, a state of exception was produced, in which power could be exercised in its crudest form, opaque and unaccountable. For Agamben, this is the unspoken ground upon which modern sovereignty stands. Perhaps the best example of it is the mass grave that the Mediterranean has become.

    Organized Hypocrisy

    Its name suggests that the Mediterranean was once the world’s center. Today it is its deadliest divide. According to the International Organization for Migration, over 9,000 people died trying to cross the sea between January 1, 2014 and July 5, 2018. A conservative estimate, perhaps. The UN Refugee Agency estimates that the number of people found dead or missing during this period is closer to 17,000.

    Concern for the situation peaks when spectacular images make the horror unavoidable. A crisis mentality takes over, and politicians make sweeping gestures with a solemn sense of urgency. One such gesture was made after nearly 400 people died en route to Lampedusa in October 2013. The Italian government responded by launching Operation #Mare_Nostrum, a search-and-rescue program led by the country’s navy and coast guard. It cost €11 million per month, deploying 34 warships and about 900 sailors per working day. Over 150,000 people were rescued by the operation in one year.

    Despite its cost, Mare Nostrum was initially supported by much of the Italian public. It was less popular, however, with other European member states, who accused the mission of encouraging “illegal” migration by making it less deadly. Within a year, Europe’s refusal to share the responsibility had produced a substantial degree of discontent in Italy. In October 2014, Mare Nostrum was scrapped and replaced by #Triton, an operation led by the European border agency #Frontex.

    With a third of Mare Nostrum’s budget, Triton was oriented not towards protecting lives but towards surveillance and border control. As a result, the deadliest incidents in the region’s history occurred less than half a year into the operation. Between April 13 and April 19, 2015, over one thousand people drowned in the waters abandoned by European search and rescue efforts. Once again, the images produced a public outcry. Once again, European leaders shed crocodile tears for the dead.

    Instead of strengthening search and rescue efforts, the EU increased Frontex’s budget and complemented Triton with #Operation_Sophia, a military effort to disrupt the networks of so-called “smugglers”. #Eugenio_Cusumano, an assistant professor of international relations at the University of Leiden, has written extensively on the consequences of this approach, which he describes as “organized hypocrisy”. In an article for the Cambridge Review of International Affairs (https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0010836718780175), Cusumano shows how the shortage of search and rescue assets caused by the termination of Mare Nostrum led non-governmental organizations to become the main source of these activities off the Libyan shore. Between 2014 and 2017, NGOs aided over 100,000 people.

    Their efforts have been admirable. Yet the precariousness of their resources and their dependence on private donors mean that NGOs have neither the power nor the capacity to provide aid on the scale required to prevent thousands of deaths at the border. To make matters worse, for the last several months governments have been targeting NGOs and individual activists as smugglers or human traffickers, criminalizing their solidarity. It is hardly surprising, then, that the border has become even deadlier in recent years. According to the UN Refugee Agency, although the number of attempted crossings has fallen over 80 percent from its peak in 2015, the percentage of people who have died or vanished has quadrupled.

    It is not my intention, with the litany of deaths described here, to simply name some of the people killed by Europe’s border regime. What I hope to have done instead is show the scale of the void at its heart and give a sense of its ruthlessness and verticality. There is a tendency to refer to this void as a gap, as a space beyond the reach of European institutions, the European gaze or European epistemologies. If this were true, the void could be filled by simply extending Europe’s reach, by producing new concepts, mapping new terrains, building new institutions.

    But, in fact, Europe has been treating the void as a site of production all along. As political theorist #Sandro_Mezzadra writes, the border is the method through which the sovereign machine of governmentality was built. Its construction must be sabotaged, subverted and disrupted at every level.

    A Crisis of Solidarity

    When the ultranationalist Italian interior minister Matteo Salvini refused to allow the MV #Aquarius to dock in June 2018, he was applauded by an alarmingly large number of Italians. Many blamed his racism and that of the Italians for putting over 600 lives at risk, including those of 123 unaccompanied minors, eleven young children and seven pregnant women.

    Certainly, the willingness to make a political point by sacrificing hundreds of migrant lives confirms that racism. But another part of what made Salvini’s gesture so horrifying was that, presumably, many of those who had once celebrated increasing search and rescue efforts now supported the opposite. Meanwhile, many of the same European politicians who had refused to share Italy’s responsibilities five years earlier were now expressing moral outrage over Salvini’s lack of solidarity.

    Once again, the crisis mode of European border politics was activated. Once again, European politicians and media talked about a “migrant crisis”, about “flows” of people causing unprecedented “pressure” on the southern border. But attempted crossings were at their lowest level in years, a fact that led many migration scholars to claim this was not a “migrant crisis”, but a crisis of solidarity. In this sense, Italy’s shift reflects the nature of the problem. By leaving it up to individual member states, the EU has made responding to the deaths at the border a matter of national conviction. When international solidarity is absent, national self-interest takes over.

    Fortunately, Spain’s freshly sworn-in Socialist Party government granted the Aquarius permission to dock in the Port of #Valencia. This happened only after Mayor Ada Colau of Barcelona, a self-declared “City of Refuge”, pressured Spanish President Pedro Sánchez by publicly offering to receive the ship at the Port of Barcelona. Party politics being as they are, Sánchez authorized a port where his party’s relationship with the governing left-wing platform was less conflictive than in Barcelona.

    The media celebrated Sánchez’s authorization as an example of moral virtue. Yet it would not have happened if solidarity with refugees had not been considered politically profitable by institutional actors. In Spain’s highly fractured political arena, younger left-wing parties and the Catalan independence movement are constantly pressuring a weakened Socialist Party to prove their progressive credentials. Meanwhile, tireless mobilization by social movements has made welcoming refugees a matter of common sense and basic human decency.

    The best known example of this mobilization was the massive protest that took place in February 2017, when 150,000 people took to the streets of Barcelona to demand that Mariano Rajoy’s government take in more refugees and migrants. It is likely because of actions like these that, according to the June 2018 Eurobarometer, over 80 percent of people in Spain believe the country should help those fleeing disaster.

    Yet even where the situation might be more favorable to bottom-up pressure, those in power will not only limit the degree to which demands are met, but actively distort those demands. The February 2017 protest is a good example. Though it also called for the abolition of detention centers, racial profiling and Spain’s racist immigration law, the march is best remembered for the single demand of welcoming refugees.

    The adoption of this demand by the Socialist Party was predictably cynical. After authorizing the Aquarius, President Sánchez used his momentarily boosted credibility to present, alongside Emmanuel Macron, a “progressive” European alternative to Salvini’s closed border. It involved creating detention centers all over the continent, with the excuse of determining people’s documentation status. Gears turn in the sovereign machine of governmentality. The void expands.

    Today the border is a sprawling, parasitic entity linking governments, private companies and supranational institutions. It is not enough for NGOs to rescue refugees, when their efforts can be turned into spot-mopping for the state. It is not enough for social movements to pressure national governments to change their policies, when individual demands can be distorted to mean anything. It is not enough for cities to declare themselves places of refuge, when they can be compelled to enforce racist laws. It is not enough for political parties to take power, when they can be conditioned by private interests, the media and public opinion polls.

    To overcome these limitations, we must understand borders as highly vertical transnational constructions. Dismantling those constructions will require organization, confrontation, direct action, sabotage and, above all, that borderless praxis of mutual aid and solidarity known as internationalism. If we truly hope to abolish the border, we must start fires in the void.

    https://roarmag.org/magazine/migrant-solidarity-fires-in-the-void
    #solidarité #frontières #migrations #réfugiés #asile #détention_administrative #rétention #Barcelone #non-lieu #Espagne #mourir_en_détention_administrative #mort #décès #mourir_en_rétention #Alik_Manukyan #renvois #expulsions #vie_nue #Méditerranée #hypocrisie #hypocrisie_organisée #ONG #sauvetage #sabotage #nationalisme #crise #villes-refuge #Valence #internationalisme #ouverture_des_frontières #action_directe

    signalé par @isskein


  • The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto
    https://www.activism.net/cypherpunk/crypto-anarchy.html
    Précurseur de la très romatique Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace et du Manifeste du web indépendant plus raisonnable et pragmatique le manifeste des anars cryptograhiques sera encore d’actualité en 2019.

    From: tcmay@netcom.com (Timothy C. May)
    Subject: The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto
    Date: Sun, 22 Nov 92 12:11:24 PST

    Cypherpunks of the World,

    Several of you at the “physical Cypherpunks” gathering yesterday in Silicon Valley requested that more of the material passed out in meetings be available electronically to the entire readership of the Cypherpunks list, spooks, eavesdroppers, and all. <Gulp>

    Here’s the “Crypto Anarchist Manifesto” I read at the September 1992 founding meeting. It dates back to mid-1988 and was distributed to some like-minded techno-anarchists at the “Crypto ’88” conference and then again at the “Hackers Conference” that year. I later gave talks at Hackers on this in 1989 and 1990.

    There are a few things I’d change, but for historical reasons I’ll just leave it as is. Some of the terms may be unfamiliar to you...I hope the Crypto Glossary I just distributed will help.

    (This should explain all those cryptic terms in my .signature!)

    –-Tim May

    ...................................................

    The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto
    Timothy C. May <tcmay@netcom.com>

    A specter is haunting the modern world, the specter of crypto anarchy.

    Computer technology is on the verge of providing the ability for individuals and groups to communicate and interact with each other in a totally anonymous manner. Two persons may exchange messages, conduct business, and negotiate electronic contracts without ever knowing the True Name, or legal identity, of the other. Interactions over networks will be untraceable, via extensive re- routing of encrypted packets and tamper-proof boxes which implement cryptographic protocols with nearly perfect assurance against any tampering. Reputations will be of central importance, far more important in dealings than even the credit ratings of today. These developments will alter completely the nature of government regulation, the ability to tax and control economic interactions, the ability to keep information secret, and will even alter the nature of trust and reputation.

    The technology for this revolution—and it surely will be both a social and economic revolution—has existed in theory for the past decade. The methods are based upon public-key encryption, zero-knowledge interactive proof systems, and various software protocols for interaction, authentication, and verification. The focus has until now been on academic conferences in Europe and the U.S., conferences monitored closely by the National Security Agency. But only recently have computer networks and personal computers attained sufficient speed to make the ideas practically realizable. And the next ten years will bring enough additional speed to make the ideas economically feasible and essentially unstoppable. High-speed networks, ISDN, tamper-proof boxes, smart cards, satellites, Ku-band transmitters, multi-MIPS personal computers, and encryption chips now under development will be some of the enabling technologies.

    The State will of course try to slow or halt the spread of this technology, citing national security concerns, use of the technology by drug dealers and tax evaders, and fears of societal disintegration. Many of these concerns will be valid; crypto anarchy will allow national secrets to be trade freely and will allow illicit and stolen materials to be traded. An anonymous computerized market will even make possible abhorrent markets for assassinations and extortion. Various criminal and foreign elements will be active users of CryptoNet. But this will not halt the spread of crypto anarchy.

    Just as the technology of printing altered and reduced the power of medieval guilds and the social power structure, so too will cryptologic methods fundamentally alter the nature of corporations and of government interference in economic transactions. Combined with emerging information markets, crypto anarchy will create a liquid market for any and all material which can be put into words and pictures. And just as a seemingly minor invention like barbed wire made possible the fencing-off of vast ranches and farms, thus altering forever the concepts of land and property rights in the frontier West, so too will the seemingly minor discovery out of an arcane branch of mathematics come to be the wire clippers which dismantle the barbed wire around intellectual property.

    Arise, you have nothing to lose but your barbed wire fences!

    –-
    ..........................................................................
    Timothy C. May | Crypto Anarchy: encryption, digital money,
    tcmay@netcom.com | anonymous networks, digital pseudonyms, zero
    408-688-5409 | knowledge, reputations, information markets,
    W.A.S.T.E.: Aptos, CA | black markets, collapse of governments.
    Higher Power: 2^756839 | PGP Public Key: by arrangement.

    https://www.eff.org/cyberspace-independence

    #internet #cryptographie


  • Erik Jan Hanussen
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Jan_Hanussen


    Heute nehmen wir Wikipedia als Einstieg in eine Untersuchung des #Mythos Hanussen , der gut und gerne als Vorläufer zu den Irrungen und Wirrungen um den Tod der Gefangenen von #Stammheim gelten kann. ab ’33 wurde es immer verrückter. Vom #Reichstagsbrand über das #Kenndy-Attentat bis zu #911, Manipulation und Vertuschung überall. Unser Mann wohnte im Jahr 1933 #Kudamm_16 , nachzulesen auf Seite_17 unseres Kudammbuchs. (https://seenthis.net/messages/745723)
    Andere Quellen sprechen von einer Adresse in der #Lietzenburger_Straße, wo er zum Zeitpunkt seiner Ermordunge gewohnt hätte.

    Erik Jan Hanussen, eigentlich Hermann Chajm Steinschneider, (* 2. Juni 1889[1] in Wien-Ottakring; † in der Nacht vom 24. auf den 25. März 1933[2] in Berlin) war ein unter anderem als „Hellseher“ bekannter österreichischer Trickkünstler. Trotz jüdischer Herkunft agierte er als Sympathisant der Nationalsozialisten.

    So geht das immer los mit den #Veschwörungstheorien. Angeblich weiß man nüscht , weil einem keiner was verrät. Meistens steckt aber bloß Faulheit dahinter. Ist ja auch viel bequemer, einfach zu behaupten, dass keena von nüchscht nix wissen kann , als sich aufzumachen ins Archiv oder wenigstens die zweite Seite der Google-Suchergebnisse zu lesen. Wir vertrauen jedenfalls auf das archivarische Gespür und die hochnotpeinliche Genauigkeit von Birgit Jochens und Sonja Miltenberger: Hanussen wohnte Kudamm 16.

    Hitlers Monsters A Supernatural History of the Third Reich - PDF Free Download
    https://mxdoc.com/hitlers-monsters-a-supernatural-history-of-the-third-reich.html

    At a seance on the night of 26 February 1933 the clairvoyant Erik Hanussen – a close friend of Nazi stormtroopers – ‘predicted’ next day’s Reichstag fire, which helped justify the Nazi imposition of martial law.

    Erik Jan Hanussen: Hellseher der Nazis - Politik - Süddeutsche.de
    https://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/mordfall-erik-jan-hanussen-der-hellseher-und-die-nazis-1.3994752

    Er unterstützte die NSDAP bei ihrem Aufstieg bis zu ihrer Machtergreifung im Januar 1933, über die er in der Hanussen-Zeitung laut jubelte.

    Ein paar Wochen später eröffnete Hanussen an der Lietzenburger Straße in Berlin seinen Palast des Okkultismus. Das Prunkstück war die astrologische Bar mit einem kreisrundem Tisch aus Glas und Hanussen als eine Art mystischer Barkeeper in der Mitte.

    Doch bei der Eröffnungsfeier ging er zu weit. Die Schauspielerin Maria Paudler ließ er in Trance „Feuer, Flammen, Verbrecher am Werk!“ verkünden. Schon am nächsten Tag bewies der Reichstagsbrand, was gemeint gewesen war, das Fanal, mit dessen propagandistischer Ausschlachtung die Nazis ihre Macht schließlich festigten. Seither gilt die Vorankündigung dieses historischen Ereignisses als eines der Motive für den bald folgenden Mord an dem umstrittenen Varieté-Künstler.

    Na also, ein akuter Fall von Faulheit. Die Adresse in der Lietzenburger war keien Wohnung sondern das magische Thaeter des Illusionisten Hanussen.

    Laut Tagesspiegel befand sich der Palast des Okkultismus in der Hausnummer 16. Das bleibt zu prüfen, denn die idnetische Hausnummer mit der Wohnandresse am Kurfürstendann kann wieder eine der beliebten Verwechslungen oder Zuschreibungen aus Nachlässigkeit sein. Leider bestand der Palast des Okkultismus nur so kurze Zeit, dass er kaum EIngang in die historischen Adreßbücher gefunden haben dürfte.

    Erik Jan Hanussen - Wikiwand
    http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Erik_Jan_Hanussen

    In 1931 Hanussen purchased a Breslau printing firm and began publishing an occult journal, Hanussen Magazin and Bunte Wochenschau, a popular biweekly Berlin tabloid which included astrological columns.[6] He used the proceeds from his publishing ventures and stage shows to purchase a mansion which became known as “The Palace of the Occult”, which he renovated and turned into a luxurious interactive theatre for fortune telling games. Guests would sit around a large circular table and place their palms on glass with symbols lit from beneath; the room lights would be lowered in a séance-like fashion; and various gimmicks would highlight Hanussen’s dramatic verbal presentation of prophecies to the guests. He predicted events in the lives of the individuals present, but controversy arose when he predicted the future of Germany. He became successful, was always in demand in various venues, and had a full-time valet.

    Alfred Neubauer, a famous motor racing team manager, refers to Hanussen in his autobiography, Speed Was My Life (first published in English in 1960). In the chapter ’A Prophecy Comes True’, he describes a prediction made by Hanussen before the race at AVUS in Germany in May 1932. While at the Roxy Bar with other drivers, Neubauer challenged Hanussen to predict the winner of the following day’s race. After some ’leg pulling’, Hanussen wrote two names on a piece of paper, which he folded, and put in an envelope. This was placed in the custody of the barman. He had strict instructions that it be left unopened until after the race. Hanussen announced, ’One of us at this table will win tomorrow, another will die. The two names are in this envelope.’ During the race, driver Prince Lobkowicz was killed, and Brauchitsch won. After the race, Neubauer states he opened the envelope and found those names inside. Several days later, a Berlin newspaper reported that Hanussen had urged the German Automobile Club to persuade Prince Lobkowicz not to take part in the race, but Club officials had taken no action.

    Erik Jan Hanussen : le médium juif d’Hitler | Terre Promise
    http://www.terrepromise.fr/2016/11/07/erik-jan-hanussen-le-medium-juif-dhitler

    Quelques jours avant la course, Hanussen avait prédit que Lobkiwicz aurait un accident. Après quelques minutes de course, sa Mercedes fut percutée, tuant le jeune homme sur le coup. Une enquête montra que la tragédie résultait d’une panne mécanique bizarre.

    Même les sceptiques les plus acharnés d’Hanussen furent bien en peine d’expliquer comment il avait pu trafiquer le véhicule. Ses ennemis ne se privèrent pas de suggérer que le médium était de connivence dans le sabotage de la voiture de Lobkowicz, de mèche avec des parieurs. Le jeune tchèque avait aussi fait des avances à une femme qu’Hanussen désirait, la jalousie était donc un mobile possible. Pour la plupart des gens, l’accident était une vraie preuve des dons de voyance du danois. Arthur Magida se demande si grâce à des années de discipline mentale, Hanussen n’aurait pas vraiment développé des pouvoirs psychiques.

    Une rencontre avec Hitler suivit peu après et Hanussen assura un Adolf angoissé qu’il n’avait pas à s’inquiéter pour les élections à venir. Sans surprise, les nazis enregistrèrent un immense succès au scrutin de juillet, doublant leurs sièges pour devenir le plus grand parti du Reichstag. Le jour de l’An 1933, Hanussen distribua un horoscope et déclara qu’Hitler serait chancelier avant la fin du mois. C’est ce qui se passa [élections du 30 janvier].
    Le Palais de l’Occulte et l’incendie du Reichstag

    Hanussen semblait au sommet de son pouvoir. Il n’était pas associé aux nazis, il en était un.

    Même son fidèle secrétaire, Ismet Dzino, appartenait au parti et à la SA.

    En plus d’être le devin favori du nouveau régime, il était sur le point d’ouvrir son opulent Palais de l’Occulte. L’élite de la capitale réclamait à cor et à cris des invitations. Mais les ennuis couvaient. Son parti pris pour les nazis valurent à Hanussen l’hostilité de la presse communiste qui avait publié des preuves de son ascendance juive. Hanussen fit de son mieux pour noyer le poisson et certains de ses copains nazis, tel Helldorf, firent preuve de loyauté envers lui jusqu’à la fin.

    Le Palais de l’Occulte ouvrit ses portes le soir du 26 février.

    Lors d’une séance semi-privée, l’une des médiums d’Hanussen, l’ancienne actrice Maria Paudler, eut une vision fatidique. En transe, elle déclara voir un « grand bâtiment » en feu. La presse attribua la prédiction à Hanussen lui-même. Moins de 24 heures plus tard, le Reichstag était en flammes. Les nazis mirent l’incendie sur le compte d’un complot communiste et prirent des mesures extraordinaires qui donnèrent à Hitler un contrôle dictatorial.

    La police de Berlin arrêta Marinus van der Lubbe, un hollandais au passé d’incendiaire en lien avec les communistes. On suppose classiquement que les nazis étaient derrière l’incendie et qu’ils se servirent de van der Lubbe comme bouc émissaire. Kugel suggère qu’Hanussen avait manipulé le hollandais par hypnose. Gerson et Mariel suggèrent une autre possibilité : le médium aurait été l’instigateur de l’incendie sur ordre de quelqu’un voulant discréditer Hitler. Si c’est bien le cas, le complot échoua lamentablement.

    À la mi-mars, la plupart des amis nazis d’Hanussen, dont Helldorf, se retrouvèrent congédiés ou réaffectés ailleurs. Le 24 mars, deux membres de la SA traînèrent le médium au quartier général de la Gestapo pour l’interroger. Ils le relâchèrent, mais le soir suivant trois hommes s’emparèrent de lui dans la rue et on ne le revit jamais vivant.

    Erik Jan Hanussen: Hellseher der Nazis - Politik - Süddeutsche.de
    https://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/mordfall-erik-jan-hanussen-der-hellseher-und-die-nazis-1.3994752

    Er unterstützte die NSDAP bei ihrem Aufstieg bis zu ihrer Machtergreifung im Januar 1933, über die er in der Hanussen-Zeitung laut jubelte.

    Ein paar Wochen später eröffnete Hanussen an der Lietzenburger Straße in Berlin seinen Palast des Okkultismus. Das Prunkstück war die astrologische Bar mit einem kreisrundem Tisch aus Glas und Hanussen als eine Art mystischer Barkeeper in der Mitte.

    Doch bei der Eröffnungsfeier ging er zu weit. Die Schauspielerin Maria Paudler ließ er in Trance „Feuer, Flammen, Verbrecher am Werk!“ verkünden. Schon am nächsten Tag bewies der Reichstagsbrand, was gemeint gewesen war, das Fanal, mit dessen propagandistischer Ausschlachtung die Nazis ihre Macht schließlich festigten. Seither gilt die Vorankündigung dieses historischen Ereignisses als eines der Motive für den bald folgenden Mord an dem umstrittenen Varieté-Künstler.

    (PDF) Hatten die Nazis etwas gegen Hypnose?
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317339412_Hatten_die_Nazis_etwas_gegen_Hypnose

    Erik Jan Hanussen, l’hypnotiseur du 3ème Reich - Hypnose
    https://www.peyrega-hypnose-paris.fr/blog/erik-jan-hanussen-hypnotiseur-hitler.html

    Quel type d’hypnose pratiquait Jan Hanussen ?

    Malheureusement, il n’y a aucun récit ou écrit expliquant précisément les techniques d’hypnose que pouvait utiliser Jan Hanussen ( c’est malheureusement valable pour toutes les anciennes techniques d’hypnose de scène ) , mais lorsque l’on sait que ce dernier faisait construire avant sa mort un “ palais de l’occultisme “ il ne faut pas se leurrer sur sa vision de l’hypnose….

    Cependant pour replacer la place de l’hypnose à cette époque dans un contexte historique, nous pouvons rappeler qu’aujourd’hui encore, de grandes stars de l’hypnose comme Messmer prétendent encore user de pouvoir psychique ou de magnétisme dans leurs spectacles, cela fait sans doute partie du jeu pour le l’hypnose de spectacle qui n’a d’autre but que de divertir le public, et c’était encore plus vrai à cette époque.

    N’oublions pas qu’à peine quelques dizaines d’années avant la mort de Jan Hanussen, d’éminents représentants de l’hypnose comme Jean-Martin Charcot utilisaient encore de grandes plaques aimantées “ pour “ déclencher “ des transes hypnotiques.

    Hitlers Monsters A Supernatural History of the Third Reich - PDF Free Download
    https://mxdoc.com/hitlers-monsters-a-supernatural-history-of-the-third-reich.html

    At a seance on the night of 26 February 1933 the clairvoyant Erik Hanussen – a close friend of Nazi stormtroopers – ‘predicted’ next day’s Reichstag fire, which helped justify the Nazi imposition of martial law.

    Herrmann Steinschneider (1889 - 1933) - Genealogy
    https://www.geni.com/people/Erik-Jan-Hanussen/6000000045424935868

    lso Known As: „Hermann Steinschneider“
    Birthdate: June 02, 1889
    Birthplace: Ottakring, Wien, Wien, Austria
    Death: März 24, 1933 (43)
    Berlin, Berlin, Germany (ermordet)
    Bestattungsort: Berlin, Germany
    Angehörige:

    Sohn von Siegfried Steinschneider und Antonie Julie Steinschneider
    Ehemann von Theresia Steinschneider
    Vater von Gerhard Belgardt und Private
    Occupation: Hellseher
    Managed by: Alex Christopher Bickle
    Last Updated: 2. August 2018

    The Hanussen Proof by Bob Cassidy : Lybrary.com
    https://www.lybrary.com/the-hanussen-proof-p-605.html

    Hanussen asked his inquisitors to concentrate on an event in their lives, and then to tell him the location and place where the event took place. It was the same test the mentalist performed the night he was arrested, except on that occasion Hanussen obtained the details of the events via secret signals from an assistant posing as a member of the audience.

    This time, however, neither his assistant nor associates were present. They had been removed from the courtroom, and placed under police guard. But despite these precautions, Hanussen provided detailed descriptions of the mentally selected events.

    The charges against him were dismissed.

    The sensational publicity that followed his acquittal, his subsequent rise to fame as “The Prophet of the Third Reich”, and his execution by the Gestapo in 1933, is described in Mel Gordon’s fascinating biography, Erik Jan Hanussen, Hitler’s Jewish Clairvoyant. The author’s primary sources were news reports, court records, historical materials, Hanussen’s own writings, and the published recollections of his contemporaries and critics. But nowhere in any of the voluminous materials written by and about the German seer is there a clue to the method he used at the trial. How was it possible for him to reveal events that occurred in people’s lives merely by knowing the dates and places?

    Medienarten und Ausgaben von Meine Lebenslinie [WorldCat.org]
    https://www.worldcat.org/title/meine-lebenslinie/oclc/32372383/editions?referer=di&editionsView=true

    Mythos Hanussen 2001-2011, Eine Sammelrezension, Wilfried Kugel
    https://www.anomalistik.de/images/pdf/zfa/zfa2013_12_196_essay-review_kugel.pdf


    parteische aber interessante Bewertung zahlreicher Quellen zu Hanussen
    u.a. Werner Herzog

    Neuauflage: Erik Jan Hanussen - Meine Lebenslinie - Schreibkurse für Ihre Lebensgeschichte/n
    https://www.meine-biographie.com/neuauflage-erik-jan-hanussen-meine-lebenslinie

    Erik Jan Hanussen – Zauber-Lexikon
    http://www.zauber-pedia.de/index.php?title=Erik_Jan_Hanussen

    Hanussens Grabstätte befindet sich auf dem Südwestkirchhof Stahnsdorf im Block Charlottenburg, Gartenblock III, Gartenstelle 50.

    Erik Jan Hanussen - Hokus-Pokus-Tausendsassa | Telepolis
    https://www.heise.de/tp/features/Erik-Jausendsassa-3417887.html?seite=all

    24. März 2008 Markus Kompa (unter Mitwirkung von Wilfried Kugel)
    Vor 75 Jahren ermordeten die Nazis ihren Propheten

    FILM: Gläubige Masse - DER SPIEGEL 42/1988
    http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/print/d-13531431.html

    Auferstehung eines „Hellsehers": Istvan Szabo verfilmte das Leben des Hitler-Propheten Hanussen - sein wahres war dramatischer.

    Internet Archive Search: Hanussen
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=Hanussen&and[]=mediatype%3A%22texts%22

    Hitlers Hellseher - Der Tagesspiegel - Andreas Conrad - 1.1.2006
    https://web.archive.org/web/20071108233135/http://www.tagesspiegel.de/zeitung/Sonderthemen%3Bart893,2287039

    die Eröffnung des „Palasts des Okkultismus“ in der Lietzenburger Straße 16, einer ultramodern eingerichteten, mit astrologischen Symbolen geschmückten Residenz, in der sich der Magier selbst inszenierte. Dort fand am 26. Februar 1933 die Séance statt, bei der Hanussen den Brand des Reichstages einen Tag später vorausgesagt haben soll.

    Der Klausener Platz Blog kennt eine Geschichte, welche die Information über Hanussens Wohnung in der Lietzenburger Straße 16 stützt.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/745779

    #Geschichte #Nazis #Okkultismus #Lietzenburger_Straße


  • How to choose a free sample cutting disc?
    With the development of the abrasives industry, the cutting disc industry is now also occupying a certain proportion in the Chinese market, especially the free sample cutting disc, which is very popular with some users. But for some novice users, in the selection of cutting discs There are always some problems encountered. Today, Aurora Abrasives will give you an analysis of how to choose a cutting disc.
    When choosing a cutting disc, you should pay attention to the following points:
    1. Good uniformity appearance and no cracks are the basic appearances of high quality cutting discs;
    2, excellent packaging and printing anti-counterfeiting barcode is the difference between the factory products and counterfeit goods;
    3, the general rule of cutting and polishing is to reduce the amount of iron, the low wear is the grinding wheel is too hard, the amount of iron to wear is small, the wear is too poor, the quality of the inner quality is as little as possible, the maximum amount of iron removal, At the same time feel good;
    4. If you have a large amount of cutting discs, it is impossible to have the cutting disc that is most suitable for you on the market, so if you can, it is best to contact the manufacturer directly.
    https://www.auroraabrasive.com/4-inches-cutting-disc


  • Why #cryptocurrency Will Probably Not Substitute Real Money In The Nearest Future?
    https://hackernoon.com/why-cryptocurrency-will-probably-not-substitute-real-money-in-the-neares

    Well, because people have fear… we always fear the unknown, right?. And Blockchains and cryptocurrencies are still too complicated to be understood by the masses. Some time it is difficult to completely understand how they work even for those who already have a technical background.So, now think about the old lady who doesn’t even trust banks (she is right, though), or the guy that lives in your neighbourhood, who doesn’t know how to use a smartphone and comes to ring at your door every time the printer is not printing (and it is usually because his cat walked over the cable and accidentally disconnected the printer cable from the pc, but still after 1000 times he keeps thinking that you are the only one able to solve the mystery!).Anyway, what I am trying to say is that the world is (...)

    #tech #bitcoin #ethereum #blockchain



  • A repository with the example of printing “Hello World” in a lot of programming languages
    https://hackernoon.com/a-repository-with-the-example-of-printing-hello-world-in-a-lot-of-progra

    Img source: yen.ioHello world!One of the first things that you are instructed to do when you start to learn to programme, or when you are simply learning a new programming language, is doing something really simple. One of the first steps that you do is print a simple text. As you are reading this, you probably may know which text is the most common and the one that I am referring to.The text that I am talking about is Hello World.This text is supposed to be for you as a way of greeting the world as you have just embarked on an important journey. A journey of learning as much as possible.A #github repository has already been prepared with taking examples from as many programming languages and putting them in a commonplace so that other people can see how this same procedure is done in (...)

    #python #hello-world #repositories #java



  • Choose a side : the battle to keep French isle McDonald’s-free | World news | The Guardian

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/24/choose-a-side-fight-keep-france-ile-doleron-mcdonalds-free

    Tiens, c’est intéressant, je n’avais pas vu ça dans la presse française.

    Inside a ramshackle former holiday club on the picturesque Île d’Oléron off France’s Atlantic coast, a group of people were screen-printing old T-shirts with anti-burger slogans inspired by the student protests of May 1968. The artwork implored “comrades” to choose their side in the island’s battle with McDonald’s.

    “Oléron is a beautiful place, it’s important to protect it,” said Nicolas, 36, an IT worker, who volunteers on a local project to make furniture from discarded wooden pallets. “We don’t need McDonald’s in a place that is pioneering local organic food, sustainable development, zero waste – alternative ways of living that aren’t about mass consumption.”


  • The cartographers - The Chronicle

    http://www.dukechronicle.com/article/2017/10/the-cartographers

    The cartographers
    small questions
    By Mihir Bellamkonda | 10/31/2017

    This week’s small question: how far can I stretch the definition of a column before my editor stops printing me? Let’s find out. Here’s a story a stranger once told me in Lilly library. I was waiting on a surprisingly comfortable wooden bench for a librarian to see if they had any copies of a book I was interested in in the stacks, when a man in a t-shirt sat down next to me. He looked young enough to be a student, but could have been anyone, really. After a moment of polite silence, he asked me if I wanted to hear a story. I don’t remember replying. I do remember the story:

    #cartographie #cartographes


  • Clay Shirky – How We Will Read | Genius
    https://genius.com/Clay-shirky-how-we-will-read-annotated

    Un article ancien, mais toujours de référence par Clay Shirky

    Publishing is not evolving. Publishing is going away. Because the word “publishing” means a cadre of professionals who are taking on the incredible difficulty and complexity and expense of making something public. That’s not a job anymore. That’s a button. There’s a button that says “publish,” and when you press it, it’s done.

    In ye olden times of 1997, it was difficult and expensive to make things public, and it was easy and cheap to keep things private. Privacy was the default setting. We had a class of people called publishers because it took special professional skill to make words and images visible to the public. Now it doesn’t take professional skills. It doesn’t take any skills. It takes a Wordpress install.

    The question isn’t what happens to publishing — the entire category has been evacuated. The question is, what are the parent professions needed around writing? Publishing isn’t one of them. Editing, we need, desperately. Fact-checking, we need. For some kinds of long-form texts, we need designers. Will we have a movie-studio kind of setup, where you have one class of cinematographers over here and another class of art directors over there, and you hire them and put them together for different projects, or is all of that stuff going to be bundled under one roof? We don’t know yet. But the publishing apparatus is gone. Even if people want a physical artifact — pipe the PDF to a printing machine.

    But a book is a “momentary stay against confusion.” This is something quoted approvingly by Nick Carr, the great scholar of digital confusion.

    “Social reading,” the way I’ve always interpreted the phrase, is reading that recognizes that you’re not just a consumer, you’re a user. You’re going to do something with this, and that something is going to involve a group of other people. Read a book. The very next thing you’re going to do, if it was at all interesting, is talk to someone about it.

    Really? So then, why annotate?

    You annotate because that’s the part you want to keep. There’s the experiential value and there’s the extractive value from books. The experiential value of reading Bruno LaTour’s Reassembling the Social was the character of LaTour’s thought at the particular point in his career. Having had that, because I don’t teach classes on the sociology of science, what I now need from that book is the extractive bit, so if I ever teach that topic, or write about it, I can start where I left off rather than having to take the book down from the shelf.

    Lastly — I know that you’re very invested in collective action. How can social reading connect to activism?

    Books are historically lousy calls to action because they tend not only to be produced slowly but consumed slowly. The role of longform writing in collective action is much more about synchronization than coordination. Whenever you read the book and whenever I read the book can be years apart, but when we both show up to the same place, we have that shared background.

    #Livres #Edition #Publication #Clay_Shirky


  • #Wikipedia se met doucement au #son, dans un souci de conservation des sons du quotidien
    http://pigsonthewing.org.uk/open-licensed-format-recordings-voices-wikipedia-wikimedia-commons

    A little while ago, my friend and fellow Wikipedia editor Andrew Gray (he’s the Wikipedian in Residence at the British Library!) mentioned to me that Wikipedia could do with more sound files. We discussed recordings of music, industrial and everyday sounds (what does a printing press sound like? Or a Volkswagen Beetle? What do different kinds of breakfast cereal sound like when milk is added?), as well as people’s voices, so that we have a record of what they sound like.

    Avis à celles et ceux qui contribuent à l’encyclopédie : Andy Mabbett détaille dans son billet le mode d’emploi (en anglais) pour ajouter des fichiers audio à Wikimedia Commons.

    Voir aussi, sur la question de la #conservation_sonore, ce reportage de la #BBC sur le splendide travail mené par les Archives sonores de la #British_Library
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0664js7

    British archivist Will Prentice is so passionate about sounds that he’s spent the last 18 years trying to rescue one of the biggest collections of sounds in the world. He works at the British Library Sound Archive, which contains sounds from wildlife recordings to music and interviews. The earliest recordings are from the 1880s and are saved on formats that are decaying or can’t be played anymore, like wax cylinders and old vinyl. Will and his team are racing against time to turn them into digital items.

    À propos du #patrimoine_sonore, voir les précédentes occurrences ici
    https://seenthis.net/tag/patrimoine_sonore


  • A Guide To The State Of Print Stylesheets In 2018
    https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/05/print-stylesheets-in-2018

    Testing print stylesheets can be something of a bore, typically requiring using print preview or printing to a PDF repeatedly. However, browser DevTools have made this a little easier for us. Both Chrome and Firefox have a way to view the print styles only.

    #Firefox : Open the Developer Toolbar then type media emulate print at the prompt.

    #css #print


  • ESA and the Vatican join forces to save data in the digital age / Observing the Earth / Our Activities / ESA
    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/ESA_and_the_Vatican_join_forces_to_save_data_in_the_digital_age

    At a ceremony held in Vatican City today, ESA and the Vatican Apostolic Library have agreed to continue their years-long cooperation on the preservation, management and exploitation of archived information.

    The declaration follows a five-year activity by the Vatican Library to digitise its ancient collection using the ‘FITS’ flexible image transport system format, to ensure that future generations will have access to the books. ESA and NASA developed FITS in the 1970s, stemming from radio astronomy.

    Our collaboration is based on the common intention by our two institutions to promote the long-term preservation of images in electronic format,” said Monsignor Cesare Pasini, Prefect of the Vatican Apostolic Library.

    He noted how the recent seismic events in Italy has further highlighted the importance of the preservation of information, drawing attention to the need to affront changes in the technology of information storage.
    […]
    Founded in 1475 and one of the world’s oldest libraries, the Vatican Library houses tens of thousands of manuscripts and codices from before the invention of the printing press – some are 1800 years old. In addition to preserving and restoring its collection, the Library has a mandate to ensure free consultation for scholars around the world.

    In addition to making the contents more accessible, the FITS digitising has helped to preserve the original documents. Pressed against a plate of glass, the old pages can be distorted, but scanner software developed for the Vatican’s project automatically calculates the different angles, resulting in an accurate, flat image.

    The format’s instructions for reading and processing the data are in a text header tacked on top of the data. In a century, when computers will presumably be very different, all the information needed to decode the data will be found within the same files.

    FITS can always be read without the need for conversion to another format, which could lose information or be incompatible with future systems.


  • When the Heavens Stopped Being Perfect - Issue 58: Self
    http://nautil.us/issue/58/self/when-the-heavens-stopped-being-perfect

    I have in my hand a little book titled The Starry Messenger (Sidereus Nuncius in its original Latin), written by the Italian mathematician and scientist Galileo Galilei in 1610. There were 550 books in the first printing of Messenger. One hundred and fifty still remain. A few years ago, Christie’s valued each first edition at between $600,000 and $800,000. My paperback copy was printed in 1989 for about $12. Although the history of science has not awarded Messenger the same laurels as Newton’s Principia or Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, I regard it as one of the most consequential volumes of science ever published. In this little book, Galileo reports what he saw after turning his new telescope toward the heavens: strong evidence that the heavenly bodies are made of ordinary (...)


  • #Art, #Information, and #Mapping

    https://www.pratt.edu/events/event/12979

    Pratt Manhattan Center, 144 West 14th Street, New York, NY, room 213, adjacent to the gallery

    In conjunction with the exhibition You Are Here NYC: Art, Information, and Mapping which presents data-based maps of NYC, by artists and information designers, that address an increasingly relevant question: in what forms can data visualization become art, and how can artists make data visible? Curated by Katharine Harmon, author of You Are Here–NYC: Mapping the Soul of the City, with Jessie Braden.

    Commentaire :

    ils ont tous des choses à dire sur le carrefour data, carto, design, info, le comment, le pourquoi, la notion d’art dans tout ça. Ca ratisse large et ça peut aller profond. Les deux super bons clients sont le canadien Jer Thorp et la tête sur pattes du MIT, Sarah Williams. Ekene Ijeoma a des interventions dans une veine plus poétique et Doug McCune est intéressant, dans la mesure où il vient d’un monde de data pur et apprend mnt à couler des statues en bronze.

    –----

    Doug McCune
    Data Artist

    http://dougmccune.com/blog/2015/03/18/portland-burglaries-2

    I’m an Oakland artist who embraces data exploration and map making in an attempt to come to terms with the chaos of urban environments. I experiment heavily with 3D printing and laser cutting to bring digital forms into physical space. I’m a programmer by trade, an amateur cartographer, and a big believer in using data to understand the world.

    –-----

    Ekene Ijeoma

    http://studioijeoma.com

    is a Nigerian–American artist, designer, fellow at The Kennedy Center and Urban Design Forum and visiting professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

    –-----------

    Data & Art Miscellanea from Jer Thorp

    http://blog.blprnt.com

    When text becomes data it opens up a phenomenal amount of possibility for insight and creative exploration. The problem is that most Natural Language Processing (NPL) tools are hard to use unless you have a good foundation in programming to begin with. We use a lot of NLP in our work at The Office for Creative Research and I’ve often wondered what it would mean to make a language tool designed for open-ended exploration.

    He’s featured in GOOD’s GOOD 100 "tackling pressing global issues,” Adweek’s Creative 100 “visual artist whose imagination and intellect will inspire you,” and GDUSA’s People to Watch “who embody the spirit of the creative community.”

    –----

    Sarah Williams

    https://dusp.mit.edu/faculty/sarah-williams

    is currently an Associate Professor of Technology and Urban Planning. She also is Director of the Civic Data Design Lab at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning. The Civic Data Design Lab works with data, maps, and mobile technologies to develop interactive design and communication strategies that expose urban policy issues to broader audiences.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIR23CzOW6k

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bjazvAmmXs

    #cartographie


  • The Dangerous Myths About Sufi Muslims - The Atlantic
    https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/11/airbrushing-sufi-muslims-out-of-modern-islam/546794

    That’s not to say that all those who self-describe as “Salafi” claim that Sufism ought to be met with violence. But many, if not most, deny its centrality within Sunni Islam. Certainly the vast majority of the Saudi religious establishment espouses that kind of belief, which is a massive challenge that the crown prince will have to tackle if he’s serious about his promise to spread “moderate” Islam.

    The birth of the purist Salafi movement (which many pejoratively describe as “Wahhabism”) saw preachers inspired by the message of 18th-century figure Muhammad bin Abdul Wahhab attacking Sufism writ large in an unprecedented way. While presenting themselves as the orthodox, these types of purist Salafis were actually engaging in a heterodox approach. Many of these figures had to ignore or rewrite large chunks of Islamic history in order to present Sufism and Sufis as beyond the pale.

    Ahmad bin Taymiyya, a commonly quoted authority for Salafis, for example, was reportedly a member of the Sufi order of Abdal Qadir al-Jilani. The Sufi affiliations of many medieval authorities have been airbrushed from history in several modern editions of their texts published by Salafi printing houses. Yet, there were virtually no prominent Muslim figures who cast aside Sufism in Islamic history. When followers of ibn Abdul Wahhab attempted to do so by describing Sufis as outside the faith, they were themselves decried by the overwhelming majority of Sunni Islamic scholarship as indulging in a type of heterodoxy because of their intolerance and revisionism.

    While some who portray Sufis as heterodox do so with malicious intent, many fans of Sufism in the West seem to agree that Sufis are heterodox—it’s just a type of heterodoxy that they prefer to the normative mainstream of Islamic thought, which they seem to think is different from Sufism. Ironically, the well-meaning nature of this misinformed perspective echoes the fallacy that extremists promote.

    #soufis #mythes


  • The incredible #Bollmann map workshop (1) – Infographics for the People

    http://www.johngrimwade.com/blog/2017/03/27/the-incredible-bollmann-map-workshop-part-1

    On the 18th of November last year, I stepped into a time tunnel, and stepped out into the offices of Bollmann Maps in Braunschweig, Germany. And I mean that in the best possible way. These cartographers produce all of their maps with the same methods that have been in use since 1963. Everything is hand-crafted. The production process is completely analogue. They use pen and ink on overlay film, photograph it with a classic 1950s line art camera, and print on their own 1965 printing press. (Bollmann Maps: www.bollmann-bildkarten.de)

    #cartographie #cartographie_manuelle #dessin #illustration #visualisation


  • New York | Quartier en guerre
    http://laboratoireurbanismeinsurrectionnel.blogspot.de/2017/07/new-york-quartier-en-guerre.html#more

    http://www.sethtobocman.com/index.html

    ""Couvre-feu, violences policières, expulsions... Les politiques sécuritaires et la spéculation immobilière s’attaquent au quartier populaire du Lower East Side à Manhattan, au coeur des années Reagan. Ses habitants résistent : squats, manifestations sauvages, émeutes...
    Ce roman graphique raconte une décennie de luttes par une succession de portraits où se croisent les vies tumultueuses d’immigrés, de sans-abri, de punks... des pauvres pour qui la solidarité et l’auto-organisation deviennent des armes.
    Au plus fort de son art du reportage, Seth Tobocman signe un livre d’une rare finesse, écrit sur plus de dix ans, alors qu’il squattait lui-même à deux pas du centre mondial de la finance."

    All of this activity led to an attempt by the city to crush the movement. But people fought back. From 1988 to 1992 there were a series of riots in the neighborhood. The Lower East Side became the focus of an international struggle for human rights.
    I decided to get more involved and so I became a member of Umbrella House, a squat on Avenue C. I worked on renovating the building and ran a printing press on the first floor with the help of Sarah Hogarth. I was involved in defending the building against an eviction attempt, which got pretty hairy.
    I also worked on defending the other squats and participated in lots of other protests. I was arrested about twenty times and convicted twice. Eventually my lawyer, Stanley Cohen, advised me to cool it. He said that the D.A. had justa bout had it with me and that if I continued the consequences would get serious."


  • DEMOCRATIC PARTY : WE WIN | The UB Post
    http://theubpost.mn/2017/07/08/democratic-party-we-win

    The run-off voting for the 2017 presidential election has taken place throughout Mongolia on July 7.

    At 1:00 a.m. on June 8, the General Election Commission (GEC) made an announcement about voter turnout of the run-off election. Head of GEC Ch.Sodnomtseren noted that 1,119,723 (60.4 percent) of 1,982,733 registered took part in the election, with 1,983 poll stations collecting votes across Mongolia.

    According to the preliminary ballot count at 2:40 a.m. on Saturday, Democratic Party (DP) candidate Kh.Battulga had won 609,950 votes (50.6 percent), M.Enkhbold received 496,185 votes (41.2 percent) of all votes, and 99,350 voters (8.2 percent) had cast blank ballots.

    … et pour la couleur locale…

    During the run-off election, voting machines in a number of poll stations of Tuv Province stopped working because the bar codes on some ballots had printing errors and a task force from the General Intelligence Agency, Information Technology Center, and Communications and Information Technology Authority was put in charge of addressing the issue.

    The task force reprogrammed the machines to read the ballots with printing errors to resolve the issue, reported GEC. On Friday, GEC issued a resolution to conduct a hand counting of all the ballots from all poll stations in Tuv Province to verify the ballots counted through voting machines.

    • L’annonce du Monde

      Ancien judoka, homme d’affaires, nationaliste… Qui est le nouveau président mongol ?
      http://www.lemonde.fr/asie-pacifique/article/2017/07/08/ancien-judoka-homme-d-affaires-nationaliste-qui-est-le-nouveau-president-mon

      Ancien judoka devenu homme d’affaires, Battulga (les Mongols utilisent communément le prénom) est un personnage haut en couleur. Son parti est passé dans l’opposition aux législatives de juin 2016 et il devra donc présider sans majorité. Il prend les rênes de la Mongolie à un moment où le pays traverse une grave crise économique, puisqu’il fait l’objet d’un plan de sauvetage du Fonds monétaire international (FMI) de 5,5 milliards de dollars, un peu moins de la moitié de son PIB, pour stabiliser ses finances publiques.

      Pour Antoine Maire, docteur associé au CERI-Sciences Po, auteur de Les Mongols, insoumis (Editions Ateliers Henry Dougier, 2016), le nouveau président représente « une sorte de nationaliste mongol » qui surfe sur un sentiment anti-chinois.

      Qui est Khaltmaa #Battulga ?
      Antoine Maire : Battulga est un personnage très controversé, mais qui a un côté romanesque. Il incarne à lui tout seul beaucoup des aspects de ce qu’est devenue la Mongolie. A la base, c’est un champion de judo, qui au tournant de la révolution démocratique a utilisé les réseaux qu’il avait noués pour se lancer dans les affaires, notamment dans les importations de produits étrangers en Chine. Il a assez vite construit un conglomérat, le groupe Genco. On dit que le nom vient du magasin où se rend Corleone dans le film Le Parrain de Coppola, ça rajoute donc au mythe.

      la suite derrière #paywall


  • Is the staggeringly profitable #business of scientific publishing bad for #science? | Science | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/profitable-business-scientific-publishing-bad-for-science

    The core of Elsevier’s operation is in scientific journals, the weekly or monthly publications in which scientists share their results. Despite the narrow audience, scientific publishing is a remarkably big business. With total global revenues of more than £19bn, it weighs in somewhere between the recording and the film industries in size, but it is far more profitable. In 2010, Elsevier’s scientific publishing arm reported profits of £724m on just over £2bn in revenue. It was a 36% margin – higher than Apple, Google, or Amazon posted that year.

    [...]

    It is difficult to overstate how much power a journal editor now had to shape a scientist’s career and the direction of science itself. “Young people tell me all the time, ‘If I don’t publish in CNS [a common acronym for Cell/Nature/Science, the most prestigious journals in biology], I won’t get a job,” says Schekman. He compared the pursuit of high-impact #publications to an incentive system as rotten as banking bonuses. “They have a very big #influence on where science goes,” he said.

    And so science became a strange co-production between scientists and journal editors, with the former increasingly pursuing discoveries that would impress the latter. These days, given a choice of projects, a scientist will almost always reject both the prosaic work of confirming or disproving past studies, and the decades-long pursuit of a risky “moonshot”, in favour of a middle ground: a topic that is popular with editors and likely to yield regular publications. “Academics are incentivised to produce research that caters to these demands,” said the biologist and Nobel laureate Sydney Brenner in a 2014 interview, calling the system “corrupt.”

    • #Robert_Maxwell #Reed-Elsevier #Elsevier #multinationales #business #Pergamon

      With total global revenues of more than £19bn, it weighs in somewhere between the recording and the film industries in size, but it is far more profitable. In 2010, Elsevier’s scientific publishing arm reported profits of £724m on just over £2bn in revenue. It was a 36% margin – higher than Apple, Google, or Amazon posted that year.

      #profit

      In order to make money, a traditional publisher – say, a magazine – first has to cover a multitude of costs: it pays writers for the articles; it employs editors to commission, shape and check the articles; and it pays to distribute the finished product to subscribers and retailers. All of this is expensive, and successful magazines typically make profits of around 12-15%.

      The way to make money from a scientific article looks very similar, except that scientific publishers manage to duck most of the actual costs. Scientists create work under their own direction – funded largely by governments – and give it to publishers for free; the publisher pays scientific editors who judge whether the work is worth publishing and check its grammar, but the bulk of the editorial burden – checking the scientific validity and evaluating the experiments, a process known as peer review – is done by working scientists on a volunteer basis. The publishers then sell the product back to government-funded institutional and university libraries, to be read by scientists – who, in a collective sense, created the product in the first place.

      A 2005 Deutsche Bank report referred to it as a “bizarre” “triple-pay” system, in which “the state funds most research, pays the salaries of most of those checking the quality of research, and then buys most of the published product”.

      Many scientists also believe that the publishing industry exerts too much influence over what scientists choose to study, which is ultimately bad for science itself. Journals prize new and spectacular results – after all, they are in the business of selling subscriptions – and scientists, knowing exactly what kind of work gets published, align their submissions accordingly. This produces a steady stream of papers, the importance of which is immediately apparent. But it also means that scientists do not have an accurate map of their field of inquiry. Researchers may end up inadvertently exploring dead ends that their fellow scientists have already run up against, solely because the information about previous failures has never been given space in the pages of the relevant scientific publications

      It is hard to believe that what is essentially a for-profit oligopoly functioning within an otherwise heavily regulated, government-funded enterprise can avoid extinction in the long run. But publishing has been deeply enmeshed in the science profession for decades. Today, every scientist knows that their career depends on being published, and professional success is especially determined by getting work into the most prestigious journals. The long, slow, nearly directionless work pursued by some of the most influential scientists of the 20th century is no longer a viable career option. Under today’s system, the father of genetic sequencing, Fred Sanger, who published very little in the two decades between his 1958 and 1980 Nobel prizes, may well have found himself out of a job.

      Improbable as it might sound, few people in the last century have done more to shape the way science is conducted today than Maxwell.

      Scientific articles are about unique discoveries: one article cannot substitute for another. If a serious new journal appeared, scientists would simply request that their university library subscribe to that one as well. If Maxwell was creating three times as many journals as his competition, he would make three times more money.

      “At the start of my career, nobody took much notice of where you published, and then everything changed in 1974 with Cell,” Randy Schekman, the Berkeley molecular biologist and Nobel prize winner, told me. #Cell (now owned by Elsevier) was a journal started by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to showcase the newly ascendant field of molecular biology. It was edited by a young biologist named #Ben_Lewin, who approached his work with an intense, almost literary bent. Lewin prized long, rigorous papers that answered big questions – often representing years of research that would have yielded multiple papers in other venues – and, breaking with the idea that journals were passive instruments to communicate science, he rejected far more papers than he published.

      Suddenly, where you published became immensely important. Other editors took a similarly activist approach in the hopes of replicating Cell’s success. Publishers also adopted a metric called “#impact_factor,” invented in the 1960s by #Eugene_Garfield, a librarian and linguist, as a rough calculation of how often papers in a given journal are cited in other papers. For publishers, it became a way to rank and advertise the scientific reach of their products. The new-look journals, with their emphasis on big results, shot to the top of these new rankings, and scientists who published in “high-impact” journals were rewarded with jobs and funding. Almost overnight, a new currency of prestige had been created in the scientific world. (Garfield later referred to his creation as “like nuclear energy … a mixed blessing”.)

      And so science became a strange co-production between scientists and journal editors, with the former increasingly pursuing discoveries that would impress the latter. These days, given a choice of projects, a scientist will almost always reject both the prosaic work of confirming or disproving past studies, and the decades-long pursuit of a risky “moonshot”, in favour of a middle ground: a topic that is popular with editors and likely to yield regular publications. “Academics are incentivised to produce research that caters to these demands,” said the biologist and Nobel laureate Sydney Brenner in a 2014 interview, calling the system “corrupt.”

      As Maxwell had predicted, competition didn’t drive down prices. Between 1975 and 1985, the average price of a journal doubled. The New York Times reported that in 1984 it cost $2,500 to subscribe to the journal Brain Research; in 1988, it cost more than $5,000. That same year, Harvard Library overran its research journal budget by half a million dollars.

      Scientists occasionally questioned the fairness of this hugely profitable business to which they supplied their work for free, but it was university librarians who first realised the trap in the market Maxwell had created. The librarians used university funds to buy journals on behalf of scientists. Maxwell was well aware of this. “Scientists are not as price-conscious as other professionals, mainly because they are not spending their own money,” he told his publication Global Business in a 1988 interview. And since there was no way to swap one journal for another, cheaper one, the result was, Maxwell continued, “a perpetual financing machine”. Librarians were locked into a series of thousands of tiny monopolies. There were now more than a million scientific articles being published a year, and they had to buy all of them at whatever price the publishers wanted.

      With the purchase of Pergamon’s 400-strong catalogue, Elsevier now controlled more than 1,000 scientific journals, making it by far the largest scientific publisher in the world.

      At the time of the merger, Charkin, the former Macmillan CEO, recalls advising Pierre Vinken, the CEO of Elsevier, that Pergamon was a mature business, and that Elsevier had overpaid for it. But Vinken had no doubts, Charkin recalled: “He said, ‘You have no idea how profitable these journals are once you stop doing anything. When you’re building a journal, you spend time getting good editorial boards, you treat them well, you give them dinners. Then you market the thing and your salespeople go out there to sell subscriptions, which is slow and tough, and you try to make the journal as good as possible. That’s what happened at Pergamon. And then we buy it and we stop doing all that stuff and then the cash just pours out and you wouldn’t believe how wonderful it is.’ He was right and I was wrong.”

      By 1994, three years after acquiring Pergamon, Elsevier had raised its prices by 50%. Universities complained that their budgets were stretched to breaking point – the US-based Publishers Weekly reported librarians referring to a “doomsday machine” in their industry – and, for the first time, they began cancelling subscriptions to less popular journals.

      In 1998, Elsevier rolled out its plan for the internet age, which would come to be called “The Big Deal”. It offered electronic access to bundles of hundreds of journals at a time: a university would pay a set fee each year – according to a report based on freedom of information requests, Cornell University’s 2009 tab was just short of $2m – and any student or professor could download any journal they wanted through Elsevier’s website. Universities signed up en masse.

      Those predicting Elsevier’s downfall had assumed scientists experimenting with sharing their work for free online could slowly outcompete Elsevier’s titles by replacing them one at a time. In response, Elsevier created a switch that fused Maxwell’s thousands of tiny monopolies into one so large that, like a basic resource – say water, or power – it was impossible for universities to do without. Pay, and the scientific lights stayed on, but refuse, and up to a quarter of the scientific literature would go dark at any one institution. It concentrated immense power in the hands of the largest publishers, and Elsevier’s profits began another steep rise that would lead them into the billions by the 2010s. In 2015, a Financial Times article anointed Elsevier “the business the internet could not kill”.

      Publishers are now wound so tightly around the various organs of the scientific body that no single effort has been able to dislodge them. In a 2015 report, an information scientist from the University of Montreal, Vincent Larivière, showed that Elsevier owned 24% of the scientific journal market, while Maxwell’s old partners Springer, and his crosstown rivals Wiley-Blackwell, controlled about another 12% each. These three companies accounted for half the market. (An Elsevier representative familiar with the report told me that by their own estimate they publish only 16% of the scientific literature.)

      Elsevier says its primary goal is to facilitate the work of scientists and other researchers. An Elsevier rep noted that the company received 1.5m article submissions last year, and published 420,000; 14 million scientists entrust Elsevier to publish their results, and 800,000 scientists donate their time to help them with editing and peer-review.

      In a sense, it is not any one publisher’s fault that the scientific world seems to bend to the industry’s gravitational pull. When governments including those of China and Mexico offer financial bonuses for publishing in high-impact journals, they are not responding to a demand by any specific publisher, but following the rewards of an enormously complex system that has to accommodate the utopian ideals of science with the commercial goals of the publishers that dominate it. (“We scientists have not given a lot of thought to the water we’re swimming in,” Neal Young told me.)

      Since the early 2000s, scientists have championed an alternative to subscription publishing called “open access”. This solves the difficulty of balancing scientific and commercial imperatives by simply removing the commercial element. In practice, this usually takes the form of online journals, to which scientists pay an upfront free to cover editing costs, which then ensure the work is available free to access for anyone in perpetuity. But despite the backing of some of the biggest funding agencies in the world, including the Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust, only about a quarter of scientific papers are made freely available at the time of their publication.

      The idea that scientific research should be freely available for anyone to use is a sharp departure, even a threat, to the current system – which relies on publishers’ ability to restrict access to the scientific literature in order to maintain its immense profitability. In recent years, the most radical opposition to the status quo has coalesced around a controversial website called Sci-Hub – a sort of Napster for science that allows anyone to download scientific papers for free. Its creator, Alexandra Elbakyan, a Kazhakstani, is in hiding, facing charges of hacking and copyright infringement in the US. Elsevier recently obtained a $15m injunction (the maximum allowable amount) against her.

      Elbakyan is an unabashed utopian. “Science should belong to scientists and not the publishers,” she told me in an email. In a letter to the court, she cited Article 27 of the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, asserting the right “to share in scientific advancement and its benefits”.

      Whatever the fate of Sci-Hub, it seems that frustration with the current system is growing. But history shows that betting against science publishers is a risky move. After all, back in 1988, Maxwell predicted that in the future there would only be a handful of immensely powerful publishing companies left, and that they would ply their trade in an electronic age with no printing costs, leading to almost “pure profit”. That sounds a lot like the world we live in now.

      https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/profitable-business-scientific-publishing-bad-for-science
      #Butterworths #Springer #Paul_Rosbaud #histoire #Genève #Pergamon #Oxford_United #Derby_County_FC #monopole #open_access #Sci-Hub #Alexandra_Elbakyan

    • Publish and be praised (article de 2003)

      It should be a public scandal that the results of publicly-funded scientific research are not available to members of the public who are interested in, or could benefit from, such access. Furthermore, many commercial publishers have exploited the effective monopoly they are given on the distribution rights to individual works and charge absurdly high rates for some of their titles, forcing libraries with limited budgets to cancel journal subscriptions and deny their researchers access to potentially critical information. The system is obsolete and broken and needs to change.

      https://www.theguardian.com/education/2003/oct/09/research.highereducation


  • 3D-printed ovaries allow infertile mice to give birth | Science | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/may/16/3d-printed-ovaries-allow-infertile-mice-to-give-birth

    Infertile mice have given birth to healthy pups after having their fertility restored with ovary implants made with a 3D printer.

    Researchers created the synthetic ovaries by printing porous scaffolds from a gelatin ink and filling them with follicles, the tiny, fluid-holding sacs that contain immature egg cells.

    In tests on mice that had one ovary surgically removed, scientists found that the implants hooked up to the blood supply within a week and went on to release eggs naturally through the pores built into the gelatin structures.

    The work marks a step towards making artificial ovaries for young women whose reproductive systems have been damaged by cancer treatments, leaving them infertile or with hormone imbalances that require them to take regular hormone-boosting drugs.
    […]
    Of seven mice that mated after receiving the artificial ovaries, three gave birth to pups that had developed from eggs released by the implants. The mice fed normally on their mother’s milk and went on to have healthy litters of their own later in life.

    L’article de Nature (mai 2017) est entièrement accessible

    A bioprosthetic ovary created using 3D printed microporous scaffolds restores ovarian function in sterilized mice | Nature Communications
    https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15261

    Abstract
    Emerging additive manufacturing techniques enable investigation of the effects of pore geometry on cell behavior and function. Here, we 3D print microporous hydrogel scaffolds to test how varying pore geometry, accomplished by manipulating the advancing angle between printed layers, affects the survival of ovarian follicles. 30° and 60° scaffolds provide corners that surround follicles on multiple sides while 90° scaffolds have an open porosity that limits follicle–scaffold interaction. As the amount of scaffold interaction increases, follicle spreading is limited and survival increases. Follicle-seeded scaffolds become highly vascularized and ovarian function is fully restored when implanted in surgically sterilized mice. Moreover, pups are born through natural mating and thrive through maternal lactation. These findings present an in vivo functional ovarian implant designed with 3D printing, and indicate that scaffold pore architecture is a critical variable in additively manufactured scaffold design for functional tissue engineering.


  • Reality Leigh Winner, 25, arrested and charged with leaking top-secret NSA docs on Russia hacks to The Intercept / Boing Boing
    https://boingboing.net/2017/06/05/reality-leigh-winner-arrested.html

    Winner had been a government contractor with Top Secret clearance at a Georgia facility since February, according to the DOJ. On May 9, the government claims she printed classified information from the facility and mailed it to a media outlet.

    #leaks #trump #Russie #élections #États-Unis