industryterm:technology industry

  • How to Hire a Python Developer With Right Skill Set?
    https://hackernoon.com/how-to-hire-a-python-developer-with-right-skill-set-764a12cc5b4f?source=

    Bram Cohen has beautifully crafted Python language in a nutshell, as “simple, clean syntax, object encapsulation, good library support and optional named parameters”.Hence hiring a Python developer is the best approach for any company where it has a huge potential to grow any business to a great extent. Some of the pioneers in the technology industry like YouTube, Reddit, NASA, PayPal, Spotify, Quora etc are the popular projects that are built using Python language. Hire a python developer to get benefited from the compelling features of the Python program.Why Python is a preferable language among the companies?In the era of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning certain programming languages always have a standard demand in the market irrespective of the evolution of other niche (...)

    #hire-python-developers #python-programming #python-web-development #hire-python-programmers #python-web-developer

  • Women Once Ruled Computers. When Did the Valley Become Brotopia? - Bloomberg
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-02-01/women-once-ruled-computers-when-did-the-valley-become-brotopia

    Lena Söderberg started out as just another Playboy centerfold. The 21-year-old Swedish model left her native Stockholm for Chicago because, as she would later say, she’d been swept up in “America fever.” In November 1972, Playboy returned her enthusiasm by featuring her under the name Lenna Sjööblom, in its signature spread. If Söderberg had followed the path of her predecessors, her image would have been briefly famous before gathering dust under the beds of teenage boys. But that particular photo of Lena would not fade into obscurity. Instead, her face would become as famous and recognizable as Mona Lisa’s—at least to everyone studying computer science.

    In engineering circles, some refer to Lena as “the first lady of the internet.” Others see her as the industry’s original sin, the first step in Silicon Valley’s exclusion of women. Both views stem from an event that took place in 1973 at a University of Southern California computer lab, where a team of researchers was trying to turn physical photographs into digital bits. Their work would serve as a precursor to the JPEG, a widely used compression standard that allows large image files to be efficiently transferred between devices. The USC team needed to test their algorithms on suitable photos, and their search for the ideal test photo led them to Lena.
    0718P_FEATURE_BROTOPIA_01
    Lena

    According to William Pratt, the lab’s co-founder, the group chose Lena’s portrait from a copy of Playboy that a student had brought into the lab. Pratt, now 80, tells me he saw nothing out of the ordinary about having a soft porn magazine in a university computer lab in 1973. “I said, ‘There are some pretty nice-looking pictures in there,’ ” he says. “And the grad students picked the one that was in the centerfold.” Lena’s spread, which featured the model wearing boots, a boa, a feathered hat, and nothing else, was attractive from a technical perspective because the photo included, according to Pratt, “lots of high-frequency detail that is difficult to code.”

    Over the course of several years, Pratt’s team amassed a library of digital images; not all of them, of course, were from Playboy. The data set also included photos of a brightly colored mandrill, a rainbow of bell peppers, and several photos, all titled “Girl,” of fully clothed women. But the Lena photo was the one that researchers most frequently used. Over the next 45 years, her face and bare shoulder would serve as a benchmark for image-processing quality for the teams working on Apple Inc.’s iPhone camera, Google Images, and pretty much every other tech product having anything to do with photos. To this day, some engineers joke that if you want your image compression algorithm to make the grade, it had better perform well on Lena.

    “We didn’t even think about those things at all when we were doing this,” Pratt says. “It was not sexist.” After all, he continues, no one could have been offended because there were no women in the classroom at the time. And thus began a half-century’s worth of buck-passing in which powerful men in the tech industry defended or ignored the exclusion of women on the grounds that they were already excluded .

    Based on data they had gathered from the same sample of mostly male programmers, Cannon and Perry decided that happy software engineers shared one striking characteristic: They “don’t like people.” In their final report they concluded that programmers “dislike activities involving close personal interaction; they are generally more interested in things than in people.” There’s little evidence to suggest that antisocial people are more adept at math or computers. Unfortunately, there’s a wealth of evidence to suggest that if you set out to hire antisocial nerds, you’ll wind up hiring a lot more men than women.

    Cannon and Perry’s work, as well as other personality tests that seem, in retrospect, designed to favor men over women, were used in large companies for decades, helping to create the pop culture trope of the male nerd and ensuring that computers wound up in the boys’ side of the toy aisle. They influenced not just the way companies hired programmers but also who was allowed to become a programmer in the first place.

    In 1984, Apple released its iconic Super Bowl commercial showing a heroic young woman taking a sledgehammer to a depressing and dystopian world. It was a grand statement of resistance and freedom. Her image is accompanied by a voice-over intoning, “And you’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.” The creation of this mythical female heroine also coincided with an exodus of women from technology. In a sense, Apple’s vision was right: The technology industry would never be like 1984 again. That year was the high point for women earning degrees in computer science, which peaked at 37 percent. As the number of overall computer science degrees picked back up during the dot-com boom, far more men than women filled those coveted seats. The percentage of women in the field would dramatically decline for the next two and a half decades.

    Despite having hired and empowered some of the most accomplished women in the industry, Google hasn’t turned out to be all that different from its peers when it comes to measures of equality—which is to say, it’s not very good at all. In July 2017 the search engine disclosed that women accounted for just 31 percent of employees, 25 percent of leadership roles, and 20 percent of technical roles. That makes Google depressingly average among tech companies.

    Even so, exactly zero of the 13 Alphabet company heads are women. To top it off, representatives from several coding education and pipeline feeder groups have told me that Google’s efforts to improve diversity appear to be more about seeking good publicity than enacting change. One noted that Facebook has been successfully poaching Google’s female engineers because of an “increasingly chauvinistic environment.”

    Last year, the personality tests that helped push women out of the technology industry in the first place were given a sort of reboot by a young Google engineer named James Damore. In a memo that was first distributed among Google employees and later leaked to the press, Damore claimed that Google’s tepid diversity efforts were in fact an overreach. He argued that “biological” reasons, rather than bias, had caused men to be more likely to be hired and promoted at Google than women.

    #Féminisme #Informatique #Histoire_numérique

  • #data Mastery: #sql — Left & Right Outer Join
    https://hackernoon.com/data-mastery-sql-left-right-outer-join-e8e2c2ee02ca?source=rss----3a8144

    Data Mastery: SQL — Left & Right Outer JoinThere are so many exciting projects out there in the Data World. Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Neural Nets, Blockchain, and more are sweeping the technology industry. In order to get to the cutting-edge stuff, first and foremost, data needs to be stored, evaluated, and tested. The best place to do that is SQL (or a library that operates with SQL-like commands, see my article on Python’s Pandas library).This series Data Mastery: SQL, will teach you the essential subjects. These are not exhaustive tutorials. Instead they are focused preparation guides — with brevity and efficiency in mind. It is meant for:Software Engineers who want to analyze their creation’s dataProduct Managers, Marketers, and others who want to be (...)

    #interview-questions #data-science #programming

  • How to biohack your intelligence — with everything from sex to modafinil to MDMA
    https://hackernoon.com/biohack-your-intelligence-now-or-become-obsolete-97cdd15e395f?source=rss

    I had some free time over the holidays and wrote this article to showcase, on the basis of a personal story, many highly actionable, science-based, approaches and tools that can be used to significantly enhance intelligence.In my case these include legal/illegal drugs; using sex as a biohacking tool; drinking ketone esters; using beta blockers or testosterone to gain advantage in negotiations; eating only once a day; and a lot more.Editor’s Note: This story contains some R-rated approaches to bio-hacking. We published it because we want readers to be informed of what’s actually happening in the technology industry. Proceed at your own risk :-)BackgroundI’m a cliche Silicon Valley techie —Russian, Stanford, YCombinator, started a couple large/successful companies, working in artificial (...)

    #life #life-lessons #health #personal-development #self-improvement

  • Pentagon Wants Silicon Valley’s Help on A.I. - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/15/technology/military-artificial-intelligence.html

    The military and intelligence communities have long played a big role in the technology industry and had close ties with many of Silicon Valley’s early tech giants. David Packard, Hewlett-Packard’s co-founder, even served as the deputy secretary of defense under President Richard M. Nixon.

    #silicon_valley #Pentagone #IA

  • Will tech giants move on from the internet, now we’ve all been harvested? | Technology | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jan/28/morozov-artificial-intelligence-data-technology-online

    Much of the current hysteria about the technology industry is due to its highly ambiguous relationship with its users. Driven by the logics of both compassion and indifference, this relationship has always been erratic yet functional. These two clashing rationales, for example, allowed technology companies, frequently painted as Dr Evil, to claim the mantle of Mother Theresa. However, as the unresolved contradictions of these logics pile up, we can’t fail to notice the incoherence of the industry’s overall social vision.

    #Internet #IA #IoT

  • Ubuntu 18.04 To Ship with GNOME Desktop, Not Unity
    http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/04/ubuntu-18-04-ship-gnome-desktop-not-unity

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will use GNOME as its default desktop environment, not Unity. In an extraordinary blog post that I have yet to fully digest, Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Canonical is to end its investment in Unity 8, Ubuntu for Phones and tablets, and end its ambition to seek “convergence”. “I’m writing to let […] This post, Ubuntu 18.04 To Ship with GNOME Desktop, Not Unity, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

    • Le post original qui ne « serait » pas un poisson :

      This is a post by Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of Ubuntu and Canonical

      We are wrapping up an excellent quarter and an excellent year for the company, with performance in many teams and products that we can be proud of. As we head into the new fiscal year, it’s appropriate to reassess each of our initiatives. I’m writing to let you know that we will end our investment in Unity8, the phone and convergence shell. We will shift our default Ubuntu desktop back to GNOME for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

      I’d like to emphasise our ongoing passion for, investment in, and commitment to, the Ubuntu desktop that millions rely on. We will continue to produce the most usable open source desktop in the world, to maintain the existing LTS releases, to work with our commercial partners to distribute that desktop, to support our corporate customers who rely on it, and to delight the millions of IoT and cloud developers who innovate on top of it.

      We care that Ubuntu is widely useful to people who use Linux every day, for personal or commercial projects. That’s why we maintain a wide range of Ubuntu flavours from both Canonical and the Ubuntu community, and why we have invested in the Ubuntu Phone.

      I took the view that, if convergence was the future and we could deliver it as free software, that would be widely appreciated both in the free software community and in the technology industry, where there is substantial frustration with the existing, closed, alternatives available to manufacturers. I was wrong on both counts.
      In the community, our efforts were seen fragmentation not innovation. And industry has not rallied to the possibility, instead taking a ‘better the devil you know’ approach to those form factors, or investing in home-grown platforms. What the Unity8 team has delivered so far is beautiful, usable and solid, but I respect that markets, and community, ultimately decide which products grow and which disappear.

      The cloud and IoT story for Ubuntu is excellent and continues to improve. You all probably know that most public cloud workloads, and most private Linux cloud infrastructures, depend on Ubuntu. You might also know that most of the IoT work in auto, robotics, networking, and machine learning is also on Ubuntu, with Canonical providing commercial services on many of those initiatives. The number and size of commercial engagements around Ubuntu on cloud and IoT has grown materially and consistently.

      This has been, personally, a very difficult decision, because of the force of my conviction in the convergence future, and my personal engagement with the people and the product, both of which are amazing. We feel like a family, but this choice is shaped by commercial constraints, and those two are hard to reconcile.

      The choice, ultimately, is to invest in the areas which are contributing to the growth of the company. Those are Ubuntu itself, for desktops, servers and VMs, our cloud infrastructure products (OpenStack and Kubernetes) our cloud operations capabilities (MAAS, LXD, Juju, BootStack), and our IoT story in snaps and Ubuntu Core. All of those have communities, customers, revenue and growth, the ingredients for a great and independent company, with scale and momentum. This is the time for us to ensure, across the board, that we have the fitness and rigour for that path.

      https://insights.ubuntu.com/2017/04/05/growing-ubuntu-for-cloud-and-iot-rather-than-phone-and-convergence

      Ubuntu Unity is dead : Desktop will switch back to GNOME next year

      https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/04/ubuntu-unity-is-dead-desktop-will-switch-back-to-gnome-next-year

    • C’est vrai, ce n’est pas un poisson d’avril. Il y a eu depuis d’autres nouvelles qui se sont accumulées sur celle-ci : licenciements suite à la fermetures de ces projets, relance de la comm’ d’Ubuntu pour redonner confiance dans cette distrib…
      Donc c’est fini Unity, Mir, Mobile…
      Remarquez, vu la force brute que va être #Vulkan ces prochaines années sur le panorama du libre, c’est peut être bien d’arrêter ce projet institutionnel qu’était Ubuntu pour laisser mûrir le reste autour de nouvelles dynamiques.

      Par contre dommage de choisir Gnome (3 Shell) qui bafoue certains paradigmes ancestraux des interfaces H/M (comme la continuité des actions utilisateurs).
      Vieil article sur le sujet, mais y’en a eu tellement d’autres : http://www.thelinuxrain.com/articles/over-a-month-on-conclusion-to-the-gnome-shell-challenge
      #futurologie

  • Thoughts on Gender Equality in Tech, Interrupted - Digits - WSJ
    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2015/03/16/thoughts-on-gender-equality-in-tech-interrupted

    Google Executive Chairman #Eric_Schmidt had a lot to say Monday about the lack of racial and gender diversity in the technology industry.

    In fact, Schmidt had so much to say that he often interrupted and spoke over his co-panelist, Megan Smith, the U.S.’s chief technology officer and a former Google executive. The two appeared on a panel at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Tex.

    (...) Toward the end of the session, one woman in the audience asked the two to address how personality biases in men and women affect workplace dynamics. She noted that Schmidt repeatedly talked over his former colleague — prompting applause from a full exhibit hall.

    #femmes #technologie #pousse-toi-de-là