• How the Pandemic Turned Refugees Into ‘Guinea Pigs’ for Surveillance Tech

    An interview with Dr. Petra Molnar, who spent 2020 investigating the use of drones, facial recognition, and lidar on refugees

    The coronavirus pandemic unleashed a new era in surveillance technology, and arguably no group has felt this more acutely than refugees. Even before the pandemic, refugees were subjected to contact tracing, drone and LIDAR tracking, and facial recognition en masse. Since the pandemic, it’s only gotten worse. For a microcosm of how bad the pandemic has been for refugees — both in terms of civil liberties and suffering under the virus — look no further than Greece.

    Greek refugee camps are among the largest in Europe, and they are overpopulated, with scarce access to water, food, and basic necessities, and under constant surveillance. Researchers say that many of the surveillance techniques and technologies — especially experimental, rudimentary, and low-cost ones — used to corral refugees around the world were often tested in these camps first.

    “Certain communities already marginalized, disenfranchised are being used as guinea pigs, but the concern is that all of these technologies will be rolled out against the broader population and normalized,” says Petra Molnar, Associate Director of the Refugee Law Lab, York University.

    Molnar traveled to the Greek refugee camps on Lesbos in 2020 as part of a fact-finding project with the advocacy group European Digital Rights (EDRi). She arrived right after the Moria camp — the largest in Europe at the time — burned down and forced the relocation of thousands of refugees. Since her visit, she has been concerned about the rise of authoritarian technology and how it might be used against the powerless.

    With the pandemic still raging and states more desperate than ever to contain it, it seemed a good time to discuss the uses and implications of surveillance in the refugee camps. Molnar, who is still in Greece and plans to continue visiting the camps once the nation’s second lockdown lifts, spoke to OneZero about the kinds of surveillance technology she saw deployed there, and what the future holds — particularly with the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, Molnar says, adding “that they’ve been using Greece as a testing ground for all sorts of aerial surveillance technology.”

    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

    OneZero: What kinds of surveillance practices and technologies did you see in the camps?

    Petra Molnar: I went to Lesbos in September, right after the Moria camp burned down and thousands of people were displaced and sent to a new camp. We were essentially witnessing the birth of the Kara Tepes camp, a new containment center, and talked to the people about surveillance, and also how this particular tragedy was being used as a new excuse to bring more technology, more surveillance. The [Greek] government is… basically weaponizing Covid to use it as an excuse to lock the camps down and make it impossible to do any research.

    When you are in Lesbos, it is very clear that it is a testing ground, in the sense that the use of tech is quite rudimentary — we are not talking about thermal cameras, iris scans, anything like that, but there’s an increase in the appetite of the Greek government to explore the use of it, particularly when they try to control large groups of people and also large groups coming from the Aegean. It’s very early days for a lot of these technologies, but everything points to the fact that Greece is Europe’s testing ground.

    They are talking about bringing biometric control to the camps, but we know for example that the Hellenic Coast Guard has a drone that they have been using for self-promotion, propaganda, and they’ve now been using it to follow specific people as they are leaving and entering the camp. I’m not sure if the use of drones was restricted to following refugees once they left the camps, but with the lockdown, it was impossible to verify. [OneZero had access to a local source who confirmed that drones are also being used inside the camps to monitor refugees during lockdown.]

    Also, people can come and go to buy things at stores, but they have to sign in and out at the gate, and we don’t know how they are going to use such data and for what purposes.

    Surveillance has been used on refugees long before the pandemic — in what ways have refugees been treated as guinea pigs for the policies and technologies we’re seeing deployed more widely now? And what are some of the worst examples of authoritarian technologies being deployed against refugees in Europe?

    The most egregious examples that we’ve been seeing are that ill-fated pilot projects — A.I. lie detectors and risk scorings which were essentially trying to use facial recognition and facial expressions’ micro-targeting to determine whether a person was more likely than others to lie at the border. Luckily, that technology was debunked and also generated a lot of debate around the ethics and human rights implications of using something like that.

    Technologies such as voice printing have been used in Germany to try to track a person’s country of origin or their ethnicity, facial recognition made its way into the new Migration’s Pact, and Greece is thinking about automating the triage of refugees, so there’s an appetite at the EU level and globally to use this tech. I think 2021 will be very interesting as more resources are being diverted to these types of tech.

    We saw, right when the pandemic started, that migration data used for population modeling became kind of co-opted and used to try and model flows of Covid. And this is very problematic because they are assuming that the mobile population, people on the move, and refugees are more likely to be bringing in Covid and diseases — but the numbers don’t bear out. We are also seeing the gathering of vast amounts of data for all these databases that Europe is using or will be using for a variety of border enforcement and policing in general.

    The concern is that fear’s being weaponized around the pandemic and technologies such as mobile tracking and data collection are being used as ways to control people. It is also broader, it deals with a kind of discourse around migration, on limiting people’s rights to move. Our concern is that it’ll open the door to further, broader rollout of this kind of tech against the general population.

    What are some of the most invasive technologies you’ve seen? And are you worried these authoritarian technologies will continue to expand, and not just in refugee camps?

    In Greece, the most invasive technologies being used now would probably be drones and unpiloted surveillance technologies, because it’s a really easy way to dehumanize that kind of area where people are crossing, coming from Turkey, trying to claim asylum. There’s also the appetite to try facial recognition technology.

    It shows just how dangerous these technologies can be both because they facilitate pushbacks, border enforcement, and throwing people away, and it really plays into this kind of idea of instead of humane responses you’d hope to happen when you see a boat in distress in the Aegean or the Mediterranean, now entities are turning towards drones and the whole kind of surveillance apparatus. It highlights how the humanity in this process has been lost.

    And the normalization of it all. Now it is so normal to use drones — everything is about policing Europe’s shore, Greece being a shield, to normalize the use of invasive surveillance tech. A lot of us are worried with talks of expanding the scope of action, mandate, and powers of Frontex [the European Border and Coast Guard Agency] and its utter lack of accountability — it is crystal clear that entities like Frontex are going to do Europe’s dirty work.

    There’s a particular framing applied when governments and companies talk about migrants and refugees, often linking them to ISIS and using careless terms and phrases to discuss serious issues. Our concern is that this kind of use of technology is going to become more advanced and more efficient.

    What is happening with regard to contact tracing apps — have there been cases where the technology was forced on refugees?

    I’ve heard about the possibility of refugees being tracked through their phones, but I couldn’t confirm. I prefer not to interact with the state through my phone, but that’s a privilege I have, a choice I can make. If you’re living in a refugee camp your options are much more constrained. Often people in the camps feel they are compelled to give access to their phones, to give their phone numbers, etc. And then there are concerns that tracking is being done. It’s really hard to track the tracking; it is not clear what’s being done.

    Aside from contact tracing, there’s the concern with the Wi-Fi connection provided in the camps. There’s often just one connection or one specific place where Wi-Fi works and people need to be connected to their families, spouses, friends, or get access to information through their phones, sometimes their only lifeline. It’s a difficult situation because, on the one hand, people are worried about privacy and surveillance, but on the other, you want to call your family, your spouse, and you can only do that through Wi-Fi and people feel they need to be connected. They have to rely on what’s available, but there’s a concern that because it’s provided by the authorities, no one knows exactly what’s being collected and how they are being watched and surveilled.

    How do we fight this surveillance creep?

    That’s the hard question. I think one of the ways that we can fight some of this is knowledge. Knowing what is happening, sharing resources among different communities, having a broader understanding of the systemic way this is playing out, and using such knowledge generated by the community itself to push for regulation and governance when it comes to these particular uses of technologies.

    We call for a moratorium or abolition of all high-risk technology in and around the border because right now we don’t have a governance mechanism in place or integrated regional or international way to regulate these uses of tech.

    Meanwhile, we have in the EU a General Data Protection Law, a very strong tool to protect data and data sharing, but it doesn’t really touch on surveillance, automation, A.I., so the law is really far behind.

    One of the ways to fight A.I. is to make policymakers understand the real harm that these technologies have. We are talking about ways that discrimination and inequality are reinforced by this kind of tech, and how damaging they are to people.

    We are trying to highlight this systemic approach to see it as an interconnected system in which all of these technologies play a part in this increasingly draconian way that migration management is being done.

    https://onezero.medium.com/how-the-pandemic-turned-refugees-into-guinea-pigs-for-surveillance-t

    #réfugiés #cobaye #surveillance #technologie #pandémie #covid-19 #coroanvirus #LIDAR #drones #reconnaissance_faciale #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #Moria #European_Digital_Rights (#EDRi) #surveillance_aérienne #complexe_militaro-industriel #Kara_Tepes #weaponization #biométrie #IA #intelligence_artificielle #détecteurs_de_mensonges #empreinte_vocale #tri #catégorisation #donneés #base_de_données #contrôle #technologies_autoritaires #déshumanisation #normalisation #Frontex #wifi #internet #smartphone #frontières

    ping @isskein @karine4

    ping @etraces

  • The global landscape of AI ethics guidelines | Nature Machine Intelligence
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s42256-019-0088-2

    In the past five years, private companies, research institutions and public sector organizations have issued principles and guidelines for ethical artificial intelligence (AI). However, despite an apparent agreement that AI should be ‘ethical’, there is debate about both what constitutes ‘ethical AI’ and which ethical requirements, technical standards and best practices are needed for its realization. To investigate whether a global agreement on these questions is emerging, we mapped and analysed the current corpus of principles and guidelines on ethical AI. Our results reveal a global convergence emerging around five ethical principles ( transparency, justice and fairness, non-maleficence, responsibility and privacy) , with substantive divergence in relation to how these principles are interpreted, why they are deemed important, what issue, domain or actors they pertain to, and how they should be implemented. Our findings highlight the importance of integrating guideline-development efforts with substantive ethical analysis and adequate implementation strategies.

    #Intelligence_artificielle #Ethique

  • * Les intellectuels à l’heure des réseaux sociaux - 14 janvier 2021 - #Gérard_Noiriel
    https://noiriel.wordpress.com/2021/01/14/les-intellectuels-a-lheure-des-reseaux-sociaux

    . . . . . . La deuxième raison de ce silence, c’est que je me suis interrogé sur l’utilité de ce blog. La façon dont ont été interprétés plusieurs des textes que j’ai publiés ici m’a fait réaliser l’ampleur du fossé qui me séparait de la plupart des adeptes de #Twitter ou de #Facebook. Comment convaincre des gens quand on ne parle pas la même langue ? Chemin faisant, je me suis rendu compte que j’avais ma part de responsabilité dans cette situation parce que je n’avais pas suffisamment expliqué les raisons qui pouvaient inciter un chercheur en #sciences_sociales, comme moi, à tenir un #blog. Je l’ai conçu non pas comme une revue savante, ni comme une tribune politique, mais comme un outil pour transmettre à un public plus large que les spécialistes, des connaissances en sciences sociales et aussi comme un moyen de réfléchir collectivement au rôle que peuvent jouer les universitaires dans l’espace public quand ils se comportent comme des intellectuels. Ces neuf mois d’abstinence m’ayant permis de mûrir ma réflexion sur ce point, je me sens aujourd’hui en état de relancer ce blog.

    Dans l’ouvrage Dire la vérité au pouvoir. Les intellectuels en question (Agone, 2010), j’avais tenté de montrer (en me limitant au monde universitaire) que trois grands types d’intellectuels s’étaient imposés à l’issue de l’Affaire Dreyfus. Ceux que j’ai appelé, par référence à Charles Péguy, les « #intellectuels de gouvernement » occupent une position dominante dans le champ médiatique (la presse de masse d’hier, les chaînes télévisées d’aujourd’hui). Ils accèdent souvent à l’Académie française et certains d’entre eux deviennent parfois ministre de l’Education nationale ou de la Culture. Ils défendent mordicus la nation française, ses traditions, l’ordre établi, mobilisant leur intelligence pour dénoncer toute forme de pensée subversive. Après avoir vaillamment combattu le « totalitarisme », ils sont aujourd’hui vent debout contre « l’islamisme ». Face à eux se dressent les « intellectuels critiques », qui sont les héritiers des « intellectuels révolutionnaires » de la grande époque du mouvement ouvrier. Certains d’entre eux prônent encore la lutte des classes, mais leur principal cheval de bataille aujourd’hui, c’est le combat contre le « racisme d’Etat » et « les #discriminations » ; les « racisé-e-s » ayant remplacé le #prolétariat.

    Ces deux pôles antagonistes peuvent s’affronter continuellement dans l’espace public parce qu’ils parlent le même langage. Les uns et les autres sont persuadés que leur statut d’#universitaire leur donne une légitimité pour intervenir sur tous les sujets qui font la une de l’actualité. Ils font comme s’il n’existait pas de séparation stricte entre le savant et le politique. Les intellectuels de gouvernement ne se posent même pas la question car ils sont convaincus que leur position sociale, et les diplômes qu’ils ont accumulés, leur fournissent une compétence spéciale pour traiter des affaires publiques. Quant aux intellectuels critiques, comme ils estiment que « tout est politique », ils se sentent autorisés à intervenir dans les polémiques d’actualité en mettant simplement en avant leur statut d’universitaire.

    Le troisième type d’intellectuels que j’avais retenu dans cet ouvrage est celui que #Michel_Foucault appelait « l’intellectuel spécifique ». Il tranche avec les deux autres parce qu’il part du principe que la science et la politique sont des activités très différentes. Le fait d’avoir une compétence dans le domaine des sciences sociales peut certes nous aider à éclairer les relations de pouvoir qui régissent nos sociétés, mais le mot pouvoir n’est pas synonyme du mot politique (au sens commun du terme) et la critique scientifique n’est pas du même ordre que la critique politique.

    Cette conviction explique pourquoi l’intellectuel spécifique ne peut intervenir dans l’espace public que sur des questions qu’il a lui-même étudiées pendant de longues années. Ces questions sont d’ordre scientifique, ce qui fait qu’elles ne se confondent pas avec celles auxquelles les #journalistes et les #politiciens voudraient qu’il réponde. Voilà pourquoi l’intellectuel spécifique doit « problématiser » (comme disait Foucault) les questions d’actualité dans le but de produire des vérités sur le #monde_social qui ne peuvent être obtenues qu’en se tenant à distance des passions et des intérêts du moment.

    Cela ne signifie pas que l’intellectuel spécifique se désintéresse de la fonction civique de son métier. Toutefois, ce qui le distingue des autres types d’intellectuels, c’est qu’il refuse de jouer les experts ou les porte-parole de telle ou telle catégorie de victimes. Il estime que l’intellectuel de gouvernement, mais aussi l’intellectuel critique, commettent un abus de pouvoir en intervenant constamment dans le #débat_public sur des questions qui concernent tous les citoyens.

    Voilà pourquoi, depuis #Max_Weber jusqu’à #Pierre_Bourdieu, les intellectuels spécifiques ont mobilisé les outils que propose la science sociale pour combattre le pouvoir symbolique que détiennent les intellectuels. Mais comme ils deviennent eux aussi des intellectuels quand ils interviennent dans le débat public, ils doivent retourner contre eux-mêmes les armes de la critique. Ce qui caractérise le véritable intellectuel spécifique, c’est donc sa capacité à se mettre lui-même en question, ce que j’ai appelé la faculté de « se rendre étranger à soi-même », alors que chez les autres intellectuels, le pouvoir de la critique s’arrête toujours devant leur porte. C’est cette propension à s’interroger sur lui-même qui a poussé Pierre Bourdieu à écrire, dans l’un de ses derniers ouvrages : « Je ne me suis jamais vraiment senti justifié d’exister en tant qu’intellectuel », ou encore « je n’aime pas en moi l’intellectuel » ( Méditations pascaliennes, Seuil, 1997, p. 16).

    Comme je l’avais souligné dans mon livre, ce malaise chronique de l’intellectuel spécifique tient aussi au fait que, pour être entendu dans l’espace public, il est parfois amené à dépasser la limite entre le savant et le politique qu’il s’était promis de ne pas franchir. Ce fut le cas pour #Durkheim pendant la Première Guerre mondiale, pour Foucault dans les années 1970, et aussi pour Bourdieu à la fin de sa vie.

    Les trois types d’intellectuels que je viens de citer se sont imposés en France au tournant des XIXe et XXe siècles, c’est-à-dire au moment où la presse de masse a restructuré complètement l’espace public en y intégrant la fraction des classes populaires qui en était exclue jusque là. Depuis une vingtaine d’années, l’irruption des chaînes d’information en continu et des « #réseaux_sociaux » a provoqué une nouvelle révolution de la communication à distance. Ces réseaux sont des entreprises privées, gouvernées par la loi du profit, qui mobilisent leurs adeptes en jouant sur leurs émotions. Toute personne peut y intervenir, de façon spontanée et souvent anonyme, en tenant le genre de propos qui s’échangeaient auparavant au « café du commerce », c’est-à-dire dans un espace d’interconnaissance directe, régi par la communication orale. La montée en puissance des réseaux sociaux a donc abouti à l’émergence d’un espace public intermédiaire entre la sphère des relations personnelles fondées sur la parole, et la sphère nationale, voire internationale, structurée par les médias de masse.

    Les #journalistes se sont adaptés à cette nouvelle situation de la même manière qu’ils s’étaient adaptés aux sondages. Ils nous font croire que les réseaux sociaux expriment « l’opinion publique », alors qu’ils sélectionnent, dans les milliards de propos échangés chaque jour sur Twitter ou Facebook, ceux qui peuvent leur servir dans le traitement de l’actualité.

    Les chaînes d’information en continu, dont la logique repose sur ce qu’on pourrait appeler « une économie de la palabre », obéissent aux mêmes principes que les réseaux sociaux : il faut mobiliser les #émotions des téléspectateurs pour booster les audiences, et donc les recettes publicitaires. Voilà pourquoi ces chaînes accordent une place essentielle aux polémiques, aux « clashs », aux insultes qui sont immédiatement relayés sur les réseaux sociaux. Dans le même temps, pour donner un peu de crédibilité à leur entreprise, ils sollicitent constamment des « experts », le plus souvent des universitaires, transformés en chasseurs de « fake news » , qui acceptent de jouer ce jeu pour en tirer quelques profits en terme de notoriété, de droits d’auteurs, etc.

    Les journalistes de la presse écrite . . . . . . . . . . .

  • Artificial intelligence : #Frontex improves its maritime surveillance

    Frontex wants to use a new platform to automatically detect and assess „risks“ on the seas of the European Union. Suspected irregular activities are to be displayed in a constantly updated „threat map“ with the help of self-learning software.

    The EU border agency has renewed a contract with Israeli company Windward for a „maritime analytics“ platform. It will put the application into regular operation. Frontex had initially procured a licence for around 800,000 Euros. For now 2.6 million Euros, the agency will receive access for four workstations. The contract can be extended three times for one year at a time.

    Windward specialises in the digital aggregation and assessment of vessel tracking and maritime surveillance data. Investors in the company, which was founded in 2011, include former US CIA director David Petraeus and former CEO’s of Thomson Reuters and British Petroleum. The former chief of staff of the Israeli military, Gabi Ashkenazi, is considered one of the advisors.

    Signature for each observed ship

    The platform is based on artificial intelligence techniques. For analysis, it uses maritime reporting systems, including position data from the AIS transponders of larger ships and weather data. These are enriched with information about the ship owners and shipping companies as well as the history of previous ship movements. For this purpose, the software queries openly accessible information from the internet.

    In this way, a „fingerprint“ is created for each observed ship, which can be used to identify suspicious activities. If the captain switches off the transponder, for example, the analysis platform can recognise this as a suspicuous event and take over further tracking based on the recorded patterns. It is also possible to integrate satellite images.

    Windward uses the register of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) as its database, which lists about 70,000 ships. Allegedly, however, it also processes data on a total of 400,000 watercraft, including smaller fishing boats. One of the clients is therefore the UN Security Council, which uses the technology to monitor sanctions.

    Against „bad guys“ at sea

    The company advertises its applications with the slogan „Catch the bad guys at sea“. At Frontex, the application is used to combat and prevent unwanted migration and cross-border crime as well as terrorism. Subsequently, „policy makers“ and law enforcement agencies are to be informed about results. For this purpose, the „risks“ found are visualised in a „threat map“.

    Windward put such a „threat map“ online two years ago. At the time, the software rated the Black Sea as significantly more risky than the Mediterranean. Commercial shipping activity off the Crimea was interpreted as „probable sanction evasions“. Ship owners from the British Guernsey Islands as well as Romania recorded the highest proportion of ships exhibiting „risky“ behaviour. 42 vessels were classified as suspicious for drug smuggling based on their patterns.

    Frontex „early warning“ units

    The information from maritime surveillance is likely to be processed first by the „Risk Analysis Unit“ (RAU) at Frontex. It is supposed to support strategic decisions taken by the headquarters in Warsaw on issues of border control, return, prevention of cross-border crime as well as threats of a „hybrid nature“. Frontex calls the applications used there „intelligence products“ and „integrated data services“. Their results flow together in the „Common Integrated Risk Analysis Model“ (CIRAM).

    For the operational monitoring of the situation at the EU’s external borders, the agency also maintains the „Frontex Situation Centre“ (FSC). The department is supposed to provide a constantly updated picture of migration movements, if possible in real time. From these reports, Frontex produces „early warnings“ and situation reports to the border authorities of the member states as well as to the Commission and the Council in Brussels.

    More surveillance capacity in Warsaw

    According to its own information, Windward’s clients include the Italian Guardia di Finanza, which is responsible for controlling Italian territorial waters. The Ministry of the Interior in Rome is also responsible for numerous EU projects aimed at improving surveillance of the central Mediterranean. For the training and equipment of the Libyan coast guard, Italy receives around 67 million euros from EU funds in three different projects. Italian coast guard authorities are also installing a surveillance system for Tunisia’s external maritime borders.

    Frontex now wants to improve its own surveillance capacities with further tenders. Together with the fisheries agency, The agency is awarding further contracts for manned maritime surveillance. It has been operating such a „Frontex Aerial Surveillance Service“ (FASS) in the central Mediterranean since 2017 and in the Adriatic Sea since 2018. Frontex also wants to station large drones in the Mediterranean. Furthermore, it is testing Aerostats in the eastern Mediterranean for a second time. These are zeppelins attached to a 1,000-metre long line.

    https://digit.site36.net/2021/01/15/artificial-intelligence-frontex-improves-its-maritime-surveillance
    #intelligence_artificielle #surveillance #surveillance_maritime #mer #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #AI #Windward #Israël #complexe_militaro-industriel #militarisation_des_frontières #David_Petraeus #Thomson_Reuters #British_Petroleum #armée_israélienne #Gabi_Ashkenazi #International_Maritime_Organisation (#IMO) #thread_map #Risk_Analysis_Unit (#RAU) #Common_Integrated_Risk_Analysis_Model (#CIRAM) #Frontex_Situation_Centre (#FSC) #Frontex_Aerial_Surveillance_Service (#FASS) #zeppelins

    ping @etraces

    • Data et nouvelles technologies, la face cachée du contrôle des mobilités

      Dans un rapport de juillet 2020, l’Agence européenne pour la gestion opérationnelle des systèmes d’information à grande échelle (#EU-Lisa) présente l’intelligence artificielle (IA) comme l’une des « technologies prioritaires » à développer. Le rapport souligne les avantages de l’IA en matière migratoire et aux frontières, grâce, entre autres, à la technologie de #reconnaissance_faciale.

      L’intelligence artificielle est de plus en plus privilégiée par les acteurs publics, les institutions de l’UE et les acteurs privés, mais aussi par le #HCR et l’#OIM. Les agences de l’UE, comme Frontex ou EU-Lisa, ont été particulièrement actives dans l’#expérimentation des nouvelles technologies, brouillant parfois la distinction entre essais et mise en oeuvre. En plus des outils traditionnels de surveillance, une panoplie de technologies est désormais déployée aux frontières de l’Europe et au-delà, qu’il s’agisse de l’ajout de nouvelles #bases_de_données, de technologies financières innovantes, ou plus simplement de la récupération par les #GAFAM des données laissées volontairement ou pas par les migrant·e·s et réfugié∙e∙s durant le parcours migratoire.

      La pandémie #Covid-19 est arrivée à point nommé pour dynamiser les orientations déjà prises, en permettant de tester ou de généraliser des technologies utilisées pour le contrôle des mobilités sans que l’ensemble des droits des exilé·e·s ne soit pris en considération. L’OIM, par exemple, a mis à disposition des Etats sa #Matrice_de_suivi_des_déplacements (#DTM) durant cette période afin de contrôler les « flux migratoires ». De nouvelles technologies au service de vieilles obsessions…

      http://www.migreurop.org/article3021.html

      Pour télécharger le rapport :
      www.migreurop.org/IMG/pdf/note_12_fr.pdf

      ping @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_ @i_s_

  • Sommes-nous encore une communauté ?

    « Il y a des étudiants fragiles qui se suicident », disait la ministre #Frédérique_Vidal le 2 janvier, une ministre et un gouvernement qui ne soutiennent ni les étudiants, ni l’université, ni la recherche. Et qui mettent des milliers de vies en danger. Publication d’un message aux collègues et étudiant.e.s de l’Université de Strasbourg, qui devient ici une lettre ouverte.

    Chères toutes, chers tous,

    Je tente de rompre un silence numérique intersidéral, tout en sachant que les regards se portent outre-atlantique …

    Cette journée du mercredi 6 janvier a été calamiteuse pour l’Université de Strasbourg. Elle a montré une fois de plus les graves conséquences des carences en moyens financiers, techniques et en personnels dans l’#enseignement_supérieur et la recherche, y compris dans les grandes universités dites de recherche intensive, qui communiquent sur leur excellent équipement et qui sont dans les faits sous-financées – tout comme les plus grands hôpitaux - et sont devenues des usines à fabriquer de la #souffrance et de la #précarité. Il faudra bien sûr identifier les causes précises de la panne informatique géante subie par toute la communauté universitaire de Strasbourg, alors que se tenaient de très nombreux examens à distance : voir ici 8https://www.dna.fr/education/2021/01/06/incident-reseau-durant-un-examen-partiel-etudiants-stresses-et-en-colere) ou là (https://www.francebleu.fr/infos/insolite/universite-de-strasbourg-une-panne-informatique-perturbe-les-examens-de-m).

    Nous avons été informés uniquement par facebook et twitter - je n’ai volontairement pas de comptes de cette nature et n’en aurai jamais, il me semble : je pratique très mal la pensée courte - et par sms. 50 000 sms, promet-on. Mais je n’ai rien reçu sur mon 06, bien que je sois secrétaire adjoint du CHSCT de cette université et que la bonne information des représentants des personnels du CHSCT dans une telle situation soit une obligation, la sécurité des personnels et des étudiants n’étant plus assurée : plus de téléphonie IP, plus de mail, plus aucun site internet actif pendant des heures et des heures. Et ce n’est peut-être pas totalement terminé à l’heure où je publie ce billet (15h).

    Il ne s’agit pas ici d’incriminer les agents de tel ou tel service, mais de faire le constat qu’une université ne peut pas fonctionner en étant sous-dotée et sous-administrée. Une fois de plus, la question qu’il convient de se poser n’est pas tant de savoir si l’université est calibrée pour le virage numérique qu’on veut lui faire prendre à tous les niveaux et à la vitesse grand V en profitant de la crise sanitaire (au profit des #GAFAM et de la #Fondation SFR_que soutient Frédérique Vidal pour booster l’accès aux data des étudiants), que de déterminer si des #examens à distance, des cours hybrides, l’indigestion de data ou de capsules vidéo ne dénaturent pas fondamentalement l’#enseignement et la relation pédagogique et ne sont pas vecteurs de multiples #inégalités, #difficultés et #souffrances, aussi bien pour les étudiants que pour les enseignants et les personnels.

    Ce sont donc des milliers d’étudiants (entre 2000 et 4000, davantage ?), déjà très inquiets, qui ont vu hier et encore aujourd’hui leur #stress exploser par l’impossibilité de passer des examens préparés, programmés de longue date et pour lesquels ils ont tenté de travailler depuis de longs mois, seuls ou accompagnés au gré des protocoles sanitaires variables, fluctuants et improvisés qu’un ministère incompétent ou sadique prend soin d’envoyer systématiquement à un moment qui en rendra l’application difficile, sinon impossible. Le stress des étudiant.e.s sera en conséquence encore plus élevé dans les jours et semaines qui viennent, pour la poursuite de leurs examens et pour la reprise des cours ce 18 janvier. De mon côté et par simple chance j’ai pu garantir hier après-midi la bonne tenue d’un examen de master à distance : je disposais de toutes les adresses mail personnelles des étudiants et j’ai pu envoyer le sujet et réceptionner les travaux dans les délais et dans les conditions qui avaient été fixées. Tout s’est bien passé. Mais qu’en sera-t-il pour les milliers d’autres étudiants auxquels on promet que l’incident « ne leur sera pas préjudiciable » ? Le #préjudice est là, et il est lourd.

    Mes questions sont aujourd’hui les suivantes : que fait-on en tant que personnels, enseignants, doctorants et étudiant.e.s (encore un peu) mobilisé.e.s contre la LPR, la loi sécurité globale, les réformes en cours, le fichage de nos opinions politiques, appartenances syndicales ou données de santé ? Que fait-on contre la folie du tout #numérique et contre les conséquences de la gestion calamiteuse de la pandémie ? Que fait-on en priorité pour les étudiants, les précaires et les collègues en grande difficulté et en souffrance ? Que fait-on pour éviter des tentatives de suicide d’étudiants qui se produisent en ce moment même dans plusieurs villes universitaires ? Et les tentatives de suicide de collègues ?

    Je n’ai pas de réponse. Je lance une bouteille à la mer, comme on dit. Et je ne suis pas même certain d’être encore en mesure d’agir collectivement avec vous dans les jours qui viennent tant j’ai la tête sous l’eau, comme beaucoup d’entre vous … Peut-être qu’il faudrait décider de s’arrêter complément. Arrêter la machine folle. Dire STOP : on s’arrête, on prend le temps de penser collectivement et de trouver des solutions. On commence à refonder. On se revoit physiquement et on revoit les étudiants à l’air libre, le plus vite possible, avant l’enfer du 3ème confinement.

    Nous sommes une #intelligence_collective. « Nous sommes l’Université », avons-nous écrit et dit, très souvent, pendant nos luttes, pour sauver ce qui reste de l’Université. Je me borne aujourd’hui à ces questions : Sommes-nous encore l’Université ? Sommes-nous encore une intelligence collective ? Que reste-t-il de notre #humanité dans un système qui broie l’humanité ? Sommes-nous encore une #communauté ?

    En 2012, j’ai écrit un texte dont je me souviens. Il avait pour titre « La communauté fragmentée ». Je crois que je pensais à Jean-Luc Nancy en écrivant ce texte, à la fois de circonstance et de réflexion. A 8 années de distance on voit la permanence des problèmes et leur vertigineuse accélération. Nous sommes aujourd’hui une communauté fragmentée dans une humanité fragmentée. Comment faire tenir ensemble ces fragments ? Comment rassembler les morceaux épars ? Comment réparer le vase ? Comment réinventer du commun ? Comment faire ou refaire communauté ?

    Je pose des questions. Je n’ai pas de réponse. Alors je transmets quelques informations. Je n’imaginais pas le faire avant une diffusion officielle aux composantes, mais vu les problèmes informatiques en cours, je prends sur moi de vous informer des avis adoptés à l’unanimité par le CHSCT qui s’est tenu ce 5 janvier. Ce n’est pas grand-chose, mais un avis de CHSCT a quand même une certaine force de contrainte pour la présidence. Il va falloir qu’ils suivent, en particulier sur le doublement des postes de médecins et de psychologues. Sinon on ne va pas les lâcher et on ira jusqu’au CHSCT ministériel.

    Je termine par l’ajout de notes et commentaires sur les propos de #Vidal sur France Culture le 2 janvier (https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/politique/frederique-vidal-ministre-de-lenseignement-superieur-et-de-la-recherch). Je voulais en faire un billet Mediapart mais j’ai été tellement écœuré que je n’ai pas eu la force. Il y est question des suicides d’étudiants. Il y a des phrases de Vidal qui sont indécentes. Elle a dit ceci : « Sur la question des suicides, d’abord ce sont des sujets multi-factoriels … On n’a pas d’augmentation massive du nombre de suicides constatée, mais il y a des étudiants fragiles qui se suicident ».

    Sur le réseau CHSCT national que j’évoquais à l’instant, il y a des alertes très sérieuses. Des CHSCT d’université sont saisis pour des TS d’étudiants. L’administrateur provisoire de l’Université de Strasbourg a bien confirmé ce 5 janvier que la promesse de Vidal de doubler les postes de psychologues dans les universités n’était actuellement suivi d’aucun moyen, d’aucun financement, d’aucun effet. Annonces mensongères et par conséquent criminelles ! Si c’est effectivement le cas et comme il y a des tentatives de suicides, il nous faudra tenir la ministre pour directement responsable. Et il faut le lui faire savoir tout de suite, à notre ministre "multi-factorielle" et grande pourvoyeuse de data, à défaut de postes et de moyens effectifs.

    Je vais transformer ce message en billet Mediapart. Car il faut bien comprendre ceci : nous n’avons plus le choix si on veut sauver des vies, il faut communiquer à l’extérieur, à toute la société. Ils n’ont peur que d’une seule chose : la communication. Ce dont ils vivent, qui est la moitié de leur infâme politique et dont ils croient tenir leur pouvoir : la #communication comme technique du #mensonge permanent. Pour commencer à ébranler leur système, il nous faut systématiquement retourner leur petite communication mensongère vulgairement encapsulée dans les media « mainstream" par un travail collectif et rigoureux d’établissement des faits, par une éthique de la #résistance et par une politique des sciences qui repose sur des savoirs et des enseignements critiques. Et j’y inclus bien sûr les savoirs citoyens.

    Notre liberté est dans nos démonstrations, dans nos mots et dans les rues, dans nos cris et sur les places s’il le faut, dans nos cours et nos recherches qui sont inséparables, dans nos créations individuelles et collectives, dans l’art et dans les sciences, dans nos corps et nos voix. Ils nous font la guerre avec des mensonges, des lois iniques, l’imposture du « en même temps » qui n’est que le masque d’un nouveau fascisme. Nous devons leur répondre par une guerre sans fin pour la #vérité et l’#intégrité, par la résistance de celles et ceux qui réinventent du commun. Au « en même temps », nous devons opposer ceci : "Nous n’avons plus le temps !". Ce sont des vies qu’il faut sauver. Le temps est sorti de ses gonds.

    Bon courage pour tout !

    Pascal

    PS : Avec son accord je publie ci-dessous la belle réponse que ma collègue Elsa Rambaud a faite à mon message sur la liste de mobilisation de l’Université de Strasbourg. Je l’en remercie. Je précise que la présente lettre ouverte a été légèrement amendée et complétée par rapport au message original. Conformément à celui-ci, j’y adjoins trois documents : la transcription commentée de l’entretien de Frédérique Vidal sur France Culture, les avis du CHSCT de l’Université de Strasbourg du 5 janvier 2021 et le courriel à tous les personnels de l’université de Valérie Robert, Directrice générale des services, et François Gauer, vice-président numérique. Nous y apprenons que c’est "le coeur" du système Osiris qui a été « affecté ». Il y a d’autres cœurs dont il faudra prendre soin … Nous avons besoin d’Isis... Soyons Isis, devenons Isis !

    –—

    Cher Pascal, cher-e-s toutes et tous,

    Merci de ce message.

    Pour ne pas s’habituer à l’inacceptable.

    Oui, tout ça est une horreur et, oui, le #distanciel dénature la #relation_pédagogique, en profondeur, et appauvrit le contenu même de ce qui est transmis. Nos fragilités institutionnelles soutiennent ce mouvement destructeur.

    Et pour avoir suivi les formations pédagogiques "innovantes" de l’IDIP l’an passé, je doute que la solution soit à rechercher de ce côté, sinon comme contre-modèle.

    Je n’ai pas plus de remèdes, seulement la conviction qu’il faut inventer vraiment autre chose : des cours dehors si on ne peut plus les faire dedans, de l’artisanat si la technique est contre nous, du voyage postal si nos yeux sont fatigués, du rigoureux qui déborde de la capsule, du ludique parce que l’ennui n’est pas un gage de sérieux et qu’on s’emmerde. Et que, non, tout ça n’est pas plus délirant que le réel actuel.

    Voilà, ça ne sert pas à grand-chose - mon mail- sinon quand même à ne pas laisser se perdre le tien dans ce silence numérique et peut-être à ne pas s’acomoder trop vite de ce qui nous arrive, beaucoup trop vite.

    Belle année à tous, résistante.

    Elsa

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/pascal-maillard/blog/070121/sommes-nous-encore-une-communaute
    #étudiants #université #France #confinement #covid-19 #crise_sanitaire #santé_mentale #suicide #fragmentation

    • Vidal sur France Culture le 2 janvier :

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/politique/frederique-vidal-ministre-de-lenseignement-superieur-et-de-la-recherch

      En podcast :

      http://rf.proxycast.org/d7f6a967-f502-4daf-adc4-2913774d1cf3/13955-02.01.2021-ITEMA_22529709-2021C29637S0002.mp3

      Titre d’un billet ironique à faire : « La ministre multi-factorielle et téléchargeable »

      Transcription et premiers commentaires.

      Reprise des enseignements en présence « de manière très progressive ».

      Dès le 4 janvier « Recenser les étudiants et les faire revenir par groupe de 10 et par convocation. » Comment, quand ?

      « Les enseignants sont à même d’identifier ceux qui sont en difficulté. » Comment ?

      « Le fait qu’on ait recruté 20 000 tuteurs supplémentaires en cette rentrée permet d’avoir des contacts avec les étudiants de première année, voir quels sont leur besoin pour décider ensuite comment on les fait revenir … simplement pour renouer un contact avec les équipes pédagogiques. » Mensonge. Ils ne sont pas encore recrutés. En 16:30 Vidal ose prétendre que ces emplois ont été créé dans les établissement au mois de décembre. Non, c’est faux.

      « 10 % des étudiants auraient pu bénéficier de TP. » Et 0,5% en SHS, Lettres, Art, Langues ?

      La seconde étape concernera tous les étudiants qu’on « essaiera de faire revenir une semaine sur deux pour les TD » à partir du 20 janvier.

      Concernant les étudiants : « souffrance psychologique très forte, … avec parfois une augmentation de 30 % des consultations »

      « Nous avons doublé les capacités de psychologues employés par les établissements ». Ah bon ?

      « Sur la question des suicides, d’abord ce sont des sujets multi-factoriels ». « On n’a pas d’augmentation massive du nombre de suicides constatée, mais il y a des étudiants fragiles qui se suicident ».

      « on recrute 1600 étudiants référents dans les présidences universitaires » (à 10 :30) « pour palier au problème de petits jobs ».

      « On a doublé le fond d’aide d’urgence. »

      « Nous avons-nous-même au niveau national passé des conventions avec la Fondation SFR … pour pouvoir donner aux étudiants la capacité de télécharger des data … », dit la ministre virtuelle. SFR permet certainement de télécharger une bouteille de lait numérique directement dans le frigo des étudiants. « Donner la capacité à télécharger des data » : Vidal le redira.

      L’angoisse de la ministre : « La priorité est de garantir la qualité des diplômes. Il ne faut pas qu’il y ait un doute qui s’installe sur la qualité des diplômés. »

      La solution est le contrôle continu, « le suivi semaine après semaine des étudiants » : « Ces contrôles continus qui donnent évidemment beaucoup de travail aux étudiants et les forcent à rester concentrés si je puis dire, l’objectif est là aussi. » Cette contrainte de rester concentré en permanence seul devant la lumière bleue de son écran, ne serait-elle pas en relation avec la souffrance psychologique reconnue par la ministre et avec le fait que « des étudiants fragiles se suicident » ?

    • Question posée par nombre d’étudiants non dépourvus d’expériences de lutte : puisque les tribunes et autres prises de position, les manifs rituelles et les « contre cours » ne suffisent pas, les profs et les chercheurs finiront-ils par faire grève ?

      Dit autrement, la « résistance » doit-elle et peut-elle être platonique ?

      Et si le suicide le plus massif et le plus terrible était dans l’évitement de ces questions ?

    • @colporteur : tes questions, évidemment, interrogent, m’interrogent, et interrogent tout le corps enseignant de la fac...
      « Les profs finiront-ils (et elles) pour faire grève ? »

      Réponse : Je ne pense pas.
      Les enseignant·es ont été massivement mobilisé·es l’année passée (il y a exactement un an). De ce que m’ont dit mes collègues ici à Grenoble : jamais ielles ont vu une telle mobilisation par le passé. Grèves, rétention des notes, et plein d’autres actions symboliques, médiatiques et concrètes. Les luttes portaient contre la #LPPR (aujourd’hui #LPR —> entérinée le matin du 26 décembre au Journal officiel !!!), contre les retraites, contres les violences policières, etc. etc.
      Cela n’a servi strictement à rien au niveau des « résultats » (rien, même pas les miettes).
      Les profs sont aussi très fatigué·es. J’ai plein de collègues qui vont mal, très mal.
      Les luttes de l’année passée ont été très dures, et il y a eu de très fortes tensions.
      On n’a pas la possibilité de se voir, de se croiser dans les couloirs, de manger ensemble. On est tou·tes chez nous en train de comprendre comment éviter que les étudiant·es lâchent.

      Je me pose tous les jours la question : quoi faire ? Comment faire ?

      L’université semble effriter sous nos pieds. En mille morceaux. Avec elle, les étudiant·es et les enseignant·es.

      Venant de Suisse, les grèves étudiantes, je ne connais pas. J’ai suivi le mouvement l’année passée, j’ai été même identifiée comme une des « meneuses du bal ». Je l’ai payé cher. Arrêt de travail en septembre. Mes collègues m’ont obligée à aller voir un médecin et m’ont personnellement accompagnée pour que je m’arrête pour de bon. Beaucoup de raisons à cela, mais c’était notamment dû à de fortes tensions avec, on va dire comme cela, « l’administration universitaire »... et les choses ont décidément empiré depuis les grèves.

      Personnellement, je continue à être mobilisée. Mais je ne crois pas à la confrontation directe et aux grèves.

      Le problème est de savoir : et alors, quelle stratégie ?

      Je ne sais pas. J’y pense. Mes collègues y pensent. Mais il y a un rouleau compresseur sur nos épaules. Difficile de trouver l’énergie, le temps et la sérénité pour penser à des alternatives.

      J’ai peut-être tort. Mais j’en suis là, aujourd’hui : détourner, passer dessous, passer derrière, éviter quand même de se faire écraser par le rouleau compresseur.
      Stratégie d’autodéfense féministe, j’ai un peu l’impression.

      Les discussions avec mes collègues et amiEs de Turquie et du Brésil me poussent à croire qu’il faut changer de stratégie. Et un mot d’ordre : « si on n’arrivera pas à changer le monde, au moins prenons soins de nous » (c’était le mot de la fin de la rencontre que j’avais organisée à Grenoble avec des chercheur·es de Turquie et du Brésil :
      https://www.pacte-grenoble.fr/actualites/universitaires-en-danger-journee-de-reflexion-et-de-solidarites-avec-

    • #Lettre d’un #étudiant : #exaspération, #résignation et #colère

      Bonjour,
      Je viens vers vous concernant un sujet et un contexte qui semblent progressivement se dessiner…
      Il s’agit du second semestre, et le passage en force (par « force » je veux dire : avec abstraction de tout débat avec les principaux acteur·ices concerné·es, post-contestations en 2019) de la loi LPR qui, il me semble, soulève une opposition d’ensemble de la part des syndicats enseignants universitaires (étant salarié, je suis sur la liste de diffusion de l’université).
      Aussi je viens vers vous concernant le deuxième semestre, qui risque de faire comme le premier : on commence en présentiel, puis on est reconfiné un mois et demi après. Bien entendu, je ne suis pas devin, mais la politique de ce gouvernement est assez facile à lire, je crois.
      Quelle opposition est possible, concrètement ? Car, loin d’aller dans des débats philosophiques, la solution d’urgence du numérique est certainement excusable, sauf lorsque cela tend à s’inscrire dans les mœurs et qu’elle ne questionne pas « l’après », mais qu’elle le conditionne. Or, je ne suis pas sûr qu’il soit sain d’envisager la transmission de savoirs d’une manière aussi arbitraire et insensée dans la durée, et qu’en l’absence de projet politique, cela semble devenir une réponse normée aux différentes crises prévues.
      J’ai la chance d’avoir un jardin, une maison, de l’espace, de pouvoir m’indigner de ceci car j’ai moins de contraintes, et de l’énergie mentale préservée de par un « capital culturel ». Ce n’est pas le cas d’autres, qui sont bloqué·es dans un 9 m2 depuis deux mois.
      Je ne veux pas me prononcer en le nom des autres étudiant·es, mais je peux affirmer que l’exaspération du distanciel et la validation de cette loi (ainsi que les autres, soyons francs) sont en train de soulever un dégoût assez fort. C’est très usant, d’être le dernier maillon d’une chaîne qui se dégrade, sous prétexte que « le distanciel fait l’affaire en attendant » alors même que rien n’est fait en profondeur pour améliorer le système de santé public, ni aucun, sinon l’inverse (l’on parle encore de réduction de lits en 2021 dans l’hôpital public). Je suis pour la solidarité nationale, mais celle-ci n’envisage aucune réciprocité. Et nous les « jeunes » sommes les bizus assumés du monde qui est en train de s’organiser.
      Et cela commence à peser sérieusement sur les promotions.

      (…)
      Je suis convaincu que personne n’apprécie la présente situation, comme j’ai l’impression qu’il n’y aura pas 36 000 occasions d’empêcher les dégradations générales du service public. Et je crains que, par l’acceptation de ce qui se passe, l’on avorte les seules options qu’il reste.
      Je suis désolé de ce message, d’exaspération, de résignation, de colère.

      J’ai choisi l’université française pour les valeurs qu’elle portait, pour la qualité de son enseignement, la force des valeurs qu’elle diffusait, la symbolique qu’elle portait sur la scène internationale et sa distance avec les branches professionnelles. Et j’ai l’impression que tout ce qui se passe nous condamne un peu plus, alors que la loi sécurité globale élève un peu plus la contestation, et que le gouvernement multiplie ses erreurs, en s’attaquant à trop de dossiers épineux en même temps. N’y a t’il pas un enjeu de convergence pour rendre efficace l’opposition et la proposition ?
      L’université n’est pas un bastion politique mais elle a de tout temps constitué un contre-pouvoir intellectuel se légitimant lors de dérives non-démocratiques, ou anti-sociales. Lorsqu’une autorité n’a que des positions dogmatiques, se soustrait de tout débat essentiel, d’acceptation de la différence (ce qui fait société !), n’est-il pas légitime de s’y opposer ?
      Nous, on se prend le climat, l’austérité qui arrive, la fragilisation de la sécu, des tafta, des lois sur le séparatisme, des policier·es décomplexé·es (minorité) qui tirent sur des innocents et sont couverts par des institutions qui ne jouent pas leur rôle arbitraire, on se fait insulter d’islamo-gauchistes sur les chaînes publiques parce qu’on porte certaines valeurs humanistes. J’avais à cœur de faire de la recherche car la science est ce qui nourrit l’évolution et garantit la transmission de la société, la rendant durable, je ne le souhaite plus. À quoi ça sert d’apprendre des notions de durabilité alors qu’on s’efforce de rendre la société la moins durable possible en pratique ?
      Que peut-on faire concrètement ? Ne nous laissez pas tomber, s’il vous plaît. Nous sommes et serons avec vous.
      Vous, enseignant·es, que vous le vouliez ou non êtes nos « modèles ». Les gens se calquent toujours sur leurs élites, sur leurs pairs.
      Vous êtes concerné·es aussi : les institutions vont commencer à faire la chasse aux sorcières dans les corpus universitaires si les dérives autoritaires se banalisent.

      L’orientation du débat public et la « fachisation » d’idéaux de société va inéluctablement faire en sorte que les enseignant·es soient en ligne de mire pour les valeurs qu’iels diffusent. C’est déjà en cours à la télé, des député·es banalisent ce discours.
      N’est-il pas du devoir des intellectuel·les d’élever le niveau du débat en portant des propositions ?
      Je ne suis pas syndiqué, pas engagé dans un parti, et je me sens libre de vous écrire ceci ; et je l’assumerai.
      Ce que je souhaite, c’est que l’on trouve un discours commun, motivant, pour que l’action puisse naître, collectivement et intelligemment : étudiant·es, et enseignant·es.
      Avec tout mon respect, fraternellement, et en considérant la difficile situation que vous-même vivez.

      Un étudiant en M1
      2 décembre 2020

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29240

    • Des #vacataires au bord de la rupture se mettent en #grève

      Depuis le 23 novembre 2020, les vacataires en sociologie de l’#université_de_Bourgogne sont en #grève_illimitée. Ils et elles dénoncent les conditions de précarité dans lesquelles ils et elles travaillent, et demandent qu’un dialogue autour de ces problématiques soit enfin instaurer.

      Suite à leur communiqué, les enseignant·e·s–chercheur·e·s du département de sociologie ont décidé de leur apporter tout leur soutien.

      –---

      Communiqué des vacataires en sociologie à l’université de Bourgogne au bord de la rupture

      Nous, docteur·es et doctorant·es, vacataires et contractuel.le.s au département de sociologie, prenons aujourd’hui la parole pour dire notre colère face aux dysfonctionnements structurels au sein de l’université de Bourgogne, qui nous mettent, nous et nos collègues titulaires, dans des situations ubuesques. Nous tirons la sonnette d’alarme !

      L’université de Bourgogne, comme tant d’autres universités en France, recourt aux vacataires et aux contractuel·les pour réaliser des missions pourtant pérennes. Ainsi, en termes d’enseignement, nous vacataires, assurons en moyenne 20 % des enseignements des formations de l’université de Bourgogne. Et au département de sociologie cette proportion grimpe à près de 30%.

      Le statut de vacataire est, à l’origine, pensé pour que des spécialistes, qui ne seraient pas enseignant·es-chercheur·ses à l’université, puissent venir effectuer quelques heures de cours dans leur domaine de spécialité. Cependant aujourd’hui ce statut est utilisé pour pallier le manque de postes, puisque sans nous, la continuité des formations ne peut être assurée : en comptant les vacations ainsi que les heures complémentaires imposées aux enseignants titularisés, ce sont en effet 46% des cours qui dépassent le cadre normal des services des enseignant-chercheurs. Nous sommes donc des rouages essentiel du fonctionnement de l’université.

      Doctorant·es (bien souvent non financé·es, notamment en Sciences Humaines et Sociales) et docteur·es sans postes, nous sommes payé·es deux fois dans l’année, nous commençons nos cours bien souvent plusieurs semaines (à plusieurs mois !) avant que nos contrats de travail soient effectivement signés. Nous sommes par ailleurs rémunéré·es à l’heure de cours effectuée, ce qui, lorsqu’on prend en compte le temps de préparation des enseignements et le temps de corrections des copies, donne une rémunération en dessous du SMIC horaire1.

      Au delà de nos situations personnelles, bien souvent complexes, nous constatons tous les jours les difficultés de nos collègues titulaires, qui tentent de « faire tourner » l’université avec des ressources toujours plus limitées, et en faisant face aux injonctions contradictoires de l’administration, la surcharge de travail qu’induit le nombre croissant d’étudiant·es et les tâches ingrates à laquelle oblige l’indigne sélection mise en place par Parcoursup ! Sans compter, aujourd’hui, les charges administratives qui s’alourdissent tout particulièrement avec la situation sanitaire actuelle. Nous sommes contraint·es d’adapter les modalités d’enseignement, sans matériel et sans moyens supplémentaires, et dans des situations d’incertitudes absolues sur l’évolution de la situation. Nous sommes toutes et tous au maximum de nos services et heures complémentaires et supplémentaires, à tel point que, quand l’un·e ou l’autre doit s’absenter pour quelques raisons que ce soit, nos équipes sont au bord de l’effondrement ! Et nous ne disons rien ici du sens perdu de notre travail : ce sentiment de participer à un vrai service public de l’enseignement supérieur gratuit et ouvert à toutes et tous, systématiquement saboté par les réformes en cours du lycée et de l’ESR !

      C’est pour ces raisons, et face au manque de réponse de la part de l’administration, que nous avons pris la difficile décision d’entamer un mouvement de grève illimité à partir du lundi 23 novembre 2020 à 8 h. Ce mouvement prendra fin lorsqu’un dialogue nous sera proposé.

      Nos revendications sont les suivantes :

      Mensualisation des rémunérations des vacataires ;
      Souplesse vis-à-vis des « revenus extérieurs » insuffisants des vacataires, particulièrement en cette période de crise sanitaire ;
      Exonération des frais d’inscription pour les doctorant.e.s vacataires ;
      Titularisation des contractuelles et contractuels exerçant des fonctions pérennes à l’université ;
      Plus de moyens humains dans les composantes de l’université de Bourgogne.

      Nous avons bien conscience des conséquences difficiles que cette décision va provoquer, autant pour nos étudiant.e.s, que pour le fonctionnement du département de sociologie. Nous ne l’avons pas pris à la légère : elle ne s’est imposée qu’à la suite d’abondantes discussions et de mûres réflexions. Nous en sommes arrivé.es à la conclusion suivante : la défense de nos conditions de travail, c’est aussi la défense de la qualité des formations de l’université de Bourgogne.

      Pour ceux qui se sentiraient désireux de nous soutenir, et qui le peuvent, nous avons mis en place une caisse de grève afin d’éponger en partie la perte financière que recouvre notre engagement pour la fin d’année 2020.

      https://www.papayoux-solidarite.com/fr/collecte/caisse-de-greve-pour-les-vacataires-sociologie-dijon

      Nous ne lâcherons rien et poursuivrons, si besoin est, cette grève en 2021.
      Lettre de soutien des enseignant·es–chercheur·ses du département de sociologie à l’université de Bourgogne

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29225
      #précarité #précaires

    • Un étudiant de Master, un doyen de droit : à quand les retrouvailles ?

      Academia republie ici, avec l’accord de leurs auteurs, deux courriels adressés l’un sur une liste de diffusion de l’Université de Paris-1 Panthéon-Sorbonne et l’autre par le doyen de la faculté de droit. Les deux disent la même chose : le souhait de se retrouver, de le faire dans des bonnes conditions sanitaires, mais de se retrouver. Aujourd’hui, seul le gouvernement — et peut-être bientôt le Conseil d’État qui devrait rendre la décision concernant le référé-liberté déposé par Paul Cassia — et audiencé le 3 décembre 2020 ((Le message que Paul Cassia a adressé à la communauté de Paris-1 à la sortie de l’audience avec un seul juge du Conseil d’État vendredi, n’était pas encourageant.)) — les en empêchent.

      –—

      Courriel de Dominik, étudiant en Master de Science Politique à l’Université de Paris-1

       » (…) Je me permets de vous transmettre le point de vue qui est le mien, celui d’un étudiant lambda, mais qui passe beaucoup de temps à échanger avec les autres. Je vous conjure d’y prêter attention, parce que ces quelques lignes ne sont pas souvent écrites, mais elles passent leur temps à être prononcées entre étudiantes et étudiants.

      Je crois qu’il est temps, en effet, de se préoccuper de la situation, et de s’en occuper à l’échelle de l’université plutôt que chacun dans son coin. Cette situation, désolé de répéter ce qui a été dit précédemment, est alarmante au plus haut point. J’entends parler autour de moi de lassitude, de colère, de fatigue, voire de problèmes de santé graves, de dépressions et de décrochages. Ce ne sont pas des cas isolés, comme cela peut arriver en novembre, mais bien une tendance de fond qui s’accroît de jour en jour. J’ai reçu des appels d’étudiantes et d’étudiants qui pleuraient de fatigue, d’autres d’incompréhensions. L’un m’écrivait la semaine dernière qu’il s’était fait remettre sous antidépresseurs, tandis que plusieurs témoignent, en privé comme sur les groupes de discussion, de leur situation de “décrochage permanent”.

      Ce décrochage permanent, je suis en train de l’expérimenter, consiste à avoir en permanence un train de retard que l’on ne peut rattraper qu’en prenant un autre train de retard. Le travail est en flux tendu, de 9 heures à 21 heures pour les plus efficaces, de 9h à minuit, voire au-delà pour les plus occupés, ceux qui font au système l’affront de vouloir continuer à suivre un second cursus (linguistique, dans mon cas), voire pire, de continuer à s’engager dans la vie associative qui rend notre Alma Mater si singulière. Parce que nous l’oublions, mais la vitalité associative est elle aussi en grand danger.

      Pour revenir au décrochage permanent, qui est à la louche le lot de la moitié des étudiantes et étudiants de ma licence, et sûrement celui de milliers d’autres à travers l’Université, c’est une situation qui n’est tenable ni sur le plan physique, ni sur le plan psychique, ni sur le plan moral, c’est à dire de la mission que l’Université se donne.

      Sur le plan physique, nous sommes victimes de migraines, de fatigue oculaire (une étudiante me confiait il y a trois jours avoir les yeux qui brûlent sous ses lentilles), de maux de dos et de poignet. Certains sont à la limite de l’atrophie musculaire, assis toute la journée, avec pour seul trajet quotidien l’aller-retour entre leur lit et leur bureau, et éventuellement une randonnée dans leur cuisine. Je n’arrive pas non plus à estimer la part des étudiantes et étudiants qui ne s’alimente plus correctement, mangeant devant son écran ou sautant des repas.

      Sur le plan psychique, la solitude et la routine s’installent. Solitude de ne plus voir ni ses amis ni même quiconque à ce qui est censé être l’âge de toutes les expériences sociales, lassitude des décors (le même bureau, la même chambre, le même magasin), routine du travail (dissertation le lundi, commentaire le mardi, fiche de lecture le mercredi, etc. en boucle) et des cours (“prenez vos fascicules à la page 63, on va faire la fiche d’arrêt de la décision n°xxx”).

      Sur le plan moral, parce que notre Université est en train d’échouer. La Sorbonne plus que toute autre devrait savoir en quoi elle est un lieu de débat d’idées, d’élévation intellectuelle, d’émancipation et d’épanouissement. Sans vie associative, sans conférences, sans rencontres, sans soirées endiablées à danser jusqu’à 6 heures avant l’amphi de Finances publiques (désolé), sans les interventions interminables des trotskystes dans nos amphis, les expos dans la galerie Soufflot, les appariteurs tatillons en Sorbonne et les cafés en terrasse où on se tape dessus, entre deux potins, pour savoir s’il vaut mieux se rattacher à Bourdieu ou à Putnam, à Duguit ou à Hauriou, sans tout ce qui fait d’une Université une Université et de la Sorbonne la Sorbonne, nous sommes en train d’échouer collectivement.

      Sous prétexte de vouloir s’adapter à la situation sanitaire, nous avons créé un problème sanitaire interne à notre établissement, et nous l’avons recouvert d’une crise du sens de ce que nous sommes en tant qu’étudiantes et étudiants, et de ce que Paris I est en tant qu’Université.

      Ce problème majeur ne pourra être traité qu’à l’échelle de toute l’Université. Parce que nombre de nos étudiants dépendent de plusieurs composantes, et qu’il serait dérisoire de croire qu’alléger les cours d’une composante suffira à sauver de la noyade celles et ceux qui seront toujours submergés par les cours de la composante voisine. Parce qu’il semble que nous ayons décidé de tenir des examens normaux en présentiel en janvier, alors même que nombre d’entre nous sont confinés loin de Paris, alors même que la situation sanitaire demeure préoccupante, alors même qu’il serait risible de considérer qu’un seul étudiant de cette Université ait pu acquérir correctement les savoirs et savoir-faires qu’on peut exiger de lui en temps normal.

      Je ne dis pas qu’il faut tenir des examens en distanciel, ni qu’il faut les tenir en présentiel, pour être honnête je n’en ai pas la moindre idée. Je sais en revanche que faire comme si tout était normal alors que rien ne l’est serait un affront fait aux étudiants.

      J’ajoute, enfin, pour conclure ce trop long mot, que je ne parle pas ici des mauvais élèves. Lorsque je parle de la souffrance et de la pénibilité, c’est autant celle des meilleurs que des médiocres. Quand quelqu’un qui a eu 18,5 au bac s’effondre en larmes au bout du fil, ce n’est plus un problème personnel. Quand des étudiantes et étudiants qui ont été sélectionnés sur ParcourSup à raison d’une place pour cent, qui ont été pour beaucoup toute leur vie les modèles les plus parfaits de notre système scolaire, qui sont pour nombre d’entre eux d’anciens préparationnaires à la rue d’Ulm, quand ceux-là vous disent qu’ils souffrent et qu’ils n’en peuvent plus, c’est que le système est profondément cassé.

      Désolé, je n’ai pas de solutions. On en a trouvé quelques-unes dans notre UFR, elles sont listées dans le mail de M. Valluy, mais je persiste à croire que ce n’est pas assez. Tout ce que je sais, c’est qu’il faut arrêter de faire comme si tout allait bien, parce que la situation est dramatique.

      Je sais, par ailleurs, que ce constat et cette souffrance sont partagés par nombre d’enseignants, je ne peux que leur témoigner mon indéfectible soutien. Je remercie également Messieurs Boncourt et Le Pape d’alerter sur cette situation, et ne peux que souscrire à leur propos.

      Prenez soin de notre société, Prenez soin de vous (…) »

      Dominik

      –—

      Mesdames, Messieurs, chers étudiants,
      Comment vous dire ? Pas d’information ici, pas de renseignement. Je voulais vous parler, au nom de tous.
      La Faculté est froide, déserte. Pas de mouvement, pas de bruit, pas vos voix, pas vos rires, pas l’animation aux pauses. Il n’y a même plus un rayon de soleil dans la cour.
      Nous continuons à enseigner devant des écrans, avec des petites mains qui se lèvent sur teams et une parole à distance. Quelque fois nous vous voyons dans une petite vignette, un par un.
      Quelle tristesse qu’une heure de cours devant un amphithéâtre vide, dont on ne sent plus les réactions, à parler devant une caméra qui finit par vous donner le sentiment d’être, vous aussi, une machine.
      Quel manque d’âme dans ce monde internet, ce merveilleux monde du numérique dont même les plus fervents défenseurs perçoivent aujourd’hui qu’il ne remplacera jamais la chaleur d’une salle remplie de votre vie.

      Vous nous manquez, plus que vous ne l’imaginez. Vous nous manquez à tous, même si nous ne savons pas toujours ni vous le dire, ni vous le montrer.
      Et au manque s’ajoute aujourd’hui une forme de colère, contre le traitement qui vous est fait. Votre retour en février seulement ? Inadmissible. La rentrée en janvier est devenue notre combat collectif.
      Partout les Présidents d’Université expriment leur désaccord et seront reçus par le Premier Ministre. Les doyens de Faculté sont montés au créneau devant le Ministre de l’enseignement supérieur. On ne garantit pas d’être entendus mais on a expliqué que l’avenir ne s’emprisonne pas et que vous êtes l’avenir. Il semble que cela fasse sérieusement réfléchir.
      Si d’aventure nous obtenions gains de cause, et pouvions rentrer en janvier, je proposerai de décaler la rentrée en cas de besoin pour qu’on puisse reprendre avec vous.
      Et vous ?
      Ne croyez pas que nous ignorions que beaucoup d’entre vous se sentent isolés, délaissés, abandonnés même, et que, parfois, même les plus forts doutent. Nous percevons, malgré votre dignité en cours, que la situation est déplaisante, anxiogène, désespérante. Et nous pensons à celles et ceux qui ont été ou sont malades, ou qui voient leurs proches souffrir.
      Nous le sentons bien et souffrons de nous sentir impuissants à vous aider davantage.
      Je veux simplement vous dire que vous devez encore tenir le coup. C’est l’affaire de quelques semaines. C’est difficile mais vous allez y arriver. Vous y arriverez pour vous, pour vos proches, pour nous.

      Pour vous parce que, quelle que soit l’issue de ce semestre, vous aurez la fierté d’avoir résisté à cet orage. Vous aurez été capables de surmonter des conditions difficiles, et serez marqués, par ceux qui vous emploieront demain, du sceau de l’abnégation et courage. Ce sera, de toute façon, votre victoire.
      Pour vos proches parce qu’ils ont besoin, eux aussi, de savoir que vous ne cédez pas, que vous continuez à tout donner, que si vous avez parfois envie d’en pleurer, vous aurez la force d’en sourire.
      Pour nous enfin car il n’y aurait rien de pire pour nous que de ne pas vous avoir donné assez envie pour aller de l’avant. Nous ne sommes pas parfaits, loin de là, mais faisons honnêtement ce que nous pouvons et espérons, de toutes nos forces, vous avoir transmis un peu de notre goût pour nos disciplines, et vous avoir convaincus que vous progresserez aussi bien par l’adversité que par votre réussite de demain.
      Comment vous dire ? j’avais juste envie de vous dire que nous croyons en vous et que nous vous attendons. Bon courage !

      Amicalement
      Fabrice GARTNER
      Doyen de la Faculté de droit, sciences économiques et gestion de Nancy
      Professeur de droit public à l’Université de Lorraine
      Directeur du Master 2 droit des contrats publics
      Avocat spécialiste en droit public au barreau d’Epinal

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29334

    • « Un #dégoût profond pour cette République moribonde » , écrit un étudiant de sciences sociales

      Le message a circulé. Beaucoup.
      Sur les listes de diffusion, sur les plateformes de messagerie. Le voici publié sur un site : Bas les masques. Il n’est pas inutile de le relire. Et de continuer à se demander que faire. De son côté, Academia continue : proposer des analyses, proposer des actions.

      –---

      Bonjour,

      Je suis enseignant de sciences sociales en lycée en Bretagne et j’ai reçu le cri d’alarme d’un de mes ancien-ne-s élèves de première qui a participé à la manifestation parisienne contre la loi dite de sécurité globale le samedi 5 décembre dernier. Il a aujourd’hui 21 ans et il est étudiant.

      Je me sens démuni pour répondre seul à ce cri d’alarme alors je le relaie en espérant qu’il sera diffusé et qu’il suscitera quelque chose. Une réaction collective à imaginer. Mais laquelle ?

      Merci d’avance pour la diffusion et pour vos éventuelles réponses.

      « Bonjour Monsieur,

      Ce mail n’appelle pas nécessairement de réponse de votre part, je cherchais simplement à écrire mon désarroi. Ne sachant plus à qui faire part du profond mal-être qui m’habite c’est vous qui m’êtes venu à l’esprit. Même si cela remonte à longtemps, l’année que j’ai passée en cours avec vous a eu une influence déterminante sur les valeurs et les idéaux qui sont aujourd’hui miens et que je tente de défendre à tout prix, c’est pour cela que j’ai l’intime conviction que vous serez parmi les plus à même de comprendre ce que j’essaye d’exprimer.

      Ces dernières semaines ont eu raison du peu d’espoir qu’il me restait. Comment pourrait-il en être autrement ? Cette année était celle de mes 21 ans, c’est également celle qui a vu disparaître mon envie de me battre pour un monde meilleur. Chaque semaine je manifeste inlassablement avec mes amis et mes proches sans observer le moindre changement, je ne sais plus pourquoi je descends dans la rue, il est désormais devenu clair que rien ne changera. Je ne peux parler de mon mal-être à mes amis, je sais qu’il habite nombre d’entre eux également. Nos études n’ont désormais plus aucun sens, nous avons perdu de vue le sens de ce que nous apprenons et la raison pour laquelle nous l’apprenons car il nous est désormais impossible de nous projeter sans voir le triste futur qui nous attend. Chaque semaine une nouvelle décision du gouvernement vient assombrir le tableau de cette année. Les étudiants sont réduits au silence, privés de leurs traditionnels moyens d’expression. Bientôt un blocage d’université nous conduira à une amende de plusieurs milliers d’euros et à une peine de prison ferme. Bientôt les travaux universitaires seront soumis à des commissions d’enquêtes par un gouvernement qui se targue d’être le grand défenseur de la liberté d’expression. Qu’en est-il de ceux qui refuseront de rentrer dans le rang ?

      Je crois avoir ma réponse.

      Samedi soir, le 5 décembre, j’étais présent Place de la République à Paris. J’ai vu les forces de l’ordre lancer à l’aveugle par-dessus leurs barricades anti-émeutes des salves de grenades GM2L sur une foule de manifestants en colère, habités par une rage d’en découdre avec ce gouvernement et ses représentants. J’ai vu le jeune homme devant moi se pencher pour ramasser ce qui ressemblait à s’y méprendre aux restes d’une grenade lacrymogène mais qui était en réalité une grenade GM2L tombée quelques secondes plus tôt et n’ayant pas encore explosée. Je me suis vu lui crier de la lâcher lorsque celle-ci explosa dans sa main. Tout s’est passé très vite, je l’ai empoigné par le dos ou par le sac et je l’ai guidé à l’extérieur de la zone d’affrontements. Je l’ai assis au pied de la statue au centre de la place et j’ai alors vu ce à quoi ressemblait une main en charpie, privée de ses cinq doigts, sorte de bouillie sanguinolente. Je le rappelle, j’ai 21 ans et je suis étudiant en sciences sociales, personne ne m’a appris à traiter des blessures de guerre. J’ai crié, crié et appelé les street medics à l’aide. Un homme qui avait suivi la scène a rapidement accouru, il m’a crié de faire un garrot sur le bras droit de la victime. Un garrot… Comment pourrais-je avoir la moindre idée de comment placer un garrot sur une victime qui a perdu sa main moins d’une minute plus tôt ? Après quelques instants qui m’ont paru interminables, les street medics sont arrivés et ont pris les choses en main. Jamais je n’avais fait face à un tel sentiment d’impuissance. J’étais venu manifester, exprimer mon mécontentement contre les réformes de ce gouvernement qui refuse de baisser les yeux sur ses sujets qui souffrent, sur sa jeunesse qui se noie et sur toute cette frange de la population qui suffoque dans la précarité. Je sais pertinemment que mes protestations n’y changeront rien, mais manifester le samedi me permet de garder à l’esprit que je ne suis pas seul, que le mal-être qui m’habite est général. Pourtant, ce samedi plutôt que de rentrer chez moi heureux d’avoir revu des amis et d’avoir rencontré des gens qui gardent espoir,je suis rentré chez moi dépité, impuissant et révolté. Dites-moi Monsieur, comment un étudiant de 21 ans qui vient simplement exprimer sa colère la plus légitime peut-il se retrouver à tenter d’installer un garrot sur le bras d’un inconnu qui vient littéralement de se faire arracher la main sous ses propres yeux, à seulement deux ou trois mètres de lui. Comment en suis-je arrivé là ? Comment en sommes-nous arrivés là ?

      Je n’ai plus peur de le dire. Aujourd’hui j’ai un dégoût profond pour cette République moribonde. Les individus au pouvoir ont perverti ses valeurs et l’ont transformée en appareil répressif à la solde du libéralisme. J’ai développé malgré moi une haine profonde pour son bras armé qui défend pour envers et contre tous ces hommes et ces femmes politiques qui n’ont que faire de ce qu’il se passe en bas de leurs châteaux. J’ai toujours défendu des valeurs humanistes et pacifistes, qui m’ont été inculquées par mes parents et desquelles j’ai jusqu’ici toujours été très fier. C’est donc les larmes aux yeux que j’écris ceci mais dites-moi Monsieur, comment aujourd’hui après ce que j’ai vu pourrais-je rester pacifique ? Comment ces individus masqués, sans matricules pourtant obligatoires peuvent-ils nous mutiler en toute impunité et rentrer chez eux auprès de leur famille comme si tout était normal ? Dans quel monde vivons-nous ? Dans un monde où une association de policiers peut ouvertement appeler au meurtre des manifestants sur les réseaux sociaux, dans un monde où les parlementaires et le gouvernement souhaitent renforcer les pouvoirs de cette police administrative qui frappe mutile et tue.Croyez-moi Monsieur, lorsque je vous dis qu’il est bien difficile de rester pacifique dans un tel monde…

      Aujourd’hui être français est devenu un fardeau, je suis l’un de ces individus que l’Etat qualifie de « séparatiste », pourtant je ne suis pas musulman, ni même chrétien d’ailleurs. Je suis blanc, issu de la classe moyenne, un privilégié en somme… Mais quelle est donc alors cette religion qui a fait naître en moi une telle défiance vis-à-vis de l’Etat et de la République ? Que ces gens là-haut se posent les bonnes questions, ma haine pour eux n’est pas due à un quelconque endoctrinement, je n’appartiens à l’heure actuelle à aucune organisation, à aucun culte « sécessioniste ». Pourtant je suis las d’être français, las de me battre pour un pays qui ne veut pas changer. Le gouvernement et les individus au pouvoir sont ceux qui me poussent vers le séparatisme. Plutôt que de mettre sur pied des lois visant à réprimer le séparatisme chez les enfants et les étudiants qu’ils s’interrogent sur les raisons qui se cachent derrière cette défiance. La France n’est plus ce qu’elle était, et je refuse d’être associé à ce qu’elle représente aujourd’hui. Aujourd’hui et malgré moi je suis breton avant d’être français. Je ne demanderais à personne de comprendre mon raisonnement, seulement aujourd’hui j’ai besoin de me raccrocher à quelque chose, une lueur, qui aussi infime soit-elle me permette de croire que tout n’est pas perdu. Ainsi c’est à regret que je dis cela mais cette lueur je ne la retrouve plus en France, nous allons au-devant de troubles encore plus grands, le pays est divisé et l’antagonisme grandit de jour en jour. Si rien n’est fait les jeunes qui comme moi chercheront une sortie, un espoir alternatif en lequel croire, quand bien même celui-ci serait utopique, seront bien plus nombreux que ne l’imaginent nos dirigeants. Et ce ne sont pas leurs lois contre le séparatisme qui pourront y changer quelque chose. Pour certains cela sera la religion, pour d’autre comme moi, le régionalisme. Comment pourrait-il en être autrement quand 90% des médias ne s’intéressent qu’aux policiers armés jusqu’aux dents qui ont été malmenés par les manifestants ? Nous sommes plus de 40 heures après les événements de samedi soir et pourtant je n’ai vu nulle part mentionné le fait qu’un manifestant avait perdu sa main, qu’un journaliste avait été blessé à la jambe par des éclats de grenades supposées sans-danger. Seul ce qui reste de la presse indépendante tente encore aujourd’hui de faire la lumière sur les événements terribles qui continuent de se produire chaque semaine. Soyons reconnaissants qu’ils continuent de le faire malgré les tentatives d’intimidation qu’ils subissent en marge de chaque manifestation.

      Je tenais à vous le dire Monsieur, la jeunesse perd pied. Dans mon entourage sur Paris, les seuls de mes amis qui ne partagent pas mon mal-être sont ceux qui ont décidé de fermer les yeux et de demeurer apolitiques. Comment les blâmer ? Tout semble plus simple de leur point de vue. Nous sommes cloitrés chez nous pendant que la planète se meurt dans l’indifférence généralisée, nous sommes rendus responsables de la propagation du virus alors même que nous sacrifions nos jeunes années pour le bien de ceux qui ont conduit la France dans cette impasse. Les jeunes n’ont plus l’envie d’apprendre et les enseignants plus l’envie d’enseigner à des écrans noirs. Nous sacrifions nos samedis pour aller protester contre ce que nous considérons comme étant une profonde injustice, ce à quoi l’on nous répond par des tirs de grenades, de gaz lacrymogènes ou de LBD suivant les humeurs des forces de l’ordre. Nous sommes l’avenir de ce pays pourtant l’on refuse de nous écouter, pire, nous sommes muselés. Beaucoup de chose ont été promises, nous ne sommes pas dupes.

      Ne gaspillez pas votre temps à me répondre. Il s’agissait surtout pour moi d’écrire mes peines. Je ne vous en fait part que parce que je sais que cette lettre ne constituera pas une surprise pour vous. Vous êtes au premier rang, vous savez à quel point l’abime dans laquelle sombre la jeunesse est profonde. Je vous demanderai également de ne pas vous inquiéter. Aussi sombre cette lettre soit-elle j’ai toujours la tête bien fixée sur les épaules et j’attache trop d’importance à l’éducation que m’ont offert mes parents pour aller faire quelque chose de regrettable, cette lettre n’est donc en aucun cas un appel au secours. J’éprouvais seulement le besoin d’être entendu par quelqu’un qui je le sais, me comprendra.

      Matéo »

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29546

    • Les étudiants oubliés : de la #méconnaissance aux #risques

      Ce qui suit n’est qu’un billet d’humeur qui n’engage évidemment ni la Faculté, ni ses étudiants dont je n’entends pas ici être le représentant. Et je ne parle que de ceux que je crois connaître, dans les disciplines de la Faculté qui est la mienne. On ne me lira pas jusqu’au bout mais cela soulage un peu.

      Le président de la République a vécu à « l’isolement » au pavillon de la Lanterne à Versailles. Ce n’était pas le #confinement d’un étudiant dans sa chambre universitaire, mais il aura peut-être touché du doigt la vie « sans contact ». On espère qu’elle cessera bientôt pour nos étudiants, les oubliés de la République…

      #Oubliés des élus (j’excepte mon député qui se reconnaîtra), y compris locaux, qui, après avoir milité pour la réouverture des petits commerces, n’ont plus que le 3e confinement comme solution, sans y mettre, et c’est le reproche que je leur fais, les nuances qu’appelle une situation estudiantine qui devient dramatique.

      Oubliés depuis le premier confinement. Alors qu’écoliers, collégiens et lycéens rentraient, ils n’ont jamais eu le droit de revenir dans leur Faculté. Le « #distanciel » était prôné par notre Ministère. On neutralisera finalement les dernières épreuves du baccalauréat, acquis sur tapis vert. Pourtant, aux étudiants, et à nous, on refusera la #neutralisation des #examens d’un semestre terminé dans le chaos. Ils devront composer et nous tenterons d’évaluer, mal.

      Tout le monde rentre en septembre… Pour les étudiants, le ministère entonne désormais l’hymne à « l’#enseignement_hybride »… On coupe les promotions en deux. On diffuse les cours en direct à ceux qui ne peuvent s’asseoir sur les strapontins désormais scotchés… Les étudiants prennent l’habitude du jour sur deux. Les débuts technologiques sont âpres, nos jeunes ont une patience d’ange, mais on sera prêts à la Toussaint.

      Oubliés au second confinement. Le Ministre de l’éducation a obtenu qu’on ne reconfine plus ses élèves, à raison du risque de #décrochage. Lui a compris. L’enseignement supérieur n’obtient rien et reprend sa comptine du « distanciel ». Les bambins de maternelle pourront contaminer la famille le soir après une journée à s’esbaudir sans masque, mais les étudiants n’ont plus le droit de venir, même masqués, même un sur deux, alors que c’est la norme dans les lycées.

      Oubliés à l’annonce de l’allègement, quand ils, apprennent qu’ils ne rentreront qu’en février, quinze jours après les restaurants… Pas d’explication, pas de compassion. Rien. Le Premier ministre, décontenancé lors d’une conférence de presse où un journaliste, un original pour le coup, demandera … « et les étudiants ? », répondra : « Oui, nous avons conscience de la situation des étudiants ».

      Des collègues croyant encore aux vertus d’un #référé_liberté agiront devant le Conseil d’Etat, en vain. Merci à eux d’avoir fait la démarche, sous la conduite de Paul Cassia. Elle traduit une demande forte, mais sonne comme un prêche dans le désert.

      Oubliés alors que le ministère a connaissance depuis décembre des chiffres qui montrent une situation psychologique dégradée, des premières tentatives de suicide. Il a répondu… ! Nos dernières circulaires nous autorisent à faire revenir les étudiants dès janvier pour… des groupes de soutien ne dépassant pas 10 étudiants… Ce n’est pas de nounous dont les étudiants ont besoin, c’est de leurs enseignants. Et les profs n’ont pas besoin d’assistants sociaux, ils veulent voir leurs étudiants.

      On pourrait refaire des travaux dirigés en demi salles… à une date à fixer plus tard. Le vase déborde ! Quand va-t-on sérieusement résoudre cet #oubli qui ne peut résulter que de la méconnaissance et annonce des conséquences graves.

      La méconnaissance

      Fort d’une naïveté qu’on veut préserver pour survivre, on va croire que l’oubli est le fruit non du mépris, mais d’une méprise.

      Les étudiants sont d’abord victimes de leur nombre. Le Premier Ministre parlera d’eux comme d’un « #flux », constitué sans doute d’écervelés convaincus d’être immortels et incapables de discipline. Les éloigner, c’est évidemment écarter la masse, mais l’argument cède devant les étudiants (les nôtres par exemple), qui ont prouvé leur capacité à passer leurs examens « en présentiel » dans un respect impressionnant des consignes. Il cède aussi devant la foule de voyageurs du métro ou les files d’attente des grands magasins. Brassage de population ? Il y en a des pires.

      Ils sont ensuite victime d’un cliché tenace. Dans un amphi, il ne se passe rien. L’enseignant débite son cours et s’en va. Le cours ayant tout d’un journal télévisé, on peut le… téléviser. Tous les enseignants, mais se souvient-on qu’ils existent, savaient et on redécouvert que tout dans un amphi est fait d’échanges avec la salle : des #regards, des #sourires, des sourcils qui froncent, un brouhaha de doute, un rire complice. Le prof sent son public, redit quand il égare, accélère quand il ennuie, ralentit quand il épuise.

      Le ministère croit le contraire, et le Conseil d’Etat, dont l’audace majeure aura été de critiquer la jauge dans les églises, a cédé au cliché pour les amphis en jugeant que le distanciel « permet l’accès à l’enseignement supérieur dans les conditions sanitaires » actuelles (ord. n°447015 du 10 décembre). Nous voilà sauvés. Le prêtre serait-il plus présent que le professeur ? La haute juridiction, pour les théâtres, admettant que leurs #mesures_sanitaires sont suffisantes, nous avons d’ailleurs les mêmes, concèdera que leur fermeture compromet les libertés mais doit être maintenue dans un « contexte sanitaire marqué par un niveau particulièrement élevé de diffusion du virus au sein de la population », autant dire tant que le gouvernement jugera que ça circule beaucoup (ord. n°447698 du 23 décembre). Si on résume, « 30 à la messe c’est trop peu », « pour les études la télé c’est suffisant » et « on rouvrira les théâtres quand ca ira mieux ».

      Au ministère, on imagine peut-être que les étudiants se plaisent au distanciel. Après tout, autre #cliché d’anciennes époques, ne sont-ils pas ces comateux en permanente grasse matinée préférant se vautrer devant un écran en jogging plutôt que subir la corvée d’un cours ? Cette armée de geeks gavés à la tablette depuis la poussette ne goûtent-ils pas la parenté entre un prof en visio et un jeu vidéo ? Ils n’en peuvent plus de la distance, de ces journées d’écran… seuls, au téléphone ou via des réseaux sociaux souvent pollués par des prophètes de malheur ayant toujours un complot à dénoncer et une rancoeur à vomir.

      Enfin, les étudiants, adeptes chaque soir de chouilles contaminantes, doivent rester éloignés autant que resteront fermés les bars dont ils sont les piliers. Ignore-t-on que la moitié de nos étudiants sont boursiers, qu’ils dépenseront leurs derniers euros à acheter un livre ou simplement des pâtes plutôt qu’à s’enfiler whisky sur vodka… ? Ignore-t-on les fêtes thématiques, les soirées littéraires, les conférences qu’ils organisent ? Quand on les côtoie, ne serait-ce qu’un peu, on mesure que leur #convivialité n’est pas celles de soudards.

      Ils survivraient sans les bars et peuvent rentrer avant qu’on les rouvre.

      Ceux qui les oublient par facilité ne les connaissent donc pas. Et c’est risqué.

      Le risque

      Le risque est pédagogique. On sait que ça décroche, partout. Les titulaires du bac sans l’avoir passé n’ont plus de repères. Leur échec est une catastrophe annoncée. Les étudiants plus aguerris ne sont pas en meilleur forme. L’#apprentissage est plus difficile, la compréhension est ralentie par l’absence d’échange. Et, alors que deux semestres consécutifs ont déjà été compromis, le premier dans l’urgence, le second par facilité, faut-il en ajouter un troisième par #lâcheté ? La moitié d’une licence gachée parce qu’on ne veut pas prendre le risque de faire confiance aux jeunes ? Les pédagogues voient venir le mur et proposent qu’on l’évite au lieu d’y foncer en klaxonnant.

      Le risque est économique. On ne confine pas les élèves en maternelle car il faut que les parents travaillent. Les étudiants ne produisent rien et peuvent se garder seuls. C’est pratique ! Mais le pari est à court terme car la génération qui paiera la dette, c’est eux. Faut-il décourager des vocations et compromettre l’insertion professionnelle de ceux qui devront avoir la force herculéenne de relever l’économie qu’on est en train de leur plomber ? Plus que jamais la #formation doit être une priorité et le soutien aux jeunes un impératif.

      Il est sanitaire. A-t-on eu des #clusters dans notre fac ? Non. Et pourtant on a fonctionné 7 semaines, avec bien moins de contaminations que dans les écoles, restées pourtant ouvertes. On sait les efforts et le sacrifice des soignants. Nul ne met en doute ce qu’ils vivent et ce qu’ils voient. Les étudiants ont eu, eux aussi, des malades et des morts. Ils savent ce qu’est la douleur. Les enseignants aussi. Mais la vie est là, encore, et il faut la préserver aussi.

      Et attention qu’à force de leur interdire les lieux dont les universités ont fait de véritables sanctuaires, on les incite aux réunions privées, à dix dans un studio juste pour retrouver un peu de partage. On sait pourtant que c’est dans la sphère privée que réside le problème. Le retour dans les #amphis, c’est la réduction du #risque_privé, et non l’amplification du #risque_public.

      Il est humain. Un étudiant n’est pas un être solitaire. Il étudie pour être utile aux autres. Il appartient toujours à une #promo, qu’en aucun cas les réseaux sociaux ne peuvent remplacer. Il voulait une #vie_étudiante faite des découvertes et des angoisses d’un début de vie d’adulte avec d’autres jeunes adultes. Ce n’est pas ce qu’on lui fait vivre, pas du tout. L’isolement le pousse au doute, sur la fac, sur les profs, sur les institutions en général, et, pire que tout, sur lui-même. La #sécurité_sanitaire conduit, chez certains, à la victoire du « à quoi bon ». Si quelques uns s’accommodent de la situation, la vérité est que beaucoup souffrent, ce qu’ils n’iront pas avouer en réunion publique quand on leur demande s’ils vont bien. Beaucoup se sentent globalement délaissés, oubliés, voire méprisés. Va-t-on continuer à leur répondre « plus tard », « un peu de patience », sans savoir jusque quand du reste, et attendre qu’on en retrouve morts ?

      Il est aussi politique. Certains étudiants ont la sensation de payer pour d’autres ; ceux qui ont affaibli l’hôpital, ceux qui n’ont pas renouvelé les masques, ceux qui ont cru à une grippette, et on en passe. Il est temps d’éviter de les culpabiliser, même indirectement.

      Pour retrouver une #confiance passablement écornée, les gouvernants doivent apprendre à faire confiance à leur peuple, au lieu de s’en défier. Les étudiants sont jeunes mais, à condition de croire que c’est une qualité, on peut parier qu’ils ne décevront personne s’ils peuvent faire leurs propres choix. N’est-ce pas à cela qu’on est censé les préparer ?

      Si la préservation des populations fragiles est un devoir que nul ne conteste, au jeu de la #fragilité, les étudiants ont la leur ; leur inexpérience et le besoin d’être guidés.

      Dans l’histoire de l’Homme, les aînés ont toujours veillé à protéger la jeune génération. Les parents d’étudiants le font dans chaque famille mais à l’échelle du pays c’est la tendance inverse. Une génération de gouvernants ignore les #jeunes pour sauver les ainés. Doit-on, pour éviter que des vies finissent trop tôt, accepter que d’autres commencent si mal ? C’est un choc de civilisation que de mettre en balance à ce point l’avenir sanitaire des uns et l’avenir professionnel des autres.

      Alors ?

      Peut-on alors revenir à l’équilibre et au bon sens ? Que ceux qui ont besoin d’être là puissent venir, et que ceux qui préfèrent la distance puissent la garder ! Que les enseignants qui veulent des gens devant eux les retrouvent et que ceux qui craindraient pour eux ou leurs proches parlent de chez eux. Peut-on enfin laisser les gens gérer la crise, en fonction des #impératifs_pédagogiques de chaque discipline, des moyens de chaque établissement, dans le respect des normes ? Les gens de terrain, étudiants, enseignants, administratifs, techniciens, ont prouvé qu’ils savent faire.

      Quand le silence vaudra l’implicite réponse « tout dépendra de la situation sanitaire », on aura compris qu’on fait passer le commerce avant le savoir, comme il passe avant la culture, et qu’on a préféré tout de suite des tiroirs caisses bien pleins plutôt que des têtes bien faites demain.

      https://academia.hypotheses.org/29817

    • Covid-19 : des universités en souffrance

      En France, les valses-hésitations et les changements réguliers de protocole sanitaire épuisent les enseignants comme les étudiants. Ces difficultés sont accentuées par un manque de vision politique et d’ambition pour les universités.

      Les années passées sur les bancs de l’université laissent en général des souvenirs émus, ceux de la découverte de l’indépendance et d’une immense liberté. La connaissance ouvre des horizons, tandis que se construisent de nouvelles relations sociales et amicales, dont certaines se prolongeront tout au long de la vie.

      Mais que va retenir la génération d’étudiants qui tente de poursuivre ses études malgré la pandémie de Covid-19 ? Isolés dans des logements exigus ou obligés de retourner chez leurs parents, livrés à eux-mêmes en raison des contraintes sanitaires, les jeunes traversent une épreuve dont ils ne voient pas l’issue. Faute de perspectives, l’épuisement prend le dessus, l’angoisse de l’échec est omniprésente, la déprime menace.

      Des solutions mêlant enseignement présentiel et à distance ont certes permis d’éviter les décrochages en masse, mais elles n’ont pas empêché l’altération de la relation pédagogique. Vissés derrière leur écran pendant parfois plusieurs heures, les étudiants pâtissent de l’absence d’échanges directs avec les professeurs, dont certains ont du mal à adapter leurs cours aux nouvelles contraintes. Faute de pouvoir transmettre leur savoir dans de bonnes conditions, certains enseignants passent du temps à faire du soutien psychologique.

      Ces difficultés sont communes à l’ensemble des établissements d’enseignement supérieur, partout dans le monde. Mais en France, elles sont accentuées par un manque de vision politique et d’ambition pour les universités et une ministre de l’enseignement supérieur, Frédérique Vidal, qui brille par sa discrétion.
      Deux vitesses dans l’enseignement supérieur

      Les universités anglo-saxonnes ont adopté des politiques plus radicales, mais qui ont le mérite de la clarté. Bon nombre d’entre elles ont décidé dès l’été que le semestre d’automne, voire toute l’année, serait entièrement en ligne. En France, les valses-hésitations et les changements réguliers de protocole sanitaire épuisent les enseignants, les empêchent de se projeter, tandis que les étudiants peinent à s’adapter sur le plan matériel, certains se retrouvant contraints de payer le loyer d’un appartement devenu inutile, alors que tous les cours sont à distance.

      La situation est d’autant plus difficile à vivre que l’enseignement supérieur avance à deux vitesses. Hormis pendant le premier confinement, les élèves des classes préparatoires et des BTS, formations assurées dans des lycées, ont toujours suivi leurs cours en présentiel. En revanche, pour l’université, c’est la double peine. Non seulement les étudiants, généralement moins favorisés sur le plan social que ceux des classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles, sont moins encadrés, mais ils sont contraints de suivre les cours en ligne. Cette rupture d’égalité ne semble émouvoir ni la ministre ni le premier ministre, qui n’a pas eu un mot pour l’enseignement supérieur lors de sa conférence de presse, jeudi 7 janvier.

      Là encore, la pandémie agit comme un révélateur de faiblesses préexistantes. Les difficultés structurelles des universités ne sont que plus visibles. Ainsi, les établissements ne parviennent pas à assumer l’autonomie qui leur a été octroyée. Obligés d’accueillir chaque année davantage d’étudiants, soumis à des décisions centralisées, ils manquent de moyens, humains et financiers, pour s’adapter. Les dysfonctionnements techniques lors des partiels, reflet d’une organisation indigente ou sous-dimensionnée, en ont encore témoigné cette semaine.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2021/01/09/covid-19-des-universites-en-souffrance_6065728_3232.html

    • Hebdo #96 : « Frédérique Vidal devrait remettre sa démission » – Entretien avec #Pascal_Maillard

      Face au danger grave et imminent qui menace les étudiants, Pascal Maillard, professeur agrégé à la faculté des lettres de l’université de Strasbourg et blogueur de longue date du Club Mediapart, considère que « l’impréparation du ministère de l’enseignement et de la recherche est criminelle ». Il appelle tous ses collègues à donner leurs cours de travaux dirigés (TD) en présentiel, même si pour cela il faut « boycotter les rectorats » !

      C’est comme si l’on sortait d’une longue sidération avec un masque grimaçant au visage. D’un cauchemar qui nous avait enfoncé dans une nuit de plus en plus noire, de plus en plus froide, sans issue. Et puis d’un coup, les étudiants craquent et on se dit : mais bon sang, c’est vrai, c’est inhumain ce qu’on leur fait vivre ! Nous abandonnons notre jeunesse, notre avenir, en leur apprenant à vivre comme des zombies.

      Depuis le début de la crise sanitaire, ils sont désocialisés, sans perspective autre que d’être collés à des écrans. Une vie numérique, les yeux éclatés, le corps en vrac et le cœur en suspens. Le mois de décembre avait pourtant redonné un peu d’espoir, Emmanuel Macron parlait de rouvrir les universités, de ne plus les sacrifier. Et puis, pschitt ! plus rien. Les fêtes sont passées et le discours du 7 janvier du premier ministre n’a même pas évoqué la question de l’enseignement supérieur. Un mépris intégral !

      Dans le Club, mais aussi fort heureusement dans de nombreux médias, la réalité catastrophique des étudiants a pris la une : ils vont mal, se suicident, pètent les plombs et décrochent en masse. De notre côté, Pascal Maillard, professeur agrégé à la faculté de lettres de l’université de Strasbourg, et blogueur infatigable depuis plus de 10 ans chez nous, a sonné la sirène d’alarme avec un premier billet, Sommes-nous encore une communauté ?, suivi quelques jours plus tard de Rendre l’Université aux étudiants, sans attendre les « décideurs », qui reprend une série de propositions formulées par le collectif RogueESR.

      Pour toucher de plus près ce qui se passe dans les universités, aux rouages souvent incompréhensibles vu de l’extérieur, mais aussi pour imaginer comment reprendre la main sur cette situation (car des solutions, il y en a !), nous lui avons passé hier soir un long coup de fil. Stimulant !

      Club Mediapart : Dans votre dernier billet, Rendre l’Université aux étudiants, sans attendre les « décideurs », vous publiez une série de propositions formulées par le collectif RogueESR pour améliorer la sécurité en vue d’une reprise des cours. Certaines exigeraient surtout du courage (réaménagement des locaux, organisation intelligente des travaux dirigés en présentiel, etc.), mais d’autres demandent des investissements matériels et financiers substantiels. Quels sont, d’après vous, les leviers possibles pour que ces propositions soient prises en compte par les instances dirigeantes ?

      Pascal Maillard : Les leviers sont multiples. Ces dernières semaines, il s’est passé quelque chose de très important : il y a eu une prise de conscience générale que l’État a abandonné l’université, les étudiants, ses personnels, alors que, dans le même temps, il subventionne l’économie à coups de milliards. Aujourd’hui, même les présidents d’université se manifestent pour dire qu’il faut en urgence faire revenir les étudiants parce que la situation est dramatique ! Je crois qu’il faut un mouvement collectif, un mouvement de masse de l’ensemble des étudiants et de la communauté universitaire pour dire : « Maintenant, ça suffit ! » L’État a aussi abandonné la culture, et c’est scandaleux car on ne peut pas vivre sans culture, mais au moins il l’a subventionnée. En revanche, pour l’université, aucune aide. On n’a rien vu, sinon !

      Club Mediapart : Avez-vous avez fait une évaluation de ces investissements et renforts humains ?

      PM : C’est vraiment très peu de moyens. Quelques dizaines de millions permettraient de financer des capteurs de CO2 (un capteur coûte 50 euros) et des filtres Hepa pour avoir une filtration sécurisée (une centaine d’euros). On peut installer également, c’est ce que préconise le collectif RogueESR (collectif informel composé d’une cinquantaine de collègues enseignants-chercheurs très actifs), des hottes aspirantes au-dessus des tables dans les lieux de restauration. Ces investissements seraient plus importants, mais ne dépasseraient pas 200/300 euros par unité. Le problème, c’est que l’État ne prend pas la décision de financer ces investissements qui permettraient de rouvrir les universités de façon plus sécurisée. Par ailleurs, il faut rappeler que certains amphithéâtres peuvent accueillir au-delà de la jauge de 50 % car ils sont très bien ventilés. Il est urgent aujourd’hui de calculer le taux de CO2, on sait le faire, on a les moyens de le faire. Ce que le collectif RoqueESR dit dans son texte et avec lequel je suis complètement d’accord, c’est que comme l’État ne veut rien faire, il faut que l’on prenne en charge ces décisions nous-mêmes.

      Club Mediapart : Dans ce billet, vous mettez le gouvernement et la bureaucratie universitaire sur le même plan. N’y a-t-il pas quand même des différences et des marges de manœuvre du côté des présidents d’université ?

      PM : Non, je crois que la grande majorité des présidents ont fait preuve de suivisme par rapport à la ligne définie par le gouvernement et Frédérique Vidal, à savoir le développement et l’exploitation maximum des ressources numériques. On n’a pas eu de filtre Hepa, mais on a eu des moyens importants pour l’informatique, les cours à distance, le développement de Moodle et des outils de visioconférence. Là, il y a eu des investissements lourds, y compris de la part du ministère, qui a lancé des appels à projets sur l’enseignement et les formations numériques. Frédérique Vidal pousse depuis de nombreuses années au tout numérique, ce n’est pas nouveau.

      Club Mediapart : Peut-on quand même attendre quelque chose de la réunion prévue ce vendredi entre les présidents d’université et Frédérique Vidal ?

      PM : Je crois que ce sont les impératifs sanitaires qui vont l’emporter. Frédérique Vidal, qui a fait preuve non seulement d’indifférence à l’égard des étudiants mais aussi d’une grande incompétence et d’un manque de fermeté pour défendre l’université, n’est plus crédible.

      Club Mediapart : Dans le fil de commentaires du dernier billet de Paul Cassia, qui montre bien comment les articles et les circulaires ministérielles ont « coincé » les directions d’université, vous proposez la réécriture de l’article 34 du décret du 10 janvier pour assouplir l’autorisation de retour en présentiel dans les universités. Cette modification ne risque-t-elle pas de reporter la responsabilité vers les présidents d’université au profit du gouvernement, qui pourrait se dédouaner encore plus de tout ce qui va se passer ?

      PM : Depuis le début, la stratégie du gouvernement est la même que celle des présidents d’université : la délégation au niveau inférieur. La ministre fait rédiger par sa bureaucratie des circulaires qui sont vagues, très pauvres, qui n’ont même pas de valeur réglementaire et qui disent en gros : c’est aux présidents de prendre leurs responsabilités. Mais que font les présidents, pour un grand nombre d’entre eux ? Afin de ne pas trop engager leur responsabilité juridique, que ce soit pour les personnels ou les étudiants, ils laissent les composantes se débrouiller. Mais les composantes ne reçoivent pas de moyens pour sécuriser les salles et pour proposer des heures complémentaires, des créations de postes, etc. Les seuls moyens qui sont arrivés dans les établissements sont destinés à des étudiants pour qu’ils aident d’autres étudiants en faisant du tutorat par groupe de 10. À l’université de Strasbourg, ça s’appelle REPARE, je crois (raccrochement des étudiants par des étudiants). Ce sont des étudiants de L3 et de masters qui sont invités à faire du tutorat pour soutenir des étudiants de L1/L2. Cela permet à des étudiants qui sont désormais malheureusement sans emploi, sans revenu, d’avoir un emploi pendant un certain temps. Ça, c’est l’aspect positif. Mais ces étudiants, il faut 1/ les recruter, 2/ il est très important de les former et de les accompagner.

      Club Mediapart : la démission de Frédérique Vidal fait-elle débat parmi les enseignants et les chercheurs ?

      PM : Frédérique Vidal nous a abandonnés, elle a aussi laissé Blanquer, qui a l’oreille de Macron, lancer sa guerre contre les « islamo-gauchistes », et puis elle a profité de la crise sanitaire pour détruire un peu plus l’université. C’est elle qui a fait passer la LPR en situation d’urgence sanitaire, alors même qu’elle avait dit pendant le premier confinement qu’il était hors de question en période d’urgence sanitaire de faire passer des réformes. La version la plus radicale en plus ! La perspective est vraiment de détruire le Conseil national des universités.

      J’ai appris hier avec une grande tristesse que Michèle Casanova, une grande archéologue, spécialiste de l’Iran, est décédée le 22 décembre. Elle s’est battue pendant un mois et demi contre le Covid. Elle était professeure des universités à Lyon, elle venait d’être nommée à Paris-Sorbonne Université. Des collègues sont morts, pas que des retraités, mais aussi des actifs.

      La ministre n’a rien dit pour les morts dans l’université et la recherche. Pas un mot. Ils sont en dessous de tout. Ils n’ont plus le minimum d’humanité que l’on attend de responsables politiques. Ils ont perdu l’intelligence et la décence, ils ont perdu la compétence et ils ne sont plus que des technocrates, des stratèges qui ne pensent qu’à leur survie politique. Ce sont des communicants, sans éthique. La politique sans l’éthique, c’est ça le macronisme.

      Aujourd’hui, les universitaires ont à l’esprit deux choses. D’une part la mise en pièces du statut des enseignants-chercheurs avec la LPR qui conduit à la destruction du Conseil national des universités : nous avons appris cette semaine que la fin de la qualification pour devenir professeur des universités étaient effective pour les maîtres de conférences titulaires, là immédiatement, sans décret d’application. Des centaines de collègues ont envoyé leur demande de qualification au CNU. Ce pouvoir bafoue tous nos droits, il bafoue le droit en permanence. D’autre part, bien sûr, les conditions calamiteuses et l’impréparation de cette rentrée. Aujourd’hui, on ne sait pas si l’on va pouvoir rentrer la semaine prochaine. On ne sait rien ! Rien n’a été préparé et je pense que c’est volontaire. Cette impréparation est politique, elle est volontaire et criminelle. Je pèse mes mots et j’assume. C’est criminel aujourd’hui de ne pas préparer une rentrée quand des milliers d’étudiants et d’enseignants sont dans la plus grande souffrance qui soit !

      Club Mediapart : Avec en plus des inégalités entre étudiants absolument incompréhensibles…

      PM : Absolument ! Les BTS et les classes préparatoires sont restés ouverts et fonctionnent à plein. Aujourd’hui, les enseignants qui préparent aux grandes écoles, que ce soit dans les domaines scientifiques ou littéraires ou les préparations aux écoles de commerce, ont la possibilité de faire toutes leurs colles jusqu’à 20 heures, avec des dérogations… devant 40/50 étudiants. Ce que l’on ne dit pas aujourd’hui, c’est que les étudiants de classe préparatoire eux aussi vont mal. Ils sont épuisés, ils n’en peuvent plus. 40 heures de cours masqués par semaine. Comment ça se vit ? Mal. Il y a pour l’instant assez peu de clusters de contamination dans les classes prépas. Les conditions sanitaires dans ces salles, souvent exiguës et anciennes, sont pourtant bien plus mauvaises que dans les grandes salles et les amphis des universités. Ces classes, qui bénéficient de moyens plus importants – un étudiant de classe prépa coûte à l’État entre 15 000 et 17 000 euros, tandis qu’un étudiant coûte entre 5 000 et 7 000 euros –, ont le droit à l’intégralité de leurs cours, tandis que les étudiants, eux, sont assignés à résidence. Il est clair que ce traitement vient élever au carré l’inégalité fondatrice du système de l’enseignement supérieur français entre classes prépas (dont les élèves appartiennent, le plus souvent, à des classes sociales plus favorisées) et universités.

      Club Mediapart : Est-ce que l’on peut s’attendre à une mobilisation importante le 26 janvier ?

      PM : Le 26 janvier sera une date importante. L’intersyndicale de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche appelle à une journée nationale de grève et de mobilisation le 26, avec un mot d’ordre clair : un retour des étudiants à l’université dans des conditions sanitaires renforcées. Mais, à mon sens, il faut accompagner cette demande de retour aux cours en présence de moyens financiers, techniques et humains conséquents. L’intersyndicale demande 8 000 postes pour 2021. On en a besoin en urgence. Il y a donc une urgence à accueillir en vis-à-vis les étudiants de L1 et L2, mais ensuite progressivement, une fois que l’on aura vérifié les systèmes de ventilation, installé des filtres Hepa, etc., il faudra accueillir le plus rapidement possible les étudiants de tous les niveaux. J’insiste sur le fait que les étudiants de Licence 3, de master et même les doctorants ne vont pas bien. Il n’y a pas que les primo-entrants qui vont mal, même si ce sont les plus fragiles. Je suis en train de corriger des copies de master et je m’en rends bien compte. Je fais le même constat pour les productions littéraires des étudiants que j’ai pu lire depuis huit mois dans le cadre d’ateliers de création littéraire. En lisant les textes de ces étudiants de L1, souvent bouleversants et très engagés, je mesure à quel point le confinement va laisser des traces durables sur elles et sur eux.

      Club Mediapart : Ce sont les thèmes traités qui vous préoccupent…

      PM : Il y a beaucoup, beaucoup de solitude, de souffrance, d’appels à l’aide et aussi l’expression forte d’une révolte contre ce que le monde des adultes est en train de faire à la jeunesse aujourd’hui. Il y a une immense incompréhension et une très grande souffrance. La question aujourd’hui, c’est comment redonner du sens, comment sortir de la peur, enrayer la psychose. Il faut que l’on se batte pour retrouver les étudiants. Les incompétents qui nous dirigent aujourd’hui sont des criminels. Et je dis aujourd’hui avec force qu’il faut démettre ces incompétents ! Frédérique Vidal devrait remettre sa démission. Elle n’est plus crédible, elle n’a aucun poids. Et si le gouvernement ne donne pas à l’université les moyens de s’équiper comme il convient pour protéger ses personnels et ses étudiants, ils porteront une responsabilité morale et politique très très lourde. Ils ont déjà une responsabilité considérable dans la gestion d’ensemble de la crise sanitaire ; ils vont avoir une responsabilité historique à l’endroit de toute une génération. Et cette génération-là ne l’oubliera pas !

      Club Mediapart : En attendant, que faire ?

      PM : Comment devenir un sujet libre, émancipé quand on est un étudiant ou un enseignant assigné à résidence et soumis à l’enfer numérique ? C’est ça la question centrale, de mon point de vue. Je ne pense pas que l’on puisse être un sujet libre et émancipé sans relation sociale, sans se voir, se rencontrer, sans faire des cours avec des corps et des voix vivantes. Un cours, c’est une incarnation, une voix, un corps donc, ce n’est pas le renvoi spéculaire de son image face à une caméra et devant des noms. Je refuse de faire cours à des étudiants anonymes. Aujourd’hui, j’ai donné rendez-vous à quelques étudiants de l’atelier de création poétique de l’université de Strasbourg. On se verra physiquement dans une grande salle, en respectant toutes les règles sanitaires. J’apporterai des masques FFP2 pour chacune et chacun des étudiants.

      Club Mediapart : Vous avez le droit ?

      PM : Je prends sur moi, j’assume. Je considère que la séance de demain est une séance de soutien. Puisque l’on a droit à faire du soutien pédagogique…

      Club Mediapart : Pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas plus de profs qui se l’autorisent ? Le texte est flou, mais il peut être intéressant justement parce qu’il est flou…

      PM : Ce qu’il est possible de faire aujourd’hui légalement, ce sont des cours de tutorat, du soutien, par des étudiants pour des étudiants. Il est aussi possible de faire des travaux pratiques, mais ces TP, il y a en surtout en sciences de la nature et beaucoup moins en sciences humaines. On a des difficultés graves en sciences sociales et sciences humaines, lettres, langue, philo, parce que l’on a zéro TP. Pour ma part, je compte demander que mes cours de L1 et mes travaux dirigés soient considérés comme des TP ! Mais, pour cela, il faut réussir à obtenir des autorisations.

      Des autorisations d’ouverture de TP, il faut le savoir, qui sont soumises aux rectorats. Les universités sont obligées de faire remonter aux rectorats des demandes d’ouverture de cours ! L’université est autonome et aujourd’hui cette autonomie est bafouée en permanence par l’État. Donc, non seulement l’État nous abandonne, l’État nous tue, mais en plus l’État nous flique, c’est-à-dire restreint nos libertés d’enseignement, de recherche, et restreint aussi nos libertés pédagogiques. Or, notre liberté pédagogique est garantie par notre indépendance, et cette indépendance a encore une valeur constitutionnelle. Tout comme notre liberté d’expression.

      Un collègue qui enseigne en IUT la communication appelle à la désobéissance civile. Le texte de RogueESR n’appelle pas explicitement à la désobéissance civile mais il dit très clairement : c’est à nous de faire, c’est à nous d’agir, avec les étudiantes et les étudiants ! Nous allons agir, on ne peut pas, si on est responsables, écrire : « Agissons » et ne pas agir ! Je dis à tous les collègues : mettons-nous ensemble pour transformer les TD en TP, qui sont autorisés, ou bien boycottons les rectorats et faisons nos TD ! Et proposons aux étudiants qui le souhaitent de venir suivre les cours en présence et aux autres qui ne le peuvent, de les suivre à distance. Avec d’autres, je vais essayer de convaincre les collègues de Strasbourg de faire du présentiel. On aura du mal, mais je pense qu’il est aujourd’hui légitime et parfaitement justifié de refuser les interdictions ministérielles parce qu’il y a des centaines et des milliers d’étudiants en danger. On a un devoir de désobéissance civile quand l’État prend des décisions qui conduisent à ce que l’on appelle, dans les CHSCT, un danger grave et imminent.

      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/edition/lhebdo-du-club/article/140121/hebdo-96-frederique-vidal-devrait-remettre-sa-demission-entretien-av

    • À propos du #brassage. #Lettre à la ministre de l’enseignement supérieur

      On pouvait s’y attendre mais c’est enfin annoncé, les universités ne réouvriront pas pour le début du second semestre. Des centaines de milliers d’étudiants vont devoir continuer à s’instruire cloitrés dans leurs 9m2, les yeux vissés à quelques petites fenêtres Zoom. Alors que des centaines de témoignages d’élèves désespérés inondent les réseaux sociaux, Frédérique Vidal, ministre de l’enseignement supérieur, a justifié ces mesures d’isolement par le « brassage » qu’impliquerait la vie étudiante avec ses pauses cafés et les « bonbons partagés avec les copains ». Un étudiant lyonnais nous a confié cette lettre de réponse à la ministre dans laquelle il insiste sur le #stress, le #vide et l’#errance qui règnent dans les campus et auxquels le gouvernement semble ne rien vouloir comprendre.

      Madame la ministre,

      Aujourd’hui, je ne m’adresse pas à vous pour vous plaindre et vous dire que je comprends votre situation. Je ne m’adresse pas à vous pour vous excuser de votre manifeste #incompétence, pire, de votre monstrueuse #indifférence à l’égard de vos administré·e·s, nous, étudiant·e·s. Je m’adresse à vous parce que vous êtes responsable de ce qu’il se passe, et vous auto congratuler à l’assemblée n’y changera rien.

      Je suis en Master 2 de philosophie, à Lyon 3. Deux étudiant·e·s de ma ville ont tenté de mettre fin à leurs jours, dans la même semaine, et tout ce que vous avez trouvé à dire, c’est : « Le problème, c’est le brassage. Ce n’est pas le cours dans l’amphithéâtre mais l’étudiant qui prend un café à la pause, un bonbon qui traîne sur la table ou un sandwich avec les copains à la cafétéria »

      Je pourrais argumenter contre vous que ce que nous voulons, c’est un espace pour travailler qui ne soit pas le même que notre espace de sommeil, de cuisine ou de repos ; ce que nous voulons, c’est pouvoir entendre et voir nos professeurs en vrai, nous débarrasser de l’écran comme interface qui nous fatigue, nous brûle les yeux et le cerveau ; ce que nous voulons, c’est avoir la certitude que ça ira mieux et qu’on va pouvoir se sortir de cette situation. Et tant d’autres choses. Mais je ne vais pas argumenter là-dessus, beaucoup l’ont déjà fait et bien mieux que je ne pourrais le faire.

      Je vais vous expliquer pourquoi aujourd’hui, il vaut mieux prendre le risque du brassage, comme vous dites, que celui, bien d’avantage réel, de la mort d’un·e étudiant·e. Nous sommes tous et toutes dans des états d’#anxiété et de stress qui dépassent largement ce qu’un être humain est capable d’endurer sur le long terme : cela fait bientôt un an que ça dure, et je vous assure que pas un·e seul·e de mes camarades n’aura la force de finir l’année si ça continue comme ça.

      Parce qu’on est seul·e·s. Dans nos appartements, dans nos chambres, nos petits 10m2, on est absolument seul·e·s. Pas d’échappatoire, pas d’air, pas de distractions, ou trop de distractions, pas d’aide à part un numéro de téléphone, pas de contacts. Des fantômes. Isolé·e·s. Oublié·e·s. Abandonné·e·s. Désespéré·e·s.

      Pour vous c’est un problème, un danger, l’étudiant·e qui prend un café à la pause ? Pour beaucoup d’entre nous c’était ce qui nous faisait tenir le coup. C’était tous ces petits moments entre, les trajets d’une salle à l’autre, les pauses café, les pauses clopes. Ces moments de discussion autour des cours auxquels on vient d’assister, ces explications sur ce que l’on n’a pas compris, les conseils et le soutien des camarades et des professeurs quand on n’y arrive pas. Toutes ces petites respirations, ces petites bulles d’air, c’était tout ça qui nous permettait de tenir le reste de la journée.

      C’était aussi le sandwich entre amis, le repas à la cafétéria ou au CROUS, pas cher, qu’on était assuré·e·s d’avoir, tandis que là, seul·e·s, manger devient trop cher, ou bien ça parait moins important. Ces moments où l’on discute, on se reprend, on s’aide, on se passe les cours, on se rassure, on se motive quand on est fatigué·e·s, on se prévoit des sessions de révision. On se parle, on dédramatise, et on peut repartir l’esprit un peu plus tranquille. Nous avons toujours eu besoin de ces moments de complicité, d’amitié et de partage, nous qui ne sommes aujourd’hui réduit·e·s qu’à des existences virtuelles depuis le mois de mars dernier. Ça fait partie des études, de ne pas étudier. D’avoir une #vie_sociale, de se croiser, de se rencontrer, de boire des cafés et manger ensemble. Supprimer cette dimension, c’est nous condamner à une existence d’#errance_solitaire entre notre bureau et notre lit, étudiant·e·s mort·e·s-vivant·e·s, sans but et sans avenir.

      Le brassage c’est tous ces moments entre, ces moments de #vie, ces #rencontres et ces #croisements, ces regards, ces dialogues, ces rires ou ces soupirs, qui donnaient du relief à nos quotidiens. Les moments entre, c’est ce qui nous permettait aussi de compartimenter, de mettre nos études dans une case et un espace désigné pour, de faire en sorte qu’elles ne débordent pas trop dans nos vies. Ce sont ces délimitations spatiales et temporelles qui maintenaient notre bonne santé mentale, notre #intérêt et notre #motivation : aujourd’hui on a le sentiment de se noyer dans nos propres vies, nos têtes balayées par des vagues de stress incessantes. Tout est pareil, tout se ressemble, tout stagne, et on a l’impression d’être bloqué·e·s dans un trou noir.

      Tout se mélange et on se noie. C’est ce qu’on ressent, tous les jours. Une sensation de noyade. Et on sait qu’autour de nous, plus personne n’a la tête hors de l’eau. Élèves comme professeurs. On crie dans un bocal depuis des mois, et personne n’écoute, personne n’entend. Au fur et à mesure, les mesures tombent, l’administration ne suit pas, nous non plus, on n’est jamais tenu·e·s au courant, on continue quand même, parce qu’on ne veut pas louper notre année. Dans un sombre couloir sans fin, on essaye tant bien que mal d’avancer mais il n’y a ni lumière, ni sortie à l’horizon. Et à la fin, on est incapables de travailler parce que trop épuisé·e·s, mais incapables aussi d’arrêter, parce que l’on se sent trop coupables de ne rien faire.

      Aujourd’hui, je m’adresse à vous au lieu de composer le dernier devoir qu’on m’a demandé pour ce semestre. Je préfère écrire ce texte plutôt que de faire comme si de rien n’était. Je ne peux plus faire semblant. J’ai envie de vomir, de brûler votre ministère, de brûler ma fac moi aussi, de hurler. Pourquoi je rendrais ce devoir ? Dans quel but ? Pour aller où ? En face de moi il y a un #brouillard qui ne fait que s’épaissir. Je dois aussi trouver un stage. Qui me prendra ? Qu’est-ce que je vais faire ? Encore du télétravail ? Encore rester tous les jours chez moi, dans le même espace, à travailler pour valider un diplôme ? Et quel diplôme ? Puis-je encore vraiment dire que je fais des études ? Tout ça ne fait plus aucun sens. C’est tout simplement absurde. On se noie dans cet océan d’#absurdité dont vous repoussez les limites jour après jour.

      Nous interdire d’étudier à la fac en demi-groupe mais nous obliger à venir tous passer un examen en présentiel en plein confinement ? Absurde. Autoriser l’ouverture des lycées, des centres commerciaux, mais priver les étudiants de leurs espaces de vie sous prétexte que le jeune n’est pas capable de respecter les mesures barrières ? Absurde. Faire l’autruche, se réveiller seulement au moment où l’on menace de se tuer, et nous fournir (encore) des numéros de téléphone en guise d’aide ? Absurde. Vous ne pouvez pas continuer de vous foutre de notre gueule comme ça. C’est tout bonnement scandaleux, et vous devriez avoir honte.

      Vous nous avez accusés, nous les #jeunes, d’être irresponsables : cela fait des mois qu’on est enfermé·e·s seul·e·s chez nous, et la situation ne s’est pas améliorée. Et nous n’en pouvons plus. Nous n’avons plus rien à quoi nous raccrocher. Je vois bien que vous, ça a l’air de vous enchanter que la population soit aujourd’hui réduite à sa seule dimension de force productive : travail, étude, rien d’autre. Pas de cinéma, pas de musées, pas de voyage, pas de temps libre, pas de manifs, pas de balades, pas de sport, pas de fêtes. Boulot, dodo. Le brassage ça vous fait moins peur dans des bureaux et sur les quais du métro hein ? Et je ne vous parle même pas de mes ami·e·s qui doivent, en prime, travailler pour se nourrir, qui vivent dans des appartements vétustes, qui n’ont pas d’ordinateur, qui n’ont pas de connexion internet, qui sont précaires, qui sont malades, qui sont à risque. Je ne vous parle même pas de Parcoursup, de la loi sur la recherche, de la tentative d’immolation d’un camarade étudiant l’année dernière. Je ne vous parle pas de cette mascarade que vous appelez « gestion de la crise sanitaire », de ces hôpitaux qui crèvent à petit feu, de ces gens qui dorment dehors, de ces gens qui meurent tous les jours parce que vous avez prêté allégeance à l’économie, à la rentabilité et à la croissance. Je ne vous parle pas non plus du monde dans lequel vous nous avez condamné·e·s à vivre, auquel vous nous reprochez de ne pas être adapté·e·s, ce monde qui se meure sous vos yeux, ce monde que vous exploitez, ce monde que vous épuisez pour vos profits.

      Je m’adresse à vous parce que vous êtes responsable de ce qu’il se passe. Je m’adresse à vous pleine de colère, de haine, de tristesse, de fatigue. Le pire, c’est que je m’adresse à vous tout en sachant que vous n’écouterez pas. Mais c’est pas grave. Les étudiant·e·s ont l’habitude.

      Rouvrez les facs. Trouvez des solutions plus concrètes que des numéros verts. Démerdez-vous, c’est votre boulot.

      PS : Et le « bonbon qui traine sur une table » ? Le seul commentaire que j’aurais sur cette phrase, c’est le constat amer de votre totale #ignorance de nos vies et du gouffre qui nous sépare. Votre #mépris est indécent.

      https://lundi.am/A-propos-du-brassage

    • Le distanciel tue

      « Le distanciel tue ! », avait écrit hier une étudiante sur sa pancarte, place de la République à Strasbourg. Macron et Vidal ont répondu ce jour aux étudiant.es, par une entreprise de communication à Saclay qui nous dit ceci : Macron est définitivement le président des 20% et Vidal la ministre du temps perdu.

      Gros malaise à l’Université Paris-Saclay, où le président Macron et la ministre Frédérique Vidal participent à une table ronde avec des étudiant.es, bien sûr un peu trié.es sur le volet. Pendant ce temps bâtiments universitaires et routes sont bouclés, les manifestants éloignés et encerclés. Voir ci-dessous le communiqué CGT, FSU, SUD éducation, SUD Recherche de l’Université Paris-Saclay. Les libertés sont une fois de plus confisquées et dans le cas présent les otages d’une entreprise de com’ qui vire au fiasco, pour ne pas dire à la farce. Attention : vous allez rire et pleurer. Peut-être un rire nerveux et des pleurs de colère. La politique de Macron appartient à un très mauvais théâtre de l’absurde, qui vire à la tragédie. Ou une tragédie qui vire à l’absurde. Nous ne savons plus, mais nous y sommes.

      Il est 13h15. Je tente de déjeuner entre deux visioconférences et quelques coups de fil urgents au sujet de collègues universitaires qui ne vont pas bien. On m’alerte par sms : Macron et Vidal à la télé ! J’alume le téléviseur, l’ordinateur sur les genoux, le portable à la main. La condition ordinaire du citoyen télétravailleur. La ministre parle aux étudiant.es. On l’attendait à l’Université de Strasbourg ce matin avec son ami Blanquer, pour les Cordées de la réussite, mais le déplacement en province du ministre de l’Education nationale a été annulé. Une lettre ouverte sur la question a circulé. La ministre est donc à Saclay. Que dit-elle ? Je prends des notes entre deux fourchettes de carottes râpées :

      « Le moment où le décret sort, il faut que ce soit au moins la veille du jour où les choses sont mises en place. » Là, je manque de m’étouffer, mais dans un réflexe salutaire je parviens à appuyer sur la touche « Enregistrement ». L’aveu est terrible, magnifique. Du Vidal dans le texte. Je pense à Jarry. Je pense à Ionesco. Je pense surtout aux dizaines de milliers de personnels des universités qui, à dix reprises depuis le début de cette gestion calamiteuse et criminelle de cette crise, se sont retrouvés vraiment dans cette situation : devoir appliquer du jour au lendemain le décret ou la circulaire de la ministre. Samedi et dimanche derniers, des centaines de collègues à l’université de Strasbourg et des milliers partout en France ont travaillé comme des brutes pour « préparer » la rentrée du 18. Le décret date du 15 et a été publié le 16 ! Des centaines de milliers d’étudiants paniquaient sans information. Criminel !

      Mais la ministre continue :

      « Tout le monde sera ravi d’accélérer l’étape d’après ». Nous aussi, mais on ne sait pas comment faire.

      « Sur le calendrier, c’est difficile .. » Effectivement.

      « Moi, j’ai des débuts d’année - des débuts de second semestre, pardon - qui s’échelonnent quelque part … ». Quelque part … La ministre fait-elle encore ses cours à l’Université de Nice ?

      Là, Macron sent que ça dérape vraiment et coupe Frédérique Vidal. Il a raison. Tant qu’il y est, il ferait bien de lui demander sa démission. Il rendra service à l’université, à la recherche, à la jeunesse, au pays. Et il sauvera peut-être des vies. Après avoir accompli cette action salutaire, il nous rendra aussi service en tentant d’être président à plus de 20%. « 20% en présentiel, dit-il, mais jamais plus de 20%, l’équivalent d’un jour par semaine ». Le président est un peu déconnecté des réalités de la gestion d’une faculté au pays du distanciel, de l’Absurdistan et du démerdentiel. Pour bien comprendre les choses en étant "pratico-pratique" comme dit Macron, voilà de quoi il retourne : les enseignants et les scolarités (personnels administratifs dévoués et épuisés qui n’en peuvent plus et qu’on prend pour des chèvres) doivent organiser et gérer les TD de 1ère année à la fois en présence et à distance pour un même groupe, les CM à distance, et articuler le tout dans un emploi du temps hebdomadaire qui n’oblige pas les étudiants à entrer chez eux pour suivre un TD ou un CM à distance après avoir suivi un TP ou un TD en présence. Et désormais il faudrait entrer dans la moulinette les 20% en présence pour tous les niveaux : L1, L2, L3, M1, M2. Une pure folie. Mais pas de problème, Macron a la solution : « C’est à vos profs de gérer », dit-il aux étudiants. Le président en disant ceci pourrait bien devoir gérer quelques tentatives de suicide supplémentaires. Pour les étudiant.es cette folie se traduit par une résignation au "distanciel" et toutes ses conséquences pathologiques, ou un quotidien complètement ingérable dans l’éclatement entre la distance et l’absence. Dites à un individu qu’il doit être présent dans la distance et distant dans la présence, faites-lui vivre cela pendant des mois, et vous êtes assuré qu’il deviendra fou. L’Etat fabrique non seulement de la souffrance individuelle et collective, mais aussi de la folie, une folie de masse.

      La suite confirmera que Macron et Vidal ont le même problème avec le temps, un gros problème avec le temps. L’avenir est au passé. Le président dira ceci : « Evidemment il y aura des protocoles sanitaires très stricts » pour le second semestre. Le second semestre a débuté dans la majorité des universités. Mais, pas de problème : « Evidemment ce que je dis, c’est pour dans 15 jours à trois semaines ». Les 20 % et tout le tralala. Dans 15 jours on recommence tout et on se met au travail tout de suite pour préparer la 11ème révolution vidalienne ? Le président n’a pas compris que Vidal a fait de l’Université une planète désorbitée ...

      Nous sommes de plus en plus nombreux à penser et dire ceci : « Ils sont fous, on arrête tout, tout de suite ! On sauve des vies, on désobéit ! ». Dans certaines universités, il y des mots d’ordre ou des demandes de banalisation des cours pour la semaine prochaine. Lors de l’AG d’hier à l’Université de Strasbourg, étudiant.es et personnels ont voté cette demande. Il faut tout banaliser avant que l’insupportable ne devienne banal ! Il nous faut nous rapprocher, limiter le "distanciel". Il n’y a aucun ciel dans les capsules et les pixels. Nous avons besoin de présence et pour cela il faut des moyens pour améliorer la sécurité sanitaire des universités.

      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/pascal-maillard/blog/210121/le-distanciel-tue

    • –-> Comment la ministre elle-même découvre l’annonce du président de la République d’un retour à l’Université de tous les étudiants 1 jour /5 (et qui annule la circulaire qui faisait rentrer les L1) lors de sa visite Potemkine à Paris-Saclay...
      Le 21 janvier donc, quand le semestre a déjà commencé...


      https://twitter.com/rogueESR/status/1353014523784015872

      Vidal dit, texto, je transcris les mots qu’elle prononce dans la vidéo :

      « Là j’ai bien entendu la visite du président, donc si l’idée c’est qu’on puisse faire revenir l’ensemble des étudiants sur l’ensemble des niveaux avec des jauges à 20% ou 1/5 de temps, ou... les universités ça, par contre... je vais le leur... dire et nous allons travailler ensemble à faire en sorte que ce soit possible, parce qu’effectivement c’était l’étape d’après, mais je pense que tout le monde sera ravi d’accélérer l’étape d’après parce que c’était quelque chose que je crois c’était vraiment demandé »

      –---

      Circulaire d’Anne-Sophie Barthez du 22 janvier 2021

      Au Journal officiel du 23/1/2021, un #décret modifiant le décret COVID, qui entre en vigueur immédiatement, sans mention des universités, ni modification de l’article 34 34 du décret du 29 oct. 2020 au JO. La circulaire du 22 janvier 2021 de la juriste Anne-Sophie Barthez, DGSIP, ci-dessous est donc illégale.


      https://academia.hypotheses.org/30306

      –---

      On se croirait au cirque... ou dans un avion sans pilote.

  • Why the Dancing Robots Are a Really, Really Big Problem. | by James J. Ward | The Startup | Dec, 2020 | Medium
    https://medium.com/swlh/why-the-dancing-robots-are-a-really-really-big-problem-4faa22c7f899

    Yes, the cynical view is probably right (at least in part), but that’s not what makes this video so problematic, in my view. The real issue is that what you’re seeing is a visual lie. The robots are not dancing, even though it looks like they are. And that’s a big problem.

    Humans dance for all kinds of reasons. We dance because we’re happy or angry, we dance to be part of a community or we do it by ourselves, we dance as part of elaborate rituals or because Bruce Springsteen held out a hand to us at a concert. Dancing, in fact, is one of the things that humans have in common across cultures, geographies, and time — we love to dance, and whenever we do it, it’s because we are taking part in an activity we understand to have some kind of meaning, even if we don’t know what it is. Perhaps that’s the point, how can we even explain dancing? As Isadora Duncan once said, “If I could tell you what it meant there would be no point in dancing it.”

    Robots, though? Robots don’t dance. That’s not some sort of critique of a robot or shade-throwing. I don’t criticize my hammer for not being able to recite Seamus Heaney. Tools serve functions and move in the ways designed or concocted for them — but they have no innerworldly life that swells and expresses itself in dancing. We might like to anthropomorphize them, imbue them with humanness largely because we do that to everything. We talk to our toasters and cut deals with our cars (“Just make it ten more miles!”) because we relate to a world filled with things made by humans as though that world was filled with humans, or at least things with a little humanity. And so when we watch the video, we see robots moving in a way that we sometimes do or wish we could, we experience the music, the rhythmic motion, the human-like gestures, and they all combine to give us an impression of joyfulness, exuberance, and idea that we should love them, now that they can dance.

    But they can’t.

    No, robots don’t dance: they carry out the very precise movements that their — exceedingly clever — programmers design to move in a way that humans will perceive as dancing. It is a simulacrum, a trompe l’oeil, a conjurer’s trick. And it works not because of something inherent in the machinery, but because of something inherent in ours: our ever-present capacity for finding the familiar. It looks like human dancing, except it’s an utterly meaningless act, stripped of any social, cultural, historical, or religious context, and carried out as a humblebrag show of technological might. Also: the robots are terrible at doing the Mashed Potato.

    The moment we get high-functioning, human-like robots we sexualize them or force them to move in ways that we think are entertaining, or both. And this is where the ethics become so crucial. We don’t owe a robot human rights; they aren’t human, and we should really be spending our time figuring out how to make sure that humans have human rights. But when we allow, celebrate, and laugh at things like this Boston Dynamics video, we’re tacitly approving a view of the world where domination and control over pseudo-humans becomes increasingly hard to distinguish from the same desire for domination and control over actual humans.

    Any ethical framework would tell you this is troubling. You don’t need to know your consequentialism from your deontology to understand that cultivating and promoting a view of the world where “things that are human-like but less human than I am get to be used however I want” will be a problem.

    #Robots #Intelligence_artificielle #Danse #Ethique #Culture_numérique

    • voir peut-être aussi Stiegler (2016) :

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/les-nuits-de-france-culture/la-nuit-revee-de-jean-pierre-vincent-2017-69-bernard-stiegler-je-refle

      Je réfléchis au rapport entre la technique et le mal […] Adorno et Horkheimer en 1944 disent que les industries culturelles sont en train de produire une nouvelle forme de barbarie. […] Ils soutiennent qu’à travers les industries culturelles, la raison se transforme en rationalisation, ce qui signifie pour moi la réduction de la raison au calcul, à la calculabilité. Ils montrent comment s’instaure un système qui est apparu dès les années 20 aux Etats-Unis, et qui va considérablement s’étendre avec la télévision. Il s’agit d’un système entre la production automatisée des automobiles, la consommation et la crétinisation qui va s’instaurer, d’après eux, avec les industries dites de programmes.

      Ce processus va bien plus loin encore selon moi avec les technologies numériques, ce qu’on appelle la data économie, mais je pense qu’il faut rouvrir ce dossier sur d’autres bases que celles de Adorno et Horkheimer (…) Nous vivons nous au 21ème siècle une véritable révolution des conditions de la pensée par une exploitation désormais absolument systématique des capacités de calcul artificiel qui est en train de totalement bouleverser notre horizon de pensée.

  • “I started crying”: Inside Timnit Gebru’s last days at Google | MIT Technology Review
    https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/12/16/1014634/google-ai-ethics-lead-timnit-gebru-tells-story

    By now, we’ve all heard some version of the story. On December 2, after a protracted disagreement over the release of a research paper, Google forced out its ethical AI co-lead, Timnit Gebru. The paper was on the risks of large language models, AI models trained on staggering amounts of text data, which are a line of research core to Google’s business. Gebru, a leading voice in AI ethics, was one of the only Black women at Google Research.

    The move has since sparked a debate about growing corporate influence over AI, the long-standing lack of diversity in tech, and what it means to do meaningful AI ethics research. As of December 15, over 2,600 Google employees and 4,300 others in academia, industry, and civil society had signed a petition denouncing the dismissal of Gebru, calling it “unprecedented research censorship” and “an act of retaliation.”

    The company’s star ethics researcher highlighted the risks of large language models, which are key to Google’s business.
    Gebru is known for foundational work in revealing AI discrimination, developing methods for documenting and auditing AI models, and advocating for greater diversity in research. In 2016, she cofounded the nonprofit Black in AI, which has become a central resource for civil rights activists, labor organizers, and leading AI ethics researchers, cultivating and highlighting Black AI research talent.

    Then in that document, I wrote that this has been extremely disrespectful to the Ethical AI team, and there needs to be a conversation, not just with Jeff and our team, and Megan and our team, but the whole of Research about respect for researchers and how to have these kinds of discussions. Nope. No engagement with that whatsoever.

    I cried, by the way. When I had that first meeting, which was Thursday before Thanksgiving, a day before I was going to go on vacation—when Megan told us that you have to retract this paper, I started crying. I was so upset because I said, I’m so tired of constant fighting here. I thought that if I just ignored all of this DEI [diversity, equity, and inclusion] hypocrisy and other stuff, and I just focused on my work, then at least I could get my work done. And now you’re coming for my work. So I literally started crying.

    You’ve mentioned that this is not just about you; it’s not just about Google. It’s a confluence of so many different issues. What does this particular experience say about tech companies’ influence on AI in general, and their capacity to actually do meaningful work in AI ethics?
    You know, there were a number of people comparing Big Tech and Big Tobacco, and how they were censoring research even though they knew the issues for a while. I push back on the academia-versus-tech dichotomy, because they both have the same sort of very racist and sexist paradigm. The paradigm that you learn and take to Google or wherever starts in academia. And people move. They go to industry and then they go back to academia, or vice versa. They’re all friends; they are all going to the same conferences.

    I don’t think the lesson is that there should be no AI ethics research in tech companies, but I think the lesson is that a) there needs to be a lot more independent research. We need to have more choices than just DARPA [the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency] versus corporations. And b) there needs to be oversight of tech companies, obviously. At this point I just don’t understand how we can continue to think that they’re gonna self-regulate on DEI or ethics or whatever it is. They haven’t been doing the right thing, and they’re not going to do the right thing.

    I think academic institutions and conferences need to rethink their relationships with big corporations and the amount of money they’re taking from them. Some people were even wondering, for instance, if some of these conferences should have a “no censorship” code of conduct or something like that. So I think that there is a lot that these conferences and academic institutions can do. There’s too much of an imbalance of power right now.

    #Intelligence_artificielle #Timnit_Gebru #Google #Ethique

  • Open letter to the European Commission calling for clear regulatory red lines to prevent uses of artificial intelligence which violate core fundamental rights

    In 2020, EDRi, its members, and many other civil society organisations have investigated several harmful uses of artificial intelligence which, unless restricted, will have a severe implication on individual and collective rights and democracy.

    We believe that, in addition to safeguards which can hope to improve the process of AI design, development and deployment, there is a need for clear, regulatory red lines for uses of AI which are incompatible with our fundamental rights. From uses which enable mass surveillance, the overpolicing of racialised and migrant communities, and exacerbate existing power imbalances, such uses are impermissable must be curtailed in order to prevent abuse. We, in particular draw attention to the harmful impact of uses of AI at the border and in migration management.

    The European Commission has made indications that it is still considering regulatory red lines in some form as part of its AI regulatory proposal (expected Q1 2021). As such, we have prepared the attached open letter for publication on the 11th January.

    If you would like the name of your organisation to be attached to the letter, please let us know by 7th January 2021 (17.00 CET).

    The list of signatory organisations will be updated via this Etherpad: https://pad.riseup.net/p/r.dd8356ea3e6e1b74b6dde570440d359b

    https://edri.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Case-studies-Impermissable-AI-biometrics-September-2020.pdf

    Contenu de la lettre:
    Open letter: Civil society call for AI red lines in the European Union’s Artificial Intelligence proposal

    We the undersigned, write to restate the vital importance of clear regulatory red lines to prevent uses of artificial intelligence which violate core fundamental rights. As we await the regulatory proposal on artificial intelligence this quarter, we emphasise that such measures form a necessary part of a fundamental rights-based artificial intelligence regulation.

    Europe has an obligation under the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union to ensure that each person’s rights to privacy, data protection, free expression and assembly, non-discrimination, dignity and other fundamental rights are not unduly restricted by the use of new and emerging technologies. Without appropriate limitations on the use of AI-based technologies, we face the risk of violations of our rights and freedoms by governments and companies alike.

    Europe has the opportunity to demonstrate to the world that true innovation can arise only when we can be confident that everyone will be protected from the most harmful and the most egregious violations of fundamental rights. Europe’s industry - from AI developers to car manufacturing companies - will benefit greatly from the regulatory certainty that comes from clear legal limits and an even playing field for fair competition.

    Civil society across Europe - and the world - have called attention to the need for regulatory limits on deployments of artificial intelligence that can unduly restrict human rights. It is vital that the upcoming regulatory proposal unequivocally addresses the enabling of mass surveillance and monitoring public spaces; exacerbating structural discrimination, exclusion and collective harms; impeding access to vital services such as health-care and social security; impeding fair access to justice and procedural rights; uses of systems which make inferences and predictions about our most sensitive characteristics, behaviours and thoughts; and, crucially, the manipulation or control of human behaviour and the associated threats to human dignity, agency, and collective democracy.

    In particular, we call attention to specific (but not exhaustive) examples of uses that, as our research has demonstrated, are incompatible with a democratic society, and must thus be prohibited or legally restricted in the AI legislation:

    Biometric mass surveillance:

    Uses of biometric surveillance technologies to process the indiscriminately or arbitrarily-collected data of people in public or publicly-accessible spaces (for example, remote facial recognition) creates a strong perception of mass surveillance and a ‘chilling effect’ on people’s fundamental rights and freedoms. In this resepct it is important to note that deployment of biometric mass surveillance in public or publicly accessible spaces brings along, per definition, indiscriminate processing of biometric data. Moreover, because of a psychological ‘chilling’ effect, people might feel inclined to adapt their behaviour to a certain norm. Thus, such use of biometric mass surveillance intrudes the psychological integrity and well-being of individuals, in addition to the violation of a vast range of fundamental rights. As emphasised in EU data protection legislation and case law, such uses are not necessary or proportionate to the aim sought, and should therefore be clearly prohibited in the AI legislation. This will ensure that law enforcement, national authorities and private entities cannot abuse the current wide margin of exception and discretion for national governments. Moreover, because of a psychological ‘chilling’ effect, people might feel inclined to adapt their behaviour to a certain norm. Thus, such use of biometric mass surveillance intrudes the psychological integrity and well-being of individuals,

    Predictive policing:

    Uses of predictive modelling to forecast where, and by whom, a narrow type of crimes are likely to be committed repeatedly score poor, working class, racialised and migrant communities with a higher likelihood of presumed future criminality. As highlighted by the European Parliament, deployment of such predictive policing can result in “grave misuse”. The use of apparently “neutral” factors such as postal code in practice serve as a proxy for race and other protected characteristics, reflecting histories of over-policing of certain communities, exacerbating racial biases and affording false objectivity to patterns of racial profiling. A number of predictive policing systems have been demonstrated to disproportionately include racialised people, in complete disaccord with actual crime rates. Predictive policing systems undermine the presumption of innocence and other due process rights by treating people as individually suspicious based on inferences about a wider group.

    Uses of AI at the border and in migration control:

    The increasing examples of AI deployment in the field of migration control pose a growing threat to the fundamental rights of migrants, to EU law, and to human dignity. Among other worrying use cases, AI is being tested to detect lies for the purposes of immigration applications at European borders and to monitor deception in English language tests through voice analysis, all of which lack credible scientific basis. In addition, EU migration policies are increasingly underpinned by the proposed or actual use of AI, such as facial recognition, algorithmic profiling and prediction tools within migration management processes, including for forced deporatation. All such uses infringe on data protection rights, the right to privacy, the right to non-discrimination, and several principles of international migration law, including the right to seek asylum. Furthermore, the significant power imbalance that such deployments exacerbate and exploit should trigger the strongest conditions possible for such systems in border and migration control.

    Social scoring and AI systems determining access to social rights and benefits

    AI systems have been deployed in various contexts threatening the allocation of social and economic rights and benefits. For example, in the areas of welfare resource allocation, eligibility assessment and fraud detection, the deployment of AI to predict risk greatly impacts people’s access to vital public services and has grave potential impact on the fundamental right to social security and social assistance. This is in particular due to the likelihood of discriminatory profiling, mistaken results and the inherent fundamental rights risks associated with processing of sensitive biometric data. A number of examples demonstrate how automated decision making systems are negatively impacting and targeting poor, migrant and working class people. In a famous case, the Dutch government deployed SyRI, a system to detect fraudulent behaviour by creating risk profiles of individual benefits claimants. Further,the Polish government has used data-driven systems to profile unemployed people, with severe implications for data protection and non-discrimination rights. Further, uses in the context of employment and education have highlighted severe instances of worker and student surveillance, as well as harmful systems involving social scoring with severe implications for fundamental rights.

    Use of risk assessment tools for offenders’ classification in the criminal justice system

    The use of algorithms in criminal justice matters to profile individuals within legal decision-making processes presents severe threats to fundamental rights. Such tools base their assessments on a vast collection of personal data unrelated to the defendants’ alleged misconduct. This collection of personal data for the purpose of predicting the risk of recidivism cannot be perceived as necessary nor proportional to the perceived purpose. Consequently, such interference with the right to respect for private life and the presumption of innocence cannot be considered necessary or proportionate. In addition, substantial evidence has shown that the introduction such systems in criminal justice systems in Europe and elsewhere has resulted in unjust and discriminatory outcomes. Beyond biased outcomes, it may be impossible for legal professionals,to understand the reasoning behind the outcomes of the system. For these reasons, we argue that legal limits must be imposed on AI risk assessment systems in the criminal justice context.

    These examples illustrate the need for an ambitious artificial intelligence proposal in 2021 which foregrounds people’s rights and freedoms. We look forward to a legislation which puts people first, and await to hear your response about how the AI proposal will address the concerns outlined in this letter. We thank you for your consideration, and are available at your convenience to discuss these issues should it be helpful

    #AI #intelligence_artificielle #lettre_ouverte #droits_fondamentaux #droits_humains

    ping @etraces

  • How global tech companies enable the Belarusian regime — and the Belarusian revolution
    https://globalvoices.org/2020/12/15/how-global-tech-companies-enable-the-belarusian-regime-and-the-belarus

    Can anything be done against companies whose tools facilitate repression ? Belarusians continue to protest against longtime ruler Alyaksandr Lukashenka, braving police violence and the cold. As the EU prepares its third package of sanctions against Belarusian officials and enterprises, demands are growing for the West to apply greater economic pressure, in particular to consider banning the supply of certain IT products. Could such sanctions really work ? It’s true that disentangling the (...)

    #Broadcom #Intel #Nvidia #Oracle #Sandvine/Procera #Seagate #DeepPacketInspection-DPI #activisme #finance #surveillance (...)

    ##Sandvine/Procera ##GlobalVoices

  • La maire de Marseille, Michèle Rubirola, annonce démissionner pour raisons de santé
    https://www.lemonde.fr/politique/article/2020/12/15/la-maire-de-marseille-michele-rubirola-annonce-sa-demission_6063475_823448.h

    Où l’on apprend que #Rubirola n’aime pas la tambouille électorale :

    « Benoît et moi, c’est un peu le yin et le yang. Il est très politique ; moi, je n’apprécie pas la tambouille électorale. Fonctionner en binôme, déléguer, faire confiance, c’est une vision écolo de la politique. J’aimerais porter une autre façon d’être maire »

    #Marseille

    • Sa démission était annoncé mi-octobre par le même journal
      « Tu es au courant que je ne reste que trois mois ? » : à Marseille, les débuts déroutants de Michèle Rubirola
      https://www.lemonde.fr/politique/article/2020/10/14/tu-es-au-courant-que-je-ne-reste-que-trois-mois-a-marseille-les-debuts-derou

      Elue en juin, la maire écologiste s’interrogeait encore en octobre sur son rôle et laissait alors souvent la main à son premier adjoint, #Benoît_Payan.

      Qui est Benoit Payan, le futur plus jeune maire de Marseille ?
      https://www.challenges.fr/politique/benoit-payan-l-interi-maire_742197

      Depuis juillet dernier, Benoit Payan était maire officieux de Marseille. Il pourrait être, lundi prochain, maire officiel, ce qui aura le mérite de simplifier les choses. A 42 ans, il serait le plus jeune maire de Marseille, coiffant un autre socialiste, Gaston Deferre, au poteau d’une année – ce dernier ayant été élu à 43 ans.

      Benoît Payan
      https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benoît_Payan

      Désolé, cette page a été récemment supprimée (dans les dernières 24 heures)

      15 décembre 2020 à 16:49 Cédric Boissière discuter contributions a protégé Benoît Payan [Créer=Autoriser uniquement les administrateurs] (expire le 18 décembre 2020 à 16:49) (Attendons son élection)

      15 décembre 2020 à 16:49 Cédric Boissière discuter contributions a supprimé la page Benoît Payan (Ne répond pas aux critères d’admissibilité)

      15 décembre 2020 à 16:33 Wikisud82 discuter contributions a créé la page Benoît Payan (Nouvelle page : ’’’Benoît Payan’’’ est un homme politique français. Premier adjoint à la maire de Marseille Michèle Rubirola de juillet à décembre 2020, il assure ces fonctions par…) Balises : Modification par mobile Modification par le web mobile Modification sur mobile avancée

      24 juillet 2020 à 15:11 Enrevseluj discuter contributions a supprimé la page Benoît Payan (Décision communautaire)

      24 juillet 2020 à 15:01 Axelcortes13 discuter contributions a créé la page Benoît Payan (Création de la Page et de 3 sections plus d’une Infobox) Balise : Éditeur visuel

      2 février 2020 à 14:59 OT38 discuter contributions a supprimé la page Benoît Payan (Page supprimée suite à une décision communautaire)

      [je vois pas plus d’historique, ndc]

      Pas du coin, sauf brèves incursions, je suis certain qu’on entendra du "Cochon de Payan", du " Payan ! Au bagne !" et d’autres compliments idoines dans la ville un de ces quatre. Mais peut-être en existe-t-il déjà ?
      #PS

    • Municipales à Marseille : les raisons du succès de l’écologiste Michèle Rubirola , Gilles Rof (Marseille, correspondant) et Solenn de Royer, 01 août 2020, Màj le 04 août 2020
      https://www.lemonde.fr/politique/article/2020/08/01/municipales-marseille-les-raisons-du-succes-de-l-ecologiste-michele-rubirola

      Une note de la Fondation Jean-Jaurès, que dévoile « Le Monde », met en évidence le rôle joué par une « classe moyenne et supérieure éduquée » dans la victoire du Printemps marseillais.

      Et « l’inconcevable » se produisit à Marseille. Médecin et conseillère départementale écologiste, Michèle Rubirola, âgée de 63 ans, totalement inconnue du grand public il y a six mois, a été élue maire de la deuxième ville de France, le 4 juillet, après vingt-cinq ans de règne de Jean-Claude Gaudin. Comment ce basculement historique a-t-il pu se produire et pourquoi ? Dans une épaisse note dévoilée par Le Monde, intitulée « Comment la gauche néomarseillaise a éjecté la bourgeoisie locale ? » , la Fondation Jean-Jaurès – qui s’est penchée sur les résultats des deux tours des élections municipales – donne quelques clés.

      Le think tank progressiste [et youplaboum] analyse ainsi la montée en puissance de la « gauche culturelle » dans cette commune de 870 000 habitants, dont une partie s’est renouvelée au cours des dernières années. S’ils concèdent que la #gentrification reste un phénomène « homéopathique (…) peu susceptible de faire bouger les équilibres locaux » , et qu’il serait « absurde d’attribuer aux seuls #néo-Marseillais la victoire » de Michèle Rubirola, le géographe Sylvain Manternach et l’essayiste Jean-Laurent Cassely soulignent le « rôle moteur » joué par une « classe moyenne et supérieure éduquée » dans le succès du Printemps marseillais.

      Comme à Lyon ou à Bordeaux, qui ont vu le triomphe des écologistes, un électorat « rajeuni, culturellement favorisé et mobile » a eu raison d’un électorat de notables, plus âgés et installés dans les beaux quartiers, ou alors issus de la petite bourgeoisie. Le vote pour le Printemps marseillais a été ainsi d’autant plus fort dans les quartiers qui ont vu leur population changer depuis une quinzaine d’années, notent les auteurs de la note. Les trois arrondissements qui ont connu un renouvellement de plus de 30 % de leur électorat (le 1er, le 6e et le 2e) ont tous les trois donné au Printemps marseillais des scores supérieurs à 30 % au premier tour, soit 6 points au-dessus de sa moyenne (23,44 %).

      Elan de centre-ville, militant et dégagiste

      L’arrondissement le plus renouvelé, le 1er, est celui qui offre au Printemps marseillais son meilleur score, avec une majorité absolue de 54,7 % des voix dès le premier tour, écrivent Sylvain Manternach et Jean-Laurent Cassely. A l’inverse, poursuivent-ils, dans les arrondissements d’« autochtones », « là où une plus forte part des électeurs est restée stable par rapport à la précédente élection, le score du Printemps marseillais est de 7 à 9 points en dessous de sa moyenne de premier tour ».

      L’analyse de la Fondation Jean-Jaurès relève également avec justesse [oh ben dis donc] que le Printemps marseillais a obtenu ses meilleurs scores dans les quartiers les plus centraux de la ville – un territoire clairement défini qui chevauche les 1e, 5e et 6e arrondissements. Le 1er est « peuplé d’#étudiants et d’#intellectuels_précaires » , le 5e a été gagné par le processus de gentrification et le 6e est plus bourgeois. « C’est aussi dans ces quartiers et arrondissements que réside une #classe_moyenne alternative à la petite bourgeoisie traditionnelle votant à droite », observent les auteurs de la note.

      Dans l’hypercentre, l’émergence d’une force politique homogène traduit « un vote de militants de gauche, porté par les populations diplômées et d’intellos précaires du centre-ville, proches des nombreux collectifs et associations bâtis autour de l’écologie, de la mixité sociale, de l’aménagement urbain ». Un vote qui, dans un contexte d’#abstention « historiquement élevée » – 64 % au second tour à Marseille –, voit son poids électoral prendre « une importance stratégique jamais acquise dans un scrutin jusqu’à présent ».

      L’analyse des bureaux les plus favorables au Printemps marseillais fait clairement émerger un cercle d’un ou deux kilomètres de diamètre dont l’épicentre est le quartier de #la_Plaine. Dans cette zone d’habitat dense, où prédominent les immeubles typiques en « trois fenêtres marseillais » , prisés par les nouveaux arrivants, une dizaine de bureaux ont voté à près de 80 % pour les listes de Michèle Rubirola au second tour. De cet élan de centre-ville, militant et dégagiste, la Fondation Jean-Jaurès différencie un vote d’adhésion au Printemps marseillais plus centriste, dont une partie est « Macron-compatible » .

      Rejet de l’équipe sortante

      « Un vote émanant de quartiers préservés qui subissent de plein fouet l’urbanisation et la #bétonisation de Marseille, lié à une population nouvellement arrivée qui, installée dans les quartiers de bord de mer, se confronte géographiquement et socialement à la bourgeoisie locale historique dont elle ne partage ni les valeurs ni la vision de la ville », explique la Fondation. Une bourgeoisie de néo-Marseillais « plus moderne et plus mobile » qui rêve d’une ville enfin en phase avec ses attentes dans les domaines de la propreté, du transport et du confort urbain.

      Les quartiers qui donnent de très bons scores au Printemps marseillais sont aussi ceux où s’est cristallisé le rejet de l’équipe sortante, dont Martine Vassal, la candidate Les Républicains, est l’héritière. Les arrondissements du centre-ville ont vécu très directement deux des crises majeures du dernier mandat du maire sortant, Jean-Claude Gaudin. D’une part, les effondrements de la #rue_d’Aubagne, le 5 novembre 2018, qui ont fait huit morts et ouvert une crise du logement indigne frappant directement près de 4 000 délogés – et donc beaucoup d’électeurs –, notamment en centre-ville.

      Mais aussi la « bataille de la Plaine », affaire plus locale mais à la forte capacité de mobilisation. Une violente polémique autour d’un projet de rénovation de la place Jean-Jaurès (6e), brutalement imposé par la municipalité. Le chantier, débuté en octobre 2018, est toujours en cours. Il a transformé ce lieu de vie du centre-ville alternatif en un chaos de travaux à ciel ouvert qui n’a fait qu’accentuer la colère des habitants contre l’équipe en place. Le poids de cette opération d’aménagement controversée se lit dans les résultats du premier tour. Avec un électorat moins renouvelé que celui des quartiers voisins (26,73 % de nouveaux inscrits de plus de 24 ans), la Plaine a donné au Printemps marseillais un de ses meilleurs scores (41,7 %).

      L’étude du vote dans le 3e secteur, remporté par Michèle Rubirola en personne, est sûrement celle qui apporte le plus de valeur à l’analyse de la Fondation Jean-Jaurès. On y voit le poids du Printemps marseillais dans une trame de rues en complète transformation dont la colonne vertébrale est le boulevard Chave. Cette artère jusqu’alors somnolente voit éclore, depuis quelques années, bars et restaurants nocturnes, épiceries paysannes et commerces branchés.

      Basculement géographique inédit

      Le vote pour le sénateur Bruno Gilles (ex-Les Républicains, LR), vainqueur sans discontinuer des municipales dans ce secteur depuis 1995, apparaît comme repoussé vers une ceinture périphérique, par l’avancée de ce « nouveau Marseille ». Il illustre un « Marseille d’avant » qui s’appuie plus fortement sur des réseaux traditionnels, notamment à travers les comités d’intérêt de quartier, les clubs de boulistes ou de sport. Ce territoire prend naissance au-delà du Jarret, sorte de périphérique marseillais, et des voies de la gare Saint-Charles, et reste encore à l’écart du nouvel épicentre dynamique. L’étude observe ainsi « une ligne de séparation assez nette entre le Marseille dense des immeubles anciens, qui vote à gauche, et un Marseille périphérique, pavillonnaire et des immeubles plus récents, résidences ou grands ensembles, au nord et à l’est ».

      Les auteurs observent en revanche que « l’élan réformateur du Printemps marseillais » a rencontré moins d’écho dans le sud de la ville, « où s’est installée de longue date une #bourgeoisie plus économique que culturelle », ou à l’est, « où s’épanouit une version plus périurbaine de la vie marseillaise ». Même si certaines enclaves du sud, notamment autour du port de la Pointe-Rouge, que l’étude définit comme un « micromarché immobilier très prisé des nouveaux arrivants », se sont montrées plus favorables au changement. Il s’agit d’un basculement géographique inédit du centre de gravité de la gauche marseillaise.

      A l’échelle de la ville, outre la rupture entre nord et sud, encore clairement visible à travers le vote favorable à Martine Vassal au premier tour, concentré au sud d’une ligne prolongeant le Vieux-Port, c’est une opposition entre gauche de centre-ville et droite périphérique que dessine la victoire de Michèle Rubirola. Les quartiers qui votent LR sont « pour la plupart moins denses, peu mixtes socialement et ethniquement et adoptent un modèle périurbain » qui s’appuie sur l’utilisation de la voiture.
      Reflet de cette « gauche de centre-ville », le Printemps marseillais n’a d’ailleurs pas convaincu le gros de l’électorat populaire, notamment celui des #quartiers_nord de Marseille. A l’instar des autres métropoles, dans lesquelles les listes écologistes et citoyennes ont fait campagne, le discours des candidats du Printemps marseillais s’est principalement adressé aux habitants plutôt favorisés, en tout cas culturellement, et vivant dans le centre-ville. « Les militants des listes écologistes et citoyennes n’ont pas su appréhender les attentes des quartiers excentrés à forte composante immigrée », résument les auteurs.

  • Google, IA et éthique : « départ » de Timnit Gebru, Sundar Pichai s’exprime
    https://www.nextinpact.com/lebrief/45022/google-ia-et-ethique-imbroglio-sur-depart-timnit-gebru-sundar-pichai-sor

    Depuis une semaine, le licenciement par Google de la chercheuse Timnit Gebru fait couler beaucoup d’encre. Elle était chargée des questions d’éthique sur l’intelligence artificielle et l’une des rares afro-américaines spécialistes du sujet.

    L’imbroglio commence dès les premiers jours quand elle explique sur Twitter que sa hiérarchie avait accepté sa démission… qu’elle affirme n’avoir jamais donnée. Cette situation arrive après que la scientifique se soit plainte que Google « réduise au silence les voix marginalisées » et lui demande de rétracter un article.

    Une pétition a rapidement été mise en ligne sur Medium afin de demander des explications à l’entreprise, notamment sur les raisons de la censure. Actuellement, elle a été signée par plus de 6 000 personnes, dont 2 351 « googlers ». Sundar Pichai est finalement sorti du bois pour évoquer cette situation et promettre une enquête :

    « Nous devons accepter la responsabilité du fait qu’une éminente dirigeante noire, dotée d’un immense talent, a malheureusement quitté Google. »

    Marchant sur des œufs, il ajoute : « Nous devons évaluer les circonstances qui ont conduit au départ du Dr Gebru ». Dans son courrier, il parle bien de « départ » (departure en anglais), et ne prononce pas le mot licenciement. Pour lui, cette situation « a semé le doute et conduit certains membres de notre communauté, qui remettent en question leur place chez Google […] Je veux dire à quel point je suis désolé pour cela et j’accepte la responsabilité de travailler pour retrouver votre confiance ».

    Sur Twitter, Timnit Gebru n’est pas convaincue et s’explique : « Il ne dit pas "Je suis désolé pour ce que nous lui avons fait et c’était mal" […] Donc je vois ça comme "Je suis désolé pour la façon dont ça s’est passé, mais je ne suis pas désolé pour ce que nous lui avons fait." ».

    #Timnit_Gebru #Google #Intelligence_artificielle #Ethique

  • We read the paper that forced Timnit Gebru out of Google. Here’s what it says | MIT Technology Review
    https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/12/04/1013294/google-ai-ethics-research-paper-forced-out-timnit-gebru/?truid=a497ecb44646822921c70e7e051f7f1a

    The company’s star ethics researcher highlighted the risks of large language models, which are key to Google’s business.
    by

    Karen Hao archive page

    December 4, 2020
    Timnit Gebru
    courtesy of Timnit Gebru

    On the evening of Wednesday, December 2, Timnit Gebru, the co-lead of Google’s ethical AI team, announced via Twitter that the company had forced her out.

    Gebru, a widely respected leader in AI ethics research, is known for coauthoring a groundbreaking paper that showed facial recognition to be less accurate at identifying women and people of color, which means its use can end up discriminating against them. She also cofounded the Black in AI affinity group, and champions diversity in the tech industry. The team she helped build at Google is one of the most diverse in AI, and includes many leading experts in their own right. Peers in the field envied it for producing critical work that often challenged mainstream AI practices.

    A series of tweets, leaked emails, and media articles showed that Gebru’s exit was the culmination of a conflict over another paper she co-authored. Jeff Dean, the head of Google AI, told colleagues in an internal email (which he has since put online) that the paper “didn’t meet our bar for publication” and that Gebru had said she would resign unless Google met a number of conditions, which it was unwilling to meet. Gebru tweeted that she had asked to negotiate “a last date” for her employment after she got back from vacation. She was cut off from her corporate email account before her return.

    Online, many other leaders in the field of AI ethics are arguing that the company pushed her out because of the inconvenient truths that she was uncovering about a core line of its research—and perhaps its bottom line. More than 1,400 Google staff and 1,900 other supporters have also signed a letter of protest.
    Sign up for The Download - Your daily dose of what’s up in emerging technology
    Stay updated on MIT Technology Review initiatives and events?
    Yes
    No

    Many details of the exact sequence of events that led up to Gebru’s departure are not yet clear; both she and Google have declined to comment beyond their posts on social media. But MIT Technology Review obtained a copy of the research paper from one of the co-authors, Emily M. Bender, a professor of computational linguistics at the University of Washington. Though Bender asked us not to publish the paper itself because the authors didn’t want such an early draft circulating online, it gives some insight into the questions Gebru and her colleagues were raising about AI that might be causing Google concern.

    Titled “On the Dangers of Stochastic Parrots: Can Language Models Be Too Big?” the paper lays out the risks of large language models—AIs trained on staggering amounts of text data. These have grown increasingly popular—and increasingly large—in the last three years. They are now extraordinarily good, under the right conditions, at producing what looks like convincing, meaningful new text—and sometimes at estimating meaning from language. But, says the introduction to the paper, “we ask whether enough thought has been put into the potential risks associated with developing them and strategies to mitigate these risks.”
    The paper

    The paper, which builds off the work of other researchers, presents the history of natural-language processing, an overview of four main risks of large language models, and suggestions for further research. Since the conflict with Google seems to be over the risks, we’ve focused on summarizing those here.
    Environmental and financial costs

    Training large AI models consumes a lot of computer processing power, and hence a lot of electricity. Gebru and her coauthors refer to a 2019 paper from Emma Strubell and her collaborators on the carbon emissions and financial costs of large language models. It found that their energy consumption and carbon footprint have been exploding since 2017, as models have been fed more and more data.

    Strubell’s study found that one language model with a particular type of “neural architecture search” (NAS) method would have produced the equivalent of 626,155 pounds (284 metric tons) of carbon dioxide—about the lifetime output of five average American cars. A version of Google’s language model, BERT, which underpins the company’s search engine, produced 1,438 pounds of CO2 equivalent in Strubell’s estimate—nearly the same as a roundtrip flight between New York City and San Francisco.

    Gebru’s draft paper points out that the sheer resources required to build and sustain such large AI models means they tend to benefit wealthy organizations, while climate change hits marginalized communities hardest. “It is past time for researchers to prioritize energy efficiency and cost to reduce negative environmental impact and inequitable access to resources,” they write.
    Massive data, inscrutable models

    Large language models are also trained on exponentially increasing amounts of text. This means researchers have sought to collect all the data they can from the internet, so there’s a risk that racist, sexist, and otherwise abusive language ends up in the training data.

    An AI model taught to view racist language as normal is obviously bad. The researchers, though, point out a couple of more subtle problems. One is that shifts in language play an important role in social change; the MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements, for example, have tried to establish a new anti-sexist and anti-racist vocabulary. An AI model trained on vast swaths of the internet won’t be attuned to the nuances of this vocabulary and won’t produce or interpret language in line with these new cultural norms.

    It will also fail to capture the language and the norms of countries and peoples that have less access to the internet and thus a smaller linguistic footprint online. The result is that AI-generated language will be homogenized, reflecting the practices of the richest countries and communities.

    Moreover, because the training datasets are so large, it’s hard to audit them to check for these embedded biases. “A methodology that relies on datasets too large to document is therefore inherently risky,” the researchers conclude. “While documentation allows for potential accountability, [...] undocumented training data perpetuates harm without recourse.”
    Research opportunity costs

    The researchers summarize the third challenge as the risk of “misdirected research effort.” Though most AI researchers acknowledge that large language models don’t actually understand language and are merely excellent at manipulating it, Big Tech can make money from models that manipulate language more accurately, so it keeps investing in them. “This research effort brings with it an opportunity cost,” Gebru and her colleagues write. Not as much effort goes into working on AI models that might achieve understanding, or that achieve good results with smaller, more carefully curated datasets (and thus also use less energy).
    Illusions of meaning

    The final problem with large language models, the researchers say, is that because they’re so good at mimicking real human language, it’s easy to use them to fool people. There have been a few high-profile cases, such as the college student who churned out AI-generated self-help and productivity advice on a blog, which went viral.

    The dangers are obvious: AI models could be used to generate misinformation about an election or the covid-19 pandemic, for instance. They can also go wrong inadvertently when used for machine translation. The researchers bring up an example: In 2017, Facebook mistranslated a Palestinian man’s post, which said “good morning” in Arabic, as “attack them” in Hebrew, leading to his arrest.
    Why it matters

    Gebru and Bender’s paper has six co-authors, four of whom are Google researchers. Bender asked to avoid disclosing their names for fear of repercussions. (Bender, by contrast, is a tenured professor: “I think this is underscoring the value of academic freedom,” she says.)

    The paper’s goal, Bender says, was to take stock of the landscape of current research in natural-language processing. “We are working at a scale where the people building the things can’t actually get their arms around the data,” she said. “And because the upsides are so obvious, it’s particularly important to step back and ask ourselves, what are the possible downsides? … How do we get the benefits of this while mitigating the risk?”

    In his internal email, Dean, the Google AI head, said one reason the paper “didn’t meet our bar” was that it “ignored too much relevant research.” Specifically, he said it didn’t mention more recent work on how to make large language models more energy-efficient and mitigate problems of bias.

    However, the six collaborators drew on a wide breadth of scholarship. The paper’s citation list, with 128 references, is notably long. “It’s the sort of work that no individual or even pair of authors can pull off,” Bender said. “It really required this collaboration.”

    The version of the paper we saw does also nod to several research efforts on reducing the size and computational costs of large language models, and on measuring the embedded bias of models. It argues, however, that these efforts have not been enough. “I’m very open to seeing what other references we ought to be including,” Bender said.

    Nicolas Le Roux, a Google AI researcher in the Montreal office, later noted on Twitter that the reasoning in Dean’s email was unusual. “My submissions were always checked for disclosure of sensitive material, never for the quality of the literature review,” he said.

    Now might be a good time to remind everyone that the easiest way to discriminate is to make stringent rules, then to decide when and for whom to enforce them.
    My submissions were always checked for disclosure of sensitive material, never for the quality of the literature review.
    — Nicolas Le Roux (@le_roux_nicolas) December 3, 2020

    Dean’s email also says that Gebru and her colleagues gave Google AI only a day for an internal review of the paper before they submitted it to a conference for publication. He wrote that “our aim is to rival peer-reviewed journals in terms of the rigor and thoughtfulness in how we review research before publication.”

    I understand the concern over Timnit’s resignation from Google. She’s done a great deal to move the field forward with her research. I wanted to share the email I sent to Google Research and some thoughts on our research process.https://t.co/djUGdYwNMb
    — Jeff Dean (@🠡) (@JeffDean) December 4, 2020

    Bender noted that even so, the conference would still put the paper through a substantial review process: “Scholarship is always a conversation and always a work in progress,” she said.

    Others, including William Fitzgerald, a former Google PR manager, have further cast doubt on Dean’s claim:

    This is such a lie. It was part of my job on the Google PR team to review these papers. Typically we got so many we didn’t review them in time or a researcher would just publish & we wouldn’t know until afterwards. We NEVER punished people for not doing proper process. https://t.co/hNE7SOWSLS pic.twitter.com/Ic30sVgwtn
    — William Fitzgerald (@william_fitz) December 4, 2020

    Google pioneered much of the foundational research that has since led to the recent explosion in large language models. Google AI was the first to invent the Transformer language model in 2017 that serves as the basis for the company’s later model BERT, and OpenAI’s GPT-2 and GPT-3. BERT, as noted above, now also powers Google search, the company’s cash cow.

    Bender worries that Google’s actions could create “a chilling effect” on future AI ethics research. Many of the top experts in AI ethics work at large tech companies because that is where the money is. “That has been beneficial in many ways,” she says. “But we end up with an ecosystem that maybe has incentives that are not the very best ones for the progress of science for the world.”

    #Intelligence_artificielle #Google #Ethique #Timnit_Gebru

  • Zwischen Überwachungskapitalismus und Gemeinwohlorientierung – Linke Perspektiven auf Künstliche Intelligenz - Fraktion DIE LINKE. im Bundestag
    https://www.linksfraktion.de/termine/detail/zwischen-ueberwachungskapitalismus-und-gemeinwohlorientierung-linke-pe


    On a appris dans cet entretien que les députés du parti de gauche sont les seuls qui posent la question des conséquences de l’utilisation de l’intelligence artificille pour la vie et les conditions de travail de la majorité des citoyens. Les députés des autres partis ne voient le sujet que sous l’angle de la concurrence interntionale et de la place de l’Allemagne capitaliste sur les marchés globalisés.

    Die Linke propose de réglementer l’emploi des technologies en relation avec l’AI en les classant dans des catégories de dangerosité. La catégorie la moins dangereuse autoriserait l’utilisation sans limites d’une technologie alors que son classement dans la catégorie la plus élevée signifierait son interdiction. Cette catégorie devrait comprendre les technologies de guerre et de reconnaissance faciale dans les lieux publiques.

    Fachgespräch, 12. November 2020

    Künstliche Intelligenz ist keine Zukunftstechnologie, sondern sie ist bereits präsenter in verschiedenen Bereichen des alltäglichen Lebens, als vielen bewusst ist. Dennoch beginnen erst jetzt gezielte Regulierungsprozesse. Die Enquete-Kommission Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) hat im Oktober 2020 ihre Empfehlungen an den Deutschen Bundestag übergeben. Die historische Chance, das Potenzial von KI als Beitrag zur Gestaltung einer sozial-ökologischen Transformation zu untersuchen, wurde von der Kommission dabei verschenkt, das Prinzip „Der Mensch steht im Mittelpunkt“ erwies sich als Feigenblatt. Die Fraktion DIE LINKE. im Bundestag erarbeitet aktuell eigene Positionen zu KI, die in Anbetracht der schnelllebigen Entwicklung in diesem Feld immer nur ein aktueller Diskussionsstand sein können.

    Da auch die Ideen, Wünsche, Sorgen und Hoffnungen der Bürgerinnen und Bürger in der Kommission trotz unseres intensiven Vorantreibens zu kurz gekommen sind, möchten wir nun mit dieser Veranstaltung die Zivilgesellschaft zu Wort kommen lassen. Abgeordnete und Sachverständige der Fraktion DIE LINKE, die an der Enquete-Kommission KI teilgenommen haben, werden daraus berichten. Im Anschluss haben Sie die Möglichkeit, Anregungen zu geben und Fragen zu stellen. Wir laden Sie herzlich ein, mit uns über linke Perspektiven auf Künstliche Intelligenz zu diskutieren.

    Anwesende MdB:
    Petra Sitte, Jessica Tatti, Anke Domscheit-Berg

    #Allemagne #politique #gauche #intelligence_artificielle

  • Lawsuit Alleges NFL’s Concussion Settlement Discriminates Against Black Players - WSJ
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/lawsuit-alleges-nfls-concussion-settlement-discriminates-against-black-players-

    (Août 2020)

    Les compensations pour commotion cérébrale des joueurs de football étasunien utilisent l’#intelligence_artificielle de manière telle que ces compensations différent selon la couleur de la peau : les fonctions intellectuelles avant toute commotion sont considérées plus faibles chez les noirs...

    A group of Black former NFL players has filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the National Football League’s much-contested concussion settlement with players blocked some Black claimants from securing payouts by using an evaluation process that assumed they had lower cognitive functioning when healthy than white players.

    #IA #programmation #biais #racisme #sans_vergogne #états-unis

    • Soupçons de financement libyen : Nicolas Sarkozy mis en examen pour « association de malfaiteurs »

      Dans ce dossier, l’ancien président a déjà été mis en examen en mars 2018 pour « corruption passive », « recel de détournement de fonds publics » et « financement illégal de campagne ».

      L’ancien président de la République Nicolas Sarkozy a été mis en examen pour « association de malfaiteurs » dans l’affaire du financement présumé libyen de sa campagne présidentielle de 2007. C’est ce qu’a annoncé vendredi 16 octobre le parquet national financier.

      Il devient de plus en plus urgent de dissoudre le parquet national financier. (Sinon j’aime assez que le membre des associés malfaiteurs, on continue régulièrement à lui demander d’aller représenter « La France » ici et là.)

  • Cyber Command has sought to disrupt the world’s largest botnet, hoping to reduce its potential impact on the election
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/national-security/cyber-command-trickbot-disrupt/2020/10/09/19587aae-0a32-11eb-a166-dc429b380d10_story.html

    In recent weeks, the U.S. military has mounted an operation to temporarily disrupt what is described as the world’s largest botnet — one used also to drop ransomware, which officials say is one of the top threats to the 2020 election. U.S. Cyber Command’s campaign against the Trickbot botnet, an army of at least 1 million hijacked computers run by Russian-speaking criminals, is not expected to permanently dismantle the network, said four U.S. officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity (...)

    #Intel #Microsoft #DoD #ransomware #spyware #bot #criminalité #hacking #élections

    ##criminalité

  • « Pour un retour au débat scientifique et à l’intelligence collective »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2020/09/30/pour-un-retour-au-debat-scientifique-et-a-l-intelligence-collective_6054272_

    Soumise à la pression de la publication, et donc de la compétition, la science connaît une crise de crédibilité majeure. L’échange entre chercheurs et le consensus qui s’en dégage sont la garantie des vérités scientifiques, rappelle un collectif dans une tribune au « Monde ».
    […]
    Comment en sommes-nous arrivés là ? Notre thèse est que le débat a peu à peu disparu car la logique de l’évaluation administrative des chercheurs les en dissuade. A partir des années 1960, avec la croissance de la recherche publique, les institutions scientifiques ont voulu se munir d’indicateurs quantitatifs de performance pour piloter leur activité. Il en a résulté un système, devenu mondial, où le but du chercheur, pour obtenir financements ou promotion, est de justifier de publications dans des journaux « prestigieu ». Le bien-fondé et les modalités de calcul de l’indicateur de prestige (le « facteur d’impact ») sont des problématiques bien connues. Cependant, selon nous, sa tare la plus nocive reste encore mal désignée : lorsque la valeur d’une production est conditionnée à la réputation du journal qui la publie, ce n’est plus le chercheur qui est créateur de valeur, mais celui qui décide de la publication : l’éditeur.

    la suite sous #paywall

    • OK, mais cela vaut aussi pour la #Sociologie alors...

      Tribune. L’épidémie de Covid-19 a mis en lumière des dysfonctionnements profonds de la science. On en attendait la connaissance fiable sur laquelle fonder les mesures efficaces et raisonnables d’une sortie de crise. Finalement, chacun aura pu trouver de quoi confirmer son préjugé au milieu d’un chaos de plus de 50 000 articles humainement impossibles à analyser, dans lequel le circuit de publication et les hommes providentiels auront failli à indiquer une direction sûre. Comment parle la science aujourd’hui ?

      La voix de la science est d’essence collective : elle est celle du consensus qui naît du débat au sein de la communauté scientifique. Aussi longtemps et passionnément que nécessaire, les chercheurs échangent arguments et expériences jusqu’à converger vers des énoncés débarrassés des préjugés des uns et des autres, en accord avec les faits observés et qui constituent la vérité scientifique du moment. Or, cette pratique fondamentale du débat a largement disparu du monde académique, au profit d’un succédané profondément différent, le « journal avec relecture par les pairs ». Ce « peer reviewing » est un processus local, interne à une publication, régie par un éditeur, où un chercheur doit se plier aux injonctions de quelques référents anonymes lors d’échanges confidentiels par mail dont le but est d’obtenir en temps compté une décision favorable d’imprimatur. Ainsi les vérités scientifiques ne sont plus des faits collectifs émergents, mais sont décrétées par un procédé analogue à un procès à huis clos. Sous l’effet délétère de ce processus de validation aléatoire, limité, conservateur, invérifiable et perméable aux conflits d’intérêt, la science dans son ensemble est entrée dans une crise existentielle majeure, dite de la reproductibilité : dans la plupart des domaines et dans une proportion alarmante, de nombreux résultats expérimentaux publiés ne peuvent pas être répliqués, et ce même par leurs auteurs.

      Comment en sommes-nous arrivés là ? Notre thèse est que le débat a peu à peu disparu car la logique de l’évaluation administrative des chercheurs les en dissuade. A partir des années 1960, avec la croissance de la recherche publique, les institutions scientifiques ont voulu se munir d’indicateurs quantitatifs de performance pour piloter leur activité. Il en a résulté un système, devenu mondial, où le but du chercheur, pour obtenir financements ou promotion, est de justifier de publications dans des journaux « prestigieux ». Le bien-fondé et les modalités de calcul de l’indicateur de prestige (le « facteur d’impact ») sont des problématiques bien connues. Cependant, selon nous, sa tare la plus nocive reste encore mal désignée : lorsque la valeur d’une production est conditionnée à la réputation du journal qui la publie, ce n’est plus le chercheur qui est créateur de valeur, mais celui qui décide de la publication : l’éditeur.

      Ce renversement engendre deux dysfonctionnements majeurs. D’une part, une minorité d’éditeurs peut contraindre la majorité à s’aligner sur sa vision et ses normes (et par exemple imposer un impératif permanent de nouveauté, faisant l’impasse sur la vérification de résultats déjà publiés ou sur le partage de résultats expérimentaux négatifs). D’autre part, la valeur scientifique devient une denrée rare, que les chercheurs souhaitent s’attribuer en publiant dans les journaux qui la dispensent. Un scientifique qui se distingue dans ce système le fait inévitablement au détriment de ses pairs. L’échange entre pairs, indispensable à la science, devient contraire aux intérêts personnels de ses agents, désormais artificiellement en concurrence. L’intelligence collective étant ainsi inhibée par une gouvernance verticale, la science tend alors à se développer horizontalement : on se cloisonne dans des sujets de niche sans concurrence, les erreurs s’accumulent sans être corrigées, les controverses stagnent, la voix de la science est celle du storytelling qui aura su séduire l’éditeur le plus prestigieux, sans confrontation avec ses détracteurs.

      Pour retrouver un développement vertical de la science, il est indispensable d’en promouvoir une gouvernance horizontale, communautaire, où le but premier du chercheur est de débattre avec ses pairs et de les convaincre. Au contraire de la compétition vide de sens induite par les règles actuelles, une gouvernance horizontale induit une « coopétition », où l’échange est dans l’intérêt de tous et produit naturellement ouverture, transparence et intelligence collective. Dans d’autres écrits, nous détaillons ses modalités concrètes, désormais techniquement possibles grâce à Internet. En résumé, nous avançons que les bonnes valeurs selon lesquelles apprécier une production scientifique sont sa validité et son importance. La validité d’une production s’établit qualitativement par le débat scientifique et peut être raisonnablement quantifiée par le degré de consensus qu’elle atteint à un moment donné. Nous proposons par ailleurs que chaque scientifique tienne librement une revue de presse de la littérature, exprimant sa vision et ses hiérarchies personnelles. L’importance d’une production en particulier se voit et se mesure alors à son degré de diffusion dans un tel écosystème.

      Ces deux mécanismes redonnent à la communauté scientifique la gestion intégrale de la science et peuvent offrir des indicateurs répondant aux besoins administratifs des institutions. Ainsi, une transition vers un tel mode d’évaluation, de plus très économe car sans intermédiaires, est principalement une question de volonté politique. Nous espérons que la France s’emparera assez tôt de ces idées et sera un moteur dans la régénération globale des processus collectifs de la science.

      Michaël Bon, chercheur et consultant ; Henri Orland, chercheur (CEA) ; Konrad Hinsen, chercheur (CNRS, CBM) ; Bernard Rentier, recteur émérite de l’université de Liège ; Jacques Lafait, directeur de recherche émérite (CNRS, Sorbonne Université) ; Tembine Hamidou, professeur assistant (université de New York) ; Jamal Atif, professeur (université Paris-Dauphine-PSL) ; Alexandre Coutte, maître de conférences (université Paris-Nanterre) ; Nicolas Morgado, maître de conférences (université Paris-Nanterre) ; Patrice Koehl, professeur (université de Californie, Davis) ; Stéphane Vautier, professeur (université de Toulouse-Jean-Jaurès) ; Jean-Paul Allouche, directeur de recherche émérite (CNRS) ; Gilles Niel, chargé de recherche (CNRS, ICGM) ; Christine Fleury, conservatrice de bibliothèques (ABES) ; Clément Stahl, chercheur (université de Paris)

      #Science #coronavirus

  • Migrants: le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression #pacte

    –---

    Documents officiels en lien avec le pacte:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/879881

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

    • Relocation, solidarity mandatory for EU migration policy: #Johansson

      In an interview with ANSA and other European media outlets, EU Commissioner for Home Affairs #Ylva_Johansson explained the new migration and asylum pact due to be unveiled on September 23, stressing that nobody will find ideal solutions but rather a well-balanced compromise that will ’’improve the situation’’.

      European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson has explained in an interview with a group of European journalists, including ANSA, a new pact on asylum and migration to be presented on September 23. She touched on rules for countries of first entry, a new mechanism of mandatory solidarity, fast repatriations and refugee relocation.

      The Swedish commissioner said that no one will find ideal solutions in the European Commission’s new asylum and migration proposal but rather a good compromise that “will improve the situation”.

      She said the debate to change the asylum regulation known as Dublin needs to be played down in order to find an agreement. Johansson said an earlier 2016 reform plan would be withdrawn as it ’’caused the majority’’ of conflicts among countries.

      A new proposal that will replace the current one and amend the existing Dublin regulation will be presented, she explained.

      The current regulation will not be completely abolished but rules regarding frontline countries will change. Under the new proposal, migrants can still be sent back to the country responsible for their asylum request, explained the commissioner, adding that amendments will be made but the country of first entry will ’’remain important’’.

      ’’Voluntary solidarity is not enough," there has to be a “mandatory solidarity mechanism,” Johansson noted.

      Countries will need to help according to their size and possibilities. A member state needs to show solidarity ’’in accordance with the capacity and size’’ of its economy. There will be no easy way out with the possibility of ’’just sending some blankets’’ - efforts must be proportional to the size and capabilities of member states, she said.
      Relocations are a divisive theme

      Relocations will be made in a way that ’’can be possible to accept for all member states’’, the commissioner explained. The issue of mandatory quotas is extremely divisive, she went on to say. ’’The sentence of the European Court of Justice has established that they can be made’’.

      However, the theme is extremely divisive. Many of those who arrive in Europe are not eligible for international protection and must be repatriated, she said, wondering if it is a good idea to relocate those who need to be repatriated.

      “We are looking for a way to bring the necessary aid to countries under pressure.”

      “Relocation is an important part, but also” it must be done “in a way that can be possible to accept for all member states,” she noted.

      Moreover, Johansson said the system will not be too rigid as the union should prepare for different scenarios.
      Faster repatriations

      Repatriations will be a key part of the plan, with faster bureaucratic procedures, she said. The 2016 reform proposal was made following the 2015 migration crisis, when two million people, 90% of whom were refugees, reached the EU irregularly. For this reason, the plan focused on relocations, she explained.

      Now the situation is completely different: last year 2.4 million stay permits were issued, the majority for reasons connected to family, work or education. Just 140,000 people migrated irregularly and only one-third were refugees while two-thirds will need to be repatriated.

      For this reason, stressed the commissioner, the new plan will focus on repatriation. Faster procedures are necessary, she noted. When people stay in a country for years it is very hard to organize repatriations, especially voluntary ones. So the objective is for a negative asylum decision “to come together with a return decision.”

      Also, the permanence in hosting centers should be of short duration. Speaking about a fire at the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where more than 12,000 asylum seekers have been stranded for years, the commissioner said the situation was the ’’result of lack of European policy on asylum and migration."

      “We shall have no more Morias’’, she noted, calling for well-managed hosting centers along with limits to permanence.

      A win-win collaboration will instead be planned with third countries, she said. ’’The external aspect is very important. We have to work on good partnerships with third countries, supporting them and finding win-win solutions for readmissions and for the fight against traffickers. We have to develop legal pathways to come to the EU, in particular with resettlements, a policy that needs to be strengthened.”

      The commissioner then rejected the idea of opening hosting centers in third countries, an idea for example proposed by Denmark.

      “It is not the direction I intend to take. We will not export the right to asylum.”

      The commissioner said she was very concerned by reports of refoulements. Her objective, she concluded, is to “include in the pact a monitoring mechanism. The right to asylum must be defended.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27447/relocation-solidarity-mandatory-for-eu-migration-policy-johansson

      #relocalisation #solidarité_obligatoire #solidarité_volontaire #pays_de_première_entrée #renvois #expulsions #réinstallations #voies_légales

    • Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « #pacte »

      La Commission européenne, assurant vouloir « abolir » le règlement de Dublin et son principe du premier pays d’entrée, doit présenter ce mercredi un « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile ». Qui ne bouleverserait rien.

      C’est une belle victoire pour Viktor Orbán, le Premier ministre hongrois, et ses partenaires d’Europe centrale et orientale aussi peu enclins que lui à accueillir des étrangers sur leur sol. La Commission européenne renonce définitivement à leur imposer d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile en cas d’afflux dans un pays de la « ligne de front » (Grèce, Italie, Malte, Espagne). Certes, le volumineux paquet de textes qu’elle propose ce mercredi (10 projets de règlements et trois recommandations, soit plusieurs centaines de pages), pompeusement baptisé « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile », prévoit qu’ils devront, par « solidarité », assurer les refoulements vers les pays d’origine des déboutés du droit d’asile, mais cela ne devrait pas les gêner outre mesure. Car, sur le fond, la Commission prend acte de la volonté des Vingt-Sept de transformer l’Europe en forteresse.
      Sale boulot

      La crise de 2015 les a durablement traumatisés. A l’époque, la Turquie, par lassitude d’accueillir sur son sol plusieurs millions de réfugiés syriens et des centaines de milliers de migrants économiques dans l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, ouvre ses frontières. La Grèce est vite submergée et plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes traversent les Balkans afin de trouver refuge, notamment en Allemagne et en Suède, parmi les pays les plus généreux en matière d’asile.

      Passé les premiers moments de panique, les Européens réagissent de plusieurs manières. La Hongrie fait le sale boulot en fermant brutalement sa frontière. L’Allemagne, elle, accepte d’accueillir un million de demandeurs d’asile, mais négocie avec Ankara un accord pour qu’il referme ses frontières, accord ensuite endossé par l’UE qui lui verse en échange 6 milliards d’euros destinés aux camps de réfugiés. Enfin, l’Union adopte un règlement destiné à relocaliser sur une base obligatoire une partie des migrants dans les autres pays européens afin qu’ils instruisent les demandes d’asile, dans le but de soulager la Grèce et l’Italie, pays de premier accueil. Ce dernier volet est un échec, les pays d’Europe de l’Est, qui ont voté contre, refusent d’accueillir le moindre migrant, et leurs partenaires de l’Ouest ne font guère mieux : sur 160 000 personnes qui auraient dû être relocalisées, un objectif rapidement revu à 98 000, moins de 35 000 l’ont été à la fin 2017, date de la fin de ce dispositif.

      Depuis, l’Union a considérablement durci les contrôles, notamment en créant un corps de 10 000 gardes-frontières européens et en renforçant les moyens de Frontex, l’agence chargée de gérer ses frontières extérieures. En février-mars, la tentative d’Ankara de faire pression sur les Européens dans le conflit syrien en rouvrant partiellement ses frontières a fait long feu : la Grèce a employé les grands moyens, y compris violents, pour stopper ce flux sous les applaudissements de ses partenaires… Autant dire que l’ambiance n’est pas à l’ouverture des frontières et à l’accueil des persécutés.
      « Usine à gaz »

      Mais la crise migratoire de 2015 a laissé des « divisions nombreuses et profondes entre les Etats membres - certaines des cicatrices qu’elle a laissées sont toujours visibles aujourd’hui », comme l’a reconnu Ursula von der Leyen, la présidente de la Commission, dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union du 16 septembre. Afin de tourner la page, la Commission propose donc de laisser tomber la réforme de 2016 (dite de Dublin IV) prévoyant de pérenniser la relocalisation autoritaire des migrants, désormais jugée par une haute fonctionnaire de l’exécutif « totalement irréaliste ».

      Mais la réforme qu’elle propose, une véritable « usine à gaz », n’est qu’un « rapiéçage » de l’existant, comme l’explique Yves Pascouau, spécialiste de l’immigration et responsable des programmes européens de l’association Res Publica. Ainsi, alors que Von der Leyen a annoncé sa volonté « d’abolir » le règlement de Dublin III, il n’en est rien : le pays responsable du traitement d’une demande d’asile reste, par principe, comme c’est le cas depuis 1990, le pays de première entrée.

      S’il y a une crise, la Commission pourra déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité » afin de soulager un pays de la ligne de front : dans ce cas, les Vingt-Sept devront accueillir un certain nombre de migrants (en fonction de leur richesse et de leur population), sauf s’ils préfèrent « parrainer un retour ». En clair, prendre en charge le refoulement des déboutés de l’asile (avec l’aide financière et logistique de l’Union) en sachant que ces personnes resteront à leur charge jusqu’à ce qu’ils y parviennent. Ça, c’est pour faire simple, car il y a plusieurs niveaux de crise, des exceptions, des sanctions, des délais et l’on en passe…

      Autre nouveauté : les demandes d’asile devront être traitées par principe à la frontière, dans des camps de rétention, pour les nationalités dont le taux de reconnaissance du statut de réfugié est inférieur à 20% dans l’Union, et ce, en moins de trois mois, avec refoulement à la clé en cas de refus. « Cette réforme pose un principe clair, explique un eurocrate. Personne ne sera obligé d’accueillir un étranger dont il ne veut pas. »

      Dans cet ensemble très sévère, une bonne nouvelle : les sauvetages en mer ne devraient plus être criminalisés. On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65% de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs. On ne se refait pas.


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/22/droit-d-asile-bruxelles-rate-son-pacte_1800264

      –—

      Graphique ajouté au fil de discussion sur les statistiques de la #relocalisation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/605713

    • Le pacte européen sur l’asile et les migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire »

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la nouvelle Commission européenne a présenté les grandes lignes d’orientation de sa politique migratoire à venir. Alors que cinq ans plutôt, en 2015, se déroulait la mal nommée « crise migratoire » aux frontières européennes, le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migration de l’UE ne tire aucune leçon du passé. Le nouveau pacte de l’Union Européenne nous propose inlassablement les mêmes recettes alors que les preuves de leur inefficacité, leur coût et des violences qu’elles procurent sont nombreuses et irréfutables. Le CNCD-11.11.11, son homologue néerlandophone et les membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à un changement de cap.

      Le nouveau Pacte repose sur des propositions législatives et des recommandations non contraignantes. Ses priorités sont claires mais pas neuves. Freiner les arrivées, limiter l’accueil par le « tri » des personnes et augmenter les retours. Cette stratégie pourtant maintes fois décriée par les ONG et le milieu académique a certes réussi à diminuer les arrivées en Europe, mais n’a offert aucune solution durable pour les personnes migrantes. Depuis les années 2000, l’externalisation de la gestion des questions migratoires a montré son inefficacité (situation humanitaires dans les hotspots, plus de 20.000 décès en Méditerranée depuis 2014 et processus d’encampement aux frontières de l’UE) et son coût exponentiel (coût élevé du contrôle, de la détention-expulsion et de l’aide au développement détournée). Elle a augmenté le taux de violences sur les routes de l’exil et a enfreint le droit international en toute impunité (non accès au droit d’asile notamment via les refoulements).

      "ll est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée"

      La proposition de mettre en place un mécanisme solidaire européen contraignant est à saluer, mais celui-ci doit être au service de l’accueil et non couplé au retour. La possibilité pour les États européens de choisir à la carte soit la relocalisation, le « parrainage » du retour des déboutés ou autre contribution financière n’est pas équitable. La répartition solidaire de l’accueil doit être permanente et ne pas être actionnée uniquement en cas « d’afflux massif » aux frontières d’un État membre comme le recommande la Commission. Il est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée. Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés.

      Le focus doit être mis sur les alternatives à la détention et non sur l’usage systématique de l’enfermement aux frontières, comme le veut la Commission. Le droit de demander l’asile et d’avoir accès à une procédure de qualité doit être accessible à tous et toutes et rester un droit individuel. Or, la proposition de la Commission de détenir (12 semaines maximum) en vue de screener (5 jours de tests divers et de recoupement de données via EURODAC) puis trier les personnes migrantes à la frontière en fonction du taux de reconnaissance de protection accordé en moyenne à leur pays d’origine (en dessous de 20%) ou de leur niveau de vulnérabilité est contraire à la Convention de Genève.

      "La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix."

      La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix, comme le préconise la Commission.

      La meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences sur les routes de l’exil reste la mise en place de plus de voies légales et sûres de migration (réinstallation, visas de travail, d’études, le regroupement familial…). Les ONG regrettent que la Commission reporte à 2021 les propositions sur la migration légale. Le pacte s’intéresse à juste titre à la criminalisation des ONG de sauvetage et des citoyens qui fournissent une aide humanitaire aux migrants. Toutefois, les propositions visant à y mettre fin sont insuffisantes. Les ONG se réjouissent de l’annonce par la Commission d’un mécanisme de surveillance des droits humains aux frontières extérieures. Au cours de l’année écoulée, on a signalé de plus en plus souvent des retours violents par la Croatie, la Grèce, Malte et Chypre. Toutefois, il n’est pas encore suffisamment clair si les propositions de la Commission peuvent effectivement traiter et sanctionner les refoulements.

      Au lendemain de l’incendie du hotspot à Moria, symbole par excellence de l’échec des politiques migratoires européennes, l’UE s’enfonce dans un déni total, meurtrier, en vue de concilier les divergences entre ses États membres. Les futures discussions autour du Pacte au sein du parlement UE et du Conseil UE seront cruciales. Les ONG membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le Parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à promouvoir des ajustements fermes allant vers plus de justice migratoire.

      https://www.cncd.be/Le-pacte-europeen-sur-l-asile-et

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum. A Critical ‘First Look’ Analysis

      Where does it come from?

      The New Migration Pact was built on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme that the Commission tried to push in 2016. And the least that one can say, is that it shows! The whole migration plan has been decisively shaped by this initial failure. Though the Pact has some merits, the very fact that it takes as its starting point the radical demands made by the most nationalist governments in Europe leads to sacrificing migrants’ rights on the altar of a cohesive and integrated European migration policy.

      Back in 2016, the vigorous manoeuvring of the Commission to find a way out of the European asylum dead-end resulted in a bittersweet victory for the European institution. Though the Commission was able to find a qualified majority of member states willing to support a fair distribution of the asylum seekers among member states through a relocation scheme, this new regulation remained dead letter. Several eastern European states flatly refused to implement the plan, other member states seized this opportunity to defect on their obligations and the whole migration policy quickly unravelled. Since then, Europe is left with a dysfunctional Dublin agreement exacerbating the tensions between member states and 27 loosely connected national asylum regimes. On the latter point, at least, there is a consensus. Everyone agrees that the EU’s migration regime is broken and urgently needs to be fixed.

      Obviously, the Commission was not keen to go through a new round of political humiliation. Having been accused of “bureaucratic hubris” the first time around, the commissioners Schinas and Johansson decided not to repeat the same mistake. They toured the European capitals and listened to every side of the entrenched migration debate before drafting their Migration Pact. The intention is in the right place and it reflects the complexity of having to accommodate 27 distinct democratic debates in one single political space. Nevertheless, if one peers a bit more extensively through the content of the New Plan, it is complicated not to get the feelings that the Visegrad countries are currently the key players shaping the European migration and asylum policies. After all, their staunch opposition to a collective reception scheme sparked the political process and provided the starting point to the general discussion. As a result, it is no surprise that the New Pact tilts firmly towards an ever more restrictive approach to migration, beefs up the coercive powers of both member states and European agencies and raises many concerns with regards to the respect of the migrants’ fundamental rights.
      What is in this New Pact on Migration and Asylum?

      Does the Pact concede too much ground to the demands of the most xenophobic European governments? To answer that question, let us go back to the bizarre metaphor used by the commissioner Schinas. During his press conference, he insisted on comparing the New Pact on Migration and Asylum to a house built on solid foundations (i.e. the lengthy and inclusive consultation process) and made of 3 floors: first, some renewed partnerships with the sending and transit states, second, some more effective border procedures, and third, a revamped mandatory – but flexible ! – solidarity scheme. It is tempting to carry on with the metaphor and to say that this house may appear comfortable from the inside but that it remains tightly shut to anyone knocking on its door from the outside. For, a careful examination reveals that each of the three “floors” (policy packages, actually) lays the emphasis on a repressive approach to migration aimed at deterring would-be asylum seekers from attempting to reach the European shores.
      The “new partnerships” with sending and transit countries, a “change in paradigm”?

      Let us add that there is little that is actually “new” in this New Migration Pact. For instance, the first policy package, that is, the suggestion that the EU should renew its partnerships with sending and transit countries is, as a matter of fact, an old tune in the Brussels bubble. The Commission may boast that it marks a “change of paradigm”, one fails to see how this would be any different from the previous European diplomatic efforts. Since migration and asylum are increasingly considered as toxic topics (for, they would be the main factors behind the rise of nationalism and its corollary, Euroscepticism), the European Union is willing to externalize this issue, seemingly at all costs. The results, however, have been mixed in the past. To the Commission’s own admission, only a third of the migrants whose asylum claims have been rejected are effectively returned. Besides the facts that returns are costly, extremely coercive, and administratively complicated to organize, the main reason for this low rate of successful returns is that sending countries refuse to cooperate in the readmission procedures. Neighbouring countries have excellent reasons not to respond positively to the Union’s demands. For some, remittances sent by their diaspora are an economic lifeline. Others just do not want to appear complicit of repressive European practices on their domestic political scene. Furthermore, many African countries are growing discontent with the forceful way the European Union uses its asymmetrical relation of power in bilateral negotiations to dictate to those sovereign states the migration policies they should adopt, making for instance its development aid conditional on the implementation of stricter border controls. The Commission may rhetorically claim to foster “mutually beneficial” international relation with its neighbouring countries, the emphasis on the externalization of migration control in the EU’s diplomatic agenda nevertheless bears some of the hallmarks of neo-colonialism. As such, it is a source of deep resentment in sending and transit states. It would therefore be a grave mistake for the EU to overlook the fact that some short-term gains in terms of migration management may result in long-term losses with regards to Europe’s image across the world.

      Furthermore, considering the current political situation, one should not primarily be worried about the failed partnerships with neighbouring countries, it is rather the successful ones that ought to give us pause and raise concerns. For, based on the existing evidence, the EU will sign a deal with any state as long as it effectively restrains and contains migration flows towards the European shores. Being an authoritarian state with a documented history of human right violations (Turkey) or an embattled government fighting a civil war (Lybia) does not disqualify you as a partner of the European Union in its effort to manage migration flows. It is not only morally debatable for the EU to delegate its asylum responsibilities to unreliable third countries, it is also doubtful that an increase in diplomatic pressure on neighbouring countries will bring major political results. It will further damage the perception of the EU in neighbouring countries without bringing significant restriction to migration flows.
      Streamlining border procedures? Or eroding migrants’ rights?

      The second policy package is no more inviting. It tackles the issue of the migrants who, in spite of those partnerships and the hurdles thrown their way by sending and transit countries, would nevertheless reach Europe irregularly. On this issue, the Commission faced the daunting task of having to square a political circle, since it had to find some common ground in a debate bitterly divided between conflicting worldviews (roughly, between liberal and nationalist perspectives on the individual freedom of movement) and competing interests (between overburdened Mediterranean member states and Eastern member states adamant that asylum seekers would endanger their national cohesion). The Commission thus looked for the lowest common denominator in terms of migration management preferences amongst the distinct member states. The result is a two-tier border procedure aiming to fast-track and streamline the processing of asylum claims, allowing for more expeditious returns of irregular migrants. The goal is to prevent any bottleneck in the processing of the claims and to avoid the (currently near constant) overcrowding of reception facilities in the frontline states. Once again, there is little that is actually new in this proposal. It amounts to a generalization of the process currently in place in the infamous hotspots scattered on the Greek isles. According to the Pact, screening procedures would be carried out in reception centres created across Europe. A far cry from the slogan “no more Moria” since one may legitimately suspect that those reception centres will, at the first hiccup in the procedure, turn into tomorrow’s asylum camps.

      According to this procedure, newly arrived migrants would be submitted within 5 days to a pre-screening procedure and subsequently triaged into two categories. Migrants with a low chance of seeing their asylum claim recognized (because they would come from a country with a low recognition rate or a country belonging to the list of the safe third countries, for instance) would be redirected towards an accelerated procedure. The end goal would be to return them, if applicable, within twelve weeks. The other migrants would be subjected to the standard assessment of their asylum claim. It goes without saying that this proposal has been swiftly and unanimously condemned by all human rights organizations. It does not take a specialized lawyer to see that this two-tiered procedure could have devastating consequences for the “fast-tracked” asylum seekers left with no legal recourse against the initial decision to submit them to this sped up procedure (rather than the standard one) as well as reduced opportunities to defend their asylum claim or, if need be, to contest their return. No matter how often the Commission repeats that it will preserve all the legal safeguards required to protect migrants’ rights, it remains wildly unconvincing. Furthermore, the Pact may confuse speed and haste. The schedule is tight on paper (five days for the pre-screening, twelve weeks for the assessment of the asylum claim), it may well prove unrealistic to meet those deadlines in real-life conditions. The Commission also overlooks the fact that accelerated procedures tend to be sloppy, thus leading to juridical appeals and further legal wrangling and eventually amounting to processes far longer than expected.
      Integrating the returns, not the reception

      The Commission talked up the new Pact as being “balanced” and “humane”. Since the two first policy packages focus, first, on preventing would-be migrants from leaving their countries and, second, on facilitating and accelerating their returns, one would expect the third policy package to move away from the restriction of movement and to complement those measures with a reception plan tailored to the needs of refugees. And here comes the major disappointment with the New Pact and, perhaps, the clearest indication that the Pact is first and foremost designed to please the migration hardliners. It does include a solidarity scheme meant to alleviate the burden of frontline countries, to distribute more fairly the responsibilities amongst member states and to ensure that refugees are properly hosted. But this solidarity scheme is far from being robust enough to deliver on those promises. Let us unpack it briefly to understand why it is likely to fail. The solidarity scheme is mandatory. All member states will be under the obligation to take part. But there is a catch! Member states’ contribution to this collective effort can take many shapes and forms and it will be up to the member states to decide how they want to participate. They get to choose whether they want to relocate some refugees on their national soil, to provide some financial and/or logistical assistance, or to “sponsor” (it is the actual term used by the Commission) some returns.

      No one expected the Commission to reintroduce a compulsory relocation scheme in its Pact. Eastern European countries had drawn an obvious red line and it would have been either naïve or foolish to taunt them with that kind of policy proposal. But this so-called “flexible mandatory solidarity” relies on such a watered-down understanding of the solidarity principle that it results in a weak and misguided political instrument unsuited to solve the problem at hand. First, the flexible solidarity mechanism is too indeterminate to prove efficient. According to the current proposal, member states would have to shoulder a fair share of the reception burden (calculated on their respective population and GDP) but would be left to decide for themselves which form this contribution would take. The obvious flaw with the policy proposal is that, if all member states decline to relocate some refugees (which is a plausible scenario), Mediterranean states would still be left alone when it comes to dealing with the most immediate consequences of migration flows. They would receive much more financial, operational, and logistical support than it currently is the case – but they would be managing on their own the overcrowded reception centres. The Commission suggests that it would oversee the national pledges in terms of relocation and that it would impose some corrections if the collective pledges fall short of a predefined target. But it remains to be seen whether the Commission will have the political clout to impose some relocations to member states refusing them. One could not be blamed for being highly sceptical.

      Second, it is noteworthy that the Commission fails to integrate the reception of refugees since member states are de facto granted an opt-out on hosting refugees. What is integrated is rather the return policy, once more a repressive instrument. And it is the member states with the worst record in terms of migrants’ rights violations that are the most likely to be tasked with the delicate mission of returning them home. As a commentator was quipping on Twitter, it would be like asking a bully to walk his victim home (what could possibly go wrong?). The attempt to build an intra-European consensus is obviously pursued at the expense of the refugees. The incentive structure built into the flexible solidarity scheme offers an excellent illustration of this. If a member state declines to relocate any refugee and offers instead to ‘sponsor’ some returns, it has to honour that pledge within a limited period of time (the Pact suggests a six month timeframe). If it fails to do so, it becomes responsible for the relocation and the return of those migrants, leading to a situation in which some migrants may end up in a country where they do not want to be and that does not want them to be there. Hardly an optimal outcome…
      Conclusion

      The Pact represents a genuine attempt to design a multi-faceted and comprehensive migration policy, covering most aspects of a complex issue. The dysfunctions of the Schengen area and the question of the legal pathways to Europe have been relegated to a later discussion and one may wonder whether they should not have been included in the Pact to balance out its restrictive inclination. And, in all fairness, the Pact does throw a few bones to the more cosmopolitan-minded European citizens. For instance, it reminds the member states that maritime search and rescue operations are legal and should not be impeded, or it shortens (from five to three years) the waiting period for refugees to benefit from the freedom of movement. But those few welcome additions are vastly outweighed by the fact that migration hardliners dominated the agenda-setting in the early stage of the policy-making exercise and have thus been able to frame decisively the political discussion. The end result is a policy package leaning heavily towards some repressive instruments and particularly careless when it comes to safeguarding migrants’ rights.

      The New Pact was first drafted on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme. Back then, the Commission publicly made amends and revised its approach to the issue. Sadly, the New Pact was presented to the European public when the ashes of the Moria camp were still lukewarm. One can only hope that the member states will learn from that mistake too.

      https://blog.novamigra.eu/2020/09/24/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-a-critical-first-look-analysis

    • #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration : un “nouveau départ” pour violer les droits humains

      La Commission européenne a publié aujourd’hui son « Nouveau Pacte sur l’Asile et la Migration » qui propose un nouveau cadre règlementaire et législatif. Avec ce plan, l’UE devient de facto un « leader du voyage retour » pour les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s en Méditerranée. EuroMed Droits craint que ce pacte ne détériore encore davantage la situation actuelle pour au moins trois raisons.

      Le pacte se concentre de manière obsessionnelle sur la politique de retours à travers un système de « sponsoring » : des pays européens tels que l’Autriche, la Pologne, la Hongrie ou la République tchèque – qui refusent d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s – pourront « sponsoriser » et organiser la déportation vers les pays de départ de ces réfugié.e.s. Au lieu de favoriser l’intégration, le pacte adopte une politique de retour à tout prix, même lorsque les demandeurs.ses d’asile peuvent être victimes de discrimination, persécution ou torture dans leur pays de retour. A ce jour, il n’existe aucun mécanisme permettant de surveiller ce qui arrive aux migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s une fois déporté.e.s.

      Le pacte proposé renforce la sous-traitance de la gestion des frontières. En termes concrets, l’UE renforce la coopération avec les pays non-européens afin qu’ils ferment leurs frontières et empêchent les personnes de partir. Cette coopération est sujette à l’imposition de conditions par l’UE. Une telle décision européenne se traduit par une hausse du nombre de refoulements dans la région méditerranéenne et une coopération renforcée avec des pays qui ont un piètre bilan en matière de droits humains et qui ne possèdent pas de cadre efficace pour la protection des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées.

      Le pacte vise enfin à étendre les mécanismes de tri des demandeurs.ses d’asile et des migrant.e.s dans les pays d’arrivée. Ce modèle de tri – similaire à celui utilisé dans les zones de transit aéroportuaires – accentue les difficultés de pays tels que l’Espagne, l’Italie, Malte, la Grèce ou Chypre qui accueillent déjà la majorité des migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s. Placer ces personnes dans des camps revient à mettre en place un système illégal d’incarcération automatique dès l’arrivée. Cela accroîtra la violence psychologique à laquelle les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s sont déjà soumis. Selon ce nouveau système, ces personnes seront identifié.e.s sous cinq jours et toute demande d’asile devra être traitée en douze semaines. Cette accélération de la procédure risque d’intensifier la détention et de diviser les arrivant.e.s entre demandeurs.ses d’asile et migrant.e.s économiques. Cela s’effectuerait de manière discriminatoire, sans analyse détaillée de chaque demande d’asile ni possibilité réelle de faire appel. Celles et ceux qui seront éligibles à la protection internationale seront relocalisé.e.s au sein des États membres qui acceptent de les recevoir. Les autres risqueront d’être déportés immédiatement.

      « En choisissant de sous-traiter davantage encore la gestion des frontières et d’accentuer la politique de retours, ce nouveau pacte conclut la transformation de la politique européenne en une approche pleinement sécuritaire. Pire encore, le pacte assimile la politique de “retour sponsorisé” à une forme de solidarité. Au-delà des déclarations officielles, cela démontre la volonté de l’Union européenne de criminaliser et de déshumaniser les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, Président d’EuroMed Droits.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-nouveau-depart-pour-violer-les-droits

    • Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum

      This Policy Insight examines the new Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the principles and commitments enshrined in the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees (UN GCR) and the EU Treaties. It finds that from a legal viewpoint the ‘Pact’ is not really a Pact at all, if understood as an agreement concluded between relevant EU institutional parties. Rather, it is the European Commission’s policy guide for the duration of the current 9th legislature.

      The analysis shows that the Pact has intergovernmental aspects, in both name and fundamentals. It does not pursue a genuine Migration and Asylum Union. The Pact encourages an artificial need for consensus building or de facto unanimity among all EU member states’ governments in fields where the EU Treaties call for qualified majority voting (QMV) with the European Parliament as co-legislator. The Pact does not abolish the first irregular entry rule characterising the EU Dublin Regulation. It adopts a notion of interstate solidarity that leads to asymmetric responsibilities, where member states are given the flexibility to evade participating in the relocation of asylum seekers. The Pact also runs the risk of catapulting some contested member states practices’ and priorities about localisation, speed and de-territorialisation into EU policy.

      This Policy Insight argues that the Pact’s priority of setting up an independent monitoring mechanism of border procedures’ compliance with fundamental rights is a welcome step towards the better safeguarding of the rule of law. The EU inter-institutional negotiations on the Pact’s initiatives should be timely and robust in enforcing member states’ obligations under the current EU legal standards relating to asylum and borders, namely the prevention of detention and expedited expulsions, and the effective access by all individuals to dignified treatment and effective remedies. Trust and legitimacy of EU asylum and migration policy can only follow if international (human rights and refugee protection) commitments and EU Treaty principles are put first.

      https://www.ceps.eu/ceps-publications/whose-pact

    • First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals

      This week the EU Commission published its new package of proposals on asylum and (non-EU) migration – consisting of proposals for legislation, some ‘soft law’, attempts to relaunch talks on stalled proposals and plans for future measures. The following is an explanation of the new proposals (not attempting to cover every detail) with some first thoughts. Overall, while it is possible that the new package will lead to agreement on revised asylum laws, this will come at the cost of risking reduced human rights standards.

      Background

      Since 1999, the EU has aimed to create a ‘Common European Asylum System’. A first phase of legislation was passed between 2003 and 2005, followed by a second phase between 2010 and 2013. Currently the legislation consists of: a) the Qualification Directive, which defines when people are entitled to refugee status (based on the UN Refugee Convention) or subsidiary protection status, and what rights they have; b) the Dublin III Regulation, which allocates responsibility for an asylum seeker between Member States; c) the Eurodac Regulation, which facilitates the Dublin system by setting up a database of fingerprints of asylum seekers and people who cross the external border without authorisation; d) the Asylum Procedures Directive, which sets out the procedural rules governing asylum applications, such as personal interviews and appeals; e) the Reception Conditions Directive, which sets out standards on the living conditions of asylum-seekers, such as rules on housing and welfare; and f) the Asylum Agency Regulation, which set up an EU agency (EASO) to support Member States’ processing of asylum applications.

      The EU also has legislation on other aspects of migration: (short-term) visas, border controls, irregular migration, and legal migration – much of which has connections with the asylum legislation, and all of which is covered by this week’s package. For visas, the main legislation is the visa list Regulation (setting out which non-EU countries’ citizens are subject to a short-term visa requirement, or exempt from it) and the visa code (defining the criteria to obtain a short-term Schengen visa, allowing travel between all Schengen states). The visa code was amended last year, as discussed here.

      For border controls, the main legislation is the Schengen Borders Code, setting out the rules on crossing external borders and the circumstances in which Schengen states can reinstate controls on internal borders, along with the Frontex Regulation, setting up an EU border agency to assist Member States. On the most recent version of the Frontex Regulation, see discussion here and here.

      For irregular migration, the main legislation is the Return Directive. The Commission proposed to amend it in 2018 – on which, see analysis here and here.

      For legal migration, the main legislation on admission of non-EU workers is the single permit Directive (setting out a common process and rights for workers, but not regulating admission); the Blue Card Directive (on highly paid migrants, discussed here); the seasonal workers’ Directive (discussed here); and the Directive on intra-corporate transferees (discussed here). The EU also has legislation on: non-EU students, researchers and trainees (overview here); non-EU family reunion (see summary of the legislation and case law here) and on long-term resident non-EU citizens (overview – in the context of UK citizens after Brexit – here). In 2016, the Commission proposed to revise the Blue Card Directive (see discussion here).

      The UK, Ireland and Denmark have opted out of most of these laws, except some asylum law applies to the UK and Ireland, and Denmark is covered by the Schengen and Dublin rules. So are the non-EU countries associated with Schengen and Dublin (Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). There are also a number of further databases of non-EU citizens as well as Eurodac: the EU has never met a non-EU migrant who personal data it didn’t want to store and process.

      The Refugee ‘Crisis’

      The EU’s response to the perceived refugee ‘crisis’ was both short-term and long-term. In the short term, in 2015 the EU adopted temporary laws (discussed here) relocating some asylum seekers in principle from Italy and Greece to other Member States. A legal challenge to one of these laws failed (as discussed here), but in practice Member States accepted few relocations anyway. Earlier this year, the CJEU ruled that several Member States had breached their obligations under the laws (discussed here), but by then it was a moot point.

      Longer term, the Commission proposed overhauls of the law in 2016: a) a Qualification Regulation further harmonising the law on refugee and subsidiary protection status; b) a revised Dublin Regulation, which would have set up a system of relocation of asylum seekers for future crises; c) a revised Eurodac Regulation, to take much more data from asylum seekers and other migrants; d) an Asylum Procedures Regulation, further harmonising the procedural law on asylum applications; e) a revised Reception Conditions Directive; f) a revised Asylum Agency Regulation, giving the agency more powers; and g) a new Resettlement Regulation, setting out a framework of admitting refugees directly from non-EU countries. (See my comments on some of these proposals, from back in 2016)

      However, these proposals proved unsuccessful – which is the main reason for this week’s attempt to relaunch the process. In particular, an EU Council note from February 2019 summarises the diverse problems that befell each proposal. While the EU Council Presidency and the European Parliament reached agreement on the proposals on qualification, reception conditions and resettlement in June 2018, Member States refused to support the Presidency’s deal and the European Parliament refused to renegotiate (see, for instance, the Council documents on the proposals on qualification and resettlement; see also my comments on an earlier stage of the talks, when the Council had agreed its negotiation position on the qualification regulation).

      On the asylum agency, the EP and Council agreed on the revised law in 2017, but the Commission proposed an amendment in 2018 to give the agency more powers; the Council could not agree on this. On Eurodac, the EP and Council only partly agreed on a text. On the procedures Regulation, the Council largely agreed its position, except on border procedures; on Dublin there was never much prospect of agreement because of the controversy over relocating asylum seekers. (For either proposal, a difficult negotiation with the European Parliament lay ahead).

      In other areas too, the legislative process was difficult: the Council and EP gave up negotiating amendments to the Blue Card Directive (see the last attempt at a compromise here, and the Council negotiation mandate here), and the EP has not yet agreed a position on the Returns Directive (the Council has a negotiating position, but again it leaves out the difficult issue of border procedures; there is a draft EP position from February). Having said that, the EU has been able to agree legislation giving more powers to Frontex, as well as new laws on EU migration databases, in the last few years.

      The attempted relaunch

      The Commission’s new Pact on asylum and immigration (see also the roadmap on its implementation, the Q and As, and the staff working paper) does not restart the whole process from scratch. On qualification, reception conditions, resettlement, the asylum agency, the returns Directive and the Blue Card Directive, it invites the Council and Parliament to resume negotiations. But it tries to unblock the talks as a whole by tabling two amended legislative proposals and three new legislative proposals, focussing on the issues of border procedures and relocation of asylum seekers.

      Screening at the border

      This revised proposals start with a new proposal for screening asylum seekers at the border, which would apply to all non-EU citizens who cross an external border without authorisation, who apply for asylum while being checked at the border (without meeting the conditions for legal entry), or who are disembarked after a search and rescue operation. During the screening, these non-EU citizens are not allowed to enter the territory of a Member State, unless it becomes clear that they meet the criteria for entry. The screening at the border should take no longer than 5 days, with an extra 5 days in the event of a huge influx. (It would also be possible to apply the proposed law to those on the territory who evaded border checks; for them the deadline to complete the screening is 3 days).

      Screening has six elements, as further detailed in the proposal: a health check, an identity check, registration in a database, a security check, filling out a debriefing form, and deciding on what happens next. At the end of the screening, the migrant is channelled either into the expulsion process (if no asylum claim has been made, and if the migrant does not meet the conditions for entry) or, if an asylum claim is made, into the asylum process – with an indication of whether the claim should be fast-tracked or not. It’s also possible that an asylum seeker would be relocated to another Member State. The screening is carried out by national officials, possibly with support from EU agencies.

      To ensure human rights protection, there must be independent monitoring to address allegations of non-compliance with human rights. These allegations might concern breaches of EU or international law, national law on detention, access to the asylum procedure, or non-refoulement (the ban on sending people to an unsafe country). Migrants must be informed about the process and relevant EU immigration and data protection law. There is no provision for judicial review of the outcome of the screening process, although there would be review as part of the next step (asylum or return).

      Asylum procedures

      The revised proposal for an asylum procedures Regulation would leave in place most of the Commission’s 2016 proposal to amend the law, adding some specific further proposed amendments, which either link back to the screening proposal or aim to fast-track decisions and expulsions more generally.

      On the first point, the usual rules on informing asylum applicants and registering their application would not apply until after the end of the screening. A border procedure may apply following the screening process, but Member States must apply the border procedure in cases where an asylum seeker used false documents, is a perceived national security threat, or falls within the new ground for fast-tracking cases (on which, see below). The latter obligation is subject to exceptions where a Member State has reported that a non-EU country is not cooperating on readmission; the process for dealing with that issue set out under the 2019 amendments to the visa code will then apply. Also, the border process cannot apply to unaccompanied minors or children under 12, unless they are a supposed national security risk. Further exceptions apply where the asylum seeker is vulnerable or has medical needs, the application is not inadmissible or cannot be fast-tracked, or detention conditions cannot be guaranteed. A Member State might apply the Dublin process to determine which Member State is responsible for the asylum claim during the border process. The whole border process (including any appeal) must last no more than 12 weeks, and can only be used to declare applications inadmissible or apply the new ground for fast-tracking them.

      There would also be a new border expulsion procedure, where an asylum application covered by the border procedure was rejected. This is subject to its own 12-week deadline, starting from the point when the migrant is no longer allowed to remain. Much of the Return Directive would apply – but not the provisions on the time period for voluntary departure, remedies and the grounds for detention. Instead, the border expulsion procedure would have its own stricter rules on these issues.

      As regards general fast-tracking, in order to speed up the expulsion process for unsuccessful applications, a rejection of an asylum application would have to either incorporate an expulsion decision or entail a simultaneous separate expulsion decision. Appeals against expulsion decisions would then be subject to the same rules as appeals against asylum decisions. If the asylum seeker comes from a country with a refugee recognition rate below 20%, his or her application must be fast-tracked (this would even apply to unaccompanied minors) – unless circumstances in that country have changed, or the asylum seeker comes from a group for whom the low recognition rate is not representative (for instance, the recognition rate might be higher for LGBT asylum-seekers from that country). Many more appeals would be subject to a one-week time limit for the rejected asylum seeker to appeal, and there could be only one level of appeal against decisions taken within a border procedure.

      Eurodac

      The revised proposal for Eurodac would build upon the 2016 proposal, which was already far-reaching: extending Eurodac to include not only fingerprints, but also photos and other personal data; reducing the age of those covered by Eurodac from 14 to 6; removing the time limits and the limits on use of the fingerprints taken from persons who had crossed the border irregularly; and creating a new obligation to collect data of all irregular migrants over age 6 (currently fingerprint data for this group cannot be stored, but can simply be checked, as an option, against the data on asylum seekers and irregular border crossers). The 2020 proposal additionally provides for interoperability with other EU migration databases, taking of personal data during the screening process, including more data on the migration status of each person, and expressly applying the law to those disembarked after a search and rescue operation.

      Dublin rules on asylum responsibility

      A new proposal for asylum management would replace the Dublin regulation (meaning that the Commission has withdrawn its 2016 proposal to replace that Regulation). The 2016 proposal would have created a ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry, requiring that State to examine first whether many of the grounds for removing an asylum-seeker to a non-EU country apply before considering whether another Member State might be responsible for the application (because the asylum seeker’s family live there, for instance). It would also have imposed obligations directly on asylum-seekers to cooperate with the process, rather than only regulate relations between Member States. These obligations would have been enforced by punishing asylum seekers who disobeyed: removing their reception conditions (apart from emergency health care); fast-tracking their substantive asylum applications; refusing to consider new evidence from them; and continuing the asylum application process in their absence.

      It would no longer be possible for asylum seekers to provide additional evidence of family links, with a view to being in the same country as a family member. Overturning a CJEU judgment (see further discussion here), unaccompanied minors would no longer have been able to make applications in multiple Member States (in the absence of a family member in any of them). However, the definition of family members would have been widened, to include siblings and families formed in a transit country. Responsibility for an asylum seeker based on the first Member State of irregular entry (a commonly applied criterion) would have applied indefinitely, rather than expire one year after entry as it does under the current rules. The ‘Sangatte clause’ (responsibility after five months of living in a second Member State, if the ‘irregular entry’ criterion no longer applies) would be dropped. The ‘sovereignty clause’, which played a key part in the 2015-16 refugee ‘crisis’ (it lets a Member State take responsibility for any application even if the Dublin rules do not require it, cf Germany accepting responsibility for Syrian asylum seekers) would have been sharply curtailed. Time limits for detention during the transfer process would be reduced. Remedies for asylum seekers would have been curtailed: they would only have seven days to appeal against a transfer; courts would have fifteen days to decide (although they could have stayed on the territory throughout); and the grounds of review would have been curtailed.

      Finally, the 2016 proposal would have tackled the vexed issue of disproportionate allocation of responsibility for asylum seekers by setting up an automated system determining how many asylum seekers each Member State ‘should’ have based on their size and GDP. If a Member State were responsible for excessive numbers of applicants, Member States which were receiving fewer numbers would have to take more to help out. If they refused, they would have to pay €250,000 per applicant.

      The 2020 proposal drops some of the controversial proposals from 2016, including the ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry (the current rule, giving Member States an option to decide if a non-EU country is responsible for the application on narrower grounds than in the 2016 proposal, would still apply). Also, the sovereignty clause would now remain unchanged.

      However, the 2020 proposal also retains parts of the 2016 proposal: the redefinition of ‘family member’ (which could be more significant now that the bottleneck is removed, unless Member States choose to apply the relevant rules on non-EU countries’ responsibility during the border procedure already); obligations for asylum seekers (redrafted slightly); some of the punishments for non-compliant asylum-seekers (the cut-off for considering evidence would stay, as would the loss of benefits except for those necessary to ensure a basic standard of living: see the CJEU case law in CIMADE and Haqbin); dropping the provision on evidence of family links; changing the rules on responsibility for unaccompanied minors; retaining part of the changes to the irregular entry criterion (it would now cease to apply after three years; the Sangatte clause would still be dropped; it would apply after search and rescue but not apply in the event of relocation); curtailing judicial review (the grounds would still be limited; the time limit to appeal would be 14 days; courts would not have a strict deadline to decide; suspensive effect would not apply in all cases); and the reduced time limits for detention.

      The wholly new features of the 2020 proposal are: some vague provisions about crisis management; responsibility for an asylum application for the Member State which issued a visa or residence document which expired in the last three years (the current rule is responsibility if the visa expired less than six months ago, and the residence permit expired less than a year ago); responsibility for an asylum application for a Member State in which a non-EU citizen obtained a diploma; and the possibility for refugees or persons with subsidiary protection status to obtain EU long-term resident status after three years, rather than five.

      However, the most significant feature of the new proposal is likely to be its attempt to solve the underlying issue of disproportionate allocation of asylum seekers. Rather than a mechanical approach to reallocating responsibility, the 2020 proposal now provides for a menu of ‘solidarity contributions’: relocation of asylum seekers; relocation of refugees; ‘return sponsorship’; or support for ‘capacity building’ in the Member State (or a non-EU country) facing migratory pressure. There are separate rules for search and rescue disembarkations, on the one hand, and more general migratory pressures on the other. Once the Commission determines that the latter situation exists, other Member States have to choose from the menu to offer some assistance. Ultimately the Commission will adopt a decision deciding what the contributions will be. Note that ‘return sponsorship’ comes with a ticking clock: if the persons concerned are not expelled within eight months, the sponsoring Member State must accept them on its territory.

      Crisis management

      The issue of managing asylum issues in a crisis has been carved out of the Dublin proposal into a separate proposal, which would repeal an EU law from 2001 that set up a framework for offering ‘temporary protection’ in a crisis. Note that Member States have never used the 2001 law in practice.

      Compared to the 2001 law, the new proposal is integrated into the EU asylum legislation that has been adopted or proposed in the meantime. It similarly applies in the event of a ‘mass influx’ that prevents the effective functioning of the asylum system. It would apply the ‘solidarity’ process set out in the proposal to replace the Dublin rules (ie relocation of asylum seekers and other measures), with certain exceptions and shorter time limits to apply that process.

      The proposal focusses on providing for possible exceptions to the usual asylum rules. In particular, during a crisis, the Commission could authorise a Member State to apply temporary derogations from the rules on border asylum procedures (extending the time limit, using the procedure to fast-track more cases), border return procedures (again extending the time limit, more easily justifying detention), or the time limit to register asylum applicants. Member States could also determine that due to force majeure, it was not possible to observe the normal time limits for registering asylum applications, applying the Dublin process for responsibility for asylum applications, or offering ‘solidarity’ to other Member States.

      Finally, the new proposal, like the 2001 law, would create a potential for a form of separate ‘temporary protection’ status for the persons concerned. A Member State could suspend the consideration of asylum applications from people coming from the country facing a crisis for up to a year, in the meantime giving them status equivalent to ‘subsidiary protection’ status in the EU qualification law. After that point it would have to resume consideration of the applications. It would need the Commission’s approval, whereas the 2001 law left it to the Council to determine a situation of ‘mass influx’ and provided for the possible extension of the special rules for up to three years.

      Other measures

      The Commission has also adopted four soft law measures. These comprise: a Recommendation on asylum crisis management; a Recommendation on resettlement and humanitarian admission; a Recommendation on cooperation between Member States on private search and rescue operations; and guidance on the applicability of EU law on smuggling of migrants – notably concluding that it cannot apply where (as in the case of law of the sea) there is an obligation to rescue.

      On other issues, the Commission plan is to use current legislation – in particular the recent amendment to the visa code, which provides for sticks to make visas more difficult to get for citizens of countries which don’t cooperate on readmission of people, and carrots to make visas easier to get for citizens of countries which do cooperate on readmission. In some areas, such as the Schengen system, there will be further strategies and plans in the near future; it is not clear if this will lead to more proposed legislation.

      However, on legal migration, the plan is to go further than relaunching the amendment of the Blue Card Directive, as the Commission is also planning to propose amendments to the single permit and long-term residence laws referred to above – leading respectively to more harmonisation of the law on admission of non-EU workers and enhanced possibilities for long-term resident non-EU citizens to move between Member States (nb the latter plan is separate from this week’s proposal to amend this law as regards refugees and people with subsidiary protection already). Both these plans are relevant to British citizens moving to the EU after the post-Brexit transition period – and the latter is also relevant to British citizens covered by the withdrawal agreement.

      Comments

      This week’s plan is less a complete restart of EU law in this area than an attempt to relaunch discussions on a blocked set of amendments to that law, which moreover focusses on a limited set of issues. Will it ‘work’? There are two different ways to answer that question.

      First, will it unlock the institutional blockage? Here it should be kept in mind that the European Parliament and the Council had largely agreed on several of the 2016 proposals already; they would have been adopted in 2018 already had not the Council treated all the proposals as a package, and not gone back on agreements which the Council Presidency reached with the European Parliament. It is always open to the Council to get at least some of these proposals adopted quickly by reversing these approaches.

      On the blocked proposals, the Commission has targeted the key issues of border procedures and allocation of asylum-seekers. If the former leads to more quick removals of unsuccessful applicants, the latter issue is no longer so pressing. But it is not clear if the Member States will agree to anything on border procedures, or whether such an agreement will result in more expulsions anyway – because the latter depends on the willingness of non-EU countries, which the EU cannot legislate for (and does not even address in this most recent package). And because it is uncertain whether they will result in more expulsions, Member States will be wary of agreeing to anything which either results in more obligations to accept asylum-seekers on their territory, or leaves them with the same number as before.

      The idea of ‘return sponsorship’ – which reads like a grotesque parody of individuals sponsoring children in developing countries via charities – may not be appealing except to those countries like France, which have the capacity to twist arms in developing countries to accept returns. Member States might be able to agree on a replacement for the temporary protection Directive on the basis that they will never use that replacement either. And Commission threats to use infringement proceedings to enforce the law might not worry Member States who recall that the CJEU ruled on their failure to relocate asylum-seekers after the relocation law had already expired, and that the Court will soon rule on Hungary’s expulsion of the Central European University after it has already left.

      As to whether the proposals will ‘work’ in terms of managing asylum flows fairly and compatibly with human rights, it is striking how much they depend upon curtailing appeal rights, even though appeals are often successful. The proposed limitation of appeal rights will also be maintained in the Dublin system; and while the proposed ‘bottleneck’ of deciding on removals to non-EU countries before applying the Dublin system has been removed, a variation on this process may well apply in the border procedures process instead. There is no new review of the assessment of the safety of non-EU countries – which is questionable in light of the many reports of abuse in Libya. While the EU is not proposing, as the wildest headbangers would want, to turn people back or refuse applications without consideration, the question is whether the fast-track consideration of applications and then appeals will constitute merely a Potemkin village of procedural rights that mean nothing in practice.

      Increased detention is already a feature of the amendments proposed earlier: the reception conditions proposal would add a new ground for detention; the return Directive proposal would inevitably increase detention due to curtailing voluntary departure (as discussed here). Unfortunately the Commission’s claim in its new communication that its 2018 proposal is ‘promoting’ voluntary return is therefore simply false. Trump-style falsehoods have no place in the discussion of EU immigration or asylum law.

      The latest Eurodac proposal would not do much compared to the 2016 proposal – but then, the 2016 proposal would already constitute an enormous increase in the amount of data collected and shared by that system.

      Some elements of the package are more positive. The possibility for refugees and people with subsidiary protection to get EU long-term residence status earlier would be an important step toward making asylum ‘valid throughout the Union’, as referred to in the Treaties. The wider definition of family members, and the retention of the full sovereignty clause, may lead to some fairer results under the Dublin system. Future plans to improve the long-term residents’ Directive are long overdue. The Commission’s sound legal assessment that no one should be prosecuted for acting on their obligations to rescue people in distress at sea is welcome. The quasi-agreed text of the reception conditions Directive explicitly rules out Trump-style separate detention of children.

      No proposals from the EU can solve the underlying political issue: a chunk of public opinion is hostile to more migration, whether in frontline Member States, other Member States, or transit countries outside the EU. The politics is bound to affect what Member States and non-EU countries alike are willing to agree to. And for the same reason, even if a set of amendments to the system is ultimately agreed, there will likely be continuing issues of implementation, especially illegal pushbacks and refusals to accept relocation.

      https://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/09/first-analysis-of-eus-new-asylum.html?spref=fb

    • Pacte européen sur les migrations et l’asile : Le rendez-vous manqué de l’UE

      Le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile présenté par la Commission ce 23 septembre, loin de tirer les leçons de l’échec et du coût humain intolérable des politiques menées depuis 30 ans, s’inscrit dans la continuité des logiques déjà largement éprouvées, fondées sur une approche répressive et sécuritaire au service de l’endiguement et des expulsions et au détriment d’une politique d’accueil qui s’attache à garantir et à protéger la dignité et les droits fondamentaux.

      Des « nouveaux » camps européens aux frontières pour filtrer les personnes arrivées sur le territoire européen et expulser le plus grand nombre

      En réaction au drame des incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, affirmait le 17 septembre devant les députés européens qu’« il n’y aurait pas d’autres Moria » mais de « véritables centres d’accueil » aux frontières européennes.

      Si le nouveau pacte prévoie effectivement la création de « nouveaux » camps conjuguée à une « nouvelle » procédure accélérée aux frontières, ces derniers s’apparentent largement à l’approche hotspot mise en œuvre par l’Union européenne (UE) depuis 2015 afin d’organiser la sélection des personnes qu’elle souhaite accueillir et l’expulsion, depuis la frontière, de tous celles qu’elle considère « indésirables ».

      Le pacte prévoie ainsi la mise en place « d’un contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire pour toutes les personnes qui se présentent aux frontières extérieures ou après un débarquement, à la suite d’une opération de recherche et de sauvetage ». Il s’agira, pour les pays situés à la frontière extérieure de l’UE, de procéder – dans un délai de 5 jours et avec l’appui des agences européennes (l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes – Frontex et le Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile – EASO) – à des contrôles d’identité (prise d’empreintes et enregistrement dans les bases de données européennes) doublés de contrôles sécuritaires et sanitaires afin de procéder à un tri préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire, permettant d’orienter ensuite les personne vers :

      Une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière pour celles possédant une nationalité pour laquelle le taux de reconnaissance d’une protection internationale, à l’échelle de l’UE, est inférieure à 20%
      Une procédure d’asile normale pour celles considérées comme éligibles à une protection.
      Une procédure d’expulsion immédiate, depuis la frontière, pour toute celles qui auront été rejetées par ce dispositif de tri, dans un délai de 12 semaines.

      Pendant cette procédure de filtrage à la frontière, les personnes seraient considérées comme n’étant pas encore entrées sur le territoire européen ce qui permettrait aux Etats de déroger aux conventions de droit international qui s’y appliquent.

      Un premier projet pilote est notamment prévu à Lesbos, conjointement avec les autorités grecques, pour installer un nouveau camp sur l’île avec l’appui d’une Task Force européenne, directement placée sous le contrôle de la direction générale des affaires intérieure de la Commission européenne (DG HOME).

      Difficile de voir où se trouve l’innovation dans la proposition présentée par la Commission. Si ce n’est que les États européens souhaitent pousser encore plus loin à la fois la logique de filtrage à ces frontières ainsi que la sous-traitance de leur contrôle. Depuis l’été 2018, l’Union européenne défend la création de « centres contrôlés au sein de l’UE » d’une part et de « plateformes de débarquement dans les pays tiers » d’autre part. L’UE, à travers ce nouveau mécanisme, vise à organiser l’expulsion rapide des migrants qui sont parvenus, souvent au péril de leur vie, à pénétrer sur son territoire. Pour ce faire, la coopération accrue avec les gardes-frontières des États non européens et l’appui opérationnel de l’agence Frontex sont encore et toujours privilégiés.
      Un « nouvel écosystème en matière de retour »

      L’obsession européenne pour l’amélioration du « taux de retour » se retrouve au cœur de ce nouveau pacte, en repoussant toujours plus les limites en matière de coopération extérieure et d’enfermement des personnes étrangères jugées indésirables et en augmentant de façon inédite ses moyens opérationnels.

      Selon l’expression de Margaritis Schinas, commissaire grec en charge de la « promotion du mode de vie européen », la nouvelle procédure accélérée aux frontières s’accompagnera d’« un nouvel écosystème européen en matière de retour ». Il sera piloté par un « nouveau coordinateur de l’UE chargé des retours » ainsi qu’un « réseau de haut niveau coordonnant les actions nationales » avec le soutien de l’agence Frontex, qui devrait devenir « le bras opérationnel de la politique de retour européenne ».

      Rappelons que Frontex a vu ses moyens décuplés ces dernières années, notamment en vue d’expulser plus de personnes migrantes. Celle-ci a encore vu ses moyens renforcés depuis l’entrée en vigueur de son nouveau règlement le 4 décembre 2019 dont la Commission souhaite accélérer la mise en œuvre effective. Au-delà d’une augmentation de ses effectifs et de la possibilité d’acquérir son propre matériel, l’agence bénéficie désormais de pouvoirs étendus pour identifier les personnes « expulsables » du territoire européen, obtenir les documents de voyage nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de leurs expulsions ainsi que pour coordonner des opérations d’expulsion au service des Etats membres.

      La Commission souhaite également faire aboutir, d’ici le second trimestre 2021, le projet de révision de la directive européenne « Retour », qui constitue un recul sans précédent du cadre de protection des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : L’expulsion au cœur des politiques migratoires européennes, 22 mai 2019
      Des « partenariats sur-mesure » avec les pays d’origine et de transit

      La Commission étend encore redoubler d’efforts afin d’inciter les Etats non européens à participer activement à empêcher les départs vers l’Europe ainsi qu’à collaborer davantage en matière de retour et de réadmission en utilisant l’ensemble des instruments politiques à sa disposition. Ces dernières années ont vu se multiplier les instruments européens de coopération formelle (à travers la signature, entre autres, d’accords de réadmission bilatéraux ou multilatéraux) et informelle (à l’instar de la tristement célèbre déclaration entre l’UE et la Turquie de mars 2016) à tel point qu’il est devenu impossible, pour les États ciblés, de coopérer avec l’UE dans un domaine spécifique sans que les objectifs européens en matière migratoire ne soient aussi imposés.

      L’exécutif européen a enfin souligné sa volonté de d’exploiter les possibilités offertes par le nouveau règlement sur les visas Schengen, entré en vigueur en février 2020. Celui-ci prévoie d’évaluer, chaque année, le degré de coopération des Etats non européens en matière de réadmission. Le résultat de cette évaluation permettra d’adopter une décision de facilitation de visa pour les « bon élèves » ou à l’inverse, d’imposer des mesures de restrictions de visas aux « mauvais élèves ». Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Expulsions contre visas : le droit à la mobilité marchandé, 2 février 2020.

      Conduite au seul prisme des intérêts européens, cette politique renforce le caractère historiquement déséquilibré des relations de « coopération » et entraîne en outre des conséquences désastreuses sur les droits des personnes migrantes, notamment celui de quitter tout pays, y compris le leur. Sous couvert d’aider ces pays à « se développer », les mesures « incitatives » européennes ne restent qu’un moyen de poursuivre ses objectifs et d’imposer sa vision des migrations. En coopérant davantage avec les pays d’origine et de transit, parmi lesquelles des dictatures et autres régimes autoritaires, l’UE renforce l’externalisation de ses politiques migratoires, sous-traitant la gestion des exilées aux Etats extérieurs à l’UE, tout en se déresponsabilisant des violations des droits perpétrées hors de ses frontières.
      Solidarité à la carte, entre relocalisation et expulsion

      Le constat d’échec du système Dublin – machine infernale de l’asile européen – conjugué à la volonté de parvenir à trouver un consensus suite aux profonds désaccords qui avaient mené les négociations sur Dublin IV dans l’impasse, la Commission souhaite remplacer l’actuel règlement de Dublin par un nouveau règlement sur la gestion de l’asile et de l’immigration, liant étroitement les procédures d’asile aux procédures d’expulsion.

      Les quotas de relocalisation contraignants utilisés par le passé, à l’instar du mécanisme de relocalisation mis en place entre 2015 et 2017 qui fut un échec tant du point de vue du nombre de relocalisations (seulement 25 000 relocalisations sur les 160 000 prévues) que du refus de plusieurs Etats d’y participer, semblent être abandonnés.

      Le nouveau pacte propose donc un nouveau mécanisme de solidarité, certes obligatoire mais flexible dans ses modalités. Ainsi les Etats membres devront choisir, selon une clé de répartition définie :

      Soit de participer à l’effort de relocalisation des personnes identifiées comme éligibles à la protection internationale depuis les frontières extérieures pour prendre en charge l’examen de leur demande d’asile.
      Soit de participer au nouveau concept de « parrainage des retours » inventé par la Commission européenne. Concrètement, il s’agit d’être « solidaire autrement », en s’engageant activement dans la politique de retour européenne par la mise en œuvre des expulsions des personnes que l’UE et ses Etats membres souhaitent éloigner du territoire, avec la possibilité de concentrer leurs efforts sur les nationalités pour lesquelles leurs perspectives de faire aboutir l’expulsion est la plus élevée.

      De nouvelles règles pour les « situations de crise et de force majeure »

      Le pacte prévoie d’abroger la directive européenne relative à des normes minimales pour l’octroi d’une protection temporaire en cas d’afflux massif de personnes déplacées, au profit d’un nouveau règlement européen relatif aux « situations de crise et de force majeure ». L’UE et ses Etats membres ont régulièrement essuyé les critiques des acteurs de la société civile pour n’avoir jamais activé la procédure prévue par la directive de 2001, notamment dans le cadre de situation exceptionnelle telle que la crise de l’accueil des personnes arrivées aux frontières sud de l’UE en 2015.

      Le nouveau règlement prévoie notamment qu’en cas de « situation de crise ou de force majeure » les Etats membres pourraient déroger aux règles qui s’appliquent en matière d’asile, en suspendant notamment l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant un durée d’un mois maximum. Cette mesure entérine des pratiques contraires au droit international et européen, à l’instar de ce qu’a fait la Grèce début mars 2020 afin de refouler toutes les personnes qui tenteraient de pénétrer le territoire européen depuis la Turquie voisine. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Frontière Grèce-Turquie : de l’approche hotspot au scandale de la guerre aux migrant·e ·s, 3 mars 2020

      Cette proposition représente un recul sans précédent du droit d’asile aux frontières et fait craindre de multiples violations du principe de non refoulement consacré par la Convention de Genève.

      Bien loin d’engager un changement de cap des politiques migratoires européennes, le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile ne semble n’être qu’un nouveau cadre de plus pour poursuivre une approche des mouvements migratoires qui, de longue date, s’est construite autour de la volonté d’empêcher les arrivées aux frontières et d’organiser un tri parmi les personnes qui auraient réussi à braver les obstacles pour atteindre le territoire européen, entre celles considérées éligibles à la demande d’asile et toutes les autres qui devraient être expulsées.

      De notre point de vue, cela signifie surtout que des milliers de personnes continueront à être privées de liberté et à subir les dispositifs répressifs des Etats membres de l’Union européenne. Les conséquences néfastes sur la dignité humaine et les droits fondamentaux de cette approche sont flagrantes, les personnes exilées et leurs soutiens y sont confrontées tous les jours.

      Encore une fois, des moyens très importants sont consacrés à financer l’érection de barrières physiques, juridiques et technologiques ainsi que la construction de camps sur les routes migratoires tandis qu’ils pourraient utilement être redéployés pour accueillir dignement et permettre un accès inconditionnel au territoire européen pour les personnes bloquées à ses frontières extérieures afin d’examiner avec attention et impartialité leurs situations et assurer le respect effectif des droits de tou∙te∙s.

      Nous appelons à un changement radical des politiques migratoires, pour une Europe qui encourage les solidarités, fondée sur la protection des droits humains et la dignité humaine afin d’assurer la protection des personnes et non pas leur exclusion.

      https://www.lacimade.org/pacte-europeen-sur-les-migrations-et-lasile-le-rendez-vous-manque-de-lue

    • EU’s new migrant ‘pact’ is as squalid as its refugee camps

      Governments need to share responsibility for asylum seekers, beyond merely ejecting the unwanted

      One month after fires swept through Europe’s largest, most squalid refugee camp, the EU’s migration policies present a picture as desolate as the blackened ruins of Moria on the Greek island of Lesbos. The latest effort at overhauling these policies is a European Commission “pact on asylum and migration”, which is not a pact at all. Its proposals sharply divide the EU’s 27 governments.

      In an attempt to appease central and eastern European countries hostile to admitting asylum-seekers, the commission suggests, in an Orwellian turn of phrase, that they should operate “relocation and return sponsorships”, dispatching people refused entry to their places of origin. This sort of task is normally reserved for nightclub bouncers.

      The grim irony is that Hungary and Poland, two countries that would presumably be asked to take charge of such expulsions, are the subject of EU disciplinary proceedings due to alleged violations of the rule of law. It remains a mystery how, if the commission proposal moves forward, the EU will succeed in binding Hungary and Poland into a common asylum policy and bend them into accepting EU definitions of the rule of law.

      Perhaps the best thing to be said of the commission’s plan is that, unlike the UK government, EU policymakers are not toying with hare-brained schemes of sending asylum-seekers to Ascension Island in the south Atlantic. Such options are the imagined privilege of a former imperial power not divested of all its far-flung possessions.

      Yet the commission’s initiative still reeks of wishful thinking. It foresees a process in which authorities swiftly check the identities, security status and health of irregular migrants, before returning them home, placing them in the asylum system or putting them in temporary facilities. This will supposedly decongest EU border zones, as governments will agree how to relocate new arrivals. But it is precisely the lack of such agreement since 2015 that led to Moria’s disgraceful conditions.

      The commission should not be held responsible for governments failing to shoulder their responsibilities. It is also justified in emphasising the need for a strong EU frontier. This is a precondition for free movement inside the bloc, vital for a flourishing single market.

      True, the Schengen system of border-free internal travel is curtailed at present because of the pandemic, not to mention restrictions introduced in some countries after the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis. But no government wants to abandon Schengen. Where they fall out with each other is over the housing of refugees and migrants.

      Europe’s overcrowded, unhygienic refugee camps, and the paralysis that grips EU policies, are all the more shameful in that governments no longer face a border emergency. Some 60,800 irregular migrants crossed into the EU between January and August, 14 per cent less than the same period in 2019, according to the EU border agency.

      By contrast, there were 1.8m illegal border crossings in 2015, a different order of magnitude. Refugees from conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria made desperate voyages across the Mediterranean, with thousands drowning in ramshackle boats. Some countries, led by Germany and Sweden, were extremely generous in opening their doors to refugees. Others were not.

      The roots of today’s problems lie in the measures devised to address that crisis, above all a 2016 accord with Turkey. Irregular migrants were kept on Moria and other Greek islands, designated “hotspots”, in the expectation that failed asylum applicants would be smoothly returned to Turkey, its coffers replenished by billions of euros in EU assistance. In practice, few went back to Turkey and the understaffed, underfunded “hotspots” became places of tension between refugees and locals.

      Unable to agree on a relocation scheme among themselves, EU governments lapsed into a de facto policy of deterrence of irregular migrants. The pandemic provided an excuse for Italy and Malta to close their ports to people rescued at sea. Visiting the Greek-Turkish border in March, Ursula von der Leyen, the commission president, declared: “I thank Greece for being our European aspida [shield].”

      The legitimacy of EU refugee policies depends on adherence to international law, as well the bloc’s own rules. Its practical success requires all governments to share a responsibility for asylum-seekers that goes beyond ejecting unwanted individuals. Otherwise the EU will fall into the familiar trap of cobbling together unsatisfactory half-measures that guarantee more trouble in the future.

      https://www.ft.com/content/c50c6b9c-75a8-40b1-900d-a228faa382dc?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754

    • The EU’s pact against migration, Part One

      The EU Commission’s proposal for a ‘New Pact for Migration and Asylum’ offers no prospect of ending the enduring mobility conflict, opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The ’New Pact for Migration and Asylum’, announced by the European Commission in July 2019, was finally presented on September 23, 2020. The Pact was eagerly anticipated as it was described as a “fresh start on migration in Europe”, acknowledging not only that Dublin had failed, but also that the negotiations between European member states as to what system might replace it had reached a standstill.

      The fire in Moria that left more than 13.000 people stranded in the streets of Lesvos island offered a glaring symbol of the failure of the current EU policy. The public outcry it caused and expressions of solidarity it crystallised across Europe pressured the Commission to respond through the publication of its Pact.

      Considering the trajectory of EU migration policies over the last decades, the particular position of the Commission within the European power structure and the current political conjuncture of strong anti-migration positions in Europe, we did not expect the Commission’s proposal to address the mobility conflict underlying its migration policy crisis in a constructive way. And indeed, the Pact’s main promise is to manage the diverging positions of member states through a new mechanism of “flexible solidarity” between member states in sharing the “burden” of migrants who have arrived on European territory. Perpetuating the trajectory of the last decades, it however remains premised on keeping most migrants from the global South out at all cost. The “New Pact” then is effectively a pact between European states against migrants. The Pact, which will be examined and possibly adopted by the European Parliament and Council in the coming months, confirms the impasse to which three decades of European migration and asylum policy have led, and an absence of any political imagination worthy of the name.
      The EU’s migration regime’s failed architecture

      The current architecture of the European border regime is based on two main and intertwined pillars: the Schengen Implementing Convention (SIC, or Schengen II) and the Dublin Convention, both signed in 1990, and gradually enforced in the following years.[1]

      Created outside the EC/EU context, they became the central rationalities of the emerging European border and migration regime after their incorporation into EU law through the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997/99). Schengen instituted the EU’s territory as an area of free movement for its citizens and, as a direct consequence, reinforced the exclusion of citizens of the global South and pushed control towards its external borders.

      However this profound transformation of European borders left unchanged the unbalanced systemic relations between Europe and the Global South, within which migrants’ movements are embedded. As a result, this policy shift did not stop migrants from reaching the EU but rather illegalised their mobility, forcing them to resort to precarious migration strategies and generating an easily exploitable labour force that has become a large-scale and permanent feature of EU economies.

      The more than 40,000 migrant deaths recorded at the EU’s borders by NGOs since the end of the 1980s are the lethal outcomes of this enduring mobility conflict opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The second pillar of the EU’s migration architecture, the Dublin Convention, addressed asylum seekers and their allocation between member-states. To prevent them from filing applications in several EU countries – derogatively referred to as “asylum shopping” – the 2003 Dublin regulation states that the asylum seekers’ first country of entry into the EU is responsible for processing their claims. Dublin thus created an uneven European geography of (ir)responsibility that allowed the member states not directly situated at the intersection of European borders and routes of migration to abnegate their responsibility to provide shelter and protection, and placed a heavier “burden” on the shoulders of states located at the EU’s external borders.

      This unbalanced architecture, around which the entire Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was constructed, would begin to wobble as soon as the number of people arriving on the EU’s shores rose, leading to crisis-driven policy responses to prevent the migration regime from collapsing under the pressure of migrants’ refusal to be assigned to a country that was not of their choosing, and conflicts between member states.

      As a result, the development of a European border, migration and asylum policy has been driven by crisis and is inherently reactive. This pattern particularly holds for the last decade, when the large-scale movements of migrants to Europe in the wake of the Arab Uprisings in 2011 put the EU migration regime into permanent crisis mode and prompted hasty reforms. As of 2011, Italy allowed Tunisians to move on, leading to the re-introduction of border controls by states such as France, while the same year the 2011 European Court of Human Rights’ judgement brought Dublin deportations to Greece to a halt because of the appalling reception and living conditions there. The increasing refusal by asylum seekers to surrender their fingerprints – the core means of implementing Dublin – as of 2013 further destabilized the migration regime.

      The instability only grew when in April 2015, more then 1,200 people died in two consecutive shipwrecks, forcing the Commission to publish its ‘European Agenda for Migration’ in May 2015. The 2015 agenda announced the creation of the hotspot system in the hope of re-stabilising the European migration regime through a targeted intervention of European agencies at Europe’s borders. Essentially, the hotspot approach offered a deal to EU member states: comprehensive registration in Europeanised structures (the hotspots) by so-called “front-line states” – thus re-imposing Dublin – in exchange for relocation of part of the registered migrants to other EU countries – thereby alleviating front-line states of part of their “burden”.

      This plan however collapsed before it could ever work, as it was immediately followed by the large-scale summer arrivals of 2015 as migrants trekked across Europe’s borders. It was simultaneously boycotted by several member states who refused relocations and continue to lead the charge in fomenting an explicit anti-migration agenda in the EU. While border controls were soon reintroduced, relocations never materialised in a meaningful manner in the years that followed.

      With the Dublin regime effectively paralysed and the EU unable to agree on a new mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers within Europe, the EU resorted to the decades-old policies that had shaped the European border and migration regime since its inception: keeping migrants out at all cost through border control implemented by member states, European agencies or outsourced to third countries.

      Considering the profound crisis the turbulent movements of migrants had plunged the EU into in the summer of 2015, no measure was deemed excessive in achieving this exclusionary end: neither the tacit acceptance of violent expulsions and push-backs by Spain and Greece, nor the outsourcing of border control to Libyan torturers, nor the shameless collaboration with dictatorial regimes such as Turkey.

      Under the guise of “tackling the root causes of migration”, development aid was diverted and used to impose border externalisation and deportation agreements. But the external dimension of the EU’s migration regime has proven just as unstable as its internal one – as the re-opening of borders by Turkey in March 2020 demonstrates. The movements of illegalised migrants towards the EU could never be entirely contained and those who reached the shores of Europe were increasingly relegated to infrastructures of detention. Even if keeping thousands of migrants stranded in the hell of Moria may not have been part of the initial hotspot plan, it certainly has been the outcome of the EU’s internal blockages and ultimately effective in shoring up the EU’s strategy of deterrence.

      The “New Pact” perpetuating the EU’s failed policy of closure

      Today the “New Pact”, promised for Spring 2020 and apparently forgotten at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, has been revived in a hurry to address the destruction of Moria hotspot. While detailed analysis of the regulations that it proposes are beyond the scope of this article,[2] the broad intentions of the Pact’s rationale are clear.

      Despite all its humane and humanitarian rhetoric and some language critically addressing the manifest absence of the rule of law at the border of Europe, the Commission’s pact is a pact against migration. Taking stock of the continued impasse in terms of internal distribution of migrants, it re-affirms the EU’s central objective of reducing, massively the number of asylum seekers to be admitted to Europe. It promises to do so by continuing to erect chains of externalised border control along migrants’ entire trajectories (what it refers to as the “whole-of-route approach”).

      Those who do arrive should be swiftly screened and sorted in an infrastructure of detention along the borders of Europe. The lucky few who will succeed in fitting their lives into the shrinking boxes of asylum law are to be relocated to other EU countries in function of a mechanism of distribution based on population size and wealth of member states.

      Whether this will indeed undo the imbalances of the Dublin regime remains an open question[3], nevertheless, this relocation key is one of the few positive steps offered by the Pact since it comes closer to migrants’ own “relocation key” but still falls short of granting asylum seekers the freedom to choose their country of protection and residence.[4] The majority of rejected asylum seekers – which may be determined on the basis of an extended understanding of the “safe third country” notion – is to be funnelled towards deportations operated by the EU states refusing relocation. The Commission hopes deportations will be made smoother after a newly appointed “EU Return Coordinator” will have bullied countries of origin into accepting their nationals using the carrot of development aid and the stick of visa sanctions. The Commission seems to believe that with fewer expected arrivals and fewer migrants ending up staying in Europe, and with its mechanism of “flexible solidarity” allowing for a selective participation in relocations or returns depending on the taste of its member states, it can both bridge the gap between member states’ interests and push for a deeper Europeanisation of the policy field in which its own role will become more central.

      Thus, the EU Commission’s attempt to square the circle of member states’ conflicting interests has resulted in a European pact against migration, which perpetuates the promises of the EU’s (anti-)migration policy over the last three decades: externalisation, enhanced borders, accelerated asylum procedures, detention and deportations to prevent and deter migrants from the global South. It seeks to strike yet another deal between European member states, without consulting – and at the expense of – migrants themselves. Because most of the policy means contained in the pact are not new, and have always failed to durably end illegalised migration – instead they have created a large precaritised population at the heart of Europe – we do not see how they would work today. Migrants will continue to arrive, and many will remain stranded in front-line states or other EU states as they await deportation. As such, the outcome of the pact (if it is agreed upon) is likely a perpetuation and generalisation of the hotspot system, the very system whose untenability – glaringly demonstrated by Moria’s fire – prompted the presentation of the New Pact in the first place. Even if the Commission’s “no more Morias” rhetoric would like to persuade us of the opposite,[5] the ruins of Moria point to the past as well as the potential future of the CEAS if the Commission has its way.

      We are dismayed at the loss of yet another opportunity for Europe to fundamentally re-orient its policy of closure, one which is profoundly at odds with the reality of large-scale displacement in an unequal and interconnected world. We are dismayed at the prospect of more suffering and more political crises that can only be the outcome of this continued policy failure. Clearly, an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with the movements of migration is called for. One which actually aims to de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict. One which starts from the reality of the movements of migrants and offers a frame for it to unfold rather than seeks to suppress and deny it.

      Notes and references

      [1] We have offered an extensive analysis of the following argument in previous articles. See in particular : Bernd Kasparek. 2016. “Complementing Schengen: The Dublin System and the European Border and Migration Regime”. In Migration Policy and Practice, edited by Harald Bauder and Christian Matheis, 59–78. Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship. Houndmills & New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani. 2016. “Ebbing and Flowing: The EU’s Shifting Practices of (Non-)Assistance and Bordering in a Time of Crisis”. Near Futures Online. No 1. Available here.

      [2] For first analyses see Steve Peers. 2020. “First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals”, EU Law Analysis, 25 September 2020; Sergio Carrera. 2020. “Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum”, CEPS, September 2020.

      [3] Carrera, ibid.

      [4] For a discussion of migration of migrants’ own relocation key, see Philipp Lutz, David Kaufmann and Anna Stütz. 2020. “Humanitarian Protection as a European Public Good: The Strategic Role of States and Refugees”, Journal of Common Market Studies 2020 Volume 58. Number 3. pp. 757–775. To compare the actual asylum applications across Europe over the last years with different relocations keys, see the tool developed by Etienne Piguet.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/the-eus-pact-against-migration-part-one

      #whole-of-route_approach #relocalisation #clé_de_relocalisation #relocation_key #pays-tiers_sûrs #EU_Return_Coordinator #solidarité_flexible #externalisation #new_pact

    • Towards a European pact with migrants, Part Two

      We call for a new Pact that addresses the reality of migrants’ movements, the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.

      In Part One, we analysed the EU’s new Pact against migration. Here, we call for an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with migration, one which offers a legal frame for migration to unfold, and addresses the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.Let us imagine for a moment that the EU Commission truly wanted, and was in a position, to reorient the EU’s migration policy in a direction that might actually de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict: what might its pact with migrants look like?

      The EU’s pact with migrants might start from three fundamental premises. First, it would recognize that any policy that is entirely at odds with social practices is bound to generate conflict, and ultimately fail. A migration policy must start from the social reality of migration and provide a frame for it to unfold. Second, the pact would acknowledge that no conflict can be brought to an end unilaterally. Any process of conflict transformation must bring together the conflicting parties, and seek to address their needs, interests and values so that they no longer clash with each other. In particular, migrants from the global South must be included in the definition of the policies that concern them. Third, it would recognise, as Tendayi Achiume has put it, that migrants from the global South are no strangers to Europe.[1] They have long been included in the expansive webs of empire. Migration and borders are embedded in these unequal relations, and no end to the mobility conflict can be achieved without fundamentally transforming them. Based on these premises, the EU’s pact with migrants might contain the following four core measures:
      Global justice and conflict prevention

      Instead of claiming to tackle the “root causes” of migration by diverting and instrumentalising development aid towards border control, the EU’s pact with migrants would end all European political and economic relations that contribute to the crises leading to mass displacement. The EU would end all support to dictatorial regimes, would ban all weapon exports, terminate all destabilising military interventions. It would cancel unfair trade agreements and the debts of countries of the global South. It would end its massive carbon emissions that contribute to the climate crisis. Through these means, the EU would not claim to end migration perceived as a “problem” for Europe, but it would contribute to allowing more people to live a dignified life wherever they are and decrease forced migration, which certainly is a problem for migrants. A true commitment to global justice and conflict prevention and resolution is necessary if Europe wishes to limit the factors that lead too many people onto the harsh paths of exile in their countries and regions, a small proportion of whom reach European shores.
      Tackling the “root causes” of European racism

      While the EU’s so-called “global approach” to migration has in fact been one-sided, focused exclusively on migration as “the problem” rather then the processes that drive the EU’s policies of exclusion, the EU’s pact with migrants would boldly tackle the “root causes” of racism and xenophobia in Europe. Bold policies designed to address the EU’s colonial past and present and the racial imaginaries it has unleashed would be proposed, a positive vision for living in common in diverse societies affirmed, and a more inclusive and fair economic system would be established in Europe to decrease the resentment of European populations which has been skilfully channelled against migrants and racialised people.
      Universal freedom of movement

      By tackling the causes of large-scale displacement and of exclusionary migration policies, the EU would be able to de-escalate the mobility conflict, and could thus propose a policy granting all migrants legal pathways to access and stay in Europe. As an immediate outcome of the institution of right to international mobility, migrants would no longer resort to smugglers and risk their lives crossing the sea – and thus no longer be in need of being rescued. Using safe and legal means of travel would also, in the time of Covid-19 pandemic, allow migrants to adopt all sanitary measures that are necessary to protect migrants and those they encounter. No longer policed through military means, migration could appear as a normal process that does not generate fear. Frontex, the European border agency, would be defunded, and concentrate its limited activities on detecting actual threats to the EU rather then constructing vulnerable populations as “risks”. In a world that would be less unequal and in which people would have the possibly to lead a dignified life wherever they are, universal freedom of movement would not lead to an “invasion” of Europe. Circulatory movement rather then permanent settlement would be frequent. Migrants’ legal status would no longer allow employers to push working conditions down. A European asylum system would continue to exist, to grant protection and support to those in need. The vestiges of the EU’s hotspots and detention centres might be turned into ministries of welcome, which would register and redirect people to the place of their choice. Registration would thus be a mere certification of having taken the first step towards European citizenship, transforming the latter into a truly post-national institution, a far horizon which current EU treaties only hint at.
      Democratizing borders

      Considering that all European migration policies to date have been fundamentally undemocratic – in that they were imposed on a group of people – migrants – who had no say in the legislative and political process defining the laws that govern their movement – the pact would instead be the outcome of considerable consultative process with migrants and the organisations that support them, as well the states of the global South. The pact, following from Étienne Balibar’s suggestion, would in turn propose to permanently democratise borders by instituting “a multilateral, negotiated control of their working by the populations themselves (including, of course, migrant populations),” within “new representative institutions” that “are not merely ‘territorial’ and certainly not purely national.”[2] In such a pact, the original promise of Europe as a post-national project would finally be revived.

      Such a policy orientation may of course appear as nothing more then a fantasy. And yet it appears evident to us that the direction we suggest is the only realistic one. European citizens and policy makers alike must realise that the question is not whether migrants will exercise their freedom to cross borders, but at what human and political cost. As a result, it is far more realistic to address the processes within which the mobility conflict is embedded, than seeking to ban human mobility. As the Black Lives Matter’s slogan “No justice no peace!” resonating in the streets of the world over recent months reminds us, without mobility justice, [3] their can be no end to mobility conflict.
      The challenges ahead for migrant solidarity movements

      Our policy proposals are perfectly realistic in relation to migrants’ movements and the processes shaping them, yet we are well aware that they are not on the agenda of neoliberal and nationalist Europe. If the EU Commission has squandered yet another opportunity to reorient the EU’s migration policy, it is simply that this Europe, governed by these member states and politicians, has lost the capacity to offer bold visions of democracy, freedom and justice for itself and the world. As such, we have little hope for a fundamental reorientation of the EU’s policies. The bleak prospect is of the perpetuation of the mobility conflict, and the human suffering and political crises it generates.

      What are those who seek to support migrants to do in this context?

      We must start by a sobering note addressed to the movement we are part of: the fire of Moria is not only a symptom and symbol of the failures of the EU’s migration policies and member states, but also of our own strategies. After all, since the hotspots were proposed in 2015 we have tirelessly denounced them, and documented the horrendous living conditions they have created. NGOs have litigated against them, but efforts have been turned down by a European Court of Human Rights that appears increasingly reluctant to position itself on migration-related issues and is thereby contributing to the perpetuation of grave violations by states.

      And despite the extraordinary mobilisation of civil society in alliance with municipalities across Europe who have declared themselves ready to welcome migrants, relocations never materialised on any significant scale. After five years of tireless mobilization, the hotspots still stand, with thousands of asylum seekers trapped in them.

      While the conditions leading to the fire are still being clarified, it appears that the migrants held hostage in Moria took it into their own hands to try to get rid of the camp through the desperate act of burning it to the ground. As such, while we denounce the EU’s policies, our movements are urgently in need of re-evaluating their own modes of action, and re-imagining them more effectively.

      We have no lessons to give, as we share these shortcomings. But we believe that some of the directions we have suggested in our utopian Pact with migrants can guide migrant solidarity movements as well , as they may be implemented from the bottom-up in the present and help reopen our political imagination.

      The freedom to move is not, or not only, a distant utopia, that may be instituted by states in some distant future. It can also be seen as a right and freedom that illegalised migrants seize on a day-to-day basis as they cross borders without authorisation, and persist in living where they choose.

      Freedom of movement can serve as a useful compass to direct and evaluate our practices of contestation and support. Litigation remains an important tool to counter the multiple forms of violence and violations that migrants face along their trajectories, even as we acknowledge that national and international courts are far from immune to the anti-migrant atmosphere within states. Forging infrastructures of support for migrants in the course of their mobility (such as the WatchTheMed Alarm Phone and the civilian rescue fleet) – and their stay (such as the many citizen platforms for housing )– is and will continue to be essential.

      While states seek to implement what they call an “integrated border management” that seeks to manage migrants’ unruly mobilities before, at, and after borders, we can think of our own networks as forming a fragmented yet interconnected “integrated border solidarity” along the migrants’ entire trajectory. The criminalisation of our acts of solidarity by states is proof that we are effective in disrupting the violence of borders.

      Solidarity cities have formed important nodes in these chains, as municipalities do have the capacity to enable migrants to live in dignity in urban spaces, and limit the reach of their security forces for example. Their dissonant voices of welcome have been important in demonstrating that segments of the European population, which are far from negligible, refuse to be complicit with the EU’s policies of closure and are ready to embody an open relation of solidarity with migrants and beyond. However we must also acknowledge that the prerogative of granting access to European states remains in the hands of central administrations, not in those of municipalities, and thus the readiness to welcome migrants has not allowed the latter to actually seek sanctuary.

      While humanitarian and humanist calls for welcome are important, we too need to locate migration and borders in a broader political and economic context – that of the past and present of empire – so that they can be understood as questions of (in)justice. Echoing the words of the late Edouard Glissant, as activists focusing on illegalised migration we should never forget that “to have to force one’s way across borders as a result of one’s misery is as scandalous as what founds that misery”.[4] As a result of this framing, many more alliances can be forged today between migrant solidarity movements and the global justice and climate justice movements, as well as anti-racist, anti-fascist, feminist and decolonial movements. Through such alliances, we may be better equipped to support migrants throughout their entire trajectories, and transform the conditions that constrain them today.

      Ultimately, to navigate its way out of its own impasses, it seems to us that migrant solidarity movements must address four major questions.

      First, what migration policy do we want? The predictable limits of the EU’s pact against migration may be an opportunity to forge our own alternative agenda.

      Second, how can we not only oppose the implementation of restrictive policies but shape the policy process itself so as to transform the field on which we struggle? Opposing the EU’s anti-migrant pact over the coming months may allow us to conduct new experiments.

      Third, as long as policies that deny basic principles of equality, freedom, justice, and our very common humanity, are still in place, how can we lead actions that disrupt them effectively? For example, what are the forms of nongovernmental evacuations that might support migrants in accessing Europe, and moving across its internal borders?

      Fourth, how can struggles around migration and borders be part of the forging of a more equal, free, just and sustainable world for all?

      The next months during which the EU’s Pact against migration will be discussed in front of the European Parliament and Council will see an uphill battle for all those who still believe in the possibility of a Europe of openness and solidarity. While we have no illusions as to the policy outcome, this is an opportunity we must seize, not only to claim that another Europe and another world is possible, but to start building them from below.

      Notes and references

      [1] Tendayi Achiume. 2019, “The Postcolonial Case for Rethinking Borders.” Dissent 66.3: pp.27-32.

      [2] Etienne Balibar. 2004. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship. Princeton: University Press, p. 108 and 117.

      [3] Mimi Sheller. 2018. Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes. London: Verso.

      [4] Edouard Glissant. 2006. “Il n’est frontière qu’on n’outrepasse”. Le Monde diplomatique, October 2006.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/towards-pact-migrants-part-two

    • Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile : Afin de garantir un nouveau départ et d’éviter de reproduire les erreurs passées, certains éléments à risque doivent être reconsidérés et les aspects positifs étendus.

      L’engagement en faveur d’une approche plus humaine de la protection et l’accent mis sur les aspects positifs et bénéfiques de la migration avec lesquels la Commission européenne a lancé le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile sont les bienvenus. Cependant, les propositions formulées reflètent très peu cette rhétorique et ces ambitions. Au lieu de rompre avec les erreurs de la précédente approche de l’Union européenne (UE) et d’offrir un nouveau départ, le Pacte continue de se focaliser sur l’externalisation, la dissuasion, la rétention et le retour.

      Cette première analyse des propositions, réalisée par la société civile, a été guidée par les questions suivantes :

      Les propositions formulées sont-elles en mesure de garantir, en droit et en pratique, le respect des normes internationales et européennes ?
      Participeront-elles à un partage plus juste des responsabilités en matière d’asile au niveau de l’UE et de l’international ?
      Seront-elles susceptibles de fonctionner en pratique ?

      Au lieu d’un partage automatique des responsabilités, le Pacte introduit un système de Dublin, qui n’en porte pas le nom, plus complexe et un mécanisme de « parrainage au retour »

      Le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile a manqué l’occasion de réformer en profondeur le système de Dublin : le principe de responsabilité du premier pays d’arrivée pour examiner les demandes d’asile est, en pratique, maintenu. De plus, le Pacte propose un système complexe introduisant diverses formes de solidarité.

      Certains ajouts positifs dans les critères de détermination de l’Etat membre responsable de la demande d’asile sont à relever, par exemple, l’élargissement de la définition des membres de famille afin d’inclure les frères et sœurs, ainsi qu’un large éventail de membres de famille dans le cas des mineurs non accompagnés et la délivrance d’un diplôme ou d’une autre qualification par un Etat membre. Cependant, au regard de la pratique actuelle des Etats membres, il sera difficile de s’éloigner du principe du premier pays d’entrée comme l’option de départ en faveur des nouvelles considérations prioritaires, notamment le regroupement familial.

      Dans le cas d’un nombre élevé de personnes arrivées sur le territoire (« pression migratoire ») ou débarquées suite à des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage, la solidarité entre Etats membres est requise. Les processus qui en découlent comprennent une série d’évaluations, d’engagements et de rapports devant être rédigés par les États membres. Si la réponse collective est insuffisante, la Commission européenne peut prendre des mesures correctives. Au lieu de promouvoir un mécanisme de soutien pour un partage prévisible des responsabilités, ces dispositions tendent plutôt à créer des formes de négociations entre États membres qui nous sont toutes devenues trop familières. La complexité des propositions soulève des doutes quant à leur application réelle en pratique.

      Les États membres sont autorisés à choisir le « parrainage de retour » à la place de la relocalisation de personnes sur leur territoire, ce qui indique une attention égale portée au retour et à la protection. Au lieu d’apporter un soutien aux Etats membres en charge d’un plus grand nombre de demandes de protection, cette proposition soulève de nombreuses préoccupations juridiques et relatives au respect des droits de l’homme, en particulier si le transfert vers l’Etat dit « parrain » se fait après l’expiration du délai de 8 mois. Qui sera en charge de veiller au traitement des demandeurs d’asile déboutés à leur arrivée dans des Etats qui n’acceptent pas la relocalisation ?

      Le Pacte propose d’étendre l’utilisation de la procédure à la frontière, y compris un recours accru à la rétention

      A défaut de rééquilibrer la responsabilité entre les États membres de l’UE, la proposition de règlement sur les procédures communes exacerbe la pression sur les États situés aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et sur les pays des Balkans occidentaux. La Commission propose de rendre, dans certains cas, les procédures d’asile et de retour à la frontière obligatoires. Cela s’appliquerait notamment aux ressortissants de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 20%. Ces procédures seraient facultatives lorsque les Etats membres appliquent les concepts de pays tiers sûr ou pays d’origine sûr. Toutefois, la Commission a précédemment proposé que ceux-ci deviennent obligatoires pour l’ensemble des Etats membres. Les associations réitèrent leurs inquiétudes quant à l’utilisation de ces deux concepts qui ont été largement débattus entre 2016 et 2019. Leur application obligatoire ne doit plus être proposée.

      La proposition de procédure à la frontière repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – notamment sur le fait que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’est pas éligible à un statut de protection et que l’examen des demandes de protection peut être effectué facilement et rapidement. Ni l’une ni l’autre ne sont correctes. En effet, en prenant en considération à la fois les décisions de première et de seconde instance dans toute l’UE il apparaît que la plupart des demandeurs d’asile dans l’UE au cours des trois dernières années ont obtenu un statut de protection. En outre, le Pacte ne doit pas persévérer dans cette approche erronée selon laquelle les procédures d’asile peuvent être conduites rapidement à travers la réduction de garanties et l’introduction d’un système de tri. La durée moyenne de la procédure d’asile aux Pays-Bas, souvent qualifiée d’ « élève modèle » pour cette pratique, dépasse un an et peut atteindre deux années jusqu’à ce qu’une décision soit prise.

      La proposition engendrerait deux niveaux de standards dans les procédures d’asile, largement déterminés par le pays d’origine de la personne concernée. Cela porte atteinte au droit individuel à l’asile et signifierait qu’un nombre accru de personnes seront soumises à une procédure de deuxième catégorie. Proposer aux Etats membres d’émettre une décision d’asile et d’éloignement de manière simultanée, sans introduire de garanties visant à ce que les principes de non-refoulement, d’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, et de protection de la vie privée et familiale ne soient examinés, porte atteinte aux obligations qui découlent du droit international. La proposition formulée par la Commission supprime également l’effet suspensif automatique du recours, c’est-à-dire le droit de rester sur le territoire dans l’attente d’une décision finale rendue dans le cadre d’une procédure à la frontière.

      L’idée selon laquelle les personnes soumises à des procédures à la frontière sont considérées comme n’étant pas formellement entrées sur le territoire de l’État membre est trompeuse et contredit la récente jurisprudence de l’UE, sans pour autant modifier les droits de l’individu en vertu du droit européen et international.

      La proposition prive également les personnes de la possibilité d’accéder à des permis de séjour pour des motifs autres que l’asile et impliquera très probablement une privation de liberté pouvant atteindre jusqu’à 6 mois aux frontières de l’UE, c’est-à-dire un maximum de douze semaines dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile à la frontière et douze semaines supplémentaires en cas de procédure de retour à la frontière. En outre, les réformes suppriment le principe selon lequel la rétention ne doit être appliquée qu’en dernier recours dans le cadre des procédures aux frontières. En s’appuyant sur des restrictions plus systématiques des mouvements dans le cadre des procédures à la frontière, la proposition restreindra l’accès de l’individu aux services de base fournis par des acteurs qui ne pourront peut-être pas opérer à la frontière, y compris pour l’assistance et la représentation juridiques. Avec cette approche, on peut s’attendre aux mêmes échecs rencontrés dans la mise en œuvre des « hotspot » sur les îles grecques.

      La reconnaissance de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant comme élément primordial dans toutes les procédures pour les États membres est positive. Cependant, la Commission diminue les garanties de protection des enfants en n’exemptant que les mineurs non accompagnés ou âgés de moins de douze ans des procédures aux frontières. Ceci est en contradiction avec la définition internationale de l’enfant qui concerne toutes les personnes jusqu’à l’âge de dix-huit ans, telle qu’inscrite dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant ratifiée par tous les États membres de l’UE.

      Dans les situations de crise, les États membres sont autorisés à déroger à d’importantes garanties qui soumettront davantage de personnes à des procédures d’asile de qualité inférieure

      La crainte d’iniquité procédurale est d’autant plus visible dans les situations où un État membre peut prétendre être confronté à une « situation exceptionnelle d’afflux massif » ou au risque d’une telle situation.

      Dans ces cas, le champ d’application de la procédure obligatoire aux frontières est considérablement étendu à toutes les personnes en provenance de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 75%. La procédure d’asile à la frontière et la procédure de retour à la frontière peuvent être prolongées de huit semaines supplémentaires, soit cinq mois chacune, ce qui porte à dix mois la durée maximale de privation de liberté. En outre, les États membres peuvent suspendre l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant quatre semaines et jusqu’à un maximum de trois mois. Par conséquent, si aucune demande n’est enregistrée pendant plusieurs semaines, les personnes sont susceptibles d’être exposées à un risque accru de rétention et de refoulement, et leurs droits relatifs à un accueil digne et à des services de base peuvent être gravement affectés.

      Cette mesure permet aux États membres de déroger à leur responsabilité de garantir un accès à l’asile et un examen efficace et équitable de l’ensemble des demandes d’asile, ce qui augmente ainsi le risque de refoulement. Dans certains cas extrêmes, notamment lorsque les États membres agissent en violation flagrante et persistante des obligations du droit de l’UE, le processus de demande d’autorisation à la Commission européenne pourrait être considéré comme une amélioration, étant donné qu’actuellement la loi est ignorée, sans consultation et ce malgré les critiques de la Commission européenne. Toutefois, cela ne peut être le point de départ de l’évaluation de cette proposition de la législation européenne. L’impact à grande échelle de cette dérogation offre la possibilité à ce qu’une grande majorité des personnes arrivant dans l’UE soient soumises à une procédure de second ordre.

      Pré-filtrage à la frontière : risques et opportunités

      La Commission propose un processus de « pré-filtrage à l’entrée » pour toutes les personnes qui arrivent de manière irrégulière aux frontières de l’UE, y compris à la suite d’un débarquement dans le cadre des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage. Le processus de pré-filtrage comprend des contrôles de sécurité, de santé et de vulnérabilité, ainsi que l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales, mais il conduit également à des décisions impactant l’accès à l’asile, notamment en déterminant si une personne doit être sujette à une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière, de relocalisation ou de retour. Ce processus peut durer jusqu’à 10 jours et doit être effectué au plus près possible de la frontière. Le lieu où les personnes seront placées et l’accès aux conditions matérielles d’accueil demeurent flous. Le filtrage peut également être appliqué aux personnes se trouvant sur le territoire d’un État membre, ce qui pourrait conduire à une augmentation de pratiques discriminatoires. Des questions se posent également concernant les droits des personnes soumises au filtrage, tels que l’accès à l’information, , l’accès à un avocat et au droit de contester la décision prise dans ce contexte ; les motifs de refus d’entrée ; la confidentialité et la protection des données collectées. Etant donné que les États membres peuvent facilement se décharger de leurs responsabilités en matière de dépistage médical et de vulnérabilité, il n’est pas certain que certains besoins seront effectivement détectés et pris en considération.

      Une initiative à saluer est la proposition d’instaurer un mécanisme indépendant des droits fondamentaux à la frontière. Afin qu’il garantisse une véritable responsabilité face aux violations des droits à la frontière, y compris contre les éloignements et les refoulements récurrents dans un grand nombre d’États membres, ce mécanisme doit être étendu au-delà de la procédure de pré-filtrage, être indépendant des autorités nationales et impliquer des organisations telles que les associations non gouvernementales.

      La proposition fait de la question du retour et de l’expulsion une priorité

      L’objectif principal du Pacte est clair : augmenter de façon significative le nombre de personnes renvoyées ou expulsées de l’UE. La création du poste de Coordinateur en charge des retours au sein de la Commission européenne et d’un directeur exécutif adjoint aux retours au sein de Frontex en sont la preuve, tandis qu’aucune nomination n’est prévue au sujet de la protection de garanties ou de la relocalisation. Le retour est considéré comme un élément admis dans la politique migratoire et le soutien pour des retours dignes, en privilégiant les retours volontaires, l’accès à une assistance au retour et l’aide à la réintégration, sont essentiels. Cependant, l’investissement dans le retour n’est pas une réponse adaptée au non-respect systématique des normes d’asile dans les États membres de l’UE.

      Rien de nouveau sur l’action extérieure : des propositions irréalistes qui risquent de continuer d’affaiblir les droits de l’homme

      La tension entre l’engagement rhétorique pour des partenariats mutuellement bénéfiques et la focalisation visant à placer la migration au cœur des relations entre l’UE et les pays tiers se poursuit. Les tentatives d’externaliser la responsabilité de l’asile et de détourner l’aide au développement, les mécanismes de visa et d’autres outils pour inciter les pays tiers à coopérer sur la gestion migratoire et les accords de réadmission sont maintenues. Cela ne représente pas seulement un risque allant à l’encontre de l’engagement de l’UE pour ses principes de développement, mais cela affaiblit également sa posture internationale en générant de la méfiance et de l’hostilité depuis et à l’encontre des pays tiers. De plus, l’usage d’accords informels et la coopération sécuritaire sur la gestion migratoire avec des pays tels que la Libye ou la Turquie risquent de favoriser les violations des droits de l’homme, d’encourager les gouvernements répressifs et de créer une plus grande instabilité.

      Un manque d’ambition pour des voies légales et sûres vers l’Europe

      L’opportunité pour l’UE d’indiquer qu’elle est prête à contribuer au partage des responsabilités pour la protection au niveau international dans un esprit de partenariat avec les pays qui accueillent la plus grande majorité des réfugiés est manquée. Au lieu de proposer un objectif ambitieux de réinstallation de réfugiés, la Commission européenne a seulement invité les Etats membres à faire plus et a converti les engagements de 2020 en un mécanisme biennal, ce qui résulte en la perte d’une année de réinstallation européenne.

      La reconnaissance du besoin de faciliter la migration de main-d’œuvre à travers différents niveaux de compétences est à saluer, mais l’importance de cette migration dans les économies et les sociétés européennes ne se reflète pas dans les ressources, les propositions et les actions allouées.

      Le soutien aux activités de recherche et de sauvetage et aux actions de solidarité doit être renforcé

      La tragédie humanitaire dans la mer Méditerranée nécessite encore une réponse y compris à travers un soutien financier et des capacités de recherches et de sauvetage. Cet enjeu ainsi que celui du débarquement sont pris en compte dans toutes les propositions, reconnaissant ainsi la crise humanitaire actuelle. Cependant, au lieu de répondre aux comportements et aux dispositions règlementaires des gouvernements qui obstruent les activités de secours et le travail des défendeurs des droits, la Commission européenne suggère que les standards de sécurité sur les navires et les niveaux de communication avec les acteurs privés doivent être surveillés. Les acteurs privés sont également requis d’adhérer non seulement aux régimes légaux, mais aussi aux politiques et pratiques relatives à « la gestion migratoire » qui peuvent potentiellement interférer avec les obligations de recherches et de sauvetage.

      Bien que la publication de lignes directrices pour prévenir la criminalisation de l’action humanitaire soit la bienvenue, celles-ci se limitent aux actes mandatés par la loi avec une attention spécifique aux opérations de sauvetage et de secours. Cette approche risque d’omettre les activités humanitaires telles que la distribution de nourriture, d’abris, ou d’information sur le territoire ou assurés par des organisations non mandatées par le cadre légal qui sont également sujettes à ladite criminalisation et à des restrictions.

      Des signes encourageants pour l’inclusion

      Les changements proposés pour permettre aux réfugiés d’accéder à une résidence de long-terme après trois ans et le renforcement du droit de se déplacer et de travailler dans d’autres Etats membres sont positifs. De plus, la révision du Plan d’action pour l’inclusion et l’intégration et la mise en place d’un groupe d’experts pour collecter l’avis des migrants afin de façonner la politique européenne sont les bienvenues.

      La voie à suivre

      La présentation des propositions de la Commission est le commencement de ce qui promet d’être une autre longue période conflictuelle de négociations sur les politiques européennes d’asile et de migration. Alors que ces négociations sont en cours, il est important de rappeler qu’il existe déjà un régime d’asile européen et que les Etats membres ont des obligations dans le cadre du droit européen et international.

      Cela requiert une action immédiate de la part des décideurs politiques européens, y compris de la part des Etats membres, de :

      Mettre en œuvre les standards existants en lien avec les conditions matérielles d’accueil et les procédures d’asile, d’enquêter sur leur non-respect et de prendre les mesures disciplinaires nécessaires ;
      Sauver des vies en mer, et de garantir des capacités de sauvetage et de secours, permettant un débarquement et une relocalisation rapide ;
      Continuer de s’accorder sur des arrangements ad-hoc de solidarité pour alléger la pression sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et encourager les Etats membres à avoir recours à la relocalisation.

      Concernant les prochaines négociations sur le Pacte, nous recommandons aux co-législateurs de :

      Rejeter l’application obligatoire de la procédure d’asile ou de retour à la frontière : ces procédures aux standards abaissés réduisent les garanties des demandeurs d’asile et augmentent le recours à la rétention. Elles exacerbent le manque de solidarité actuel sur l’asile dans l’UE en plaçant plus de responsabilité sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures. L’expérience des hotspots et d’autres initiatives similaires démontrent que l’ajout de procédures ou d’étapes dans l’asile peut créer des charges administratives et des coûts significatifs, et entraîner une plus grande inefficacité ;
      Se diriger vers la fin de la privation de liberté de migrants, et interdire la rétention de mineurs conformément à la Convention internationale des droits de l’enfant, et de dédier suffisamment de ressources pour des solutions non privatives de libertés appropriées pour les mineurs et leurs familles ;
      Réajuster les propositions de réforme afin de se concentrer sur le maintien et l’amélioration des standards des droits de l’homme et de l’asile en Europe, plutôt que sur le retour ;
      Œuvrer à ce que les propositions réforment fondamentalement la façon dont la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile en UE est organisée, en adressant les problèmes liés au principe de pays de première entrée, afin de créer un véritable mécanisme de solidarité ;
      Limiter les possibilités pour les Etats membres de déroger à leurs responsabilités d’enregistrer les demandes d’asile ou d’examiner les demandes, afin d’éviter de créer des incitations à opérer en mode gestion de crise et à diminuer les standards de l’asile ;
      Augmenter les garanties pendant la procédure de pré-filtrage pour assurer le droit à l’information, l’accès à une aide et une représentation juridique, la détection et la prise en charge des vulnérabilités et des besoins de santé, et une réponse aux préoccupations liées à l’enregistrement et à la protection des données ;
      Garantir que le mécanisme de suivi des droits fondamentaux aux frontières dispose d’une portée large afin de couvrir toutes les violations des droits fondamentaux à la frontière, qu’il soit véritablement indépendant des autorités nationales et dispose de ressources adéquates et qu’il contribue à la responsabilisation ;
      S’opposer aux tentatives d’utiliser l’aide au développement, au commerce, aux investissements, aux mécanismes de visas, à la coopération sécuritaire et autres politiques et financements pour faire pression sur les pays tiers dans leur coopération étroitement définie par des objectifs européens de contrôle migratoire ;
      Evaluer l’impact à long-terme des politiques migratoires d’externalisation sur la paix, le respect des droits et le développement durable et garantir que la politique extérieure migratoire ne contribue pas à la violation de droits de l’homme et prenne en compte les enjeux de conflits ;
      Développer significativement les voies légales et sûres vers l’UE en mettant en œuvre rapidement les engagements actuels de réinstallation, en proposant de nouveaux objectifs ambitieux et en augmentant les opportunités de voies d’accès à la protection ainsi qu’à la migration de main-d’œuvre et universitaire en UE ;
      Renforcer les exceptions à la criminalisation lorsqu’il s’agit d’actions humanitaires et autres activités indépendantes de la société civile et enlever les obstacles auxquels font face les acteurs de la société civile fournissant une assistance vitale et humanitaire sur terre et en mer ;
      Mettre en place une opération de recherche et de sauvetage en mer Méditerranée financée et coordonnée par l’UE ;
      S’appuyer sur les propositions prometteuses pour soutenir l’inclusion à travers l’accès à la résidence à long-terme et les droits associés et la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action sur l’intégration et l’inclusion au niveau européen, national et local.

      https://www.forumrefugies.org/s-informer/positions/europe/774-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-l-asile-afin-de-garantir-un-no

    • Nouveau Pacte européen  : les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s traité.e.s comme des « # colis à trier  »

      Le jour même de la Conférence des Ministres européens de l’Intérieur, EuroMed Droits présente son analyse détaillée du nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration, publié le 23 septembre dernier (https://euromedrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Analysis-of-Asylum-and-Migration-Pact_Final_Clickable.pdf).

      On peut résumer les plus de 500 pages de documents comme suit  : le nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration déshumanise les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s, les traitant comme des «  #colis à trier  » et les empêchant de se déplacer en Europe. Ce Pacte soulève de nombreuses questions en matière de respect des droits humains, dont certaines sont à souligner en particulier  :

      L’UE détourne le concept de solidarité. Le Pacte vise clairement à «  rétablir la confiance mutuelle entre les États membres  », donnant ainsi la priorité à la #cohésion:interne de l’UE au détriment des droits des migrant.e.s et des réfugié.e.s. La proposition laisse le choix aux États membres de contribuer – en les mettant sur un pied d’égalité – à la #réinstallation, au #rapatriement, au soutien à l’accueil ou à l’#externalisation des frontières. La #solidarité envers les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s et leurs droits fondamentaux sont totalement ignorés.

      Le pacte promeut une gestion «  sécuritaire  » de la migration. Selon la nouvelle proposition, les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s seront placé.e.s en #détention et privé.e.s de liberté à leur arrivée. La procédure envisagée pour accélérer la procédure de demande d’asile ne pourra se faire qu’au détriment des lois sur l’asile et des droits des demandeur.se.s. Il est fort probable que la #procédure se déroulera de manière arbitraire et discriminatoire, en fonction de la nationalité du/de la demandeur.se, de son taux de reconnaissance et du fait que le pays dont il/elle provient est «  sûr  », ce qui est un concept douteux.

      L’idée clé qui sous-tend cette vision est simple  : externaliser autant que possible la gestion des frontières en coopérant avec des pays tiers. L’objectif est de faciliter le retour et la réadmission des migrant.e.s dans le pays d’où ils/elles sont parti.es. Pour ce faire, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes (Frontex) verrait ses pouvoirs renforcés et un poste de coordinateur.trice européen.ne pour les retours serait créé. Le pacte risque de facto de fournir un cadre juridique aux pratiques illégales telles que les refoulements, les détentions arbitraires et les mesures visant à réduire davantage la capacité en matière d’asile. Des pratiques déjà en place dans certains États membres.

      Le Pacte présente quelques aspects «  positifs  », par exemple en matière de protection des enfants ou de regroupement familial, qui serait facilité. Mais ces bonnes intentions, qui doivent être mises en pratique, sont noyées dans un océan de mesures répressives et sécuritaires.

      EuroMed Droits appelle les Etats membres de l’UE à réfléchir en termes de mise en œuvre pratique (ou non) de ces mesures. Non seulement elles violent les droits humains, mais elles sont impraticables sur le terrain  : la responsabilité de l’évaluation des demandes d’asile reste au premier pays d’arrivée, sans vraiment remettre en cause le Règlement de Dublin. Cela signifie que des pays comme l’Italie, Malte, l’Espagne, la Grèce et Chypre continueront à subir une «  pression  » excessive, ce qui les encouragera à poursuivre leurs politiques de refoulement et d’expulsion. Enfin, le Pacte ne répond pas à la problématique urgente des «  hotspots  » et des camps de réfugié.e.s comme en Italie ou en Grèce et dans les zones de transit à l’instar de la Hongrie. Au contraire, cela renforce ce modèle dangereux en le présentant comme un exemple à exporter dans toute l’Europe, alors que des exemples récents ont démontré l’impossibilité de gérer ces camps de manière humaine.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/nouveau-pacte-europeen%e2%80%af-les-migrant-e-s-et-refugie-e-s-traite

      #paquets_de_la_poste #paquets #poste #tri #pays_sûrs

    • A “Fresh Start” or One More Clunker? Dublin and Solidarity in the New Pact

      In ongoing discussions on the reform of the CEAS, solidarity is a key theme. It stands front and center in the New Pact on Migration and Asylum: after reassuring us of the “human and humane approach” taken, the opening quote stresses that Member States must be able to “rely on the solidarity of our whole European Union”.

      In describing the need for reform, the Commission does not mince its words: “[t]here is currently no effective solidarity mechanism in place, and no efficient rule on responsibility”. It’s a remarkable statement: barely one year ago, the Commission maintained that “[t]he EU [had] shown tangible and rapid support to Member States under most pressure” throughout the crisis. Be that as it may, we are promised a “fresh start”. Thus, President Von der Leyen has announced on the occasion of the 2020 State of the Union Address that “we will abolish the Dublin Regulation”, the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal (examined here) has been withdrawn, and the Pact proposes a “new solidarity mechanism” connected to “robust and fair management of the external borders” and capped by a new “governance framework”.

      Before you buy the shiny new package, you are advised to consult the fine print however. Yes, the Commission proposes to abolish the Dublin III Regulation and withdraws the Dublin IV Proposal. But the Proposal for an Asylum and Migration Management Regulation (hereafter “the Migration Management Proposal”) reproduces word-for-word the Dublin III Regulation, subject to amendments drawn … from the Dublin IV Proposal! As for the “governance framework” outlined in Articles 3-7 of the Migration Management Proposal, it’s a hodgepodge of purely declamatory provisions (e.g. Art. 3-4), of restatements of pre-existing obligations (Art. 5), of legal bases authorizing procedures that require none (Art. 7). The one new item is a yearly monitoring exercise centered on an “European Asylum and Migration Management Strategy” (Art. 6), which seems as likely to make a difference as the “Mechanism for Early Warning, Preparedness and Crisis Management”, introduced with much fanfare with the Dublin III Regulation and then left in the drawer before, during and after the 2015/16 crisis.

      Leaving the provisions just mentioned for future commentaries – fearless interpreters might still find legal substance in there – this contribution focuses on four points: the proposed amendments to Dublin, the interface between Dublin and procedures at the border, the new solidarity mechanism, and proposals concerning force majeure. Caveat emptor! It is a jungle of extremely detailed and sometimes obscure provisions. While this post is longer than usual – warm thanks to the lenient editors! – do not expect an exhaustive summary, nor firm conclusions on every point.
      Dublin, the Undying

      To borrow from Mark Twain, reports of the death of the Dublin system have been once more greatly exaggerated. As noted, Part III of the Migration Management Proposal (Articles 8-44) is for all intents and purposes an amended version of the Dublin III Regulation, and most of the amendments are lifted from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal.

      A first group of amendments concerns the responsibility criteria. Some expand the possibilities to allocate applicants based on their “meaningful links” with Member States: Article 2(g) expands the family definition to include siblings, opening new possibilities for reunification; Article 19(4) enlarges the criterion based on previous legal abode (i.e. expired residence documents); in a tip of the hat to the Wikstroem Report, commented here, Article 20 introduces a new criterion based on prior education in a Member State.

      These are welcome changes, but all that glitters is not gold. The Commission advertises “streamlined” evidentiary requirements to facilitate family reunification. These would be necessary indeed: evidentiary issues have long undermined the application of the family criteria. Unfortunately, the Commission is not proposing anything new: Article 30(6) of the Migration Management Proposal corresponds in essence to Article 22(5) of the Dublin III Regulation.

      Besides, while the Commission proposes to expand the general definition of family, the opposite is true of the specific definition of family applicable to “dependent persons”. Under Article 16 of the Dublin III Regulation, applicants who e.g. suffer from severe disabilities are to be kept or brought together with a care-giving parent, child or sibling residing in a Member State. Due to fears of sham marriages, spouses have been excluded and this is legally untenable and inhumane, but instead of tackling the problem the Commission proposes in Article 24 to worsen it by excluding siblings. The end result is paradoxical: persons needing family support the most will be deprived – for no apparent reason other than imaginary fears of “abuses” – of the benefits of enlarged reunification possibilities. “[H]uman and humane”, indeed.

      The fight against secondary movements inspires most of the other amendments to the criteria. In particular, Article 21 of the Proposal maintains and extends the much-contested criterion of irregular entry while clarifying that it applies also to persons disembarked after a search and rescue (SAR) operation. The Commission also proposes that unaccompanied children be transferred to the first Member State where they applied if no family criterion is applicable (Article 15(5)). This would overturn the MA judgment of the ECJ whereby in such cases the asylum claim must be examined in the State where the child last applied and is present. It’s not a technical fine point: while the case-law of the ECJ is calculated to spare children the trauma of a transfer, the proposed amendment would subject them again to the rigours of Dublin.

      Again to discourage secondary movements, the Commission proposes – as in 2016 – a second group of amendments: new obligations for the applicants (Articles 9-10). Applicants must in principle apply in the Member State of first entry, remain in that State for the duration of the Dublin procedure and, post-transfer, remain in the State responsible. Moving to the “wrong” State entails losing the benefits of the Reception Conditions Directive, subject to “the need to ensure a standard of living in accordance with” the Charter. It is debatable whether this is a much lesser standard of reception. More importantly: as reception conditions in line with the Directive are seldom guaranteed in several frontline Member States, the prospect of being treated “in accordance with the Charter” elsewhere will hardly dissuade applicants from moving on.

      The 2016 Proposal foresaw, as further punishment, the mandatory application of accelerated procedures to “secondary movers”. This rule disappears from the Migration Management Proposal, but as Daniel Thym points out in his forthcoming contribution on secondary movements, it remains in Article 40(1)(g) of the 2016 Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation. Furthermore, the Commission proposes deleting Article 18(2) of the Dublin III Regulation, i.e. the guarantee that persons transferred back to a State that has meanwhile discontinued or rejected their application will have their case reopened, or a remedy available. This is a dangerous invitation to Member States to reintroduce “discontinuation” practices that the Commission itself once condemned as incompatible with effective access to status determination.

      To facilitate responsibility-determination, the Proposal further obliges applicants to submit relevant information before or at the Dublin interview. Late submissions are not to be considered. Fairness would demand that justified delays be excused. Besides, it is also proposed to repeal Article 7(3) of the Dublin III Regulation, whereby authorities must take into account evidence of family ties even if produced late in the process. All in all, then, the Proposal would make proof of family ties harder, not easier as the Commission claims.

      A final group of amendments concern the details of the Dublin procedure, and might prove the most important in practice.

      Some “streamline” the process, e.g. with shorter deadlines (e.g. Article 29(1)) and a simplified take back procedure (Article 31). Controversially, the Commission proposes again to reduce the scope of appeals against transfers to issues of ill-treatment and misapplication of the family criteria (Article 33). This may perhaps prove acceptable to the ECJ in light of its old Abdullahi case-law. However, it contravenes Article 13 ECHR, which demands an effective remedy for the violation of any Convention right.
      Other procedural amendments aim to make it harder for applicants to evade transfers. At present, if a transferee absconds for 18 months, the transfer is cancelled and the transferring State becomes responsible. Article 35(2) of the Proposal allows the transferring State to “stop the clock” if the applicant absconds, and to resume the transfer as soon as he reappears.
      A number of amendments make responsibility more “stable” once assigned, although not as “permanent” as the 2016 Proposal would have made it. Under Article 27 of the Proposal, the responsibility of a State will only cease if the applicant has left the Dublin area in compliance with a return decision. More importantly, under Article 26 the responsible State will have to take back even persons to whom it has granted protection. This would be a significant extension of the scope of the Dublin system, and would “lock” applicants in the responsible State even more firmly and more durably. Perhaps by way of compensation, the Commission proposes that beneficiaries of international protection obtain “long-term status” – and thus mobility rights – after three years of residence instead of five. However, given that it is “very difficult in practice” to exercise such rights, the compensation seems more theoretical than effective and a far cry from a system of free movement capable of offsetting the rigidities of Dublin.

      These are, in short, the key amendments foreseen. While it’s easy enough to comment on each individually, it is more difficult to forecast their aggregate impact. Will they – to paraphrase the Commission – “improv[e] the chances of integration” and reduce “unauthorised movements” (recital 13), and help closing “the existing implementation gap”? Probably not, as none of them is a game-changer.

      Taken together, however, they might well aggravate current distributive imbalances. Dublin “locks in” the responsibilities of the States that receive most applications – traditional destinations such as Germany or border States such as Italy – leaving the other Member States undisturbed. Apart from possible distributive impacts of the revised criteria and of the now obligations imposed on applicants, first application States will certainly be disadvantaged combination by shortened deadlines, security screenings (see below), streamlined take backs, and “stable” responsibility extending to beneficiaries of protection. Under the “new Dublin rules” – sorry for the oxymoron! – effective solidarity will become more necessary than ever.
      Border procedures and Dublin

      Building on the current hotspot approach, the Proposals for a Screening Regulation and for an Asylum Procedures Regulation outline a new(ish) “pre-entry” phase. This will be examined in a forthcoming post by Lyra Jakuleviciene, but the interface with infra-EU allocation deserves mention here.

      In a nutshell, persons irregularly crossing the border will be screened for the purpose of identification, health and security checks, and registration in Eurodac. Protection applicants may then be channelled to “border procedures” in a broad range of situations. This will be mandatory if the applicant: (a) attempts to mislead the authorities; (b) can be considered, based on “serious reasons”, “a danger to the national security or public order of the Member States”; (c) comes from a State whose nationals have a low Union-wide recognition rate (Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal).

      The purpose of the border procedure is to assess applications “without authorising the applicant’s entry into the Member State’s territory” (here, p.4). Therefore, it might have seemed logical that applicants subjected to it be excluded from the Dublin system – as is the case, ordinarily, for relocations (see below). Not so: under Article 41(7) of the Proposal, Member States may apply Dublin in the context of border procedures. This weakens the idea of “seamless procedures at the border” somewhat but – from the standpoint of both applicants and border States – it is better than a watertight exclusion: applicants may still benefit from “meaningful link” criteria, and border States are not “stuck with the caseload”. I would normally have qualms about giving Member States discretion in choosing whether Dublin rules apply. But as it happens, Member States who receive an asylum application already enjoy that discretion under the so-called “sovereignty clause”. Nota bene: in exercising that discretion, Member States apply EU Law and must observe the Charter, and the same principle must certainly apply under the proposed Article 41(7).

      The only true exclusion from the Dublin system is set out in Article 8(4) of the Migration Management Proposal. Under this provision, Member States must carry out a security check of all applicants as part of the pre-entry screening and/or after the application is filed. If “there are reasonable grounds to consider the applicant a danger to national security or public order” of the determining State, the other criteria are bypassed and that State becomes responsible. Attentive readers will note that the wording of Article 8(4) differs from that of Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal (e.g. “serious grounds” vs “reasonable grounds”). It is therefore unclear whether the security grounds to “screen out” an applicant from Dublin are coextensive with the security grounds making a border procedure mandatory. Be that as it may, a broad application of Article 8(4) would be undesirable, as it would entail a large-scale exclusion from the guarantees that applicants derive from the Dublin system. The risk is moderate however: by applying Article 8(4) widely, Member States would be increasing their own share of responsibilities under the system. As twenty-five years of Dublin practice indicate, this is unlikely to happen.
      “Mandatory” and “flexible” solidarity under the new mechanism

      So far, the Migration Management Proposal does not look significantly different from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal, which did not itself fundamentally alter existing rules, and which went down in flames in inter- and intra-institutional negotiations. Any hopes of a “fresh start”, then, are left for the new solidarity mechanism.

      Unfortunately, solidarity is a difficult subject for the EU: financial support has hitherto been a mere fraction of Member State expenditure in the field; operational cooperation has proved useful but cannot tackle all the relevant aspects of the unequal distribution of responsibilities among Member States; relocations have proved extremely beneficial for thousands of applicants, but are intrinsically complex operations and have also proven politically divisive – an aspect which has severely undermined their application and further condemned them to be small scale affairs relative to the needs on the ground. The same goes a fortiori for ad hoc initiatives – such as those that followed SAR operations over the last two years– which furthermore lack the predictability that is necessary for sharing responsibilities effectively. To reiterate what the Commission stated, there is currently “no effective solidarity mechanism in place”.

      Perhaps most importantly, the EU has hitherto been incapable of accurately gauging the distributive asymmetries on the ground, to articulate a clear doctrine guiding the key determinations of “how much solidarity” and “what kind(s) of solidarity”, and to define commensurate redistributive targets on this basis (see here, p.34 and 116).

      Alas, the opportunity to elaborate a solidarity doctrine for the EU has been completely missed. Conceptually, the New Pact does not go much farther than platitudes such as “[s]olidarity implies that all Member States should contribute”. As Daniel Thym aptly observed, “pragmatism” is the driving force behind the Proposal: the Commission starts from a familiar basis – relocations – and tweaks it in ways designed to convince stakeholders that solidarity becomes both “compulsory” and “flexible”. It’s a complicated arrangement and I will only describe it in broad strokes, leaving the crucial dimensions of financial solidarity and operational cooperation to forthcoming posts by Iris Goldner Lang and Lilian Tsourdi.

      The mechanism operates according to three “modes”. In its basic mode, it is to replace ad hoc solidarity initiatives following SAR disembarkations (Articles 47-49 of the Migration Management Proposal):

      The Commission determines, in its yearly Migration Management Report, whether a State is faced with “recurring arrivals” following SAR operations and determines the needs in terms of relocations and other contributions (capacity building, operational support proper, cooperation with third States).
      The Member States are “invited” to notify the “contributions they intend to make”. If offers are sufficient, the Commission combines them and formally adopts a “solidarity pool”. If not, it adopts an implementing act summarizing relocation targets for each Member State and other contributions as offered by them. Member States may react by offering other contributions instead of relocations, provided that this is “proportional” – one wonders how the Commission will tally e.g. training programs for Libyan coastguards with relocation places.
      If the relocations offered fall 30% short of the target indicated by the Commission, a “critical mass correction mechanism” will apply: each Member States will be obliged to meet at least 50% of the quota of relocations indicated by the Commission. However, and this is the new idea offered by the Commission to bring relocation-skeptics onboard, Member States may discharge their duties by offering “return sponsorships” instead of relocations: the “sponsor” Member State commits to support the benefitting Member State to return a person and, if the return is not carried out within eight months, to accept her on its territory.

      If I understand correctly the fuzzy provision I have just summarized – Article 48(2) – it all boils down to “half-compulsory” solidarity: Member States are obliged to cover at least 50% of the relocation needs set by the Commission through relocations or sponsorships, and the rest with other contributions.

      After the “solidarity pool” is established and the benefitting Member State requests its activation, relocations can start:

      The eligible persons are those who applied for protection in the benefitting State, with the exclusion of those that are subject to border procedures (Article 45(1)(a)).Also excluded are those whom Dublin criteria based on “meaningful links” – family, abode, diplomas – assign to the benefitting State (Article 57(3)). These rules suggest that the benefitting State must carry out identification, screening for border procedures and a first (reduced?) Dublin procedure before it can declare an applicant eligible for relocation.
      Persons eligible for return sponsorship are “illegally staying third-country nationals” (Article 45(1)(b)).
      The eligible persons are identified, placed on a list, and matched to Member States based on “meaningful links”. The transfer can only be refused by the State of relocation on security grounds (Article 57(2)(6) and (7)), and otherwise follows the modalities of Dublin transfers in almost all respects (e.g. deadlines, notification, appeals). However, contrary to what happens under Dublin, missing the deadline for transfer does not entail that the relocation is cancelled it (see Article 57(10)).
      After the transfer, applicants will be directly admitted to the asylum procedure in the State of relocation only if it has been previously established that the benefitting State would have been responsible under criteria other than those based on “meaningful links” (Article 58(3)). In all the other cases, the State of relocation will run a Dublin procedure and, if necessary, transfer again the applicant to the State responsible (see Article 58(2)). As for persons subjected to return sponsorship, the State of relocation will pick up the application of the Return Directive where the benefitting State left off (or so I read Article 58(5)!).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is under “migratory pressure”, at the request of the concerned State or of its own motion (Article 50), the mechanism operates as described above except for one main point: beneficiaries of protection also become eligible for relocation (Article 51(3)). Thankfully, they must consent thereto and are automatically granted the same status in the relocation State (see Articles 57(3) and 58(4)).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is confronted to a “crisis”, rules change further (see Article 2 of the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation):

      Applicants subject to the border procedure and persons “having entered irregularly” also become eligible for relocation. These persons may then undergo a border procedure post-relocation (see Article 41(1) and (8) of the Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation).
      Persons subject to return sponsorship are transferred to the sponsor State if their removal does not occur within four – instead of eight – months.
      Other contributions are excluded from the palette of contributions available to the other Member States (Article 2(1)): it has to be relocation or return sponsorship.
      The procedure is faster, with shorter deadlines.

      It is an understatement to say that the mechanism is complex, and your faithful scribe still has much to digest. For the time being, I would make four general comments.

      First, it is not self-evident that this is a good “insurance scheme” for its intended beneficiaries. As noted, the system only guarantees that 50% of the relocation needs of a State will be met. Furthermore, there are hidden costs: in “SAR” and “pressure” modes, the benefitting State has to screen the applicant, register the application, and assess whether border procedures or (some) Dublin criteria apply before it can channel the applicant to relocation. It is unclear whether a 500 lump sum is enough to offset the costs (see Article 79 of the Migration Management Proposal). Besides, in a crisis situation, these preliminary steps might make relocation impractical – think of the Greek registration backlog in 2015/6. Perhaps, extending relocation to persons “having entered irregularly” when the mechanism is in “crisis mode” is meant precisely to take care of this. Similar observations apply to return sponsorship. Under Article 55(4) of the Migration Management Proposal, the support offered by the sponsor to the benefitting State can be rather low key (e.g. “counselling”) and there seems to be no guarantee that the benefitting State will be effectively relieved of the political, administrative and financial costs associated to return. Moving from costs to risks, it is clear that the benefitting State bears all the risks of non implementation – in other words, if the system grinds to a halt or breaks down, it will be Moria all over again. In light of past experience, one can only agree with Thomas Gammelthoft-Hansen that it’s a “big gamble”. Other aspects examined below – the vast margins of discretion left to the Commission, and the easy backdoor opened by the force majeure provisions – do not help either to create predictability.
      Second, as just noted the mechanism gives the Commission practically unlimited discretion at all critical junctures. The Commission will determine whether a Member States is confronted to “recurring arrivals”, “pressure” or a “crisis”. It will do so under definitions so open-textured, and criteria so numerous, that it will be basically the master of its determinations (Article 50 of the Migration Management Proposal). The Commission will determine unilaterally relocation and operational solidarity needs. Finally, the Commission will determine – we do not know how – if “other contributions” are proportional to relocation needs. Other than in the most clear-cut situations, there is no way that anyone can predict how the system will be applied.
      Third: the mechanism reflects a powerful fixation with and unshakable faith in heavy bureaucracy. Protection applicants may undergo up to three “responsibility determination” procedures and two transfers before finally landing in an asylum procedure: Dublin “screening” in the first State, matching, relocation, full Dublin procedure in the relocation State, then transfer. And this is a system that should not “compromise the objective of the rapid processing of applications”(recital 34)! Decidedly, the idea that in order to improve the CEAS it is above all necessary to suppress unnecessary delays and coercion (see here, p.9) has not made a strong impression on the minds of the drafters. The same remark applies mutatis mutandis to return sponsorships: whatever the benefits in terms of solidarity, one wonders if it is very cost-effective or humane to drag a person from State to State so that they can each try their hand at expelling her.
      Lastly and relatedly, applicants and other persons otherwise concerned by the relocation system are given no voice. They can be “matched”, transferred, re-transferred, but subject to few exceptions their aspirations and intentions remain legally irrelevant. In this regard, the “New Pact” is as old school as it gets: it sticks strictly to the “no choice” taboo on which Dublin is built. What little recognition of applicants’ actorness had been made in the Wikstroem Report is gone. Objectifying migrants is not only incompatible with the claim that the approach taken is “human and humane”. It might prove fatal to the administrative efficiency so cherished by the Commission. Indeed, failure to engage applicants is arguably the key factor in the dismal performance of the Dublin system (here, p.112). Why should it be any different under this solidarity mechanism?

      Framing Force Majeure (or inviting defection?)

      In addition to addressing “crisis” situations, the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation includes separate provisions on force majeure.

      Thereunder, any Member State may unilaterally declare that it is faced with a situation making it “impossible” to comply with selected CEAS rules, and thus obtain the right – subject to a mere notification – to derogate from them. Member States may obtain in this way longer Dublin deadlines, or even be exempted from the obligation to accept transfers and be liberated from responsibilities if the suspension goes on more than a year (Article 8). Furthermore, States may obtain a six-months suspension of their duties under the solidarity mechanism (Article 9).

      The inclusion of this proposal in the Pact – possibly an attempt to further placate Member States averse to European solidarity? – beggars belief. Legally speaking, the whole idea is redundant: under the case-law of the ECJ, Member States may derogate from any rule of EU Law if confronted to force majeure. However, putting this black on white amounts to inviting (and legalizing) defection. The only conceivable object of rules of this kind would have been to subject force majeure derogations to prior authorization by the Commission – but there is nothing of the kind in the Proposal. The end result is paradoxical: while Member States are (in theory!) subject to Commission supervision when they conclude arrangements facilitating the implementation of Dublin rules, a mere notification will be enough to authorize them to unilaterally tear a hole in the fabric of “solidarity” and “responsibility” so painstakingly – if not felicitously – woven in the Pact.
      Concluding comments

      We should have taken Commissioner Ylva Johansson at her word when she said that there would be no “Hoorays” for the new proposals. Past the avalanche of adjectives, promises and fancy administrative monikers hurled at the reader – “faster, seamless migration processes”; “prevent the recurrence of events such as those seen in Moria”; “critical mass correction mechanism” – one cannot fail to see that the “fresh start” is essentially an exercise in repackaging.

      On responsibility-allocation and solidarity, the basic idea is one that the Commission incessantly returns to since 2007 (here, p. 10): keep Dublin and “correct” it through solidarity schemes. I do sympathize to an extent: realizing a fair balance of responsibilities by “sharing people” has always seemed to me impracticable and undesirable. Still, one would have expected that the abject failure of the Dublin system, the collapse of mutual trust in the CEAS, the meagre results obtained in the field of solidarity – per the Commission’s own appraisal – would have pushed it to bring something new to the table.

      Instead, what we have is a slightly milder version of the Dublin IV Proposal – the ultimate “clunker” in the history of Commission proposals – and an ultra-bureaucratic mechanism for relocation, with the dubious addition of return sponsorships and force majeure provisions. The basic tenets of infra-EU allocation remain the same – “no choice”, first entry – and none of the structural flaws that doomed current schemes to failure is fundamentally tackled (here, p.107): solidarity is beefed-up but appears too unreliable and fuzzy to generate trust; there are interesting steps on “genuine links”, but otherwise no sustained attempt to positively engage applicants; administrative complexity and coercive transfers reign on.

      Pragmatism, to quote again Daniel Thym’s excellent introductory post, is no sin. It is even expected of the Commission. This, however, is a study in path-dependency. By defending the status quo, wrapping it in shiny new paper, and making limited concessions to key policy actors, the Commission may perhaps carry its proposals through. However, without substantial corrections, the “new” Pact is unlikely to save the CEAS or even to prevent new Morias.

      http://eumigrationlawblog.eu/a-fresh-start-or-one-more-clunker-dublin-and-solidarity-in-the-ne

      #Francesco_Maiani

      #force_majeure

    • European Refugee Policy: What’s Gone Wrong and How to Make It Better

      In 2015 and 2016, more than 1 million refugees made their way to the European Union, the largest number of them originating from Syria. Since that time, refugee arrivals have continued, although at a much slower pace and involving people from a wider range of countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

      The EU’s response to these developments has had five main characteristics.

      First, a serious lack of preparedness and long-term planning. Despite the massive material and intelligence resources at its disposal, the EU was caught completely unaware by the mass influx of refugees five years ago and has been playing catch-up ever since. While the emergency is now well and truly over, EU member states continue to talk as if still in the grip of an unmanageable “refugee crisis.”

      Second, the EU’s refugee policy has become progressively based on a strategy known as “externalization,” whereby responsibility for migration control is shifted to unstable states outside Europe. This has been epitomized by the deals that the EU has done with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan, and Turkey, all of which have agreed to halt the onward movement of refugees in exchange for aid and other rewards, including support to the security services.

      Third, asylum has become increasingly criminalized, as demonstrated by the growing number of EU citizens and civil society groups that have been prosecuted for their roles in aiding refugees. At the same time, some frontline member states have engaged in a systematic attempt to delegitimize the NGO search-and-rescue organizations operating in the Mediterranean and to obstruct their life-saving activities.

      The fourth characteristic of EU countries’ recent policies has been a readiness to inflict or be complicit in a range of abuses that challenge the principles of both human rights and international refugee law. This can be seen in the violence perpetrated against asylum seekers by the military and militia groups in Croatia and Hungary, the terrible conditions found in Greek refugee camps such as Moria on the island of Lesvos, and, most egregiously of all, EU support to the Libyan Coastguard that enables it to intercept refugees at sea and to return them to abusive detention centers on land.

      Fifth and finally, the past five years have witnessed a serious absence of solidarity within the EU. Frontline states such as Greece and Italy have been left to bear a disproportionate share of the responsibility for new refugee arrivals. Efforts to relocate asylum seekers and resettle refugees throughout the EU have had disappointing results. And countries in the eastern part of the EU have consistently fought against the European Commission in its efforts to forge a more cooperative and coordinated approach to the refugee issue.

      The most recent attempt to formulate such an approach is to be found in the EU Pact on Migration and Asylum, which the Commission proposed in September 2020.

      It would be wrong to entirely dismiss the Pact, as it contains some positive elements. These include, for example, a commitment to establish legal pathways to asylum in Europe for people who are in need of protection, and EU support for member states that wish to establish community-sponsored refugee resettlement programs.

      In other respects, however, the Pact has a number of important, serious flaws. It has already been questioned by those countries that are least willing to admit refugees and continue to resist the role of Brussels in this policy domain. The Pact also makes hardly any reference to the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration—a strange omission given the enormous amount of time and effort that the UN has devoted to those initiatives, both of which were triggered by the European emergency of 2015-16.

      At an operational level, the Pact endorses and reinforces the EU’s externalization agenda and envisages a much more aggressive role for Frontex, the EU’s border control agency. At the same time, it empowers member states to refuse entry to asylum seekers on the basis of very vague criteria. As a result, individuals may be more vulnerable to human smugglers and traffickers. There is also a strong likelihood that new refugee camps will spring up on the fringes of Europe, with their residents living in substandard conditions.

      Finally, the Pact places enormous emphasis on the involuntary return of asylum seekers to their countries of origin. It even envisages that a hardline state such as Hungary could contribute to the implementation of the Pact by organizing and funding such deportations. This constitutes an extremely dangerous new twist on the notions of solidarity and responsibility sharing, which form the basis of the international refugee regime.

      If the proposed Pact is not fit for purpose, then what might a more constructive EU refugee policy look like?

      It would in the first instance focus on the restoration of both EU and NGO search-and-rescue efforts in the Mediterranean and establish more predictable disembarkation and refugee distribution mechanisms. It would also mean the withdrawal of EU support for the Libyan Coastguard, the closure of that country’s detention centers, and a substantial improvement of the living conditions experienced by refugees in Europe’s frontline states—changes that should take place with or without a Pact.

      Indeed, the EU should redeploy the massive amount of resources that it currently devotes to the externalization process, so as to strengthen the protection capacity of asylum and transit countries on the periphery of Europe. A progressive approach on the part of the EU would involve the establishment of not only faster but also fair asylum procedures, with appropriate long-term solutions being found for new arrivals, whether or not they qualify for refugee status.

      These changes would help to ensure that those searching for safety have timely and adequate opportunities to access their most basic rights.

      https://www.refugeesinternational.org/reports/2020/11/5/european-refugee-policy-whats-gone-wrong-and-how-to-make-it-b

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: Turning European Union Territory into a non-Territory

      Externalization policies in 2020: where is the European Union territory?

      In spite of the Commission’s rhetoric stressing the novel elements of the Pact on Migration and Asylum (hereinafter: the Pact – summarized and discussed in general here), there are good reasons to argue that the Pact develops and consolidates, among others, the existing trends on externalization policies of migration control (see Guild et al). Furthermore, it tries to create new avenues for a ‘smarter’ system of management of immigration, by additionally controlling access to the European Union territory for third country nationals (TCNs), and by creating different categories of migrants, which are then subject to different legal regimes which find application in the European Union territory.

      The consolidation of existing trends concerns the externalization of migration management practices, resort to technologies in developing migration control systems (further development of Eurodac, completion of the path toward full interoperability between IT systems), and also the strengthening of the role of the European Union executive level, via increased joint management involving European Union agencies: these are all policies that find in the Pact’s consolidation.

      This brief will focus on externalization (practices), a concept which is finding a new declination in the Pact: indeed, the Pact and several of the measures proposed, read together, are aiming at ‘disentangling’ the territory of the EU, from a set of rights which are related with the presence of the migrant or of the asylum seeker on the territory of a Member State of the EU, and from the relation between territory and access to a jurisdiction, which is necessary to enforce rights which otherwise remain on paper.

      Interestingly, this process of separation, of splitting between territory-law/rights-jurisdiction takes place not outside, but within the EU, and this is the new declination of externalization which one can find in the measures proposed in the Pact, namely with the proposal for a Screening Regulation and the amended proposal for a Procedure Regulation. It is no accident that other commentators have interpreted it as a consolidation of ‘fortress Europe’. In other words, this externalization process takes place within the EU and aims at making the external borders more effective also for the TCNs who are already in the territory of the EU.

      The proposal for a pre-entry screening regulation

      A first instrument which has a pivotal role in the consolidation of the externalization trend is the proposed Regulation for a screening of third country nationals (hereinafter: Proposal Screening Regulation), which will be applicable to migrants crossing the external borders without authorization. The aim of the screening, according to the Commission, is to ‘accelerate the process of determining the status of a person and what type of procedure should apply’. More precisely, the screening ‘should help ensure that the third country nationals concerned are referred to the appropriate procedures at the earliest stage possible’ and also to avoid absconding after entrance in the territory in order to reach a different state than the one of arrival (recital 8, preamble of proposal). The screening should contribute as well to curb secondary movements, which is a policy target highly relevant for many northern and central European Union states.

      In the new design, the screening procedure becomes the ‘standard’ for all TCNs who crossed the border in irregular manner, and also for persons who are disembarked following a search and rescue (SAR) operation, and for those who apply for international protection at the external border crossing points or in transit zones. With the screening Regulation, all these categories of persons shall not be allowed to enter the territory of the State during the screening (Arts 3 and 4 of the proposal).

      Consequently, different categories of migrants, including asylum seekers which are by definition vulnerable persons, are to be kept in locations situated at or in proximity to the external borders, for a time (up to 5 days, which can become 10 at maximum), defined in the Regulation, but which must be respected by national administrations. There is here an implicit equation between all these categories, and the common denominator of this operation is that all these persons have crossed the border in an unauthorized manner.

      It is yet unclear how the situation of migrants during the screening is to be organized in practical terms, transit zones, hotspot or others, and if this can qualify as detention, in legal terms. The Court of Justice has ruled recently on Hungarian transit zones (see analysis by Luisa Marin), by deciding that Röszke transit zone qualified as ‘detention’, and it can be argued that the parameters clarified in that decision could find application also to the case of migrants during the screening phase. If the situation of TCNs during the screening can be considered detention, which is then the legal basis? The Reception Conditions Directive or the Return Directive? If the national administrations struggle to meet the tight deadlines provided for the screening system, these questions will become more urgent, next to the very practical issue of the actual accommodation for this procedure, which in general does not allow for access to the territory.

      On the one side, Article 14(7) of the proposal provides a guarantee, indicating that the screening should end also if the checks are not completed within the deadlines; on the other side, the remaining question is: to which procedure is the applicant sent and how is the next phase then determined? The relevant procedure following the screening here seems to be determined in a very approximate way, and this begs the question on the extent to which rights can be protected in this context. Furthermore, the right to have access to a lawyer is not provided for in the screening phase. Given the relevance of this screening phase, also fundamental rights should be monitored, and the mechanism put in place at Article 7, leaves much to the discretion of the Member States, and the involvement of the Fundamental Rights Agency, with guidance and support upon request of the MS can be too little to ensure fundamental rights are not jeopardized by national administrations.

      This screening phase, which has the purpose to make sure, among other things, that states ‘do their job’ as to collecting information and consequently feeding the EU information systems, might therefore have important effects on the merits of the individual case, since border procedures are to be seen as fast-track, time is limited and procedural guarantees are also sacrificed in this context. In the case the screening ends with a refusal of entry, there is a substantive effect of the screening, which is conducted without legal assistance and without access to a legal remedy. And if this is not a decision in itself, but it ends up in a de-briefing form, this form might give substance to the next stage of the procedure, which, in the case of asylum, should be an individualized and accurate assessment of one’s individual circumstances.

      Overall, it should be stressed that the screening itself does not end up in a formal decision, it nevertheless represents an important phase since it defines what comes after, i.e., the type of procedure following the screening. It must be observed therefore, that the respect of some procedural rights is of paramount importance. At the same time, it is important that communication in a language TCNs can understand is effective, since the screening might end in a de-briefing form, where one or more nationalities are indicated. Considering that one of the options is the refusal of entry (Art. 14(1) screening proposal; confirmed by the recital 40 of the Proposal Procedure Regulation, as amended in 2020), and the others are either access to asylum or expulsion, one should require that the screening provides for procedural guarantees.

      Furthermore, the screening should point to any element which might be relevant to refer the TCNs into the accelerated examination procedure or the border procedure. In other words, the screening must indicate in the de-briefing form the options that protect asylum applicants less than others (Article 14(3) of the proposal). It does not operate in the other way: a TCN who has applied for asylum and comes from a country with a high recognition rate is not excluded from the screening (see blog post by Jakuleviciene).

      The legislation creates therefore avenues for disentangling, splitting the relation between physical presence of an asylum applicant on a territory and the set of laws and fundamental rights associated to it, namely a protective legal order, access to rights and to a jurisdiction enforcing those rights. It creates a sort of ‘lighter’ legal order, a lower density system, which facilitates the exit of the applicant from the territory of the EU, creating a sort of shift from a Europe of rights to the Europe of borders, confinement and expulsions.

      The proposal for new border procedures: an attempt to create a lower density territory?

      Another crucial piece in this process of establishing a stronger border fence and streamline procedures at the border, creating a ‘seamless link between asylum and return’, in the words of the Commission, is constituted by the reform of the border procedures, with an amendment of the 2016 proposal for the Regulation procedure (hereinafter: Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation).

      Though border procedures are already present in the current Regulation of 2013, they are now developed into a “border procedure for asylum and return”, and a more developed accelerated procedure, which, next to the normal asylum procedure, comes after the screening phase.

      The new border procedure becomes obligatory (according to Art. 41(3) of the Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation) for applicants who arrive irregularly at the external border or after disembarkation and another of these grounds apply:

      – they represent a risk to national security or public order;

      – the applicant has provided false information or documents or by withholding relevant information or document;

      – the applicant comes from a non-EU country for which the share of positive decisions in the total number of asylum decisions is below 20 percent.

      This last criterion is especially problematic, since it transcends the criterion of the safe third country and it undermines the principle that every asylum application requires a complex and individualized assessment of the particular personal circumstances of the applicant, by introducing presumptive elements in a procedure which gives fewer guarantees.

      During the border procedure, the TCN is not granted access to the EU. The expansion of the new border procedures poses also the problem of the organization of the facilities necessary for the new procedures, which must be a location at or close to the external borders, in other words, where migrants are apprehended or disembarked.

      Tellingly enough, the Commission’s explanatory memorandum describes as guarantees in the asylum border procedure all the situations in which the border procedure shall not be applied, for example, because the necessary support cannot be provided or for medical reasons, or where the ‘conditions for detention (…) cannot be met and the border procedure cannot be applied without detention’.

      Also here the question remains on how to qualify their stay during the procedure, because the Commission aims at limiting resort to detention. The situation could be considered de facto a detention, and its compatibility with the criteria laid down by the Court of Justice in the Hungarian transit zones case is questionable.

      Another aspect which must be analyzed is the system of guarantees after the decision in a border procedure. If an application is rejected in an asylum border procedure, the “return procedure” applies immediately. Member States must limit to one instance the right to effective remedy against the decision, as posited in Article 53(9). The right to an effective remedy is therefore limited, according to Art. 53 of the Proposed Regulation, and the right to remain, a ‘light’ right to remain one could say, is also narrowly constructed, in the case of border procedures, to the first remedy against the negative decision (Art. 54(3) read together with Art. 54(4) and 54(5)). Furthermore, EU law allows Member States to limit the right to remain in case of subsequent applications and provides that there is no right to remain in the case of subsequent appeals (Art. 54(6) and (7)). More in general, this proposal extends the circumstances where the applicant does not have an automatic right to remain and this represents an aspect which affects significantly and in a factual manner the capacity to challenge a negative decision in a border procedure.

      Overall, it can be argued that the asylum border procedure is a procedure where guarantees are limited, because the access to the jurisdiction is taking place in fast-track procedures, access to legal remedies is also reduced to the very minimum. Access to the territory of the Member State is therefore deprived of its typical meaning, in the sense that it does not imply access to a system which is protecting rights with procedures which offer guarantees and are therefore also time-consuming. Here, efficiency should govern a process where the access to a jurisdiction is lighter, is ‘less dense’ than otherwise. To conclude, this externalization of migration control policies takes place ‘inside’ the European Union territory, and it aims at prolonging the effects of containment policies because they make access to the EU territory less meaningful, in legal terms: the presence of the person in the territory of the EU does not entail full access to the rights related to the presence on the territory.

      Solidarity in cooperating with third countries? The “return sponsorship” and its territorial puzzle

      Chapter 6 of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum proposes, among other things, to create a conditionality between cooperation on readmission with third countries and the issuance of visas to their nationals. This conditionality was legally established in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code Regulation. The revision (discussed here) states that, given their “politically sensitive nature and their horizontal implications for the Member States and the Union”, such provisions will be triggered once implementing powers are conferred to the Council (following a proposal from the Commission).

      What do these measures entail? We know that they can be applied in bulk or separately. Firstly, EU consulates in third countries will not have the usual leeway to waive some documents required to apply for visas (Art. 14(6), visa code). Secondly, visa applicants from uncooperative third countries will pay higher visa fees (Art. 16(1) visa code). Thirdly, visa fees to diplomatic and service passports will not be waived (Art. 16(5)b visa code). Fourthly, time to take a decision on the visa application will be longer than 15 days (Art. 23(1) visa code). Fifthly, the issuance of multi-entry visas (MEVs) from 6 months to 5 years is suspended (Art. 24(2) visa code). In other words, these coercive measures are not aimed at suspending visas. They are designed to make the procedure for obtaining a visa more lengthy, more costly, and limited in terms of access to MEVs.

      Moreover, it is important to stress that the revision of the Visa Code Regulation mentions that the Union will strike a balance between “migration and security concerns, economic considerations and general external relations”. Consequently, measures (be they restrictive or not) will result from an assessment that goes well beyond migration management issues. The assessment will not be based exclusively on the so-called “return rate” that has been presented as a compass used to reward or blame third countries’ cooperation on readmission. Other indicators or criteria, based on data provided by the Member States, will be equally examined by the Commission. These other indicators pertain to “the overall relations” between the Union and its Member States, on the one hand, and a given third country, on the other. This broad category is not defined in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code, nor do we know what it precisely refers to.

      What do we know about this linkage? The idea of linking cooperation on readmission with visa policy is not new. It was first introduced at a bilateral level by some member states. For example, fifteen years ago, cooperation on redocumentation, including the swift delivery of laissez-passers by the consular authorities of countries of origin, was at the centre of bilateral talks between France and North African countries. In September 2005, the French Ministry of the Interior proposed to “sanction uncooperative countries [especially Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria] by limiting the number of short-term visas that France delivers to their nationals.” Sanctions turned out to be unsuccessful not only because of the diplomatic tensions they generated – they were met with strong criticisms and reaction on the part of North African countries – but also because the ratio between the number of laissez-passers requested by the French authorities and the number of laissez-passers delivered by North African countries’ authorities remained unchanged.

      At the EU level, the idea to link readmission with visa policy has been in the pipeline for many years. Let’s remember that, in October 2002, in its Community Return Policy, the European Commission reflected on the positive incentives that could be used in order to ensure third countries’ constant cooperation on readmission. The Commission observed in its communication that, actually, “there is little that can be offered in return. In particular visa concessions or the lifting of visa requirements can be a realistic option in exceptional cases only; in most cases it is not.” Therefore, the Commission set out to propose additional incentives (e.g. trade expansion, technical/financial assistance, additional development aid).

      In a similar vein, in September 2015, after years of negotiations and failed attempt to cooperate on readmission with Southern countries, the Commission remarked that the possibility to use Visa Facilitation Agreements as an incentive to cooperate on readmission is limited in the South “as the EU is unlikely to offer visa facilitation to certain third countries which generate many irregular migrants and thus pose a migratory risk. And even when the EU does offer the parallel negotiation of a visa facilitation agreement, this may not be sufficient if the facilitations offered are not sufficiently attractive.”

      More recently, in March 2018, in its Impact Assessment accompanying the proposal for an amendment of the Common Visa Code, the Commission itself recognised that “better cooperation on readmission with reluctant third countries cannot be obtained through visa policy measures alone.” It also added that “there is no hard evidence on how visa leverage can translate into better cooperation of third countries on readmission.”

      Against this backdrop, why has so much emphasis been put on the link between cooperation on readmission and visa policy in the revised Visa Code Regulation and later in the New Pact? The Commission itself recognised that this conditionality might not constitute a sufficient incentive to ensure the cooperation on readmission.

      To reply to this question, we need first to question the oft-cited reference to third countries’ “reluctance”[n1] to cooperate on readmission in order to understand that, cooperation on readmission is inextricably based on unbalanced reciprocities. Moreover, migration, be it regular or irregular, continues to be viewed as a safety valve to relieve pressure on unemployment and poverty in countries of origin. Readmission has asymmetric costs and benefits having economic social and political implications for countries of origin. Apart from being unpopular in Southern countries, readmission is humiliating, stigmatizing, violent and traumatic for migrants,[n2] making their process of reintegration extremely difficult, if not impossible, especially when countries of origin have often no interest in promoting reintegration programmes addressed to their nationals expelled from Europe.

      Importantly, the conclusion of a bilateral agreement does not automatically lead to its full implementation in the field of readmission, for the latter is contingent on an array of factors that codify the bilateral interactions between two contracting parties. Today, more than 320 bilateral agreements linked to readmission have been concluded between the 27 EU Member States and third countries at a global level. Using an oxymoron, it is possible to argue that, over the past decades, various EU member states have learned that, if bilateral cooperation on readmission constitutes a central priority in their external relations (this is the official rhetoric), readmission remains peripheral to other strategic issue-areas which are detailed below. Finally, unlike some third countries in the Balkans or Eastern Europe, Southern third countries have no prospect of acceding to the EU bloc, let alone having a visa-free regime, at least in the foreseeable future. This basic difference makes any attempt to compare the responsiveness of the Balkan countries to cooperation on readmission with Southern non-EU countries’ impossible, if not spurious.

      Today, patterns of interdependence between the North and the South of the Mediterranean are very much consolidated. Over the last decades, Member States, especially Spain, France, Italy and Greece, have learned that bringing pressure to bear on uncooperative third countries needs to be evaluated cautiously lest other issues of high politics be jeopardized. Readmission cannot be isolated from a broader framework of interactions including other strategic, if not more crucial, issue-areas, such as police cooperation on the fight against international terrorism, border control, energy security and other diplomatic and geopolitical concerns. Nor can bilateral cooperation on readmission be viewed as an end in itself, for it has often been grafted onto a broader framework of interactions.

      This point leads to a final remark regarding “return sponsorship” which is detailed in Art. 55 of the proposal for a regulation on asylum and migration management. In a nutshell, the idea of the European Commission consists in a commitment from a “sponsoring Member State” to assist another Member State (the benefitting Member State) in the readmission of a third-country national. This mechanism foresees that each Member State is expected to indicate the nationalities for which they are willing to provide support in the field of readmission. The sponsoring Member State offers an assistance by mobilizing its network of bilateral cooperation on readmission, or by opening a dialogue with the authorities of a given third country where the third-country national will be deported. If, after eight months, attempts are unsuccessful, the third-country national is transferred to the sponsoring Member State. Note that, in application of Council Directive 2001/40 on mutual recognition of expulsion decisions, the sponsoring Member State may or may not recognize the expulsion decision of the benefitting Member State, just because Member States continue to interpret the Geneva Convention in different ways and also because they have different grounds for subsidiary protection.

      Viewed from a non-EU perspective, namely from the point of view of third countries, this mechanism might raise some questions of competence and relevance. Which consular authorities will undertake the identification process of the third country national with a view to eventually delivering a travel document? Are we talking about the third country’s consular authorities located in the territory of the benefitting Member State or in the sponsoring Member State’s? In a similar vein, why would a bilateral agreement linked to readmission – concluded with a given ‘sponsoring’ Member State – be applicable to a ‘benefitting’ Member State (with which no bilateral agreement or arrangement has been signed)? Such territorially bounded contingencies will invariably be problematic, at a certain stage, from the viewpoint of third countries. Additionally, in acting as a sponsoring Member State, one is entitled to wonder why an EU Member State might decide to expose itself to increased tensions with a given third country while putting at risk a broader framework of interactions.

      As the graph shows, not all the EU Member States are equally engaged in bilateral cooperation on readmission with third countries. Moreover, a geographical distribution of available data demonstrates that more than 70 per cent of the total number of bilateral agreements linked to readmission (be they formal or informal[n3]) concluded with African countries are covered by France, Italy and Spain. Over the last decades, these three Member States have developed their respective networks of cooperation on readmission with a number of countries in Africa and in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

      Given the existence of these consolidated networks, the extent to which the “return sponsorship” proposed in the Pact will add value to their current undertakings is objectively questionable. Rather, if the “return sponsorship” mechanism is adopted, these three Member States might be deemed to act as sponsoring Member States when it comes to the expulsion of irregular migrants (located in other EU Member States) to Africa and the MENA region. More concretely, the propensity of, for example, Austria to sponsor Italy in expelling from Italy a foreign national coming from the MENA region or from Africa is predictably low. Austria’s current networks of cooperation on readmission with MENA and African countries would never add value to Italy’s consolidated networks of cooperation on readmission with these third countries. Moreover, it is unlikely that Italy will be proactively “sponsoring” other Member States’ expulsion decisions, without jeopardising its bilateral relations with other strategic third countries located in the MENA region or in Africa, to use the same example. These considerations concretely demonstrate that the European Commission’s call for “solidarity and fair sharing of responsibility”, on which its “return sponsorship” mechanism is premised, is contingent on the existence of a federative Union able to act as a unitary supranational body in domestic and foreign affairs. This federation does not exist in political terms.

      Beyond these practical aspects, it is important to realise that the cobweb of bilateral agreements linked to readmission has expanded as a result of tremendously complex bilateral dynamics that go well beyond the mere management of international migration. These remarks are crucial to understanding that we need to reflect properly on the conditionality pattern that has driven the external action of the EU, especially in a regional context where patterns of interdependence among state actors have gained so much relevance over the last two decades. Moreover, given the clear consensus on the weak correlation between cooperation on readmission and visa policy (the European Commission being no exception to this consensus), linking the two might not be the adequate response to ensure third countries’ cooperation on readmission, especially when the latter are in position to capitalize on their strategic position with regard to some EU Member States.

      Conclusions

      This brief reflection has highlighted a trend which is taking shape in the Pact and in some of the measures proposed by the Commission in its 2020 package of reforms. It has been shown that the proposals for a pre-entry screening and the 2020 amended proposal for enhanced border procedures are creating something we could label as a ‘lower density’ European Union territory, because the new procedures and arrangements have the purpose of restricting and limiting access to rights and to jurisdiction. This would happen on the territory of a Member State, but in a place at or close to the external borders, with a view to confining migration and third country nationals to an area where the territory of a state, and therefore, the European territory, is less … ‘territorial’ than it should be: legally speaking, it is a ‘lower density’ territory.

      The “seamless link between asylum and return” the Commission aims to create with the new border procedures can be described as sliding doors through which the third country national can enter or leave immediately, depending on how the established fast-track system qualifies her situation.

      However, the paradox highlighted with the “return sponsorship” mechanism shows that readmission agreements or arrangements are no panacea, for the vested interests of third countries must also be taken into consideration when it comes to cooperation on readmission. In this respect, it is telling that the Commission never consulted third states on the new return sponsorship mechanism, as if their territories were not concerned by this mechanism, which is far from being the case. For this reason, it is legitimate to imagine that the main rationale for the return sponsorship mechanism may be another one, and it may be merely domestic. In other words, the return sponsorship, which transforms itself into a form of relocation after eight months if the third country national is not expelled from the EU territory, subtly takes non-frontline European Union states out of their comfort-zone and engage them in cooperating on expulsions. If they fail to do so, namely if the third-country national is not expelled after eight months, non-frontline European Union states are as it were ‘forcibly’ engaged in a ‘solidarity practice’ that is conducive to relocation.

      Given the disappointing past experience of the 2015 relocations, it is impossible to predict whether this mechanism will work or not. However, once one enters sliding doors, the danger is to remain stuck in uncertainty, in a European Union ‘no man’s land’ which is nothing but another by-product of the fortress Europe machinery.

      http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/11/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum.html

  • I costi nascosti delle nuove “guerre remote” di Stati Uniti ed Europa

    Le forze occidentali sperimentano in Somalia e in Sahel un tipo di conflitto che non prevede l’invio di nutriti contingenti armati e utilizza al suo posto nuclei speciali, droni, contractors. Tra le controindicazioni un aumento delle vittime civili.

    Nel settembre 2019 membri di al-Shabaab, un gruppo terrorista con base in Somalia, hanno attaccato un convoglio italiano nella capitale Mogadiscio e la base militare statunitense di Baledogle. Due attacchi tanto imprevisti quanto sottovalutati. La ragione di questa analisi insufficiente dipende in gran parte dalla natura delle recenti azioni in teatri di guerra stranieri: Paesi come Stati Uniti e Italia dispiegano un numero limitato di forze per affrontare gruppi ribelli o terroristi, con l’obiettivo di contenere i costi per le proprie truppe. Gli attacchi, tuttavia, non andrebbero letti come un incidente isolato ma come sintomo di un problema più ampio. E dovrebbero spingere il governo statunitense e i vari governi europei coinvolti in conflitti esteri a rivalutare la presunta assenza di rischio, non solo per le proprie truppe ma anche per la stabilità dei Paesi oggetto di intervento a distanza.

    I due attacchi sono una perfetta illustrazione dei pericoli legati alla “guerra remota”, quella che si combatte quando l’intervento non avviene attraverso l’invio di grandi contingenti armati. La definizione è dell’Oxford Research Group (ORG), un istituto di ricerca con sede a Londra: secondo i ricercatori di ORG, guerra remota è “lo sforzo da parte di attori esterni di evitare il modello di contro-insorgenza (COIN) associato all’intervento statunitense in Afghanistan e Iraq e di focalizzarsi invece su altri modelli, quali l’invio di forze speciali, l’utilizzo di droni armati -l’arma simbolo di questo approccio-, il dispiegamento di contractors privati, l’assistenza attraverso il servizio di intelligence, l’invio di attrezzature e il training a milizie locali”.

    Paesi come Stati Uniti e Italia dispiegano un numero limitato di forze per affrontare gruppi ribelli o terroristi, con l’obiettivo di limitare i costi per le proprie truppe

    L’utilizzo di droni in particolare è legato all’interpretazione legale di “guerra globale al terrore”, applicata dagli Stati Uniti per giustificare uccisioni mirate in Pakistan, Siria, Yemen e Somalia. Non solo Usa, però: anche Israele, Turchia, Cina, Nigeria, Regno Unito, Francia e ora anche l’Italia fanno un uso globale di droni armati. Dan Gettinger del Center for the Study of the Drone a Washington riporta che la spesa per droni statunitense è salita del 21% nel 2018 rispetto al 2017. Phil Finnegan di Teal Group afferma che “la produzione globale di droni dovrebbe più che raddoppiare in un decennio, da 4,9 miliardi di dollari nel 2018 a 10,7 miliardi nel 2027, con un tasso di crescita annuo del nove per cento”. L’Unione europea intanto sta per lanciare il suo primo Fondo per la Difesa: se approvato dal Parlamento europeo, dovrebbe ammontare a circa 13 miliardi di euro in sette anni.

    Ma nessuna guerra può essere chirurgica, priva di costi ed efficace allo stesso tempo: portare avanti guerre remote può essere percepito come vantaggioso, ma ha delle ricadute che aggravano il bilancio dell’intervento. Sia in Sahel sia in Somalia, dove è in corso un peggioramento della situazione di sicurezza, esacerbato da altre dinamiche interne, è vitale per gli attori esterni che hanno scelto di intervenire farlo con una strategia coerente e che tenga conto soprattutto di quelli che sono i bisogni della popolazione locale.

    10,7 miliardi di dollari: il valore stimato del mercato dei droni nel 2027. Nel 2018 si è fermato a 4,9 miliardi

    Le forze italiane attaccate a fine settembre del 2019 facevano parte di EUTM Somalia, una “missione militare dell’Unione europea che ha il compito di contribuire all’addestramento delle forze armate nazionali somale (Somali National Armed Forces, o SNA)”. La Somalia è una delle aree d’intervento delle politiche di sicurezza e difesa (CSDP) dell’Unione Europea. Paul Williams del Wilson Center osserva che “per oltre un decennio, una dozzina di Stati e organizzazioni multilaterali hanno investito tempo, sforzi, attrezzature e centinaia di milioni di dollari per costruire un’efficace esercito nazionale somalo. Finora hanno fallito”. Lo SNA conta “circa 29mila unità sul suo libro paga” ma molti sono soldati fantasma e quando le forze della missione dell’Unione africana in Somalia (AMISOM) si ritirano dai territori “la sicurezza tende a deteriorarsi in modo significativo ed è al-Shabaab a colmare il vuoto”. Gravi problemi affliggono anche l’impegno del comando africano degli Stati Uniti (AFRICOM) nel Paese. Ella Knight di Amnesty International ha documentato almeno sei casi in cui si ritiene che gli attacchi aerei statunitensi in Somalia abbiano provocato vittime civili e tutto questo in un’area geografica limitata.

    Nessuna guerra può essere chirurgica, priva di costi ed efficace allo stesso tempo: portare avanti guerre remote ha ricadute che aggravano il bilancio delle operazioni

    Nel caso dell’intervento europeo e americano in Somalia le questioni aperte sono due: prima di tutto il training delle milizie governative locali ha portato a soprusi verso la popolazione, accrescendo paradossalmente la reputazione di al-Shabaab. Inoltre, la guerra remota attraverso droni ha fatto un numero ancora imprecisato di vittime civili, non riconosciute dagli Stati Uniti, contribuendo alla percezione negativa che la popolazione civile ha di questi interventi armati. In ultima istanza, anche le truppe (in questo caso italiane e statunitensi) sul territorio sono vittima di rappresaglie da parte di gruppi armati.

    Anche il Sahel è un teatro di conflitti, dove sempre più Paesi, non solo occidentali, stanno intervenendo con le tattiche della guerra remota. Ma anche qui il costo dell’intervento non è da sottovalutare. Il 25 novembre scorso in Mali due elicotteri delle forze armate francesi si sono scontrati, uccidendo tredici soldati. La presenza delle truppe francesi rimanda a quanto accaduto nel dicembre 2013: allora, truppe francesi sotto l’egida dell’Operazione Serval erano intervenute in Mali per fermare l’avanzata di milizie armate verso la capitale Bamako; l’operazione, conclusa con successo, aveva dato il via a un altro intervento francese nella regione. A partire dal 2014 l’Operazione Barkhane intende fornire supporto nel lungo termine all’intera regione.

    L’impegno internazionale sembra spesso esacerbare l’instabilità. L’abuso di Stato reale o percepito è un fattore alla base della decisione di unirsi a gruppi estremisti violenti

    La missione di stabilizzazione integrata multidimensionale delle Nazioni Unite in Mali (MINUSMA) è stata istituita nel 2013 anche al fine di addestrare le forze regionali della Joint Force G5 Sahel. L’Unione europea ha istituto tre missioni di sicurezza e difesa in Mali e Niger, e sta procedendo a una maggiore regionalizzazione della propria presenza attraverso le Cellule Regionali di Consiglio e Coordinazione (RACC).
    L’European Union Training Mission in Mali, in particolare, rientra nella definizione di assistenza a forze di sicurezza, in quanto fornisce addestramento militare a forze armate maliane. Tale contributo fa parte di uno sforzo più ampio per condurre operazioni a distanza nella regione: anche gli Stati Uniti hanno da poco costruito la base aerea 201 ad Agadez, un futuro hub per droni armati e altri velivoli. La presenza degli Stati Uniti nel Sahel è notevolmente aumentata negli ultimi anni, così come quella tedesca, britannica e italiana.

    In Niger la presenza militare straniera ha avuto impatti negativi sulla libertà di parola e molti leader dell’opposizione hanno lamentato la mancanza di controllo parlamentare

    L’impegno internazionale però sembra spesso esacerbare l’instabilità, come hanno affermato alcuni gruppi della società civile. International Alert riporta che tra giovani Fulani nelle regioni di Mopti (Mali), Sahel (Burkina Faso) e Tillabéri (Niger) “l’abuso di stato reale o percepito è il fattore numero uno alla base della decisione di unirsi a gruppi estremisti violenti. L’Unione europea sta attualmente addestrando truppe locali senza (però) esercitare pressioni sul governo di Bamako per introdurre riforme strutturali”. Proprio in Mali la questione è particolarmente problematica: secondo Abigail Watson dell’Oxford Research Group “forze armate e governo maliani sono accusati di favorire un gruppo etnico rispetto ad un altro”. Favorire un particolare gruppo all’interno di conflitti tra diverse etnie si è dimostrato essere estremamente dannoso per la sicurezza a lungo termine. Il governo nigerino ha accolto con favore la presenza di truppe statunitensi, purché contribuiscano allo sradicamento dell’attività terroristica nel Paese. La società civile in Niger però sembra diffidare di tale presenza. Un’inchiesta del Guardian nel 2018 segnalava che la presenza militare straniera ha avuto impatti negativi sulla libertà di parola e molti leader dell’opposizione hanno lamentato la mancanza di controllo parlamentare ogni volta che la presenza straniera è autorizzata. Gli Stati Uniti non hanno chiarito le loro intenzioni strategiche a lungo termine, mentre sia la Francia sia l’Ue lo hanno fatto: l’intenzione è quella di sostituire all’operazione Barkhane e alle missioni europee la G5 Sahel Joint Force. Non sembra tuttavia esserci un progetto strategico chiaro per il raggiungimento di tale obiettivo, il che porta inevitabilmente ad aspre critiche. Infine, come mostrano recenti ricerche, la “guerra dall’impronta leggera” ha comportato una serie di sfide che si riflettono su trasparenza e responsabilità pubblica. Come sottolineano Goldsmith e Waxman nel loro articolo “The Legal Legacy of Light- Footprint Warfare”, pubblicato da The Washington Quarterly nel 2016, “la guerra di impronta leggera non attira lo stesso livello di scrutinio congressuale e soprattutto pubblico rispetto a guerre più convenzionali”.

    Tra le considerazioni che i Paesi europei e l’Unione stessa dovrebbero fare è necessario inserire un dialogo costante con la società civile del Paese in cui si sta intervenendo, ma soprattutto una chiara definizione della strategia e un’analisi del tipo di guerra che si vuole condurre, tenendo conto dei rischi che questo comporta.

    https://altreconomia.it/guerra-remota
    #guerre #drones #Somalie #Sahel #expérimentation #drones #contractors #complexe_militaro-industriel #armes #guerre_à_distance #drones_armés #contractors #intelligence #milices

    ping @albertocampiphoto @wizo @etraces