• #Journal du #Regard : Février 2021
    http://liminaire.fr/journal/article/journal-du-regard-fevrier-2021

    Chaque mois, un film regroupant l’ensemble des images prises au fil des jours, le mois précédent, et le texte qui s’écrit en creux. « Une sorte de palimpseste, dans lequel doivent transparaître les traces - ténues mais non déchiffrables - de l’écriture “préalable” ». Jorge Luis Borges, Fictions Nous ne faisons qu’apparaître dans un monde soumis comme nous au pouvoir du temps. Dans le silence qui suit la fin du signal de départ. Dans un seul et unique instant. Non pas suites sans principe de (...) #Journal / #Vidéo, #Architecture, #Art, #Écriture, Journal, #Voix, #Sons, #Paris, #Paysage, #Ville, #Journal_du_regard, #Politique, Regard, #Ciel, (...)

    #Dérive

  • The Danger of Anti-Immigrant Extremism Posing as Environmentalism—and Who Funds It

    With President Joe Biden in the White House and Vice President Kamala Harris providing the deciding vote in the Senate, a range of long-sought Democratic policy goals are back in play, albeit just barely. That includes ambitious agendas on immigration and the environment.

    Could this be the administration that pushes through comprehensive immigration reform after decades of failed attempts? Will youth activists and the burgeoning movement for a Green New Deal provide a pathway to major climate legislation? If so, advocates and their funders alike face a tough road ahead, including an obstructionist congressional minority and opponents on both fronts that will look to appeal to the public’s darkest impulses to build opposition.

    At this inflection point, a report this month from the Center for American Progress, “The Extremist Campaign to Blame Immigrants for U.S. Environmental Problems,” offers a timely overview of the history of how opponents of immigration falsely portray it as a threat to the natural world—a strategy we’re likely to see more of in the months ahead. The report offers a valuable review of these efforts, ranging from the past anti-immigrant stances of some of the nation’s best-known environmental groups to the funders that have bankrolled the nation’s largest anti-immigration groups.

    Four years of an administration defined by its opposition to immigration, plus growing attention to climate change, breathed new life into the toxic and racist narrative of immigrants as a cause of environmental degradation. As the report lays out, this argument—often part of a right-wing, white supremacist ideology known as ecofascism, though CAP’s report does not use the term—found allies in the top echelons of government and media, including a former head of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and conservative commentators like Ann Coulter and Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

    In contemporary politics, this strategy is mainly seen as a right-wing phenomenon or an artifact of the racist and Eurocentric early history of conservation. Yet the fact that anti-immigrant sentiment found a home within top environmental groups, including Earthfirst! and the Sierra Club, which had a major faction in support of these ideas as late as 2004, is a reminder that it has found fertile soil in a variety of political camps. That makes the narrative all the more dangerous, and one against which funders working in both immigration and the environment ought to take a firm and vocal stance.

    Who’s funding anti-immigration work in the name of the environment?

    Although not comprehensive, the report highlights three funders as key backers of anti-immigration groups: Colcom Foundation, Weeden Foundation and Foundation for the Carolinas. The first two are, in their branding and language, environmental funders—and make those grants in the name of preventing further damage to the natural world.

    Colcom, founded by Mellon Bank heir Cordelia Scaife May, is far and away the largest funder. With a roughly $500 million endowment, it has provided a large share of the support for a network of groups founded by John Tanton, a Sierra Club official in the 1980s, whom the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) calls “the racist architect of the modern anti-immigrant movement.”

    Recipients include NumbersUSA, Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), and the Center for Immigration Studies, which we once called “Trump’s favorite immigration think tank.” The latter two are classified as hate groups by the SPLC, a designation the organizations reject.

    In keeping with the bending of reflexive political categories, it’s worth noting that May—who died in 2005—was also a substantial funder of Planned Parenthood due to her prioritization of “population control” as a means of achieving conservation. In 2019, the New York Times documented May’s dark journey to becoming a leading funder of the modern anti-immigrant movement, and the millions her foundation continued to move, long after her death, in support of ideas that gained a receptive audience in a nativist Trump administration. May’s wealth came from the Mellon-Scaife family fortune, which yielded several philanthropists, including another prominent conservative donor, Richard Mellon Scaife.

    Weeden, led by Don Weeden, has funded a similar who’s who of top anti-immigration groups, as well as lower-profile or regional groups like Californians for Population Stabilization, Progressives for Immigration Reform—which CAP calls the “most central organization in the anti-immigrant greenwashing universe”—and the Rewilding Institute.

    Both Weeden and Colcom, as well as the groups they fund, generally say they are neither anti-immigrant nor anti-immigration. Aside from restrictionist policy positions and racist comments by former leaders, it is revealing that the groups they fund are the favored information sources for some of the most virulently anti-immigrant politicians, both historically and among those who rose prominence during the Trump administration. For a deeper dive on Weeden and Colcom, see my colleague Philip Rojc’s excellent 2019 piece on these grantmakers.

    Finally, there is the Foundation for the Carolinas, which in many ways is a typical community foundation, with initiatives on topics from COVID-19 relief to local arts. But it also hosts a donor-advised fund that has supported several anti-immigration groups, including Center for Immigration Studies, FAIR and NumbersUSA. That fund channeled nearly $21 million to nine such groups between 2006 and 2018, according to the report.

    There’s a connection here to a larger problem of private foundations and DAFs, some of which are housed at community foundations, supporting 501(c)(3) nonprofits identified as hate groups, according to a recent analysis from the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Foundation for the Carolinas also made its list of top donors to these groups.

    An ideology funders must fight against

    As the debates over both immigration and climate policies move forward under this new administration, and the opposition marshals efforts to defeat them, this report offers a helpful guide to this enduring and noxious myth. It’s also an important reminder that if these ideas are not called actively combated, they can take root within well-intentioned efforts. Though it seems only a small number of foundations directly fund groups advancing these ideas, anti-immigrant sentiment is insidious.

    For example, while some commentators are suggesting that acceding to Trump-fueled demands for a border wall is how Congress could reach bipartisan action on immigration reform, the report notes how the existing sections of wall are ineffective against furtive crossings, disruptive to species migration, and in violation of Indigenous sacred sites. These facts—and more broadly, the connection to white supremacist and fascist movements—should put foundations on guard, whether they support grantees pushing for immigration reform, action on climate or both.

    With the United States and other nations facing greater and greater pressures from climate change—particularly as it forces migration from regions like Latin America and the Middle East—philanthropy would do well to be proactive now and draw a bright line in countering this ideology’s propagation.

    https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2021/2/24/anti-immigrant-environmentalism-is-resurgent-new-report-looks-at
    #extrême_droite #anti-migrants #USA #Etats-Unis #environnementalisme #environnement #migrations #nature #dégradation_environnementale #écofascisme #éco-fascisme #suprématisme_blanc #extrême_droite #Ann_Coulte #Tucker_Carlson #racisme #Earthfirst #Sierra_Club #deep_ecology #fondations #Colcom_Foundation #Weeden_Foundation #Foundation_for_the_Carolinas #Mellon_Bank #Cordelia_Scaife_May #mécénat #John_Tanton #NumbersUSA #Federation_for_American_Immigration_Reform (#FAIR) #Center_for_Immigration_Studies #Planned_Parenthood #démographie #contrôle_démographique #néo-malthusianisme #néomalthusianisme #protection_de_l'environnement #philanthropie #Richard_Mellon_Scaife #Weeden #Don_Weeden #Californians_for_Population_Stabilization #Progressives_for_Immigration_Reform #Rewilding_Institute

    • The Extremist Campaign to Blame Immigrants for U.S. Environmental Problems

      With growing frequency over the past four years, right-wing pundits, policymakers, and political operatives have fiercely and furiously blamed immigrants for the degradation and decline of nature in the United States. William Perry Pendley, who temporarily ran the U.S. Bureau of Land Management under former President Donald Trump, saw “immigration as one of the biggest threats to public lands,” according to an agency spokesperson.1 A handful of right-wing anti-immigration zealots, including Joe Guzzardi, have repeatedly misused data published by the Center for American Progress on nature loss to make xenophobic arguments for anti-immigration policies.2 This so-called “greening of hate”—a term explored by Guardian reporter Susie Cagle—is a common refrain in a wide range of conservative and white supremacist arguments, including those of Ann Coulter, Fox News host Tucker Carlson, neo-Nazi Richard Spencer, and the manifestos of more than one mass shooter.3

      The claim that immigration is to blame for America’s environmental problems is so absurd, racist, and out of the mainstream that it is easily debunked and tempting to ignore. The scientific community, and the little research that has been conducted in this area, resoundingly refutes the premise. Consider, for example, the environmental damage caused by weak and inadequate regulation of polluting industries; the destruction of wildlife habitat to accommodate wealthy exurbs and second homes; the design and propagation of policies that concentrate toxic poisons and environmental destruction near communities of color and low-income communities; the continued subsidization of fossil fuel extraction and trampling of Indigenous rights to accommodate drilling and mining projects; and the propagation of a throw-away culture by industrial powerhouses. All of these factors and others cause exponentially more severe environmental harm than a family that is fleeing violence, poverty, or suffering to seek a new life in the United States.

      The extremist effort to blame immigrants for the nation’s environmental problems deserves scrutiny—and not merely for the purpose of disproving its xenophobic and outlandish claims. The contours, origins, funding sources, and goals of this right-wing effort must be understood in order to effectively combat it and ensure that the extremists pushing it have no place in the conservation movement. The individuals and organizations that are most fervently propagating this argument come largely from well-funded hate groups that are abusing discredited ideologies that were prevalent in the 19th-century American conservation movement in an attempt to make their racist rhetoric more palatable to a public concerned about the health of their environment.

      While leaders of the contemporary, mainstream environmental movement in the United States have disavowed this strain of thought and are working to confront the legacies of colonialism and racism in environmental organizations and policies, a small set of right-wing political operatives are trying to magnify overtly xenophobic and false environmental arguments to achieve specific political objectives. In particular, these right-wing political operatives and their deep-pocketed funders are seeking to broaden the appeal of their anti-immigration zealotry by greenwashing their movement and supplying their right-wing base with alternative explanations for environmental decline that sidestep the culpability of the conservative anti-regulatory agenda. In their refusal to confront the true reasons for environmental decline, they are hurting the people—immigrants, Indigenous peoples, and people of color—who bear a disproportionate burden of environmental consequences and are increasingly the base of the climate justice and conservation movements.

      (...)

      https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/green/reports/2021/02/01/495228/extremist-campaign-blame-immigrants-u-s-environmental-problems

  • Débat Twitch avec les écoles de journalisme
    http://www.davduf.net/20-presse-puree-sur-twitter-%F0%9F%8E%99-on-va-parler-du

    Ce mercredi 24 février en direct sur Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/davduf, 18h45 Purée ! 🥔 🎈On parle de la presse et du journalisme. Les pieds dans le plat ! Presse-Purée est une chaîne animée par des étudiant.e.s en journalisme. 🎈À chaque stream, un.e invité.e partagera ses réflexions, ses doutes et ses espoirs sur le journalisme et les médias, et répondra à vos questions dans le chat. 🎈Suivez notre chaîne pour les prochains streams 👉 https://www.twitch.tv/presse_puree_ 🎈Retrouvez-nous aussi sur Twitter (...) #Agenda

    https://www.twitch.tv/davduf

    #journalisme #médias #critique

  • Behigorri - Le journal - Les Ruminant-e-s
    http://lesruminants.eklablog.com/behigorri-le-journal-a205194986

    Sommaire :

    Jesuispangoline de Laura Outan 2
    Dans ma cabane, je suis de Nina Terrpl 3
    Leçon de sauvagerie de SaVge 4
    La théorie de la fiction­panier de Ursula K. Le Guin 4
    Civilisation et biogynophobie de Ana Minski 7
    L’âge des couleurs de Colette Daviles­-Estinès 9
    CAPP, collectif abolition porno prostitution 10
    Pornland, Gail Dines 11
    Vous avez dit Satire ! de Cathy Garcia Canalès 12
    Julia Hill Butterfly 13
    Variations de la ville de Rosales Miroslava 14
    Animaux en terres humaines de Ana Minski 15
    Andrea Dworkin 16
    Les lézardes de feu de Ana Minski 16

    http://ekladata.com/YkNQ7S_EOTGBQnVg1fvd8yFhvlM.jpg

    Le PDF :
    http://ekladata.com/GNl9d1q9WrltWDegZwQoGyk6prU/journal-compresse.pdf

    Souvenez-vous, une lecture d’Ana Minski :
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGA7SoUPxbU

    On ne va pas s’entendre
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-izn_70LSY

    #Ana_Minski #féminisme #Andrea_Dworkin #fanzine #journal

  • Making sense of silenced #archives: #Hume, Scotland and the ‘debate’ about the humanity of Black people

    Last September, the University of Edinburgh found itself at the centre of international scrutiny after temporarily renaming the #David_Hume Tower (now referred to by its street designation 40 George Square). The decision to rename the building, and hold a review on the way forward, prompted much commentary – a great deal of which encouraged a reckoning on what David Hume means to the University, its staff and students. These ideas include the full extent of Hume’s views on humanity, to establish whether he maintained any possible links (ideological or participatory) in the slave trade, and the role of Scotland in the African slave trade.

    Hume’s belief that Black people were a sub-human species of lower intellectual and biological rank to Europeans have rightfully taken stage in reflecting whether his values deserve commemoration on a campus. “I am apt to suspect the negroes and in general all other species of men (for there are four or five different kinds) to be naturally inferior to the whites. […] No ingenious manufactures amongst them, no arts, no sciences.” The full link to the footnote can be found here.

    Deliberations are split on whether statues and buildings are being unfairly ‘targeted’ or whether the totality of ideas held by individuals whose names are commemorated by these structures stand in opposition to a modern university’s values. Depending on who you ask, the debate over the tower fluctuates between moral and procedural. On the latter, it must be noted the University has in the past renamed buildings at the behest of calls for review across specific points in history. The Hastings ‘Kamuzu’ Banda building on Hill Place was quietly renamed in 1995, with no clarity on whether there was a formal review process at the time. On the moral end, it is about either the legacy or demythologization of David Hume.

    Some opposing the name change argue against applying present moral standards to judge what was not recognised in the past. Furthermore, they point to the archives to argue that prior to the 1760s there is scant evidence that Scots were not anything more than complicit to the slave trade given the vast wealth it brought.

    I argue against this and insist that the African experience and the engaged intellectual abolition movement deserves prominence in this contemporary debate about Hume.

    For to defend ‘passive complicity’ is to undermine both the Africans who rose in opposition against their oppression for hundreds of years and the explicit goals of white supremacy. For access to mass acquisition of resources on inhabited land requires violent dispossession of profitable lands and forced relocation of populations living on them. The ‘moral justification’ of denying the humanity of the enslaved African people has historically been defended through the strategic and deliberate creation of ‘myths’ – specifically Afrophobia – to validate these atrocities and to defend settler colonialism and exploitation. Any intellectual inquiry of the renaming of the tower must take the genuine concern into account: What was David Hume’s role in the strategic myth-making about African people in the Scottish imagination?

    If we are starting with the archives as evidence of Scottish complicity in the slave trade, why ignore African voices on this matter? Does the Scottish archive adequately represent the African experience within the slave trade? How do we interpret their silence in the archives?

    Decolonisation, the process Franz Fanon described as when “the ‘thing’ colonised becomes a human through the very process of liberation”, offers a radical praxis through which we can interrogate the role of the archive in affirming or disregarding the human experience. If we establish that the 18th century Scottish archive was not invested in preserving ‘both sides’ of the debate’, then the next route is to establish knowledge outside of a colonial framework where the ideology, resistance and liberation of Africans is centred. That knowledge is under the custodianship of African communities, who have relied on intricate and deeply entrenched oral traditions and practices which are still used to communicate culture, history, science and methods.

    To reinforce a point raised by Professor Tommy Curry, the fact that Africans were aware of their humanity to attempt mutiny in slave ships (Meermin & Amistad) and to overthrow colonial governance (the Haitian revolution) amidst the day-to-day attempts to evade slave traders is enough to refute the insistence that the debates must centre around what Scots understood about the slave trade in the 18th century.

    To make sense of these gaps in my own research, I have broadly excavated the archival records in Scotland if only to establish that a thorough documentation of the African-led resistance to Scottish participation in the slave trade and colonialism cannot be located in the archives.

    Dr David Livingstone (1813–1873), whose writing documenting the slave trade across the African Great Lakes galvanized the Scottish public to take control of the region to be named the Nyasaland Protectorate, would prove to be a redemptive figure in Scotland’s reconsideration of its role in the slave trade. However, in 1891, 153 years after Hume wrote his footnote, Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston (1858–1927), the first British colonial administrator of Nyasaland, would re-inforce similar myths about the ‘British Central African’: “to these [negroes] almost without arts and sciences and the refined pleasures of the senses, the only acute enjoyment offered them by nature is sexual intercourse”. Even at that time, the documented resistance is represented by Scottish missionaries who aimed to maintain Nyasaland under their sphere of control.

    Filling in the gaps that the archives cannot answer involves more complex and radical modalities of investigation.

    I rely on locally-recognised historians or documenters within communities, who preserve their histories, including the slave trade, through methodically structured oral traditions. The legacy of both the Arab and Portuguese slave trade and British colonialism in Nyasaland remains a raw memory, even though there are no precise indigenous terms to describe these phenomena.

    I have visited and listened to oral histories about the importance of ‘ancestor caves’ where families would conduct ceremonies and celebrations out of view to evade the slave catchers. These are the stories still being told about how children were hidden and raised indoors often only taken outside at night, keeping silent to escape the eyes and ears of the catchers. Embedded in these historical narratives are didactic tales, organised for ease of remembrance for the survival of future generations.
    Despite what was believed by Hume and his contemporaries, the arts and sciences have always been intrinsic in African cultural traditions. Decolonising is a framework contingent upon recognising knowledge productions within systems that often will never make their way into archival records. It centres the recognition and legitimization of the ways in which African people have collected and shared their histories.

    The knowledge we learn from these systems allows us to reckon with both the silence of archives and the fallacies of myth-making about African people.

    At very least, these debates should lead to investigations to understand the full extent of Hume’s participation in the dehumanization of enslaved Africans, and the role he played to support the justification for their enslavement.

    https://www.race.ed.ac.uk/making-sense-of-silenced-archives-hume-scotland-and-the-debate-about-the-
    #Édimbourg #toponymie #toponymie_poltique #Ecosse #UK #Edinburgh #David_Hume_Tower #esclavage #histoire #mémoire #Kamuzu_Banda #colonialisme #imaginaire #décolonisation #Nyasaland #Nyasaland_Protectorate #histoire_orale #archives #mythes #mythologie #déshumanisation

    ping @cede @karine4 @isskein

    • Hastings Banda

      The #University_of_Edinburgh renamed the Hastings ‘Kamuzu’ Banda building on #Hill_Place in the 1990s. Whilst fellow independence leader and Edinburgh alumni #Julius_Nyerere is still regarded as a saint across the world, #Banda died with an appalling record of human rights abuses and extortion – personally owning as much as 45% of #Malawi’s GDP. There are no plaques in Edinburgh commemorating #Kamuzu, and rightly so.

      Banda’s time in Edinburgh does, however, give us a lens through which to think about the University and colonial knowledge production in the 1940s and ‘50s; how numerous ‘fathers of the nation’ who led African independence movements were heavily involved in the linguistic, historical and anthropological codification of their own people during the late colonial period; why a cultural nationalist (who would later lead an anti-colonial independence movement) would write ‘tracts of empire’ whose intended audience were missionaries and colonial officials; and how such tracts reconciled imagined modernities and traditions.

      Fellow-Edinburgh student Julius Nyerere showed considerable interest in the ‘new science’ of anthropology during his time in Scotland, and #Jomo_Kenyatta – the first president of independent Kenya – penned a cutting-edge ethnography of the #Kikuyu whilst studying under #Malinowski at the LSE, published as Facing Mount Kenya in 1938. Banda himself sat down and co-edited Our African Way of Life, writing an introduction outlining Chewa and broader ‘Maravi’ traditions, with the Edinburgh-based missionary anthropologist T. Cullen Young in 1944.

      Before arriving in Edinburgh in 1938, Banda had already furthered his education in the US through his expertise on Chewa language and culture: Banda was offered a place at the University of Chicago in the 1930s on the strength of his knowledge of chiChewa, with Mark Hana Watkins’s 1937 A Grammar of Chichewa: A Bantu Language of British Central Africa acknowledging that “All the information was obtained from Kamuzu Banda, a native Chewa, while he was in attendance at the University of Chicago from 1930 to 1932”, and Banda also recorded ‘together with others’ four Chewa songs for Nancy Cunard’s Negro Anthology. In Britain in 1939 he was appointed as adviser to the Malawian chief, Mwase Kasungu, who spent six months at the London University of Oriental and African Languages to help in an analysis of chiNyanja; an experience that “must have reinforced” Banda’s “growing obsession with his Chewa identity” (Shepperson, 1998).

      Banda in Edinburgh

      In Edinburgh, Banda shifted from being a source of knowledge to a knowledge producer – a shift that demands we think harder about why African students were encouraged to Edinburgh in the first place and what they did here. Having already gained a medical degree from Chicago, Banda was primarily at Edinburgh to convert this into a British medical degree. This undoubtedly was Banda’s main focus, and the “techniques of men like Sir John Fraser electrified him, and he grew fascinated with his subject in a way which only a truly dedicated man can” (Short, 1974, p.38).

      Yet Banda also engaged with linguistic and ethnographic codification, notably with the missionary anthropologist, T Cullen Young. And whilst black Edinburgh doctors were seen as key to maintaining the health of colonial officials across British Africa in the 19th century, black anthropologists became key to a “more and fuller understanding of African thought and longings” (and controlling an increasingly agitative and articulate British Africa) in the 20th century (Banda & Young, 1946, p.27-28). Indeed, having acquired ‘expertise’ and status, it is also these select few black anthropologists – Banda, Kenyatta and Nyerere – who led the march for independence across East and Central Africa in the 1950s and 60s.

      Banda was born in c.1896-1989 in Kasungu, central Malawi. He attended a Scottish missionary school from the age 8, but having been expelled from an examination in 1915, by the same T Cullen Young he would later co-author with, Banda left Malawi and walked thousands of miles to South Africa. Banda came to live in Johannesburg at a time when his ‘Nyasa’ cousin, Clements Musa Kadalie was the ‘most talked about native in South Africa’ and the ‘uncrowned king of the black masses’, leading Southern Africa’s first black mass movement and major trade union, the Industrial and Commercial Workers’ Union (ICU).

      Banda was friends with Kadalie, and may have been involved with the Nyasaland Native National Congress which was formed around 1918-1919 with around 100 members in Johannesburg, though no record of this remains. Together, Banda and Kadalie were the two leading Malawian intellectuals of the first half of the twentieth century and, in exploring the type of ‘colonial knowledge’ produced by Africans in Edinburgh, it is productive to compare their contrasting accounts of ‘African history’.

      In 1927 Kadalie wrote an article for the British socialist journal Labour Monthly entitled ‘The Old and the New Africa’. Charting a pre-capitalist Africa, Kadalie set out that the

      “white men came to Africa of their own free will, and told my forefathers that they had brought with them civilisation and Christianity. They heralded good news for Africa. Africa must be born again, and her people must discard their savagery and become civilised people and Christians. Cities were built in which white and black men might live together as brothers. An earthly paradise awaited creation…They cut down great forests; cities were built, and while the Christian churches the gospel of universal brotherhood, the industrialisation of Africa began. Gold mining was started, and by the close of the nineteenth century European capitalism had made its footing firm in Africa….The churches still preached universal brotherhood, but capitalism has very little to do with the ethics of the Nazerene, and very soon came a new system of government in Africa with ‘Law and Order’ as its slogan.” (Kadalie, 1927).

      Banda’s own anthropological history, written 17 years later with Cullen Young, is a remarkably different tale. Banda and Young valorise the three authors within the edited volume as fossils of an ideal, isolated age, “the last Nyasalanders to have personal touch with their past; the last for whom the word ‘grandmother’ will mean some actually remembered person who could speak of a time when the land of the Lake knew no white man” (Banda & Young, 1946, p7). Already in 1938, Banda was beginning to develop an idea for a Central African nation.

      Writing from the Edinburgh Students Union to Ernest Matako, he reflected: “the British, the French and the Germans were once tribes just as we are now in Africa. Many tribes united or combined to make one, strong British, French or German nation. In other words, we have to begin to think in terms of Nyasaland, and even Central Africa as a whole, rather than of Kasungu. We have to look upon all the tribes in Central Africa, whether in Nyasaland or in Rhodesia, as our brothers. Until we learn to do this, we shall never be anything else but weak, tiny tribes, that can easily be subdued.” (Banda, 1938).
      Banda after Edinburgh

      But by 1944, with his hopes of returning to Nyasaland as a medical officer thwarted and the amalgamation of Nyasaland and the Rhodesias into a single administrative unit increasingly on the cards, Banda appears to have been grounding this regional identity in a linguistic-cultural history of the Chewa, writing in Our African Way of Life: “It is practically certain that aMaravi ought to be the shared name of all these peoples; this carrying with it recognition of the Chewa motherland group as representing the parent stock of the Nyanja speaking peoples.” (Banda & Young, 1946, p10). Noting the centrality of “Banda’s part in the renaming of Nyasaland as Malawi”, Shepperson asked in 1998, “Was this pan-Chewa sentiment all Banda’s or had he derived it largely from the influence of Cullen Young? My old friend and collaborator, the great Central African linguist Thomas Price, thought the latter. But looking to Banda’s Chewa consciousness as it developed in Chicago, I am by no means sure of this.” Arguably it is Shepperson’s view that is vindicated by two 1938 letters unearthed by Morrow and McCracken in the University of Cape Town archives in 2012.

      In 1938, Banda concluded another letter, this time to Chief Mwase Kasungu: “I want you tell me all that happens there [Malawi]. Can you send me a picture of yourself and your council? Also I want to know the men who are the judges in your court now, and how the system works.” (Banda, 1938). Having acquired and reworked colonial knowledge from Edinburgh, Our African Way of Life captures an attempt to convert British colonialism to Banda’s own end, writing against ‘disruptive’ changes that he was monitoring from Scotland: the anglicisation of Chewa, the abandoning of initiation, and the shift from matriarchal relations. Charting and padding out ideas about a pan-Chewa cultural unit – critical of British colonialism, but only for corrupting Chewa culture – Banda was concerned with how to properly run the Nyasaland state, an example that productively smudges the ‘rupture’ of independence and explains, in part, neo-colonial continuity in independent Malawi.

      For whilst the authors of the edited works wrote their original essays in chiNyanja, with the hope that it would be reproduced for Nyasaland schools, the audience that Cullen Young and Banda addressed was that of the English missionary or colonial official, poised to start their ‘African adventure’, noting:

      “A number of important points arise for English readers, particularly for any who may be preparing to work in African areas where the ancient mother-right still operates.” (Banda & Cullen, 1946, p.11).

      After a cursory summary readers are directed by a footnote “for a fuller treatment of mother-right, extended kinship and the enjoined marriage in a Nyasaland setting, see Chaps. 5-8 in Contemporary Ancestors, Lutterworth Press, 1942.” (Banda & Young, 1946, p.11). In contrast to the authors who penned their essays so “that our children should learn what is good among our ancient ways: those things which were understood long ago and belong to their own people” the introduction to Our African Way of Life is arguably published in English, under ‘war economy standards’ in 1946 (post-Colonial Development Act), for the expanding number of British ‘experts’ heading out into the empire; and an attempt to influence their ‘civilising mission’. (Banda & Young, 1946, p.7).

      By the 1950s, Banda was fully-assured of his status as a cultural-nationalist expert – writing to a Nyasaland Provincial Commissioner, “I am in a position to know and remember more of my own customs and institutions than the younger men that you meet now at home, who were born in the later twenties and even the thirties…I was already old enough to know most of these customs before I went to school…the University of Chicago, which cured me of my tendency to be ashamed of my past. The result is that, in many cases, really, I know more of our customs than most of our people, now at home. When it comes to language I think this is even more true. for the average youngster [In Malawi] now simply uses what the European uses, without realising that the European is using the word incorrectly. Instead of correcting the european, he uses the word wrongly, himself, in order to affect civilisation, modernity or even urbanity.” (Shepperdson, 1998).

      This however also obscures the considerable investigatory correspondence that he engaged in whilst in Scotland. Banda was highly critical of indirect rule in Our African Way of Life, but from emerging archival evidence, he was ill-informed of the changing colonial situation in 1938.

      Kadalie and Banda’s contrasting histories were written at different times, in different historical contexts by two people from different parts of Nyasaland. Whilst Banda grew up in an area on the periphery of Scottish missionaries’ sphere of influence, Kadalie came from an area of Malawi, Tongaland, heavily affected by Scottish missionaries and his parents were heavily involved with missionary work. The disparity between the histories that they invoke, however, is still remarkable – Banda invokes a precolonial rural Malawi devoid of white influence, Kadalie on the other hand writes of a pre-capitalist rural Malawi where Christians, white and black, laboured to create a kingdom of heaven on earth – and this, perhaps, reflects the ends they are writing for and against.

      Kadalie in the 1920s looked to integrate the emerging African working class within the international labour movement, noting “capitalism recognises no frontiers, no nationality, and no race”, with the long-term view to creating a socialist commonwealth across the whole of Southern Africa. Britain-based Banda, writing with Cullen Young in the 1940s, by comparison, mapped out a pan-Chewa culture with the immediate aim of reforming colonial ‘protectorate’ government – the goal of an independent Malawian nation state still yet to fully form.

      http://uncover-ed.org/hastings-banda
      #Kenyatta

  • Migration and asylum: updates to the EU-Africa ’#Joint_Valletta_Action_Plan' on the way

    In November 2015 European and African heads of state met at a summit in Valletta, Malta, “to discuss a coordinated answer to the crisis of migration and refugee governance in Europe.” Since then joint activities on migration and asylum have increased significantly, according to documents published here by Statewatch. The Council is now examining an update to the ’Joint Valletta Action Plan’ (JVAP) and considering how to give it “a renewed sense of purpose”.

    "The #JVAP has an important bearing within the #GAMM [#Global_Approach_on_Migration_and_Mobility] and in the EU migration policies context, since it established the first ever framework for exchanges and monitoring of migration priorities involving a significant number of both European and African partners. The JVAP plays an important role in the implementation of the proposed new Pact on Migration and Asylum, tabled by the Commission in September 2020.

    “Over the last five years, the JVAP’s operational focus has grown in size and scope, as evidenced by the JVAP database.

    Several other benefits stem from the strategic linkage between the JVAP and the two Processes. One worth mentioning is the growing operationalisation of the regional migration dialogues through, in particular, the development of resources with an operational focus and the participant profiling, increasingly adapted to the stakes of the meetings. For example, the Rabat Process has developed the labelling mechanism, the reference countries system and the laboratory of ideas to step up the implementation and monitoring of each area of the Marrakesh Action Plan.”

    “The JVAP is therefore widely seen as having contributed to shaping the political, technical, and financial architecture of EU-Africa engagement on migration and mobility. At the same time, the JVAP provides a forum of discussion that rises to the political level and so could serve as a forum for debate and discussion in the future, especially should political circumstances call for high-level multilateral engagement on migration.”

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2021/february/migration-and-asylum-updates-to-the-eu-africa-joint-valletta-action-plan

    #update #mise_à_jour #Valletta #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #sommet_de_La_Vallette #La_Vallette #Vallette

    –---

    ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

  • En #France, les recherches sur la #question_raciale restent marginales

    Avec des relents de maccarthysme, une violente campagne politico-médiatique s’est abattue sur les chercheurs travaillant sur les questions raciales ou l’#intersectionnalité en France, les accusant de nourrir le « #séparatisme ». Dans les faits, ces recherches sont pourtant dramatiquement marginalisées.

    « L’université est une matrice intellectuelle, aujourd’hui traversée par des mouvements puissants et destructeurs qui s’appellent le #décolonialisme, le #racialisme, l’#indigénisme, l’intersectionnalité. » Lors de l’examen du projet de loi dit « séparatisme », à l’instar de la députée Les Républicains (LR) #Annie_Genevard, beaucoup d’élus se sont émus de cette nouvelle #menace pesant sur le monde académique.

    Que se passe-t-il donc à l’université ? Alors que des étudiants font aujourd’hui la queue pour obtenir des denrées alimentaires et que certains se défenestrent de désespoir, la classe politique a longuement débattu la semaine dernière de « l’#entrisme » de ces courants intellectuels aux contours pour le moins flous.

    Après les déclarations du ministre de l’éducation nationale Jean-Michel #Blanquer en novembre dernier – au lendemain de l’assassinat de #Samuel_Paty, il avait dénoncé pêle-mêle les « #thèses_intersectionnelles » et « l’#islamo-gauchisme » qui auraient fourni, selon lui, « le terreau d’une fragmentation de notre société et d’une vision du monde qui converge avec les intérêts des islamistes » –, Emmanuel #Macron a lui-même tancé, dans son discours des Mureaux (Yvelines), le discours « postcolonial », coupable, selon lui, de nourrir la haine de la République et le « séparatisme ».

    À l’Assemblée, Annie Genevard a invité à se référer aux « travaux » du tout récent #Observatoire_du_décolonialisme qui a publié son manifeste dans un dossier spécial du Point, le 14 janvier. Appelant à la « riposte », les signataires – des universitaires pour l’essentiel très éloignés du champ qu’ils évoquent et pour une grande partie à la retraite – décrivent ainsi le péril qui pèserait sur le monde académique français. « Un #mouvement_militant entend y imposer une critique radicale des sociétés démocratiques, au nom d’un prétendu “#décolonialisme” et d’une “intersectionnalité” qui croit combattre les #inégalités en assignant chaque personne à des identités de “#race” et de #religion, de #sexe et de “#genre”. » « Nous appelons à mettre un terme à l’#embrigadement de la recherche et de la #transmission_des_savoirs », affirment-ils.

    À Mediapart, une des figures de cette riposte, la sociologue de l’art #Nathalie_Heinich, explique ainsi que « nous assistons à la collusion des militants et des chercheurs autour d’une #conception_communautariste de la société ». Ces derniers mois, différents appels ont été publiés en ce sens, auxquels ont répondu d’autres appels. S’armant de son courage, Le Point a même, pour son dossier intitulé « Classe, race et genre à l’université », « infiltré une formation en sciences sociales à la Sorbonne, pour tenter de comprendre cette mutation ».

    Derrière le bruit et la fureur de ces débats, de quoi parle-t-on ? Quelle est la place réelle des recherches sur les questions raciales ou mobilisant les concepts d’intersectionnalité à l’université française ? La première difficulté réside dans un certain flou de l’objet incriminé – les critiques mélangent ainsi dans un grand maelström #études_de_genre, #postcolonialisme, etc.

    Pour ce qui est des recherches portant principalement sur les questions raciales, elles sont quantitativement très limitées. Lors d’un colloque qui s’est tenu à Sciences-Po le 6 mai 2020, Patrick Simon et Juliette Galonnier ont présenté les premiers résultats d’une étude ciblant une quinzaine de revues de sciences sociales. Les articles portant sur la « #race » – celle-ci étant entendue évidemment comme une construction sociale et non comme une donnée biologique, et comportant les termes habituellement utilisés par la théorie critique de la race, tels que « racisé », « #racisation », etc. – représentent de 1960 à 2020 seulement 2 % de la production.

    La tendance est certes à une nette augmentation, mais dans des proportions très limitées, montrent-ils, puisque, entre 2015 et 2020, ils comptabilisent 68 articles, soit environ 3 % de l’ensemble de la production publiée dans ces revues.

    Pour répondre à la critique souvent invoquée ces derniers temps, notamment dans le dernier livre de Gérard Noiriel et Stéphane Beaud, Race et sciences sociales (Agone), selon laquelle « race » et « genre » auraient pris le pas sur la « classe » dans les grilles d’analyses sociologiques, le sociologue #Abdellali_Hajjat a, de son côté, mené une recension des travaux de sciences sociales pour voir si la #classe était réellement détrônée au profit de la race ou du genre.

    Ce qu’il observe concernant ces deux dernières variables, c’est qu’il y a eu en France un lent rééquilibrage théorique sur ces notions, soit un timide rattrapage. « Les concepts de genre et de race n’ont pas occulté le concept de classe mais ce qui était auparavant marginalisé ou invisibilisé est en train de devenir (plus ou moins) légitime dans les revues de sciences sociales », relève-t-il.

    Plus difficile à cerner, et pourtant essentielle au débat : quelle est la place réelle des chercheurs travaillant sur la race dans le champ académique ? Dans un article publié en 2018 dans Mouvements, intitulé « Le sous-champ de la question raciale dans les sciences sociales française », la chercheuse #Inès_Bouzelmat montre, avec une importante base de données statistiques, que leur position reste très marginale et souligne qu’ils travaillent dans des laboratoires considérés comme périphériques ou moins prestigieux.

    « Les travaux sur la question minoritaire, la racialisation ou le #postcolonial demeurent des domaines de “niche”, largement circonscrits à des revues et des espaces académiques propres, considérés comme des objets scientifiques à la légitimité discutable et bénéficiant d’une faible audience dans le champ académique comme dans l’espace public – à l’exception de quelques productions vulgarisées », note-t-elle soulignant toutefois qu’ils commencent, encore très prudemment, à se frayer un chemin. « Si la question raciale ne semble pas près de devenir un champ d’étude légitime, son institutionnalisation a bel et bien commencé. »

    Un chemin vers la reconnaissance institutionnelle qu’ont déjà emprunté les études de genre dont la place – hormis par quelques groupuscules extrémistes – n’est plus vraiment contestée aujourd’hui dans le champ académique.

    Deux ans plus tard, Inès Bouzelmat observe que « les études raciales sortent de leur niche et [que] c’est une bonne chose ». « Le sommaire de certaines revues en témoigne. Aujourd’hui, de plus en plus, la variable de race est mobilisée de manière naturelle, ce qui n’était vraiment pas le cas il y a encore dix ans », dit-elle.

    Pour #Eric_Fassin, qui a beaucoup œuvré à la diffusion de ces travaux en France, « il y a une génération de chercheurs, ceux qui ont plus ou moins une quarantaine d’années, qui ne sursaute pas quand on utilise ces concepts ». « Il n’y a plus besoin, avec eux, de s’excuser pendant une demi-heure en expliquant qu’on ne parle pas de race au sens biologique. »

    #Fabrice_Dhume, un sociologue qui a longtemps été très seul sur le terrain des #discriminations_systémiques, confirme : « Il y a eu toute une époque où ces travaux-là ne trouvaient pas leur place, où il était impossible de faire carrière en travaillant sur ce sujet. » Ceux qui travaillent sur la question raciale et ceux qui ont été pionniers sur ces sujets, dans un pays si réticent à interroger la part d’ombre de son « #universalisme_républicain », l’ont souvent payé très cher.

    Les travaux de la sociologue #Colette_Guillaumin, autrice en 1972 de L’Idéologie raciste, genèse et langage actuel, et qui la première en France a étudié le #racisme_structurel et les #rapports_sociaux_de_race, ont longtemps été superbement ignorés par ses pairs.

    « Travailler sur la race n’est certainement pas la meilleure façon de faire carrière », euphémise Éric Fassin, professeur à Paris VIII. Lui n’a guère envie de s’attarder sur son propre cas, mais au lendemain de l’assassinat de Samuel Paty, il a reçu des menaces de mort par un néonazi, condamné à quatre mois de prison avec sursis en décembre dernier. Il en avait déjà reçu à son domicile. Voilà pour le climat.

    Lorsqu’on regarde les trajectoires de ceux qui se sont confrontés à ces sujets, difficile de ne pas voir les mille et un obstacles qu’ils ou elles ont souvent dû surmonter. Si la raréfaction des postes, et l’intense compétition qui en découle, invite à la prudence, comment ne pas s’étonner du fait que pratiquement toutes les carrières des chercheurs travaillant sur la race, l’intersectionnalité, soient aussi chaotiques ?

    « La panique morale de tenants de la fausse opposition entre, d’un côté, les pseudo-“décoloniaux/postcoloniaux/racialistes” et, de l’autre, les pseudo-“universalistes” renvoie à une vision conspirationniste du monde de la recherche : les premiers seraient tout-puissants alors que la recherche qui semble être ciblée par ces vagues catégories est, globalement, tenue dans les marges », affirme le sociologue #Abdellali_Hajjat.

    Le parcours de ce pionnier, avec #Marwan_Mohammed, de l’étude de l’#islamophobie comme nouvelle forme de #racisme, ne peut là aussi qu’interroger. Recruté en 2010 à l’université Paris-Nanterre, avant d’avoir commencé à travailler la question de l’islamophobie, il a fini par quitter l’université française en 2019 après avoir fait l’expérience d’un climat de plus en plus hostile à ses travaux.

    « On ne mesure pas encore les effets des attentats terroristes de 2015 sur le champ intellectuel. Depuis 2015, on n’est plus dans la #disputatio académique. On est même passés au-delà du stade des obstacles à la recherche ou des critiques classiques de tout travail de recherche. On est plutôt passés au stade de la #censure et de l’établissement de “listes” d’universitaires à bannir », explique-t-il, égrenant la #liste des colloques sur l’islamophobie, l’intersectionnalité ou le racisme annulés ou menacés d’annulation, les demandes de financements refusées, etc.

    En 2016, il fait l’objet d’une accusation d’antisémitisme sur la liste de diffusion de l’#ANCMSP (#Association_nationale_des_candidats_aux_métiers_de_la_science_politique) en étant comparé à Dieudonné et à Houria Bouteldja. Certains universitaires l’accusent, par exemple, d’avoir participé en 2015 à un colloque sur les luttes de l’immigration à l’université Paris-Diderot, où étaient aussi invités des représentants du Parti des indigènes de la République. Qu’importe que ce chercheur n’ait aucun rapport avec ce mouvement et que ce dernier l’attaque publiquement depuis 2008… « Je suis devenu un indigéniste, dit-il en souriant. Pour moi, c’est une forme de racisme puisque, sans aucun lien avec la réalité de mes travaux, cela revient à m’assigner à une identité du musulman antisémite. »

    Abdellali Hajjat travaille aujourd’hui à l’Université libre de Bruxelles. « Lorsque l’on va à l’étranger, on se rend compte que, contrairement au monde académique français, l’on n’a pas constamment à se battre sur la #légitimité du champ des études sur les questions raciales ou l’islamophobie. Sachant bien que ce n’est pas satisfaisant d’un point de vue collectif, la solution que j’ai trouvée pour poursuivre mes recherches est l’exil », raconte-t-il.

    « Moi, j’ai choisi de m’autocensurer »

    #Fabrice_Dhume, qui mène depuis plus de 15 ans des recherches aussi originales que précieuses sur les #discriminations_raciales, notamment dans le milieu scolaire, a lui aussi un parcours assez révélateur. Après des années de statut précaire, jonglant avec des financements divers, celui qui a été un temps maître de conférences associé à Paris-Diderot, c’est-à-dire pas titulaire, est aujourd’hui redevenu « free lance ».

    Malgré la grande qualité de ses travaux, la sociologue #Sarah_Mazouz, autrice de Race (Anamosa, 2020) a, elle, enchaîné les post-doctorats, avant d’être finalement recrutée comme chargée de recherche au CNRS.

    Autrice d’une thèse remarquée en 2015, intitulée Lesbiennes de l’immigration. Construction de soi et relations familiales, publiée aux éditions du Croquant en 2018, #Salima_Amari n’a toujours pas trouvé de poste en France et est aujourd’hui chargée de cours à Lausanne (Suisse). Beaucoup de chercheurs nous ont cité le cas d’étudiants prometteurs préférant quitter l’Hexagone, à l’image de #Joao_Gabriel, qui travaille sur les questions raciales et le colonialisme, et qui poursuit aujourd’hui ses études à Baltimore (États-Unis).

    Derrière ces parcours semés d’obstacles, combien surtout se sont découragés ? Inès Bouzelmat a choisi de se réorienter, raconte-t-elle, lucide sur le peu de perspectives que lui ouvraient l’université et la recherche françaises.

    Certains adoptent une autre stratégie, elle aussi coûteuse. « Moi, j’ai choisi de m’autocensurer », nous raconte une chercheuse qui ne veut pas être citée car elle est encore en recherche de poste. « Dans ma thèse, je n’utilise jamais le mot “race”, je parle “d’origines”, de personnes “issues de l’immigration”… Alors que cela m’aurait été très utile de parler des rapports sociaux de race. Même le terme “intersectionnalité” – qui consiste simplement à réfléchir ensemble classe-race et genre –, je me le suis interdit. Je préfère parler “d’imbrication des rapports sociaux”. Cela revient au même, mais c’est moins immédiatement clivant », nous confie cette sociologue. « Le pire, c’est parler de “#Blancs”… Là, c’est carrément impossible ! Alors je dis “les Franco-Français”, ce qui n’est pas satisfaisant », s’amuse-t-elle.

    « Oui, il y a eu des générations d’étudiants découragés de travailler sur ces thématiques. On leur a dit : “Tu vas te griller !”… Déjà qu’il est très dur de trouver un poste mais alors si c’est pour, en plus, être face à une institution qui ne cesse de disqualifier votre objet, cela devient compliqué ! », raconte le socio-démographe Patrick Simon, qui dirige le projet Global Race de l’Agence nationale pour la recherche (ANR).

    La #double_peine des #chercheurs_racisés

    L’accès au financement lorsqu’on traite de la « race » est particulièrement ardu, l’important projet de Patrick Simon représentant, à cet égard, une récente exception. « On m’a accusé d’être financé par la French American Fondation : c’est faux. Mes recherches ont bénéficié exclusivement de financements publics – et ils sont plutôt rares dans nos domaines », indique Éric Fassin.

    « Il est difficile d’obtenir des financements pour des travaux portant explicitement sur les rapports sociaux de race. Concernant le genre, c’est désormais beaucoup plus admis. Travailler sur les rapports sociaux de race reste clivant, et souvent moins pris au sérieux. On va soupçonner systématiquement les chercheurs de parti-pris militant », affirme la sociologue Amélie Le Renard, qui se définit comme défendant une approche féministe et postcoloniale dans sa recherche. « Nous avons aussi du mal à accéder aux grandes maisons d’édition, ce qui contribue à renforcer la hiérarchisation sociale des chercheurs », ajoute-t-elle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spfIKVjGkEo&feature=emb_logo

    Certains se tournent donc vers des #maisons_d’édition « militantes », ce qui, dans un milieu universitaire très concurrentiel, n’a pas du tout le même prestige… Et alimente le cercle vicieux de la #marginalisation de ces travaux comme leur procès en « #militantisme ».

    Pourquoi les signataires des différentes tribunes s’inquiétant d’un raz-de-marée d’universitaires travaillant sur la race, l’intersectionnalité, se sentent-ils donc assaillis, alors que factuellement ces chercheurs sont peu nombreux et pour la plupart largement marginalisés ?

    « J’ai tendance à analyser ces débats en termes de rapports sociaux. Quel est le groupe qui n’a pas intérêt à ce qu’émergent ces questions ? Ce sont ceux qui ne sont pas exposés au racisme, me semble-t-il », avance le sociologue Fabrice Dhume, pour qui les cris d’orfraie de ceux qui s’insurgent de l’émergence – timide – de ces sujets visent à faire taire des acteurs qui risqueraient d’interroger trop frontalement le fonctionnement de l’institution elle-même et son propre rapport à la racisation. « Dans ce débat, il s’agit soit de réduire ceux qui parlent au silence, soit de noyer leur parole par le bruit », affirme-t-il.

    « Il y a aussi une hiérarchie implicite : tant que ces recherches étaient cantonnées à Paris VIII, “chez les indigènes”, cela ne faisait peur à personne, mais qu’elles commencent à en sortir… », s’agace-t-il, en référence à une université historiquement marquée à gauche et fréquentée par beaucoup d’étudiants issus de l’immigration ou étrangers.

    Dans ce paysage, les chercheurs eux-mêmes racisés et travaillant sur les discriminations raciales subissent souvent une forme de double peine. « Ils sont soupçonnés d’être trop proches de leur objet. Comme si Bourdieu n’avait pas construit tout son parcours intellectuel autour de questions qui le concernent directement, lui, le fils de paysans », souligne Patrick Simon.

    La sociologue #Rachida_Brahim, autrice de La Race tue deux fois (Syllepse, 2021), raconte comment, lors de sa soutenance de doctorat, son directeur de thèse, Laurent Mucchielli, et le président du jury, Stéphane Beaud, lui ont expliqué qu’en allant sur le terrain racial, elle était « hors sujet ». « Le fait que je sois moi-même d’origine algérienne m’aurait empêchée de prendre de la distance avec mon sujet », écrit-elle.

    Au cours de notre enquête, nous avons recueilli plusieurs témoignages en ce sens de la part de chercheurs et singulièrement de chercheuses qui, pour être restés dans l’institution, ne souhaitent pas citer nommément leur cas (voir notre Boîte noire). « Ce sont des petites remarques, une façon insistante de vous demander de vous situer par rapport à votre sujet de recherche », raconte une chercheuse.

    De la même manière que les féministes ont longtemps dû répondre à l’accusation de confondre militantisme et sciences au sein des études de genres, les chercheurs racisés osant s’aventurer sur un terrain aussi miné que le « racisme systémique » doivent constamment montrer des gages de leur #objectivité et de leur #rigueur_scientifique.

    « Le procès en militantisme est un lieu commun de la manière dont ces travaux ont été disqualifiés. C’est la façon de traiter l’objet qui définit le clivage entre ce qui est militant et ce qui est académique. Sont en réalité qualifiés de “militants” les travaux qui entrent par effraction dans un champ qui ne reconnaît pas la légitimité de l’objet », analyse Patrick Simon.

    Comme les études de genre ont massivement été portées par des femmes, les questions raciales intéressent particulièrement ceux qui ont eu à connaître de près le racisme. Ce qui n’est pas, manifestement, sans inquiéter un monde universitaire encore ultra-majoritairement blanc. « Les chercheurs assignés à des identités minoritaires sont souvent discrédités au prétexte qu’ils seraient trop proches de leur sujet d’étude ; en miroir, la figure du chercheur homme blanc est, de manière implicite, considérée comme neutre et les effets sur l’enquête et l’analyse d’une position dominante dans plusieurs rapports sociaux sont rarement interrogés », souligne de son côté Amélie Le Renard.

    « Il y a eu des générations de chercheurs qui n’ont pas réussi à trouver leur place dans l’institution. Ce qui est intéressant, c’est que certains commencent à émerger et qu’ils appartiennent à des minorités. Et c’est à ce moment-là que des universitaires s’élèvent pour dire “ça suffit, c’est déjà trop”, alors qu’ils devraient dire “enfin !” », insiste Éric Fassin.

    Depuis quelques mois, et le tragique assassinat de Samuel Paty par un islamiste, les attaques à l’encontre de ces chercheurs ont pris un tour plus violent. Ceux qui travaillent sur l’islamophobie s’y sont presque habitués, mais c’est désormais tous ceux qui travaillent sur les discriminations ethno-raciales, la #colonisation, qui sont accusés d’entretenir un #esprit_victimaire et une rancœur à l’égard de l’État français qui armerait le terrorisme.

    « Quand le ministre de l’éducation nationale vous associe à des idéologues qui outillent intellectuellement les terroristes, c’est très violent », affirme une chercheuse qui a particulièrement travaillé sur la question de l’islamophobie et a, dans certains articles, été qualifiée de « décoloniale ».

    « Les termes employés sont intéressants. Qu’est-ce qu’on sous-entend quand on dit que les “décoloniaux infiltrent l’université” ou qu’on reprend le terme d’“entrisme” ? Cela dit que je n’y ai pas ma place. Alors que je suis pourtant un pur produit de l’université », analyse cette maîtresse de conférences d’origine maghrébine, qui ne souhaite plus intervenir dans les médias pour ne pas subir une campagne de dénigrement comme elle en a déjà connu. « C’est terrible parce qu’au fond, ils arrivent à nous réduire au #silence », ajoute-t-elle en référence à ceux qui demandent que le monde académique construise des digues pour les protéger.

    Le grand paradoxe est aussi l’immense intérêt des étudiants pour ces thématiques encore peu représentées dans l’institution. En attendant, l’université semble organiser – avec le soutien explicite du sommet de l’État – sa propre cécité sur les questions raciales. Comme si la France pouvait vraiment se payer encore longtemps le luxe d’un tel #aveuglement.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/080221/en-france-les-recherches-sur-la-question-raciale-restent-marginales?onglet

    #recherche #université #auto-censure #autocensure #assignation_à_identité #neutralité #décolonial

    ping @karine4 @cede

  • #JO_2024 : un bassin contre des jardins

    Le projet d’une giga-#piscine à #Aubervilliers menace les #jardins_ouvriers des #Vertus, tandis que la maire y voit l’occasion de « faire décoller » sa ville. Opacité comptable et budgétaire, utilité olympique contestable, coût important, pari sur la rentabilité foncière d’une vaste #friche urbaine : un drame métropolitain éclate. Et des anti « saccages » par les JO se rassemblent à Paris le 6 février.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/050221/jo-2024-un-bassin-contre-des-jardins
    #jeux_olympiques #JO #Paris #France #agriculture_urbaine #Fort-d’Aubervilliers #Seine-Saint-Denis #Grand_Paris_Aménagement #destruction #saccage_olympique #quartiers_populaires #urbanisme #urban_matter #géographie_urbaine #Solideo #Karine_Franclet

  • Le #Salaire_minimum : une histoire américaine – par Frédéric Farah
    https://www.les-crises.fr/le-salaire-minimum-une-histoire-americaine-par-frederic-farah

    « Avec l’établissement de ces standards rudimentaires, nous devons viser à construire, à travers une organisation administrative appropriée, un salaire minimum, sur des bases de justice et de raison, industrie par industrie, aussi porter un regard fait d’obligation sur les inégalités locales et géographiques de manière générale et sur les conséquences des conditions de travail […]

    #Économie #États-Unis #Joe_Biden #Économie,_États-Unis,_Joe_Biden,_Salaire_minimum

  • India cracks down on journalism, again - Columbia Journalism Review
    https://www.cjr.org/the_media_today/india_modi_farmers_protests_journalism.php

    Last Tuesday, as India celebrated a national holiday commemorating its democratic constitution, thousands of farmers marched and drove their tractors through New Delhi. It was the latest in a series of protests against agricultural reforms that many farmers fear will allow large corporations to crush them. Police tear-gassed the demonstrators and charged at the crowd with batons; as Vidya Krishnan wrote in The Atlantic, “the dueling images—a celebration of India’s democracy on the one hand, the crushing of dissent on the other—were carried on a split screen by many news channels, inadvertently offering the perfect visual metaphor for modern India.” A twenty-five-year-old farmer named Navreet Singh was killed during the protest; officials claimed that he died in a tractor accident, but witnesses said that police shot Singh in the head—an account supported by photographic evidence. Singh’s family has alleged a cover-up. “One doctor told me that my grandson was hit by a gunshot,” Hardip Singh Dibdiba, Singh’s grandfather, told The Guardian, “but said they could not write that a bullet killed him.”

    Indian authorities have since filed sedition and other charges against at least nine journalists who reported on, or merely tweeted about, Singh’s death and the protests; some members of the press have been subjected to extrajudicial harassment and threats. Under Indian law, sedition carries a possible penalty of life imprisonment. The editors of two prominent independent news outlets—Vinod K. Jose, of the magazine The Caravan, and Siddharth Varadarajan, of the news website The Wire—were among those charged. On Saturday, police detained two more reporters—Mandeep Punia, a Caravan contributor, and Dharmender Singh, of Online News India—as they covered ongoing farmers’ protests in New Delhi. Kanwardeep Singh, a reporter with the Times of India, told The Guardian that his phone is under surveillance. The government, he believes, is trying to send him a message: “Either I stop writing and stay safe or be ready to live my remaining life behind the bars.”

    Masthead - Columbia Journalism Review
    https://www.cjr.org/about_us/masthead.php

    Columbia Journalism Review is published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

    Dean
    Steve Coll

    Chairman
    Stephen Adler

    Editor in Chief and Publisher
    Kyle Pope

    Managing Editor
    Betsy Morais

    Digital Editor
    Ravi Somaiya

    Senior Editor
    Brendan Fitzgerald

    Staff Writer and Senior Delacorte Fellow
    Alexandria Neason

    Chief Digital Writer
    Mathew Ingram

    The Media Today
    Jon Allsop

    Contributing Editor
    Camille Bromley

    Delacorte Fellows
    Akintunde Ahmad, Lauren Harris, and Savannah Jacobson

    Communications and Design
    Darrel Frost

    Website Development
    Michael Murphy

    Print Design
    Point Five, NY

    #Inde #répression #journalisme #modi

  • ‘Dem loot’ takes Zimbabwe by storm – NewsDay Zimbabwe
    https://www.newsday.co.zw/2021/02/dem-loot-takes-zimbabwe-by-storm

    AWARD-WINING journalist, Hopewell Chin’ono has taken to music to amplify his voice on government corruption which he says has impoverished citizens and exposed many to COVID-19.

    Chin’ono, one of the prominent critics of corruption and human rights abuses, asserts that the vices are flourishing under President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration.

    On Sunday, a few days, after his release from remand prison for allegedly communicating falsehoods, the scribe took to micro blogging site Twitter to release an amateur video of a song he titled Dem Loot. The song denounces corruption at higher levels of government.

    Dem Loot has taken Zimbabwe’s digital space by storm with several versions of the song under the banner #dem loot challenge now released.

    Within 24 hours of its release, the song reached a historic 112 000 views on Twitter and has been shared globally.

    (...).

    “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” hospitals no medication “Dem Loot,”
    “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” ghetto yuts no jobs you know “Dem Loot,”
    “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” no water to drink in townships “Dem Loot,”
    “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” they have no sense of purpose “Dem Loot,”
    “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” the elderly dying without medication, “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot,” “Dem Loot.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHQor6kdJ5E&list=PL-61mJf9OnSOy5avws7F9q2jHiIEHvHnX

    #demloot #corruption #zimbabwe #reggae #Hopewell_Chin’ono #journalisme

    • La France une « démocratie défaillante » : la faute au covid, mais pas seulement
      https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/geopolitique/geopolitique-04-fevrier-2021

      Les conclusions sont de deux ordres :

      1. d’abord que les citoyens devront faire preuve de vigilance pour retrouver tous leurs droits et toutes leurs libertés une fois la pandémie surmontée. Cela n’est pas gagné partout.
      2. Mais surtout, tout ceci montre à quel point la démocratie reste un acquis fragile, l’après-élections américaines l’a montré ; mais aussi le fait que plusieurs pays ont régressé ; et qu’il n’y a que 8,4% de la population mondiale dans la catégorie « démocratie à part entière ». C’est peu, c’est inquiétant.

    • Le nouveau bras d’honneur du Conseil constitutionnel à l’Etat de droit
      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/paul-cassia/blog/050221/le-nouveau-bras-d-honneur-du-conseil-constitutionnel-l-etat-de-droit

      La prolongation automatique des détentions provisoires organisée par le gouvernement lors du premier état d’urgence sanitaire était inconstitutionnelle. Dix mois plus tard, par une décision du 29 janvier 2021, le Conseil constitutionnel a neutralisé les effets de cette inconstitutionnalité...

      ... Il y a donc eu, durant le premier état d’urgence sanitaire, non seulement 67 millions de personnes assignées à domicile 23h/24 pendant 55 jours d’affilée sous peine de 135 euros d’amende voire d’un emprisonnement en cas de triple récidive dans le mois, mais encore un nombre indéterminé d’individus présumés innocents placés en détention provisoire et qui auront fait l’objet, sur la base d’un acte pris par le Conseil des ministres, d’une détention arbitraire après que cette détention provisoire aura été automatiquement prolongée.

      Dix mois plus tard, le 2 février 2021, le président de la République française n’a pas hésité à faire la leçon à son homologue russe à propos de la condamnation (par une juridiction !) à près de trois ans de prison, sur un prétexte fallacieux, du courageux opposant Alexeï Navalny : « le respect des droits humains comme celui de la liberté démocratique ne sont pas négociables ». Ils le sont pourtant en France, ainsi que le montrent les décisions rendues le 29 janvier 2021 par le Conseil constitutionnel et le 3 février 2021 par le Conseil d’Etat.

      Sauf à se résigner à vivre dans une « démocratie (de plus en plus) défaillante », les contrepouvoirs à l’exécutif sont à inventer, spécialement en cette époque d’états d’urgence permanents.

  • La Somalia di Ilaria - RaiPlay
    https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/lasomaliadiilaria

    La giornalista del TG3 #IlariaAlpi è stata uccisa a #Mogadiscio assieme al suo cineoperatore #MiranHrovatin il 20 marzo 1994. RaiPlay la ricorda con lo speciale «La Somalia di Ilaria», andato in onda ad un mese dalla sua tragica morte, che raccoglie le sue coraggiose inchieste in Somalia.

    #somalie #journalisme #rai

  • Quand l’info en continu touche le fond, ils arrivent encore à creuser !…
    via @Fil

    Sabletorialiste sur Twitter : « Je suis sidéré de la pauvreté intellectuelle des intervenants de ce plateau. Hill leur explique un truc con comme une brique et ils ne comprennent pas la base de la base. À ce degré-là, c’est même plus de l’incompétence, c’est un choix de vie, d’être aussi mauvais et ignare. » / Twitter
    https://twitter.com/Sable_60CH/status/1356992497398996992

    • CDB, outre la comparaison de pics haut et bas, c’est cette incohérence qui m’a épaté, alors qu’on prétend utiliser un graphique chiffré pour dire des choses :
      – on affiche donc ce pic haut à 88 000 et ce pic bas à 24 600 ; ce qui représenterait une chute vertigineuse de 72% ;
      – sous la courbe, il y a un gros « -30% », et je ne comprends pas d’où ça vient ;
      – et malgré ces affichages de -72% et -30% énormes, les deux types pris en défaut commentent « un plateau descendant ».

      Sinon, faire des affichages du nombre de cas dans le pays de Bolsonaro pour montrer quoi que ce soit concernant le Covid, c’est assez osé…

    • Il me vient un doute affreux,…
      Ce -30% qui débarque on ne sait d’où, avec un peu de chance (!) ça correspond à 30% * 87843
      bon, en vrai, ç’est 28%, soit -72% comme le calcule @arno ci-dessus
      mais, au point où on en est, et comme il n’y a que deux nombres sur la diapo, il y a des chances (!!) que ce soit ça

    • J’ai cru comprendre que le type a expliqué sur Touiteur que les -30%, c’est qu’il a pris la valeur d’un jeudi (le fameux 7 janvier, je crois), puis la valeur du jeudi 3 semaines plus tard (et donc tout de même pas le point bas du 1er février), et ça lui a donné 30%. Évidemment, prendre un point totalement exceptionnel pour « calculer » une tendance, ça reste totalement con.

    • Je me suis cogné toute la séquence, (6’33")…

      ainsi présentée (on appréciera…) :

      Les contaminations reculent partout : que disent les indicateurs ? | LCI
      https://www.lci.fr/international/video-les-contaminations-reculent-partout-que-disent-les-indicateurs-2177275.htm

      DÉCRYPTAGE - Dans sa chronique « Les indispensables », Baptiste Morin s’est intéressé ce mardi 2 février 2021 à la situation sanitaire dans le monde.

      02 févr. 2021 18:20

      C’est un phénomène mondial que l’on observe, le virus recule un peu partout. Le pic dans le monde a été atteint le 7 janvier, + 852 604 cas en 24 heures. 447 127 nouvelles contaminations ont été recensées le 1er février, soit une baisse de 30%. Qu’en est-il des chiffres aux États-Unis, au Mexique, au Portugal, en Espagne, en Italie, au Royaume-Uni, au Brésil, en Afrique du Sud et en Inde ?

      TOUTE L’INFO SUR 24H PUJADAS
      Ce vendredi 1er janvier 2021, Baptiste Morin, dans sa chronique « Les indispensables », nous parle des indicateurs épidémiques dans le monde. Cette chronique a été diffusée dans 24h Pujadas du 02/02/2021 présentée par David Pujadas sur LCI. Du lundi au vendredi, à partir de 18h, David Pujadas apporte toute son expertise pour analyser l’actualité du jour avec pédagogie.

    • pour les calculs, effectivement, ils bricolent quelque chose qui n’a pas vraiment de rapport avec les 2 chiffres présentés ; impossible de deviner quoi.

      Das les commentaires, BM dit qu’ils ont fait « comme il faut » en comparant les lundis avec les lundis, etc.

      voici tous les pays présentés avec les chiffres portés sur les diapos :

      |                 |  07/01  |  01/02  | affiché | | calculé |
      |-----------------|:-------:|:-------:|---------|-|---------|
      | Monde           | 852 604 | 447 127 |    -30% | |  -47,6% |
      | États-Unis      | 300 282 | 134 339 |    -50% | |  -55,3% |
      | Mexique         |  22 339 |   5 448 |    -36% | |  -75,6% |
      | Japon           |         | images  |         | |         |
      | Portugal        |  16 432 |   5 805 |         | |  -64,7% |
      | Espagne         |  93 822 |  79 686 |    -15% | |  -15,1% |
      | Italie          |         | images  |         | |         |
      | Allemagne       |         | images  |         | |         |
      | Grande-Bretagne |  68 692 |  18 668 |    -60% | |  -72,8% |
      | Brésil          |  87 843 |  24 591 |    -30% | |  -72,0% |
      | Afrique du Sud  |  21 980 |   2 548 |    -80% | |  -88,4% |
    • comme indiqué dans le titre, le message de la séquence est : contaminations, ça baisse partout et, comme répété à plusieurs occasions, qu’on pratique les gestes barrière ou pas, le port du masque ou pas, etc.
      (une des occasions dans l’extrait initial : le Brésil est sur un plateau descendant
      le Brésil ne confine pas, le Brésil respecte très peu le port du masque

      Et là, où, effectivement il y a une franche baisse, en Afrique du Sud, c’est mentionné en passant dans la présentation par BM, puis souligné par CH

      BM : et le pays est confiné, il faut quand même le dire, le confinement a l’air de fonctionner
      CH : depuis quand ils sont confinées ?
      BM : ils sont confinés depuis un mois, depuis la fin du mois de décembre
      CH : ben oui, ça c’est l’effet du confinement, c’est pas très étonnant