• Sur les #îles grecques... un nouvel #hiver...

    Winter warnings for Europe’s largest refugee camp

    ‘This year it’s worse than ever because so many people came.’

    With winter approaching, aid workers and refugee advocates on Lesvos are worried: there doesn’t appear to be a plan in place to prepare Moria – Europe’s largest refugee camp – for the rain, cold weather, and potential snow that winter will bring.

    The road leading to Moria runs along the shoreline on the Greek island of Lesvos, passing fish restaurants and a rocky beach. On sunny days, the water sparkles and dances in the 20-kilometer stretch of the Aegean Sea separating the island from the Turkish coast. But in the winter, the weather is often grey, a strong wind blows off the water, and the temperature in bitingly cold.

    Moria was built to house around 3,000 people and was already over capacity in May this year, holding around 4,500. Then, starting in July, the number of people crossing the Aegean from Turkey to Greece spiked, compared to the past three years, and the population of asylum seekers and migrants on the Greek islands exploded. Following a recent visit, the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights, Dunja Mijatovic, called the situation on the islands “explosive”.

    By the beginning of October, when TNH visited, around 13,500 people were living in Moria – the highest number ever, up to that point – and conditions were like “hell on Earth”, according to Salam Aldeen, an aid worker who has been on Lesvos since 2015 and runs an NGO called Team Humanity.

    Every year, when summer comes, the weather gets better and the number of people crossing the Aegean increases. But this year, more people have crossed than at any time since the EU and Turkey signed an agreement, known as the EU-Turkey deal, in March 2016 to curb migration from Turkey to Greece.

    So far this year, more than 47,000 people have landed on the Greek islands compared to around 32,500 all of last year – led by Afghans, accounting for nearly 40 percent of arrivals, and Syrians, around 25 percent. Even though numbers are up, they are still a far cry from the more than one million people who crossed the Aegean between the beginning of 2015 and early 2016.

    “People are going to die. It’s going to happen. You have 10,000 people in tents.”

    In Moria, the first home in Europe for many of the people who arrive to Greece, there’s a chronic shortage of toilets and showers; the quality of the food is terrible; people sleep rough outside or in cramped, flimsy tents; bed bugs, lice, scabies, and other vermin thrive in the unsanitary environment; raw sewage flows into tents; people’s mental health suffers; fights break out; there are suicide attempts, including among children; domestic violence increases; small sparks lead to fires; people have died.

    “Every year it’s like this,” Aldeen said. “[But] this year it’s worse than ever because so many people came.”

    The lack of preparation for winter is unfortunately nothing new, according to Sophie McCann an advocacy manager for medical charity Médecins Sans Frontières. “It is incredible how the Greek authorities have... completely failed to put in place any kind of system [to] manage it properly,” McCann said. “Winter is not a surprise to anyone.”

    The severe overcrowding this year will likely only make the situation in Moria even more miserable and dangerous than it has been in the past. “People are going to die,” Aldeen said. “It’s going to happen. You have 10,000 people in tents.”
    ‘A policy-made humanitarian crisis’

    Moria has been overcrowded and plagued by problems since the signing of the EU-Turkey, which requires Greece to hold people on the islands until their asylum claims can be processed – something that can take as long as two years.

    Read more → Briefing: How will Greece new asylum law affect refugees?

    “It’s very predictable what is happening,” said Efi Latsoudi, from the NGO Refugee Support Aegean, referring to the overcrowding and terrible conditions this year.

    RSA released a report in June calling the situation on the islands “a policy-made humanitarian crisis” stemming from “the status quo put in place by the EU-Turkey [deal]”. The report predicted that Greece’s migration reception system “would not manage to absorb a sudden and significant increase in refugee arrivals”, which is exactly what happened this summer.

    “It’s very predictable what is happening.”

    According to the report, Greek authorities have failed to adopt a comprehensive and proactive strategy for dealing with the reality of ongoing migration across the Aegean. Bureaucratic deficiencies, political expediency, a lack of financial transparency and the broader EU priority of reducing migration have also contributed to the “structural failure” of Greece’s migration reception system, it says.

    As a result, Moria today looks more like a chaotic settlement on the edge of a war zone than an organised reception centre in a European country that has received almost $2.5 billion in funding from the EU since 2015 to support its response to migration.
    Tents a luxury for new arrivals

    Inside the barbed wire fences of the official camp, people are housed in trailer-like containers, each one holding four or five families. Outside, there is a sea of tents filling up the olive groves surrounding the camp. The more permanent tents are basic wooden structures covered in tarps bearing the logos of various organisations – the UN’s refugee agency, European Humanitarian Aid, the Greek Red Cross.

    Newer arrivals have been given small, brightly coloured camping tents as temporary shelters that aren’t waterproof or winterised. These are scattered, seemingly at random, between the olive trees, and even these appear to be a luxury for the newly arrived.

    Most of the asylum seekers TNH spoke to said they spent days or weeks sleeping outside before they were given a tent.

    Large mounds of blue and black garbage bags are piled up along the main arteries of Moria. The air stinks of the garbage and is thickened by cooking smoke laced with plastic. Portable toilets with thin streams of liquid trickling out from under them line the edge of one road.

    Hundreds of children wander around in small clusters. A mother hunches over her small daughter, picking lice from her hair. Other women squat on their heels and plunge their arms into basins of soapy water, washing clothes. Hundreds of clothes lines criss-cross between trees and blankets, and clothing is draped over fences and tree branches to dry. A tangle of electrical wires from a makeshift grid runs haywire between the tents. A faulty connection or errant spark could lead to a blaze.

    Drainage ditches and small berms have been dug in preparation for rain.

    There are people everywhere: carrying fishing poles that they take to the sea to catch extra food; bending to pray between the trees; resting in their tents; collecting dry tree branches to build cooking fires; baking bread in homemade clay ovens dug into the dirt; jostling and whittling away time in the hours-long food line; wandering off on their own for a moment’s respite.
    ‘Little by little, I’ll die’

    “Staying in this place is making us crazy,” said Hussain, a 15-year-old Afghan asylum seeker. An amateur guitarist in Afghanistan, he was threatened by the Taliban for his music playing and fled with his family, but was separated from them while crossing the border from Iran to Turkey. “The situation [in Moria] is not good,” he said. “Every[body has] stress here. They want to leave… because it is not a good place for a child, for anyone.”

    “The situation here is hard,” said Mohammad, an Iraqi asylum seeker who has been in the camp with his pregnant wife since the end of July. “It’s harder than it is in Iraq.”

    “[My wife] is going to have a baby. Is she going to have it here?” Mohammad continued. “Where will [the baby] live? When they child comes, it’s one day old and we’re going to keep it in a tent? This isn’t possible. But if you return to Iraq, what will happen?”

    “If I go back to Iraq, I’ll die.” Mohammad said, answering his own question. “[But] if I stay here I’ll die… Right now, I won’t die. But little by little, I’ll die.”
    More arrivals than relocations

    People have been dying in Moria almost since the camp began operating. In November 2016, a 66-year-old woman and her six-year-old granddaughter were killed when a cooking gas container exploded, setting a section of the camp ablaze. In January 2017, three people died in one week due to cold weather. And in January this year, another man died during a cold snap.

    At the end of September, shortly before TNH’s visit, a toddler playing in a cardboard box was run over by a garbage truck outside of Moria. A few days later a fire broke out killing a woman and sparking angry protests over the dismal living conditions.

    Greece’s centre-right government, which took office in July, responded to the deaths and protests in Moria by overhauling the country’s asylum system to accelerate the processing of applications, cutting out a number of protections along the way, promising to return more people to Turkey under the terms of the EU-Turkey deal and pledging to rapidly decongest the islands by moving 20,000 people to the mainland by the end of the year.

    As of 12 November, just over 8,000 people have been transported from the islands to the mainland by the Greek government since the fire. Over the same period of time, nearly 11,000 people arrived by sea, and the population of Moria has continued to grow, reaching around 15,000.

    With winter rapidly approaching, the situation on the islands is only growing more desperate, and there’s no end in sight.

    Transfers to the mainland won’t be able to solve the problem, according to Latsoudi from RSA. There simply aren’t enough reception spaces to accommodate all of the people who need to be moved, and the ones that do exist are often in remote areas, lack facilities, and will also be hit by harsh winter weather.

    “[The] mainland is totally unprepared to receive people,” Latsoudi said. “It’s not a real solution… The problems are still there [in Moria] and other problems are created all over Greece.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2019/11/14/Greece-Moria-winter-refugees
    #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #réfugiés #asile #Grèce #île #Lesbos #Moria #froid

  • Réfugiés en #Turquie : évaluation de l’utilisation des #fonds de l’#UE et de la coopération avec Ankara

    Les députés évalueront mercredi la situation des #réfugiés_syriens en Turquie et les résultats du #soutien_financier fourni par l’UE au gouvernement turc.

    Des représentants de la Commission européenne informeront les députés des commissions des libertés civiles, des affaires étrangères et du développement avant de participer à un débat. Ils se concentreront sur la facilité de l’UE en faveur des réfugiés en Turquie, mise en place en 2015 pour aider les autorités turques à venir en aide aux réfugiés sur leur territoire. Elle dispose d’un #budget total de six milliards d’euros à distribuer au plus tard en 2025.

    Sur les 5,6 millions de réfugiés syriens dans le monde, près de 3,7 millions seraient en Turquie, selon les données du HCR.

    #Accord_UE-Turquie et situation en Grèce

    Les députés de la commission des libertés civiles débattront également de la mise en œuvre de la déclaration UE-Turquie, l’accord conclu par les dirigeants européens avec le gouvernement turc en mars 2016 pour mettre un terme au flux de réfugiés en direction des îles grecques.

    Ils échangeront dans un premier temps avec #Michalis_Chrisochoidis, le ministre grec en charge de la protection des citoyens. Les conséquences de l’accord ainsi que la situation dans les #îles grecques feront ensuite l’objet d’une discussion avec des représentants de la Commission européenne, de l’Agence des droits fondamentaux de l’UE, du Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile et de Médecins sans frontières.

    DATE : mercredi 6 novembre, de 9h à 12h30

    LIEU : Parlement européen, Bruxelles, bâtiment Paul-Henri Spaak, salle 3C50

    https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/fr/press-room/20191104IPR65732/refugies-en-turquie-evaluation-de-l-utilisation-des-fonds-de-l-ue
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #EU #accord_UE-Turquie #aide_financière #financement #catastrophe_humanitaire #crise_humanitaire #externalisation #hotspot

    –-------------

    Ici le lien vers la vidéo de la deuxième partie de la séance : https://www.europarl.europa.eu/ep-live/fr/committees/video?event=20191106-1000-COMMITTEE-LIBE

    Vous pouvez y voir l’intervention d’MSF sur le deal avec la Turquie et la situation en Grèce à la min 11:55.
    #suicide #santé_mentale #violences_sexuelles #santé #enfants #mineurs #enfance #surpopulation #toilettes #vulnérabilité #accès_aux_soins

    • Pour la #Cour_européenne_des_droits_de_l’Homme, tout va bien dans les hotspots grecs

      La Cour européenne des droits de l’Homme vient de rejeter pour l’essentiel la requête dont l’avaient saisie, le 16 juin 2016, 51 personnes de nationalités afghane, syrienne et palestinienne - parmi lesquelles de nombreux mineurs -, maintenues de force dans une situation de détresse extrême dans le hotspot de #Chios, en Grèce [1].

      Les 51 requérant.es, soutenu.es par nos associations*, avaient été identifié.es lors d’une mission d’observation du Gisti dans les hotspots grecs au mois de mai 2016 [2]. Privées de liberté et retenues dans l’île de Chios devenue, comme celles de #Lesbos, #Leros, #Samos et #Kos, une prison à ciel ouvert depuis la mise en œuvre de la #Déclaration_UE-Turquie du 20 mars 2016, les personnes concernées invoquaient la violation de plusieurs dispositions de la Convention européenne des droits de l’Homme [3].

      Dans leur requête étaient abondamment et précisément documentés l’insuffisance et le caractère inadapté de la nourriture, les conditions matérielles parfois très dangereuses (tentes mal fixées, serpents, chaleur, promiscuité, etc.), les grandes difficultés d’accès aux soins, l’absence de prise en charge des personnes les plus vulnérables - femmes enceintes, enfants en bas âge, mineurs isolés -, aggravées par le contexte de privation de liberté qui caractérise la situation dans les hotspots, mais aussi l’arbitraire administratif, particulièrement anxiogène du fait de la menace permanente d’un renvoi vers la Turquie.

      La seule violation retenue par la Cour concerne l’impossibilité pour les requérant.es de former des recours effectifs contre les décisions ordonnant leur expulsion ou leur maintien en détention, du fait du manque d’informations accessibles sur le droit au recours et de l’absence, dans l’île de Chios, de tribunal susceptible de recevoir un tel recours.

      Pour le reste, il aura fallu plus de trois ans à la Cour européenne des droits de l’Homme pour juger que la plainte des 51 de Chios n’est pas fondée. Son argumentation se décline en plusieurs volets :

      s’agissant du traitement des personnes mineures, elle reprend à son compte les dénégations du gouvernement grec pour conclure qu’elle n’est « pas convaincue que les autorités n’ont pas fait tout ce que l’on pouvait raisonnablement attendre d’elles pour répondre à l’obligation de prise en charge et de protection » ;

      elle reconnaît qu’il a pu y avoir des problèmes liés à l’accès aux soins médicaux, à la mauvaise qualité de la nourriture et de l’eau et au manque d’informations sur les droits et d’assistance juridique, mais les relativise en rappelant que « l’arrivée massive de migrants avait créé pour les autorités grecques des difficultés de caractère organisationnel, logistique et structurel » et relève qu’en l’absence de détails individualisés (pour chaque requérant.e), elle « ne saurait conclure que les conditions de détention des requérants [y ayant séjourné] constituaient un traitement inhumain et dégradant » ;

      s’agissant de la surpopulation et de la promiscuité, elle n’en écarte pas la réalité – tout en relevant que les requérant.es n’ont « pas indiqué le nombre de mètres carrés dans les conteneurs » – mais pondère son appréciation des risques que cette situation entraîne en précisant que la durée de détention « stricte » n’a pas dépassé trente jours, délai dans lequel « le seuil de gravité requis pour que [cette détention] soit qualifiée de traitement inhumain ou dégradant n’avait pas été atteint ».

      *

      L’appréciation faite par la Cour de la situation de privation de liberté invoquée par les requérant.es est en effet au cœur de sa décision, puisqu’elle s’en sert pour relativiser toutes les violations des droits qu’elles et ils ont subies. C’est ainsi que, sans contester les très mauvaises conditions matérielles qui prévalaient au camp de Vial, elle (se) rassure en précisant qu’il s’agit d’« une structure semi-ouverte, ce qui permettait aux occupants de quitter le centre toute la journée et d’y revenir le soir ». De même, « à supposer qu’il y eut à un moment ou à un autre un problème de surpopulation » au camp de Souda, elle estime « ce camp a toujours été une structure ouverte, fait de nature à atténuer beaucoup les nuisances éventuelles liées à la surpopulation » [4].

      Autrement dit, peu importe, pour la Cour EDH, que des personnes soient contraintes de subir les conditions de vie infrahumaines des camps insalubres du hotspot de Chios, dès lors qu’elles peuvent en sortir. Et peu importe qu’une fois hors de ces camps, elles n’aient d’autre solution que d’y revenir, puisqu’elles n’y sont pas officiellement « détenues ». Qu’importe, en effet, puisque comme dans le reste de « l’archipel des camps » de la mer Égée [5], c’est toute l’île de Chios qu’elles n’ont pas le droit de quitter et qui est donc leur prison.

      En relayant, dans sa décision, l’habillage formel donné par les autorités grecques et l’Union européenne au mécanisme des hotspots, la Cour EDH prend la responsabilité d’abandonner les victimes et conforte l’hypocrisie d’une politique inhumaine qui enferme les exilé.es quand elle devrait les accueillir.

      Contexte

      Depuis trois ans, des dizaines de milliers de personnes sont confinées dans les cinq hotspots de la mer Égée par l’Union européenne, qui finance la Grèce afin qu’elle joue le rôle de garde-frontière de l’Europe.

      Dès leur création, des associations grecques et des ONG, mais aussi des instances européennes et internationales comme, le Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU pour les réfugiés (HCR), le rapporteur spécial de l’ONU pour les droits de l’Homme des migrants, le Comité de prévention de la torture du Conseil de l’Europe, l’Agence de l’UE pour les droits fondamentaux, n’ont cessé d’alerter sur les nombreuses violations de droits qui sont commises dans les hotspots grecs : des conditions d’accueil marquées par la surpopulation, l’insécurité, l’insalubrité et le manque d’hygiène, des violences sexuelles, des atteintes répétées aux droits de l’enfant, le défaut de prise en compte des situations de vulnérabilité, un accès à l’information et aux droits entravé ou inexistant, le déni du droit d’asile. On ne compte plus les témoignages, rapports et enquêtes qui confirment la réalité et l’actualité des situations dramatiques engendrées par ces violations, dont la presse se fait périodiquement l’écho.

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2939.html?lang=fr
      #CEDH

  • Briefing: Behind the new refugee surge to the Greek islands

    “They told us, the young boys, to take a gun and go fight. Because of that I escaped from there [and] came here,” Mohammed, a 16-year-old from Ghazni province in Afghanistan, said while sitting in the entrance of a small, summer camping tent on the Greek island of Lesvos in early October.

    Nearby, across a narrow streambed, the din of voices rose from behind the barbed wire-topped fences surrounding Moria, Europe’s largest refugee camp.

    With the capacity to house around 3,000 people, the camp has long since spilled out of its walls, spreading into the olive groves on the surrounding hills, and is continuing to grow each day, with dangers of sickness and accidents set to increase in the winter months ahead.

    The population of the camp exploded this summer, from about 4,500 people in May to almost 14,000 by the end of October, reflecting a spike in the number of people crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey in recent months. So far this year, nearly 44,000 people have landed on the Greek islands, compared to around 32,500 in all of 2018.

    The increase is being led by Afghans, accounting for nearly 40 percent of arrivals, and Syrians, around 25 percent, and appears to be driven by worsening conflict and instability in their respective countries and increasingly hostile Turkish policies towards refugees.
    Isn’t it normal to see a surge this time of year?

    Arrivals to Greece usually peak in the summertime, when weather conditions are better for making the passage from the Turkish coast.

    But the increase this year has been “unprecedented”, according to Astrid Castelein, head of the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) office on Lesvos.

    Since the EU and Turkey signed an agreement in March 2016 aimed at stopping the flow of asylum seekers and migrants across the Aegean, arrivals to the Greek Islands during the summer have ranged from around 2,000 to just under 5,000 people per month.

    In July this year, arrivals rose to more than 5,000 and continued to climb to nearly 8,000 in August, before peaking at over 10,000 in September.

    These numbers are a far cry from the height of the European migration crisis in 2015, when over 850,000 people crossed the Aegean in 12 months and more than 5,000 often landed on the islands in a single day.

    Still, this year’s uptick has caused European leaders to warn about the potential that arrivals from Turkey could once again reach 2015 levels.
    What is Turkey threatening to do?

    Turkey hosts the largest refugee population in the world, at around four million people, including around 3.6 million Syrians.

    In recent months, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has repeatedly threatened to “open the gates” of migration, using the spectre of increased refugee arrivals to try to pressure the EU to support controversial plans for “a safe zone” in northern Syria. He wielded it again to try to get EU leaders to dampen their criticism of the military offensive Turkey launched at the beginning of October, which had the stated aim of carving out the zone, as well as fending off a Kurdish-led militia it considers terrorists.

    But despite the rhetoric, apprehensions of asylum seekers and migrants trying to leave Turkey have increased along with arrivals to the Greek islands.

    Between the beginning of July and the end of September, the Turkish Coast Guard apprehended around 25,500 people attempting to cross the Aegean Sea, compared to around 8,600 in the previous three months.

    “This stark increase is in line with the increase in [the] number of people crossing the Eastern Mediterranean,” Simon Verduijn, a Middle East migration specialist with the Mixed Migration Centre, said via email. “The Turkish Coast Guard seems to monitor the Aegean seas very carefully.”

    “The situation has not changed,” Ali Hekmat, founder of the Afghan Refugees Association in Turkey, said, referring to the difficulty of crossing the sea without being apprehended, “but the number of boats increased.”
    Why are there so many Afghans?

    The spike in people trying to reach the Greek islands also coincides with an increase in the number of asylum seekers and migrants crossing into Turkey.

    “We’ve noticed a general… increase in movement across the country lately,” said Lanna Walsh, a spokesperson for the UN’s migration agency, IOM, in Turkey.

    So far this year, Turkish authorities have apprehended more than 330,000 people who irregularly entered the country, compared to just under 270,000 all of last year. Similar to the Greek islands, Afghans are crossing into Turkey in greater numbers than any other nationality, accounting for 44 percent of people who have been apprehended, following a spike in Afghan arrivals that started last year.

    “It’s not surprising that people see that they no longer have a future in Turkey.”

    2018 was the deadliest year for civilians in Afghanistan out of the past decade, and the violence has continued this year, crescendoing in recent months as peace talks between the United States and the Taliban gained momentum and then collapsed and the country held presidential elections. Afghanistan is now the world’s least peaceful country, trading places with Syria, according to the Institute for Economics and Peace, an Australia-based think tank that publishes an annual Global Peace Index.

    At the same time, options for Afghans seeking refuge outside the country have narrowed. Conditions for around three million Afghans living in Iran – many without legal status – have deteriorated, with US sanctions squeezing the economy and the Iranian government deporting people back to Afghanistan.

    Turkey has also carried out mass deportations of Afghans for the past two years, changes to the Turkish asylum system have made it extremely difficult for Afghans to access protection and services in the country, and legal routes out of the country – even for the most vulnerable – have dried up following deep cuts to the US refugee resettlement programme, according to independent migration consultant Izza Leghtas.

    “It’s not surprising that people see that they no longer have a future in Turkey,” Leghtas said.
    What do the refugees themselves say?

    The stories of Afghans who have made it to Lesvos reflect these difficult circumstances. Mohammed, the 16-year-old who fled Afghanistan because he didn’t want to fight, said that the Taliban had attacked the area near his home in Ghazni province. He decided to flee when local men who were fighting the Taliban told him and other young men to take up arms. “We just want to get [an] education… We want to live. We don’t want to fight,” he said.

    Mohammed went to Iran using his Afghan passport and then crossed the border into Turkey with the help of a smuggler, walking for about 14 hours before he reached a safe location inside the country. After about a month, he boarded an inflatable dinghy with other refugees and crossed from the Turkish coast to Lesvos. “There’s no way to live in Turkey,” he said when asked why he didn’t want to stay in the country. “If they found out that I am Afghan… the police arrest Afghan people who are refugees.”

    Ahmad, a 23-year-old Afghan asylum seeker also camping out in the olive groves at Moria, left Afghanistan three years ago because of tensions between ethnic groups in the country and because of Taliban violence. He spent two years in Iran, working illegally – “the government didn’t give us permission to work,” he said – before crossing into Turkey last year. He eventually found a job in Turkey and was able to save up enough money to come to Greece after struggling to register as an asylum seeker in Turkey.

    Ali, a 17-year-old Afghan asylum seeker, was born in Iran. Ali’s father was the only member of the family with a job and wasn’t earning enough money to cover the family’s expenses. Ali also wasn’t able to register for school in Iran, so he decided to come to Europe to continue his education. “I wanted to go to Afghanistan, but I heard that Afghanistan isn’t safe for students or anyone,” Ali said.
    Is pressure growing on Syrian refugees?

    UNHCR also noticed an increase in the proportion of Syrians arriving to the Greek islands in August and September compared to previous months, according to Castelein.

    Since July, human rights organisations have documented cases of Turkish authorities forcibly returning Syrians from Istanbul to Idlib, a rebel-held province in northwestern Syria, which has been the target of an intense bombing campaign by the Syrian government and its Russian allies since April. The Turkish government has denied that it is forcibly returning people to northwest Syria, which would be a violation of customary international law.

    “I left for safety – not to take a vacation – for safety, for a safe country that has work, that has hope, that life.”

    Tighter controls on residency permits, more police checks, and increased public hostility towards Syrians amidst an economic downturn in Turkey have also added to a climate of fear. “People that don’t have a kimlik (a Turkish identity card) aren’t leaving their houses. They’re afraid they’ll be sent back to Syria,” said Mustafa, a 22-year-old Syrian asylum seeker on Lesvos who asked that his name be changed.

    Until recently, Mustafa was living in the countryside of Damascus, Syria’s capital, in an area controlled by the Syrian government. His family was displaced early on in Syria’s more than eight and a half year civil war, but he decided to leave the country only now, after being called up for mandatory military service. “I didn’t know what to do. They want you to go fight in Idlib,” he said.

    Mustafa spent a month in Istanbul before crossing to Lesvos at the end of September. “I saw that the situation was terrible in Turkey, so I decided to come here,” he added. “I left for safety – not to take a vacation – for safety, for a safe country that has work, that has hope, that life.”
    How shaky is the EU-Turkey deal?

    The military campaign Turkey launched in the Kurdish-administered part of northeast Syria at the beginning of October displaced some 180,000 people, and around 106,000 have yet to return. Another 12,000 Syrians have crossed the border into Iraq.

    A ceasefire is now in place but the future of the region remains unclear, so it’s too early to tell what impact, if any, it will have on migration across the Aegean, according to Gerry Simpson, associate director of Human Rights Watch’s crisis and conflict division.

    But Turkey’s tightening residency restrictions, deportations, and talk of mass expulsions could, Simpson said, be a “game-changer” for the EU-Turkey deal, which is credited with reducing the number of people crossing the Aegean since March 2016.

    The agreement is based on the idea that Turkey is a safe third country for asylum seekers and migrants to be sent back to, a claim human rights groups have always taken issue with.

    In the more than three years since the deal was signed, fewer than 3,000 people have been returned from Greece to Turkey. But Greece’s new government, which came to power in July, has said it will speed up returns, sending 10,000 people back to Turkey by the end of 2020.

    “This idea that [Turkey] is a safe third country of asylum was never acceptable to begin with. Obviously, now we’ve seen [that] even more concretely with very well documented returns, not only of Syrians, but also of Afghans,” Leghtas, the migration consultant, said.

    “Whether that changes the two sides’ approach to the [EU-Turkey deal] is another matter because in practical terms… the only real effect of the [deal] has been to trap people on the islands,” Simpson added.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news/2019/10/30/refugee-surge-Greek-islands
    #îles #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #Mer_Egée #réfugiés_afghans

    • Refugees trapped on Kos: An unspeakable crisis in reception conditions

      Hundreds of refugees are forced to live in boxes made out of cardboard and reed or makeshift sheds inside and outside of the Kos hotspot, in the utmost precarious and unsuitable conditions, without access to adequate medical and legal assistance. Since last April, the Kos hotspot, located on a hill at the village of Pyli, 15km outside of the city, is overcrowded, while the number of transfers of vulnerable refugees from the island to the mainland is significantly lower[1] compared to other islands, therefore creating an unbearable sense of entrapment for the refugees. RSA staff visited the island recently, spoke with refugees[2] living at the hotspot and visited the surrounding area. The images and testimonies cited in this document point out an unspeakable crisis in reception conditions.

      A former military camp in the village of Pyli serves as the Kos hotspot, despite intense protests residents; it started operating in March 2016 following the implementation of the toxic EU – Turkey Deal. According to official data, a place designed for a maximum occupancy of 816 people and 116 containers is now accommodating 3.734 people. Given the lack of any other accommodation structure on the island, the above number includes those living in makeshift sheds inside the hotspot as well as in crumbling abandoned buildings and tents outside of it. This severe overcrowding has led the authorities to use the Pre-removal Centre as an area for the stay for asylum-seekers– who are under restriction of their freedom of movement – including vulnerable individuals, women and families.

      According to UNHCR, the majority of asylum-seekers come from Syria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Palestine and Iraq, while children make up for 27% of the entire population. This data points out that, despite the dominant opposite and unfounded rhetoric, most of the newcomers are refugees, coming from countries with high asylum recognition rates.

      “We are living like mice”

      Two large abandoned buildings stand outside the hotspot; they are accessible only through debris, trash and a “stream” of sewage. RSA met with refugees who live there and who described their wretched living conditions. “Here, we are living like mice. We are looking for cardboard boxes and reeds to make ourselves a place to sleep. At night, there is no electricity. You look for an empty space between others, you lay down and try to sleep”, says an English-speaking man from Cameroon, who has been living in one of these abandoned buildings for two months. It is an open space full of holes in the walls and a weathered roof of rusty iron[3].

      Cardboard rooms

      African refugees, men and women have found shelter in this utterly dangerous setting. They have made a slum with big cardboard rooms, one next to the other, where the entrance is not visible. As the refugees sleeping in this area mention, there is cement and plaster falling off of the roof all the time. A vulnerable female refugee from Africa described to us her justified fear that her living conditions expose her to further danger.

      “The police told us to go find somewhere to sleep, there is no room at the hotspot. I am scared in here among so many men, because there is no electricity and it gets dark at night. But, what can I do? There was no room for me inside”.

      A blanket for each person

      The situation for Afghan families living in rooms of the other abandoned building, a few meters away, is similar. “When we take our children to the doctor, he writes prescriptions and tells us to buy them by ourselves. No one has helped us. When we arrived, they gave only one blanket to each one of us. Us women, we don’t even have the basics for personal hygiene”, says a young Afghan who has been living here for a month with her daughter and her husband. “They give us 1.5lt of water every day and pasta or potatoes almost daily”, says a young Afghan.

      In that space we met with refugees who complain about snakes getting indoors, where people sleep. Many try to shut the holes in the abandoned buildings to deter serpents from entering and to protect themselves from the cold. “We shut the holes but it is impossible to protect ourselves, this building is falling apart, it is really dangerous”, says a man from Afghanistan.

      There are no toilets outside of the hotspot; a cement trough is used as a shower for men, women and children, along with a hose from the fields nearby. There, they collect water in buckets and take it to their sheds. Alongside the road leading to the hotspot, refugees are carrying on their shoulders mattresses they have found in the trash, to put them in their tents and sheds.

      According to UNHCR, following a request by the Reception and Identification Authority, 200 tents were donated to the hotspot. This said, the Authorities have yet to find an appropriate space to set them up.

      Unbearable conditions inside the hotspot

      At the moment, there is not really a “safe zone” for unaccompanied minors, despite the fact that there is a space that was designed for this purpose, as families seem to be living in UNHCR tents in that space. The area is not completely protected and according to reports adults, who use the hygiene facilities, can enter there.

      Due to the overcrowding, lodgings have been set up in almost every available space, whereas, according to testimonies, there are serious problems with electricity, water supply, sewage disposal and cleanliness. The refugees mention that there is only one public toilet for those not living in a container, lack of clothing, shoes and hygiene products. Some told us that they left the hotspot because of the conditions there, in search of a living space outside of it. Such is the case of a Syrian refugee with his son, who are sleeping in a small construction near the hotspot entrance. “I found two mattresses in the trash. It was so filthy inside and the smell was so unbearable that I couldn’t stand it. I was suffering of skin problems, both me and the child”, he says. Tens of other refugees are sleeping in parks and streets downtown and depend upon solidarity groups in order to attend to their basic needs.

      Several refugees told us that they are in search of ways to work, even for free, in order to be of use. “I want to do something, I can’t just sit around doing nothing, it is driving me crazy. Would you happen to know where I could be of help? They say they don’t need me at the hotspot, is there anything I could do for the town of Kos? Clean, help somehow?”, a young Palestinian asks.

      Inadequate access to medical care

      Refugees living in the hotspot point out the inadequate or non-existent medical care. “We queue up and, if we manage to get to a doctor, they tell us to drink water, a lot of water, and sometimes they give paracetamol. There is no doctor at night, not even for emergencies. If someone is sick, the police won’t even call an ambulance. Take a taxi, they tell us. The other day, my friend was sick with a high fever, we called a taxi, but because the taxi wouldn’t come to the hotspot entrance, we carried him down the road for the taxi to pick us up”, says a young refugee.

      According to reports, at this moment there is only one doctor at the hotspot and only one Arab-speaking interpreter among the National Public Health Organization (NPHO) staff; during the summer, because of the limited NHPO staff, there were serious delays in medical tests and vulnerability screenings. Also, Kos hospital is understaffed, with whatever the consequences might be for the locals and the refugees in need of medical care[4].

      Not having a Social Security Number makes things even worse for those in need of medication, as they have to pay the entire price to buy it. The amount of 90 EURO that they receive as asylum-seekers from the cash program (cash card), especially when they have a health issue, is not enough. Such is the testimony of a woman from Africa, living in one of the abandoned buildings outside the hotspot. “It is dangerous here, we are suffering. It is difficult in these conditions, with our health, if you go to the hospital, they won’t give you medication. They will write you a prescription and you will have to buy it with your own money”, she tells us.

      Problems with free access to medical care for the thousands of newcomers increased sharply since July 2019 because the Foreigner Health Card system did not work and the Minister of Labor revoked[5] the circular on granting a Social Security Number to asylum-seekers, since the matter has yet to be regulated.

      Under these circumstances, survivors of a shipwreck (caused by the Coast Guard ramming a refugee boat near Kos resulting in the death of a 3-year old boy and a man) were transferred last week. According to the press, the 19-year old mother of the child, a few hours after the shipwreck and while still in shock, grave mourning and exhaustion, was transferred to the Reception and Identification Centre in order to be registered.

      Repression and police brutality

      According to the testimonies of at least four refugees, their protests are mostly dealt with repression, while there are reports on use of police violence in these situations. “Every time there is an issue, we go to the police and tell them do something, you have to protect us. They tell us to go away and if we insist, they start yelling and, if we don’t leave, they beat us”, says a minor Afghan who is living in the hotspot with his family. “If we complain, no one listens to you. It is a waste of time and you risk getting in trouble”, a 41-year old man from Africa, who has been living for the past six months inside the hotspot in a shed made of cardboard boxes, explains to us. ”A month ago, when we had the first rain, people were complaining, but it did nothing other than the riot police coming over”, they are telling us.

      Huge delays in the asylum process

      Many of those we met have yet to receive the threefold document and still have no access to the cash program. Newcomers have only received their “Restriction of Freedom Decision”, valid for 25 days; several have told us that the information on the asylum process is incomplete and they are having difficulty understanding it. At the end of the 25 days, they usually receive a document titled “Service Note of Release” where there is mention of the geographical restriction on the island of Kos. Lately, a notification for the intention to claim asylum is required.

      According to reports, at the moment there is a large number of people whose asylum process has not advanced (backlog). “Some of us have been here for 4-6 months and we haven’t even had a pre-interview[6] or an interview yet”, says a woman from Cameroon who is living in the hotspot.

      Arrivals have particularly increased in the past months, while refugees arriving in smaller islands, such as Kalymnos, Symi, are transferred to the Kos and Leros hotspots. According to UNHCR, a recent transfer of refugees from Kos to the mainland took place on 6 October and concerned 16 individuals. [7]. Due to the fact that in Kos the geographic restriction was not usually lifted in the past months, hundreds of people are trapped in these extremely precarious conditions. This appears to be happening because of the delays in the asylum process and the lack of medical staff, resulting to vulnerable individuals not being identified, combined with the lack of available space in the mainland structures and the prioritization of other islands that have hotspots.

      In Kos, there is free legal aid by four lawyers in total (a Registry lawyer, Metadrasi, Greek Refugee Council, Arsis), while there is great lack of interpreters both in the hotspot and the local hospital.

      Lack of access to education

      With regard to the refugees children’s education, evening classes in the Refugee Reception and Education Centres (RREC) have yet to start. According to UNHCR data, more than 438 children of school and pre-school age – aged 5 to 17-years old – are living in the hotspot[8] .

      In total, 108 children attend the Centre of non-typical education (KEDU) of Arsis Organization near the hotspot, funded by UNHCR. Any educational activity inside the hotspot, take place as part of an unemployment program by the Manpower Employment Organization. According to reports, the kindergarten providing formal education that operated in the previous two years inside the hotspot under the Ministry of Education is now closed as safety reasons were invoked.

      Detention: bad conditions and detention of vulnerable individuals

      The Pre-removal Centre next to the hotspot, with a capacity of 474 people, is currently detaining 325 people. According to UNHCR observations, the main nationalities are Iraq, Cameroon, Egypt, Syria and Pakistan.

      According to reports, newcomers in nearby islands that are transferred to Kos are also detained there until they submit their asylum claim. Also, people who have violated the geographic restriction are also held there. Among the detainees, there are people who have not been subjected to reception procedures process due to shortcomings of the Reception and Identification Authority[9]. Characteristically, following his visit to Kos in August 2019, Philippe Leclerc, the UNHCR Representative in Greece, reported: “I also visited the pre-removal centre on Kos, which since May 2019 has broadly been used as a place for direct placement in detention, instead of reception, of asylum-seekers, including women and those with specific needs, some of whom without prior and sufficient medical or psychosocial screening, due to lack of enough personnel”.

      In the context of the pilot project implemented in Lesvos, even extremely vulnerable individuals are being detained, despite the fact that there is no doctor in the Pre-removal Centre. An African refugee with a serious condition told us “I was in the Pre-removal Centre for three and a half months. I almost collapsed. I showed them a document from my country’s hospital, where my condition is mentioned, I asked them for a doctor, but they brought a nurse. Now I sleep in a room made of cardboard and reed outside of the hotspot”.

      According to complaints by at least two people who have been detained at the Pre-removal Centre, the police broke the camera of their mobile phones, that resulted in the phones not functioning and them losing their contacts and the only means of communication with their families. “Inside the Pre-removal Centre we didn’t have access to a doctor nor to medication. There was a nurse, but we were receiving no help. Also, we didn’t have access to a lawyer. When we complained, they transferred us to another wing, but all the wings were in an equally bad condition. Many times those who complained were being taken to the police station”, says a 30-year old man from Gambia.

      https://rsaegean.org/en/refugees-trapped-on-kos

    • 800 migrants arrive in Greece within 48 hours, living conditions described as ’horrible’

      Migrant arrivals to Greece continue unabated: Nearly 800 migrants crossed from Turkey to Greece in just 48 hours this week, marking the highest pace of arrivals in 40 months. The Council of Europe during a visit to migrant camps on the Greek islands warned of an explosive situation and described living conditions there as ’horrible.’

      On Wednesday, the Greek coastguard registered the arrival of 790 migrants in just 48 hours. As state media reported, the migrants arrived by land and by sea on boats at Alexandropouli on the mainland and the islands of Samos and Farmakonisi.

      The country has not seen this many arrivals of migrants via sea since the EU-Turkey deal came into effect in March 2016. The number of migrants arriving in Greece in the first ten months of this year has already overshot last year’s figure of around 50,500.

      According to the latest UNHCR figures, 55,348 migrants have arrived, 43,683 of them by sea, between the start of 2019 and Sunday.

      Dramatic situation

      The surge has led to dramatic overcrowding in camps on the Greek Aegean islands, where the migrant population has more than doubled over the past six months, according to the German press agency dpa. Even before, the camps were packed at more than twice their capacity. Outbreaks of violence and fires at the EU-funded island camps have further escalated the situation.

      During a visit to Greek island camps on Wednesday, Dunja Mijatovic, the Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe, said she had witnessed people queuing for food or to use a bathroom for more than three hours at refugee camps for asylum seekers on the Greek islands of Lesbos, Samos and Corinth.

      “The people I have met are living in horrible conditions and in an unbearable limbo,” she said at a news briefing on Thursday; adding the migrants were struggling to cope with overcrowding, lack of shelter, poor hygiene conditions and substandard access to medical care.

      “I saw children with skin diseases not treated. I heard about no medications or drugs at all available to these people. No access to health, no proper access to health and many other things that are really quite shocking for Europe in the 21st century,” Mijatovic continued.

      Relocation

      To ease the overcrowding, the Greek government has already started relocating people to the mainland. Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced that 20,000 migrants would be moved by the end of the year. With the current resurgence of arrivals, however, decongestion is not in sight. Mijatovic urged the authorities to transfer asylum seekers from islands to the mainland as soon as possible. “It is an explosive situation”, she said. “This no longer has anything to do with the reception of asylum-seekers,” she said. “This has become a struggle for survival,” she concluded at the end of her visit.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/20526/800-migrants-arrive-in-greece-within-48-hours-living-conditions-descri

    • Sur l’île de #Samos, une poudrière pour des milliers d’exilés confinés à l’entrée de l’UE

      Avec 6 000 migrants pour 650 places, le camp grec de Samos est une poudrière ravagée par un incendie à la mi-octobre. Alors que la Grèce redevient la première porte d’entrée dans l’UE, autorités comme réfugiés alertent sur la catastrophe en cours. Reportage sur cette île, symptôme de la crise européenne de l’accueil.

      La ligne d’horizon se fond dans le ciel d’encre de Samos. L’île grecque des confins de l’Europe est isolée dans la nuit d’automne. Sur le flanc de la montagne qui surplombe la ville côtière de Vathy, des lumières blanches et orange illuminent un amas de blocs blancs d’où s’élèvent des voix. Elles résonnent loin dans les hauteurs de cyprès et d’oliviers, où s’égarent des centaines de tentes. Ces voix sont celles d’Afghans et de Syriens en majorité, d’Irakiens, de Camerounais, de Congolais, de Ghanéens… Pour moitié d’entre eux, ce sont des femmes et des enfants. Un monde au-dehors qui peine à s’endormir malgré l’heure tardive.

      À deux kilomètres des côtes turques, l’île de Samos (Grèce) est rejointe en Zodiac par les exilés. © Dessin Elisa Perrigueur

      Ils sont 6 000 à se serrer dans les conteneurs prévus pour 648 personnes, et la « jungle » alentour, dit-on ici. Ce camp est devenu une ville dans la ville. On y compte autant de migrants que d’habitants. « Samos est un petit paradis avec ce point cauchemardesque au milieu », résume Mohammed, Afghan qui foule ces pentes depuis un an. Les exilés sont arrivés illégalement au fil des mois en Zodiac, depuis la Turquie, à deux kilomètres. Surpeuplé, Vathy continue de se remplir de nouveaux venus débarqués avec des rêves d’Europe, peu à peu gagnés par la désillusion.

      À l’origine lieu de transit, le camp fut transformé en 2016 en « hotspot », l’un des cinq centres d’identification des îles Égéennes gérés par l’État grec et l’UE. Les migrants, invisibles sur le reste de l’île de Samos, sont désormais tous bloqués là le temps de leur demande d’asile, faute de places d’hébergement sur le continent grec, où le dispositif est débordé par 73 000 requêtes. Ils attendent leur premier entretien, parfois calé en 2022, coincés sur ce bout de terre de 35 000 habitants.

      Naveed Majedi, Afghan de 27 ans rencontré à Vathy. © Elisa Perrigueur
      Naveed Majedi, un Afghan de 27 ans, physique menu et yeux verts, évoque la sensation d’être enlisé dans un « piège » depuis sept mois qu’il s’est enregistré ici. « On est bloqués au milieu de l’eau. Je ne peux pas repartir en Afghanistan, avec les retours volontaires [proposés par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations de l’ONU – ndlr], c’est trop dangereux pour ma vie », déplore l’ancien traducteur pour la Force internationale d’assistance à la sécurité à Kaboul.

      Le camp implose, les « habitations » se négocient au noir. Naveed a payé sa tente 150 euros à un autre migrant en partance. Il peste contre « ces tranchées de déchets, ces toilettes peu nombreuses et immondes. La nourriture mauvaise et insuffisante ». Le jeune homme prend des photos en rafale, les partage avec ses proches pour montrer sa condition « inhumaine », dit-il. De même que l’organisation Médecins sans frontières (MSF) alerte : « On compte aujourd’hui le plus grand nombre de personnes dans le camp depuis 2016. La situation se détériore très vite. Le lieu est dangereux pour la santé physique et mentale. »

      Il n’existe qu’une échappatoire : un transfert pour Athènes en ferry avec un relogement à la clef, conditionné à l’obtention d’une « carte ouverte » (en fonction des disponibilités, de la nationalité, etc.). Depuis l’arrivée en juillet d’un premier ministre de droite, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, celles-ci sont octroyées en petit nombre.

      Se rêvant dans le prochain bateau, Naveed scrute avec obsession les rumeurs de transferts sur Facebook. « Il y a des nationalités prioritaires, comme les Syriens », croit-il. Les tensions entre communautés marquent le camp, qui s’est naturellement divisé par pays d’origine. « Il y a constamment des rixes, surtout entre des Afghans et des Syriens, admet Naveed. Les Africains souvent ne s’en mêlent pas. Nous, les Afghans, sommes mal perçus à cause de certains qui sont agressifs, on nous met dans le même sac. » Querelles politiques à propos du conflit syrien, embrouilles dans les files d’attente de repas, promiscuité trop intense… Nul ne sait précisément ce qui entraîne les flambées de colère. La dernière, sanglante, a traumatisé Samos.

      Le camp était une poudrière, alertaient ces derniers mois les acteurs de l’île dans l’indifférence. Le 14 octobre, Vathy a explosé. Dans la soirée, deux jeunes exilés ont été poignardés dans le centre-ville, vengeance d’une précédente rixe entre Syriens et Afghans au motif inconnu. En représailles, un incendie volontaire a ravagé 700 « habitations » du camp. L’état d’urgence a été déclaré. Les écoles ont fermé. Des centaines de migrants ont déserté le camp.

      L’Afghan Abdul Fatah, 43 ans, sa femme de 34 ans et leurs sept enfants ont quitté « par peur » leur conteneur pour dormir sur la promenade du front de mer. Les manifestations de migrants se sont multipliées devant les bureaux de l’asile. Des policiers sont arrivés en renfort et de nouvelles évacuations de migrants vers Athènes ont été programmées.

      Dans l’attente de ces transferts qui ne viennent pas, les migrants s’échappent quand ils le peuvent du camp infernal. Le jour, ils errent entre les maisons pâles du petit centre-ville, déambulent sur la baie, patientent dans les squares publics.

      « Nous ne sommes pas acceptés par tous. Un jour, j’ai voulu commander à dîner dans une taverne. La femme m’a répondu que je pouvais seulement prendre à emporter », relate Naveed, assis sur une place où trône le noble Lion de Samos. Un homme du camp à l’air triste sirote à côté une canette de bière. Une famille de réfugiés sort d’un supermarché les bras chargés : ils viennent de dépenser les 90 euros mensuels donnés par le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) dans l’échoppe où se mêlent les langues grecque, dari, arabe et français.

      D’autres migrants entament une longue marche vers les hauteurs de l’île. Ils se rendent à l’autre point de convergence des réfugiés : l’hôpital de Samos. Situé entre les villas silencieuses, l’établissement est pris d’assaut. Chaque jour entre 100 et 150 demandeurs s’y pressent espérant rencontrer un docteur, de ceux qui peuvent rédiger un rapport aidant à l’octroi d’un statut de « vulnérabilité » permettant d’obtenir plus facilement une « carte ouverte ».

      Samuel et Alice, un couple de Ghanéens ont mis des semaines à obtenir un rendez-vous avec le gynécologue de l’hôpital. © Elisa Perrigueur

      La « vulnérabilité » est théoriquement octroyée aux femmes enceintes, aux personnes atteintes de maladies graves, de problèmes psychiques. Le panel est flou, il y a des failles. Tous le savent, rappelle le Dr Fabio Giardina, le responsable des médecins. Certains exilés désespérés tentent de simuler des pathologies pour partir. « Un jour, on a transféré plusieurs personnes pour des cas de tuberculose ; les jours suivants, d’autres sont venues ici, nombreuses, en prétextant des symptômes, relate le médecin stoïque. On a également eu beaucoup de cas de simulations d’épilepsie. C’est très fatigant pour les médecins, stressés, qui perdent du temps et de l’argent pour traiter au détriment des vrais malades. Avec la nouvelle loi en préparation, plus sévère, ce système pourrait changer. »

      En neuf mois, l’établissement de 123 lits a comptabilisé quelque 12 000 consultations ambulatoires. Les pathologies graves constatées : quelques cas de tuberculose et de VIH. L’unique psychiatre a démissionné il y a quelques mois. Depuis un an et demi, deux postes de pédiatres sont vacants. « Le camp est une bombe à retardement, lâche le Dr Fabio Giardina. Si la population continue d’augmenter, on franchira la ligne rouge. »

      Dans le couloir où résonnent les plaintes, Samuel Kwabena Opoku, Ghanéen de 42 ans, est venu pour sa femme Alice enceinte de huit mois. Ils ont mis longtemps à obtenir ce rendez-vous, qui doit être pris avec le médecin du camp. « Nous, les Noirs, passons toujours au dernier plan, accuse-t-il. Une policière m’a lancé un jour : vous, les Africains [souvent venus de l’ouest du continent – ndlr], vous êtes des migrants économiques, vous n’avez rien à faire là. » Ils sont les plus nombreux parmi les déboutés.
      Le maire : « L’Europe doit nous aider »

      Samuel, lui, raconte être « menacé de mort au Ghana. Je devais reprendre la place de mon père, chef de tribu important. Pour cela, je devais sacrifier le premier de mes fils, eu avec mon autre femme. J’ai refusé ce crime rituel ». Son avocate française a déposé pour le couple une requête d’urgence, acceptée, devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme. Arrivés à Samos en août, Samuel et Alice ont vu le gynécologue, débordé, en octobre pour la première fois. L’hôpital a enregistré 213 naissances sur l’île en 2019, dont 88 parmi la population migrante.

      Des ONG internationales suisses, françaises, allemandes sillonnent l’institution, aident aux traductions, mais ne sont qu’une quinzaine sur l’île. « Nous sommes déconnectées des autorités locales qui communiquent peu et sommes sans arrêt contrôlées, déplore Domitille Nicolet, de l’association Avocats sans frontières. Une situation que nous voulons dénoncer mais peu de médias s’intéressent à ce qui se passe ici. »

      Une partie de la « jungle » du camp de Vathy, non accessible aux journalistes ni aux ONG. © Elisa Perrigueur

      Chryssa Solomonidou, habitante de l’île depuis 1986 qui donne des cours de grec aux exilés, est en lien avec ces groupes humanitaires souvent arrivés ces dernières années. « Les migrants et ONG ont rajeuni la ville, les 15-35 ans étaient partis à cause de la crise », relate-t-elle. Se tenant droite dans son chemisier colorée au comptoir d’un bar cossu, elle remarque des policiers anti-émeute attablés devant leurs cafés frappés. Eux aussi sont les nouveaux visages de cette ville « où tout le monde se connaissait », souligne Chryssa Solomonidou. En grand nombre, ils remplissent tous les hôtels aux façades en travaux après une saison estivale.

      « J’ai le cœur toujours serré devant cette situation de misère où ces gens vivent dehors et nous dans nos maisons. C’est devenu ici le premier sujet de conversation », angoisse Chryssa. Cette maman a assisté, désemparée, à la rapide montée des ressentiments, de l’apparition de deux univers étrangers qui se croisent sans se parler. « Il y a des rumeurs sur les agressions, les maladies, etc. Une commerçante vendait des tee-shirts en promotion pour 20 euros. À trois hommes noirs qui sont arrivés, elle a menti : “Désolée, on ferme.” Elle ne voulait pas qu’ils les essayent par peur des microbes », se souvient Chryssa.

      Il y a aussi eu cette professeure, ajoute-t-elle, « poursuivie en justice par des parents d’élèves » parce qu’elle voulait faire venir des migrants dans sa classe, ce que ces derniers refusaient. L’enseignante s’est retrouvée au tribunal pour avoir appelé les enfants à ignorer « la xénophobie » de leurs aînés. « Ce n’est pas aux migrants qu’il faut en vouloir, mais aux autorités, à l’Europe, qui nous a oubliés », déplore Chryssa.

      « L’UE doit nous aider, nous devons rouvrir les frontières [européennes – ndlr] comme en 2015 et répartir les réfugiés », prône Giorgos Stantzos, le nouveau maire de Vathy (sans étiquette). Mais le gouvernement de Mitsotakis prépare une nouvelle loi sur l’immigration et a annoncé des mesures plus sévères que son prédécesseur de gauche Syriza, comme le renvoi de 10 000 migrants en Turquie.

      Des centaines de migrants ont embarqué sur un ferry le 21 octobre, direction Athènes. © Elisa Perrigueur

      Les termes de l’accord controversé signé en mars 2016 entre Ankara et l’UE ne s’appliquent pas dans les faits. Alors que les arrivées en Grèce se poursuivent, la Turquie affirme que seuls 3 des 6 milliards d’euros dus par l’Europe en échange de la limitation des départs illégaux de ses côtes auraient été versés. Le président turc Erdogan a de nouveau menacé au cours d’un discours le 24 octobre « d’envoyer 3,6 millions de migrants en Europe » si celle-ci essayait « de présenter [son] opération [offensive contre les Kurdes en Syrie – ndlr] comme une invasion ».

      À Samos, où les avions militaires turcs fendent régulièrement le ciel, ce chantage résonne plus qu’ailleurs. « Le moment est très critique. Le problème, ce n’est pas l’arrivée des familles qui sont réfugiées et n’ont pas le choix, mais les hommes seuls. Il n’y a pas de problèmes avec les habitants mais entre eux », estime la municipalité. Celle-ci « n’intervient pas dans le camp, nous ne logeons pas les réfugiés même après les incendies, ce n’est pas notre job ».

      L’édile Giorgos Stantzos multiplie les déclarations sur Samos, trop éclipsée médiatiquement, selon les locaux, par la médiatisation, légitime, de l’île de Lesbos et de son camp bondé, avec 13 000 migrants. Au cours d’un rassemblement appelé le 21 octobre, Giorgos Stantzos a pris la parole avec les popes sur le parvis de la mairie de Samos. « Nous sommes trop d’êtres humains ici […], notre santé publique est en danger », a-t-il martelé sous les applaudissements de quelques milliers d’habitants.

      La municipalité attend toujours la « solution d’urgence » proposée par l’État grec et l’UE. Bientôt, un nouveau camp devrait naître, loin des villes et des regards. Un mastodonte de 300 conteneurs, d’une capacité de 1 000 à 1 500 places, cernés de grillages de l’OTAN, avec « toutes les facilités à l’intérieur : médecins, supermarchés, électricité, etc. », décrypte une source gouvernementale. Les conteneurs doivent être livrés mi-novembre et le camp devrait être effectif à la fin de l’année. « Et le gouvernement nous a assuré qu’il organiserait des transferts de migrants vers le continent toutes les semaines d’ici la fin novembre pour désengorger Samos », précise le maire Giorgos Stantzos.

      Sur les quais du port, le soir du 21 octobre, près de 700 Afghans, Syriens, Camerounais, Irakiens… ont souri dans le noir à l’arrivée du ferry de l’État aux lumières aveuglantes. Après s’y être engouffrés sans regret, ils ont fait escale au port du Pirée et voulu rejoindre des hébergements réquisitionnés aux quatre coins du continent. Quelque 380 passagers de ce convoi ont été conduits en bus dans le nord de la Grèce. Eux qui espéraient tant de cette nouvelle étape ont dû faire demi-tour sous les huées de villageois grecs : « Fermez les frontières », « Chassez les clandestins ».

      Boîte noire :

      L’actuel camp de conteneurs de Vathy, entouré de barbelés, n’est accessible qu’avec l’autorisation du gouvernement, et il est donc uniquement possible de se rendre dans la « jungle » de tentes alentour.

      Dès le 10 octobre, nous avons formulé des demandes d’interviews avec le secrétaire de la politique migratoire, Giorgos Koumoutsakos (ou un représentant de son cabinet), la responsable du « hotspot » de Samos et/ou un représentant de l’EASO, bureau européen de l’asile. Le 15 octobre, nous avons reçu une réponse négative, après les « graves incidents » de la veille. Nous avons réitéré cette demande les 20 et 23 octobre, au cours de notre reportage à Samos. Avec un nouveau refus des autorités grecques à la clef, qui évoquent une « situation trop tendue » sur les îles.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/311019/sur-l-ile-de-samos-une-poudriere-pour-des-milliers-d-exiles-confines-l-ent

  • No other option : Teenage migrants on Lesbos turn to prostitution to get by

    The situation in the overcrowded Moria refugee camp on Lesbos is getting worse by the day. Minors are particularly vulnerable. InfoMigrants spoke with teenagers who said they had no other option left than to sell their bodies for money.

    It is 10:00 pm and looks already dark outside when my colleague and I meet a group of teenagers sitting around at a roadside park close to Mytilene’s harbor. The youngsters tell us they are from Afghanistan and that they live at the island’s overcrowded Moria migrant camp.

    At first, they seem hesitant to talk to us. They don’t want to share too many details about their lives and their experiences in Lesbos with reporters. But slowly, they start to open up. They agree to speak with us only on the condition of anonymity.

    Ahmad (not his real name) is one of the hundreds of unaccompanied Afghans who are stuck in Greece. He’s 17 years old and has lived in Athens and Mytilene, the capital of the Greek island of Lesbos, since 2017.

    Ahmad says that during this time in Greece, he has encountered many instances of violence and abuse. He details that his problems began when he was tricked by a group of drug traffickers when he was in Athens. They gave him a package and wanted him to bring it to Lesbos. They promised him money for the transfer. But police caught him on the way and he was put in jail.

    “I did not know what was inside the package. They told me I would get an amount of money by transferring the package to Lesbos. When the police caught me I realized that hashish was inside the package,” Ahmad admits.

    Ahmad says he has witnessed many scenes of sexual assault and violence at the Moria camp. “I myself was assaulted many times. A group of men tried to rape me several times but I fended them off and I ran away.”

    The Moria camp is divided up into different sections. Usually, underage migrants, children and families are assigned to Section A, B or C, where they are meant to be safe. Ahmad however, says he did not get a spot in either of those sections without giving any reasons for this. “I have to stay with other refugees who are older than me,” he says.

    Ahmad says he was an athlete in Afghanistan; he believes that his strong physique might be what saves him from danger at the camp.

    These days, Ahmad earns money by reselling bus tickets in the center of Mytilene. He buys tickets for 80 cents each and sells them for one euro. He walks about 16 kilometers from Moria Camp to Mytilene per day to do this.

    Warning signs

    Violence, prostitution, homelessness – the crisis situation that many underage migrants are facing in the Greek hotspots did not just suddenly arrive without warning signs. In a report published in April 2017, Harvard University researchers warned of an “Emergency within an emergency”, where migrant children would suffer from physical, psychological and sexual violence in Greece’s migrant camps and facilities.

    The report focused, in particular, on the many factors contributing to the commercial sexual exploitation of migrant children, and the effects on the victims of this kind of abuse. One of the report’s aims was to prompt lawmakers to address this “emergency within an emergency” with better policy decisions. Almost two years later, little has changed; Greece is now struggling to cope with a new surge in migrant arrivals and a rising proportion of unaccompanied minors.

    Prostitution is sometimes the only option left

    Ahmad is not the only one who has witnessed sexual abuse. Some of his friends concede they have experienced similar situations at the camp.

    “Some people who are living at section A, B and C of Moria Camp are selling their body to get some money. When you have no money to buy something to eat, what would you do? Prostitution is the only option. There is no other way to earn money,” one of Ahmad’s friends said.

    Ahmad then turns to us and conveys that two of his close friends were selling their bodies to get some money. He adds that even though one of them behaves normally when he is around them, his mood changes immediately when he sees adult migrants. “He does not want to face them or us when he sees them.”

    The following day, we meet a 16-year-old Afghan near the entrance of Moria camp. He approaches us, asking for information on how to get away from the island. When we ask him why he wants to leave, he says that "minors are in a miserable situation here and adult asylum seekers misuse the minors.

    “They ]adults[ have knives. If you don’t do what they want, they’ll threaten to kill you.”

    A dire place

    Moria, located in a former military base, opened in 2015 as a center to register new arrivals but is now filled up at four times its capacity. The camp has spilled over into a muddy, garbage-strewn olive grove nearby, and authorities are feeling overwhelmed with the current situation.

    In Moria, several people usually share flimsy tents packed next to one another. Women have told humanitarian organizations that they feel unsafe at night, and sanitary conditions have been described by aid groups “horrendous,” with over 100 people sharing just one toilet.

    More than 10,000 people, mostly Afghan and Syrian families, crossed the Aegean Sea from Turkey to Greece in September 2019 alone, according to UNHCR. This marks the highest monthly level of crossings to Greece in over three years.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/20338/no-other-option-teenage-migrants-on-lesbos-turn-to-prostitution-to-get
    #prostitution #asile #migrations #mineurs #réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce

    –-------

    Pour rappel, en 2016 on parlait déjà des mineurs réfugiés dans les rues d’#Athènes contraints à se prostituer :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/548736

  • Migranti, incendio e rivolta nel campo di Lesbo: muoiono una donna e un bambino, 15 feriti

    Scontri con la polizia nel campo dove sono ospitati 13mila migranti a fronte di una capienza di 3mila.

    Tragedia nel campo profughi di Lesbo dove la situazione era già insostenibile da mesi con oltre 13.000 persone in una struttura che ne può ospitare 3500. Una donna e un bambino sono morti nell’incendio (sembra accidentale) di un container dove abitano diverse famiglie ma le vittime potrebbero essere di più. Una quindicina i feriti che sono stati curati nella clinica pediatrica che Medici senza frontiere ha fuori dal campo e che è stata aperta eccezionalmente.

    «Nessuno può dire che questo è un incidente - è la dura accusa di Msf - E’ la diretta conseguenza di intrappolare 13.000 persone in uno spazio che ne può contenere 3.000».

    Dopo l’incendio nel campo è esplosa una vera e propria rivolta con i migranti, costretti a vivere in condizioni disumane, che hanno dato vita a duri scontri con la polizia e hanno appiccato altri incendi all’interno e all’esterno del campo di Moria, chiedendo a gran voce di essere trasferiti sulla terraferma. Ancora confuse le notizie che arrivano dall’isola greca dove negli ultimi mesi gli sbarchi di migranti provenienti dalla Turchia sono aumentati in maniera esponenziale.

    https://www.repubblica.it/cronaca/2019/09/29/news/incendio_e_rivolta_nel_campo_di_moria_a_lesbo_muoiono_una_donna_e_un_bamb
    #Moria #révolte #incendie #feu #Lesbos #Grèce #réfugiés #asile #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #hotspot #camp_de_réfugiés #îles #décès #morts

    • Μία γυναίκα νεκρή και ένα μωρό από τις αναθυμιάσεις στη Μόρια

      Φωτιά ξέσπασε το απόγευμα σε κοντέινερ στο ΚΥΤ Μόριας, με τις μέχρι τώρα πληροφορίες μια γυναίκα είναι νεκρή και ένα μωρό.

      Μετά τη φωτιά στο κοντέινερ, ξέσπασε εξέγερση. Η πυροσβεστική μπήκε να σβήσει τη φωτιά, ενώ αρχικά εμποδίστηκε από τα επεισόδια η αστυνομία αυτή τη στιγμή προσπαθεί να παρέμβει.

      Νεότερα εντός ολίγου.

      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/4319/mia-gynaika-nekrh-kai-ena-mwro-apo-tis-anathymiaseis-sth-moria-updated

    • Fire, clashes, one dead at crowded Greek migrant camp on Lesbos

      A fire broke out on Sunday at a container inside a crowded refugee camp on the eastern Greek island of Lesbos close to Turkey and one person was killed, emergency services said.

      Refugees clashed with police as thick smoke rose over the Moria camp, which currently houses about 12,000 people in overcrowded conditions and firefighters fought to extinguish the blaze.

      Police said one burned body was taken to hospital in the island’s capital Mytilini for identification by the coroner. Police sent reinforcements to the island along with the chief of police to help restore order.

      Police could not immediately reach an area of containers, where there were unconfirmed reports of another burned body.

      Greece has been dealing with a resurgence in refugee and migrant flows in recent weeks from neighboring Turkey. Nearly a million refugees fleeing war in Syria and migrants crossed from Turkey to Greece’s islands in 2015.

      More than 9,000 people arrived in August, the highest number in the three years since the European Union and Ankara implemented a deal to shut off the Aegean migrant route. More than 8,000 people have arrived so far in September.

      Turks have also attempted to cross to Greece in recent years following a failed coup attempt against Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan in 2016.

      On Friday seven Turkish nationals, two women and five children, drowned when a boat carrying them capsized near Greece’s Chios island.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-greece-lesbos-moria/fire-clashes-at-crowded-migrant-camp-on-greek-island-lesbos-idUSKBN1WE0NJ

    • Incendio nel campo rifugiati di Moria. Amnesty: “Abbietto fallimento delle politiche di protezione del governo greco e dell’Ue”

      Incendio nel campo rifugiati di Moria. Amnesty International denuncia: “Abbietto fallimento delle politiche di protezione del governo greco e dell’Ue”

      “L’incendio di Moria ha evidenziato l’abietto fallimento del governo greco e dell’Unione europea, incapaci di gestire la deplorevole situazione dei rifugiati in Grecia“.

      Così Massimo Moratti, direttore delle ricerche sull’Europa di Amnesty International, ha commentato la notizia dell’incendio di domenica 29 settembre nel campo rifugiati di Moria, sull’isola greca di Lesbo, nel quale è morta una donna.

      “Con 12.503 persone presenti in un campo che potrebbe ospitarne 3000 e dati gli incendi già scoppiati nel campo, le autorità greche non possono sostenere che questa tragedia fosse inevitabile. Solo un mese fa erano morte altre tre persone“, ha aggiunto Moratti.

      “L’accordo tra Unione europea e Turchia ha solo peggiorato le cose, negando dignità a migliaia di persone intrappolate sulle isole dell’Egeo e violando i loro diritti“, ha sottolineato Moratti.

      “Il campo di Moria è sovraffollato e insicuro. Le autorità greche devono immediatamente evacuarlo, assistere, anche fornendo le cure mediche necessarie, le persone che hanno subito le conseguenze dell’incendio e accelerare il trasferimento dei richiedenti asilo e dei rifugiati in strutture adeguate in terraferma. Gli altri stati membri dell’Unione europea devono collaborare accettando urgentemente i programmi di ricollocazione che potrebbero ridurre la pressione sulla Grecia“, ha concluso Moratti.

      Ulteriori informazioni

      Nelle ultime settimane, Amnesty International ha riscontrato un drammatico peggioramento delle condizioni dei rifugiati sulle isole dell’Egeo, nelle quali si trovano ormai oltre 30.000 persone.

      Il sovraffollamento ha raggiunto il livello peggiore dal 2016. Le isole di Lesbo e Samo ospitano un numero di persone superiore rispettivamente di quattro e otto volte i posti a disposizione.

      La situazione dei minori è, a sua volta, drasticamente peggiorata. La morte di un afgano di 15 anni nella cosiddetta “zona sicura” del campo di Moria testimonia la fondamentale mancanza di sicurezza per le migliaia di minori costretti a vivere in quel centro.

      All’inizio di settembre il governo greco ha annunciato l’inizio dei trasferimenti dei richiedenti asilo e dei rifugiati sulla terraferma. Questi trasferimenti, effettuati in cooperazione con l’Organizzazione internazionale delle migrazioni, si sono rivelati finora una serie di iniziative frammentarie.

      All’indomani dell’incendio di Moria le autorità di Atene hanno espresso l’intenzione di arrivare a 3000 trasferimenti entro la fine di ottobre: un numero insufficiente a fare fronte all’aumento degli approdi da luglio, considerando che solo la settimana scorsa sono arrivate altre 3000 persone.

      La politica di trattenimento dei nuovi arrivati sulle isole dell’Egeo resta dunque immutata, poiché le misure adottate sono clamorosamente insufficienti a risolvere i problemi dell’insicurezza e delle condizioni indegne cui i richiedenti asilo e i rifugiati sono stati condannati a convivere a partire dall’attuazione dell’accordo tra Unione europea e Turchia.

      https://www.amnesty.it/incendio-campo-rifugiati-moria-grecia

    • This was not an accident!

      They died because of Europe’s cruel deterrence and detention regime!

      Yesterday, on Sunday 29 September 2019, a fire broke out in the so-called hotspot of Moria on Lesvos Island in Greece. A woman and probably also a child lost their lives in the fire and it remains unclear how many others were injured. Many people lost all their small belongings, including identity documents, in the fire. The people imprisoned on Lesvos have fled wars and conflicts and now experience violence within Europe. Many were re-traumatised by these tragic events and some escaped and spent the night in the forest, scared to death.

      Over the past weeks, we had to witness two more deaths in the hotspot of Moria: In August a 15-year-old Afghan minor was killed during a violent fight among minors inside the so-called “safe space” of the camp. On September 24, a 5-year-old boy lost his life when he was run-over by a truck in front of the gate.

      The fire yesterday was no surprise and no accident. It is not the first, and it will not be the last. The hotspot burned already several times, most tragically in November 2016 when large parts burned down. Europe’s cruel regime of deterrence and detention has now killed again.

      In the meantime, in the media, a story was immediately invented, saying that the refugees themselves set the camp on fire. It was also stated that they blocked the fire brigade from entering. We have spoken to many people who witnessed the events directly. They tell us a very different story: In fact, the fire broke out most probably due to an electricity short circuit. The fire brigade arrived very late, which is no surprise given the overcrowdedness of this monstrous hotspot. Despite its official capacity for 3,000 people, it now detains at least 12,500 people who suffer there in horrible living conditions. On mobile phone videos taken by the prisoners of the camp, one can see how in this chaos, inhabitants and the fire brigade tried their best together to at least prevent an even bigger catastrophe.

      There simply cannot be a functioning emergency plan in a camp that has exceeded its capacity four times. When several containers burned in a huge fire that generated a lot of smoke, the imprisoned who were locked in the closed sector of the camp started in panic to try to break the doors. The only response the authorities had, was to immediately bring police to shoot tear-gas at them, which created an even more toxic smoke.

      Anger and grief about all these senseless deaths and injuries added to the already explosive atmosphere in Moria where thousands have suffered while waiting too long for any change in their lives. Those who criminalise and condemn this outcry in form of a riot of the people of Moria cannot even imagine the sheer inhumanity they experience daily. The real violence is the camp itself, conditions that are the result of the EU border regime’s desire for deterrence.

      We raise our voices in solidarity with the people of Moria and demand once again: The only possibility to end this suffering and dying is to open the islands and to have freedom of movement for everybody. Those who arrive on the islands have to continue their journeys to hopefully find a place of safety and dignity elsewhere. We demand ferries to transfer the exhausted and re-traumatised people immediately to the Greek mainland. We need ferries not Frontex. We need open borders, so that everyone can continue to move on, even beyond Greece. Those who escape the islands should not be imprisoned once more in camps in mainland Greece, with conditions that are the same as the ones here on the islands.

      Close down Moria!

      Open the islands!

      Freedom of Movement for everyone!

      http://lesvos.w2eu.net/2019/09/30/this-was-not-an-accident

    • Grèce : quand s’embrase le plus grand camp de réfugiés d’Europe

      Sur l’île de Lesbos, le camp de Moria accueille 13 000 personnes dans des installations prévues pour 3000. Un incendie y a fait au moins deux morts et a déclenché un début d’"émeutes dimanche. En Autriche, les Verts créent la sensation aux législatives alors que l’extrême-droite perd 10 points.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/revue-de-presse-internationale/la-revue-de-presse-internationale-emission-du-lundi-30-septembre-2019

    • Riots at Greek refugee camp on Lesbos after fatal fire

      Government says it will step up transfers to the mainland after unrest at overcrowded camp.
      Greek authorities are scrambling to deal with unrest at a heavily overcrowded migrant camp on Lesbos after a fire there left at least one person dead.

      Officials said they had found the charred remains of an Afghan woman after the blaze erupted inside a container used to house refugees at the Moria reception centre on Sunday. The fire was eventually extinguished by plane.

      More than 13,000 people are now crammed into tents and shipping containers with facilities for just 3,000 at Moria, a disused military barracks outside Mytilene, the island’s capital, where tensions are rising.

      “A charred body was found, causing foreign [migrants] to rebel,” said Lefteris Economou, Greece’s deputy minister for citizen protection. “Stones and other objects were hurled, damaging three fire engines and slightly injuring four policemen and a fireman.”

      The health ministry said 19 people including four children were injured, most of them in the clashes. There were separate claims that a child died with the Afghan woman.

      Greece’s centre-right government said it would immediately step up transfers to the mainland. The camp is four times over capacity. “By the end of Monday 250 people will have been moved,” Economou said.

      Like other Aegean isles near the Turkish coast, Lesbos has witnessed a sharp rise in arrivals of asylum seekers desperate to reach Europe in recent months.

      “The situation was totally out of control,” said the local police chief, Vasillis Rodopoulos, describing the melee sparked by the fire. “Their behaviour was very aggressive, they wouldn’t let the fire engines pass to put out the blaze, and for the first time they were shouting: kill police.”

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ed39991b42492c24aba4f85e701b66e48521375c/0_178_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=356be51355ebcb04a111f2

      But NGO workers on Lesbos said the chaos reflected growing frustration among the camp’s occupants. There have been several fires at the facility since the EU struck a deal with Turkey in 2016 to stem the flow of migrants. A woman and child died in a similar blaze three years ago.

      “No one can call the fire and these deaths an accident,” said Marco Sandrone, a field officer with Médecins Sans Frontières. “This tragedy is the direct result of a brutal policy that is trapping 13,000 people in a camp made for 3,000.

      “European and Greek authorities who continue to contain these people in these conditions have a responsibility in the repetition of these dramatic episodes. It is high time to stop the EU-Turkey deal and this inhumane policy of containment. People must be urgently evacuated out of the hell that Moria has become.”

      Greece currently hosts around 85,000 refugees, mostly from Syria although recent arrivals have also been from Afghanistan and Africa. Close to 35,000 have arrived this year, outstripping the numbers in Italy and Spain.

      It is a critical issue for the prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, who won office two months ago promising to crack down on migration.
      Aid workers warn of catastrophe in Greek refugee camps
      Read more

      Mitsotakis raised the matter with Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, on the sidelines of the UN general assembly in New York last week, and Greece’s migration minister and the head of the coastguard will fly to Turkey for talks this week.

      Ministers admit the island camps can no longer deal with the rise in numbers.

      Government spokesman Stelios Petsas announced that a cabinet meeting called to debate emergency measures had on Monday decided to radically increase the number of deportations of asylum seekers whose requests are rejected.

      “There will be an increase in returns [to Turkey],” he said. “From 1,806 returned in 4.5 years under the previous Syriza government, 10,000 will be returned by the end of 2020.”

      Closed detention centres would also be established for those who had illegally entered the EU member state and did not qualify for asylum, he added.

      However, Spyros Galinos, until recently the mayor of Lesbos, who held the post when close to a million Syrian refugees landed on the island, told the Guardian: “This is a bomb that will explode. Decongestion efforts aren’t enough. You move more to the mainland and others come. It’s a cycle that will continue repeating itself with devastating effect until the big explosion comes.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/30/riots-at-greek-refugee-camp-on-lesbos-after-fatal-fire

    • Grèce : incendie meurtrier à Moria suivi d’émeutes

      Au moins une personne a péri dans un incendie survenu dimanche dans le camp surpeuplé de Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. Ce drame a été suivi d’émeutes provoquées par la colère des habitants du camp, excédés par leurs conditions de vie indignes.

      Un incendie survenu, dimanche 29 septembre, au sein du camp de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce a fait au moins un mort parmi les habitants. "Nous n’avons qu’une personne morte confirmée pour l’instant", a déclaré le ministre adjoint à la protection civile Lefteris Oikonomou, lundi. La veille, plusieurs sources ont indiqué que la victime était décédée avec son enfant portant le nombre de décès à au moins deux.

      Selon les médias grecs, une couverture brûlée retrouvée à côté de la femme morte, contiendrait des résidus de peau qui pourraient appartenir à l’enfant de la défunte, un nouveau-né. Des examens médico-légaux sont en cours.

      Selon l’Agence de presse grecque ANA, citant des sources policières, la femme a été transportée à l’hôpital de Lesbos, tandis que l’enfant a été remis aux autorités par les migrants qui l’avait recouvert d’une couverture. Un correspondant de l’AFP a confirmé avoir vu deux corps, l’un transporté au bureau de l’ONG Médecins sans frontières (MSF), l’autre devant lequel “sanglotaient des proches”.

      Il a fallu, d’après un témoin cité par l’AFP, plus de 30 minutes pour éteindre l’incendie et les pompier ont tardé à arriver. C’est un avion bombardier d’eau qui a permis de stopper le brasier qui aurait démarré dans un petit commerce ambulant avant de s’étendre aux conteneurs d’habitation voisins.

      Dans un communiqué, la police fait état de deux incendies, le premier à l’extérieur du camp, puis un autre à l’intérieur, à 20 minutes d’intervalle. Les émeutes ont débuté juste après que le second feu s’est déclaré.
      "Six ou sept conteneurs [hébergeant des migrants] étaient en flammes. On a appelé les pompiers qui sont arrivés après 20 minutes. On s’est mis en colère", a déclaré Fedouz, 15 ans, interrogé par l’AFP. Le jeune Afghan affirme avoir trouvé deux enfants “complètement carbonisés et une femme morte” en voulant essayer, avec ses proches, d’aider les personnes qui se trouvaient dans les conteneurs.

      Afin de reprendre le contrôle sur la foule en colère à cause de la lenteur des secours, la police a tiré des gaz lacrymogènes. Peu après 23h locales (20h GMT), le camp avait retrouvé son calme, selon des sources policières.

      Plus de 20 blessés dans les émeutes soignés par MSF

      “Nous sommes outrés”, a réagi Marco Sandrone, le coordinateur de Médecins sans frontières (MSF) en Grèce. “L’équipe médicale de notre clinique située juste à l’extérieur du camp a porté secours à au moins 15 personnes blessées à la suite des émeutes entre les migrants et la police, juste après l’incendie.” L’ONG a ensuite revu le nombre de patients à la hausse indiquant que 21 personnes avaient été prises en charge dans leur clinique.

      Pour Marco Sandrone cet incendie et ces émeutes n’ont rien d’un banal incident. “Cette tragédie est le résultat d’une politique brutale qui piègent 13 000 migrants dans un camp qui ne peut en accueillir que 3 000. Les autorités européennes et grecques qui maintiennent ces personnes dans ces conditions de vie ont une part de responsabilité dans ce genre d’épisode”, a-t-il déclaré.

      Moria est le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe. La Grèce compte actuellement 70 000 migrants, principalement des réfugiés syriens, qui ont fui leur pays depuis 2015 et risqué la traversée depuis les côtes turques voisines.

      Le gouvernement grec doit se pencher, à compter de lundi, sur une modernisation de la procédure d’asile afin d’essayer de désengorger ses camps de migrants. En vertu d’un accord conclu au printemps 2016 entre la Turquie et l’Union européenne, la Turquie avait mis un frein aux flux des départs de migrants vers les cinq îles grecques les plus proches de son rivage, en échange d’une aide de six milliards de dollars. Mais le nombre des arrivées en grèce est reparti à la hausse ces derniers mois.

      Quelque 3 000 migrants arrivés dans les îles grecques cette semaine

      Ainsi, en seulement 24 heures, entre samedi matin et dimanche matin, près de 400 migrants au total sont arrivés en Grèce, selon les autorités. En outre, le Premier ministre grec Kyriakos Mitsotakis a déclaré plus tôt cette semaine qu’environ 3 000 personnes étaient arrivées depuis la Turquie ces dernier jours, ce qui ajoute à la pression sur des installations d’accueil déjà surpeuplées.

      Début septembre, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan, dont le pays accueille près de quatre millions de réfugiés, a menacé "d’ouvrir les portes" aux migrants vers l’Union européenne s’il n’obtient pas davantage d’aide internationale.

      “Il est grand temps d’arrêter cet accord entre la Grèce et la Turquie ainsi que cette politique de rétention des migrants dans les camps. Il faut évacuer d’urgence les personnes de cet enfer qu’est devenu Moria”, a commenté Marco Sandrone de MSF.

      Le gouvernement grec, pour sa part, a réitéré la nécessité de continuer à transférer vers le continent les migrants hébergés dans les centres d’enregistrement et d’identification sur les îles du nord de la mer Égée.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19850/grece-incendie-meurtrier-a-moria-suivi-d-emeutes

    • “Il y a au moins 500 manifestants en ce moment dans le camp de Moria, la police anti-émeute est sur place”

      InfoMigrants a recueilli le témoignage d’un habitant du camp de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce au lendemain d’un incendie meurtrier et d’émeutes survenus dimanche 30 septembre. Les manifestations ont repris mardi et la situation semble se tendre d’heure en heure.

      Je m’appelle Lionel*, je viens d’Afrique de l’Ouest* et je vis dans le camp de Moria depuis le mois de mai. Depuis un mois, des vagues de nouvelles personnes se succèdent, la situation se dégrade de jour en jour. Ce sont surtout des gens qui arrivent depuis la Turquie. Il paraît que le gouvernement turc laisse de nouveau passer des gens à la frontière malgré l’accord [qui a été signé avec l’Union européenne au printemps 2016].

      Il y a eu un grave incendie suivi d’émeutes dimanche. J’habite juste en face de là où le feu a démarré. Les autorités disent qu’il y a eu un mort mais nous on en a vu plus.

      Hier soir [lundi], des personnes ont organisé une veillée musulmane sur les lieux de l’incendie en hommage aux victimes. Il y avait des bougies, c’était plutôt calme.

      Depuis ce matin, les Afghans, Irakiens et Syriens se sont mis à manifester en face de l’entrée principale du camp. Ils protestent contre les conditions de vie qui sont horribles ici. Ils veulent également transporter, eux-mêmes, le corps d’une autre victime de l’incendie jusqu’à Mytilène pour montrer à la population et aux dirigeants ce qu’il se passe ici.

      Il doit y avoir au moins 500 personnes rassemblées. La police anti-émeute est sur place et empêche les manifestants de sortir du camp pour porter le corps jusqu’à Mytilène. Un autre bus de policiers est arrivé ce matin mais en revanche, personne ne se soucie de comment on va.

      Moi j’ai trop peur que ça dégénère encore plus alors j’ai quitté le camp. Je fais les cent pas à l’écart pour rester en dehors des problèmes et pour me protéger. On ne sait pas ce qui va arriver, j’ai peur et cette situation est très frustrante.

      « Le matin, on part se cacher dans les oliviers pour rester à l’écart de la foule »

      Tous les matins, on doit se lever à 5h pour aller faire la queue et espérer avoir quelque chose à boire ou à manger. Après le petit-déjeuner, on part se cacher et s’abriter dans les oliviers pour rester à l’écart de la foule. Il y a tellement de gens que l’air est devenu irrespirable dans le camp.

      Je retourne dans ma tente en fin d’après-midi et j’essaie de dormir pour pouvoir me lever le plus tôt possible le matin, sinon je n’aurai pas à manger.

      On ne nous dit rien, la situation est désastreuse, je dirais même que je n’ai pas connu pire depuis mon arrivée à Moria il y a près de cinq mois. J’ai fait une demande d’asile mais je me sens totalement piégé ici et je ne vois pas comment je vais m’en sortir à moins d’un miracle.

      Au final, la situation est presque semblable à celle de mon pays d’origine. La seule différence, c’est qu’il n’y a pas les coups de feu. Ils sont remplacés par les tirs de gaz lacrymogènes de la police grecque. Cela me déclenche des flashback, c’est traumatisant.

      * Le prénom et le pays d’origine ont été changés à la demande du témoin, par souci de sécurité.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19879/il-y-a-au-moins-500-manifestants-en-ce-moment-dans-le-camp-de-moria-la

    • Greece must act to end dangerous overcrowding in island reception centres, EU support crucial

      This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Liz Throssell – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

      UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is today calling on Greece to urgently move thousands of asylum-seekers out of dangerously overcrowded reception centres on the Greek Aegean islands. Sea arrivals in September, mostly of Afghan and Syrian families, increased to 10,258 - the highest monthly level since 2016 – worsening conditions on the islands which now host 30,000 asylum-seekers.

      The situation on Lesvos, Samos and Kos is critical. The Moria centre on Lesvos is already at five times its capacity with 12,600 people. At a nearby informal settlement, 100 people share a single toilet. Tensions remain high at Moria where a fire on Sunday in a container used to house people killed one woman. An ensuing riot by frustrated asylum-seekers led to clashes with police.

      On Samos, the Vathy reception centre houses 5,500 people – eight times its capacity. Most sleep in tents with little access to latrines, clean water, or medical care. Conditions have also deteriorated sharply on Kos, where 3,000 people are staying in a space for 700.

      Keeping people on the islands in these inadequate and insecure conditions is inhumane and must come to an end.

      The Greek Government has said that alleviating pressure on the islands and protecting unaccompanied children are priorities, which we welcome. We also take note of government measures to speed up and tighten asylum procedures and manage flows to Greece announced at an exceptional cabinet meeting on Monday. We look forward to receiving details in writing to which we can provide comments.

      But urgent steps are needed and we urge the Greek authorities to fast-track plans to transfer over 5,000 asylum-seekers already authorized to continue their asylum procedure on the mainland. In parallel, new accommodation places must be provided to prevent pressure from the islands spilling over into mainland Greece, where most sites are operating at capacity. UNHCR will continue to support transfers to the mainland in October at the request of the government.

      Longer-term solutions are also needed, including supporting refugees to become self-reliant and integrate in Greece.

      The plight of unaccompanied children, who overall number more than 4,400, is particularly worrying, with only one in four in a shelter appropriate for their age.

      Some 500 children are housed with unrelated adults in a large warehouse tent in Moria. On Samos, more than a dozen unaccompanied girls take turns to sleep in a small container, while other children are forced to sleep on container roofs. Given the extremely risky and potentially abusive conditions faced by unaccompanied children, UNHCR appeals to European States to open up places for their relocation as a matter of priority and speed up transfers for children eligible to join family members.

      UNHCR continues to work with the Greek authorities to build the capacity needed to meet the challenges. We manage over 25,000 apartment places for some of the most vulnerable asylum-seekers and refugees, under the EU-funded ESTIA scheme. Some 75,000 people receive monthly cash assistance under the same programme. UNHCR is prepared, with the continuous support of the EU and other donors, to expand its support through a cash for shelter scheme which would allow authorized asylum-seekers to move from the islands and establish themselves on the mainland.

      Greece has received the majority of arrivals across the Mediterranean region this year, some 45,600 of 77,400 – more than Spain, Italy, Malta, and Cyprus combined.

      https://www.unhcr.org/news/briefing/2019/10/5d930c194/greece-must-act-end-dangerous-overcrowding-island-reception-centres-eu.html

    • Migration : Lesbos, un #échec européen

      Plus de 45 000 personnes ont débarqué en Grèce, en 2019. Au centre de la crise migratoire européenne depuis 2015, l’île de Lesbos est au bord de la rupture.
      Le terrain, un ancien centre militaire, est accidenté de toutes parts. Entre ses terrassements qu’ont recouverts des rangées de tentes et de conteneurs, des dénivelés abrupts. Sur les quelques pentes goudronnées, des grappes d’enfants dévalent en glissant sur des bouteilles de plastique aplaties. Leurs visages sont salis par la poussière que soulèvent des bourrasques de vent dans les oliveraies alentours. Ils courent partout, se faufilent à travers des grilles métalliques éventrées ici et là, et disparaissent en un mouvement. On les croirait seuls.

      Vue du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, le 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Ici, l’un s’est accroupi pour uriner, à la vue de tous. Un autre joue à plonger ses mains dans la boue formée au sol par un mélange d’eau sale et de terre. D’autres se jettent des cailloux. Alors que le jour est tombé, une gamine erre au hasard des allées étroites, dessinées par l’implantation anarchique de cabanes de fortune. Les flammes des fours à pain, faits de pierres et de terre séchée, éclairent par endroits la nuit qui a enveloppé Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos.

      Article réservé à nos abonnés Lire aussi
      Migrants : A Bruxelles, un débat miné par l’égoïsme des Etats
      Un moment, à jauger le plus grand camp d’Europe, à détailler ses barbelés, sa crasse et le dénuement de ses 13 000 habitants – dont 40 % d’enfants –, on se croirait projetés quatre-vingts ans en arrière, dans les camps d’internement des réfugiés espagnols lors de la Retirada [l’exode de milliers de républicains espagnols durant la guerre civile, de 1936 à 1939]. Ici, les gens balayent les pierres devant leur tente pour sauvegarder ce qui leur reste d’hygiène, d’intimité. Depuis cet été, ils arrivent par centaines tous les jours, après avoir traversé en rafiot lesquelques kilomètres de mer Egée qui séparent Lesbos de la Turquie. Ce sont des familles afghanes, en majorité, qui demandent l’asile en Europe. Mais viennent aussi des Syriens, des Congolais, des Irakiens, des Palestiniens…

      « Ceci n’est pas une crise »

      Au fur et à mesure que les heures passent, les nouveaux venus apprennent qu’ils devront se contenter d’une toile de tente et d’un sol dur pour abri, qu’il n’y a pas assez de couvertures pour tous, qu’il faut faire la queue deux heures pour obtenir une ration alimentaire et que plusieurs centaines d’entre elles viennent à manquer tous les jours… Très vite, à parler avec les anciens, ils réalisent que beaucoup endurent cette situation depuis plus d’un an, en attendant de voir leur demande d’asile enfin examinée et d’être peut-être autorisés à rejoindre le continent grec.

      Lire aussi
      En Grèce, dans l’enfer du camp de réfugiés de Moria, en BD
      Plus de 45 000 personnes ont afflué en Grèce, en 2019, dont plus de la moitié entre juillet et septembre. « Ceci n’est pas une crise », répète Frontex, l’agence européenne de gardes frontières et de gardes-côtes, présente dans cette porte d’entrée en Europe. Les chiffres ne sont en effet guère comparables avec 2015, quand plus de 860 000 personnes sont arrivées sur les rivages grecs, provoquant une crise majeure dans toute l’Europe.

      C’est fin 2015 que le « hot spot » de Moria, nom donné à ces centres d’accueil contrôlés pour demandeurs d’asile, a été créé. D’autres centres de transit sont apparus sur les îles grecques de Chios, Samos, Leros, Kos ainsi qu’en Italie. Face à la « crise », l’Europe cherchait à s’armer. Dans les « hot spots », les personnes migrantes sont identifiées, enregistrées, et leur situation examinée. Aux réfugiés, l’asile. Aux autres, le retour vers des territoires hors de l’Union européenne (UE).

      L’accord UE-Turquie

      Pour soulager les pays d’entrée, un programme temporaire de relocalisations a été mis en place pour permettre de transférer une partie des réfugiés vers d’autres Etats membres. Une façon de mettre en musique une solidarité européenne de circonstance, sans toucher au sacro-saint règlement de Dublin qui fait de l’Etat d’entrée en Europe le seul responsable de l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un réfugié.

      Dans la foulée, en mars 2016, l’accord UE-Turquie prévoyait qu’Ankara renforce le contrôle de ses frontières et accepte le renvoi rapide de demandeurs d’asile arrivés sur les îles grecques, en contrepartie, notamment, d’un versement de 6 milliards d’euros et d’une relance du processus d’adhésion à l’UE.

      Quatre années se sont écoulées depuis le pic de la crise migratoire et ses cortèges de migrants traversant l’Europe à pied, le long de la route des Balkans, jusqu’à l’eldorado allemand. Si les flux d’arrivées en Europe ont considérablement chuté, Lesbos incarne plus que jamais l’échec du continent face aux phénomènes migratoires.

      Le mécanisme de relocalisation, une lointaine chimère

      Sur les 100 000 relocalisations programmées depuis l’Italie et la Grèce, à peine 34 000 ont eu lieu. « Les Etats n’ont pas joué le jeu », analyse Yves Pascouau, fondateur du site European Migration Law. Plusieurs pays (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie, Autriche, Bulgarie) n’ont pas du tout participé à l’effort. Seuls Malte, le Luxembourg et la Finlande ont atteint leur quota. « Il y a aussi eu des difficultés techniques et organisationnelles liées à un processus nouveau », reconnaît M. Pascouau.

      L’ONG Lighthouse Relief accueille un groupe de réfugiés qui vient d’être intercepté en mer par Frontex puis transféré à terre par l’ONG Refugee Rescue, entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, sur l’île de Lesbos, le 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      Le 19 septembre au petit matin, 37 personnes, des familles et des mineurs tous originaires d’Afghanistan viennent de débarquer entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, sur l’île de Lesbos. Ils sont pris en charge et dirigés vers le camp de transit Stage 2 géré par l’UNHCR et administré par les autorités grecques. À l’horizon, la côte turque. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Le mécanisme de relocalisation n’est plus aujourd’hui qu’une lointaine chimère, comme l’ont été les « hot spots » italiens, Rome choisissant de laisser ses centres ouverts et ses occupants se disperser en Europe. « On a été dans une double impasse côté italien, analyse l’ancien directeur de l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofpra), Pascal Brice. Les Italiens se sont satisfaits d’une situation où les migrants ne faisaient que passer, car ils ne voulaient pas s’installer dans le pays. Et les autres Etats, en particulier les Français et les Allemands, se sont accrochés à Dublin. C’est ce qui a provoqué cette dérive italienne jusqu’à Salvini et la fermeture des ports. »

      Le système est à l’agonie, les personnes qui arrivent aujourd’hui se voient donner des rendez-vous pour leur entretien d’asile… en 2021
      Seule la Grèce a continué de jouer le jeu des « hot spots » insulaires. Résultat : plus de 30 000 personnes s’entassent désormais dans des dispositifs prévus pour 5 400 personnes. « Nous n’avons pas vu autant de monde depuis la fermeture de la frontière nord de la Grèce et l’accord UE-Turquie, souligne Philippe Leclerc, représentant du Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés des Nations unies (HCR) en Grèce. Plus de 7 500 personnes devraient être transférées des îles vers le continent et ne le sont pas, faute de capacités d’accueil. On arrive à saturation. » Le système est à l’agonie, les personnes qui arrivent aujourd’hui se voient donner des rendez-vous pour leur entretien d’asile… en 2021.

      A Lesbos, 13 000 personnes s’agglutinent à l’intérieur et autour du camp de Moria, pour une capacité d’accueil officielle de 3 100 personnes. Les deux tiers de cette population sont sous tente. Et leur nombre enfle chaque jour. Cette promiscuité est mortifère. Dimanche 29 septembre, un incendie a ravagé plusieurs conteneurs hébergeant des demandeurs d’asile et tué au moins une femme. « Tous les dirigeants européens sont responsables de la situation inhumaine dans les îles grecques et ont la responsabilité d’empêcher toute nouvelle mort et souffrance », a réagi le jour même Médecins sans frontières (MSF). La même semaine, un enfant de 5 ans qui jouait dans un carton sur le bord d’une route a été accidentellement écrasé par un camion. Fin août, déjà, un adolescent afghan de 15 ans avait succombé à un coup de couteau dans une bagarre.

      Un bateau vient de débarquer entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, avec à son bord 37 personnes originaires d’Afghanistan. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      « Personne ne fait rien pour nous », lâche Mahdi Mohammadi, un Afghan de 27 ans arrivé il y a neuf mois. Il doit passer son entretien de demande d’asile en juin 2020. En attendant, il dort dans une étroite cabane, recouverte de bâches blanches estampillées Union européenne, avec trois autres compatriotes. A côté, une femme de plus de 60 ans dort sous une toile de tente avec son fils et sa nièce adolescente.

      « Nous n’avons aucun contrôle sur la situation »

      « Des années ont passé depuis la crise et on est incapables de gérer, se désespère une humanitaire de Lesbos. Les autorités sont dépassées. C’est de plus en plus tendu. » Un fonctionnaire européen est plus alarmiste encore : « Nous n’avons aucun contrôle sur la situation », confie-t-il.

      En Grèce, le sort des mineurs non accompagnés est particulièrement préoccupant. Ils sont 4 400 dans le pays (sur près de 90 000 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile), dont près d’un millier rien qu’à Lesbos. La moitié dort en présence d’adultes dans une sorte de grand barnum. Sur l’île de Samos, des enfants sont obligés de dormir sur le toit des conteneurs.

      Le 19 septembre, dans la partie extérieure du camp de Moria appelée « Jungle », une famille Syrienne de 7 personnes originaire de la ville de Deir Ez Zor, en Syrie. Ils sont arrivés à Moria il y a deux jours. La jeune femme dans la tente attend un enfant. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      Dans la clinique pédiatrique de MSF, qui jouxte le camp de Moria, le personnel soignant mesure les effets d’un tel abandon. « Sur les deux derniers mois, un quart de nos patients enfants nous ont été envoyés pour des comportements d’automutilation, déclare Katrin Brubakk, pédopsychologue. Ça va d’adolescents qui se scarifient à des enfants de deux ans qui se tapent la tête contre les murs jusqu’à saigner, qui se mordent ou qui s’arrachent les cheveux. » « A long terme, cela va affecter leur vie sociale, leurs apprentissages et, in fine, leur santé mentale », prévient-elle. Présidente de l’ONG grecque d’aide aux mineursMETAdrasi, Lora Pappa s’emporte : « Ça fait des années qu’on dit que plus d’un tiers des mineurs non accompagnés ont un membre de leur famille en Allemagne ou ailleurs. Mais chaque enfant, c’est trente pages de procédure et, si tout se passe bien, ça prend dix mois pour obtenir une réunification familiale. Le service d’asile grec est saturé, et les Etats membres imposent des conditions de plus en plus insensées. »

      Dans le petit port de plaisance de Panayouda, à quelques kilomètres de Moria, des adolescents jouent à appâter des petits poissons argentés avec des boules de mie de pain. Samir, un Afghan de 21 ans, les regarde en riant. A Moria, il connaît des jeunes qui désespèrent de rejoindre leur famille en Suède. « Leur demande a déjà été rejetée trois fois », assure-t-il. Samir a passé deux ans sur l’île, avant d’être autorisé à gagner le continent. Il est finalement revenu à Lesbos il y a une semaine pour retrouver son frère de 14 ans. « Ça faisait cinq ans qu’on s’était perdus de vue, explique-t-il. Notre famille a été séparée en Turquie et, depuis, je les cherche. Je ne quitterai pas Athènes tant que je n’aurai pas retrouvé mes parents. »

      « Les “hot spots” sont la preuve de l’absurdité et de l’échec de Dublin »

      « Il faudrait repenser à des mécanismes de répartition, affirme Philippe Leclerc, du HCR. C’est l’une des urgences de solidarité, mais il n’y a pas de discussion formelle à ce sujet au niveau de l’UE. » « La relocalisation, ça n’a jamais marché parce que ça repose sur le volontariat des Etats, tranche Claire Rodier, directrice du Gisti (Groupe d’information et de soutien des immigrés). Les “hot spots” sont la preuve de l’absurdité et de l’échec de Dublin, qui fait peser tout le poids des arrivées sur les pays des berges de l’Europe. » Yves Pascouau appuie : « Les Etats ont eu le tort de penser qu’on pouvait jouir d’un espace de libre circulation sans avoir une politique d’asile et d’immigration commune. Ce qui se passe à Lesbos doit nous interroger sur toutes les idées qu’on peut avoir de créer des zones de débarquement et de traitement des demandes d’asile. » Marco Sandrone, coordinateur de MSF à Lesbos, va plus loin : « Il est grand temps d’arrêter cet accord UE-Turquie et sa politique inhumaine de confinement et d’évacuer de toute urgence des personnes en dehors de cet enfer qu’est devenu Moria. »

      Des policiers portugais de Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes surveillent la mer au large de la côte Nord de l’île, dans la nuit du 18 au 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      A Skala Sikamineas, les équipes de FRONTEX procèdent à la destruction sommaire d’un bateau clandestin. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Dans les faits, l’accord UE-Turquie est soumis à « forte pression », a reconnu récemment le nouveau premier ministre grec, Kyriakos Mitsotakis. Jusqu’ici, en vertu de cet accord, Athènes a renvoyé moins de 2 000 migrants vers la Turquie, en majorité des ressortissants pakistanais (38 %), syriens (18 %), algériens (11 %), afghans (6 %) et d’autres. Mais le nouveau gouvernement conservateur, arrivé au pouvoir en juillet, envisage d’augmenter les renvois. Lundi 30 septembre, il a annoncé un objectif de 10 000 migrants d’ici à la fin 2020, en plus de mesures visant à accélérer la procédure d’asile, à augmenter les transferts vers le continent ou encore à construire des centres fermés pour les migrants ne relevant pas de l’asile.

      Dans le même temps, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan n’a eu de cesse, ces derniers mois, de menacer d’« ouvrir les portes » de son pays aux migrants afin de les laisser rejoindre l’Europe. « Si nous ne recevons pas le soutien nécessaire pour partager le fardeau des réfugiés, avec l’UE et le reste du monde, nous allons ouvrir nos frontières », a-t-il averti.

      « Entre Erdogan qui montre les dents et le nouveau gouvernement grec qui est beaucoup plus dur, ça ne m’étonnerait pas que l’accord se casse la figure », redoute le fonctionnaire européen. Le thème migratoire est devenu tellement brûlant qu’il a servi de prétexte à la première rencontre, en marge de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies à New York, entre le président turc et le premier ministre grec, le 26 septembre. A l’issue, M. Mitsotakis a dit souhaiter la signature d’« un nouvel accord », assorti d’un soutien financier supplémentaire de l’UE à la Turquie.

      La Turquie héberge officiellement 3,6 millions de réfugiés syriens, soit quatre fois plus que l’ensemble des Etats de l’UE. L’absence de perspectives pour un règlement politique en Syrie, le caractère improbable de la reconstruction, l’hostilité manifestée par Damas envers les éventuels candidats au retour, menacés d’expropriation selon le décret-loi 63 du gouvernement de Bachar Al-Assad, ont réduit à néant l’espoir de voir les réfugiés syriens rentrer chez eux. Le pays ne pourra assumer seul un nouvel afflux de déplacés en provenance d’Idlib, le dernier bastion de la rébellion syrienne actuellement sous le feu d’une offensive militaire menée par le régime et son allié russe.

      Un « ferrailleur de la mer » sur la côte entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, le 19 septembre. Après l’évacuation d’une embarcation de 37 réfugiés d’origine Afghane, un homme vient récupérer des morceaux du bateau. A l’horizon la côte turque, toute proche. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Le président turc presse les Etats-Unis de lui accorder une « zone de sécurité » au nord-est de la Syrie, où il envisage d’installer jusqu’à 3 millions de Syriens. « Nous voulons créer un corridor de paix pour y loger 2 millions de Syriens. (…) Si nous pouvions étendre cette zone jusqu’à Deir ez-Zor et Raqqa, nous installerions jusqu’à 3 millions d’entre eux, dont certains venus d’Europe », a-t-il déclaré depuis la tribune des Nations unies à New-York.

      Climat de peur

      La population turque s’est jusqu’ici montrée accueillante envers les « invités » syriens, ainsi qu’on désigne les réfugiés en Turquie, dont le statut se limite à une « protection temporaire ». Mais récemment, les réflexes de rejet se sont accrus. Touchée de plein fouet par l’inflation, la perte de leur pouvoir d’achat, la montée du chômage, la population s’est mise à désapprouver la politique d’accueil imposée à partir de 2012 par M. Erdogan. D’après une enquête publiée en juillet par le centre d’étude de l’opinion PIAR, 82,3 % des répondants se disent favorables au renvoi « de tous les réfugiés syriens ».

      A la mi-juillet, la préfecture d’Istanbul a lancé une campagne d’arrestations et d’expulsions à l’encontre de dizaines de milliers de réfugiés, syriens et aussi afghans. Le climat de peur suscité par ces coups de filet n’est peut être pas étranger à l’augmentation des arrivées de réfugiés en Grèce ces derniers mois.

      « La plupart des gens à qui on porte secours ces derniers temps disent qu’ils ont passé un mois seulement en Turquie, alors qu’avant ils avaient pu y vivre un an, observe Roman Kutzowitz, de l’ONG Refugee Rescue, qui dispose de la seule embarcation humanitaire en Méditerranée orientale, à quai dans le petit port de Skala Sikamineas, distant d’une dizaine de kilomètres de la rive turque. Ils savent que le pays n’est plus un lieu d’accueil. »

      La décharge de l’île de Lesbos, située à côté de la ville de Molivos. Ici s’amassent des gilets de sauvetages, des bouées et des restes d’embarcations qui ont servi aux réfugiés pour effectuer la traversée depuis la Turquie. Samuel Gratacap pour "Le Monde"
      Au large de Lesbos, dans le mouchoir de poche qui sépare la Grèce et la Turquie, les gardes-côtes des deux pays et les équipes de Frontex tentent d’intercepter les migrants. Cette nuit-là, un bateau de la police maritime portugaise – mobilisé par Frontex – patrouille le long de la ligne de démarcation des eaux. « Les Turcs sont présents aussi, c’est sûr, mais on ne les voit pas forcément », explique Joao Pacheco Antunes, à la tête de l’équipe portugaise.

      Dix jours « sans nourriture, par terre »

      Sur les hauteurs de l’île, des collègues balayent la mer à l’aide d’une caméra thermique de longue portée, à la recherche d’un point noir suspect qui pourrait indiquer une embarcation. « S’ils voient un bateau dans les eaux turques, le centre maritime de coordination des secours grec est prévenu et appelle Ankara », nous explique Joao Pacheco Antunes. Plusieurs canots seront interceptés avant d’avoir atteint les eaux grecques.

      Sur une plage de galets, à l’aube, un groupe de trente-sept personnes a accosté. Il y a treize enfants parmi eux, qui toussent, grelottent. Un Afghan de 28 ans, originaire de la province de Ghazi, explique avoir passé dix jours « sans nourriture, par terre », caché dans les champs d’oliviers turcs avant de pouvoir traverser. « J’ai perdu dix kilos », nous assure-t-il, en désignant ses jambes et son buste amaigris. Un peu plus tard, une autre embarcation est convoyée jusqu’au port de Skala Sikamineas par des gardes-côtes italiens, en mission pour Frontex. « Il y a trois femmes enceintes parmi nous », prévient un Afghan de 27 ans, qui a fui Daech [acronyme arabe de l’organisation Etat islamique] et les talibans. Arrive presque aussitôt un troisième canot, intercepté par les gardes-côtes portugais de Frontex. Tous iront rejoindre le camp de Moria.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/10/04/migration-lesbos-un-echec-europeen_6014219_3210.html

    • Grèce : une politique anti-réfugiés « aux relents d’extrême-droite »

      Suite à l’incendie mortel qui s’est déclenché dimanche dans le camp de Moria à Lesbos, le gouvernement grec a convoqué en urgence un conseil des ministres et annoncé des mesures pour faire face à la crise. Parmi elles, distinguer les réfugiés des migrants économiques. Revue de presse.
      Suite à l’incendie qui s’est déclenché dimanche dans le camp

      surpeuplé de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, et qui a fait une morte – une

      réfugiée afghane mère d’un nourrisson – le gouvernement s’est réuni en

      urgence lundi et a présenté un plan d’actions. Athènes veut notamment

      renvoyer 10 000 réfugiés et migrants d’ici à 2020 dans leur pays

      d’origine ou en Turquie, renforcer les patrouilles en mer, créer des

      camps fermés pour les immigrés illégaux et continuer à transférer les

      réfugiés des îles vers le continent grec pour désengorger les camps sur

      les îles de la mer Egée. D’après Efimerida Ton Syntakton, le

      Parlement doit voter dans les jours à venir un texte réformant les

      procédures de demande d’asile, en les rendant plus rapides.

      « L’immigration constitue une bombe pour le pays », estime le site

      iefimerida.gr. « Le gouvernement sait que c’est Erdoğan qui détient la

      solution au problème. Si le sultan n’impose pas plus de contrôles et ne

      veut pas diminuer les flux, alors les mesures prises n’auront pas plus

      d’effet qu’une aspirine. » Le quotidien de centre droit Kathimerini

      rappelle que la Grèce est « première en arrivées de migrants » en

      Europe. « La Grèce a accueilli cette année 45 600 migrants sur les

      77 400 arrivés en Méditerranée, devant l’Espagne et l’Italie », tandis

      qu’en septembre 10 258 arrivées ont été enregistrés par le

      Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés.

      Comme à la loterie

      Dans l’édition du 1er octobre,

      une caricature d’Andreas Petroulakis montre un officiel tenant un

      papier près d’un boulier pour le tirage du loto. « Nous allons enfin

      différencier les réfugiés des immigrés ! Les réfugiés seront ceux qui

      ont les numéro 12, 31, 11... » Le dessin se moque des annonces du

      gouvernement qui a affirmé vouloir accepter les réfugiés en Grèce, mais

      renvoyer chez eux les migrants économiques, et selon qui la Grèce n’est

      plus confrontée à une crise des réfugiés mais des migrants. « De la

      désinformation de la part du gouvernement », estime Efimerida Ton Syntakton,

      car « les statistiques montrent bien que la majorité des personnes

      actuellement sur les îles sont originaires d’Afghanistan, de Syrie,

      d’Irak, du Congo, de pays en guerre ou en situation de guerre civile ».

      « Le nouveau dogme du gouvernement est que les réfugiés et les immigrés sont deux catégories différentes », souligne la chaîne de télévision Star.

      Le gouvernement veut « être plus sévère avec les immigrés, mais

      intégrer les réfugiés », précise le journal télévisé de mardi. Le

      journal de centre-gauche Ta Nea indique que « huit réfugiés sur

      dix seront transférés des îles vers des hôtels ou des appartements », le

      gouvernement souhaitant décongestionner au plus vite les îles de la mer

      Égée comme Lesbos.

      Pour le magazine LIFO, « la grande pression exercée sur le

      gouvernement Mitsotakis concernant l’immigration vient de ses

      électeurs ». « Les annonces selon lesquelles les demandes d’asile seront

      examinées immédiatement, tandis que ceux qui ne remplissent pas les

      critères seront renvoyés dans les trois jours, sont irréalistes car il y

      a des standards européens à respecter. Ces annonces sont faites

      uniquement pour soulager quelques électeurs. » Enfin, pour le site

      News247, « depuis longtemps à Moria un crime se déroule sous nos yeux,

      les responsables sont les décideurs à Bruxelles et les gouvernements en

      Grèce. Des mesures respectant les êtres humains doivent être prises ou

      bien l’avenir risque de nous réserver d’autres tragédies ».

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Grece-le-gouvernement-grec-face-a-une-nouvelle-augmentation-des-f

  • Διαμαρτυρία ανηλίκων στη Μόρια

    Oλοένα και αυξάνεται η πίεση στο καζάνι της Μόριας. Μόλις μία μέρα μετά την αναχώρηση σχεδόν 1.500 προσφύγων από το ΚΥΤ, μια μίνι εξέγερση των ανήλικων εγκλωβισμένων ήρθε να υπενθυμίσει ότι η κατάσταση συνεχίζει να είναι απελπιστική. Και θα συνεχίσει, όσο σε έναν χώρο που είναι φτιαγμένος για 3.000 ανθρώπους στοιβάζονται αυτή τη στιγμή πάνω από 9.400 ψυχές, εκ των οποίων οι 750 είναι ανήλικοι.

    Μερίδα αυτών των ανηλίκων και ειδικότερα των νεοεισερχομένων ήταν αυτή που ξεκίνησε τη χθεσινή διαμαρτυρία, ζητώντας την άμεση αναχώρησή τους από τη Λέσβο ή έστω τη μεταφορά τους σε ξενοδοχεία, αφού από τη μέρα που πάτησαν το πόδι τους στο ΚΥΤ είναι υποχρεωμένοι να ζουν όλοι μαζί στοιβαγμένοι σε μια μεγάλη σκηνή που έχει στηθεί στον χώρο της Πρώτης Υποδοχής και η οποία μέχρι πρόσφατα έπαιζε τον ρόλο της ρεσεψιόν για όλους τους νεοαφιχθέντες, αλλά πλέον έχει μετατραπεί σε χώρο προσωρινής διαμονής ανηλίκων, έως ότου δοθεί κάποια λύση.

    Η ένταση ξεκίνησε το μεσημέρι της Τετάρτης, όταν ομάδα ανηλίκων έσπασε την πόρτα της σκηνής και ορισμένοι επιχείρησαν να βάλουν φωτιά σε κάδους απορριμμάτων. Παράλληλα, άλλη ομάδα από τους 300 ανήλικους που βρίσκονται στην τέντα κινήθηκε προς την έξοδο και μπλόκαρε τον δρόμο έξω από την πύλη, φωνάζοντας συνθήματα όπως Athens-Athens και Hotel-Hotel, θέλοντας έτσι να κάνουν κατανοητά τα αιτήματά τους.

    Σύντομα, στον χώρο επενέβη η Αστυνομία, που απώθησε με δακρυγόνα τους ανήλικους, και όταν η κατάσταση ηρέμησε ξεκίνησαν κάποιες διαπραγματεύσεις μεταξύ των δύο πλευρών, χωρίς να καταγραφούν μέχρι αυτή την ώρα συλλήψεις ή τραυματισμοί.

    Παρών στη Μόρια κατά τη διάρκεια των επεισοδίων ήταν και ο ύπατος αρμοστής της UNHR, Φίλιπ Λεκλέρκ, που έφθασε στη Μυτιλήνη προκειμένου να έχει προσωπική εικόνα της κατάστασης που έχει δημιουργηθεί, αλλά και για να συμμετάσχει σε σύσκεψη όλων των δημάρχων του Βορείου Αιγαίου που πραγματοποιήθηκε υπό τον νέο περιφερειάρχη, Κώστα Μουτζούρη.
    Ακροδεξιά λογική Μουτζούρη και δημάρχων

    Σε αυτήν, κυριολεκτικά επικράτησε η ακροδεξιά λογική, με τους συμμετέχοντες να καταλήγουν σε ένα πλαίσιο που βρίθει ξενοφοβικών και ρατσιστικών στερεοτύπων. Στην τετράωρη σύσκεψη -και με τη συμμετοχή των περιφερειακών διευθυντών Αστυνομίας και Λιμενικού-, οι δήμαρχοι με τον περιφερειάρχη κατέληξαν ομόφωνα σε ένα κείμενο με αιτήματα που θα αποσταλεί στο υπουργείο Προστασίας του Πολίτη, όπου θα ζητούν την εφαρμογή όσων υποσχόταν προεκλογικά η Ν.Δ. Αναλυτικά οι αυτοδιοικητικοί ζητούν :

    ● Να μη δημιουργηθεί καμία νέα δομή για πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες στα νησιά της περιφέρειας.

    ● Την άμεση μεταφορά των υφισταμένων δομών εκτός των αστικών ιστών και την οριστική διακοπή λειτουργίας των ΚΥΤ της Σάμου, της Μόριας και της ΒΙΑΛ στη Χίο.

    ● Την αναλογική διασπορά των προσφύγων στο σύνολο της χώρας, με άμεση αποσυμφόρηση των νησιών και μαζικές επιστροφές στην Τουρκία, στο πλαίσιο της κοινής δήλωσης Ε.Ε. – Τουρκίας, ώστε η σημερινή αναλογία του 1:7 (μετανάστες προς γηγενείς) των νησιών να μειωθεί στο 1:170 της ηπειρωτικής χώρας.

    ● Την άμεση και πλήρη αποζημίωση των κατοίκων που έχουν υποστεί καταπάτηση και ζημιές στο φυτικό και ζωικό κεφάλαιο από τους πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες.

    ● Την άμεση καταγραφή και τον έλεγχο των ΜΚΟ που δραστηριοποιούνται στην περιφέρεια.

    ● Την αποτελεσματική φύλαξη των θαλάσσιων συνόρων και την άμεση υλοποίηση των προεκλογικών δεσμεύσεων της κυβέρνησης και των πρόσφατων αποφάσεων του ΚΥΣΕΑ.

    ● Τη στήριξη των εμπλεκόμενων δημόσιων υπηρεσιών και πρωτίστως του Λιμενικού Σώματος, της ΕΛ.ΑΣ. και των ενόπλων δυνάμεων για την καθοριστική συμβολή τους στην αντιμετώπιση του προβλήματος και την απαίτηση για άμεση ενίσχυσή τους με προσωπικό και μέσα.


    https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209598_diamartyria-anilikon-sti-moria

    Avec ce commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop, reçu le 05.09.2019 :

    Le reportage du quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn donne plus des précisions sur les incidents qui ont éclaté hier mercredi au hot-spot de Moria à Lesbos. Il s’agissait d’une mini-révolte des mineurs bloqués sur l’île, qui demandaient d’être transférés à Athènes ou du moins d’être logés à l’hôtel. Même après le transfert 1.500 personnes au continent, il y a actuellement à Moria 9.400 personnes dont 750 mineurs pour une capacité d’accueil de 3.000. Les mineurs qui arrivent depuis quelques jours sont entassés dans une grande #tente qui servait jusqu’à maintenant de lieu de Premier Accueil, une sorte de réception-desk pour tous les arrivants, qui s’est transformé en gîte provisoire pour 300 mineurs. Hier,vers midi, un groupe de mineurs ont cassé la porte de la tente et ont essayé de mettre le feu à des poubelles, tandis qu’un deuxième groupe de mineurs avait bloqué la route vers la porte du camp en criant Athens-Athens et Hotel-Hotel, faisant ainsi comprendre qu’ils réclament leur transfert à Athènes ou à défaut à des chambres d’hôtel. La police est intervenue en lançant de gaz lacrymogènes, et une fois le calme répandu ; des pourparlers se sont engagés avec les deux groupes. Il n’y a pas eu ni arrestations ni blessés.

    En même temps la situation est encore plus désespérante au hot-spot de Samos où pour une capacité d’accueil de 648 personnes y sont actuellement entassées presque 5.000 dans des conditions de vie inimaginables. Voir le tableau édité par le Ministère de Protection du Citoyen (alias de l’Ordre Public) (https://infocrisis.gov.gr/5869/national-situational-picture-regarding-the-islands-at-eastern-aegean-sea-4-9-2019/?lang=en)

    #Moria #Lesbos #Lesvos #migrations #asile #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce #hotspot #révolte #résistance #mineurs #MNA #enfants #enfance #violence

    • Διαμαρτυρία εκατοντάδων ανηλίκων για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στη Μόρια

      Ένταση επικράτησε το μεσημέρι της Τετάρτης στο Κέντρο Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης Προσφύγων στην Μόρια, καθώς περίπου 300 ανήλικοι πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες διαμαρτυρήθηκαν για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στο κέντρο, που έχουν γίνει ακόμα χειρότερες τις τελευταίες μέρες λόγω της άφιξης εκατοντάδων νέων ανθρώπων.

      Όπως αναφέρουν πληροφορίες της ιστοσελίδας stonisi.gr, περίπου 300 ανήλικοι πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες προχώρησαν σε συγκέντρωση διαμαρτυρίας έξω από το κέντρο της Μόριας, θέλοντας να διαμαρτυρηθούν για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης.

      Οι ίδιες πληροφορίες αναφέρουν ότι πάρθηκε απόφαση να εκκενωθεί η πτέρυγα των ανηλίκων ενώ έγινε και περιορισμένη χρήση χημικών από την αστυνομία. Σημειώνεται ότι τη Δευτέρα έφτασαν στο νησί εκατοντάδες άνθρωποι, που πλέον κατευθύνθηκαν σε δομές της Βόρειας Ελλάδας, όπου είναι ήδη αδύνατη η στέγαση περισσότερων ανθρώπων.

      https://thepressproject.gr/diamartyria-ekatontadon-anilikon-gia-tis-apanthropes-synthikes-diavi

      –------

      Avec ce commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi (05.09.2019) :

      Des centaines de mineurs protestent contre les conditions de vie inhumaines en Moria
      La tension a monté d’un cran mercredi à midi au centre de réception et d’identification des réfugiés de Moria. Environ 300 réfugiés et immigrants ont protesté contre les conditions de vie inhumaines dans le centre, qui se sont encore aggravées ces derniers jours avec l’arrivée de centaines de personnes.

      Selon des informations du site Internet stonisi.gr , quelque 300 réfugiés et migrants mineurs se sont rassemblés hors du centre de la Moria, dans le but de protester contre ces conditions de vie inhumaines.

      La même source d’’information indique qu’une décision a été prise d’évacuer l’aile des mineurs tandis que la police a fait un usage moderé de gaz chimiques. Il est à noter que lundi, des centaines de personnes sont arrivées sur l’île, se dirigeant maintenant vers des structures situées dans le nord de la Grèce, où il est déjà impossible d’accueillir plus de personnes.

  • #Migrerrance... de camp en camp en #Grèce...
    Des personnes traitées comme des #paquets de la poste

    Greece moves 1400 asylum-seekers from crowded Lesbos camp as migrant numbers climb

    Greek officials and aid workers on Monday began an emergency operation to evacuate 1,400 migrants from a dangerously overcrowded camp on Lesbos as numbers of arrivals on the island continue to climb.

    Six hundred and forty people were bussed away from Moria camp, which has become notorious for violence and poor hygiene, with 800 more following.

    “I hope to get out of this hell quickly,” 21-year-old Mohamed Akberi, who arrived at the camp five days earlier, told Agence-France Presse.

    Lesbos has been hit hard by the migrant crisis, with authorities deadlocked over what to do with new arrivals. Some 11,000 have been put in Moria camp, an old army barracks in a remote part of the island which has a capacity of around 3,000.

    The camp has been criticised sharply by human rights organisations for its squalid living conditions and poor security. Last month, a 14-year-old Afghan boy was killed in a fight and women in the camp are targets for sexual violence.

    The migrants removed from Moria on Monday will be taken by ferry to Thessaloniki, where they will be transported to Nea Kavala, a small camp in northern Greece near the border with North Macedonia.

    Lesbos saw 3,000 new arrivals in August, with around 650 arriving in just one day last week, and another 400 over the weekend.

    The emergency transfer from Moria was agreed by the government at an emergency meeting on Saturday, with unaccompanied minors and other vulnerable people given priority.

    The Greek government agreed to do away with the appeal procedures for asylum seekers to facilitate their swift return to Turkey.

    Greece will also step up border patrols with the help of the EU border control agency Frontex.

    Nearly 1,900 migrants have been forcibly returned to Turkey under a deal brokered by the European Union in 2016, and 17,000 migrants have voluntarily left Greece for their home countries over the last three years.

    Aid workers have questioned whether the emergency move provides a meaningful solution to Greece’s migrant problem.

    “While the situation in Moria is certainly diabolical, the government’s response to move people doesn’t solve the problem of overcrowding and is more of a PR exercise without addressing the issues that will be exacerbated by the move,” one aid worker with Nea Kavala, who wished to remain anonymous, told the Telegraph. “It’s very much an out-of-the-frying-pan-into- the-fire situation.”

    Stella Nanou, a spokesperson at the UNHCR in Greece, told the Daily Telegraph: “The situation is an urgent one in Moria and requires urgent relief. It is obvious more needs to be done in the short term. In the long term, solutions need to be provided to decongest and relieve the situation on the islands. We stand ready to help.”

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/09/02/greece-moves-1400-asylum-seekers-crowded-lesbos-camp-migrant
    #Moria #Lesbos #Lesvos #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce_du_Nord #déplacement #asile #migrations #réfugiés
    #paquets_postaux
    ping @isskein

    • Grèce : Plus de 1 000 migrants transférés de l’île de Lesbos vers le continent

      Un premier groupe de 600 migrants ont été transférés lundi matin du camp de Moria, à Lesbos, vers le continent. Un deuxième contingent de 700 personnes devraient aussi être acheminé vers le continent grec dans l’après-midi. Ce week-end, le gouvernement avait annoncé une série de mesure pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants, notamment le transfert rapide des mineurs non accompagnés et des personnes les plus vulnérables des îles vers le continent.

      Les premières évacuations de l’île grecque de Lesbos vers le continent ont débuté lundi 2 septembre. Un premier contingent de 600 migrants installés dans le camp saturé de Moria ont été évacués lundi matin.

      Six cent trente-cinq Afghans, transportant des bagages encombrants, se sont précipités pour monter dans les bus de la police, sous la supervision du Haut-commissariat des Nations unies aux réfugiés (#HCR).

      Dans la cohue générale, ils ont ensuite embarqué sur le navire « Caldera Vista » vers le port de Thessalonique, où ils doivent être acheminés vers le camp de réfugiés de Nea Kavala, dans la ville de Kilkis situé dans le nord de la Grèce.

      Un autre groupe de 700 migrants devaient également être transférés dans l’après-midi vers le même lieu, dans le cadre de la décision du gouvernement grec de désengorger le camp de Moria.

      « 3 000 arrivées rien qu’au mois d’août »

      Samedi 31 août, le gouvernement grec a annoncé une série de mesure pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants, notamment le transfert rapide des mineurs non accompagnés et des personnes les plus vulnérables des îles vers le continent mais aussi la suppression des procédure d’appels aux demandes d’asile pour faciliter les retours des réfugiés en Turquie.

      Le camp de Moria, centre d’enregistrement et d’identification de Lesbos, héberge déjà près de 11 000 personnes, soit quatre fois la capacité évaluée par le HCR.

      Le nombre de migrants n’a cessé de grossir cet été. L’agence onusienne parle de « plus de 3 000 arrivées rien qu’au mois d’août ». Jeudi soir, 13 bateaux sont arrivés à Lesbos avec plus de 540 personnes dont 240 enfants, une hausse sans précédent qui inquiète le gouvernement conservateur arrivé au pouvoir le 7 juillet dernier.

      Ce week-end, 280 autres migrants sont arrivés en Grèce, souvent interceptés en pleine mer par les garde-côtes de l’Union européenne et de la Grèce.

      Sur la côte nord de l’île où les canots pneumatiques chargés de migrants débarquent le plus souvent, la surveillance a été renforcée dimanche. Une équipe de l’AFP a pu constater les allers et venues des patrouilleurs en mer, et la vigilance accrue des policiers sur les rives grecques.
      Depuis l’accord UE-Turquie signé en mars 2016, le contrôle aux frontières a été renforcé, rendant l’accès à l’île depuis la Turquie de plus en plus difficile. Mais, ces derniers mois près de 100 personnes en moyenne parviennent chaque jour à effectuer cette traversée.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19227/grece-plus-de-1-000-migrants-transferes-de-l-ile-de-lesbos-vers-le-con

    • Message de Vicky Skoumbi reçu via la mailing-list de Migreurop, 03.09.2019:

      Des scènes qui rappellent l’été 2015 se passent actuellement à Lesbos.

      Le nombre particulièrement élevé d’arrivées récentes à Lesbos (Grèce) – plus que 3.600 pour le seul mois d’août- a obligé le nouveau gouvernement de transférer 1.300 personnes vulnérables vers le continent et notamment vers la commune Nouvelle Kavalla à Kilkis, au nord-ouest du pays. Il s’agit juste d’un tiers de réfugiés reconnus comme vulnérables qui restent bloqués dans l’île, malgré la levée de leur confinement géographique. Jusqu’à ce jour le gouvernement Mitsotakis avait bloqué tout transfert vers le continent, même au moment où la population de Moria avait dépassé les 10.000 dont 4.000 étaient obligés de vivre en dehors du camp, dans des abris de fortune sur les champs d’alentours. Le service médical à Moria y est désormais quasi-inexistant, dans la mesure où des 40 médecins qui y travaillaient, il ne reste actuellement que deux qui ne peuvent s’occuper que des urgences – et encore-, tandis qu’il n’y a plus aucune ambulance disponible sur place. Ceci a comme résultant que les personnes qui arrivent ne passent plus de contrôle médical avec tous les risques sanitaires que cela puisse créer dans un camp si surpeuplé.

      Le nouveau président de la Région de l’Egée du Nord, M. Costas Moutzouris, de droite sans affiliation, avait déclaré que toutes les régions de la Grèce doivent partager le ‘fardeau’, car « les îles ne doivent pas subir une déformation, une altération raciale, religieuse, et ethnique ».

      Source (en grec) Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209204_sti-moria-kai-sti-sykamnia-i-lesbos-anastenazei)

      C’est sans doute l’arrivée de 13 bateaux avec 550 personnes à Sykamia (Lesbos) samedi dernier, qui a obligé le gouvernement de céder et d’organiser un convoi vers le continent. Mais l’endroit choisi pour l’installation de personnes transférées est un campement déjà surchargé – pour une capacité d’accueil de 700 personnes, 924 y sont installés dans de containers et 450 dans des tentes. Avec l’arrivée de 1.300 de plus ni le réseau d’eau potable, ni les deux générateurs électriques ne sauraient tenir. La situation risque de devenir totalement chaotique, d’autant plus que le centre d’accueil en question est géré sans aucune structure administrative par une ONG, le Conseil danois pour les Réfugiés. En même temps, l’endroit est exposé aux vents et les tentes qui y sont montés pour les nouveaux arrivants risquent de s’envoler à la première rafale. D’après le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntktôn (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209222_giati-i-boreia-ellada-kathistatai-afiloxeni-sto-neo-kyma-prosfygon) toutes les structures du Nord de la Grèce ont déjà dépassé la limite de leurs capacités d’accueil.

    • Greece to increase border patrols and deportations to curb migrant influx

      Greece is to step up border patrols, move asylum-seekers from its islands to the mainland and speed up deportations in an effort to deal with a resurgence in migrant flows from neighboring Turkey.

      The government’s Council for Foreign Affairs and Defence convened on Saturday for an emergency session after the arrival on Thursday of more than a dozen migrant boats carrying around 600 people, the first simultaneous arrival of its kind in three years.

      The increase in arrivals has piled additional pressure on Greece’s overcrowded island camps, all of which are operating at least twice their capacity.

      Arrivals - mostly of Afghan families - have picked up over the summer, and August saw the highest number of monthly landings in three years.

      Greece’s Moria camp on the island of Lesbos - a sprawling facility where conditions have been described by aid organizations as inhumane - is also holding the largest number of people since the deal was agreed.

      On Saturday, the government said it would move asylum-seekers to mainland facilities, increase border surveillance together with the European Union’s border patrol agency Frontex and NATO, and boost police patrols across Greece to identify rejected asylum seekers who have remained in the country.

      It also plans to cut back a lengthy asylum process, which can take several months to conclude, by abolishing the second stage of appeals when an application is rejected, and deporting the applicant either to Turkey or to their country of origin.

      “The asylum process in our country was the longest, the most time consuming and, in the end, the most ineffective in Europe,” Greece’s deputy citizen protection minister responsible for migration policy, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, told state television.

      Responding to criticism from the opposition that the move was unfair and unlawful, Koumoutsakos said:

      “Asylum must move quickly so that those who are entitled to international protection are vindicated ... and for us to know who should not stay in Greece.”

      The government was “determined to push ahead with a robust returns policy because that is what the law and the country’s best interest impose, in accordance with human rights,” he said.

      Greece was the main gateway to northern Europe in 2015 for nearly a million migrants and refugees from war-torn and poverty-stricken countries in the Middle East and Africa.

      A deal between the EU and Turkey in March 2016 reduced the influx to a trickle, but closures of borders across the Balkans resulted in tens of thousands of people stranded in Greece.

      Humanitarian organizations have criticized Greece for not doing enough to improve living conditions at its camps, which they have described as “shameful”.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-greece/greece-to-increase-border-patrols-and-deportations-to-curb-migrant-influx-i

    • Grèce : les migrants de Lesbos désemparés dans leur nouveau camp

      « Nous avons quitté Moria en espérant quelque chose de mieux et finalement, c’est pire » : Sazan, un Afghan de 20 ans, vient d’être transféré, avec mille compatriotes, de l’île grecque de Lesbos saturée, dans le camp de #Nea_Kavala, dans le nord de la Grèce.

      Après six mois dans « l’enfer » de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos, Sazan se sent désemparé à son arrivée à Nea Kavala, où il constate « la difficulté d’accès à l’eau courante et à l’électricité ».

      A côté de lui, Mohamed Nour, 28 ans, entouré de ses trois enfants, creuse la terre devant sa tente de fortune pour fabriquer une rigole « pour protéger la famille en cas de pluie ».

      Mille réfugiés et migrants sont installés dans 200 tentes, les autres seront transférés « dans d’autres camps dans le nord du pays », a indiqué une source du ministère de la Protection du citoyen, sans plus de détails.

      L’arrivée massive de centaines de migrants et réfugiés la semaine dernière à Lesbos, principale porte d’entrée migratoire en Europe, a pris de court les autorités grecques, qui ont décidé leur transfert sur des camps du continent.

      Car le camp de Moria, le principal de Lesbos, l’un des plus importants et insalubres d’Europe, a dépassé de quatre fois sa capacité ces derniers mois.

      En juillet seulement, plus de 5.520 personnes ont débarqué à Lesbos - un record depuis le début de l’année - auxquelles se sont ajoutés 3.250 migrants au cours de quinze premiers jours d’août, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM).

      – Tensions à Moria -

      Quelque 300 mineurs non accompagnés ont protesté mercredi contre leurs conditions de vie dans le camp de Moria et demandé leur transfert immédiat à Athènes. De jeunes réfugiés ont mis le feu à des poubelles et la police a dispersé la foule avec des gaz lacrymogènes, a rapporté l’agence de presse grecque ANA.

      « Nous pensions que Moria était la pire chose qui pourrait nous arriver », explique Mohamed, qui s’efforce d’installer sa famille sous une tente de Nea Kavala.

      « On nous a dit que notre séjour serait temporaire mais nous y sommes déjà depuis deux jours et les conditions ne sont pas bonnes, j’espère partir d’ici très vite », assène-t-il.

      Des équipes du camp œuvrent depuis lundi à installer des tentes supplémentaires, mais les toilettes et les infrastructures d’hygiène ne suffisent pas.

      Le ministère a promis qu’avant la fin du mois, les migrants seraient transférés dans d’autres camps.

      Mais Tamim, 15 ans, séjourne à Nea Kavala depuis trois mois : « On nous a dit la même chose (que nous serions transférés) quand nous sommes arrivés (...). A Moria, c’était mieux, au moins on avait des cours d’anglais, ici on ne fait rien », confie-t-il à l’AFP.

      Pour Angelos, 35 ans, employé du camp, « il faut plus de médecins et des infrastructures pour répondre aux besoins de centaines d’enfants ».

      – « Garder espoir » -

      Plus de 70.000 migrants et réfugiés sont actuellement bloqués en Grèce depuis la fermeture des frontières en Europe après la déclaration UE-Turquie de mars 2016 destinée à freiner la route migratoire vers les îles grecques.

      Le Premier ministre de droite Kyriakos Mitsotakis, élu début juillet, a supprimé le ministère de la Politique migratoire, créé lors de la crise migratoire de 2015, et ce dossier est désormais confié au ministère de la Protection du citoyen.

      Face à la recrudescence des arrivées en Grèce via les frontières terrestre et maritime gréco-turques depuis janvier 2019, le gouvernement a annoncé samedi un train de mesures allant du renforcement du contrôle des frontières et des sans-papiers à la suppression du droit d’appel pour les demandes d’asile rejetées en première instance.

      Des ONG de défense des réfugiés ont critiqué ces mesures, dénonçant « le durcissement » de la politique migratoire.

      La majorité des migrants arrivés en Grèce espère, comme destination « finale », un pays d’Europe centrale ou occidentale.

      « Je suis avec ma famille ici, nous souhaitons aller vivre en Autriche », confirme Korban, 19 ans, arrivé mardi à Nea Kavala.

      « A Moria, les rixes et la bousculade étaient quotidiennes, c’était l’enfer. La seule chose qui nous reste maintenant, c’est d’être patients et de garder espoir », confie-t-il.

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/Migrants-transferes-Grece-Ici-pire-Lesbos-2019-09-04-1301045157

  • UNHCR shocked at death of Afghan boy on #Lesvos; urges transfer of unaccompanied children to safe shelters

    UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is deeply saddened by news that a 15-year-old Afghan boy was killed and two other teenage boys injured after a fight broke out last night at the Moria reception centre on the Greek island of Lesvos. Despite the prompt actions by authorities and medical personnel, the boy was pronounced dead at Vostaneio Hospital in Mytilene, the main port town on Lesvos. The two other boys were admitted at the hospital where one required life-saving surgery. A fourth teenager, also from Afghanistan, was arrested by police in connection with the violence.

    The safe area at the Moria Reception and Identification Centre, RIC, hosts nearly 70 unaccompanied children, but more than 500 other boys and girls are staying in various parts of the overcrowded facility without a guardian and exposed to exploitation and abuse. Some of them are accommodated with unknown adults.

    “I was shocked to hear about the boy’s death”, said UNHCR Representative in Greece, Philippe Leclerc. “Moria is not the place for children who are alone and have faced profound trauma from events at home and the hardship of their flight. They need special care in dedicated shelters. The Greek government must take urgent measures to ensure that these children are transferred to a safe place and to end the overcrowding we see on Lesvos and other islands,” he said, adding that UNHCR stands ready to support by all means necessary.

    Frustration and tensions can easily boil over in Moria RIC which now hosts over 8,500 refugees and migrants – four times its capacity. Access to services such as health and psychological support are limited while security is woefully insufficient for the number of people. Unaccompanied children especially can face unsafe conditions for months while waiting for an authorized transfer to appropriate shelter. Their prolonged stay in such difficult conditions further affects their psychology and well-being.

    Nearly 2,000 refugees and migrants arrived by sea to Greece between 12 and 18 August, bringing the number of entries this year to 21,947. Some 22,700 people, including nearly 1,000 unaccompanied and separated children, are now staying on the Greek Aegean islands, the highest number in three years.

    https://www.unhcr.org/gr/en/12705-unhcr-shocked-at-death-of-afghan-boy-on-lesvos-urges-transfer-of-unacco

    #MNA #mineurs #enfants #enfance #Moria #décès #mort #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #bagarre #dispute #surpopulation

    • Cet article du HCR, m’a fait pensé à la #forme_camps telle qu’elle est illustrée dans l’article... j’ai partagé cette réflexion avec mes collègues du comité scientifique du Centre du patrimoine arménien de Valence.

      Je la reproduis ici :

      Je vous avais parlé du film documentaire « #Refugistan » (https://seenthis.net/messages/502311), que beaucoup d’entre vous ont vu.

      Je vous disais, lors de la dernière réunion, qu’une des choses qui m’avait le plus frappé dans ce film, c’est ce rapprochement géographique du « camp de réfugié tel que l’on se l’imagine avec des #tentes blanches avec estampillons HCR »... cet #idéal-type de #camp on le voit dans le film avant tout en Afrique centrale, puis dans les pays d’Afrique du Nord et puis, à la fin... en Macédoine. Chez nous, donc.

      J’ai repensé à cela, ce matin, en voyant cette triste nouvelle annoncée par le HCR du décès d’un jeune dans le camps de Moria à Lesbos suite à une bagarre entre jeunes qui a lieu dans le camp.

      Regardez l’image qui accompagne l’article :

      Des tentes blanches avec l’estampillons « UNHCR »... en Grèce, encore plus proche, en Grèce, pays de l’Union européenne...

      Des pensées... que je voulais partager avec vous.

      #altérité #cpa_camps #altérisation

      ping @reka @isskein @karine4

    • Greek refugee camp unable to house new arrivals

      Authorities on the Greek island of Lesvos say they can’t house more newly arrived migrants at a perpetually overcrowded refugee camp that now is 400 percent overcapacity.

      Two officials told AP the Moria camp has a population of 12,000 and no way to accommodate additional occupants.

      The officials say newcomers are sleeping in the open or in tents outside the camp, which was built to hold 3,000 refugees.

      Some were taken to a small transit camp run by the United Nations’ refugee agency on the north coast of Lesvos.

      The island authorities said at least 410 migrants coming in boats from Turkey reached Lesvos on Friday.

      The officials asked not to be identified pending official announcements about the camp.

      http://www.ekathimerini.com/244771/article/ekathimerini/news/greek-refugee-camp-unable-to-house-new-arrivals

  • Message de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 24.08.2019:

    Le #Hotspot de #Moria fonctionne actuellement avec un #taux_d’occupation qui atteint presque au triple de sa #capacité_d’accueil : voir les #chiffres donnés par le ministère pour le 15 août où on voit que pour une capacité d’accueil de 3.000 il y avait 8. 218 occupants, chiffre qui a sans doute augmenté depuis, étant donné les arrivées plus récentes. Début août déjà il y avait 2.500 personnes vivant à l’extérieur du camp dans des tentes et de abris de fortune. Au moment où plus que 10.000 réfugiés sont bloqués dans l’île de #Lesbos, il y a, selon un rapport du directeur du hot-spot, 3.000 d’entre eux, pour qui le confinement géographique a été levé ; malgré le fait qu’ils ont le droit de se déplacer librement en Grèce continental, aucune mesure n’est prévue pour leur transfert au continent.

    Source:


    https://infocrisis.gov.gr/5503/national-situational-picture-regarding-the-islands-at-eastern-aegean-sea-15-8-2019/?lang=en

    #statistiques #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #îles #2019

  • #Richard_Gere à Lampedusa « keeps saying that he is ’not interested in politics - basta’ and that rescue is not political but spiritual. Sigh... »

    Source : Maurice Stierl, présent à la conférence de presse :


    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10158192322562079&set=a.10154070612182079&type=3&theater

    Richard Gere qui, comme vous le savez probablement a fait ces jours son cirque sur un bateau humanitaire #Open_Arms...

    Richard Gere embarque à bord de l’Open Arms

    L’acteur Richard Gere est monté à bord de l’Open Arms ce vendredi. L’acteur et activiste est venu apporter son aide et son soutien au navire humanitaire, bloqué depuis 8 jours, alors que les pas européens lui refusent d’accoster. 121 personnes se trouvent à bord.


    https://www.bfmtv.com/mediaplayer/video/richard-gere-embarque-a-bord-de-l-open-arms-1179825.html

    #ONG #sauvetage #migrations #Méditerranée #asile #acteurs #VIP #VIPs #politique #spiritualité

  • Refugee, volunteer, prisoner: #Sarah_Mardini and Europe’s hardening line on migration

    Early last August, Sarah Mardini sat on a balcony on the Greek island of Lesvos. As the sun started to fade, a summer breeze rose off the Aegean Sea. She leaned back in her chair and relaxed, while the Turkish coastline, only 16 kilometres away, formed a silhouette behind her.

    Three years before, Mardini had arrived on this island from Syria – a dramatic journey that made international headlines. Now she was volunteering her time helping other refugees. She didn’t know it yet, but in a few weeks that work would land her in prison.

    Mardini had crossed the narrow stretch of water from Turkey in August 2015, landing on Lesvos after fleeing her home in Damascus to escape the Syrian civil war. On the way, she almost drowned when the engine of the inflatable dinghy she was travelling in broke down.

    More than 800,000 people followed a similar route from the Turkish coast to the Greek Islands that year. Almost 800 of them are now dead or missing.

    As the boat Mardini was in pitched and spun, she slipped overboard and struggled to hold it steady in the violent waves. Her sister, Yusra, three years younger, soon joined. Both girls were swimmers, and their act of heroism likely saved the 18 other people on board. They eventually made it to Germany and received asylum. Yusra went on to compete in the 2016 Olympics for the first ever Refugee Olympic Team. Sarah, held back from swimming by an injury, returned to Lesvos to help other refugees.

    On the balcony, Mardini, 23, was enjoying a rare moment of respite from long days spent working in the squalid Moria refugee camp. For the first time in a long time, she was looking forward to the future. After years spent between Lesvos and Berlin, she had decided to return to her university studies in Germany.

    But when she went to the airport to leave, shortly after The New Humanitarian visited her, Mardini was arrested. Along with several other volunteers from Emergency Response Centre International, or ERCI, the Greek non-profit where she volunteered, Mardini was charged with belonging to a criminal organisation, people smuggling, money laundering, and espionage.

    According to watchdog groups, the case against Mardini is not an isolated incident. Amnesty International says it is part of a broader trend of European governments taking a harder line on immigration and using anti-smuggling laws to de-legitimise humanitarian assistance to refugees and migrants.

    Far-right Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini recently pushed through legislation that ends humanitarian protection for migrants and asylum seekers, while Italy and Greece have ramped up pressure on maritime search and rescue NGOs, forcing them to shutter operations. At the end of March, the EU ended naval patrols in the Mediterranean that had saved the lives of thousands of migrants.

    In 2016, five other international volunteers were arrested on Lesvos on similar charges to Mardini. They were eventually acquitted, but dozens of other cases across Europe fit a similar pattern: from Denmark to France, people have been arrested, charged, and sometimes successfully prosecuted under anti-smuggling regulations based on actions they took to assist migrants.

    Late last month, Salam Kamal-Aldeen, a Danish national who founded the rescue non-governmental organisation Team Humanity, filed an application with the European Court of Human Rights, challenging what he says is a Greek crackdown on lifesaving activities.

    According to Maria Serrano, senior campaigner on migration at Amnesty International, collectively the cases have done tremendous damage in terms of public perception of humanitarian work in Europe. “The atmosphere… is very hostile for anyone that is trying to help, and this [has a] chilling effect on other people that want to help,” she said.

    As for the case against Mardini and the other ERCI volunteers, Human Rights Watch concluded that the accusations are baseless. “It seems like a bad joke, and a scary one as well because of what the implications are for humanitarian activists and NGOs just trying to save people’s lives,” said Bill Van Esveld, who researched the case for HRW.

    While the Lesvos prosecutor could not be reached for comment, the Greek police said in a statement after Mardini’s arrest that she and other aid workers were “active in the systematic facilitation of illegal entrance of foreigners” – a violation of the country’s Migration Code.

    Mardini spent 108 days in pre-trial detention before being released on bail at the beginning of December. The case against her is still open. Her lawyer expects news on what will happen next in June or July. If convicted, Mardini could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison.

    “It seems like a bad joke, and a scary one as well because of what the implications are for humanitarian activists and NGOs just trying to save people’s lives.”

    Return to Lesvos

    The arrest and pending trial are the latest in a series of events, starting with the beginning of the Syrian war in 2011, that have disrupted any sense of normalcy in Mardini’s life.

    Even after making it to Germany in 2015, Mardini never really settled in. She was 20 years old and in an unfamiliar city. The secure world she grew up in had been destroyed, and the future felt like a blank and confusing canvas. “I missed Syria and Damascus and just this warmness in everything,” she said.

    While wading through these emotions, Mardini received a Facebook message in 2016 from an ERCI volunteer. The swimming sisters from Syria who saved a boat full of refugees were an inspiration. Volunteers on Lesvos told their story to children on the island to give them hope for the future, the volunteer said, inviting Mardini to visit. “It totally touched my heart,” Mardini recalled. “Somebody saw me as a hope… and there is somebody asking for my help.”

    So Mardini flew back to Lesvos in August 2016. Just one year earlier she had nearly died trying to reach the island, before enduring a journey across the Balkans that involved hiding from police officers in forests, narrowly escaping being kidnapped, sneaking across tightly controlled borders, and spending a night in police custody in a barn. Now, all it took was a flight to retrace the route.

    Her first day on the island, Mardini was trained to help refugees disembark safely when their boats reached the shores. By nighttime, she was sitting on the beach watching for approaching vessels. It was past midnight, and the sea was calm. Lights from the Turkish coastline twinkled serenely across the water. After about half an hour, a walkie talkie crackled. The Greek Coast Guard had spotted a boat.

    Volunteers switched on the headlights of their cars, giving the refugees something to aim for. Thin lines of silver from the reflective strips on the refugees’ life jackets glinted in the darkness, and the rumble of a motor and chatter of voices drifted across the water. As the boat came into view, volunteers yelled: “You are in Greece. You are safe. Turn the engine off.”

    Mardini was in the water again, holding the boat steady, helping people disembark. When the rush of activity ended, a feeling of guilt washed over her. “I felt it was unfair that they were on a refugee boat and I’m a rescuer,” she said.

    But Mardini was hooked. She spent the next two weeks assisting with boat landings and teaching swimming lessons to the kids who idolised her and her sister. Even after returning to Germany, she couldn’t stop thinking about Lesvos. “I decided to come back for one month,” she said, “and I never left.”
    Moria camp

    The island became the centre of Mardini’s life. She put her studies at Bard College Berlin on hold to spend more time in Greece. “I found what I love,” she explained.

    Meanwhile, the situation on the Greek islands was changing. In 2017, just under 30,000 people crossed the Aegean Sea to Greece, compared to some 850,000 in 2015. There were fewer arrivals, but those who did come were spending more time in camps with dismal conditions.

    “You have people who are dying and living in a four-metre tent with seven relatives. They have limited access to water. Hygiene is zero. Privacy is zero. Security: zero. Children’s rights: zero. Human rights: zero… You feel useless. You feel very useless.”

    The volunteer response shifted accordingly, towards the camps, and when TNH visited Mardini she moved around the island with a sense of purpose and familiarity, joking with other volunteers and greeting refugees she knew from her work in the streets.

    Much of her time was spent as a translator for ERCI’s medical team in Moria. The camp, the main one on Lesvos, was built to accommodate around 3,000 people, but by 2018 housed close to 9,000. Streams of sewage ran between tents. People were forced to stand in line for hours for food. The wait to see a doctor could take months, and conditions were causing intense psychological strain. Self-harm and suicide attempts were increasing, especially among children, and sexual and gender-based violence were commonplace.

    Mardini was on the front lines. “What we do in Moria is fighting the fire,” she said. “You have people who are dying and living in a four-metre tent with seven relatives. They have limited access to water. Hygiene is zero. Privacy is zero. Security: zero. Children’s rights: zero. Human rights: zero… You feel useless. You feel very useless.”

    By then, Mardini had been on Lesvos almost continuously for nine months, and it was taking a toll. She seemed to be weighed down, slipping into long moments of silence. “I’m taking in. I’m taking in. I’m taking in. But it’s going to come out at some point,” she said.

    It was time for a break. Mardini had decided to return to Berlin at the end of the month to resume her studies and make an effort to invest in her life there. But she planned to remain connected to Lesvos. “I love this island… the sad thing is that it’s not nice for everybody. Others see it as just a jail.”
    Investigation and Arrest

    The airport on Lesvos is on the shoreline close to where Mardini helped with the boat landing her first night as a volunteer. On 21 August, when she went to check in for her flight to Berlin, she was surrounded by five Greek police officers. “They kind of circled around me, and they said that I should come with [them],” Mardini recalled.

    Mardini knew that the police on Lesvos had been investigating her and some of the other volunteers from ERCI, but at first she still didn’t realise what was happening. Seven months earlier, in February 2018, she was briefly detained with a volunteer named Sean Binder, a German national. They had been driving one of ERCI’s 4X4s when police stopped them, searched the vehicle, and found Greek military license plates hidden under the civilian plates.

    When Mardini was arrested at the airport, Binder turned himself in too, and the police released a statement saying they were investigating 30 people – six Greeks and 24 foreigners – for involvement in “organised migrant trafficking rings”. Two Greek nationals, including ERCI’s founder, were also arrested at the time.

    While it is still not clear what the plates were doing on the vehicle, according Van Esveld from HRW, “it does seem clear… neither Sarah or Sean had any idea that these plates were [there]”.

    The felony charges against Mardini and Binder were ultimately unconnected to the plates, and HRW’s Van Esveld said the police work appears to either have been appallingly shoddy or done in bad faith. HRW took the unusual step of commenting on the ongoing case because it appeared authorities were “literally just [taking] a humanitarian activity and labelling it as a crime”, he added.
    Detention

    After two weeks in a cell on Lesvos, Mardini was sent to a prison in Athens. On the ferry ride to the mainland, her hands were shackled. That’s when it sank in: “Ok, it’s official,” she thought. “They’re transferring me to jail.”

    In prison, Mardini was locked in a cell with eight other women from 8pm to 8am. During the day, she would go to Greek classes and art classes, drink coffee with other prisoners, and watch the news.

    She was able to make phone calls, and her mother, who was also granted asylum in Germany, came to visit a number of times. “The first time we saw each other we just broke down in tears,” Mardini recalled. It had been months since they’d seen each other, and now they could only speak for 20 minutes, separated by a plastic barrier.

    Most of the time, Mardini just read, finishing more than 40 books, including Nelson Mandela’s autobiography, which helped her come to terms with her situation. “I decided this is my life right now, and I need to get something out of it,” she explained. “I just accepted what’s going on.”

    People can be held in pre-trial detention for up to 18 months in Greece. But at the beginning of December, a judge accepted Mardini’s lawyer’s request for bail. Binder was released the same day.
    Lingering fear

    On Lesvos, where everyone in the volunteer community knows each other, the case came as a shock. “People started to be... scared,” said Claudia Drost, a 23-year-old from the Netherlands and close friend of Mardini’s who started volunteering on the island in 2016. “There was a feeling of fear that if the police… put [Mardini] in prison, they can put anyone in prison.”

    “We are standing [up] for what we are doing because we are saving people and we are helping people.”

    That feeling was heightened by the knowledge that humanitarians across Europe were being charged with crimes for helping refugees and migrants.

    During the height of the migration crisis in Europe, between the fall of 2015 and winter 2016, some 300 people were arrested in Denmark on charges related to helping refugees. In August 2016, French farmer Cédric Herrou was arrested for helping migrants and asylum seekers cross the French-Italian border. In October 2017, 12 people were charged with facilitating illegal migration in Belgium for letting asylum seekers stay in their homes and use their cellphones. And last June, the captain of a search and rescue boat belonging to the German NGO Mission Lifeline was arrested in Malta and charged with operating the vessel without proper registration or license.

    Drost said that after Mardini was released the fear faded a bit, but still lingers. There is also a sense of defiance. “We are standing [up] for what we are doing because we are saving people and we are helping people,” Drost said.

    As for Mardini, the charges have forced her to disengage from humanitarian work on Lesvos, at least until the case is over. She is back in Berlin and has started university again. “I think because I’m not in Lesvos anymore I’m just finding it very good to be here,” she said. “I’m kind of in a stable moment just to reflect about my life and what I want to do.”

    But she also knows the stability could very well be fleeting. With the prospect of more time in prison hanging over her, the future is still a blank canvas. People often ask if she is optimistic about the case. “No,” she said. “In the first place, they put me in… jail.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/feature/2019/05/02/refugee-volunteer-prisoner-sarah-mardini-and-europe-s-hardening-
    #criminalisation #délit_de_solidarité #asile #migrations #solidarité #réfugiés #Grèce #Lesbos #Moria #camps_de_réfugiés #Europe

    Avec une frise chronologique:

    ping @reka

  • Le #Racist_Violence_Recording_Network (#RVRN), un réseau qui recense les violences racistes en Grèce auquel participe 46 ONG et associations de la société civile, vient de présenter son #rapport annuel pour 2018. (le rapport est accessible en anglais en cliquant ici:http://rvrn.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/RVRN_report_2018en.pdf

    On y constate une recrudescence inquiétante de violences racistes dont la grande majorité des victimes sont des réfugiés et des migrants. Parmi les 117 incidents répertoriés, 74 ont eu pour cible des migrants et des réfugiés. Le rapport constate un renforcement de l’action des groupes organisés d’#extrême_droite qui se revendiquent comme tels et dont les attaques sont souvent planifiées d’avance. Un scénario typique est celui de la #poursuite_en_voiture des réfugiés sortant ou rentrant à un camp par un groupe d’individus qui les attaquent à coup des pieds et de barres, en visant surtout les parties visibles du corps et le visage, afin d’y provoquer des marques dans un but d’#intimidation.

    Particulièrement alarmant est le fait que les #violences_racistes de la part de #forces_de_l’ordre ont plus que doublé l’année dernière, et notamment à #Lesbos, au port de #Patras et à la frontière gréco-turque terrestre en #Thrace. On dénombre 22 incidents racistes dont les auteurs sont des policiers au lieu de 10 pour 2017, et ce ne sont que les incidents qui ont été dénoncés tandis que plusieurs autres sont sans doute passés sous silence.

    –-> message reçu de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop

    #rapport #Grèce #violence #racisme #xénophobie #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Evros #violences_policières #statistiques #chiffres #2018 #homophobie #attaques_racistes

  • #Giles_Duley, survivre pour mieux photographier les victimes de la guerre

    Invité par le Centre international de déminage humanitaire à l’occasion d’une conférence sur les mines à l’ONU, à Genève, le photographe britannique, triple amputé, a survécu par miracle à un engin explosif improvisé en Afghanistan. Ce tragique épisode a décuplé son empathie pour les sujets qu’il photographie et renforcé une vocation

    « Tu es un dur, tu vas vivre, buddy. » Le 7 février 2011, au cœur de l’Afghanistan. Dans l’hélicoptère qui l’emmène d’urgence à l’Hôpital des Nations unies à Kandahar, des soldats américains s’évertuent à maintenir Giles Duley en vie. Incorporé dans la 101e Division aéroportée de l’armée américaine pour photographier l’impact humanitaire de la guerre sur les civils, il vient de sauter sur une mine improvisée. Deux jambes et un bras arrachés. Transféré à Birmingham en Angleterre, il passe 46 jours aux soins intensifs. Il survit. Un miracle. Il subit 37 opérations en un an avant de pouvoir quitter l’hôpital.
    Façonner ma vie future

    Invité par le Centre international de déminage humanitaire (GICHD) à Genève à l’occasion de la 22e Conférence internationale de Mine Action réunissant plus de 300 responsables nationaux et onusiens au Palais des Nations jusqu’à vendredi, ce Britannique de 47 ans n’est pas du genre à s’apitoyer sur son sort. A l’ONU, mardi matin, équipé de ses deux prothèses, il lâchera devant un parterre plutôt rangé : « Si je n’avais plus été capable de faire de la photo, j’aurais préféré mourir en Afghanistan. »

    « J’ai d’emblée perdu mes ressources financières, ma maison, ma fiancée, poursuit Giles Duley. J’ai vécu dans une petite chambre où même ma chaise roulante ne rentrait pas. Tout le monde voulait façonner ma vie future. A moi qui avais été un sportif (boxe et athlétisme), on m’avait dit, un an après l’Afghanistan, que j’allais pouvoir désormais m’intéresser aux Jeux paralympiques de Londres de 2012. » Une remarque offensante pour lui qui voit le handicap comme l’incapacité de faire ce que l’on veut faire.

    « Or aujourd’hui, je fais ce que j’aime. Je suis un meilleur photographe qu’avant. » Dans son appartement de Hastings faisant face à la mer, ce Londonien s’en fait un point d’honneur : son appartement n’est pas aménagé spécialement pour lui. Il rappelle qu’il y a quelque temps, il posait vêtu de noir, avec les amputations visibles, sur un tronc blanc pour un autoportrait, prouvant qu’il acceptait son nouveau physique. « Au British Museum, explique-t-il, il y a bien des statues en partie abîmées qu’on continue de trouver belles. »

    Pour la seule année 2018, Giles Duley, exemple de résilience, a voyagé dans 14 pays. Avec la photo comme raison d’être, de vivre. Pour documenter les horreurs réelles de la guerre : « Je ne suis pas un reporter de guerre. Je suis anti-guerre. Je ne photographie jamais des soldats au combat. » Son empathie pour les sujets qu’il photographie est décuplée. En 2015, le Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU pour les réfugiés (HCR) lui confie un mandat pour raconter la crise des migrants de Syrie en lui donnant pour seule directive : « Suis ton cœur. » Une manière de bien cerner le personnage.

    A Lesbos, l’arrivée de migrants épuisés le touche profondément. Il le confesse au Temps : « Je n’ai pas que des blessures. Mes souffrances physiques et émotionnelles sont quotidiennes. Mais c’est précisément cela qui me connecte aux gens. » Giles Duley n’a plus la même palette de possibilités qu’auparavant. Mais il s’en accommode : « Les limites que je peux éprouver me forcent à davantage de créativité. » D’ailleurs, ajoute-t-il, « les meilleures photos ne sont pas celles qu’on prend, mais celles qu’on nous donne ».
    Une vérité, pas la vérité

    Quand, en 2014, il rencontre Khouloud dans un camp de réfugiés dans la vallée de la Bekaa au Liban, il est touché par cette Syrienne, atteinte par un sniper à la colonne vertébrale et alitée dans une tente de fortune depuis plusieurs mois. Un cliché la montre en compagnie de son mari, « une scène d’amour » davantage qu’une scène dramatique dans un camp de réfugiés, relève-t-il. Deux ans après sa première rencontre, il constate que Khouloud est toujours dans la même tente. La situation l’insupporte. Il lance une campagne de financement participatif pour lui venir en aide. Un jour, il recevra de Khouloud, médicalement traitée aux Pays-Bas, un message disant « Vous m’avez redonné ma vie. »

    Giles Duley reste honnête. Ses photos ne représentent pas la réalité, mais une réalité qu’il a choisie. Préférant le noir et blanc, il aime utiliser un drap blanc comme seul arrière-fond pour effacer tout contexte : « Si je photographie une personne dans un camp de réfugiés, on va se limiter à la voir comme une réfugiée. Or elle est bien autre chose. Elle n’est pas née réfugiée. »
    La puissance de l’esprit

    Aujourd’hui directeur de sa fondation Legacy of War, Giles Duley estime être « l’homme le plus chanceux du monde » à voir les milliers de mutilés qui croupissent dans des conditions de vie inacceptables. Dans une interview avec Giles Duley, Melissa Fleming, directrice de la communication au HCR, le relève : « Au cours de toute ma vie, je n’ai jamais rencontré une personne aussi forte, ayant été si proche de la mort et capable de recourir à la puissance de son esprit et de sa volonté pour surmonter » l’adversité.

    La vocation de Giles n’était toutefois pas une évidence. Des cinq frère et sœurs, il est le plus « difficile ». Les études ne le branchent pas, au contraire du sport. Il décroche une bourse d’études aux Etats-Unis pour la boxe, mais un accident de voiture met fin à ses espoirs. Il se lance dans la photo de groupes de rock (Oasis, Marilyn Manson, Lenny Kravitz, etc.) et de mode. Mais un jour, face à une jeune actrice en pleurs dans un hôtel londonien, il réalise que la photo de mode ne le rend plus heureux. Il abandonne, travaille dans un bar, cédant brièvement à la dépression et à l’alcool.
    A 30 ans, une nouvelle vocation

    Mais comme une bouée de sauvetage, il se souvient d’un cadeau laissé par son parrain à peine décédé quand il avait 18 ans : un appareil photo Olympus et Unreasonable Behaviour, l’ouvrage autobiographique de la légende de la photo Don McCullin. Les images du Vietnam et du Biafra le bouleversent. A 30 ans, il identifie sa nouvelle vocation : raconter par l’image l’histoire personnelle des victimes oubliées du cynisme humain à travers la planète. Pour leur donner la chance d’une nouvelle vie. Malgré les douleurs qui ne le lâchent jamais. Ou peut-être à cause d’elles.

    https://www.letemps.ch/monde/giles-duley-survivre-mieux-photographier-victimes-guerre
    #photographie #victimes_de_guerre #handicap #autonomie
    ping @albertocampiphoto @philippe_de_jonckheere

  • A #Lesbos, la dignité perdue des migrants afghans dans le camp de Moria - Asialyst
    https://asialyst.com/fr/2018/10/20/lesbos-dignite-perdue-migrants-afghans-camp-moria

    uir la guerre en Afghanistan, traverser mille morts et se retrouver parqués dans une île grecque. Et attendre. C’est le quotidien des migrants afghans arrivés à Lesbos en Grêce. Ici, le camp de Moria abrite la majorité des 10 000 demandeurs d’asile résidant sur l’île. Marine Jeannin et Sarah Samya Anfis sont parvenues à entrer illégalement dans ce camp interdit aux journalistes par peur des reportages alarmistes. Elles ont trouvé une communauté afghane en proie à la violence, et qui ne reçoit plus ni soins, ni justice.

    #migrations #asile #grèce #camps #méditerranée cc @cdb_77

  • Let the children play: the man who built a playground on Lesbos | World news | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/oct/12/let-the-children-play-man-who-built-playground-lesbos-salam-aldeen

    Eyes glued to the screen, mouths wide open, they watch the final scene of the Disney film Aladdin.

    When the movie ends, the faces of nearly 500 children turn gloomy and tears fall down their cheeks. They come from Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, and the time has come for them to return to their tents and metal containers in the squalid Moria camp on Lesbos. No one is getting out of here on a magic carpet.

    Dozens of the 3,000 minors here have attempted suicide because of overcrowding, squalor and their hopeless situation. But one man is trying to make things a little better for the children abandoned on Europe’s doorstep.

    #migrations #asile #grèce #lesbos

  • Grèce : à Lesbos, le camp réservé aux migrants « est un monstre qui ne cesse de s’étendre » - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/09/20/grece-a-lesbos-le-camp-reserve-aux-migrants-est-un-monstre-qui-ne-cesse-d

    Alors que les dirigeants européens sont réunis à Salzbourg pour évoquer notamment les questions migratoires et la création de « centres fermés », les hotspots surpeuplés des îles grecques se trouvent dans une situation explosive.

    L’annonce n’aurait pu mieux tomber : mardi, le gouvernement grec s’est enfin engagé à transférer 2 000 migrants de l’île de Lesbos vers la Grèce continentale d’ici la fin du mois. Une décision censée décongestionner quelque peu le camp surpeuplé de Moria qui abrite près de 9 000 personnes, dont un tiers d’enfants. Or, depuis plusieurs jours, les ONG installés sur place ne cessent d’alerter sur les conditions de vie abjectes dans ce camp, aux allures de caserne, prévu au départ pour 3 000 personnes.

    Car #Moria est censé accueillir l’immense majorité de réfugiés et migrants qui accostent sur l’île (ils sont aujourd’hui plus de 11 000 au total à Lesbos), en provenance des côtes turques qu’on distingue à l’œil nu au large. Généraliser les #hotspots, ou centres fermés, en Europe : c’est justement l’une des options envisagées par les dirigeants européens réunis jeudi et vendredi à Salzbourg en Autriche. En Grèce, les hotspots créés il y a plus de deux ans, ont pourtant abouti à une situation explosive.

    Moria, comme les autres hotspots des îles grecques, n’est certes pas un centre fermé : ses occupants ont le droit de circuler sur l’île, mais pas de la quitter. En mars 2016, un accord inédit entre l’Union européenne et la Turquie devait tarir le flot des arrivées sur cette façade maritime. Comme Ankara avait conditionné le rapatriement éventuel en Turquie de ces naufragés à leur maintien sur les hotspots d’arrivée, les îles grecques qui lui font face se sont rapidement transformées en prison. Condamnant les demandeurs d’asile à attendre de longs mois le résultat de leurs démarches auprès des services concernés. Certains attendent même une réponse depuis déjà deux ans. Et plus le temps passe, plus les candidats sont nombreux.

    Silence

    Si le deal UE-Turquie a fait baisser le nombre des arrivées, elles n’ont jamais cessé. Rien que pour l’année 2018, ce sont près de 20 000 nouveaux arrivants qui ont échoué sur les îles grecques, où l’afflux des barques venues de Turquie reste quasi quotidien. Selon le quotidien grec Kathimerini, 615 personnes sont arrivées rien que le week-end dernier. Pour le seul mois d’août, Lesbos a accueilli plus de 1 800 nouveaux arrivants. Des arrivées désormais peu médiatisées alors que les dirigeants européens se sont écharpés cet été sur l’accueil de bateaux en provenance de Libye. Et pendant ce temps à Lesbos, la situation vire au cauchemar dans un silence assourdissant.

    Il y a une semaine, 19 ONG, dont Oxfam, ont pourtant tiré la sonnette d’alarme dans une déclaration commune, dénonçant des conditions de vie scandaleuses, et appelant les dirigeants européens à abandonner l’idée de créer d’autres centres fermés à travers l’Europe.

    « Moria, c’est un monstre qui n’a cessé de s’étendre. Faute de place on installe désormais des tentes dans les champs d’oliviers voisins, des enfants y dorment au milieu des serpents, des scorpions et de torrents d’eau pestilentiels qui servent d’égouts. A l’intérieur même du camp, il y a une toilette pour 72 résidents, une douche pour 80 personnes. Et encore, ce sont les chiffres du mois de juin, c’est pire aujourd’hui », dénonce Marion Bouchetel, chargée sur place du plaidoyer d’Oxfam, et jointe par téléphone. « Ce sont des gens vulnérables, qui ont vécu des situations traumatisantes, ont été parfois torturés. Quand ils arrivent ici, ils sont piégés pour une durée indéterminée. Ils n’ont souvent aucune information, vivent dans une incertitude totale », ajoute-t-elle.

    Avec un seul médecin pour tout le camp de Moria, les premiers examens psychologiques sont forcément sommaires et de nombreuses personnes vulnérables restent livrées à elles-mêmes. Dans la promiscuité insupportable du camp, les agressions sont devenues fréquentes, les tentatives de suicide et d’automutilations aussi. Elles concernent désormais souvent des adolescents, voire de très jeunes enfants.

    « Enfer »

    « J’ai travaillé quatorze ans dans une clinique psychiatrique de santé mentale à Trieste en Italie », explique dans une lettre ouverte publiée lundi, le docteur Alessandro Barberio, employé par Médecins sans frontières (MSF), à Lesbos. « Pendant toutes ces années de pratique médicale, jamais je n’ai vu un nombre aussi phénoménal qu’à Lesbos de gens en souffrance psychique », poursuit le médecin, qui dénonce la tension extrême dans laquelle vivent les réfugiés mais aussi les personnels soignants. Sans compter le cas particulier des enfants « qui viennent de pays en guerre, ont fait l’expérience de la violence et des traumatismes. Et qui, au lieu de recevoir soins et protection en Europe, sont soumis à la peur, au stress et à la violence », renchérit dans une vidéo récemment postée sur les réseaux sociaux le coordinateur de MSF en Grèce Declan Barry.

    « Comment voulez vous aider quelqu’un qui a subi des violences sexuelles ou a fait une tentative de suicide, si vous le renvoyez chaque soir dans l’enfer du camp de Moria ? Tout en lui annonçant qu’il aura son premier entretien pour sa demande d’asile en avril 2019 ? Actuellement, il n’y a même plus d’avocat sur place pour les seconder dans la procédure d’appel », s’indigne Marion Bouchetel d’Oxfam.

    Il y a une dizaine de jours, la gouverneure pour les îles d’Egée du Nord avait menacé de fermer Moria pour cause d’insalubrité. Est-ce cette annonce, malgré tout difficile à appliquer, qui a poussé le gouvernement grec a annoncé le transfert de 2 000 personnes en Grèce continentale ? Le porte-parole du gouvernement grec a admis mardi que la situation à Moria était « borderline ». Mais de toute façon, ce transfert éventuel ne réglera pas le problème de fond.

    « Il a déjà eu d’autres transferts, au coup par coup, sur le continent. Le problème, c’est que ceux qui partent sont rapidement remplacés par de nouveaux arrivants », soupire Marion Bouchetel. Longtemps, les ONG sur place ont soupçonné les autorités grecques et européennes de laisser la situation se dégrader afin d’envoyer un message négatif aux candidats au départ. Lesquels ne se sont visiblement pas découragés.
    Maria Malagardis

    Cette photo me déglingue ! Cette gamine plantée là les bras collés contre le buste, jambes et pieds serrés, comme au garde à vous. Et ce regard, cette expression, je sais pas mais je n’arrive pas à m’en détacher ! Et forcément le T-shirt ! Et le contexte du camp avec l’article, ça me flingue.

    #immigration #grèce #Lesbos #camps #MSF #europe

  • Avec ce commentaire de Tihomir Sabchev sur twitter :

    Graph of all actors involved in the refugee reception in Lesvos. Apparently, a civil society led approach. What about local authorities? Only role I see is “Sex management of Kara Tepe”..To fulfill #humanrights we need stronger engagement of local gvmts

    source : https://twitter.com/TihomirSabchev/status/1039761860504023040
    et ici : https://www.opoiesis.com/ressources/3w-map-of-ngos-and-services-in-lesvos

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce #solidarité #société_civile #ONG #associations #visualisation #acteurs
    Et je ressors ici un concept, utilisé par @louca dans sa thèse de doctorat : #projectorat

  • Memorial for drowned refugees completely destroyed on Lesvos

    Unknown perpetrators on the island of Lesvos have completely destroyed the memorial dedicated to the refugees who have lost their lives in the Aegean Sea.

    They have even removed the base of the memorial made of concrete.

    Locals have reported that they saw plastic parts of the memorial floating in the sea, a few days ago.

    The memorial was set up at the edge of #Thermi harbor around six years ago and was dedicated to the victims of older shipwrecks whose bodies were washed ashore in the area.

    Last November, also unknown perpetrators had vandalized the monument. they had thrown black paint on the memorial surface where the victims’ names were written.

    With the help and contributions from local bodies like the fishermen of Thermi and the solidarity collectives the memorial was restored.

    According to local media, there have been often denouncements about the presence of a group of extremists in the area of Thermi. The group was reportedly active against the presence of refugees in local homes, rooms to let and hotels leased by organizations and NGOs.

    So far there has been no reaction to the memorial destruction neither by local bodies nor the police, notes local media lesvosnews.


    http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2018/09/03/memorial-for-drowned-refugees-completely-destroyed-on-lesvos
    #mémoire #monument #vandalisme #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #Lesbos
    signalé par @isskein via FB

    • Ολοσχερής καταστροφή από αγνώστους του μνημείου στη Θερμή για τους πρόσφυγες

      Άγνωστοι κατέστρεψαν ολοσχερώς τις τελευταίες μέρες το μνημείο των προσφύγων που χάθηκαν στα νερά του Αιγαίου, και βρισκόταν στην άκρη του μικρού λιμανιού της Θερμής, οκτώ χιλιόμετρα βόρεια της πόλης της Μυτιλήνης. Μάλιστα εξαφάνισαν ακόμα και την τσιμεντένια βάση του πετώντας την, φυσικά μαζί με όλο το μνημείο, στη θάλασσα. Κάτοικοι της περιοχής αναφέρουν ότι πριν μέρες είδαν πλαστικά τμήματα του μνημείου να επιπλέουν στη θάλασσα.

      Το μνημείο είχε στηθεί πριν από έξη περίπου χρόνια για τα θύματα παλιότερων ναυαγίων, οι σοροί των οποίων είχαν εκβραστεί στην περιοχή. Από τον Οκτώβριο του 2013 δε, πραγματοποιείτο εκεί τελετή μνήμης οργανωμένη από το δίκτυο « Welcome to Europe ». Ας σημειωθεί ότι πέρυσι το Νοέμβριο, άγνωστοι επίσης, είχαν βανδαλίσει το μνημείο πετώντας πάνω στην επιφάνεια του όπου αναφέρονταν τα ονόματα των ναυαγών, μαύρη μπογιά. Τότε είχε επισκευασθεί με τη συμβολή συλλογικοτήτων και τοπικών φορέων όπως οι ψαράδες της Θερμής.

      Ας σημειωθεί ότι όπως επανειλημμένα έχει καταγγελθεί, στην περιοχή της Θερμής λειτουργεί ομάδα ακροδεξιών που στο παρελθόν έχουν κάνει μάλιστα και δημόσιες εμφανίσεις. Εστιάζοντας τη δράση τους εναντίον της παρουσίας προσφύγων σε σπίτια, δωμάτια και ξενοδοχεία που έχουν ενοικιασθεί για τη στέγαση τους από οργανισμούς και ΜΚΟ.

      Μέχρι στιγμής δεν έχει υπάρξει η παραμικρή αντίδραση από τοπικούς φορείς και αστυνομικές αρχές για την καταστροφή του μνημείου.

      http://www.lesvosnews.net/articles/news-categories/koinonia/olosheris-katastrofi-apo-agnostoys-toy-mnimeioy-sti-thermi-gia

  • Vu sur Twitter :

    M.Potte-Bonneville @pottebonneville a retweeté Catherine Boitard

    Vous vous souvenez ? Elle avait sauvé ses compagnons en tirant l’embarcation à la nage pendant trois heures : Sarah Mardini, nageuse olympique et réfugiée syrienne, est arrêtée pour aide à l’immigration irrégulière.

    Les olympiades de la honte 2018 promettent de beaux records

    M.Potte-Bonneville @pottebonneville a retweeté Catherine Boitard @catboitard :

    Avec sa soeur Yusra, nageuse olympique et distinguée par l’ONU, elle avait sauvé 18 réfugiés de la noyade à leur arrivée en Grèce. La réfugiée syrienne Sarah Mardini, boursière à Berlin et volontaire de l’ONG ERCI, a été arrêtée à Lesbos pour aide à immigration irrégulière

    #migration #asile #syrie #grèce #solidarité #humanité

    • GRÈCE : LA POLICE ARRÊTE 30 MEMBRES D’UNE ONG D’AIDE AUX RÉFUGIÉS

      La police a arrêté, mardi 28 août, 30 membres de l’ONG grecque #ERCI, dont les soeurs syriennes Yusra et Sarah Mardini, qui avaient sauvé la vie à 18 personnes en 2015. Les militant.e.s sont accusés d’avoir aidé des migrants à entrer illégalement sur le territoire grec via l’île de Lesbos. Ils déclarent avoir agi dans le cadre de l’assistance à personnes en danger.

      Par Marina Rafenberg

      L’ONG grecque Emergency response centre international (ERCY) était présente sur l’île de Lesbos depuis 2015 pour venir en aide aux réfugiés. Depuis mardi 28 août, ses 30 membres sont poursuivis pour avoir « facilité l’entrée illégale d’étrangers sur le territoire grec » en vue de gains financiers, selon le communiqué de la police grecque.

      L’enquête a commencé en février 2018, rapporte le site d’information protagon.gr, lorsqu’une Jeep portant une fausse plaque d’immatriculation de l’armée grecque a été découverte par la police sur une plage, attendant l’arrivée d’une barque pleine de réfugiés en provenance de Turquie. Les membres de l’ONG, six Grecs et 24 ressortissants étrangers, sont accusés d’avoir été informés à l’avance par des personnes présentes du côté turc des heures et des lieux d’arrivée des barques de migrants, d’avoir organisé l’accueil de ces réfugiés sans en informer les autorités locales et d’avoir surveillé illégalement les communications radio entre les autorités grecques et étrangères, dont Frontex, l’agence européenne des gardes-cotes et gardes-frontières. Les crimes pour lesquels ils sont inculpés – participation à une organisation criminelle, violation de secrets d’État et recel – sont passibles de la réclusion à perpétuité.

      Parmi les membres de l’ONG grecque arrêtés se trouve Yusra et Sarah Mardini, deux sœurs nageuses et réfugiées syrienne qui avaient sauvé 18 personnes de la noyade lors de leur traversée de la mer Égée en août 2015. Depuis Yusra a participé aux Jeux Olympiques de Rio, est devenue ambassadrice de l’ONU et a écrit un livre, Butterfly. Sarah avait quant à elle décidé d’aider à son tour les réfugiés qui traversaient dangereusement la mer Égée sur des bateaux de fortune et s’était engagée comme bénévole dans l’ONG ERCI durant l’été 2016.

      Sarah a été arrêtée le 21 août à l’aéroport de Lesbos alors qu’elle devait rejoindre Berlin où elle vit avec sa famille. Le 3 septembre, elle devait commencer son année universitaire au collège Bard en sciences sociales. La jeune Syrienne de 23 ans a été transférée à la prison de Korydallos, à Athènes, dans l’attente de son procès. Son avocat a demandé mercredi sa remise en liberté.

      Ce n’est pas la première fois que des ONG basées à Lesbos ont des soucis avec la justice grecque. Des membres de l’ONG espagnole Proem-Aid avaient aussi été accusés d’avoir participé à l’entrée illégale de réfugiés sur l’île. Ils ont été relaxés en mai dernier. D’après le ministère de la Marine, 114 ONG ont été enregistrées sur l’île, dont les activités souvent difficilement contrôlables inquiètent le gouvernement grec et ses partenaires européens.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Une-ONG-accusee-d-aide-a-l-entree-irreguliere-de-migrants

      #grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #délit_de_solidarité

    • Arrest of Syrian ’hero swimmer’ puts Lesbos refugees back in spotlight

      Sara Mardini’s case adds to fears that rescue work is being criminalised and raises questions about NGO.

      Greece’s high-security #Korydallos prison acknowledges that #Sara_Mardini is one of its rarer inmates. For a week, the Syrian refugee, a hero among human rights defenders, has been detained in its women’s wing on charges so serious they have elicited baffled dismay.

      The 23-year-old, who saved 18 refugees in 2015 by swimming their waterlogged dingy to the shores of Lesbos with her Olympian sister, is accused of people smuggling, espionage and membership of a criminal organisation – crimes allegedly committed since returning to work with an NGO on the island. Under Greek law, Mardini can be held in custody pending trial for up to 18 months.

      “She is in a state of disbelief,” said her lawyer, Haris Petsalnikos, who has petitioned for her release. “The accusations are more about criminalising humanitarian action. Sara wasn’t even here when these alleged crimes took place but as charges they are serious, perhaps the most serious any aid worker has ever faced.”

      Mardini’s arrival to Europe might have gone unnoticed had it not been for the extraordinary courage she and younger sister, Yusra, exhibited guiding their boat to safety after the engine failed during the treacherous crossing from Turkey. Both were elite swimmers, with Yusra going on to compete in the 2016 Rio Olympics.

      The sisters, whose story is the basis of a forthcoming film by the British director Stephen Daldry, were credited with saving the lives of their fellow passengers. In Germany, their adopted homeland, the pair has since been accorded star status.

      It was because of her inspiring story that Mardini was approached by Emergency Response Centre International, ERCI, on Lesbos. “After risking her own life to save 18 people … not only has she come back to ground zero, but she is here to ensure that no more lives get lost on this perilous journey,” it said after Mardini agreed to join its ranks in 2016.

      After her first stint with ERCI, she again returned to Lesbos last December to volunteer with the aid group. And until 21 August there was nothing to suggest her second spell had not gone well. But as Mardini waited at Mytilini airport to head back to Germany, and a scholarship at Bard College in Berlin, she was arrested. Soon after that, police also arrested ERCI’s field director, Nassos Karakitsos, a former Greek naval force officer, and Sean Binder, a German volunteer who lives in Ireland. All three have protested their innocence.

      The arrests come as signs of a global clampdown on solidarity networks mount. From Russia to Spain, European human rights workers have been targeted in what campaigners call an increasingly sinister attempt to silence civil society in the name of security.

      “There is the concern that this is another example of civil society being closed down by the state,” said Jonathan Cooper, an international human rights lawyer in London. “What we are really seeing is Greek authorities using Sara to send a very worrying message that if you volunteer for refugee work you do so at your peril.”

      But amid concerns about heavy-handed tactics humanitarians face, Greek police say there are others who see a murky side to the story, one ofpeople trafficking and young volunteers being duped into participating in a criminal network unwittingly. In that scenario,the Mardini sisters would make prime targets.

      Greek authorities spent six months investigating the affair. Agents were flown into Lesbos from Athens and Thessaloniki. In an unusually long and detailed statement, last week, Mytilini police said that while posing as a non-profit organisation, ERCI had acted with the sole purpose of profiteering by bringing people illegally into Greece via the north-eastern Aegean islands.

      Members had intercepted Greek and European coastguard radio transmissions to gain advance notification of the location of smugglers’ boats, police said, and that 30, mostly foreign nationals, were lined up to be questioned in connection with the alleged activities. Other “similar organisations” had also collaborated in what was described as “an informal plan to confront emergency situations”, they added.

      Suspicions were first raised, police said, when Mardini and Binder were stopped in February driving a former military 4X4 with false number plates. ERCI remained unnamed until the release of the charge sheets for the pair and that of Karakitsos.

      Lesbos has long been on the frontline of the refugee crisis, attracting idealists and charity workers. Until a dramatic decline in migration numbers via the eastern Mediterranean in March 2016, when a landmark deal was signed between the EU and Turkey, the island was the main entry point to Europe.

      An estimated 114 NGOs and 7,356 volunteers are based on Lesbos, according to Greek authorities. Local officials talk of “an industry”, and with more than 10,000 refugees there and the mood at boiling point, accusations of NGOs acting as a “pull factor” are rife.

      “Sara’s motive for going back this year was purely humanitarian,” said Oceanne Fry, a fellow student who in June worked alongside her at a day clinic in the refugee reception centre.

      “At no point was there any indication of illegal activity by the group … but I can attest to the fact that, other than our intake meeting, none of the volunteers ever met, or interacted, with its leadership.”

      The mayor of Lesbos, Spyros Galinos, said he has seen “good and bad” in the humanitarian movement since the start of the refugee crisis.

      “Everything is possible,. There is no doubt that some NGOs have exploited the situation. The police announcement was uncommonly harsh. For a long time I have been saying that we just don’t need all these NGOs. When the crisis erupted, yes, the state was woefully unprepared but now that isn’t the case.”

      Attempts to contact ERCI were unsuccessful. Neither a telephone number nor an office address – in a scruffy downtown building listed by the aid group on social media – appeared to have any relation to it.

      In a statement released more than a week after Mardini’s arrest, ERCI denied the allegations, saying it had fallen victim to “unfounded claims, accusations and charges”. But it failed to make any mention of Mardini.

      “It makes no sense at all,” said Amed Khan, a New York financier turned philanthropist who has donated boats for ERCI’s search and rescue operations. To accuse any of them of human trafficking is crazy.

      “In today’s fortress Europe you have to wonder whether Brussels isn’t behind it, whether this isn’t a concerted effort to put a chill on civil society volunteers who are just trying to help. After all, we’re talking about grassroots organisations with global values that stepped up into the space left by authorities failing to do their bit.”


      https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/06/arrest-of-syrian-hero-swimmer-lesbos-refugees-sara-mardini?CMP=shar

      #Sarah_Mardini

    • The volunteers facing jail for rescuing migrants in the Mediterranean

      The risk of refugees and migrants drowning in the Mediterranean has increased dramatically over the past few years.

      As the European Union pursued a policy of externalisation, voluntary groups stepped in to save the thousands of people making the dangerous crossing. One by one, they are now criminalised.

      The arrest of Sarah Mardini, one of two Syrian sisters who saved a number of refugees in 2015 by pulling their sinking dinghy to Greece, has brought the issue to international attention.

      The Trial

      There aren’t chairs enough for the people gathered in Mytilíni Court. Salam Aldeen sits front row to the right. He has a nervous smile on his face, mouth half open, the tongue playing over his lips.

      Noise emanates from the queue forming in the hallway as spectators struggle for a peak through the door’s windows. The morning heat is already thick and moist – not helped by the two unplugged fans hovering motionless in dead air.

      Police officers with uneasy looks, 15 of them, lean up against the cooling walls of the court. From over the judge, a golden Jesus icon looks down on the assembly. For the sunny holiday town on Lesbos, Greece, this is not a normal court proceeding.

      Outside the court, international media has unpacked their cameras and unloaded their equipment. They’ve come from the New York Times, Deutsche Welle, Danish, Greek and Spanish media along with two separate documentary teams.

      There is no way of knowing when the trial will end. Maybe in a couple of days, some of the journalists say, others point to the unpredictability of the Greek judicial system. If the authorities decide to make a principle out of the case, this could take months.

      Salam Aldeen, in a dark blue jacket, white shirt and tie, knows this. He is charged with human smuggling and faces life in jail.

      More than 16,000 people have drowned in less than five years trying to cross the Mediterranean. That’s an average of ten people dying every day outside Europe’s southern border – more than the Russia-Ukraine conflict over the same period.

      In 2015, when more than one million refugees crossed the Mediterranean, the official death toll was around 3,700. A year later, the number of migrants dropped by two thirds – but the death toll increased to more than 5,000. With still fewer migrants crossing during 2017 and the first half of 2018, one would expect the rate of surviving to pick up.

      The numbers, however, tell a different story. For a refugee setting out to cross the Mediterranean today, the risk of drowning has significantly increased.

      The deaths of thousands of people don’t happen in a vacuum. And it would be impossible to explain the increased risks of crossing without considering recent changes in EU-policies towards migration in the Mediterranean.

      The criminalisation of a Danish NGO-worker on the tiny Greek island of Lesbos might help us understand the deeper layers of EU immigration policy.

      The deterrence effect

      On 27 March 2011, 72 migrants flee Tripoli and squeeze into a 12m long rubber dinghy with a max capacity of 25 people. They start the outboard engine and set out in the Mediterranean night, bound for the Italian island of Lampedusa. In the morning, they are registered by a French aircraft flying over. The migrants stay on course. But 18 hours into their voyage, they send out a distress-call from a satellite phone. The signal is picked up by the rescue centre in Rome who alerts other vessels in the area.

      Two hours later, a military helicopter flies over the boat. At this point, the migrants accidentally drop their satellite phone in the sea. In the hours to follow, the migrants encounter several fishing boats – but their call of distress is ignored. As day turns into night, a second helicopter appears and drops rations of water and biscuits before leaving.

      And then, the following morning on 28 March – the migrants run out of fuel. Left at the mercy of wind and oceanic currents, the migrants embark on a hopeless journey. They drift south; exactly where they came from.

      They don’t see any ships the following day. Nor the next; a whole week goes by without contact to the outside world. But then, somewhere between 3 and 5 April, a military vessel appears on the horizon. It moves in on the migrants and circle their boat.

      The migrants, exhausted and on the brink of despair, wave and signal distress. But as suddenly as it arrived, the military vessel turns around and disappears. And all hope with it.

      On April 10, almost a week later, the migrant vessel lands on a beach south of Tripoli. Of the 72 passengers who left 2 weeks ago, only 11 make it back alive. Two die shortly hereafter.

      Lorenzo Pezzani, lecturer at Forensic Architecture at Goldsmiths University of London, was stunned when he read about the case. In 2011, he was still a PhD student developing new spatial and aesthetic visual tools to document human rights violations. Concerned with the rising number of migrant deaths in the Mediterranean, Lorenzo Pezzani and his colleague Charles Heller founded Forensic Oceanography, an affiliated group to Forensic Architecture. Their first project was to uncover the events and policies leading to a vessel left adrift in full knowledge by international rescue operations.

      It was the public outrage fuelled by the 2013 Lampedusa shipwreck which eventually led to the deployment of Operation Mare Nostrum. At this point, the largest migration of people since the Second World War, the Syrian exodus, could no longer be contained within Syria’s neighbouring countries. At the same time, a relative stability in Libya after the fall of Gaddafi in 2011 descended into civil war; waves of migrants started to cross the Mediterranean.

      From October 2013, Mare Nostrum broke with the reigning EU-policy of non-interference and deployed Italian naval vessels, planes and helicopters at a monthly cost of €9.5 million. The scale was unprecedented; saving lives became the political priority over policing and border control. In terms of lives saved, the operation was an undisputed success. Its own life, however, would be short.

      A critical narrative formed on the political right and was amplified by sections of the media: Mare Nostrum was accused of emboldening Libyan smugglers who – knowing rescue ships were waiting – would send out more migrants. In this understanding, Mare Nostrum constituted a so-called “pull factor” on migrants from North African countries. A year after its inception, Mare Nostrum was terminated.

      In late 2014, Mare Nostrum was replaced by Operation Triton led by Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, with an initial budget of €2.4 million per month. Triton refocused on border control instead of sea rescues in an area much closer to Italian shores. This was a return to the pre-Mare Nostrum policy of non-assistance to deter migrants from crossing. But not only did the change of policy fail to act as a deterrence against the thousands of migrants still crossing the Mediterranean, it also left a huge gap between the amount of boats in distress and operational rescue vessels. A gap increasingly filled by merchant vessels.

      Merchant vessels, however, do not have the equipment or training to handle rescues of this volume. On 31 March 2015, the shipping community made a call to EU-politicians warning of a “terrible risk of further catastrophic loss of life as ever-more desperate people attempt this deadly sea crossing”. Between 1 January and 20 May 2015, merchant ships rescued 12.000 people – 30 per cent of the total number rescued in the Mediterranean.

      As the shipping community had already foreseen, the new policy of non-assistance as deterrence led to several horrific incidents. These culminated in two catastrophic shipwrecks on 12 and 18 April 2015 and the death of 1,200 people. In both cases, merchant vessels were right next to the overcrowded migrant boats when chaotic rescue attempts caused the migrant boats to take in water and eventually sink. The crew of the merchant vessels could only watch as hundreds of people disappeared in the ocean.

      Back in 1990, the Dublin Convention declared that the first EU-country an asylum seeker enters is responsible for accepting or rejecting the claim. No one in 1990 had expected the Syrian exodus of 2015 – nor the gigantic pressure it would put on just a handful of member states. No other EU-member felt the ineptitudes and total unpreparedness of the immigration system than a country already knee-deep in a harrowing economic crisis. That country was Greece.

      In September 2015, when the world saw the picture of a three-year old Syrian boy, Alan Kurdi, washed up on a beach in Turkey, Europe was already months into what was readily called a “refugee crisis”. Greece was overwhelmed by the hundreds of thousands of people fleeing the Syrian war. During the following month alone, a staggering 200.000 migrants crossed the Aegean Sea from Turkey to reach Europe. With a minimum of institutional support, it was volunteers like Salam Aldeen who helped reduce the overall number of casualties.

      The peak of migrants entered Greece that autumn but huge numbers kept arriving throughout the winter – in worsening sea conditions. Salam Aldeen recalls one December morning on Lesbos.

      The EU-Turkey deal

      And then, from one day to the next, the EU-Turkey deal changed everything. There was a virtual stop of people crossing from Turkey to Greece. From a perspective of deterrence, the agreement was an instant success. In all its simplicity, Turkey had agreed to contain and prevent refugees from reaching the EU – by land or by sea. For this, Turkey would be given a monetary compensation.

      But opponents of the deal included major human rights organisations. Simply paying Turkey a formidable sum of money (€6 billion to this date) to prevent migrants from reaching EU-borders was feared to be a symptom of an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ attitude pervasive among EU decision makers. Moreover, just like Libya in 2015 threatened to flood Europe with migrants, the Turkish President Erdogan would suddenly have a powerful geopolitical card on his hands. A concern that would later be confirmed by EU’s vague response to Erdogan’s crackdown on Turkish opposition.

      As immigration dwindled in Greece, the flow of migrants and refugees continued and increased in the Central Mediterranean during the summer of 2016. At the same time, disorganised Libyan militias were now running the smuggling business and exploited people more ruthlessly than ever before. Migrant boats without satellite phones or enough provision or fuel became increasingly common. Due to safety concerns, merchant vessels were more reluctant to assist in rescue operations. The death toll increased.
      A Conspiracy?

      Frustrated with the perceived apathy of EU states, Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) responded to the situation. At its peak, 12 search and rescue NGO vessels were operating in the Mediterranean and while the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) paused many of its operations during the fall and winter of 2016, the remaining NGO vessels did the bulk of the work. Under increasingly dangerous weather conditions, 47 per cent of all November rescues were carried out by NGOs.

      Around this time, the first accusations were launched against rescue NGOs from ‘alt-right’ groups. Accusations, it should be noted, conspicuously like the ones sounded against Mare Nostrum. Just like in 2014, Frontex and EU-politicians followed up and accused NGOs of posing a “pull factor”. The now Italian vice-prime minister, Luigi Di Maio, went even further and denounced NGOs as “taxis for migrants”. Just like in 2014, no consideration was given to the conditions in Libya.

      Moreover, NGOs were falsely accused of collusion with Libyan smugglers. Meanwhile Italian agents had infiltrated the crew of a Save the Children rescue vessel to uncover alleged secret evidence of collusion. The German Jugendrettet NGO-vessel, Iuventa, was impounded and – echoing Salam Aldeen’s case in Greece – the captain accused of collusion with smugglers by Italian authorities.

      The attacks to delegitimise NGOs’ rescue efforts have had a clear effect: many of the NGOs have now effectively stopped their operations in the Mediterranean. Lorenzo Pezzani and Charles Heller, in their report, Mare Clausum, argued that the wave of delegitimisation of humanitarian work was just one part of a two-legged strategy – designed by the EU – to regain control over the Mediterranean.
      Migrants’ rights aren’t human rights

      Libya long ago descended into a precarious state of lawlessness. In the maelstrom of poverty, war and despair, migrants and refugees have become an exploitable resource for rivalling militias in a country where two separate governments compete for power.

      In November 2017, a CNN investigation exposed an entire industry involving slave auctions, rape and people being worked to death.

      Chief spokesman of the UN Migration Agency, Leonard Doyle, describes Libya as a “torture archipelago” where migrants transiting have no idea that they are turned into commodities to be bought, sold and discarded when they have no more value.

      Migrants intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) are routinely brought back to the hellish detention centres for indefinite captivity. Despite EU-leaders’ moral outcry following the exposure of the conditions in Libya, the EU continues to be instrumental in the capacity building of the LCG.

      Libya hadn’t had a functioning coast guard since the fall of Gaddafi in 2011. But starting in late 2016, the LCG received increasing funding from Italy and the EU in the form of patrol boats, training and financial support.

      Seeing the effect of the EU-Turkey deal in deterring refugees crossing the Aegean Sea, Italy and the EU have done all in their power to create a similar approach in Libya.
      The EU Summit

      Forty-two thousand undocumented migrants have so far arrived at Europe’s shores this year. That’s a fraction of the more than one million who arrived in 2015. But when EU leaders met at an “emergency summit” in Brussels in late June, the issue of migration was described by Chancellor Merkel as a “make or break” for the Union. How does this align with the dwindling numbers of refugees and migrants?

      Data released in June 2018 showed that Europeans are more concerned about immigration than any other social challenge. More than half want a ban on migration from Muslim countries. Europe, it seems, lives in two different, incompatible realities as summit after summit tries to untie the Gordian knot of the migration issue.

      Inside the courthouse in Mytilini, Salam Aldeen is questioned by the district prosecutor. The tropical temperature induces an echoing silence from the crowded spectators. The district prosecutor looks at him, open mouth, chin resting on her fist.

      She seems impatient with the translator and the process of going from Greek to English and back. Her eyes search the room. She questions him in detail about the night of arrest. He answers patiently. She wants Salam Aldeen and the four crew members to be found guilty of human smuggling.

      Salam Aldeen’s lawyer, Mr Fragkiskos Ragkousis, an elderly white-haired man, rises before the court for his final statement. An ancient statuette with his glasses in one hand. Salam’s parents sit with scared faces, they haven’t slept for two days; the father’s comforting arm covers the mother’s shoulder. Then, like a once dormant volcano, the lawyer erupts in a torrent of pathos and logos.

      “Political interests changed the truth and created this wicked situation, playing with the defendant’s freedom and honour.”

      He talks to the judge as well as the public. A tragedy, a drama unfolds. The prosecutor looks remorseful, like a small child in her large chair, almost apologetic. Defeated. He’s singing now, Ragkousis. Index finger hits the air much like thunder breaks the night sounding the roar of something eternal. He then sits and the room quiets.

      It was “without a doubt” that the judge acquitted Salam Aldeen and his four colleagues on all charges. The prosecutor both had to determine the defendants’ intention to commit the crime – and that the criminal action had been initialised. She failed at both. The case, as the Italian case against the Iuventa, was baseless.

      But EU’s policy of externalisation continues. On 17 March 2018, the ProActiva rescue vessel, Open Arms, was seized by Italian authorities after it had brought back 217 people to safety.

      Then again in June, the decline by Malta and Italy’s new right-wing government to let the Aquarious rescue-vessel dock with 629 rescued people on board sparked a fierce debate in international media.

      In July, Sea Watch’s Moonbird, a small aircraft used to search for migrant boats, was prevented from flying any more operations by Maltese authorities; the vessel Sea Watch III was blocked from leaving harbour and the captain of a vessel from the NGO Mission Lifeline was taken to court over “registration irregularities“.

      Regardless of Europe’s future political currents, geopolitical developments are only likely to continue to produce refugees worldwide. Will the EU alter its course as the crisis mutates and persists? Or are the deaths of thousands the only possible outcome?

      https://theferret.scot/volunteers-facing-jail-rescuing-migrants-mediterranean

  • #Grèce : Des enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’école

    À cause de sa politique migratoire appuyée par l’Union européenne qui bloque des milliers d’enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de la mer Égée, la Grèce prive ces enfants de leur droit à l’éducation, a déclaré Human Rights Watch aujourd’hui.
    Le rapport de 51 pages, intitulé « ‘Without Education They Lose Their Future’ : Denial of Education to Child Asylum Seekers on the Greek Islands » (« ‘Déscolarisés, c’est leur avenir qui leur échappe’ : Les enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’éducation sur les îles grecques », résumé et recommandations disponibles en français), a constaté que moins de 15 % des enfants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, soit plus de 3 000, étaient inscrits dans des établissements publics à la fin de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, et que dans les camps que gère l’État dans les îles, seuls une centaine, tous des élèves de maternelle, avaient accès à l’enseignement officiel. Les enfants demandeurs d’asile vivant dans les îles grecques sont exclus des opportunités d’instruction qu’ils auraient dans la partie continentale du pays. La plupart de ceux qui ont pu aller en classe l’ont fait parce qu’ils ont pu quitter les camps gérés par l’État grâce à l’aide des autorités locales ou de volontaires.

    « La Grèce devrait abandonner sa politique consistant à confiner aux îles les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles, puisque depuis deux ans, l’État s’est avéré incapable d’y scolariser les enfants », a déclaré Bill Van Esveld, chercheur senior de la division Droits des enfants à Human Rights Watch. « Abandonner ces enfants sur des îles où ils ne peuvent pas aller en classe leur fait du tort et viole les propres lois de la Grèce. »

    Human Rights Watch s’est entretenue avec 107 enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, ainsi qu’avec des responsables du ministère de l’Éducation, de l’ONU et de groupes humanitaires locaux. Elle a également examiné la législation en vigueur.

    L’État grec applique une politique appuyée par l’UE qui consiste à maintenir dans les îles les demandeurs d’asile qui arrivent de Turquie par la mer jusqu’à ce que leurs dossiers de demande d’asile soient traités. Le gouvernement soutient que ceci est nécessaire au regard de l’accord migratoire que l’EU et la Turquie ont signé en mars 2016. Le processus de traitement est censé être rapide et les personnes appartenant aux groupes vulnérables sont censées en être exemptées. Mais Human Rights Watch a parlé à des familles qui avaient été bloquées jusqu’à 11 mois dans les camps, souvent à cause des longs délais d’attente pour être convoqué aux entretiens relatifs à leur demande d’asile, ou parce qu’elles ont fait appel du rejet de leur demande.

    Même si l’État grec a transféré plus de 10 000 demandeurs d’asile vers la Grèce continentale depuis novembre, il refuse de mettre fin à sa politique de confinement. En avril 2018, la Cour suprême grecque a invalidé cette politique pour les nouveaux arrivants. Au lieu d’appliquer ce jugement, le gouvernement a émis une décision administrative et promulgué une loi afin de rétablir la politique.

    D’après la loi grecque, la scolarité est gratuite et obligatoire pour tous les enfants de 5 à 15 ans, y compris ceux qui demandent l’asile. Le droit international garantit à tous les enfants le même droit de recevoir un enseignement primaire et secondaire, sans discrimination. Les enfants vivant en Grèce continentale, non soumis à la politique de confinement, ont pu s’inscrire dans l’enseignement officiel.

    Selon l’office humanitaire de la Commission européenne, ECHO, « l’éducation est cruciale » pour les filles et garçons touchés par des crises. Cette institution ajoute que l’éducation permet aux enfants de « retrouver un certain sens de normalité et de sécurité », d’acquérir des compétences importantes pour leur vie, et que c’est « un des meilleurs outils pour investir dans leur avenir, ainsi que dans la paix, la stabilité et la croissance économique de leur pays ».

    Une fille afghane de 12 ans, qui avait séjourné pendant six mois dans un camp géré par l’État grec dans les îles, a déclaré qu’avant de fuir la guerre, elle était allée à l’école pendant sept ans, et qu’elle voulait y retourner. « Si nous n’étudions pas, nous n’aurons pas d’avenir et nous ne pourrons pas réussir, puisque nous [ne serons pas] instruits, nous ne saurons parler aucune langue étrangère », a-t-elle déclaré.

    Plusieurs groupes non gouvernementaux prodiguent un enseignement informel aux enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles, mais d’après les personnes qui y travaillent, rien ne peut remplacer l’enseignement officiel. Par exemple il existe une école de ce type dans le camp de Moria géré par l’État sur l’île de Lesbos, mais elle ne dispose qu’à temps partiel d’une salle dans un préfabriqué, ce qui signifie que les enfants ne peuvent recevoir qu’une heure et demie d’enseignement par jour. « Ils font de leur mieux et nous leur en sommes reconnaissants, mais ce n’est pas une véritable école », a fait remarquer un père.

    D’autres assurent le transport vers des écoles situées à l’extérieur des camps, mais ne peuvent pas emmener les enfants qui sont trop jeunes pour s’y rendre tout seuls. Certains élèves vivant à l’extérieur des camps de l’État suivent un enseignement informel et ont également reçu l’aide de volontaires ou de groupes non gouvernementaux afin de s’inscrire dans l’enseignement public. Ainsi des volontaires ont aidé un garçon kurde de 13 ans vivant à Pipka, un site situé à l’extérieur des camps de l’île de Lesbos, désormais menacé de fermeture, à s’inscrire dans un établissement public, où il est déjà capable de suivre la classe en grec

    Des parents et des enseignants estimaient que la routine scolaire pourrait aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile à se remettre des expériences traumatisantes qu’ils ont vécues dans leurs pays d’origine et lors de leur fuite. À l’inverse, le manque d’accès à l’enseignement, combiné aux insuffisances du soutien psychologique, exacerbe le stress et l’anxiété qui découlent du fait d’être coincé pendant des mois dans des camps peu sûrs et surpeuplés. Évoquant les conditions du camp de Samos, une fille de 17 ans qui a été violée au Maroc a déclaré : « [ça] me rappelle ce que j’ai traversé. Moi, j’espérais être en sécurité. »

    Le ministère grec de la Politique d’immigration, qui est responsable de la politique de confinement et des camps des îles, n’a pas répondu aux questions que Human Rights Watch lui avait adressées au sujet de la scolarisation des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants vivant dans ces îles. Plusieurs professionnels de l’éducation ont déclaré qu’il existait un manque de transparence autour de l’autorité que le ministère de l’Immigration exerçait sur l’enseignement dans les îles. Une commission du ministère de l’Éducation sur la scolarisation des réfugiés a rapporté en 2017 que le ministère de l’Immigration avait fait obstacle à certains projets visant à améliorer l’enseignement dans les îles.

    Le ministère de l’Éducation a mis en place deux programmes clés pour aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile de toute la Grèce qui ne parlent pas grec et ont souvent été déscolarisés pendant des années, à intégrer l’enseignement public et à y réussir, mais l’un comme l’autre excluaient la plupart des enfants vivant dans les camps des îles gérés par l’État.

    En 2018, le ministère a ouvert des écoles maternelles dans certains camps des îles, et en mai, environ 32 enfants d’un camp géré par une municipalité de Lesbos ont pu s’inscrire dans des écoles primaires – même si l’année scolaire se terminait en juin. Le ministère a déclaré que plus de 1 100 enfants demandeurs d’asile avaient fréquenté des écoles des îles à un moment ou un autre de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, mais apparemment ils étaient nombreux à avoir quitté les îles avant la fin de l’année.

    Une loi adoptée en juin a permis de clarifier le droit à l’éducation des demandeurs d’asile et, le 9 juillet, le ministère de l’Éducation a déclaré qu’il prévoyait d’ouvrir 15 classes supplémentaires destinées aux enfants demandeurs d’asile des îles pour l’année scolaire 2018-2019. Ce serait une mesure très positive, à condition qu’elle soit appliquée à temps, contrairement aux programmes annoncés les années précédentes. Même dans ce cas, elle laisserait sur le carreau la majorité des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés, à moins que le nombre d’enfants vivant dans les îles ne diminue.

    « La Grèce a moins de deux mois devant elle pour veiller à ce que les enfants qui ont risqué leur vie pour atteindre ses rivages puissent aller en classe lorsque l’année scolaire débutera, une échéance qu’elle n’a jamais réussi à respecter auparavant », a conclu Bill Van Esveld. « L’Union européenne devrait encourager le pays à respecter le droit de ces enfants à l’éducation en renonçant à sa politique de confinement et en autorisant les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles à quitter les îles pour qu’ils puissent accéder à l’enseignement et aux services dont ils ont besoin. »

    https://www.hrw.org/fr/news/2018/07/18/grece-des-enfants-demandeurs-dasile-prives-decole
    #enfance #enfants #éducation #îles #mer_Egée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #école #éducation #rapport #Lesbos #Samos #Chios

    Lien vers le rapport :
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/07/18/without-education-they-lose-their-future/denial-education-child-asylum-seekers

  • Greek gunboat on patrol nudged by Turkish cargo vessel: Navy | Reuters
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-greece-gunboat/greek-gunboat-on-patrol-nudged-by-turkish-cargo-vessel-navy-idUSKBN1I50FQ

    A Greek gunboat was nudged by a Turkish cargo vessel early on Friday while on patrol for unauthorized migrant crossings in the Aegean Sea, the Greek navy said.

    The gunboat “Armatolos” was on patrol off the island of #Lesbos as part of a NATO operation when the incident occurred at 4 a.m. local time (0100 GMT).

    The Turkish-flagged vessel “approached and touched” the Greek gunboat, the navy said in a statement. It then accelerated toward Turkish shores and did not respond to subsequent radio calls from the Greek gunboat, according to the statement.

    The Greek navy said NATO authorities had been informed, adding that there were no injuries or any serious damage to the ship. Turkey’s transport ministry later confirmed that there were no casualties on either side following the collision.

    • Deux versions très différentes de l’incident :

      • Chine Nouvelle reprend le communiqué de la marine grecque : incident mineur et délit de fuite

      Minor collision between Turkish merchant vessel, Greek navy ship - Xinhua | English.news.cn
      http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-05/04/c_137156430.htm

      The Hellenic Navy General Staff on Friday announced that a Turkish-flagged merchant ship “Karmate” approached and slightly collided with the Hellenic Navy gunboat “Armatolos” in the sea southeast of Lesvos island in the early hours of Friday morning.

      According to the announcement posted on Greek national news agency AMNA, there were no injuries or serious damage and no pollution of the marine environment as a result.

      Noting that the Turkish ship had been in violation of navigation rules for avoiding collisions at sea, it added that the Greek side will take all the necessary steps for the imposition of penal and civil sanctions on the basis of international maritime law.

      After striking the Greek gunboat, the “Karmate” increased speed and sailed toward the nearest Turkish shore, ignoring attempts by the “Armatolos” to hail it on the radio.

      Coast guard authorities and NATO authorities have also been alerted to the incident, which took place during a planned patrol by the “Armatolos” during the NATO operation “Aegean Activity” to combat migration flows in the Aegean.

      • pour ZeroHedge on est au bord de la énième guerre gréco-turque…

      Turkish Cargo Vessel Rams Greek Warship In Aegean Sea | Zero Hedge
      https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-05-04/turkish-cargo-vessel-rams-greek-warship-aegean-sea

      In the last three months, tensions between two NATO member states have escalated dramatically - Turkey has threatened to invade Greek islands, Greece has responded, and Greeks now see Turkey as the greatest threat to their existence., but today it appears the situation may have escalated dramatically as Turkish cargo ship KARMATE has collided with the Greek warship ’Armatolos’ despite warnings that it was on collision course.

      Le reste reprend le texte d’un site d’informations grec de langue anglaise paraphrasant la dépêche Reuters.