• Les secrets de la surface
    Les mathématiques selon#Maryam_Mirzakhani
    est visible sur arte.
    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/109799-000-A/les-secrets-de-la-surface

    Portrait de la mathématicienne iranienne, Maryam Mirzakhani, première femme à obtenir la Médaille Field, brillante et discrète, à travers les témoignages de ses collègues et de ses proches. De son enfance en Iran à ses travaux sur les surfaces, le parcours très inspirant d’une remarquable scientifique, disparue trop tôt.

    Film mentionné déjà par @fil https://seenthis.net/messages/836775

  • Mary Beth Meehan’s photos dissolve distances between people - CSMonitor.com
    https://www.csmonitor.com/Books/Book-Reviews/2021/1006/Mary-Beth-Meehan-s-photos-dissolve-distances-between-people
    https://images.csmonitor.com/csm/2021/09/1011+BOOKS%20meehan%20pool.jpg?alias=standard_900x600

    By April Austin Weekly Deputy Editor, Books Editor
    Silicon Valley exerts a magnetism like a tractor beam on people from around the world. They come to the San Francisco Bay Area seeking riches, or at least the trickle down from the booming high-tech economy led by Apple, Alphabet (owner of Google), and Facebook.

    The reality, as photographer Mary Beth Meehan depicts in the book “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America,” is strikingly different. Yes, tech companies have created thousands of jobs, she says in an interview, “but the dominant narrative about a ‘utopia’ obscures how life is actually lived, and what it means to be a human being there.” The gap between the ultra-wealthy and ordinary workers – who cannot afford housing and basic necessities even with decent-paying jobs – is widening.   

    Silicon Valley is a microcosm of the broader inequality that divides the nation, according to Meehan. The effects are felt not just economically but socially. “People are living right next to each other and they don’t interact,” she says. To counter this sense of separation, the photographer created portraits that encourage readers to go beyond stereotypes to see the people who make up this amorphous place known as Silicon Valley. The result is a book of images that speaks to the human toll exacted by the relentless economy. 


    Alfredo Sosa/Staff
    Mary Beth Meehan stands in front of one of her mural-sized photographs at the WaterFire Arts Center in Providence, Rhode Island, in August.

    WHY WE WROTE THIS

    From afar, the lives of others can take on a caricature-like quality. Mary Beth Meehan’s photography invites neighbors to see each other more fully.

    The project began with an invitation from Stanford University professor Fred Turner, who brought Meehan to the university with the idea of using photography to go beneath the “streets of gold” myth. Her photographs would help answer questions such as: Who lives in the area? What are the conditions in which they live?  

    It’s not the first time that Meehan has created portraits of individuals in a specific community; her past projects include Brockton, Massachusetts; Newnan, Georgia; and her now-hometown of Providence, Rhode Island. The process she developed in those cities set the template for her work in Silicon Valley. In each of those projects, she spent time getting to know the area. She went out with her camera and knocked on doors, visited houses of worship, and talked with people on the street and in their homes. 

    Meehan’s approach involves capturing people from a cross section of a city’s demographics. “Each individual is her- or himself, but they also represent a community, a whole ecosystem,” she says. Some of her photographs of Newnan and Providence eventually became large-scale banners, the biggest measuring 38 feet wide, that were displayed on public buildings in those cities, furthering dialogues within the communities. 

    Mary Beth Meehan
    A U.S. Army veteran, Cristobal works full time as a security officer at Facebook. He earns $21 per hour, but he can’t afford a home in Silicon Valley. He lives in a backyard shed in Mountain View.
    Meehan, who grew up in a working-class family with immigrant Irish and Italian roots, has made it her lifework to help spark conversations among people of different racial, class, and cultural backgrounds. The essence of her approach is simple but far from easy: “Just go talk to people.” 

    She’s aware that her background as a well-educated white woman might raise questions in some communities that have been historically misunderstood and misrepresented in the media. “I’m interested in all the ways that we see each other incorrectly, and how photography can push against that,” she says.  

    The people in these neighborhoods are far more accustomed to journalists and researchers who have already formed a judgment about the situation before they even ask their first question. Meehan takes a different approach: “Let’s let the people, who are the experts on their own lives, tell us.” 

    Mary Beth Meehan
    Ravi and Gouthami work as pharmaceutical-technology engineers. They would like to make a home and start a family, but with the high cost of housing – their one-bedroom apartment costs $3,000 a month – they are not sure they can afford to stay.

    Meehan has wrestled with photography’s history as a tool of exploitation, in which people with money and access have had the power to shape the dominant narrative. She’s come to the conclusion that the practice of photography needs to be rebuilt in a way that “doesn’t reinscribe the old ruptures.” The answer, she says, is developing deeper collaborations. For her, this means mentoring everyone from schoolchildren to older adults from diverse backgrounds as they find their own paths to self-
    expression through photography. 

    When she makes portraits, Meehan collaborates with individuals to decide where and how they will be photographed, and what they’ll be wearing. Her skill is seen in the deliberateness with which she frames and edits the picture. 

    By highlighting the humanity of each person, Meehan hopes to bring out the viewer’s humanity. This is especially important in a place like Silicon Valley, she says, where the wealthy may not really see the people who clean, cook, and care for them and their families. It’s a place where immigrants arrive seeking the American dream, only to end up struggling to find a foothold. 

    “Each project is pushing against a big system,” she says. “In Silicon Valley, it’s the myth that the economy there is floating all boats.” Why, she argues, can’t some of that enormous wealth go into creating healthy lives for the people there? “That’s the question we’re really asking, and what does that say about the American economy?”

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visage_Silicon_Valley

  • A large-scale installation of portraits by photographer Mary Beth Meehan
    https://events.brown.edu/watson-international-public/event/221928-seeing-silicon-valley

    A large-scale installation of portraits by photographer Mary Beth Meehan on the Watson Institute (111 Thayer Street) and in Stephen Robert ’62 Hall (280 Brook Street). Installation on view October 13, 2021 through May 31, 2023.

    MARY BETH MEEHAN uses photography to transform public spaces, works collaboratively to reflect communities back to themselves, and aims to jolt people into considering one another anew. Combining image, text, and large-scale public installation, Meehan’s work challenges notions of representation, visibility, and equity, and prompts people to talk with one another about what they see. Meehan’s work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe, as well as in publications in the U.K., Europe, and Asia.

    A former artist in residence at Stanford University in 2017, Meehan collaborated with Stanford professor Fred Turner ’84 to produce her first book, Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America, which was published by the University of Chicago Press in Spring 2021. The book is currently in its second printing.

    Meehan has lectured and led workshops at the School of Visual Arts, New York, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. A native of Brockton, Massachusetts, Meehan holds degrees from Amherst College and the University of Missouri, Columbia. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan

  • Mary Beth Meehan on How a Single Photo Can Spark New Conversations – The Hawks’ Herald
    https://rwuhawksherald.com/7862/arts-and-culture/mary-beth-meehan-on-how-a-single-photo-can-spark-new-conversations

    Meehan is an independent photographer, writer and editor whose work has been featured in The New York Times and other publications as well as in internationally prestigious collections. She describes herself as a public art activist, someone who uses art as representational justice that allows others to see across race, gender and religion by sparking conversations about who and what is seen, and by whom. In her lecture, she explained the path of her career and the way she came to understand exactly how an image can spark a new conversation.

    “People want to tell you what their lives are like, if you care,” Meehan said.

    Her first photography installation was put up outside her parents’ house and featured many people from the Brockton community. This public installation prompted many of those featured in her photos to show up and start having conversations with each other and her family, all thanks to a situation that they otherwise never would have been a part of. It was here that Meehan got the idea that the point of her work was to get people to see things differently.

    As she went on to explain, it was following this first installation that she displayed her work in downtown Brockton as part of her “City of Champions” series. This was when her work first started getting widespread attention. Volunteers started to give walking tours of Meehan’s pictures, and one woman even went around and interviewed people about what they thought the photos meant. When one observer got very vocally upset about the pictures, Meehan was able to converse with her about why, that was when she realized just how powerful an image could be.

    However, her most impactful work came about in Newnan, Georgia. As someone who grew up in New England, she explained, her work here became about grappling with her own stereotypes of the South. She visited and revisited Newnan over the course of two years, conducting interviews and witnessing moments that illustrated the community’s identity. However, when her installation “Seeing Newnan,” which featured less-seen members of Newnan’s community, was put on display, it received very vocal online backlash from members of the community. These people even went so far as to complain about and harass Meehan herself. However, the community as a whole fought back against these outliers, showing that the group did not represent everyone’s views.

    “People aren’t rude,” Meehan said after her presentation concluded. “They’re amazing, like heart-to-heart. This stuff isn’t about me. I’m just the lightning rod; the communities and people come out and do the rest.”

    Le seul livre de photos de Mary Beth Meehan en français est :
    Visages de la Silicon Valley

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Photographie #Brockton #Newnan

  • Mary Beth Meehan’s photos dissolve distances between people - CSMonitor.com
    https://www.csmonitor.com/Books/Book-Reviews/2021/1006/Mary-Beth-Meehan-s-photos-dissolve-distances-between-people
    https://images.csmonitor.com/csm/2021/09/1011+BOOKS%20meehan%20pool.jpg?alias=standard_900x600

    Silicon Valley exerts a magnetism like a tractor beam on people from around the world. They come to the San Francisco Bay Area seeking riches, or at least the trickle down from the booming high-tech economy led by Apple, Alphabet (owner of Google), and Facebook.

    The reality, as photographer Mary Beth Meehan depicts in the book “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America,” is strikingly different. Yes, tech companies have created thousands of jobs, she says in an interview, “but the dominant narrative about a ‘utopia’ obscures how life is actually lived, and what it means to be a human being there.” The gap between the ultra-wealthy and ordinary workers – who cannot afford housing and basic necessities even with decent-paying jobs – is widening.

    Silicon Valley is a microcosm of the broader inequality that divides the nation, according to Meehan. The effects are felt not just economically but socially. “People are living right next to each other and they don’t interact,” she says. To counter this sense of separation, the photographer created portraits that encourage readers to go beyond stereotypes to see the people who make up this amorphous place known as Silicon Valley. The result is a book of images that speaks to the human toll exacted by the relentless economy.

    When she makes portraits, Meehan collaborates with individuals to decide where and how they will be photographed, and what they’ll be wearing. Her skill is seen in the deliberateness with which she frames and edits the picture.

    By highlighting the humanity of each person, Meehan hopes to bring out the viewer’s humanity. This is especially important in a place like Silicon Valley, she says, where the wealthy may not really see the people who clean, cook, and care for them and their families. It’s a place where immigrants arrive seeking the American dream, only to end up struggling to find a foothold.

    “Each project is pushing against a big system,” she says. “In Silicon Valley, it’s the myth that the economy there is floating all boats.” Why, she argues, can’t some of that enormous wealth go into creating healthy lives for the people there? “That’s the question we’re really asking, and what does that say about the American economy?”

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages

  • #Nike, la victoire à tout prix

    L’équipementier américain Nike a lancé en 2001 aux États-Unis un groupe d’athlètes de haut niveau, l’Oregon Project, financé par la marque à des fins promotionnelles. Mais en 2019, son entraîneur Alberto Salazar est suspendu par l’Agence américaine antidopage lors des championnats du monde d’athlétisme. Il est accusé d’"incitation à une conduite dopante". La direction de Nike dissout aussitôt le projet.

    Plus disponible sur arte, mais voici la bande-annonce :
    https://ne-np.facebook.com/infobyarte/videos/nike-la-victoire-%C3%A0-tout-prix-thema-arte/324506792744931/?__so__=permalink&__rv__=related_videos

    #sport #Alberto_Salazar #dopage #doping #Nike_Oregon_Project #Oregon_Project #Projet_Oregon #marathon #médecine_du_sport #athlétisme #techniques_d'entraînement #entraînement #violences_psychologiques #Mary_Cain #violences_physiques #poids #performance #optimisation #médicaments #EPO #vaporFly #vapor_fly #technologie #chaussures #AlphaFly #Alpha_Fly #marketing #Peter_Julien #dopage_technologique

  • A conversation with Fred Turner and photographer Mary Beth Meehan | USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
    https://annenberg.usc.edu/events/annenberg-research-seminar/conversation-silicon-valley-culture-expert-fred-turner-and

    Annenberg Research Seminar
    A conversation with Silicon Valley culture expert Fred Turner and photographer Mary Beth Meehan
    Monday, November 8, 2021 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. PT Online

    Acclaimed photographer Mary Beth Meehan and Silicon Valley culture expert Fred Turner join forces to give us an unseen view of the heart of the tech world.

    Photo of Mary Beth Meehan Mary Beth Meehan
    It’s hard to imagine a place more central to American mythology today than Silicon Valley. To outsiders, the region glitters with the promise of extraordinary wealth and innovation. But behind this image lies another Silicon Valley, one segregated by race, class and nationality in complex and contradictory ways.

    Photo of Fred Turner Fred Turner
    With arresting photographs and intimate stories, Seeing Silicon Valley makes this hidden world visible. Join Fred Turner and Mary Beth Meehan as they discuss the making of the book, the role of photography in scholarship, activism and public life, and what it might mean for the technology industry to help us make a truly humane society.

    Speakers:

    Mary Beth Meehan is a photographer known for her large-scale, community-based portraiture centered around questions of representation, visibility, and social equity in the United States
    Fred Turner is Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication at Stanford University

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Fred_Turner #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • EYE TO EYE Photographs and Projects by MARY BETH MEEHAN Digital Catalog - WaterFire Providence
    https://waterfire.org/about-the-waterfire-arts-center/exhibitions/eye-to-eye-photographs-and-projects-mary-beth-meehan-digital-catalog

    The photographic gaze has been much dissected by critics and theorists. Our media-saturated social world is awash daily in casual imagery that vanishes as quickly as it arises.

    Yet photography in the hands of an engaged artist can be transcendent – a silver mirror to the soul. Meehan’s photographs are the result of her radical purpose, a sincere and thoughtful engagement with the people around her, and the revelations that come from such a committed outlook. Her concern over the past two decades has been to examine her own preconceptions and to urge us into a new regard for one another – across differences of race, class, culture, or religion. Reflected in this process we are able to see ourselves more clearly.

    Meehan has spent her career working in American communities, engaging them as ecosystems of interdependent individuals, often challenging the dominant narratives that valorize and celebrate a few and erase and deny the many. Meehan’s stunning portraits allow each of us to behold one another – in the formal sense of the word ‘behold,’ to see a person anew, with a kind, active and attentive regard – with the intention of achieving understanding and sharing respect. In essence, coming Eye to Eye with one another.

    The WaterFire Arts Center is pleased to present work from all four of Meehan’s most recent in-depth projects – from Brockton, Massachusetts, to Providence, Rhode Island, to Newnan, Georgia, to her newest project and book on Silicon Valley, California. In these times of a much needed re-examination of our society’s failure to assure equity and justice for all, we hope these portraits can contribute to this important on-going conversation. The WaterFire Arts Center will be producing a series of talks and community discussions that will extend and amplify the ethos and impact of Mary Beth Meehan’s photographs and projects.

    In 2011 in her hometown of Brockton, Massachusetts, Meehan began installing her work as large-scale banners right in the public square to prompt dialogue and engagement among the people who share space together. These public art projects continued here in Providence with a large-scale collaboration with the Providence Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism, and in Newnan, Georgia, at the invitation of the University of West Georgia. Her most recent banner was just installed in Providence in collaboration with Jessica “The Lady J” Brown, For Freedoms, and the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society. We are pleased to include a sampling of her original banners here.

    “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America,” in collaboration with Fred Turner, has just be

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Exposition #Providence

  • Féminicide présumé dans la Somme : la justice rouvre l’enquête sur la mort de la première épouse du suspect - Le Parisien
    https://www.leparisien.fr/faits-divers/feminicide-presume-dans-la-somme-la-justice-rouvre-lenquete-sur-la-mort-d

    Deux femmes sont décédées à quatre ans d’intervalle dans la même maison en présence d’un même homme. La seconde a subi des coups, probablement à l’origine de sa mort, dimanche dernier, la première serait morte des suites d’une chute dans l’escalier. Le parquet d’Amiens relance les investigations.
    La procureure de la République d’Amiens a ordonné une enquête pour déterminer la responsabilité du suspect dans le décès - alors classé comme un accident - de sa première épouse il y a quatre ans.

    Après le décès de Laurena Domart, 33 ans, survenu le dimanche 8 août à son domicile de Longpré-les-Corps-Saints (Somme), et la mise en examen de son compagnon, Serge B., pour « homicide volontaire sur conjoint », la justice s’intéresse désormais au sort de l’ex-épouse de cet homme de 44 ans. Cette femme, Maryline D., avec laquelle il a eu deux enfants, est décédée en octobre 2017 à l’intérieur du même domicile de Longpré-les-Corps-Saints.

    Selon nos informations, la vice-procureure de la République d’Amiens, Anne-Laure Sandretto, a décidé ce vendredi de rouvrir une enquête pour recherche des causes de la mort. À l’époque, l’enquête avait conclu à l’origine accidentelle du décès « sans intervention d’un tiers ». Selon les explications fournies alors par son mari, la mère de famille aurait fait une chute dans l’escalier en pleine nuit puis serait remontée se coucher avant de subir un malaise et de succomber. Serge avait juste eu le temps d’appeler les secours, qui n’avaient pu que constater le décès de Maryline à leur arrivée. L’homme n’avait à l’époque aucun antécédent judiciaire et n’était pas connu pour des faits de violence conjugale.
    Il évoque les ravages de l’alcool

    Aucun élément matériel ne permet d’établir pour le moment de lien précis entre les décès de Maryline et de Laurena, survenus à quatre ans d’intervalle au sein d’une même maison et en présence d’un même homme. Mais les derniers événements poussent forcément la justice à rouvrir ce dossier. Au cours de sa garde à vue en début de semaine, Serge B. a reconnu avoir porté des coups sur Laurena mais aurait contesté toute intention homicide. Le corps de la victime présentait de multiples traces de coups au visage et à l’abdomen.

    Les faits se seraient déroulés le dimanche 8 août à l’aube. Fortement alcoolisé, l’homme se serait ensuite endormi auprès de sa compagne et n’aurait constaté son décès qu’à son réveil, une dizaine d’heures plus tard. En revanche, il n’aurait pas été interrogé sur le décès de son épouse en 2017.

    Les nouvelles investigations sont confiées aux gendarmes de la section de recherches d’Amiens. L’exhumation de la mère de famille est envisagée dans les prochaines semaines.

  • GoLocalProv | Exhibition Celebrates Photographer Mary Beth Meehan at WaterFire - Inside Art with Michael Rose
    https://www.golocalprov.com/lifestyle/exhibition-celebrates-photographer-mary-beth-meehan-at-waterfire-inside

    Over the last year, the WaterFire Arts Center has become a premier setting for stunning exhibitions. The venue’s latest show celebrates the remarkable capacity of photography to celebrate everyday people and build community. On view through August 22, WaterFire is mounting an excellent survey of large-scale photographs by Providence artist Mary Beth Meehan. The exhibition, appropriately titled Eye to Eye, consists of sensitive and beautiful portraits capturing sitters drawn from regions throughout the United States. Although technology has rendered the world image-sodden, Meehan’s portraits are an antidote to the alienation common in today’s culture.

    The famed French street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson spoke of the importance of “the decisive moment” in making images. For Meehan, great photography can more readily be equated with the decisive individual. Regular people who will not find themselves on magazine covers or as models in advertising campaigns are Meehan’s subjects of choice. She elevates her sitters to the status of popular icons in form and treatment, signifying her care and respect for their diverse and unique experiences.

    One method Meehan employs to highlight her models is the sheer size of her photographs, which are often printed as industrial banners and then adhered to buildings, pushing viewers to reassess their own connectedness. This hierarchy of scale accords the same level of importance to the individuals being photographed as to a billboard in Times Square.

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan

    N’oubliez pas : le premier livre de photographies de Mary beth Meehan a été publié en France chez C&F éditions.


    https://cfeditions.com/visages

  • Rhode Island PBS Weekly | Behind the Myths | Interview de Mary beth Meehan
    https://www.pbs.org/video/behind-myths-ivhbly

    Interview vidéo d’une vingtaine de minutes de Mary Beth Meehan par Bill Batholomew sur PBS (télé locale/nationale équivalent d’un service public aux USA).

    Mary Beth est une photographe-anthropologue, qui aime renvoyer aux gens (aux villes, aux communautés,...) une image de leur collectif. Une image surprenante, souvent de remise en cause. Une image collective portée par des photos individuelles. De grand art.

    Je suis très fier d’avoir publié le premier livre de Mary Beth Meehan, « Visages de la Silicon valley » (https://cfeditions.com/visages)

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan

  • In Silicon Valley, many find it impossible to make ends meet | The Big Issue
    https://www.bigissue.com/culture/books/in-silicon-valley-many-find-it-impossible-to-make-ends-meet

    Facebook, Google and hundreds of other companies that drive our digital lives call Silicon Valley home, but so do people who find it almost impossible to make ends meet, even if they are key to keeping billion-dollar industries running.

    In a new book, photographer Mary Beth Meehan presents a series of portraits that show another side of the people who power the world’s tech capital.

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • #Sortir_du_noir

    Sortir du noir est conçu par les créatrices #Mary_Jimenez et #Bénédicte_Liénard, le travail engage une réflexion pointue et sensible sur la réalité des flux migratoires et notamment par le prisme de la question du #devoir_de_sépulture. La présentation de Sortir du noir aura lieu dans un espace où le spectateur sera proche de l’acteur, en l’incluant dans la scénographie créant ainsi une forme de voyage. La scénographe Sabine Theunissen travaillera à inclure les spectateurs dans une réflexion intime sur la question de #sépulture, le sol jonché de sable, des projections de mer sur les murs, etc. pour s’immerger pleinement dans l’univers sensible et puissant des deux créatrices.

    La présentation comportera un échantillon des #récits récoltés en Tunisie ainsi que d’autres nombreux #témoignages récoltés par les deux porteuses du projet. Le spectacle sera volontairement court afin de porter au mieux l’intensité du propos, créant une situation intime sans créer de malaise. La notion d’une interaction entre image, son, performance vivante sera au service du propos délicat du devoir de sépulture. Le spectacle croisera images et récits pour porter au mieux cette réflexion. Le plateau de théâtre devenant le lieu de la parole des oubliés.

    https://theatredeliege.be/evenement/sortir-du-noir

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #morts #décès #art #spectacle #art_et_politiques #mourir_aux_frontières #morts_aux_frontières

    –-> je signale ici pour archivage

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Mary Beth Meehan: Seeing Silicon Valley - LENSCRATCH
    http://lenscratch.com/2021/05/mary-beth-meehan-seeing-silicon-valley

    “For more than seven decades, business leaders, politicians, and would-be entrepreneurs have tried to unravel the secrets of Silicon Valley. In just over one hundred powerful, haunting pages, Meehan and Turner have captured a side of the valley rarely seen: the deeply inequitable landscape of contingent and disproportionately foreign-born labor that makes its high-tech magic possible. Humane, insightful, and deeply compelling, this book tells the story of Silicon Valley in a completely new and utterly magnetic way.” – Margaret O’Mara, author of The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America

    Photographer Mary Beth Meehan has a legacy of considering the complexity of communities and reminding us of our humanity through her portraits and interviews. For her newest project and book published by the University of Chicago Press, Seeing Silicon Valley, she joined forces with Silicon Valley culture expert Fred Turner to give us an unseen view of the heart of the tech world.

    When considering the population central to this American mythology, we might consider the characters of the television show Silicon Valley–rag tag techies that carry dark under eye circles from long days in front of a screen without sunshine and a small cluster of visionaries who have gotten very rich from technology. But the reality of place is very different. Behind this image lies another Silicon Valley, one segregated by race, class, and nationality in complex and contradictory ways. Its beautiful landscape lies atop underground streams of pollutants left behind by decades of technological innovation, and while its billionaires live in compounds, surrounded by redwood trees and security fences, its service workers live in their cars.

    With arresting photography and intimate stories, Seeing Silicon Valley makes this hidden world visible. Instead of young entrepreneurs striving for efficiency in minimalist corporate campuses, we see portraits of struggle—families displaced by an impossible real estate market, workers striving for a living wage, and communities harmed by environmental degradation. If the fate of Silicon Valley is the fate of America—as so many of its boosters claim—then this book gives us an unvarnished look into the future.

    Mary Beth Meehan uses photography to transform public spaces, works collaboratively to reflect communities back to themselves, and aims to jolt people into considering one another anew. Combining image, text, and large-scale public installation, Meehan’s work challenges notions of representation, visibility, and equity, and prompts people to talk with one another about what they see.

    Meehan’s first book, Seeing Silicon Valley: Life inside a Fraying America, with Fred Turner, is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press in Spring of 2021.

    “Seeing Newnan,” Meehan’s most recent public installation, was featured on the Sunday front page of The New York Times on Martin Luther King Jr. weekend, in January of 2020, and has shifted the dialogue about representation, identity, and race in that small Georgia city.

    Meehan has held residencies at Stanford University, the University of Missouri School of Journalism, and at Brown University upcoming in 2021. She has lectured and led workshops at the School of Visual Arts, New York, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

    A native of Brockton, Massachusetts, Mary Beth holds degrees from Amherst College and the University of Missouri, Columbia. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.
    Book spread 2

    Spread from “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021

    Seeing Silicon Valley

    Seeing Silicon Valley is a collaboration between myself and Silicon Valley culture scholar Fred Turner. During the Fall of 2017 I was invited by Turner to hold an artist’s residency at Stanford University, in order to try to see, ­through my own eyes, what life was like for the thousands of workers in that mythic place. Since then Turner and I have worked together to present what we found – a place, within one of the richest economies in the world, where life is tenuous and where people struggle to find stability, connection, and community. These portraits and narratives are meant to draw viewers in to considering Silicon Valley on an intimate, human scale, and reflecting on what it means for our future.
    From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021

    ©Mary Beth Meehan, RAVI and GOUTHAMI Between them, Ravi and Gouthami have multiple degrees — in biotechnology, computer science, chemistry, and statistics. After studying in India and working in Wisconsin and Texas, they have landed here, in the international center of technology, where they work in the pharmaceutical-technology industry. They rent an apartment in Foster City and attend a Hindu temple in Sunnyvale, where immigrants from India have been building a community since the early 1990s. Although the couple have worked hard to get here, and they make good money, they feel that a future in Silicon Valley eludes them — their one-bed-room apartment, for example, costs almost $3,000 a month. They could move somewhere less expensive, but, with the traffic, they’d spend hours each day commuting. They would like to stay, but they don’t feel confident that they can save, invest, start a family. They’re not sure what to do next. From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021
    From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America”

    ©Mary Beth Meehan, RICHARD Richard has spent his entire adult life in the auto industry, loving his work and making good money. In 2010, the year that GM went bankrupt and the plant he worked at in Fremont closed, he was earning $120,000 a year. After Tesla took over the plant, Richard got a job on the manufacturing floor. He was paid $18 an hour, or less than $40,000 a year. Richard started noticing things that didn’t seem right. As a line worker assembling car doors, he was required to work twelve-hour shifts, five or six days a week. Richard had a home, but he noticed young guys “who came in broke, with a bag of clothes” being hired, working the long shifts, sleeping in their cars, showering in the break room, and doing it again the next day. When a friend invited Richard to meet with the United Automobile Workers union, he agreed. Soon after that, when people complained to him about the low pay or long hours, he’d tell them that with the union, they could stand up for themselves. He handed out buttons and T-shirts, told people they had a choice. “We don’t want to break ’em,” he said of the company. “We just want a little larger piece of the pie — so we can have a cooler of beer every now and then, go camping once in a while.” Though he’d never received a negative review, Richard was fired last October, along with more than four hundred other workers. The UAW has filed a complaint, alleging that Tesla fired workers who were trying to unionize. The worst part for Richard, he says, is that he hears the employees are now too scared to talk about the union. He believes that all his hard work has been in vain. From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021
    From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021

    ©Mary Beth Meehan,WARREN In junior high, in Illinois, before he knew anyone else who had a personal computer, Warren got to play Lemonade Stand on his uncle Bob’s Commodore PET. At thirteen, he attended a computer trade show in Chicago: “I didn’t even know what I was looking at,” he says. “But it was cool. It piqued my curiosity profoundly.” In high school, Warren sought out a friend who could teach him all the workings of computers. After he graduated as his school’s valedictorian, Warren went to Stanford to study engineering and business. Then he became a venture capitalist, backing such fledgling firms as Skype, Hotmail, and Tesla (and turning down the founders of Theranos, one of Silicon Valley’s legendary frauds). Ten years ago, he says, “I did a very Silicon Valley thing”: he called a few of his industry pals to launch Thuuz, a service that creates highlights of sporting events in real time. He runs the company out of a bungalow in Palo Alto, adjacent to his house—just a block away from the garage where Hewlett-Packard began. Warren’s company is small, and while he wants it to be successful, he doesn’t strive to make it one of Silicon Valley’s giants. “Many of those companies are huge because they are willing to cross some lines,” he says—ethical, moral lines. “Steve Jobs was irascible,” he says, “Jobs was tough, Jobs was rude.” But, says Warren, thanks to the iPhone, billions of people in India and China now have access to information. “I put Steve Jobs above that line and say, ‘Yeah, he could have been a jerk, but he’s above that line.’” Warren feels differently about Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg. “He has broken some massive, massive rules,” he says. “He is completely abusing his users.” Facebook has “corrupted our election. They corrupted Brexit, over in Europe. They’ve destroyed minorities in Asia. . . . They are below the line, below the line. Absolutely, below the line.” From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Great Reads in Photography: May 16, 2021 | PetaPixel
    https://petapixel.com/2021/05/16/great-reads-in-photography-may-16-2021

    Every Sunday, we bring together a collection of easy-reading articles from analytical to how-to to photo-features in no particular order that did not make our regular daily coverage. Enjoy!

    Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America — Lenscratch
    From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021
    Elisa and Family © Mary Beth Meehan, courtesy University of Chicago Press. 2021
    Mary Beth Meehan © Molly Heller

    Acclaimed photographer Mary Beth Meehan and Silicon Valley culture expert Fred Turner join forces to give us an unseen view of the heart of the tech world.

    “With arresting photography and intimate stories, Seeing Silicon Valley makes this hidden world visible,” says Aline Smithson in Lenscratch. “Instead of young entrepreneurs striving for efficiency in minimalist corporate campuses, we see portraits of struggle—families displaced by an impossible real estate market, workers striving for a living wage, and communities harmed by environmental degradation.

    “If the fate of Silicon Valley is the fate of America—as so many of its boosters claim—then this book gives us an unvarnished look into the future.”
    From “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” University of Chicago Press, 2021
    Ravi and Gouthami © Mary Beth Meehan, courtesy University of Chicago Press, 2021

    Silicon Valley glitters with the promise of extraordinary wealth and innovation. But behind the façade lies a world segregated by race, class, and nationality in complex and contradictory ways.
    Cristobal was born in Bakersfield, out in the desert. After high school, he served eight years in the Army, including one tour in the Iraq war. He now works full time as a security guard at Facebook. He starts at dawn, guiding cars on and off the campus, and making sure walkers looking down at their phones cross safely. Despite this job, he has no health benefits, and he can’t afford to have a home in Silicon Valley. He’d like to go back to Bakersfield, to be near his mother, but there’s no work there. So he keeps doing his best. Cristobal feels he works hard, and has given back to his country, but his pay forces him to live in a rented repurposed shed, in a back yard in Mountain View. He’s starting to get angry. “Silicon Valley is a shithole,” he says.
    Cristobal © Mary Beth Meehan, courtesy University of Chicago Press, 2021

    “For those who have not been fortunate enough to make billionaire lists, for midlevel engineers and food truck workers and longtime residents, the valley has become increasingly inhospitable, testing their resilience and resolve,” say photographer Meehan and Turner in The New York Times.

    #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan

  • 12 则真实硅谷故事:不一样的硅谷,残酷的人生百态_详细解读_最新资讯_热点事件_36氪
    https://www.36kr.com/p/1220133179347336
    https://img.36krcdn.com/20210512/v2_d8cd77d36e0b4b2783b64ed25a14d3be_img_jpg

    Les journaux chinois en parlent... l’édition originale est en français
    https://cfeditions.com/visages

    则真实硅谷故事:不一样的硅谷,残酷的人生百态
    神译局
    昨天
    关注
    在硅谷看不到未来。

    编者按:作为全球科技精英的圣地,硅谷似乎永远与创新、财富、机会、奇迹、梦想和成功这些令人心潮澎湃的词汇紧密相连。但在创造巨额财富、改变世界进程的同时,硅谷也是美国贫富分化最严重的地区之一,生活成本极其高昂,从赤贫的流浪汉到年入百万的白领精英,硅谷各个阶层的居民们都背负着巨大的生活压力。一起来看硅谷最真实的另一面吧!本文编译自《纽约时报》,作者Mary Beth Meehan和Fred Turner,原标题Seeing the Real Faces of Silicon Valley,希望给您带来启发。

    La véritable histoire de la Silicon Valley : une Silicon Valley différente, une vie brutale
    Le Bureau de la traduction
    Hier
    Suivez
    L’avenir n’est pas en vue dans la Silicon Valley.

    Note de l’éditeur : en tant que Mecque de l’élite mondiale de la technologie, la Silicon Valley semble être associée pour toujours aux mots enivrants d’innovation, de richesse, d’opportunités, de miracles, de rêves et de succès. Mais si la Silicon Valley a créé d’énormes richesses et changé le cours du monde, c’est aussi l’une des régions les plus polarisées des États-Unis. Le coût de la vie y est extrêmement élevé, des sans-abri démunis à l’élite millionnaire en col blanc, les habitants de la Silicon Valley de tous horizons subissent une pression énorme pour vivre. Découvrez le vrai visage de la Silicon Valley ! Cet article a été compilé à partir du New York Times par Mary Beth Meehan et Fred Turner, sous le titre initial Seeing the Real Faces of Silicon Valley, et j’espère qu’il vous inspirera.

    #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Providence photographer captures overlooked truths about Silicon Valley - The Boston Globe
    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/05/11/metro/providence-photographer-captures-overlooked-truths-about-silicon-valley
    https://bostonglobe-prod.cdn.arcpublishing.com/resizer/mqqHgBHUEptHJkF7FfCDhgzWBfI=/506x0/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/bostonglobe/67J7OLM57BGGVAUNUEHMVARROA.jpg

    From Brockton to Providence, from small-town Georgia to Silicon Valley, photographer Mary Beth Meehan is challenging communities to see themselves in new ways, spurring discussions about race and inequality, the economy and the environment.

    “We want people to see beyond the myths of Silicon Valley’s wealth and innovation to the ways in which real people struggle in that environment,” Meehan said. “They struggle in terms of financial security but also to find connection and community.”

    In “Seeing Silicon Valley,” Meehan introduces us to Cristobal, a US Army veteran who makes $21 an hour working as a full-time security officer at Facebook but lives in a shed because he can’t afford a house in the area’s high-priced housing market.

    Meehan said a former colleague connected her to Turner, a Stanford communications professor who was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, lived in Boston for 10 years, and graduated from Brown University. The book was designed by a Providence resident, Lucinda Hitchcock.

    Turner, who now lives two miles from Google headquarters, said Silicon Valley excels at marketing itself. “But the actual community that is here on the ground is much more diverse and much more unequal than the mythology tells us,” he said. “Very few people look or make money like Mark Zuckerberg.”

    Turner said Meehan’s large-scale portraits demonstrated her ability to capture images that tell you something about both the person and their community, and as a Brockton native, she brought to bear a working-class background.

    “I hope people can see that the seemingly magical world of technology depends on the really hard work of a whole lot of different people,” he said. “In the same way that the Industrial Revolution in Boston didn’t just depend on the people who went to Harvard, Silicon Valley is not just the Zuckerbergs and Jobs.”

    Turner said the nation’s industries need to sustain the people that build them – not just a few people at the top. “The lesson is that if you just pursue profit and innovation, you can injure your workers, pollute your landscape, and build a society you wouldn’t want to be a member of,” he said. “We can do a lot better than that.”

    As an artist-in-residence at Stanford, Meehan spent six weeks introducing herself to strangers, sitting in kitchens and living rooms, listening to their stories.

    She said she found tremendous unease among the people there, not only among the cashiers and waiters, but among the tech professionals and other high-income earners. And she found the anxieties of Silicon Valley reflect a nationwide gulf between the rich and the poor – the hollowing out of the middle class.

    “Even though the stock market is doing well, people are struggling,” Meehan said. “If people are not doing well in Silicon Valley, then what does that say about where the country is headed?”

    #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Seeing the Real Faces of Silicon Valley - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/08/business/economy/seeing-the-real-faces-of-silicon-valley.html

    The workers of Silicon Valley rarely look like the men idealized in its lore. They are sometimes heavier, sometimes older, often female, often darker skinned. Many migrated from elsewhere. And most earn far less than Mark Zuckerberg or Tim Cook.

    This is a place of divides.

    As the valley’s tech companies have driven the American economy since the Great Recession, the region has remained one of the most unequal in the United States.

    During the depths of the pandemic, four in 10 families in the area with children could not be sure that they would have enough to eat on any given day, according to an analysis by the Silicon Valley Institute for Regional Studies. Just months later, Elon Musk, the chief executive of Tesla, who recently added “Technoking” to his title, briefly became the world’s richest man. The median home price in Santa Clara County — home to Apple and Alphabet — is now $1.4 million, according to the California Association of Realtors.

    For those who have not been fortunate enough to make billionaire lists, for midlevel engineers and food truck workers and longtime residents, the valley has become increasingly inhospitable, testing their resilience and resolve.

    Here are 12 of them, who originally appeared in our book, “Seeing Silicon Valley,” from which this photo essay is excerpted.

    #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Stanford scholar’s new collaboration reveals the complexities of life in Silicon Valley
    https://news.stanford.edu/press-releases/2021/05/04/revealing-complee-silicon-valley

    To capture what it’s like to live and work in Silicon Valley – for the affluent, those who are barely getting by and the many people in between – Stanford communication professor and Silicon Valley scholar Fred Turner teamed up with renowned photographer Mary Beth Meehan.

    Turner hopes his new project, a collaboration with renowned photographer Mary Beth Meehan, can shine a spotlight on some of the complexities of the region known as the center of tech innovation.

    “I knew that there were things that photographers could see that I couldn’t quite put into words,” said Turner, the Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication in the School of Humanities and Sciences, “I thought that if I worked with a photographer like Mary Beth Meehan I would find a new way to express some of the kinds of things that I wanted to express in academic work but hadn’t really found an idiom for.”

    The result of their academic-artistic collaboration is a new book, Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America, (University of Chicago Press, 2021), an intimate look into the everyday experiences of people who live and work in Silicon Valley, from some of its more wealthy residents to its poorest – and the many people in between. In a collection of over 30 portraits photographed in 2017 and 2019, readers see Silicon Valley workers inside their homes and at their workplaces – images that convey the realities of what life is like in one of America’s wealthiest regions.

    Meehan, who lives in Providence, Rhode Island, had never spent much time in Silicon Valley. What she knew of the region came mostly from stories she read in newspapers and magazines that had for a long time portrayed the region as a place of the future, where tech geniuses were transforming society.

    “Silicon Valley was a mythic idea for me,” Meehan said. “I had this idea of it as a place where everything sparkled, where everything was possible, where people were young and healthy – that it was a place in which all of the best of human ingenuity was put into play.”

    What Meehan encountered was far different from what she imagined.

    “Nothing could have prepared me for the uneasiness and human stress and suffering that went along with being a part of that economy,” Meehan said.

    Over several extended trips, Meehan immersed herself in Silicon Valley culture. She approached strangers she encountered on neighborhood streets and had long conversations with the cashiers she met at the taquerias she frequented. She attended a United Auto Workers meeting and went to a party with tech entrepreneurs – and through these interactions, Meehan began to see themes emerge from the valley’s hustle and bustle.

    Some of Meehan’s observations surprised Turner, particularly the feelings of economic insecurity workers reported experiencing on a daily basis.

    “One of the things that really surprised me was how Mary Beth heard a persistent humming of anxiety in the workers that she was talking with – at every level: from folks at the taqueria up to the executive, C-suite,” he said. “Across the board, you find folks worried about whether they can make it, whether they can survive, whether they can get ahead.”

    The project was supported by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the Stanford Arts Initiative and the Departments of Communication and Art & Art History. An earlier version of the book was published in 2018 by C&F Editions in Paris, France.

    #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Silicon Valley photograph book by Mary Beth Meehan and Fred Turner focuses on the unseen in the uber-rich area - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/silicon-valley-photography-book-mary-beth-meehan/2021/04/30/4867019e-a46f-11eb-85fc-06664ff4489d_story.html

    Four years ago, New England portrait photographer Mary Beth Meehan received a query out of the blue. A professor in California named Fred Turner wanted to collaborate on a project about the people who live and work in Silicon Valley.

    “It was just so bizarre,” Meehan recalls thinking. “It never occurred to me to think of Silicon Valley as an actual place where people lived.”

    This was precisely Turner’s point. A Stanford University historian and professor of communication who has studied Silicon Valley culture for 20 years, Turner has long been troubled by what he calls the “persistent mythology” of the region, a digital ecosystem in Northern California known mainly as the home of Apple, Google and Facebook, and as the hub of billionaire innovators.

    “We tell ourselves that Silicon Valley is a place where heroic geniuses invent products that somehow harness the invisible powers of electricity and information and magically change the world,” Turner said in an interview. “And the heroes in our stories are almost always White men.”

    Everybody else might as well be invisible. “You can literally be here and see the young tech bros not seeing the people cleaning the stores or their houses or the streets,” he said. “It’s a kind of low-key oblivious arrogance that comes from being genuinely brilliant, spending a lot of time with machines, working with code, which is highly abstract and rational, and being rewarded with lots of money.”
    Image without a caption
    Photographer Mary Beth Meehan. (Molly Heller)

    Turner, a photography aficionado, was familiar with Meehan’s work and knew that invisibility is one of her key themes. Her process is to immerse herself in communities and create large-scale portraits of ordinary, uncelebrated people and install them as huge banners on the sides of buildings in downtown areas. Invariably, her installations prompt townwide dialogue about race, inclusiveness and the meaning of community. Meehan’s work also is evocative of JR, the French photographer and street artist, though she has been influenced by many artists who activate public spaces.
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    “A common thread is moving past preconceptions to understand one another,” said Meehan, who has created installations in Brockton, Mass., where she grew up, Providence, R.I., where she lives now, and, most recently, in Newnan, Ga., a small town striving to embrace and celebrate change in the wake of a white nationalist rally there in 2018.

    Meehan was eager to take on a Silicon Valley project, though she and Turner were fuzzy about the end product. Banners were — and continue to be — a consideration, but, Meehan said, “I haven’t been able to get my head around what banners would look like. There’s no central Silicon Valley space. There’s no there there. It’s a conglomeration of towns.”

    They ultimately landed on a book, featuring text and Meehan’s images. “Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America” will be released May 3 by the University of Chicago Press.
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    “Silicon Valley has long been a shining example of those who dream of a society built around individual initiative and enabling technologies,” Turner writes in the introduction. “But what does it feel like to live in such a world? What kind of society does the relentless pursuit of technological innovation and wealth produce?”

    Meehan went to Stanford in the fall of 2018 as an artist in residence and set to work finding the answer. She introduced herself to strangers, sat in their kitchens and living rooms, met them in businesses and shops.

    “I chased them on the street,” she said. “I met people through workers’ rights groups and at a gathering of young tech engineers. I met a couple in a Hindu temple. And then there was the magic of connecting with someone in that moment, photographically.”
    Justyna, one of Meehan’s subjects: “If we want to achieve excellence in technology, why can’t we achieve excellence in being good to each other?”
    Justyna, one of Meehan’s subjects: “If we want to achieve excellence in technology, why can’t we achieve excellence in being good to each other?” (© Mary Beth Meehan)
    Mary came to the United States from Uganda more than a year ago: “I’ve discovered one thing. There are people here who are poorer than we are in Africa . . . because our community cares for each other. . . . This place is lonely.”
    Mary came to the United States from Uganda more than a year ago: “I’ve discovered one thing. There are people here who are poorer than we are in Africa . . . because our community cares for each other. . . . This place is lonely.” (© Mary Beth Meehan)

    She got to know affluent professionals, people behind cash registers and in homeless encampments, rising tech stars, a recent immigrant from Uganda, a food truck worker from Mexico who serves burritos to Tesla employees, a man in his 80s who can’t afford an apartment so he lives in a small trailer a couple of miles from the Google campus; he has no electricity or running water. She met the parents of a 19-year-old girl who had killed herself. They allowed her to photograph the suicide note, in which she apologized and wrote: “i am not super smart or talented.”
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    As Meehan pieced together a narrative about the unseen heart of the tech world, what emerged was a startling view of Silicon Valley.

    “What surprised me, and what stays with me still, was the unease that was palpable in Silicon Valley,” Meehan writes in the book’s afterword. “From those at the lowest end of the economic spectrum to those with higher incomes whose unease was more existential, people conveyed how hard it was to find balance, connection, and community. The sense of distress was so pervasive that I wondered if I was seeing things correctly.”

    Among the people she photographed was the blond-haired Justyna with a piercing gaze, originally from Poland. (No last names are used in the book.) She has a PhD, works on self-driving cars and shares a mansion with other scientists in Cupertino. She told Meehan she used to be idealistic but thinks people have lost track of the core values of integrity, respect for others and being good to each other. “We seem to be losing ourselves,” she said.

    Meehan met Mark, 39, born with severe brain damage. When his mother was pregnant, she worked in the electronics industry making the lasers that scan groceries. She later learned that the greenish substance she was inhaling was toxic — and the cause of her son’s birth defects.
    Image without a caption
    Mark is 39 and needs constant care. His mother worked in a Mountain View electronics plant making laser scanners with a mixture that contained high levels of lead known to cause birth defects. (© Mary Beth Meehan)

    Brenda and Abraham lost their home after the 2008 crash. They lived for a while in improvised shacks that are common in the region, though illegal. They now live in a trailer in a long row of other trailers in Palo Alto, parked in front of the Stanford campus.
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    Mary, from Uganda, told Meehan: “There are people here who are poorer than we are in Africa.”

    She spent a lot of time with Cristobal, an Army veteran who works full time as a contract security officer at Facebook, earning $21 an hour. Meehan agreed to meet him at his home, which turned out to be a shed.

    “I was shocked,” she said. “[Cristobal and I] shared so much anger in the making of that picture. I mean, for God’s sakes. You have a full-time job, you served in the U.S. military. Should a home be so far outside your reach?”

    It was at times like this that the story she and Turner were telling became personal.

    “I was raised by working-class people, and there was a level of security that could be attained by hard work,” she said. “And when I think of the equivalent of that worker toiling away in Silicon Valley, I don’t see the same level of comfort or security or the ability to build a life or build wealth. It’s not a livable economy.

    “I don’t think the difference is in the character and ambitions of these people. I think the difference is in the system they entered. And that’s the part we’re not talking about.”

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Fred_Turner #Visages_Silicon_Valley

  • Visual Arts Review: “Seeing Silicon Valley” - Our Future Dystopia? - The Arts Fuse
    https://artsfuse.org/227474/visual-arts-review-seeing-silicon-valley-our-future-dystopia

    Meanwhile, Turner, now Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communications at Stanford, had embarked on similarly disillusioning project. Turner, who lives in Mountain View, in the heart of Silicon Valley, had studied the region’s culture for some two decades. In 2017, he invited Mary Beth Meehan, known for her “large-scale, community-based portraiture,” to spend six weeks in the Valley, photographing its inhabitants and listening to their stories.

    “He told me that he was troubled by the power of the region’s mythology,” Meehan recalls, “and wanted people to see the place as it is. He asked if I’d be willing to come and try to see it through my own eyes.” After her work got underway, Turner asked Meehan to his house once a week for a home-cooked dinner and would “pepper me with questions: ‘What are you seeing? What are you finding out there?’”

    But brevity, succinctness, and personal focus are among the key strengths of this powerful and important book, an account that fans out into other developing narratives about the decline of California as America’s paradise, social media’s mendacity and lack of civic responsibility, and the super-charged rise of economic injustice and insecurity. It is likely to attract a lot of attention, discussion, and controversy.

    Nowadays, the economy of Silicon Valley is based mostly on software, biotech, product development, and gigantic, Internet-based companies like Facebook and Google. Silicon and its industrial byproducts are no longer the raw materials of the region’s wealth, which is mostly generated via brand names and intellectual property. Meehan’s photographs and stories portray a different kind of environmental damage: economic and social disruption, especially the upheavals caused by a catastrophic rise in housing costs.

    Meehan’s photographs are unsentimental. Nobody smiles. The images are saturated in California sunlight and color and classically composed, suggesting the long heritage of Western portraiture. The various poverties they encompass do not immediately strike the eye, as Evans’ images do. The pain lurks below, like Turner’s underground toxic plumes.

    #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan

  • Short Fuse Podcast #39 : « Seeing Silicon Valley » : The Fraying of Life in America - The Arts Fuse
    https://artsfuse.org/227588/short-fuse-podcast-39-seeing-silicon-valley-the-fraying-of-life-in-america

    N’oubliez pas que la version orginale de ce livre est celle en français de C&F éditions, il y a deux ans. Le livre est toujours d’actualité, c’est pourquoi les Presses de l’Université de Chicago le publient aujourd’hui.
    https://cfeditions.com/visages

    Perception vs. Reality. For many, the words “Silicon Valley” signify the egalitarian opportunities offered by America’s cutting-edge tech industry. Stark reality reveals a much more complicated picture. Growing inequality and an ever rising cost of living are putting pressure on all of the area’s workers: at least seven percent of families live in poverty without access to quality education, health care or housing. Fred Turner and Mary Beth Meehan spotlight these realities in their new book, Seeing Silicon Valley: Life Inside a Fraying America. In a recent conversation with Elizabeth Howard, they talk about the situation they found there, and what it reveals about our country as a whole.

    #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan

  • Cartes sensibles ou subjectives

    Cartographie sensible ou subjective
    Pour Quentin Lefèvre, la cartographie sensible (ou #cartographie_subjective) peut se définir comme un média de restitution de l’#expérience du territoire ou encore comme la "#spatialisation_sensible de données sensibles".
    http://quentinlefevre.com/cartographie-sensible

    Cartographie sensible, émotions et #imaginaire
    #Elise_Olmedo cerne les contours théoriques et méthodologiques de la cartographie sensible, en décrit les étapes de création et s’interroge sur ses impacts, son utilité et ses limites, à partir d’une expérimentation faite sur le terrain au Maroc, à Marrakech, au printemps 2010.
    http://visionscarto.net/cartographie-sensible

    Cartographier les #interstices de la #ville
    En faisant remonter à la surface les éléments du #paysage, l’artiste scénographe #Mathias_Poisson délivre des informations sur l’#ambiance des lieux, qui sensorialisent la carte. Élise Olmedo rend compte de cette #expérience_urbaine subjective dans ce beau billet.
    http://www.strabic.fr/Mathias-Poisson-Cartographier-les-interstices-de-la-ville

    Cartes et cartographie des ressentis et représentations d’individus
    La cartographie d’objets tels que des #ressentis (une gêne) ou des représentations de l’#espace_vécu (un risque) relatés par des individus mobilise des bagages conceptuels et techniques nombreux, nécessitant une mise au point sémantique et méthodologique. Aurélie Arnaud discute l’état de la recherche dans ce domaine dans la revue M@ppemonde.
    https://journals-openedition-org/mappemonde/4666

    Et si les cartes permettaient aussi d’explorer l’#invisible ?
    C’est ce que propose l’atelier pédagogique de la BNF "Les cartes de l’invisible".
    http://c.bnf.fr/JtG

    L’#Otletosphère
    Cette cartographie relationnelle des personnalités et institutions liées à #Paul_Otlet cherche à mettre en visibilité la forte implication de l’auteur au sein des organisations pacifistes internationales ainsi qu’au sein des institutions bibliographiques et documentaires.
    http://hyperotlet.huma-num.fr/otletosphere/117

    Pour une pratique féministe de la #visualisation de données
    #Donna_Haraway, dans son essai fondateur sur les #savoirs_situés, offre une critique brillante non seulement de la représentation visuelle mais de la préférence extrême et perverse donnée aux yeux sur le corps dans la pensée occidentale.
    http://visionscarto.net/visualisation-donnees-feministe
    #feminisme

    Nouvelles cartographies – Lettres du #Tout-Monde
    Ce projet de création expérimental et ouvert à tou.te.s a été lancé par des artistes et journalistes associés au #Labo_148. Quelle sera la cartographie du monde après la crise sanitaire ? Que redéfinit-elle ? Quelles urgences « à rêver un autre rêve, à inventer d’autres espoirs » s’imposent ? Le “Tout-Monde” selon #Edouard_Glissant, est cette inextricabilité de nos devenirs, et en cela, il invite à une poétique active de la #mondialité, de rencontres des imaginaires. Voir notamment l’expérience de Paul Wamo Taneisi : “Je porterai moi-même ma carte géographique”
    http://www.labo148.com/category/nouvelles-cartographies

    #Cartographies_traverses
    « Cartographies traverses » est un dispositif de recherche-création qui regroupe des productions visuelles et sonores traitant des expériences migratoires contemporaines.
    http://visionscarto.net/cartographies-traverses

    Re-dessiner l’expérience, art, sciences, conditions migratoires
    #Sarah_Mekdjian et #Marie_Moreau utilisent la cartographie avec des migrants "pour un autre partage du sensible". Le projet débouche sur l’élaboration d’une très belle carte sensible (à voir).
    http://www.antiatlas-journal.net

    Cartes de migrants
    L’artiste camerounais #Jean_David_Nkot réalise des portraits avec des cartes afin de "représenter les nombreux lieux qui se bousculent dans la tête des migrants" : https://wepresent.wetransfer.com/story/jean-david-nkot

    Cartes d’ici et d’ailleurs
    Favoriser l’inclusion sociale des personnes migrantes en France à travers des ateliers de #cartographie_participative et sensible (CartONG) : tel est l’objectif global du projet “Cartes d’ici et d’ailleurs”, soutenu par la Fondation de France et mis en oeuvre par #CartONG.
    http://veillecarto2-0.fr/2018/12/21/carte-sensible-un-outil-dinclusion-sociale

    #Guerilla_Cartography
    L’objectif de Guerrilla Cartography est d’utiliser l’#art pour promouvoir une #cartographie_collaborative et engagée. Le site rassemble plusieurs atlas originaux et artistiques sur l’#eau, la #nourriture, les migrants.
    http://www.guerrillacartography.org

    Plateforme Art & Géo de Cartes Sensibles
    Proposé par le polau-pôle des arts urbains et #Crévilles, ce site regroupe des cartes artistiques et géographiques qui rendent compte d’un territoire existant en assumant un regard sensible et/ou subjective. Il est conçu comme un outil de ressource et de partage pour chercheurs, artistes et curieux.
    http://polau.org/pacs

    L’art est dans la cARTe
    #Ghislaine_Escande est artiste peintre et plasticienne. Avec ses cARTes, elle redessine le Monde et nous fait voyager.
    http://neocarto.hypotheses.org/10407

    Carte sensible du festival de #Glastonbury
    Le plan du célèbre festival de musique et d’arts de Glastonbury au Royaume-Uni selon The Word Magazine.

    La carte subjective du musicien #Nick_Cave
    Il s’agit d’une affiche de 2006 pour le concert de Nick Cave à Manchester en Angleterre. Elle contient plus de 50 énigmes basées sur les paroles de ses chansons. Voir cette vidéo qui revient sur le sens de cette carte subjective.
    http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/s/3ypdis

    Médier les récits de vie. Expérimentations de #cartographies_narratives et sensibles
    Article de Sarah Mekdjian et Élise Olmedo paru en 2016 sur le site de M@ppemonde.
    http://mappemonde.mgm.fr/118as2
    #cartographie_narrative

    Cartographier une année de sa vie
    #Nicholas_Felton est un artiste designer qui traduit les données de la vie quotidienne en objets et en expériences significatives. Il est l’auteur de plusieurs rapports annuels qui résument les événements de l’année en cartes et graphiques rendant compte de son expérience subjective.
    http://feltron.com/FAR08.html

    Cartographie du #confinement en période d’épidémie
    L’artiste britannique #Gareth_Fuller (https://fullermaps.com/artworks/quarantine-maps) raconte en 14 cartes l’expérience de survie que représente la #quarantaine. Un grand nombre de cartes décrivant différents vécus en mode confiné sur Citylab (www.citylab.com/life/2020/04/neighborhood-maps-coronavirus-lockdown-stay-at-home-art/610018/). Le confinement en croquis, vu de France : géographie politique, sociale et culturelle du monde post-Covid19 par #Jérôme_Monnet (Cybergéo : https://journals.openedition.org/cybergeo/34804). Une manière de décaler le regard sur le monde peut être d’utiliser (et d’admirer au passage) les très belles oeuvres de #street-art (https://www.francetvinfo.fr/culture/arts-expos/street-art/coronavirus-tour-du-monde-des-plus-belles-oeuvres-de-street-art-face-a-) produites dans le contexte de la pandémie. #Virginie_Estève a proposé un projet cartographique à ses élèves de 4e : cartographier leur espace vécu de confinement et aborder le paysage sensible depuis leur fenêtre. La preuve que l’on peut continuer à faire de la géographie et travailler à distance, moyennant quelques aménagements ( voir ce Genialy : https://view.genial.ly/5e80c8155ad5150d93dab237/guide-geographie-du-confinement). Julien Dupont (Kobri), professeur d’histoire-géographie en collège à Vaulx-en-Velin et auteur de fictions radiophoniques et cartographiques, a mis en ligne sur son site Kartokobri (https://kartokobri.wordpress.com) ses cartes quotidiennes du confinement. #SCOPIC (http://www.revuesurmesure.fr/issues/battre-aux-rythmes-de-la-ville/explorations-sensibles-de-notre-1km) s’est interrogée sur l’expérience du kilomètre autour de nos habitats. Pour d’autres liens, consulter le billet "Faire de la géographie en période de confinement" (https://cartonumerique.blogspot.com/2020/03/geographie-et-confinement.html).

    Maps of Home
    "Maps of Home" est une vision nostalgique faite des souvenirs de #Janesville dans le #Wisconsin, où l’auteur a grandi et où il a dû revenir à cause de la pandémie.
    http://moriartynaps.org/maps-of-home

    Suivre ses proches en temps de guerre
    Carte dessinée à la main par ma grand-mère pour suivre les mouvements de mes grands-pères pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale (1943-1945).
    http://www.reddit.com/comments/be814f

    #Nomadways
    Le groupe Nomadways a invité 24 artistes, éducateurs et travailleurs sociaux à découvrir et explorer l’espace à partir de leurs #émotions et à créer leurs propres cartes subjectives dans un but de construction et d’inclusion communautaires.
    http://nomadways.eu/subjective-mapping-2017-france

    Cartographie autochtone, activités extractives et représentations alternatives
    Le réseau #MappingBack a pour objectif de fournir du soutien cartographique aux membres des communautés autochtones luttant contre les industries extractives sur leur territoire. MappingBack cherche à utiliser la cartographie comme un outil de #résistance.
    http://mappingback.org/home_fr
    #peuples_autochtones #extractivisme

    #Native_land, cartographier les voix autochtones
    Le site Native Land, mis sur pied en 2015 par #Victor_Temprano, propose un outil cartographique participatif permettant une conceptualisation décoloniale des Amériques, du #Groenland, de l’#Australie et de la #Nouvelle-Zélande. Lire la présentation du site.
    http://native-land.ca
    #décolonial

    Cartographie et #langues_autochtones
    #Marlena_Myles utilise son art pour célébrer sa culture et sa langue autochtones ainsi que pour aider le public (notamment les enfants) à comprendre l’importance des traditions et de l’histoire orales autochtones. Ses cartes racontent le passé, le présent et l’avenir du peuple et de la langue du #Dakota.
    http://marlenamyl.es/project/dakota-land-map
    #histoire_orale

    Counter Mapping
    #Jim_Enote, agriculteur #zuni traditionnel dans le Colorado (Etats-Unis), collabore avec des artistes pour créer des cartes qui ramènent une voix et une perspective autochtones à la terre. Ces cartes zunis s’inspirent profondément d’expériences partagées de lieux dans une volonté de #réappropriation du territoire par les #Amerindiens.
    http://emergencemagazine.org/story/counter-mapping

    Cartographie personnelle et subjective de #Mary_Jones
    Au cours de ses dérives dans la ville de #Des_Moines, Mary Jones observe les lieux et les habitant⋅e⋅s, fait des photos, remplit des carnets d’#esquisses, prend des notes, enregistre parfois aussi des sons. Une masse de matériaux bruts qu’elle assemble ensuite en images hybrides (#collages, #superpositions, #sampling_visuels) qui composent une sorte de cartographie personnelle, subjective, voire intime de la cité et de ses marges.
    http://aris.papatheodorou.net/une-flaneuse-a-la-derive

    Cartographier les espaces vécus et les émotions (#Drusec)
    La ville telles qu’elle est vécue par les usagè.re.s de drogue marginalisés de #Bordeaux.
    http://drusec.hypotheses.org/1722

    #Queering_the_Map
    Queering the Map est un projet de cartographie généré par la communauté #queer afin de géolocaliser des moments, des souvenirs et des histoires par rapport à leur espace physique. En cartographiant ces moments éphémères, Queering the Map vise à créer une archive vivante d’expériences queer.
    http://queeringthemap.com

    Cartographie subjective des Etats-Unis par #Paul_Steinberg
    Cette série de vues subjectives des Etats-Unis et du monde a été réalisée par Saul Steinberg pour des couvertures anciennes de magazines (The New Yorker ou autres)
    http://saulsteinbergfoundation.org/essay/view-of-the-world-from-9th-avenue

    La cartographie au service des théories platistes
    La théorie de la Terre Plate perdure jusqu’à aujourd’hui. La réalisation de cartes à l’image de la #terre_plate devient un objet de promotion de ces théories.
    http://veillecarto2-0.fr/2020/09/22/la-cartographie-au-service-des-theories-platistes

    Le monde vu de...
    Une série de vues du monde à partir de #New_York, #San_Francisco et différentes villes des Etats-Unis (lire notre article sur le monde vu de la Silicon Valley).
    https://imgur.com/a/XTnSn#0

    Le monde vu par les Anciens
    Cet atlas de #Karl_Müller de 1874 reproduit "les systèmes géographiques des Anciens" et d’une certaine manière la façon dont ces systèmes de représentation de l’#Antiquité étaient eux-mêmes vus au XIXe siècle.
    http://geodata.mit.edu/catalog/princeton-r207tq824

    L’Europe vue de la Russie
    L’Europe vue de Moscou et l’Asie vue d’#Irkoutsk pendant la Guerre froide (1952).
    https://www.reddit.com/r/MapPorn/comments/epdn4c/europe_from_moscowasia_from_irkutsk_time_magazine

    Cartographie et subjectivité chez #Alexander_von_Humboldt
    En scrutant minutieusement les différentes cartes réalisées par Alexander #von_Humboldt, on remarque certaines particularités, des mentions qui, à priori, n’auraient pas lieu de s’y trouver tant elles témoignent de la subjectivité de l’auteur.
    http://visionscarto.net/Humboldt-carto-subjective

    Le monde sens dessus dessous
    Un planisphère renversé montrant la Terre vue depuis l’hémisphère sud (à télécharger en haute résolution). Consulter la page des #projections cartographiques (http://cartonumerique.blogspot.com/p/projections-cartographiques.html) pour accéder à d’autres vues renversantes de la Terre.
    https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:9s161j433

    Cartographie ultrapériphérique, et si on changeait de point de vue
    Une carte des territoires ultramarins vus depuis l’hémisphère sud.
    http://www.une-saison-en-guyane.com/extras/carte/carto-ultraperipherie-si-on-changeait-de-point-de-vue%e2%80%89

    Projections du futur
    Les projections du futur seront probablement centrées sur les océans, comme ces deux cartes du monde en projection Mercator oblique qui représentent les continents tout autour d’un océan unique.
    http://rightbasicbuilding.com/2019/09/09/the-world-maps-of-the-future

    Carte subjective de #Paris en 2050
    Cette carte imagine Paris en 2050, lorsque les effets du #réchauffement_climatique se seront durement faits ressentir... si rien n’est fait. Voir notre article de présentation : https://cartonumerique.blogspot.com/2019/02/carto-subjective-geo-prospective.html
    http://www.deuxdegres.net/projects/paris-2050
    #changement_climatique

    Utiliser des #SIG pour cartographier les #pratiques_spatiales
    Des recherches récentes montrent l’intérêt d’utiliser les données fournies par les #réseaux_sociaux pour les cartographier et mettre en évidence des comportements des individus dans l’espace.
    http://www.gislounge.com/using-gis-to-analyze-peoples-attitudes

    Cartographie collaborative
    L’objectif de ce site est de développer un ensemble d’usages pour aider à la dissémination des pratiques collaboratives en matière de cartographie, que ce soit pour le citoyen ou au sein de structures (associations, collectivités, milieu scolaire).
    http://cartographie-collaborative.eu

    #Mapquote
    Le projet collaboratif Mapquote prend la forme d’une #carte_interactive où chaque utilisateur peut déposer une #citation de #romans où il est question de cartes.
    http://neocarto.hypotheses.org/6502

    L’usage de Google Maps dans « #Netherland »
    Netherland est une belle réflexion désabusée sur les lieux et le déplacement, l’#espace et la #séparation, le fait de pouvoir être physiquement dans un lieu et mentalement dans un autre. Google Maps n’intervient que dans deux courts passages au début et à la fin du livre (source : Spacefiction)
    http://spacefiction.fr/2009/11/01/google-maps-enters-litteraturegoogle-maps-entre-dans-la-litterature

    #Hoodmaps
    Hoodmaps permet de créer des cartes participatives pour éviter les #pièges_à_touristes et fréquenter les quartiers branchés de la ville. La typologie est assez basique, voire un peu réductrice : entre les “hipsters”, les touristes, les étudiants, les “riches”, les “costards” et les “normaux”, mais permet de rapidement identifier les différents quartiers d’une ville.
    http://hoodmaps.com

    Apprendre sur le territoire en représentant son territoire
    Carte sensible élaborée par une classe de 1re ES qui montre la vision de leur lycée. A compléter par l’interview de Sophie Gaujal pour le Café pédagogique : L’approche sensible en cours de géographie, un ingrédient du bonheur ?
    http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr

    Cartographie ton quartier
    Les cartes postales géocartographiques permettent d’articuler géographie spontanée et géographie raisonnée. Organisé par Sophie Gaujal, en partenariat avec le Café pédagogique, la Cité de l’architecture et l’IGN, le concours Cartographie ton quartier récompense les cartes postales cartographiques réalisées par des classes.
    http://blog.ac-versailles.fr/geophotographie

    Atelier de cartographie sensible (Ehess)
    La plateforme SIG de l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, met à disposition des ressources sur la cartographie sensible dans le cadre des ateliers Géomatique et humanités numériques qu’elle organise, notamment sur Gennevilliers.
    http://psig.huma-num.fr/cartes-sensibles

    #Cartes_mentales dans le nord de #Marseille
    Ce billet de #Jérémy_Garniaux relate un atelier « cartes mentales » mené à Marseille, dans les 14, 15 et 16e arrondissements, par une plate-forme culturelle hors-les-murs constituée de cinq structures culturelles du Nord de Marseille.
    http://www.mapper.fr/cartes-mentales-dans-le-nord-de-marseille

    Chicago HomeStories Project
    Le projet est né à #Chicago et commence à se diffuser dans le monde. Il s’agit d’encourager les citoyens par des #marches_civiques à en savoir plus sur leur quartier.
    http://www.nationalgeographic.org/projects/out-of-eden-walk/blogs/lab-talk/2021-04-chicago-homestories-goes-global

    Concours #cartographie_imaginaire
    Cartographier la ville de demain, son quartier dans le futur, son école ou son collège idéal...
    http://www.concourscarto.com/accueil-cci

    Concours de dessin de cartes du monde pour enfants
    Le concours #Barbara_Petchenik est un concours biennal de dessin de carte destiné aux enfants. Il a été créé par l’Association cartographique internationale en 1993 dans le but de promouvoir la représentation créative du monde sous forme graphique par les enfants.
    http://icaci.org/petchenik

    Lignes d’erre - Les cartes de #Fernand_Deligny
    Pendant des années, Deligny a dessiné et fait dessiner des cartes de ce qu’il appelle leurs #lignes_d’erre, soit les trajets « libres » des #enfants sur leur aire de séjour. Il a perçu, par l’observation, que les autistes avaient une autre façon d’être au monde, une autre manière d’incarner l’humain.
    http://culture.univ-lille1.fr/fileadmin/lna/lna60/lna60p34.pdf

    La carte sensible de #Boulogne-Billancourt
    Un projet pédagogique conduit par une équipe d’enseignants du lycée J. Prévert de Boulogne-Billancourt avec des classes de Seconde.
    http://www.cafepedagogique.net

    La "carte du Tendre" de #Nantes
    #Gwenaëlle_Imhoff et #Emilie_Arbey, professeures de français et d’histoire géographie au collège Gutenberg de Saint-Herblain ont amené leurs 4èmes à réaliser de nouvelles « Cartes du Tendre » à la manière de Madame de Scudéry pour inventer « une géographie nantaise de l’Amour ». Enjeu de ce travail créatif et collaboratif, visuel et oral : aider les élèves à s’approprier « l’espace urbain proche et pourtant trop souvent lointain ».
    http://www.cafepedagogique.net/lexpresso/Pages/2020/08/31082020Article637344555283464848.aspx
    http://www.pedagogie.ac-nantes.fr/lettres/continuite-pedgogique-et-numerique-en-lettres-carte-du-tendre-pr

    Cartographier l’#insécurité au collège
    Professeure d’histoire-géographie au collège Molière de Beaufort en Anjou, #Anaïs_Le_Thiec lance sa classe de 5ème dans une cartographie sensible du collège. Elle les invite à libérer leur parole via une #storymap.
    http://www.cafepedagogique.net/lexpresso/Pages/2019/10/18102019Article637069844590338061.aspx

    Dans ma ville on traîne
    Visite guidée et habitée par le rappeur #Orelsan, qui propose une description de la ville de #Caen. L’intérêt principal est de rappeler qu’un espace géographique, avant d’être un objet d’étude, reste surtout un lieu de vie que l’on habite. Le rappeur énumère ses souvenirs d’enfant, d’adolescent, d’étudiant. Ce faisant, il raconte SA ville. Il associe chaque action passée au lieu où elle s’est déroulée.
    http://lhistgeobox.blogspot.com/2020/10/dans-ma-ville-on-traine-visite-guidee.html

    Des lieux où l’on exprime ses sentiments
    Carte interactive des lieux où les étudiants ont déclaré avoir pleuré sur le campus de l’université de Waterloo aux Etats-Unis (avec les commentaires). Cela correspondrait-il aux bâtiments de sciences et de mathématiques ?
    http://www.reddit.com/r/dataisbeautiful/comments/l3t3xx/oc_an_interactive_map_of_where_students_have

    Psycho-géographie de la ville de #Gibellina
    Quand les artistes essaient de tromper les algorithmes de télédétection. C’est ce qu’a fait l’artiste #Burri avec une oeuvre d’art gigantesque couvrant les ruines de la vieille ville de Gibellina en Italie (à voir dans Google Maps)
    http://www.archdaily.com/958178/the-psycho-geography-of-the-cretto-di-burri

    Lyon-La Duchère 2030 : imaginer des scénarios prospectifs
    Ces #scénarios prospectifs sont proposés par des élèves de 2nde du Lycée La Martinière-Duchère concernant le projet d’aménagement urbain #Lyon-La Duchère 2030.
    http://canabae.enseigne.ac-lyon.fr/spip/spip.php?article1103

    #Cartographie_sonore du quartier de l’Union (#Lille - #Roubaix - #Tourcoing)
    Réalisé dans le cadre du projet de recherche Géographie et prospective piloté par l’IFE, cette expérimentation pédagogique a permis de découvrir par l’expérience spatiale un projet d’#aménagement_urbain d’envergure (son évolution, ses acteurs et ses enjeux) dans l’environnement proche des élèves, en privilégiant une géographie fondée sur l’expérience du terrain.
    http://ife.ens-lyon.fr/geo-et-prospective/projet/cartographie-sonore-du-quartier-de-lunion

    #Cartophonies
    Comment sonne le monde ? Le site « Cartophonies » a pour objectif d’explorer l’#expérience_sonore contemporaine et d’aider a les prendre en compte dans l’avenir et dans les projets de transformation. Il contribue à construire une connaissance des milieux habités, du vécu des espaces et des ambiances contemporaines, celles du passé proche comme celles du futur.
    http://www.cartophonies.fr
    #son

    Cartes et mise en récit des mobilités
    Dans le cadre d’une recherche doctorale, #Sylvie_Joublot-Ferré étudie les spatialités des adolescents en s’appuyant sur la cartographie de leurs déplacements quotidiens enregistrés sous forme de traces GPS et en analysant ces cartes comme des #récits_de_vie.
    http://www.researchgate.net
    http://www.radiobus.fm/episode/interview-de-sylvie-joublot-ferre-hepl

    Comment les enfants ont perdu le droit de se déplacer
    Carte montrant le territoire pratiqué pendant l’enfance sur quatre générations à #Sheffield.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-462091/How-children-lost-right-roam-generations.html

    Comment les jeunes géographes ressentent-ils le monde contemporain ?
    Un exercice de cartographie sensible proposé à des étudiants de master destinés à s’orienter vers le monde associatif donne un regard sur leurs représentations du monde. Environnement menacé, mobilités généralisées, et questionnements autour de la mondialisation émergent de ces cartes mentales, témoignant des inquiétudes d’une génération.
    http://geoconfluences.ens-lyon.fr/informations-scientifiques/a-la-une/carte-a-la-une/cartographie-emotions-monde-contemporain

    « Mais madame, je n’y suis jamais allé ! »
    Un #voyage_virtuel à #La_Réunion à travers la confection de #cartes_postales sensibles par des élèves de lycée professionnel. La #géographie_expérientielle ce n’est pas seulement du vécu, ce sont aussi (et surtout) des représentations (article extrait des Cahiers pédagogique, n° 559 "L’aventure de la géographie".
    http://www.cahiers-pedagogiques.com/Mais-madame-je-n-y-suis-jamais-alle

    Tour de la France par deux enfants (G. Bruno)
    Cet ouvrage constitue l’archétype du roman scolaire géographique. Réédité de nombreuses fois depuis sa sortie en 1877, l’ouvrage a connu un énorme succès (plus de 9 millions d’exemplaires), contribuant à façonner une image du territoire national.
    http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k5684551x

    Une géographie subjective à travers les romans d’aventure pour la jeunesse
    Aurélie Gille Comte-Sponville, Modernité et archaïsme des lieux dans les romans d’enquête et d’aventure pour la jeunesse pendant les Trente Glorieuses en France, thèse soutenue en 2016. L’importance des lieux correspond à la quête d’une #utopie de l’enfance éternelle, qui figerait non seulement les héros dans la perfection de leur âge, mais aussi les lieux, dans une forme d’uchronie idéalisée.
    http://www.theses.fr/2016ARTO0008

    Le #Londres des romans de #John_Le_Carré
    #Mike_Hall a été chargé de dessiner pour l’éditeur Penguin Books la carte des personnages, des lieux et des scènes de romans d’espionnage de John Le Carré.
    http://thisismikehall.com/smileyslondon

    La carte de la classe de khâgne
    Cartographie subjective de la classe khâgne par Gus (@ecsolius) : quand un khagneux dresse la carte symbolique d’une année en prépa littéraire
    http://twitter.com/ecsolius/status/1292071140047937536

    La carte des mathématiques
    La carte du "#Mathematistan" représente les rapports ambigus que l’on peut avoir les #mathématiques. Une région souvent inaccessible ?
    http://www.reddit.com/r/math/comments/2av79v/map_of_mathematistan_source_in_comments

    Cartographie de son appartement
    Géographie de mon appartement vu par Thibaut Sardier.
    http://twitter.com/tsardier/status/1326832393655816192

    Cartographie imaginaire du nourrisson
    @LittleBigData suit, en infographies et sur les réseaux sociaux, les tourments et les joies de #jeunes_parents (voir cette présentation). Le résultat est un cartographie imaginaire des premiers mois de la vie d’un enfant. Avec une magnifique carte de la première année extraite de l’ouvrage Le Bébégraphe publié par Claire Dealberto et Jules Grandin aux éditions Les Arènes en 2021.
    http://twitter.com/LittleBigData_/status/1263721598076555265

    Carte des #lieux_communs
    De "l’usine à gaz" au "terrain d’entente", @LaMineComics passe en revue tous nos lieux communs inspirés de métaphores géographiques.
    http://twitter.com/LaMineComics/status/1097068721846321152

    https://cartonumerique.blogspot.com/p/cartes-sensibles.html

    #cartographie_sensible #bibliographie #ressources_pédagogiques

    ping @visionscarto @odilon @reka