#mary_beth_meehan

  • 9 photographers you MUST know about, according to Annie Leibovitz | Digital Camera World
    https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/au/news/9-photographers-you-must-know-about-according-to-annie-leibovitz

    Très fiers d’être les seuls éditeurs au monde à avoir un livre de Mary Beth Meehan, encensée parmi des grands noms par Annie Leibovitz.

    9) Mary Beth Meehan

    “I do want to bring up, there was someone recently, this woman Mary Beth Meehan. I don’t know if you saw her work – she did an art installation in a small town in Georgia. She photographed portraits of people in the small town and then she took these huge prints, mural-sized prints, and put them on the sides of buildings, and it was incredible.”

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Annie_Leibovitz #Photographie

  • How 17 Outsize Portraits Rattled a Small Southern Town - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/19/us/newnan-art-georgia-race.html

    But it turned out that only a few dozen white nationalists attended the rally, and the Newnan they had imagined no longer existed. Its population had more than doubled in less than 20 years, drawing an increasingly diverse collection of newcomers. Newnan was changing and many in the community wanted to embrace that change more openly. A year after the white nationalist rally, the town made an effort to do so by putting up 17 large-scale banner portraits, images of the ordinary people who make up Newnan.

    They hang from the perches of brick buildings around downtown. There’s Helen Berry, an African-American woman who for years worked at a sewing factory. Wiley Driver, a white worker who folded and packed blankets at a local mill before his death in 2017. Jineet Blanco, a waitress who arrived in Newnan carrying her Mexican traditions and dreams. And then there were the Shah sisters.

    A portrait of Aatika and Zahraw Shah wearing hijabs was displayed on the side of an empty building in downtown Newnan. The sisters were born in Georgia and had lived in Newnan since 2012, after they moved from Athens, Ga. They attended a local high school in the county. Their father, an engineer, moved to the United States from Pakistan, as did their mother.

    The reaction to their portrait was fast and intense. James Shelnutt was driving through downtown when he saw it. “I feel like Islam is a threat to the American way of life,” he said. “There should be no positive portrayals of it.” Mr. Shelnutt turned to Facebook, encouraging residents to complain. The thread quickly devolved into anti-Muslim attacks and name-calling. Some posters referred to Sept. 11 and argued that believers of Islam were violent.

    One woman said there were not enough Muslims in Newnan for the Shahs to be included in the art installation in the first place.

    The portraits were meant to be inclusive, upend stubborn preconceptions and unravel the cocoons people had created within the community. And they did — but they also exposed how immigration and demographic change have recast the racial dynamics that once defined America, adding new layers of anxiety on the old tensions that persist across the country and in small towns like Newnan.

    “Seeing Newnan,” as the art installation is called, was created by the photographer Mary Beth Meehan. Mr. Hancock and Chad Davidson, director of the University of West Georgia’s School of the Arts, were in Providence, R.I., for an art conference in 2015 when they saw one of Ms. Meehan’s installations.

    Mr. Hancock was drawn to the beauty of the portraits, but he was also thinking about his almost exclusively white world in Newnan. “My children told me, ‘Dad, you are so open, but your circle is not inclusive,’” he said. “When I thought about it, they were right.” So he reached out to Ms. Meehan and told her about Newnan.

    He told her about the town’s race and class tensions, about the old Newnan versus the new Newnan, how residents who grew up here have watched the population explode. And yet, “I just felt like we were living apart,” Mr. Hancock said. “We were in these little bubbles. I thought this project could pierce the bubbles.”

    Ms. Meehan arrived in Newnan in 2016 as part of the Artist in Residence program. She had done similar portraiture projects in her hometown, Brockton, Mass., and most recently in Silicon Valley. In Newnan, she was met with both open arms and some suspicion — she was a white liberal from the North who had not spent much time in the South.

    Ms. Meehan was in Newnan for the big moments and the small. A fall high school homecoming. The reunion of a class from 1954 who attended an all-black high school. Sunday morning services at a church attended by descendants of early settlers. The 2016 election night that ushered in President Trump.

    She spent more than two years visiting Newnan, witnessing the kind of moments that offer hints about a community’s identity. Newnan was the right place for the project. “Newnan was ready to begin this conversation, and the evidence is that despite the tensions and difficulties, the people ultimately didn’t shut me down,” she said. “They kept inviting me back.”

    The post drew nearly 1,000 responses, most of them defending the sisters and accusing Mr. Shelnutt and others of being out-of-touch racists who were resistant to change and religious freedom. Mr. Shelnutt, who grew up in Newnan and owns a small construction company, denied being racist. “I do not feel like the two women in the photo are radical or dangerous,” he said. “I just do not think Newnan should be pushed to embrace Islam.”

    The backlash made the sisters realize that much of Newnan didn’t know Newnan. They said it felt especially painful to be singled out. “We have been here seven years,” said Aatika Shah, 22, “and now because they have never seen us and then saw our picture, they somehow think we don’t belong.”

    Ms. Meehan’s portraits, which will come down in June, have already had a lasting effect on the town. They have prompted deep conversations between people who had never met. “The truth is, these conversations are hard and uncomfortable and awkward but we need to lean into it,” said the Rev. David Jones II, the pastor of Newnan Presbyterian Church, who plans to use the art installation to organize a retreat about race, gender and identity this year. “We need to talk about who lives in our community and if they are different, why does that make us uncomfortable?”

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Newnam

  • Visages de la Silicon Valley, Fred Turner et Mary Beth Meehan -
    http://danactu-resistance.over-blog.com/2019/04/visages-de-la-silicon-valley-fred-turner-et-mary-beth-

    A l’automne dernier les éditions C&F, basées à Caen, ont publié un ouvrage d’une grande originalité, intitulé Visages de la Silicon Valley, un essai signé Fred Turner avec des photographies et récits de Mary Beth Meehan.

    Quand on lit ou entend ces deux mots , Silicon Valley, formant un lieu géographique célèbre en Californie, aussitôt l’on pense, technologies de pointe, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Facebook, et autres Apple, Tesla. Les gros bataillons de la super start-up nation nord-américaine que Macron voudrait bien installer en France. Certes sont bien là, le soleil, les innovations qui nous changent, parfois, la vie et les symboles de la réussite économique, concentrés sur quelques kilomètres carrés.

    Pourtant comme le savent les cinéphiles, depuis Quai des brumes (Carné, Prévert) il est utile de voir les choses cachées derrière les choses. Voilà pourquoi ce livre, Visages de la Silicon Valley, à la fois un superbe livre de photographies et un ensemble de textes, nous a particulièrement surpris. Que se cache-t-il derrière les mythes de la Silicon Valley où semblerait se construire le futur de notre monde, ou du moins de leur monde ? Quels sont les visages cachées derrière ceux des grands dirigeants des multinationales, diffusés en boucle dans tous les médias du monde ?

    S’il nous semble difficile de qualifier d’essai, l’introduction en une demi-douzaine de pages de Fred Turner, le livre nous offre, dans un beau format, un superbe reportage photos de Mary Beth Meehan. Chaque cliché est accompagné d’un petit récit le contextualisant. Photographe indépendante, son travail a été publié et exposé dans le monde entier. Nominée deux fois pour le prestigieux prix Pulitzer, elle anime aussi des conférences et ateliers à l’Université de Brown ou à l’école de Design de Rhode Island. Cela débute par Cristobal,vétéran de l’armée américaine durant sept ans, dont trois dans l’Irak en guerre, aujourd’hui agent de sécurité chez Facebook, il gagne une vingtaine de dollars de l’heure, et vu le prix de l’immobilier dans la Silicon Valley, il vit dans un abri au fond d’une cour à Mountain View ! Il constate que les immenses richesses des grandes entreprises ne ruissellent pas vraiment.

    Victor, 80 ans, qui survit dans une petite caravane, au milieu d’autres, non loin du magnifique campus de Google. Ni électricité, ni eau. Et aussi Mary, venue d’un village en Ouganda où elle enseignait l’anglais dans toute l’Afrique, venue rejoindre sa fille, et qui voudrait bien repartir : « C’est la solitude ici, tellement de solitude. »

    Ainsi se succèdent les portraits, magnifiques photographies et textes édifiants, matérialisme partout, spiritualité nulle part, argent coulant à flots mais pas pour tous. Précarité, pauvreté, invisibilité, et parfois peur, l’envers terrible de ce que l’on appelait jadis, le rêve américain !

    Dan29000

    Visages de la Silicon Valley
    Mary Beth Meehan, Fred Turner
    Éditions C&F
    2018 / 112 p / 25 euros

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Fred_Turner #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Silicon_Valley

  • Diversity On Display: Art Installation Sparks Conversation Among Newnan Residents | Georgia Public Broadcasting
    https://www.gpbnews.org/post/diversity-display-art-installation-sparks-conversation-among-newnan-residen

    If art is supposed to start conversations, then “Seeing Newnan” is working. The project mounted 19 large-scale photographs of residents on buildings around Newnan, Georgia.

    Artist Mary Beth Meehan’s large-scale photographs of residents in Newnan have exposed the shifting demographics of the town. A resident, who protested the image of two Muslim schoolgirls in the town square, got more than a thousand responses from others who embrace a more inclusive vision of the town.

    Listen
    Listen
    Listening...
    13:59
    On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott speaks with Mary Beth Meehan.

    “Just because the public facing history that’s celebrated of a town like Newnan is of the old white people, it doesn’t mean that all of these other human beings haven’t been integral to that places founding and development,” Meehan said.

    The portraits are on display in Newnan until June 1, 2020.

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Podcast #Newnan

  • Enormous Images Link Past to Present and Future - Atlanta Jewish Times
    https://atlantajewishtimes.timesofisrael.com/enormous-images-link-past-to-present-and-future

    What began in 2016 as a two-week artist’s residency for photographer and educator Mary Beth Meehan became two years visiting Newnan, meeting townspeople and taking photographs. This is Meehan’s fourth such large-scale public installation; the first was in her hometown of Brockton, Mass.

    The “Seeing Newnan” exhibit, sponsored by the University of West Georgia School of the Arts and funded by the Hollis Charitable Trust, will remain in place through the spring.

    The photograph that we particularly wanted to see faces Jefferson Street, where it crosses Lee Street. To say that the portrait of Muslim sisters Zahraw and Aatika Shah generated controversy is an understatement. Examples of the vile reactions and heartening rebuttals can be found online.

    Zahraw and Aatika, the Georgia-born daughters of an engineer who emigrated from Pakistan in the 1980s, sat side by side, the former’s hijab in light shades of blue and red and the latter’s a deep purple. They were honor students at Newnan High School and today attend universities in Atlanta.

    Something in “Seeing Newnan” caused me to think about the diversity in Atlanta’s Jewish community. I wondered, what would a similar exhibit look like, displayed at, say, the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum or the Marcus Jewish Community Center?

    In no particular order, perhaps such an exhibit might include portraits of an Orthodox rabbi wearing a black suit, white shirt and black hat; a Reform rabbi wearing her kippah and tallit; an elderly man or woman surrounded by family photographs; a child preparing for a bar or bat mitzvah; a Holocaust survivor; an African American Jew, an LGBT Jew; Jews of Bukharian, Sephardic, Mizrachi, and Russian heritage; an interfaith family; a physically-challenged Jew and a developmentally-challenged Jew.

    You get the idea. Who would you choose?

    The city of Newnan bravely mounted an exhibit linking the town’s past to its present and future. The Jewish community of Atlanta might be well-served to similarly remind itself of its diversity.

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Newnan

  • Diversity On Display: Art Installation Sparks Conversation Among Newnan Residents | Georgia Public Broadcasting
    https://www.gpbnews.org/post/diversity-display-art-installation-sparks-conversation-among-newnan-residen

    If art is supposed to start conversations, then “Seeing Newnan” is working. The project mounted 19 large-scale photographs of residents on buildings around Newnan, Georgia.

    Artist Mary Beth Meehan’s large-scale photographs of residents in Newnan have exposed the shifting demographics of the town. A resident, who protested the image of two Muslim schoolgirls in the town square, got more than a thousand responses from others who embrace a more inclusive vision of the town.

    “Just because the public facing history that’s celebrated of a town like Newnan is of the old white people, it doesn’t mean that all of these other human beings haven’t been integral to that places founding and development,” Meehan said.

    The portraits are on display in Newnan until June 1, 2020.

    Get in touch with us.

    Twitter: @OSTTalk
    Facebook: OnSecondThought
    Email: OnSecondThought@gpb.org
    Phone: 404-500-9457

    #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Art #Miroir

  • Visages de la Silicon Valley, Fred Turner et Mary Beth Meehan -
    http://danactu-resistance.over-blog.com/2019/04/visages-de-la-silicon-valley-fred-turner-et-mary-beth-

    A l’automne dernier les éditions C&F, basées à Caen, ont publié un ouvrage d’une grande originalité, intitulé Visages de la Silicon Valley, un essai signé Fred Turner avec des photographies et récits de Mary Beth Meehan.

    Cela débute par Cristobal,vétéran de l’armée américaine durant sept ans, dont trois dans l’Irak en guerre, aujourd’hui agent de sécurité chez Facebook, il gagne une vingtaine de dollars de l’heure, et vu le prix de l’immobilier dans la Silicon Valley, il vit dans un abri au fond d’une cour à Mountain View ! Il constate que les immenses richesses des grandes entreprises ne ruissellent pas vraiment.

    Victor, 80 ans, qui survit dans une petite caravane, au milieu d’autres, non loin du magnifique campus de Google. Ni électricité, ni eau. Et aussi Mary, venue d’un village en Ouganda où elle enseignait l’anglais dans toute l’Afrique, venue rejoindre sa fille, et qui voudrait bien repartir : « C’est la solitude ici, tellement de solitude. »

    Ainsi se succèdent les portraits, magnifiques photographies et textes édifiants, matérialisme partout, spiritualité nulle part, argent coulant à flots mais pas pour tous. Précarité, pauvreté, invisibilité, et parfois peur, l’envers terrible de ce que l’on appelait jadis, le rêve américain !

    #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan #C&F_éditions #Silicon_Valley

  • BALLAST | Visages de la Silicon Valley
    https://www.revue-ballast.fr/cartouches-40

    En quelques décennies, la Silicon Valley est devenue la terre promise du capitalisme technologique. Sur les trois dernières années, 19 000 brevets y ont été déposés, 47 000 nouveaux emplois créés et cinq millions et demi de mètres carrés de locaux commerciaux construits. Dans un essai introductif, Fred Turner la compare au Plymouth du XVIIe siècle, où les Pères pèlerins s’installèrent pour former une « communauté de saints », résolument tournés vers un « paradis à venir ». Mais sous le vernis de ce temple de l’innovation, créé pour des « entrepreneurs mâles et blancs », nul besoin de gratter longtemps pour découvrir une réalité peu reluisante. À travers une série de portraits d’habitants de la vallée, Mary Beth Meehan fait ressortir l’anxiété, l’insécurité et la solitude, omniprésentes, que ce soit pour ce vétéran agent de sécurité chez Facebook, obligé d’habiter un abri au fond d’un jardin, ce couple vivant dans un air pollué au TCE, solvant cancérogène utilisé en masse avant que la production de composants électroniques ne soit délocalisée en Asie, cet ouvrier qui a eu la mauvaise idée de parler de syndicalisme dans une usine Tesla, ou encore ces innombrables migrants qui viennent chercher un travail dans la restauration, le ménage, etc. Le modèle de société développé sur ce minuscule territoire a tout d’une dystopie obéissant aux préceptes du darwinisme social : les places de winner se font de plus en plus rares ; même la classe moyenne, incapable de suivre la flambée des prix de l’immobilier, est progressivement éjectée ; de nombreuses familles vivent sur des terres toxiques, provoquant fausses couches et maladies congénitales ; et un enfant sur dix vit dans la pauvreté, alors que le revenu moyen par habitant est deux fois supérieur à la moyenne nationale. Comme le dit si bien Branton, passé par une usine Tesla : « Avec les conneries d’Elon [Musk], nous allons tous y perdre. » [M.H.]

    #Visages_Silicon_Valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan #C&F_éditions #Fred_Turner

  • Lu sur le Net : Visages de la Silicon Valley
    https://epi.asso.fr/revue/lu/l1812b.htm

    Visages de la Silicon Valley

    Fred Turner et Mary Beth Meehan, cf édition, novembre 2018, 33 euros.

    https://cfeditions.com

    « Si nous aspirons à l’excellence technologique, pourquoi n’avons-nous pas la même exigence en étant bons les uns envers les autres ? »

    Un rapport paru récemment aux États-Unis le souligne : la Silicon Valley, au delà de l’image mythique des « hommes dans un garage qui changent le monde » est avant tout un haut lieu de l’inégalité sociale, de l’exclusion et de la pollution. 90 % des employés de Californie gagnant aujourd’hui moins qu’en 1997 ! Ce qui renforce la vie sans logis et les autres formes de ségrégation que les photographies de Mary Beth Meehan donnent à voir concrètement.

    Fred Turner et Mary Beth Meehan ont choisi d’explorer la Silicon Valley par l’image. Une enquête de sociologie photographique sur les habitants réels de ce haut lieu technologique, accompagnée de récits de vie poignants.

    L’essai de Fred Turner, qui étudie l’évolution de la Silicon Valley depuis des années, pointe la responsabilité des entreprises de technologie et demande qu’un véritable grand dessein soit convoqué, capable d’améliorer vraiment la vie de tous.

    On peut lire un extrait spécimen de ce livre :
    https://cfeditions.com/visages/ressources/visages_specimen.pdf

    _________________
    Association EPI
    Décembre 2018

    #Visage_Silicon_Valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Fred_Turner #C&F_éditions

  • Visages de la Silicon Valley
    Mary Beth Meehan (photographies et récits)
    et Fred Turner (essai)
    C&F éditions, octobre 2018.
    https://cfeditions.com/visages

    Cet ouvrage pourrait être qualifié de "sociologie par l’image" : en présentant des portraits et des récits de vie, en les insérant dans des photos de l’environnement (dégradé) de la Valley, il s’agit de comprendre le type d’inquiétude qui traverse tous les habitants de cette région.

    Alors que pour le monde entier, la Silicon Valley est associée à la richesse, à la liberté et à l’innovation, pour celles et ceux qui y vivent, c’est plutôt un monde stressant. En s’intéressant aux personnes qui font vivre la région, mais n’en tirent pas les bénéfices des milliardaires des licornes, on mesure les inégalités, mais aussi la dégradation de l’environnement, parmi les plus pollués des États-Unis.

    Mais c’est en photographiant les personnes qui s’en sortent bien que Mary Beth Meehan sait encore mieux montrer le caractère anxiogène et l’insécurité qui façonnent ce coin de terre.

    En reprenant la parabole des premiers "pilgrims" voulant construire en Amérique une "cité idéale", Fred Turner donne des clés prises dans l’histoire et la culture des États-Unis pour appréhender le "mythe" de la Silicon Valley.

    Mais au delà de la sociologie, c’est aussi à des rencontres très fortes que les photographies nous conduisent. Tous ces gens qui témoignent les yeux dans l’appareil photo d’un rêve devenu dystopie.

    A mettre dans toutes les mains.

    Bonne lecture,

    Quelques articles sur ce livre :

    Les ombres de la Silicon Valley | Portfolios | Mediapart
    https://www.mediapart.fr/studio/portfolios/les-ombres-de-la-silicon-valley

    Les invisibles de la Silicon Valley
    https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2018/12/06/les-invisibles-de-la-silicon-valley_5393357_3232.html

    « La Silicon Valley nous montre à quoi ressemble le capitalisme déchaîné »
    https://usbeketrica.com/article/silicon-valley-capitalisme-dechaine

    Des histoires ou des expériences cachées et l’histoire publique d’un lieu | Entre les lignes entre les mots
    https://entreleslignesentrelesmots.blog/2018/12/12/des-histoires-ou-des-experiences-cachees-et-lhistoire-p

    Silicon Valley : une artiste photographie ses communautés oubliées
    https://www.ladn.eu/mondes-creatifs/oublies-silicon-valley

    Visages de la Silicon Valley | Cultures de l’Information
    https://cultinfo.hypotheses.org/407

    #Fred_Turner #Mary_Beth_Meehan #Visages_Silicon_Valey #Silicon_Valley #Photographie #C&F_éditions

  • Les ombres de la Silicon Valley | Portfolios | Mediapart
    https://www.mediapart.fr/studio/portfolios/les-ombres-de-la-silicon-valley

    Photographe indépendante, Mary Beth Meehan saisit les habitants des États-Unis dans des portraits qui s’affichent en grande dimension. Professeur de communication à Stanford (Californie), ancien journaliste, Fred Turner se passionne pour les racines et ramifications idéologiques et culturelles de la Silicon Valley et pour ses inventeurs – souvent « des entrepreneurs mâles et blancs », écrit-il ici – qu’il a fait connaître dans une « histoire inédite de la culture numérique », publiée en français (en 2013) sous le titre Aux sources de l’utopie numérique. Les deux se sont associés pour composer une autre représentation de la région, quelques dizaines de kilomètres qui s’étirent au sud de San Francisco. Car il n’y aurait pas de Tesla « sans le travail des corps transpirants de milliers de riveteurs, emballeurs et chauffeurs », écrit Turner, pas de Google « sans des légions de codeurs, de cuisiniers, de concierges et d’employés de maison ». Avec 47 milliardaires recensés en 2018, la Silicon Valley « est l’une des régions les plus riches des États-Unis ». Mais malgré un salaire moyen deux fois plus élevé qu’ailleurs dans le pays, c’est aussi « l’une de celles où les inégalités sont les plus marquées ». Voyage aux portes du mythe.

    #Visages_silicon_valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan #C&F_éditions

  • Les invisibles de la Silicon Valley
    https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2018/12/06/les-invisibles-de-la-silicon-valley_5393357_3232.html

    La photographe Mary Beth Meehan a documenté la vie des habitants de cette partie de la Californie, bouleversée par l’émergence des géants du Web.

    Par Damien Leloup

    C’est cette Silicon Valley, rarement décrite, jamais montrée, qu’a voulu documenter la photographe Mary Beth Meehan. Son livre, Visages de la Silicon Valley, offre toute une série de rencontres, avec la face cachée des campus rutilants d’Apple ou de Facebook. Sans tomber dans le misérabilisme, la photographe donne à voir les contrastes saisissants qui séparent le monde des start-up et celui dans lequel vivent leurs employés.
    Contrastes et nouveaux mythes

    Car la Silicon Valley n’est pas seulement un endroit où les contrastes entre les plus riches et les plus pauvres sont particulièrement marqués – c’est, après tout, vrai de beaucoup d’endroits. Mais en creux, Mary Beth Meehan montre aussi une autre dissonance, plus subtile, entre la manière dont la Silicon Valley se voit elle-même et ce qu’elle est réellement. Justyna, ingénieure ultradiplômée et qui vit confortablement, regrette à demi-mot l’époque où « elle était encore une idéaliste ».

    #Silicon_Valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan #C&F_éditions

  • « La Silicon Valley nous montre à quoi ressemble le capitalisme déchaîné »
    https://usbeketrica.com/article/silicon-valley-capitalisme-dechaine

    A l’invitation de Fred Turner, professeur de Stanford qui a étudié - avec Aux sources de l’utopie numérique : de la contre culture à la cyberculture, Stewart Brand, un homme d’influence, C&F Editions, 2012) - la filiation entre les hippies et le rêve d’émancipation par la technologie, Mary Beth Meehan, s’est installée, en « résidence », à Menlo Park. Pendant cinq semaines, elle s’est présentée à des inconnus avec lesquels elle a passé plusieurs jours ou plusieurs heures, et le résultat, un livre de photographies et de témoignages percutant, Visages de la Silicon Valley, est paru le 9 novembre aux éditions C&F. Nous avons rencontré la photographe lors de son passage à Paris.

    #Silicon_Valley #Mary_Beth_Meehan