#mer_mediterranee

  • CE MATIN LA MER EST CALME - Les Étaques
    https://lesetaques.org/2020/11/11/ce-matin-la-mer-est-calme

    Journal d’un marin-sauveteur en Méditerranée

    La mer est un miroir que seule notre étrave vient troubler. Le ciel est voilé, mais la lumière est forte. L’atmosphère d’un gris métallique. Nous sommes en route vers notre dernier sauvetage avant de remonter vers le nord. Je suis tendu, ma tête se remplit de tous les « et si… » que je peux imaginer après les jours que nous avons vécus. Nous mettons les canots rapides à l’eau. À notre approche, la tension est palpable, les gens nous demandent si nous sommes de la police. On dégaine le speech habituel – « nous sommes ici pour vous aider ». Nos « invités » sont pleins de vie, et sans le savoir ils rallument notre motivation. Dans l’équipage, certains disent que ce n’est pas nous qui les avons sauvés, mais eux qui nous sauvent.

    Par le récit de ses expériences du sauvetage en #Méditerranée, #Antonin_Richard nous embarque là où la démagogie des politiques européennes fusionne avec la police des régimes dictatoriaux. Là, aussi, où celles et ceux qui font vivre la camaraderie marine apprivoisent quotidiennement la mer – et s’activent pour laisser aux personnes qui migrent le droit de se donner un présent et un avenir.

    cc @cdb_77 et @tout_le_monde. Je l’ai lu, c’est très bien. ça sort demain...

  • I fantasmi di #Portopalo

    Il giorno della vigilia di Natale #1996 #Saro_Ferro, pescatore del piccolo borgo marinaro siciliano di Portopalo, salva un naufrago al rientro da una battuta di pesca nel mare in tempesta. Nei giorni successivi le acque cominciano a restituire cadaveri su cadaveri: chi sono questi uomini? E cosa gli è successo?

    https://www.raiplay.it/programmi/ifantasmidiportopalo
    #pêcheurs #migrations #asile #réfugiés #naufrage #séquestration #Pachino #mourir_en_mer #Italie #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée
    #film

    Dans la #terminologie...
    Les naufragés étaient appelés « i #tonni di Portopalo » (les « #thons de Portopalo »)
    #mots #vocabulaire
    –-> ping @sinehebdo

    –—

    page wiki
    Naufragio della #F174
    https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naufragio_della_F174

  • Discussion #Frontex et #MSF sur twitter...

    Tout commence par un tweet de Frontex, le 13.11.2020 :

    Ruthless people smugglers put dozens of people in danger today. Thankfully a Frontex plane saw the overcrowded boat near Libyan coast and issued mayday call. We also alerted all national rescue centres. 102 people were rescued by Libyan Coast Guard. Sadly, 2 bodies were recovered

    MSF répond le 14.11.2020 :

    How many boats do you see & not report to the NGOs who could have rescued them?
    How many people have you watched die without alerting the world to what reality looks in the #Med?
    What happens to the people you facilitate the Libyan Coast Guard in trapping & forcing back to Libya?

    https://twitter.com/MSF_Sea/status/1327569141344194560

    Frontex :

    Frontex always alerts national rescue centres in the relevant area, as required by international law. Always. Don’t you?

    MSF :

    International law requires people to be brought to a place of safety.

    Frontex :

    So you do not/would not contact the closest internationally-recognised rescue centres, violating international law and putting lives in danger?

    MSF :

    So you are not/ would not be concerned that people are taken back to a place internationally recognised as unsafe, violating international law and putting lives in danger?
    Your Director was.

    –-> en ajoutant le lien vers une lettre signée par Paraskevi MICHOU (EUROPEAN COMMISSION DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR MIGRATION AND HOME AFFAIRS) et adressée à #Fabrice_Leggeri (Ref. Ares(2019)1755075 - 18/03/2019) :
    https://www.statewatch.org/media/documents/news/2019/jun/eu-letter-from-frontex-director-ares-2019)1362751%20Rev.pdf

    Frontex :

    We care deeply about the safety and security of hundreds of millions of European by helping to protect our borders. And we care deeply about the lives of those in distress at sea. This is why we helped to save more than a quarter million people in recent years.

    https://twitter.com/Frontex/status/1327288578678906880

    –---

    Commentaire de #Jeff_Crisp sur twitter :

    Latest score:
    MSF: 3
    Frontex: 0
    And it is only half-time...

    https://twitter.com/JFCrisp/status/1327692414686027776

    #sauvetages_en_mer #frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #sauvetage #mensonges #Libye #twitter #réseaux_sociaux #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Italy: UN expert condemns ‘criminalization’ of those saving lives in the Mediterranean

    A UN human rights expert condemned today the criminalization of 11 human rights defenders in Italy, saying their efforts to search for and save lives of migrants and asylum seekers in distress in the Mediterranean should instead be applauded.

    “Carola Rackete, the former captain of the rescue vessel Sea-Watch 3, and the ‘Iuventa 10’ crew members are human rights defenders and not criminals,” said Mary Lawlor, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders.

    “I regret that the criminal proceedings against them are still open and they continue to face stigmatization in connection with their human rights work protecting the human rights of migrants and asylum seekers at risk in the Mediterranean Sea.”

    In September 2016, a criminal investigation was opened against some crew members of the Iuventa rescue ship.Charges against them included aiding and abetting in the commission of a crime of illegal immigration, an offence that carries a jail term of between five and 20 years, and a fine of 15,000 euros. On 18 June 2019, a motion for the dismissal of the preliminary criminal investigation against the ‘Iuventa 10’ crew members was filed, but a formal decision is still pending.

    Ms. Rackete was arrested by Italian authorities on 29 June 2019 for docking her rescue ship, with 53 migrants on board, without permission. At the beginning of this year, acting upon appeal, the Italian Supreme Court ruled that she should not have been arrested. Despite this, Ms. Rackete continues to face charges, including aiding and abetting in the commission of a crime of illegal immigration. She risks up to 20 years of imprisonment , and various fines of up to 50,000 euros.

    Since 2014, at least 16,000 migrants have lost their lives in the Mediterranean, according to the IOM’s ’Missing Migrants’ project. “The Italian Government must publicly recognise the important role of human rights defenders in protecting the right to life of migrants and asylum seekers at risk in the Mediterranean and must end the criminalization of those who defend their human rights,” Lawlor said.

    https://www.ohchr.org/FR/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=26361&LangID=E
    #condamnation #UN #nations_unies #Italie #sauvetage #criminalisation #solidarité #Méditerranée #Mer_Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #stigmatisation #Iuventa #Carola_Rakete

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Overlapping crises in Lebanon fuel a new migration to Cyprus

    Driven by increasingly desperate economic circumstances and security concerns in the wake of last month’s Beirut port explosion, a growing number of people are boarding smugglers’ boats in Lebanon’s northern city of Tripoli bound for Cyprus, an EU member state around 160 kilometres away by sea.

    The uptick was thrown into sharp relief on 14 September when a boat packed with 37 people was found adrift off the coast of Lebanon and rescued by the marine task force of UNIFIL, a UN peacekeeping mission that has operated in the country since 1978. At least six people from the boat died, including two children, and six are missing at sea.

    Between the start of July and 14 September, at least 21 boats left Lebanon for Cyprus, according to statistics provided by the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR. This compares to 17 in the whole of 2019. The majority of this year’s trips have happened since 29 August.

    Overall, more than 52,000 asylum seekers and migrants have crossed the Mediterranean so far this year, and compared to Libya, Tunisia, and Turkey – where most of these boat journeys originate – departures from Lebanon are still low. But given the deteriorating situation in the county and the sudden increase in numbers, the attempted crossings represent a significant new trend.

    Fishermen at the harbour in the Tripoli suburb of Al Mina told The New Humanitarian that groups of would-be migrants have been leaving in recent weeks on fishing vessels to the small island of Rankin off the coast, under the pretense of going for a day’s swimming outing. They then wait on the island to be picked up and taken onward, normally to Cyprus.

    Lebanese politicians have periodically used the threat of a wave of refugees heading for Europe to coax more funds from international donors. Former foreign minister Gebran Bassil told French President Emmanuel Macron after the 4 August port explosion that “those whom we welcome generously, may take the escape route towards you in the event of the disintegration of Lebanon.”

    The vast majority of those trying to reach Cyprus – many hope to continue on to Germany or other countries in mainland Europe – have been Syrian refugees, whose situation in Lebanon was precarious long before its descent into full-on financial and political meltdown over the past year.

    Syrians are still the largest group, but as the coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the multiple crises facing Lebanon – the country recorded a record 1,006 COVID-19 cases on 20 September, precipitating calls for a new lockdown – Lebanese residents of Tripoli told The New Humanitarian that an increasing number of Lebanese citizens are attempting, or considering, the sea route.

    “How many people are thinking about it? All of us, without exception,” Mohammed al-Jindi, a 32-year-old father of two who manages a mobile phone shop in Tripoli, said of people he knows in the city.

    The Lebanese lira, officially pegged to the dollar at a rate of about 1,500, has lost 80 percent of its value over the past year. Prices of many basic goods have skyrocketed, and more than half of the population is now estimated to be living in poverty. The port explosion – which destroyed some 15,000 metric tonnes of wheat and displaced as many as 300,000 families, at least temporarily – has compounded fears about worsening poverty and food insecurity.

    Adding to the uncertainty, it has been nearly a year since the outbreak of a protest movement calling for the ouster of Lebanon’s long-ruling political class, blamed for much of the country’s dysfunction, including the port explosion. The economic and political turbulence has led to fears about insecurity, wielded as a threat by some political parties. These fears were underscored by violent clashes in Beirut’s suburbs that left two dead at the end of August.

    “In desperate situations, whether in search of safety, protection, or basic survival, people will move, whatever the danger,” Mireille Girard, UNHCR representative in Lebanon, said in a statement following the 14 September incident. “Addressing the reasons of these desperate journeys and the swift collective rescue of people distressed at sea are key.”
    ‘It’s the only choice’

    Al-Jindi is planning to take the sea route himself and bring his family later. But so far he has been unable to scrape together the approximately $1,000 required by smugglers – the ones he has contacted insist on being paid in scarce US dollars, not Lebanese lira. The currency crisis means al-Jindi’s monthly salary of 900,000 Lebanese lira, previously worth $600, is now worth only around $120.

    The port explosion in Beirut added insecurity to al-Jindi’s list of worries. He lives in the neighbourhood of Bab al Tabbaneh – which has sporadically clashed for years with the adjacent neighborhood of Jabal Mohsen – and fears a return of the conflict.

    “I don’t want to let my children live the same experiences… the sound of explosions, the sound of shooting,” al-Jindi said. After the port explosion, he added, “1,000 percent, now I have a greater desire to leave.”

    Paying for a smuggler’s services is beyond the reach of many Lebanese. But members of the country’s shrinking middle class, frustrated with a lack of opportunities, are also contemplating the Mediterranean journey.

    “I don’t want to let my children live the same experiences… the sound of explosions, the sound of shooting.”

    Educated young people are more likely to apply for emigration through legal routes.

    According to Lebanese research firm Information International, about 66,800 Lebanese emigrated in 2019, an increase from the previous year. The firm also reported a 36 percent increase in departures from the Beirut airport after the explosion.

    But with COVID-19 travel restrictions and the general trend of tightening borders around the world, some Lebanese are also turning to the sea.

    Unable to find steady work since he graduated from university with a degree in IT two years ago, 22-year-old Mohammed Ahmad had applied for a visa to Canada, without success, before deciding to take his chances on the sea route. Before the port explosion, Ahmad had already struck a deal with a purported smuggler to take him to Cyprus and then Greece for 10 million Lebanese lira (the equivalent of around $1,200 at the black exchange market rate). The explosion has only strengthened his resolve.

    “Before, you could think, ‘Maybe the dollar will go down, maybe the situation will get better,’” said Ahmad. “Now, you can’t think that way. We know how the situation is.”

    Mustapha Masri, 21, a fourth-year accounting student at Lebanese University, said he hadn’t planned on leaving Lebanon, “but year after year the situation got worse.” Like Ahmad, Masri first tried emigrating legally, but without success.

    A few months ago, acquaintances referred him to a smuggler. He began selling his belongings to raise the funds for the trip, beginning with his laptop, which he traded for a cheaper one. Even his parents were willing to sell valuables to help him, Masri said.

    “In the beginning, they were against it, but after Australia and Germany denied me, they agreed,” Masri said. “It’s the only choice.”

    Increasing movement

    The past two months have shown a significant uptick in crossings.

    According to UNHCR statistics, in all of 2019, only eight boats from Lebanon arrived in Cyprus, seven were intercepted by Lebanese authorities before getting to the open sea, and two went missing at sea.

    In 2020, three boats are known to have left Lebanon for Cyprus in July, followed by 16 in the weeks between 29 August and 9 September, said UNHCR spokeswoman Lisa Abou Khaled. Eight of those boats were confirmed to have reached Cyprus and another two were reported to have arrived but could not be verified, she said. Another five were intercepted by Lebanese authorities and four were pushed back by Cypriot authorities before they reached the island and returned to Lebanon.

    “From our conversations with the individuals, we understand that the majority tried to leave Lebanon because of their dire socio-economic situation and struggle to survive, and that a couple of families left because of the impact of the blast,” Abou Khaled said.

    The pushbacks by Cypriot authorities have raised concerns among refugee rights advocates, who allege that Cyprus is violating the principle of non-refoulement, which states that refugees and asylum seekers should not be forcibly returned to a country where they might face persecution.

    Loizos Michael, spokesman for the Cypriot Ministry of Interior, said of the arriving migrants: “At this point we can only confirm the increase in boats arriving in Cyprus…The Cypriot government is in close cooperation with the Lebanese authorities and within this framework are trying to respond to the issue.”

    In 2002, Lebanon and Cyprus signed a bilateral agreement to cooperate in combating organised crime, including illegal immigration and human trafficking.

    Peter Stano, a spokesman for the European Union, said that the EU Commission takes allegations of pushbacks “very seriously”, adding, “It is essential… that fundamental rights, and EU law more broadly, is fully respected.”
    Worth the risk?

    The sea route to Cyprus is often deadly, as the 14 September incident underscored. To increase their earnings, smugglers pack small vessels beyond their capacity. More than 70 people have died or gone missing in 2020 on the Eastern Mediterranean sea route – which includes boats bound for Cyprus and Greece – up from 59 all of last year.

    Those who TNH spoke to who were contemplating the crossing said they were aware of the dangers but they still considered it worth the risk to attempt the journey.

    “I don’t believe all the talk that life there is like paradise.”

    “There are a lot of people who have gone and arrived, so I don’t want to think from the perspective that I might not arrive,” said Ahmad, the 22-year-old IT graduate. He was sanguine too about what he might find if he makes it to Europe. “I don’t believe all the talk that life there is like paradise and so on, but I’ll go and see,” he said.

    But the plans of both Ahmad and Masri hit a glitch.

    The two young men – who do not know each other – had been expecting to travel last month. Both had paid a percentage of the agreed-upon fee to the purported smuggler as a deposit, the equivalent of about $100. In both cases, soon after they paid, the smuggler disappeared. When they tried contacting him, they found his line had been disconnected.

    Still, they haven’t given up.

    “If I found someone else, I would go – 100 percent,” Masri said. “Anything is better than here.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/09/21/Lebanon-Cyprus-Beirut-security-economy-migration

    #Chypre #Liban #migrations #asile #réfugiés #routes_migratoires #itinéraires_migratoires #migrants_libanais #réfugiés_libanais #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée

    ping @reka @karine4 @isskein

  • Libérez l’« Ocean Viking » et les autres navires humanitaires

    Les maires de #Montpellier et de #Palerme lancent un #appel pour que le navire de #SOS_Méditerranée détenu en Sicile soit libéré, et que les opérations en Méditerranée centrale puissent reprendre.

    Nous, maires des #villes_méditerranéennes jumelées de Montpellier et Palerme, confrontés à la #crise_humanitaire majeure qui a transformé la #mer_Méditerranée en cimetière ces dernières années, sommes indignés par la #détention_administrative du navire humanitaire #Ocean Viking de SOS Méditerranée depuis le 22 juillet en Sicile.

    Cette détention vient s’ajouter à celle de trois autres #navires_humanitaires depuis le mois d’avril. A chaque fois les autorités maritimes italiennes invoquent des « #irrégularités_techniques_et_opérationnelles » et de prétendus motifs de #sécurité à bord des navires. Pourtant, malgré le harcèlement exercé à l’encontre de leurs navires, ces #ONG de sauvetage en mer opèrent depuis plusieurs années en toute transparence et en coordination avec les autorités maritimes compétentes qui les soumettent très régulièrement au contrôle des autorités portuaires.

    Ces dernières années, les ONG civiles de sauvetage en mer ont secouru des dizaines de milliers d’hommes, de femmes et d’enfants en danger de mort imminente, comblant un #vide mortel laissé par les Etats européens en Méditerranée.

    Alors que les sauveteurs sont empêchés de mener leur mission vitale de sauvetage, de nouveaux naufrages, de nouveaux morts sont à prévoir aux portes de l’Europe.

    Est-ce là le prix à payer pour l’#irresponsabilité et la #défaillance des Etats européens ? En tant que #maires, #citoyens méditerranéens et européens, nous le refusons et dénonçons ces politiques délétères !

    Nous demandons la levée immédiate des mesures de détention qui touchent l’Ocean Viking et tous les navires de sauvetage, pour une reprise immédiate des opérations en Méditerranée centrale !

    Nous appelons tous les citoyens à signer la pétition demandant aux autorités maritimes italiennes la libération du navire.

    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/08/28/liberez-l-ocean-viking-et-les-autres-navires-humanitaires_1797888

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #villes-refuge #Méditerranée #sauvetage #indignation #Michael_Delafosse #Leoluca_Orlando #géographie_du_vide #géographie_du_plein

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les villes-refuge :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145

  • Migrants : les traversées depuis le #Maghreb bousculées par le Covid

    Au début de la crise sanitaire, les chercheuses #Nabila_Moussaoui et #Chadia_Arab ont constaté une baisse des départs depuis les côtes algériennes et marocaines vers l’Europe, et même quelques traversées « retours ». Depuis, les tentatives de passage ont largement repris.

    Jusqu’à quel point le phénomène de « harraga », qui désigne un départ clandestin par la mer depuis les pays du Maghreb vers l’Europe, a été touché par la pandémie de Covid-19 ? Mediapart donne la parole à deux spécialistes des migrations internationales : Nabila Moussaoui, anthropologue, enseignante-chercheuse à l’université Oran II-Mohamed Ben Ahmed et doctorante à l’université Toulouse II-Jean-Jaurès, et la géographe Chadia Arab, chargée de recherche au CNRS (UMR ESO-Angers), enseignante à l’université d’Angers.

    En Algérie, de nombreux départs clandestins se font depuis l’Oranie, que Nabila Moussaoui surnomme "La Mecque des harragas". © NB

    Avec la fermeture des frontières, la pandémie a-t-elle eu une incidence sur le phénomène de harraga ?

    Nabila Moussaoui : Elle a modifié le cours normal de la vie quotidienne sur tous les plans. Inattendue, elle a poussé les États à prendre des décisions rapides pour limiter les dégâts. La fermeture des frontières, de cette façon inédite, a eu des incidences à plusieurs niveaux. En Algérie, où la harraga est une réalité permanente, beaucoup de jeunes ont renoncé au départ ou l’ont reporté. Tout comme le « Hirak » [le mouvement de contestation sociale ayant touché l’Algérie dès février 2019 – ndlr] à ses débuts, la crise sanitaire a été un moment d’incertitude où la vie humaine a été doublement menacée pour les #harragas.

    Chadia Arab, géographe et chargée de recherche au CNRS, UMR ESO-Angers. © DR
    Chadia Arab : Le Maroc a pris la décision de fermer ses frontières dès le 13 mars, avant certains pays européens. Les harragas de toutes nationalités se sont retrouvés dans des situations compliquées. Dans les deux enclaves espagnoles au Maroc, Ceuta et Melilla, des Marocains ne peuvent pas rentrer chez eux. Des demandeurs d’asile sont aussi en attente, dans des conditions parfois dramatiques (voir notre reportage sur ce sujet en 2019).

    La presse locale a fait état de plusieurs cas de harraga « inversée » : des Marocains et Algériens partis clandestinement pour l’Espagne seraient revenus dans leur pays d’origine durant la crise sanitaire. Un épiphénomène ?

    Nabila Moussaoui : Ça n’a pas été rendu officiel par les autorités mais beaucoup de rumeurs ont circulé quant au retour de migrants par voie maritime, en Algérie comme au Maroc. Travaillant essentiellement sur l’Oranie, j’ai eu des récits de retours de harraga d’Espagne par les côtes de Mostaganem. Un quotidien algérien arabophone a rapporté les mêmes faits, mais je ne peux me prononcer sur leur véracité. Il s’agirait de jeunes (reste à définir sociologiquement ce jeune et la tranche d’âge dans laquelle il se situe) rentrés par les côtes mostaganemoises. Ils seraient une dizaine, originaires de Mostaganem et Relizane. Je trouve curieux qu’il n’y ait pas de harragas d’Oran, qui reste une ville de départ très prisée. Mais si retour il y a, c’est un épisode ponctuel, imposé par la conjoncture.

    Chadia Arab : Les journaux marocains, algériens et espagnols ont évoqué des cas. Je ne pense pas que ce soit un phénomène massif mais il est néanmoins important d’en parler. Il faudrait rappeler que d’une part, dans une histoire récente, des cas de harragas ne supportant pas la vie difficile en Europe sont revenus dans leur pays d’origine. D’autre part, dans les années 1950, les Espagnols fuyant la dictature de Franco empruntaient des barques de fortune pour traverser les 13 kilomètres séparant les côtes espagnoles du Maroc pour s’y réfugier.

    Comment l’analysez-vous ?

    Chadia Arab : Les deux pays majoritairement prisés par les harragas sont l’Espagne et l’Italie, deux pays européens et méditerranéens fortement touchés par l’épidémie. Leur situation géographique explique une partie de ces cas de harraga de retour. Mais c’est surtout la crise économique et sociale qui accompagne cette crise sanitaire qui pousse ces migrants à choisir de rentrer chez eux. Les conditions des migrants sans papiers en Europe sont dramatiques et sont exacerbées par la crise du Covid. Sans papiers mais surtout sans ressources, parfois sans logement, ils ne peuvent même pas travailler dans un pays où le confinement ne permet pas la recherche d’emploi. Les risques sont démultipliés chez des personnes déjà fragilisées par leur statut administratif et leur condition sociale. Il est normal qu’avec ce contexte, un certain nombre d’entre eux réfléchissent à rentrer. Par ailleurs, la gestion de la crise, surtout au début, n’était pas au rendez-vous pour rassurer les populations présentes dans ces pays, qu’elles soient migrantes ou non. Le nombre de décès dans les deux pays a aussi inquiété.

    Nabila Moussaoui, chercheuse à l’université Oran II-Mohamed Ben Ahmed. © DR
    Nabila Moussaoui : Les chiffres alarmants de contaminations par le virus du Covid 19 ont effrayé les migrants et le nombre croissant de morts les a plongés dans la panique. Mais la mauvaise gestion de la crise dans les pays européens n’est pas le seul motif. En partant, le harraga s’inscrit dans l’incertitude, même si son départ est un projet réfléchi. En bravant la mer, il brave la mort, mais celle-ci fait partie du projet initial. Mourir d’une épidémie loin des siens reste « hors contrôle » pour le harraga, avec le risque d’être enterré loin de la terre d’islam, s’il échappe à l’incinération, qui n’est pas de sa culture. Le harraga s’inscrit dans une logique de réussite, il est vu comme un héros « qui prend sa vie en main ». Mais dans ce contexte, sa mort serait synonyme d’échec social. Elle serait assimilée au suicide, comme le stipule la fatwa relative à la harraga en Algérie, le plus grand des péchés dans la religion musulmane.

    Où en est le phénomène de harraga aujourd’hui ?

    Nabila Moussaoui : Au début du Hirak, les départs ont régressé, puis cessé, pour reprendre de manière alarmante au moment de l’annonce de la date des élections. Le même constat est valable aujourd’hui avec cette crise sanitaire : après le flou, les interrogations et la peur vient la résilience.

    Chadia Arab : Ce que nous avons appris de la société civile qui travaille avec les migrants, c’est que la fermeture des frontières ne limite pas la volonté de migrer. Et bien que les personnes ne puissent plus voyager, le transit des camions et conteneurs se poursuit. Dans le port de Tanger, les harragas continuent à tenter d’échapper à la vigilance des contrôles qui se sont renforcés pendant la crise sanitaire. Ils surveillent nuit et jour la possibilité de s’engouffrer sous un camion ou à l’intérieur d’un bateau pour tenter l’aventure migratoire vers l’Europe (lire notre reportage à Tanger).

    L’inquiétude qu’on peut avoir, c’est sur la dangerosité du « hrig » [« brûler les frontières », soit le départ clandestin – ndlr]. Ces migrants risquent leur vie à chaque tentative, et les arrestations peuvent être rudes et violentes. Plusieurs associations en Europe et au Maghreb (Euromed Right, Sea-Watch, Fmas, Gadem, Ftdes, Amdh, etc.) ont dénoncé les tensions et la vulnérabilité, encore plus fortes en temps de crise sanitaire, dans les centres de détention [Ceti de Melilla et Ceuta, El Wardia en Tunisie, les centres en Libye, à Chypre et Malte – ndlr]. Des bateaux flottants sont venus remplacer ces hotspots pour enfermer les migrants retrouvés en mer. Melilla est un des passages empruntés par ces harragas. Six cents Tunisiens risquent actuellement leur vie à Melilla et peuvent être expulsés à tout moment. La situation déjà dramatique des harragas s’aggrave donc.

    Avez-vous une estimation du nombre de bateaux ou personnes qui partent chaque jour, et du coût que cela représente ?

    Chadia Arab : À l’époque où le phénomène était vraiment très important, fin des années 1990 et début des années 2000, les migrants pouvaient payer une traversée dans des pateras ou Zodiac 1 000 euros. Aujourd’hui, il semblerait que le tarif ait augmenté pour atteindre jusqu’à 5 000 euros.
    Nabila Moussaoui : Je ne peux pas avancer d’estimation. Les prix augmentent d’année en année, suivant le taux de change du secteur informel, la qualité de l’embarcation, le « professionnalisme » du passeur… Et, bien sûr, les conditions du départ. Les traversées coûtent entre 1 200 et 3 000 euros, selon les périodes, les itinéraires choisis et le nombre de candidats. En cette période de crise, je ne doute pas de l’augmentation des coûts de la traversée, de par la conjoncture au départ et à l’arrivée. Elle doit pouvoir se négocier à partir de 2 000 euros aujourd’hui, « prime de risque de contamination incluse ». La harraga est un business.

    À quoi faut-il s’attendre lors du déconfinement au Maroc (où un confinement total a été instauré depuis le 20 mars) et en Algérie (où un confinement partiel a été étendu à tout le territoire le 4 avril) ?

    Nabila Moussaoui : Pour l’instant, les médias se focalisent sur l’évolution du Covid-19. Que le phénomène ne fasse pas la une des journaux ou des JT ne signifie pas qu’il n’existe plus. Au moment du déconfinement, des chiffres alarmants de harragas partis ou disparus seront révélés. La réalité des crises algériennes dans leur globalité refera surface. La liste des disparus en mer ou des signalements s’allongera. Durant le confinement déjà, des cas de disparitions d’adolescents et de jeunes adultes ont envahi les réseaux sociaux. À Oran, deux mineurs de 17 ans sortis faire des courses ne sont jamais rentrés. La situation politique et socio-économique de l’Algérie peut l’expliquer. La crise a révélé le manque affligeant de structures hospitalières et de moyens, ainsi qu’une impréparation à la gestion de crise. Seule la solidarité « populaire » a permis d’y faire face. Les mesures d’aide sont venues bien plus tard (10 000 dinars, soit 50 euros, que l’État a promis aux familles sans ou à faible revenu), après la pénurie d’aliments de première nécessité et le chômage soudain lié à l’arrêt de l’activité économique, reflétant l’importance du secteur informel dans l’économie.

    Chadia Arab : Avec le déconfinement, les réseaux mafieux vont peut-être s’accentuer. Ce qui est sûr, c’est que l’Europe poursuit sa politique de surveillance des frontières : on l’a vu à Melilla et Ceuta, en Grèce, à Malte ou Chypre. L’externalisation des frontières dans les pays du Maghreb fait aussi le jeu de cette Europe sécuritaire. Ce qui veut dire que l’inquiétude sur les risques subis par les migrants sera toujours présente, et que le droit à la vie des migrants, le droit à la liberté de circulation prônés par plusieurs membres de la société civile maghrébine et européenne ne seront toujours pas d’actualité dans le monde d’après, que beaucoup espéraient plus juste…

    Un mot sur le prochain Tribunal permanent des peuples (TPP), qui devrait avoir lieu à Tunis cette année ?

    Chadia Arab : Le TPP est un tribunal d’opinion qui agit de manière indépendante des États et répond aux demandes des communautés et des peuples dont les droits ont été violés. La prochaine édition se tiendra avant la fin de l’année 2020 à Tunis et se concentrera sur les violations des droits des migrants en pointant du doigt les États du Maghreb, avec des accusations sur le droit à la vie, la non-assistance à personnes en danger, les expulsions collectives, le refoulement, la torture, les déplacements forcés, la violence et l’exploitation au sein des centres de détention. Je pense notamment à ce qui se passe en Libye. C’est organisé par la dynamique du Forum social maghrébin (FSMagh).

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/070620/migrants-les-traversees-depuis-le-maghreb-bousculees-par-le-covid?onglet=f
    #covid-19 #coronavirus #parcours_migratoires #routes_migratoires #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #Algérie #Maroc #Tunisie

    ping @thomas_lacroix @isskein @reka @_kg_

  • L’Europe, la Turquie et les nouvelles lignes de conflit en Méditerranée orientale - European council on foreign relations
    Dans un monde où les grandes puissances sont en compétition, où une pandémie fait rage et où les guerres n’ont pas de fin, d’aucuns seraient surpris que la prochaine crise à laquelle l’Europe se confronterait concernerait des différends en droit maritime.

    Le conflit chypriote et l’antagonisme historique entre la Turquie et la Grèce se trouvent au cœur de ces tensions, autour desquelles un front anti-Turquie plus large se constitue. Ces différends s’entremêlent désormais aux guerres civiles en Libye et en Syrie et attirent des pays aussi lointains que le Golfe ou la Russie.

    Dans une nouvelle cartographie détaillée, l’équipe du programme MENA de l’ECFR analyse les acteurs clés de cette arène méditerranéenne – les Européens, le Conseil de coopération du Golfe, la Turquie et Israël – et identifie les principaux points de compétition, comme les gisements de gaz, le conflit chypriote, mais aussi les conflits en Libye et en Syrie.

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Gréce#frontière#mer_méditerranée#gaz#géopolitique#migrant#migration#réfugié

    https://www.ecfr.eu/paris/publi/rivalite_en_haute_mer_lue_la_turquie_et_les_nouvelles_lignes_de_conflit_en
    https://www.ecfr.eu/specials/eastern_med

  • Appel à l’annulation d’un contrat entre l’#UE et des entreprises israéliennes pour la surveillance des migrants par drones

    Les contrats de l’UE de 59 millions d’euros avec des entreprises militaires israélienne pour s’équiper en drones de guerre afin de surveiller les demandeurs d’asile en mer sont immoraux et d’une légalité douteuse.
    L’achat de #drones_israéliens par l’UE encourage les violations des droits de l’homme en Palestine occupée, tandis que l’utilisation abusive de tout drone pour intercepter les migrants et les demandeurs d’asile entraînerait de graves violations en Méditerranée, a déclaré aujourd’hui Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor dans un communiqué.
    L’UE devrait immédiatement résilier ces #contrats et s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones contre les demandeurs d’asile, en particulier la pratique consistant à renvoyer ces personnes en #Libye, entravant ainsi leur quête de sécurité.

    L’année dernière, l’Agence européenne des garde-frontières et des garde-côtes basée à Varsovie, #Frontex, et l’Agence européenne de sécurité maritime basée à Lisbonne, #EMSA, ont investi plus de 100 millions d’euros dans trois contrats pour des drones sans pilote. De plus, environ 59 millions d’euros des récents contrats de drones de l’UE auraient été accordés à deux sociétés militaires israéliennes : #Elbit_Systems et #Israel_Aerospace_Industries, #IAI.

    L’un des drones que Frontex a obtenu sous contrat est le #Hermes_900 d’Elbit, qui a été expérimenté sur la population mise en cage dans la #bande_de_Gaza assiégée lors de l’#opération_Bordure_protectrice de 2014. Cela montre l’#investissement de l’UE dans des équipements israéliens dont la valeur a été démontrée par son utilisation dans le cadre de l’oppression du peuple palestinien et de l’occupation de son territoire. Ces achats de drones seront perçus comme soutenant et encourageant une telle utilisation expérimentale de la #technologie_militaire par le régime répressif israélien.

    « Il est scandaleux pour l’UE d’acheter des drones à des fabricants de drones israéliens compte tenu des moyens répressifs et illégaux utilisés pour opprimer les Palestiniens vivant sous occupation depuis plus de cinquante ans », a déclaré le professeur Richard Falk, président du conseil d’administration d’Euromed-Monitor.

    Il est également inacceptable et inhumain pour l’UE d’utiliser des drones, quelle que soit la manière dont ils ont été obtenus pour violer les droits fondamentaux des migrants risquant leur vie en mer pour demander l’asile en Europe.

    Les contrats de drones de l’UE soulèvent une autre préoccupation sérieuse car l’opération Sophia ayant pris fin le 31 mars 2020, la prochaine #opération_Irini a l’intention d’utiliser ces drones militaires pour surveiller et fournir des renseignements sur les déplacements des demandeurs d’asile en #mer_Méditerranée, et cela sans fournir de protocoles de sauvetage aux personnes exposées à des dangers mortels en mer. Surtout si l’on considère qu’en 2019 le #taux_de_mortalité des demandeurs d’asile essayant de traverser la Méditerranée a augmenté de façon spectaculaire, passant de 2% en moyenne à 14%.

    L’opération Sophia utilise des navires pour patrouiller en Méditerranée, conformément au droit international, et pour aider les navires en détresse. Par exemple, la Convention des Nations Unies sur le droit de la mer (CNUDM) stipule que tous les navires sont tenus de signaler une rencontre avec un navire en détresse et, en outre, de proposer une assistance, y compris un sauvetage. Étant donné que les drones ne transportent pas d’équipement de sauvetage et ne sont pas régis par la CNUDM, il est nécessaire de s’appuyer sur les orientations du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit international coutumier pour guider le comportement des gouvernements.

    Euro-Med Monitor craint que le passage imminent de l’UE à l’utilisation de drones plutôt que de navires en mer Méditerranée soit une tentative de contourner le #droit_international et de ne pas respecter les directives de l’UE visant à sauver la vie des personnes isolées en mer en situation critique. Le déploiement de drones, comme proposé, montre la détermination de l’UE à dissuader les demandeurs d’asile de chercher un abri sûr en Europe en facilitant leur capture en mer par les #gardes-côtes_libyens. Cette pratique reviendrait à aider et à encourager la persécution des demandeurs d’asile dans les fameux camps de détention libyens, où les pratiques de torture, d’esclavage et d’abus sexuels sont très répandues.

    En novembre 2019, l’#Italie a confirmé qu’un drone militaire appartenant à son armée s’était écrasé en Libye alors qu’il était en mission pour freiner les passages maritimes des migrants. Cela soulève de sérieuses questions quant à savoir si des opérations de drones similaires sont menées discrètement sous les auspices de l’UE.

    L’UE devrait décourager les violations des droits de l’homme contre les Palestiniens en s’abstenant d’acheter du matériel militaire israélien utilisé dans les territoires palestiniens occupés. Elle devrait plus généralement s’abstenir d’utiliser des drones militaires contre les demandeurs d’asile civils et, au lieu de cela, respecter ses obligations en vertu du droit international en offrant un refuge sûr aux réfugiés.

    Euro-Med Monitor souligne que même en cas d’utilisation de drones, les opérateurs de drones de l’UE sont tenus, en vertu du droit international, de respecter les #droits_fondamentaux à la vie, à la liberté et à la sécurité de tout bateau de migrants en danger qu’ils rencontrent. Les opérateurs sont tenus de signaler immédiatement tout incident aux autorités compétentes et de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour garantir que les opérations de recherche et de sauvetage soient menées au profit des migrants en danger.

    L’UE devrait en outre imposer des mesures de #transparence et de #responsabilité plus strictes sur les pratiques de Frontex, notamment en créant un comité de contrôle indépendant pour enquêter sur toute violation commise et prévenir de futures transgressions. Enfin, l’UE devrait empêcher l’extradition ou l’expulsion des demandeurs d’asile vers la Libye – où leur vie serait gravement menacée – et mettre fin à la pratique des garde-côtes libyens qui consiste à arrêter et capturer des migrants en mer.

    http://www.france-palestine.org/Appel-a-l-annulation-d-un-contrat-entre-l-UE-et-des-entreprises-is
    #Europe #EU #drones #Israël #surveillance #drones #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Méditerranée #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #militarisation_des_frontières #complexe_militaro-industriel #business #armée #droits_humains #sauvetage

    ping @etraces @reka @nepthys @isskein @karine4

  • Esternalizzazione e diritto d’asilo, un approfondimento dell’ASGI

    Con il documento che si pubblica l’ASGI, facendo uso delle analisi, delle azioni e delle discussioni prodotte nel corso degli ultimi anni, offre una lettura del fenomeno dell’esternalizzazione delle frontiere e del diritto di asilo focalizzando la propria attenzione in particolare sulle politiche di esternalizzazione volte ad impedire o limitare l’accesso delle persone straniere attraverso la rotta del Mare Mediterraneo centrale, nonché nell’ottica della verifica del rispetto delle norme costituzionali, europee ed internazionali che tutelano i diritti fondamentali delle persone e della conseguente ricerca di strumenti giuridici di contrasto alle violazioni verificate.

    L’esternalizzazione del controllo delle frontiere e del diritto dei rifugiati viene definita come l’insieme delle azioni economiche, giuridiche, militari, culturali, prevalentemente extraterritoriali, poste in essere da soggetti statali e sovrastatali, con il supporto indispensabile di ulteriori attori pubblici e privati, volte ad impedire o ad ostacolare che i migranti (e, tra essi, i richiedenti asilo) possano entrare nel territorio di uno Stato al fine di usufruire delle garanzie, anche giurisdizionali, previste in tale Stato, o comunque volte a rendere legalmente e sostanzialmente inammissibili il loro ingresso o una loro domanda di protezione sociale e/o giuridica.

    Nell’ambito del documento è considerato prima il contesto storico della esternalizzazione, dunque quello geopolitico più recente, attinente la rotta del mar Mediterraneo centrale, infine il contesto giuridico nazionale ed internazionale che si ritiene leso da tali politiche. Vengono, dunque, indicate alcune tra le possibili strade affinché sia individuata la responsabilità dei soggetti che determinano la violazione dei diritti umani delle persone conseguenti alle politiche in materia.

    Il documento intende porsi quale strumento di dibattito nell’ambito dell’ evoluzione dell’analisi del diritto di asilo per fornire adeguati strumenti di comprensione e contrasto di un fenomeno che si ritiene particolarmente insidioso e tale da inficiare sostanzialmente la rilevanza di diritti, tra cui innanzitutto il diritto di asilo, pur formalmente riconosciuti alle persone da parte dell’Italia e degli Stati membri dell’Unione europea.

    https://www.asgi.it/asilo-e-protezione-internazionale/asilo-esternalizzazione-approfondimento
    #ASGI #rapport #externalisation #Méditerranée_centrale #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Mer_Méditerranée #droits_fondamentaux #droit_d'asile #Libye #Italie #Trust_Fund #HCR #relocalisation #fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence #Trust_Fund_for_Africa

    Pour télécharger le rapport:


    https://www.asgi.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/2020_1_Documento-Asgi-esternalizzazione.pdf

    ping @isskein

  • Sauvetage de migrants en Méditerranée : #MSF met un terme à son partenariat avec #SOS_Méditerranée

    Médecins sans frontières a annoncé vendredi la fin de sa collaboration avec SOS Méditerranée à bord du navire Ocean Viking. Les deux ONG sont en désaccord sur la possibilité d’effectuer des sauvetages malgré la #crise_sanitaire liée au coronavirus.

    Après quatre ans de collaboration, l’organisation #Médecins_sans_frontières (MSF) a annoncé, vendredi 17 avril, qu’elle cessait ses missions de #sauvetage_en_mer aux côtés de SOS Méditerranée, qui affrète le bateau #Ocean_Viking, contraint de rester jusqu’à nouvel ordre à Marseille, son port d’attache.

    https://twitter.com/MSF_Sea/status/1251093648529334273?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

    Les deux ONG, dont le partenariat a permis de sauver au cours des quatre dernières années environ 30 000 personnes en Méditerranée, ne sont pas parvenues à s’entendre sur la possibilité d’opérer malgré la crise sanitaire du coronavirus qui a notamment vu les ports italiens et maltais se fermer.

    MSF aurait souhaité poursuivre les sauvetages, même sans garantie des États européens de pouvoir débarquer les personnes secourues, au nom de « l’#impératif_humanitaire », a expliqué Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, chargée des questions humanitaires. Mais l’ONG pouvait difficilement continuer de mobiliser une équipe médicale si le bateau de sauvetage restait à quai en France, a-t-elle ajouté.

    SOS Méditerranée a considéré, de son côté, que « les conditions de sécurité n’étaient malheureusement plus réunies pour les équipages et les personnes secourues », a expliqué à l’AFP Sophie Beau, sa directrice générale. Reprendre la mer, c’était prendre le risque de se retrouver « face à des situations de #blocage qui s’éternisent en mer », « sans aucune garantie de #débarquement », et « des #évacuations_médicales rendues très hasardeuses du fait des conditions de crise sanitaire », a-t-elle ajouté.

    De nombreuses embarcations quittent la Libye

    MSF a par ailleurs rappelé la gravité de la situation de ceux qui continuent de fuir la #Libye. Alors que #Malte et l’#Italie ont fermé leurs #ports et que plus aucun navire humanitaire ne se trouvait dans la zone de recherche et sauvetage libyenne vendredi, les tentatives de traversées de la Méditerranée sont encore plus dangereuses qu’avant.

    Pour MSF, les États européens « continuent de se dérober devant leur #responsabilité, contrecarrant sans relâche les efforts des ONG ». Elle accuse Malte et l’Italie de ne pas avoir répondu à plusieurs appels de détresse et d’avoir refusé « le débarquement à près de 200 personnes » par d’autres ONG pendant le week-end de Pâques.

    Prenant acte du #retrait de son « #partenaire_médical », SOS Méditerranée espère pouvoir reprendre les opérations de sauvetage au plus vite pour éviter « que la crise sanitaire n’en cache une autre », humanitaire, en Méditerranée. Et elle rappelle dans un communiqué que plus de 1 000 personnes ont fui la Libye « à bord de bateaux impropres à la navigation » au cours des dix derniers jours.

    https://twitter.com/SOSMedFrance/status/1251088701217746951?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24182/sauvetage-de-migrants-en-mediterranee-msf-met-un-terme-a-son-partenari
    #sauvetage #ONG #asile #migrations #Méditerranée #coronavirus #covid-19 #Mer_Méditerranée #rupture #ports_fermés #fermeture_des_ports

  • Le Covid-19, nouveau danger pour les migrants en #Méditerranée

    Seul bateau humanitaire à opérer en ce moment, le « #Alan_Kurdi » cherche en vain un port pour débarquer 150 rescapés. Avec l’épidémie, l’Italie et Malte ont fermé leurs ports et disent n’être plus en mesure de mener des opérations de sauvetage.

    La scène est devenue d’une triste banalité. Depuis cinq jours, le bateau de sauvetage Alan Kurdi, de l’ONG allemande Sea-Eye, erre en Méditerranée entre Malte et l’île italienne de Lampedusa. Aucun des deux Etats n’est prêt à accueillir les 150 rescapés que le bateau a recueillis le 6 avril au large de la Libye. Avec l’épidémie de Covid-19 qui fait rage (plus de 18 000 morts en Italie, deux dans le petit archipel maltais), ils s’opposent même à un débarquement temporaire des migrants avant une relocalisation dans d’autres pays, alors que 150 villes allemandes se sont dites prêtes à accueillir des réfugiés, selon Sea-Eye. Rome aurait également refusé d’approvisionner le bateau en nourriture, médicaments et carburant.

    Le coronavirus et la fermeture du continent européen ont rendu les traversées de la Méditerranée plus risquées encore, et le travail des ONG plus difficile. Le Alan Kurdi est actuellement le seul navire humanitaire à patrouiller en Méditerranée centrale. Le bateau de l’ONG espagnole Open Arms est en réfection. Sea Watch et MSF ne sont pas retournés en mer après avoir été placés en quarantaine au large de l’Italie début mars.

    Fermeture des ports

    Après l’annonce du sauvetage effectué le 6 avril par le Alan Kurdi, et alors que le bateau demandait à l’Italie et à Malte une autorisation de débarquer, Rome et La Vallette ont choisi de fermer complètement leurs ports. Le 8 avril, le gouvernement italien annonçait que tant que l’état d’urgence sanitaire serait en vigueur, « les ports italiens ne pourraient être considérés comme "sûrs" pour le débarquement de navires battant pavillon étranger ». « A l’heure actuelle et en raison de l’épidémie de Covid-19, les ports ne présentent plus les conditions sanitaires nécessaires », a précisé le ministère des Transports.

    Malte a suivi le même chemin le 9 avril. « Il n’est actuellement pas possible d’assurer la disponibilité d’une zone sûre sur le territoire maltais sans mettre en danger l’efficacité des structures nationales de santé et de logistique », affirme le gouvernement, qui incite les migrants à ne pas tenter le voyage. « Il est de leur intérêt et de leur responsabilité de ne pas se mettre en danger en tentant un voyage risqué vers un pays qui n’est pas en mesure de leur offrir un abri sûr. »
    Selon l’agence européenne de surveillance des frontières, Frontex, les arrivées illégales en Europe ont diminué avec la pandémie, sans s’arrêter pour autant. Ainsi, 800 personnes ont quitté la Libye en mars, selon l’agence de l’ONU pour les réfugiés. De l’autre côté de la Méditerranée, 177 personnes ont débarqué en Italie entre le 2 et le 8 avril, selon l’OIM. « Nous avons constaté une augmentation des traversées cette semaine en Méditerranée centrale, probablement due à l’instabilité croissante en Libye et à un temps clément », précise une porte-parole d’Alarm Phone, ONG qui alerte les garde-côtes si elle repère des embarcations en détresse. Dans la nuit du 6 au 7 avril, 67 personnes ont ainsi réussi à atteindre Lampedusa par elles-mêmes après avoir dérivé plusieurs dizaines d’heures. Alertés, les garde-côtes italiens et maltais ne sont pas intervenus.

    Sabotage

    « Notre ligne d’urgence pour les personnes en détresse a constaté ces derniers jours un comportement de plus en plus irresponsable des garde-côtes européens. Les Maltais ou les Italiens n’interviennent pas toujours ou n’arrivent que très longtemps après les alertes », affirme Alarm Phone. L’ONG accuse les gardes-côtes de Malte d’avoir saboté le 9 avril un bateau transportant 70 personnes, qui se trouvait à 20 miles au sud-ouest de l’île. D’après un enregistrement consulté par le New York Times, les garde-côtes auraient coupé le câble d’alimentation du moteur. On y entend aussi l’un d’eux dire : « On va vous laisser mourir dans l’eau. Personne n’entre à Malte. » L’embarcation a finalement été secourue plusieurs heures plus tard.

    Avec la fermeture des ports, les garde-côtes devraient encore limiter leurs interventions. La Vallette a prévenu qu’elle ne serait plus en mesure de mener des missions de sauvetage. « Les personnes qui fuient la Libye devront rejoindre les points les plus méridionaux de Malte ou de l’Italie par elles-mêmes. C’est un pari extraordinairement risqué pour ces bateaux fragiles et trop chargés », s’inquiète Alarm Phone. « Malgré la pression que la pandémie fait peser sur tous les aspects de la société, nous sommes extrêmement préoccupés par ces décisions politiques qui, de fait, outrepassent le droit international.  Le débarquement des rescapés dans un lieu sûr est une obligation pour les capitaines de navire et les États ont la responsabilité juridique de coopérer à la désignation d’un lieu "sûr" approprié, rappelle une porte-parole de SOS Méditerranée.  Nous craignons que les gouvernements européens établissent une hiérarchie entre deux devoirs de priorité égale : sauver des vies à terre et sauver des vies en mer ».

    La situation est d’autant plus préoccupante que le nombre de traversées devrait repartir à la hausse, comme c’est habituellement le cas au printemps. Et pour la première fois, la marine libyenne pourrait refuser de pourchasser les migrants, là aussi en raison de la pandémie. Tripoli a suivi ses voisins du nord et déclaré ses propres ports « non sûrs ». Un bateau officiel des garde-côtes avec 280 rescapés à bord a été interdit d’aborder dans la capitale libyenne. Selon Sea-Eye, leurs collègues à terre exigent quant à eux des masques pour continuer les opérations d’interception.


    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/04/10/le-covid-19-nouveau-danger-pour-les-migrants-en-mediterranee_1784859
    #ONG #sauvetage #Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Mer_Méditerranée #ports #ports_fermés #fermeture_des_ports #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @thomas_lacroix

    • Les migrants abandonnés en Méditerranée

      Le navire humanitaire allemand Alan Kurdi est coincé en mer avec 150 personnes à bord, l’Italie et Malte ayant fermé leurs ports pour cause de coronavirus. En raison de la guerre qui sévit à Tripoli, la Libye refuse de faire débarquer sur son sol 280 migrants interceptés par les gardes-côtes libyens.
      Il n’y a plus de port en Méditerranée centrale prêt à accueillir les demandeurs d’asile sauvés en mer. Les bateaux humanitaires se trouvent pris en étau entre les ports italiens et maltais, fermés pour cause de coronavirus, et les ports libyens, qui se ferment également pour cause de guerre.

      L’Alan Kurdi, le bateau de l’ONG allemande Sea Eye, avait tout juste repris du service en mer depuis quelques heures, après plus d’un mois d’absence de navire humanitaire en Méditerranée, qu’il a été amené à secourir, lundi 6 avril au matin, 62 personnes qui avaient lancé un appel de détresse depuis leur embarcation de bois surchargée dans les eaux internationales au large de la Libye.

      L’ONG rapporte que pendant le sauvetage, un hors-bord battant pavillon libyen les a menacés en tirant des coups de feu en l’air. Pris de panique, la moitié des migrants se sont alors jetés à l’eau, mais ils ont pu être sauvés par l’équipage de l’Alan Kurdi.

      Les ports italiens décrétés « peu sûrs »

      Quelques heures plus tard, le bateau était amené à secourir une deuxième embarcation, avec 82 personnes à bord dont une femme enceinte. Selon l’ONG, le bateau italien de ravitaillement de plates-formes pétrolières Asso Ventinove, présent à proximité du bateau en détresse, avait refusé de procéder au sauvetage.

      En raison de la pandémie de Covid-19, les autorités italiennes et maltaises ont informé l’Allemagne qu’elles refusaient tout débarquement sur leurs côtes, même si une répartition des personnes sauvées entre les États européens était organisée. Le 7 avril, le gouvernement italien a publié un décret déclarant ses ports « peu sûrs » tant que durera l’urgence de santé publique.

      Depuis, l’Alan Kurdi reste en mer avec, à son bord, les 150 personnes secourues. Une nouvelle errance en Méditerranée qui rappelle la crise de l’été dernier, lorsque sous, l’impulsion de son ministre de l’intérieur d’extrême droite, Matteo Salvini, l’Italie avait fermé ses ports.

      Gorden Isler, président de Sea-Eye, veut croire que l’Allemagne saura leur venir en aide. « Le gouvernement fédéral a réussi à rapatrier 200 000 de ses propres citoyens de l’étranger dans un effort immense. Il doit être imaginable et humainement possible d’envoyer un avion pour 150 personnes en quête de sécurité en Europe du Sud », a-t-il plaidé.

      Une situation « tragique » à Tripoli

      De l’autre côté de la Méditerranée, la guerre bat son plein. Un an après le lancement, le 4 avril 2019, de l’offensive sur Tripoli par le maréchal Haftar et ses troupes de l’est libyen, le conflit a « dégénéré en une dangereuse et potentiellement interminable guerre par procuration alimentée par des puissances étrangères cyniques »,dénonçait la mission des Nations unies en avril dernier.

      Selon elle, 150 000 personnes ont été forcées de fuir leurs foyers, et près de 350 000 civils restent dans les zones de la ligne de front, sans compter 750 000 autres qui vivent dans les zones touchées par les affrontements. Pour la troisième fois de la semaine, l’hôpital Al-Khadra de Tripoli a été bombardé. « Des éclats d’obus ont touché une salle d’opération et un chirurgien en train d’opérer un patient », précise le journal The Libya observer.

      280 migrants bloqués au large de Tripoli

      En raison de l’intensification des bombardements, y compris sur le port de Tripoli, les autorités libyennes ont refusé, le 9 avril, de laisser débarquer 280 migrants interceptés par les gardes-côtes libyens contraints de rester à bord du bateau, a alerté l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). L’OIM, présent au point de débarquement pour fournir une aide d’urgence, a jugé la situation « tragique ».

      Selon elle, au moins 500 migrants à bord de six bateaux ont quitté la Libye en une semaine en raison de l’intensification du conflit et de l’amélioration des conditions météorologiques. 150 d’entre eux se trouvent à bord de l’Alan Kurdi, et 177 sont arrivés en Italie (soit près de 3 000 depuis le début de l’année).

      « Le droit maritime international et les obligations en matière de droits de l’homme doivent être respectés pendant l’urgence Covid-19 », revendique l’OIM. « Le statu quo ne peut pas continuer », dénonce-t-elle, en réclamant « une approche globale de la situation en Méditerranée centrale ».

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/migrants-abandonnes-Mediterranee-2020-04-10-1201088875
      #port_sûr #ports_sûrs

    • L’Italie - par un décret signé par 4 ministres - annonce le 7 avril que l’Italie ne peut plus être considéré un #POS (#place_of_safety) pour les migrants interceptés par des bateaux battant pavillon étranger hors des eaux nationales.

      https://www.avvenire.it/c/attualita/Documents/M_INFR.GABINETTO.REG_DECRETI(R).0000150.07-04-2020%20(3).pdf

      Nombreuses les réaction de dénonciation de cette décision par la société civile

      –> l’appel du Tavolo Asilo (circulé hier sur la liste)
      –> l’appel des ong de sauvetage en mer https://mediterranearescue.org/news/ong-decreto-porto-sicuro

      –> un appel signé par parlementaires, sénateurs, conseillers régionaux et parlementaires européennes (de majorité gouvernementale)

      Hier Malte annonce aussi la fermeture de ses ports

      https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/malta-says-it-cannot-guarantee-migrant-rescues.784571
      pour ensuite décider - hier à 22:30 - de laisser débarquer un bateau avec à bord 61 migrant(e)s 41 heures après avoir lancé un sos (source : alarm phone) https://twitter.com/alarm_phone/status/1248503658188140545

      Tripoli se déclare aussi un port non sure et refoulé un de ses propres motovedettes avec à bord 280 migrant(e)s, dont semblerait aussi femmes et enfants

      https://www.avvenire.it/amp/attualita/pagine/tripoli-si-dichiara-porto-non-sicuro-e-respinge-una-propria-motovedetta-con
      Selon l’OIM la Libye se déclare port non sures à cause de l’intensification du conflit qui toucherait aussi le port de Tripoli-
      Le Gouvernement de Al Serraj déclarait de ne avoir presque plus le control du port de Tripoli.

      Cette semaine serait autour de 500 les migrants partis des cotes libyennes. 67 ont pu arriver par leur moyen à Lampedusa, 150 sont toujours à bord du bateau Alan Kurdi (sans pouvoir trouver un port de débarquement) et les autres ont été interceptés par les « Gardes Cotes Libyennes ». 280 sont à bord d’une motovodette libyenne au large de Tripoli après etre en mer depuis 72heures.

      –-> Message de Sara Prestianni, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 10.04.2020

      #Malte #Libye

    • Migrants trapped on boat in Tripoli due to shelling

      The plight of 280 migrants trapped on a boat in Tripoli harbour due to shelling has shown that EU states and other regional powers needed “a comprehensive approach to the situation in the central Mediterranean,” the International Organisation for Migration, a UN agency, has said. The Libyan coast guard intercepted the migrants en route to Europe, but port authorities refused to let them disembark due to the intensity of fighting.

      https://euobserver.com/tickers/148047

    • The Covid-19 Excuse: Non-Assistance in the Central Mediterranean becomes the Norm

      The Covid-19 pandemic has allowed states to enact emergency measures which curtail the right and freedom to move, within Europe and beyond. While some measures seem justified in order to contain the spread of a dangerous virus, European authorities have used this health crisis to normalise the already existing practice of non-assistance at sea. In the central Mediterranean, the consequences are particularly devastating. These measures, implemented in the name of ‘saving lives’, have the opposite effect: people are left at serious risk of dying in distress at sea. Under the veil of the health crisis, European authorities are carrying out racist border security policies that make sea crossings even more dangerous and deadly.
      Over 1,000 people try to escape Libya in one week

      In only one week, 5-11 April 2020, over 1,000 people on more than 20 boats have left the Libyan shore. The Alarm Phone was alerted to 10 boats in total, two of which were rescued by Alan Kurdi on 6 April. Over 500 people are reported to have been returned to Libya within merely three days. Some of the survivors have informed us that six people drowned. Many of those returned were kept imprisoned on a ship at Tripoli harbour. Moreover, the fate of some boats remains unclear. At the same time, we have also learned of several other boats that reached Italy autonomously, arriving in Lampedusa, Sicily, Linosa and Pantelleria.

      At the time of writing, 14.30h CEST on 11 April, four boats are still in severe distress at sea. The Armed Forces of Malta refuse to rescue a boat in the Maltese Search and Rescue (SAR) zone. The people on board tell us: “People are without water, the pregnant woman is so tired, the child is crying, so thirsty. Please if you don’t want to save us give us at least water.”
      Creating a deadly Rescue Gap

      In the central Mediterranean, a dangerous rescue gap is actively being created. European coastguards and navies, as well as the so-called Libyan coastguards are stating that they will not engage in SAR activities. One civil rescue boat, the Alan Kurdi, was able to rescue two boats in the current good weather period. However, with 150 people now on board, they are searching for a Port of Safety and cannot carry out further operations. All other rescue NGOs are not allowed or unable to carry out SAR operations.

      For the Alarm Phone, the greatest challenge is the systematic withdrawal of European authorities from the central Mediterranean area. We have documented several scandalous delays and even acts of sabotage at sea. One of the boats that reached out to us was rescued by Italian authorities to Lampedusa only after it had fully crossed the Maltese SAR zone, with the Armed Forces of Malta refusing to intervene. Another boat already in the Maltese SAR zone with 66 people on board was rescued only after about 40 hours. The people on board told us that the Armed Forces of Malta tried to cut the cable of the engine, telling them: “I leave you to die in the water. Nobody will come to Malta.”

      We have experienced irresponsible behaviour by European authorities in all distress cases that have reached the Alarm Phone. Routinely, the so-called “Rescue Coordination Centres” hang up the phone, refuse to take down new information, or are not reachable for hours.
      “Libya is worse than the Corona virus”

      We call on all European authorities to cease endangering the lives of people who seek to escape torture, rape, and war in Libya. Despite the Covid-19 crisis, Europe is still safe compared to Libya and has the resources to carry out vital SAR operations. People trying to flee from Libya are aware of the danger of crossing the sea and the spread of Covid-19 within Europe. Still, as they tell Alarm Phone: “Libya is worse than the Corona virus.”

      https://alarmphone.org/en/2020/04/11/the-covid-19-excuse/?post_type_release_type=post

  • Privatized Pushbacks: How Merchant Ships Guard Europe

    To hinder migrants crossing the Mediterranean, European navies stopped rescuing them. Now commercial ships are tasked with saving lives — and returning migrants to war-torn Libya.

    The #Panther, a German-owned merchant ship, is not in the business of sea rescues. But one day a few months ago the Libyan Coast Guard ordered it to divert course, rescue 68 migrants in distress in the Mediterranean and return them to Libya, which is embroiled in civil war.

    The request, which the Panther was required to honor, was at least the third time that day, Jan. 11, that the Libyans had called on a merchant ship to assist migrants.

    The Libyans could easily have alerted a nearby rescue ship run by a Spanish charity. The reason they did not goes to the core of how the European authorities have found a new way to thwart desperate African migrants trying to reach their shores from across the Mediterranean.

    And some maritime lawyers think the new tactic is unlawful.

    Commercial ships like the Panther must follow instructions from official forces, like the Libyan Coast Guard, which works in close cooperation with its Italian counterpart.

    Humanitarian rescue ships, on the other hand, take the migrants to Europe, citing international refugee law, which forbids returning refugees to danger.

    After the Panther arrived in Tripoli, Libyan soldiers boarded, forced the migrants ashore at gunpoint, and drove them to a detention camp in the besieged Libyan capital.

    “We call them privatized pushbacks,” said Charles Heller, the director of Forensic Oceanography, a research group that investigates migrant rights abuses in the Mediterranean. “They occur when merchant ships are used to rescue and bring back migrants to a country in which their lives are at risk — such as Libya.”

    The coronavirus crisis has made arguments about Mediterranean migration policy seem peripheral to the European moment, as governments focus on restricting not just external migration, but also the internal movement of their own citizens.

    But long before the pandemic hit, European leaders were mainly consumed by preventing Mediterranean migration, hoping to avoid a repeat of the 2015 migration crisis. And that approach remains topical, with hundreds of migrants crossing the Mediterranean already this week, either oblivious to or unconcerned by the coronavirus outbreak.

    Since the 2015 crisis, European governments have frequently stopped the nongovernmental rescue organizations that patrol the southern Mediterranean — like the Spanish ship, Open Arms — from taking rescued migrants to European ports.

    European navies and coast guards have also largely withdrawn from the area, placing the Libyan Coast Guard in charge of search-and-rescue.

    Now Europe has a new proxy: privately-owned commercial ships. And their deployment is contested by migrant rights watchdogs.

    Although a 1979 international convention on search and rescue requires merchant ships to obey orders from a country’s Coast Guard forces, the agreement also does not permit those forces to pick and choose who helps during emergencies, as Libya’s did.

    “That’s a blatantly illegal policy,” said Dr. Itamar Mann, an expert on maritime law at the University of Haifa in Israel.

    But commercial shipowners say that after saving migrants from drowning, their legal duty is to do as they are told by the Libyan Coast Guard, as decreed by a separate convention on search-and-rescue signed in 1979.

    “This is in accordance with international law,” said John Stawpert, a representative for the International Chamber of Shipping, a global shipowners’ association.

    Between 2011 and 2018, only one commercial ship returned migrants to Libya, according to research by Forensic Oceanography.

    Since 2018 there have been about 30 such returns, involving roughly 1,800 migrants, in which merchant ships have either returned migrants to Libyan ports or transferred them to Libyan Coast Guard vessels, according to data collated by The New York Times and Forensic Oceanography.

    The real number is likely to be higher.

    During the height of the crisis, ships like the Panther would have transferred rescued migrants to the Italian Coast Guard or humanitarian organizations.

    But in 2017, Italy gradually relinquished responsibility for search-and-rescue coordination in the southern Mediterranean to the Libyan Coast Guard, neatly absolving Italy of the legal obligation to rescue and admit every migrant entering international waters north of Libya.

    The next year, merchant ship crews began to return migrants to the Libyan authorities, which had been persuaded to take on the role by the promise of more equipment and international legitimacy.

    The Panther ordinarily supplies a cluster of oil rigs roughly 50 miles north of Libya. On Jan. 11, the Libyan Coast Guard engaged the Panther instead of the Open Arms because only the Panther’s owner had agreed to abide by a restrictive set of regulations drawn up by the Libyan Coast Guard.

    “All the ships who work in search-and-rescue have to follow this code of conduct,” Commodore Masoud Abdal Samad, the Libyan Coast Guard commander, said by telephone.

    Consequently, only the Panther was considered an “acceptable” rescue vessel on Jan. 11, he added.

    The pattern of using commercial ships has increased in recent months, said Anabel Montes Mier, the head of mission aboard the Open Arms that day.

    “These commercial ships follow the orders,” Ms. Montes Mier said. “We refuse to return people to places that are unsafe.”

    Rights groups fear Libya’s refusal to work with humanitarian rescuers has put more migrant lives in danger at sea.

    The number of people reaching Italy has dropped by more than 90 percent since 2017, while the death-toll in the southern Mediterranean has roughly halved in the same period.

    But the number of people drowning, as a proportion of those trying to cross, has sharply risen — from roughly 1 in 50 in 2017, to 1 in 20 in 2019, according to data compiled by the International Organization for Migration.

    The forcible return of the migrants, a practice known as refoulement, has also put many of them in lethal danger on land, because of Libya’s civil war.

    In February, an airstrike hit the dock used by the Panther to disembark migrants in Tripoli. Once ashore, migrants are imprisoned in detention camps run by an assortment of militias. Often, these lie in areas under attack. Last July, one camp was bombed, killing 53 prisoners.

    In a lawless land that provides few rights to foreign laborers, migrants are often tortured, raped, held for ransom, or treated as modern-day slaves.

    Steven, a 20-year-old from South Sudan, described being shot and beaten by Libyan officials after he was returned to Libya by a commercial ship in November 2018.

    “Why did they rescue us and take us back to Libya?” said Steven, who asked to be identified only by his first name for fear of legal repercussions. “It was better to die in the ship.”

    The question of culpability is complex.

    Since 1951, international refugee law has stipulated that migrants should not be returned without due process to the countries they fled. But in cases involving merchant ships, migrants are often rescued in international waters, before reaching Europe’s maritime borders.

    The authorities in Italy and European Union say they should therefore be returned to Libya, since Libya coordinates search-and-rescue operations in these international waters.

    Critics argue that Italy and its European allies still bear responsibility. In the view of humanitarian monitoring groups, the Europeans never relinquished their role in orchestrating search-and-rescue missions — undermining the rationale for surrendering control to Libya.

    During at least part of 2019, Italian navy officers aboard an Italian vessel docked in Tripoli’s harbor oversaw rescues on behalf of the Libyans, according to documents published during a court case in Sicily last March.

    “They coordinated the rescue activities,” Matteo Salvini, Italy’s interior minister at the time, said in an interview with the Times.

    In one instance in November 2018, logbooks show how Italian Coast Guard officers contacted a cargo ship, the Nivin, “on behalf of” their Libyan counterparts. But the logs also reveal that the Nivin’s captain could only reach the Libyan authorities by contacting the Italian Coast Guard.

    And though European navies have withdrawn from the area, their planes still direct the Libyan Coast Guard to migrant vessels, recordings published by The Guardian show.

    In March last year, one such military plane ordered a merchant vessel to return a boatload of rescued migrants to Tripoli, without any intervention from the Libyan Coast Guard, according to recordings reported in The Atavist, a digital magazine.

    In one of several recent phone interviews, Commodore Abdal Samad of the Libyan Coast Guard said an Italian ship docked in Tripoli, once used as a search-and-rescue control center, no longer directs Libyan Coast Guard activity.

    But Libyan Coast Guard crews still sometimes use the Italian ship’s equipment to communicate with merchant vessels, Commodore Abdal Samad conceded, particularly when their radios break down.

    One of the most recent instances, he said, was the weekend in January when the Panther rescued 68 migrants from the southern Mediterranean.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/world/europe/mediterranean-libya-migrants-europe.html

    #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #bateaux_marchands #privatisation #externalisation #Méditerranée #Libye #Mer_Méditerranée #refoulements_privatisés #sauvetage #privatized_pushbacks #gardes-côtes_libyens

    ping @reka

  • Près de 600 migrants portés disparus en Libye, alerte l’OIM

    Les autorités libyennes disent avoir libéré 600 personnes, dont des femmes et des enfants, détenus dans un établissement sous le contrôle du ministère de l’Intérieur. L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) s’inquiète du sort de ces migrants volatilisés.

    L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) a indiqué avoir perdu la trace de 600 migrants en Libye. « Des femmes et des enfants de tous âges font partie des disparus, ce sont des personnes vulnérables », a alerté Safa Msehli, porte-parole de l’OIM, contactée par InfoMigrants jeudi 20 février.

    Ce groupe de migrants était enfermé dans un établissement sous le contrôle du ministère de l’Intérieur libyen à Tripoli depuis début janvier, après avoir été intercepté en mer Méditerranée et débarqué en Libye par les garde-côtes.

    L’OIM indique ne jamais avoir eu l’autorisation d’accéder à ce #centre. « Ce que nous savons c’est que le gouvernement libyen dit avoir libéré les 600 migrants, mais nous n’avons #aucun_signe_de vie d’eux. Nous sommes très inquiets. Nous avons demandé des éclaircissements aux autorités libyennes », a précisé Safa Msehli.


    https://twitter.com/ONUmigration/status/1230168903348891651?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

    Bombardements d’un port de débarquement des migrants

    Sur place, la situation humanitaire continue de se détériorer, 10 mois après le début de l’offensive du maréchal Khalifa Haftar sur Tripoli, a prévenu l’OIM.

    Dernier incident en date, quelques heures à peine avant un débarquement de migrants interceptés en Méditerranée mardi : le port maritime de Tripoli ainsi que celui d’al-Chaab, un port secondaire, ont été la cible de plus de 15 roquettes. C’est la première fois que ces ports sont ciblés par de si lourds bombardements.

    « La Libye ne peut pas attendre », a réagi Federico Soda, chef de la mission de l’OIM en Libye, dans un communiqué. Dans un appel à la communauté internationale émis après cet incident, l’organisation enjoint plus spécifiquement l’Union européenne à réagir au plus vite en prenant « des mesures concrètes pour s’assurer que les vies sauvées en mer soient acheminées vers des ports sûrs, et pour mettre fin au système de détention arbitraire ».

    L’OIM plaide pour « un mécanisme de débarquement rapide et prévisible, dans lequel les États méditerranéens prennent une responsabilité égale pour trouver un port sûr aux personnes secourues ». Il demande aussi la reconnaissance des « efforts de sauvetage des navires des ONG opérant en Méditerranée » et une levée « de toute restriction et tout retard dans le débarquement ».

    Au moins 1 700 migrants ont été interceptés et renvoyés en Libye par les garde-côtes libyens depuis le début de la nouvelle année, selon l’OIM.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/22909/pres-de-600-migrants-portes-disparus-en-libye-alerte-l-oim
    #disparitions #IOM #OIM #Libye #asile #migrations #réfugiés #disparitions #gardes-côtes_libyens #sauvetage (?) #Méditerranée #push-back #refoulements #Mer_Méditerranée

    @sinehebdo... c’est aussi un nouveau mot ?
    #migrants_volatilisés

  • Libye : l’UE lance une #opération_navale pour contrôler l’#embargo sur les #armes, pas pour sauver des migrants

    Prenant la suite de l’opération Sophia, une nouvelle mission navale va être mise en place par l’Union européenne (UE) d’ici le printemps. Des navires vont être déployés pour empêcher les livraisons d’armes à l’est des côtes libyennes. Mais ces navires n’ont pas vocation à intervenir dans le sauvetage de migrants en mer Méditerranée.

    « L’Union européenne va déployer des navires dans la zone à l’est de la Libye pour empêcher le trafic d’armes », a annoncé lundi 17 février le chef de la diplomatie italienne Luigi di Maio. La nouvelle opération aura des moyens aériens et satellitaires ainsi que des navires, précise le correspondant de RFI à Bruxelles, Pierre Bénazet.

    Toutefois, il a ajouté que la mission, loin des routes migratoires actuelles, serait arrêtée si elle « devait provoquer un afflux de bateaux de migrants » dans la zone où elle sera déployée.

    Ce compromis a permis de « lever les réticences » de plusieurs pays européens, a commenté le ministre luxembourgeois des Affaires étrangères Jean Asselborn.

    En effet, lundi matin, Josep Borrell le chef de la diplomatie européenne ne pensait pas arriver à un accord pour que l’opération Sophia soit relancée, « l’unanimité est nécessaire » et « si nous ne l’obtenons pas, nous ne pouvons pas aller de l’avant », regrettait-il.

    L’opération faisait face notamment à un veto de l’Autriche, qui refusait de reprendre les opérations navales, estimant qu’il s’agissait d’"un billet d’entrée en Europe pour des milliers de migrants clandestins." Une position partagée par l’Italie.

    « Ce fut une très longue et très difficile discussion et à la fin, nous avons trouvé une solution médiane », a reconnu Josep Borrell, au sortir d’une réunion à Bruxelles avec les ministres européens des Affaires étrangères. « La zone d’actions pour la nouvelle mission navale ne sera pas celle de Sophia, qui couvrait toutes les côtes de la Libye. Elle sera concentrée à l’Est, là où les passages d’armes se font », a-t-il précisé.

    L’Europe « doit être capable de faire de la politique européenne »

    Décidé en 2015, le mandat de l’opération Sophia a été prolongé jusqu’au 31 mars 2020. La nouvelle opération visant uniquement un meilleur contrôle de l’embargo libyen sur les armes devrait prendre la suite. Son nom de baptême n’est pas encore décidé.

    Les navires européens de Sophia avaient été retirés de la Méditerranée au printemps 2019 à la suite du refus de l’Italie de laisser les migrants sauvés en mer débarquer sur son territoire.

    « Je ne peux pas imaginer qu’un pays comme l’Autriche dise non en fin de compte », a ajouté le ministre des Affaires étrangères du Luxembourg, Jean Asselborn. « Je comprends que l’Europe ne soit parfois pas capable de faire de la politique mondiale, mais elle doit être capable de faire de la politique européenne. »
    https://twitter.com/sunderland_jude/status/1229438296318717958?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12
    Plusieurs ONG de défense des migrants ont, pour leur part, manifesté leur indignation à l’image de Judith Sunderland, directrice adjointe chez Human Rights Watch pour les divisions Europe et Asie centrale. « L’UE remplace Sophia par une mission navale VRAIMENT loin [des routes migratoires] pour éviter d’avoir à secourir quiconque. Je travaille sur les politiques migratoires européennes depuis des années et pourtant je suis toujours CHOQUÉE par tant d’inhumanité explicite », a-t-elle écrit sur Twitter.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/22832/libye-l-ue-lance-une-operation-navale-pour-controler-l-embargo-sur-les
    #Libye #asile #migrations #réfugiés #sauvetage (non... en fait...) #Méditerranée #Mer_Méditerranée #opération_Sophia

  • Des vies sauvées par l’UE ?
    –-> Question reçue via la mailing-list Migreurop :

    Dans son "Rapport d’avancement sur la mise en œuvre de l’agenda européen en matière de migration » d’octobre 2019, la Commission européenne se félicite de ce que l’UE, parmi les « progrès clefs » enregistrés depuis 2015, a pu « sauver des vies : près de 760’000 sauvetages en mer et le sauvetage de plus de 23’000 migrants dans le désert nigérien depuis 2015 ».

    Déjà, dans un bilan d’étape de décembre 2018, elle affirmait :
    « Sauver des vies : par son action, l’UE a contribué à sauver près de 730’000 personnes en mer depuis 2015 ».

    QUESTIONS :
    Savez-vous quel est le mode de calcul de la Commission pour arriver à ces chiffres ? S’agit-il des chiffres fournis par Frontex sur ses opérations ? Additionnés éventuellement à ceux de EunavforMed / Sofia (quand elle intervenait encore en mer) ? Comptabilise-t-elle aussi les chiffres fournis par les Etats membres ?

    –-> Les deux rapports mentionnés dans le messages sont ci-dessous...

    –----------

    Rapport décembre 2018 :
    Un changement radical dans la gestion des migrations et de la sécurité des frontières

    À son entrée en fonctions, la #Commission_Juncker a fait des questions migratoires et de la #sécurité_des_frontières des priorités absolues de son mandat de cinq ans, consciente que les États membre devaient, ensemble, relever ces #défis_communs. Peu de temps après est survenue la #crise_des_réfugiés la plus grave que le monde ait connue depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale, entraînant pour l’#Union_européenne des répercussions immédiates et profondes. La Commission, aux côtés des États membres, a accéléré les travaux pour faire face à chaque nouveau #défi à mesure qu’ils se présentaient, tout en jetant les bases d’une nouvelle manière, plus pérenne, de gérer les migrations et la sécurité des frontières dans l’UE. Il en a résulté plus de #progrès en l’espace de quatre ans que cela n’a été possible au cours des vingt années précédentes. Le chemin qui reste à parcourir ne devrait pas faire sous-estimer ce qui a été accompli.


    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20190306_managing-migration-factsheet-step-change-migration-management-bor

    Communication octobre 2019
    Rapport d’avancement sur la mise en œuvre de l’#agenda_européen_en_matière_de_migration


    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20191016_com-2019-481-report_fr.pdf

    #frontières #UE #EU #asile #migrations #réfugiés #vies_sauvées #gestion_des_migrations #Méditerranée #Mer_Méditerranée #désert #Sahara #Niger
    #rapport #bilan #commission_européenne
    #statistiques #calculs
    #même_pas_honte #hypocrisie

    Est-ce que quelqu’un a des réponses ? @reka @karine4 @simplicissimus @fil @isskein ?

    #sauvetage

    • Je sais pas si ça peut aider (les chiffres semblent bizarre par rapport aux tiens), Frontex, dans son rapport d’activité 2019 affirme avoir secouru 54800 personnes. Le pictogramme est une bouée, mais il n’est pas vraiment précisé « en mer ». Moi je m’interroge sur le cas Libyien : si le centre de coordination des secours en mer dit à Frontex de débarquer les migrants à Tripoli, difficile d’appeler cela un secours.
      Régis

  • Grèce. Le « #mur_flottant » visant à arrêter les personnes réfugiées mettra des vies en danger

    En réaction à la proposition du gouvernement d’installer un système de #barrages_flottants de 2,7 km le long des côtes de #Lesbos pour décourager les nouvelles arrivées de demandeurs et demandeuses d’asile depuis la Turquie, Massimo Moratti, directeur des recherches pour le bureau européen d’Amnesty International, a déclaré :

    « Cette proposition marque une escalade inquiétante dans les tentatives du gouvernement grec de rendre aussi difficile que possible l’arrivée de personnes demandeuses d’asile et réfugiées sur ses rivages. Cela exposerait davantage aux #dangers celles et ceux qui cherchent désespérément la sécurité.

    « Ce plan soulève des questions préoccupantes sur la possibilité pour les sauveteurs de continuer d’apporter leur aide salvatrice aux personnes qui tentent la dangereuse traversée par la mer jusqu’à Lesbos. Le gouvernement doit clarifier de toute urgence les détails pratiques et les garanties nécessaires pour veiller à ce que ce système ne coûte pas de nouvelles vies. »

    Complément d’information

    Le système de barrage flottant ferait partie des mesures adoptées dans le cadre d’une tentative plus large de sécuriser les #frontières_maritimes et d’empêcher les arrivées.

    En 2019, près de 60 000 personnes sont arrivées en Grèce par la mer, soit presque deux fois plus qu’en 2018. Entre janvier et octobre, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) a enregistré 66 décès sur la route de la Méditerranée orientale.

    https://www.amnesty.org/fr/latest/news/2020/01/greece-floating-wall-to-stop-refugees-puts-lives-at-risk
    #migrations #frontières #asile #réfugiés #Grèce #Mer_Méditerranée #Mer_Egée #fermeture_des_frontières #frontière_mobile #frontières_mobiles

    ping @karine4 @mobileborders

    • Greece plans floating border barrier to stop migrants

      The government in Greece wants to use a floating barrier to help stop migrants from reaching the Greek islands from the nearby coast of Turkey.
      The Defense Ministry has invited private contractors to bid on supplying a 2.7-kilometer-long (1.7 miles) floating fence within three months, according to information available on a government procurement website Wednesday. No details were given on when the barrier might be installed.
      A resurgence in the number of migrants and refugees arriving by sea to Lesbos and other eastern Greek islands has caused severe overcrowding at refugee camps.
      The netted barrier would rise 50 centimeters (20 inches) above water and be designed to hold flashing lights, the submission said. The Defense Ministry estimates the project will cost 500,000 euros ($550,000), which includes four years of maintenance.
      The government’s description says the “floating barrier system” needs to be built “with non-military specifications” and “specific features for carrying out the mission of (maritime agencies) in managing the refugee crisis.”
      “This contract process will be executed by the Defense Ministry but is for civilian use — a process similar to that used for the supply of other equipment for (camps) housing refugees and migrants,” a government official told The Associated Press.
      The official asked not to be identified pending official announcements by the government.
      Greece’s six-month old center-right government has promised to take a tougher line on the migration crisis and plans to set up detention facilities for migrants denied asylum and to speed up deportations back to Turkey.
      Under a 2016 migration agreement between the European Union and Turkey, the Turkish government was promised up to 6 billion euros to help stop the mass movement of migrants to Europe.
      Nearly 60,000 migrants and refugees made the crossing to the islands last year, nearly double the number recorded in 2018, according to data from the United Nations’ refugee agency.

      https://www.arabnews.com/node/1619991/world

    • Greece wants floating fence to keep migrants out

      Greece wants to install a floating barrier in the Aegean Sea to deter migrants arriving at its islands’ shores through Turkey, government officials said on Thursday.

      Greece served as the gateway to the European Union for more than one million Syrian refugees and other migrants in recent years. While an agreement with Turkey sharply reduced the number attempting the voyage since 2016, Greek islands still struggle with overcrowded camps operating far beyond their capacity.

      The 2.7 kilometer long (1.68 miles) net-like barrier that Greece wants to buy will be set up in the sea off the island of Lesbos, where the overcrowded Moria camp operates.

      It will rise 50 centimeters above sea level and carry light marks that will make it visible at night, a government document inviting vendors to submit offers said, adding that it was “aimed at containing the increasing inflows of migrants”.

      “The invitation for floating barriers is in the right direction,” Defence Minister Nikos Panagiotopoulos told Skai Radio. “We will see what the result, what its effect as a deterrent will be in practice.”

      “It will be a natural barrier. If it works like the one in Evros... it can be effective,” he said, referring to a cement and barbed-wire fence Greece set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to stop a rise in migrants crossing there.

      Aid groups, which have described the living conditions at migrant camps as appalling, said fences in Europe had not deterred arrivals and that Greece should focus on speeding up the processing of asylum requests instead.

      “We see, in recent years, a surge in the number of barriers that are being erected but yet people continue to flee,” Βoris Cheshirkov, spokesman in Greece for U.N. refugee agency UNHCR, told Reuters. “Greece has to have fast procedures to ensure that people have access to asylum quickly when they need it.”

      Last year, 59,726 migrants and refugees reached Greece’s shores according to the UN agency UNHCR. Nearly 80% of them arrived on Chios, Samos and Lesbos.

      A defense ministry official told Reuters the floating fence would be installed at the north of Lesbos, where migrants attempt to cross over due to the short distance from Turkey.

      If the 500,000 euro barrier is effective, more parts may be added and it could reach up to 15 kilometers, the official said.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-greece-barrier/greece-wants-floating-fence-to-keep-migrants-out-idUSKBN1ZT0W5?il=0

    • La Grèce veut ériger une frontière flottante sur la mer pour limiter l’afflux de migrants

      Le ministère grec de la Défense a rendu public mercredi un appel d’offres pour faire installer un "système de protection flottant" en mer Égée. L’objectif : réduire les flux migratoires en provenance de la Turquie alors que la Grèce est redevenue en 2019 la première porte d’entrée des migrants en Europe.

      C’est un appel d’offres surprenant qu’a diffusé, mercredi 29 janvier, le ministère grec de la Défense : une entreprise est actuellement recherchée pour procéder à l’installation d’un “système de protection flottant” en mer Égée. Cette frontière maritime qui pourra prendre la forme de "barrières" ou de "filets" doit servir "en cas d’urgence" à repousser les migrants en provenance de la Turquie voisine.

      Selon le texte de l’appel d’offres, le barrage - d’une “longueur de 2,7 kilomètres” et d’une hauteur de 1,10 mètre dont 50 cm au dessus du niveau de la mer - sera mis en place par les forces armées grecques. Il devrait être agrémenté de feux clignotants pour une meilleure visibilité. Le budget total comprenant conception et installation annoncé par le gouvernement est de 500 000 euros.

      “Au-delà de l’efficacité douteuse de ce choix, comme ne pas reconnaître la dimension humanitaire de la tragédie des réfugiés et la transformer en un jeu du chat et de la souris, il est amusant de noter la taille de la barrière et de la relier aux affirmations du gouvernement selon lesquelles cela pourrait arrêter les flux de réfugiés”, note le site d’information Chios News qui a tracé cette potentielle frontière maritime sur une carte à bonne échelle pour comparer les 2,7 kilomètres avec la taille de l’île de Lesbos.

      La question des migrants et des réfugiés est gérée par le ministère de l’Immigration qui a fait récemment sa réapparition après avoir été fusionné avec un autre cabinet pendant six mois. Devant l’ampleur des flux migratoires que connaît la Grèce depuis 2015, le ministère de la Défense et l’armée offrent un soutien logistique au ministère de l’Immigration et de l’Asile.

      Mais la situation continue de se corser pour la Grèce qui est redevenue en 2019 la première porte d’entrée des migrants et des réfugiés en Europe. Actuellement, plus de 40 000 demandeurs d’asile s’entassent dans des camps insalubres sur des îles grecques de la mer Égée, alors que leur capacité n’est que de 6 200 personnes.

      Le nouveau Premier ministre Kyriakos Mitsotakis, élu à l’été 2019, a fait de la lutte contre l’immigration clandestine l’une de ses priorités. Il a déjà notamment durci l’accès à la procédure de demande d’asile. Il compte également accélérer les rapatriements des personnes qui "n’ont pas besoin d’une protection internationale" ou des déboutés du droit d’asile, une mesure à laquelle s’opposent des ONG de défense des droits de l’Homme.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/22441/la-grece-veut-eriger-une-frontiere-flottante-sur-la-mer-pour-limiter-l

    • Vidéo avec la réponse d’ #Adalbert_Jahnz, porte-parole de la Commission Européenne, à la question de la légalité d’une telle mesure.
      La réponse est mi-figue, mi-raisin : les réfugiés ne doivent pas être empêchés par des #barrières_physiques à déposer une demande d’asile, mais la mise en place de telles #barrières n’est pas en soi contraire à la législation européenne et la protection de frontières externes relève principalement de la responsabilité de chaque Etat membre : https://audiovisual.ec.europa.eu/en/video/I-183932

      signalé, avec le commentaire ci-dessus, par Vicky Skoumbi.

    • Greece’s Answer to Migrants, a Floating Barrier, Is Called a ‘Disgrace’

      Rights groups have condemned the plan, warning that it would increase the dangers faced by asylum seekers.

      As Greece struggles to deal with a seemingly endless influx of migrants from neighboring Turkey, the conservative government has a contentious new plan to respond to the problem: a floating net barrier to avert smuggling boats.

      But rights groups have condemned the plan, warning that it would increase the perils faced by asylum seekers amid growing tensions at camps on the Aegean Islands and in communities there and on the mainland. The potential effectiveness of the barrier system has also been widely questioned, and the center-right daily newspaper Kathimerini dismissed the idea in an editorial on Friday as “wishful thinking.”

      Moreover, the main opposition party, the leftist Syriza, has condemned the floating barrier plan as “a disgrace and an insult to humanity.”

      The authorities aim to install a 1.7-mile barrier between the Greek and Turkish coastlines that would rise more than 19 inches above the water and display flashing lights, according to a description posted on a government website this past week by Greece’s Defense Ministry.

      Citing an “urgent need to address rising refugee flows,” the 126-page submission invited private contractors to bid for the project that would cost an estimated 500,000 euros, or more than $554,000, including the cost of four years of maintenance. The government is expected to assign the job in the next three months, though it is unclear when the barrier would be erected.

      Greece’s defense minister, Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, told Greek radio on Thursday that he hoped the floating barrier would act as a deterrent to smugglers, similar to a barbed-wire fence that the Greek authorities built along the northern land border with Turkey in 2012.

      “In Evros, physical barriers had a relative impact in curbing flows,” he said. “We believe a similar result can be achieved with these floating barriers.”

      The construction will be overseen by the Defense Ministry, which has supervised the creation of new reception centers on the Greek islands and mainland in recent months, and will be subject to “nonmilitary specifications” to meet international maritime standards, the submission noted.

      A spokesman for Greece’s government, Stelios Petsas, said the barrier system would have to be tested for safety.

      But rights activists warn that the measure would increase the dangers faced by migrants making the short but perilous journey across the Aegean. Amnesty International’s research director for Europe, Massimo Moratti, condemned the proposal as “an alarming escalation in the Greek government’s ongoing efforts to make it as difficult as possible for asylum-seekers and refugees to arrive on its shores.”

      He warned that it could “lead to more danger for those desperately seeking safety.”

      The head of Amnesty International’s chapter in Greece, Gavriil Sakellaridis, questioned whether the Greek authorities would respond to an emergency signal issued by a boat stopped at the barrier.

      The European Commission has expressed reservations and planned to ask the authorities in Greece, which is a member of the European Union, for details about the proposal. Adalbert Jahnz, a commission spokesman, told reporters in Brussels on Thursday that any Greek sea barriers to deter migrants must not block access for asylum seekers.

      “The setting up of barriers is not in and of itself against E.U. law,” he said. “But physical barriers or obstacles of this sort should not be an impediment to seeking asylum which is protected by E.U. law,” he said, conceding, however, that the protection of external borders was primarily the responsibility of member states.

      The barrier was proposed amid an uptick in migrants from Turkey. The influx, though far below the thousands of daily arrivals at the peak of the crisis in 2015, has put an increasing strain on already intensely overcrowded reception centers.

      According to Greece’s migration minister, Notis Mitarakis, 72,000 migrants entered Greece last year, compared with 42,000 in 2018. The floating barrier will help curb arrivals, Mr. Mitarakis said.
      Editors’ Picks
      Michael Strahan on Kelly Ripa, Colin Kaepernick and How to Fix the Giants
      ‘Taylor Swift: Miss Americana’ Review: A Star, Scathingly Alone
      The Survivor of Auschwitz Who Painted a Forgotten Genocide

      “It sends out the message that we are not a place where anything goes and that we’re taking all necessary measures to protect the borders,” he said, adding that the process of deporting migrants who did not merit refugee status would be sped up.

      “The rules have changed,” he said.

      Greece has repeatedly appealed for more support from the bloc to tackle migration flows, saying it cannot handle the burden alone and accusing Turkey of exploiting the refugee crisis for leverage with the European Union.

      Repeated threats by Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, to “open the gates” to Europe for Syrian refugees on his country’s territory have fueled fears that an agreement signed between Turkey and the European Union in 2016, which radically curbed arrivals, will collapse.

      Growing tensions between Greece and Turkey over energy resources in the Eastern Mediterranean and revived disputes over sovereignty in the Aegean have further undermined cooperation between the two traditional foes in curbing human trafficking, fragile at the best of times.

      The Greek government of Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis is also under growing pressure domestically since it came to power last summer on a pledge to take a harder line on migration than that of his predecessor, Alexis Tsipras of Syriza.

      Plans unveiled in November to create new camps on the Aegean Islands have angered residents, who staged mass demonstrations last month, waving banners reading, “We want our islands back.”

      Rights groups have also warned of the increasingly dire conditions at existing camps on five islands hosting some 44,000 people, nearly 10 times their capacity.

      Tensions are particularly acute on the sprawling Moria camp on Lesbos, with reports of 30 stabbings in the past month, two fatal.

      https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/01/world/europe/greece-migrants-floating-barrier.html

    • Greece plans to build sea barrier off Lesbos to deter migrants

      Defence ministry says floating barrier will stop migrants crossing from Turkey.

      The Greek government has been criticised after announcing it will build a floating barrier to deter thousands of people from making often perilous sea journeys from Turkey to Aegean islands on Europe’s periphery.

      The centre-right administration unveiled the measure on Thursday, following its pledge to take a tougher stance on undocumented migrants accessing the country.

      The 2.7km-long netted barrier will be erected off Lesbos, the island that shot to prominence at the height of the Syrian civil war when close to a million Europe-bound refugees landed on its beaches. The bulwark will rise from pylons 50 metres above water and will be equipped with flashing lights to demarcate Greece’s sea borders.

      Greece’s defence minister, Nikos Panagiotopoulos, told Skai radio: “In Evros, natural barriers had relative [good] results in containing flows,” referring to the barbed-wire topped fence that Greece built along its northern land border with Turkey in 2012 to deter asylum seekers. “We believe a similar result can be had with these floating barriers. We are trying to find solutions to reduce flows.”

      Amnesty International slammed the plan, warning it would enhance the dangers asylum-seekers and refugees encountered as they attempted to seek safety.

      “This proposal marks an alarming escalation in the Greek government’s ongoing efforts to make it as difficult as possible for asylum-seekers and refugees to arrive on its shores,” said Massimo Moratti, the group’s Research Director for Europe.“The plan raises serious issues about rescuers’ ability to continue providing life-saving assistance to people attempting the dangerous sea crossing to Lesbos. The government must urgently clarify the operational details and necessary safeguards to ensure that this system does not cost further lives.”

      Greece’s former migration minister, Dimitris Vitsas, described the barrier as a “stupid idea” that was bound to be ineffective. “The idea that a fence of this length is going to work is totally stupid,” he said. “It’s not going to stop anybody making the journey.”

      Greece has seen more arrivals of refugees and migrants than any other part of Europe over the past year, as human traffickers along Turkey’s western coast target its outlying Aegean isles with renewed vigour. More than 44,000 people are in camps on the outposts designed to hold no more than 5,400 people. Human rights groups have described conditions in the facilities as deplorable. In Moria, the main reception centre on Lesbos, about 140 sick children are among an estimated 19,000 men, women and children crammed into vastly overcrowded tents and containers.

      Amid mounting tensions with Turkey over energy resources in the Mediterranean, Greece fears a further surge in arrivals in the spring despite numbers dropping radically since the EU struck a landmark accord with Ankara to curb the flows in March 2016.

      The prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, who trounced his predecessor, Alexis Tsipras, in July partly on the promise to bolster the country’s borders, has accused the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, of exploiting the refugee drama as political leverage both in dealings with Athens and the EU. As host to some 4 million displaced Syrians, Turkey has more refugees than anywhere else in the world, with Erdoğan facing mounting domestic pressure over the issue.

      Greek officials, who are also confronting growing outrage from local communities on Aegean islands, fear that the number of arrivals will rise further if, as looks likely, Idlib, Syria’s last opposition holdout falls. The area has come under renewed attack from regime forces in recent days.

      It is hoped the barrier will be in place by the end of April after an invitation by the Greek defence ministry for private contractors to submit offers.

      The project is expected to cost €500,000 (£421,000). Officials said it will be built by the military, which has also played a role in erecting camps across Greece, but with “non-military specifications” to ensure international maritime standards. The fence could extend 13 to 15km, with more parts being added if the initial pilot is deemed successful.

      “There will be a test run probably on land first for technological reasons,” said one official.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jan/30/greece-plans-to-build-sea-barrier-off-lesbos-to-deter-migrants

    • “Floating wall” to stop refugees puts lives at risk, says Amnesty International

      The plans of the Greek government to build floating fences to prevent refugee and migrants arrivals from Turkey have triggered sharp criticism by Amnesty International. A statement issued on Thursday says that the floating fences will put people’s lives at risk.

      In response to a government proposal to install a 2.7 km long system of floating dams off the coast of Lesvos to deter new arrivals of asylum seekers from Turkey, Amnesty International’s Research Director for Europe Massimo Moratti said:

      “This proposal marks an alarming escalation in the Greek government’s ongoing efforts to make it as difficult as possible for asylum-seekers and refugees to arrive on its shores and will lead to more danger for those desperately seeking safety.

      This proposal marks an alarming escalation in the Greek government’s ongoing efforts to make it as difficult as possible refugees to arrive on its shores.
      Massimo Moratti, Amnesty International

      “The plan raises serious issues about rescuers’ ability to continue providing life-saving assistance to people attempting the dangerous sea crossing to Lesvos. The government must urgently clarify the operational details and necessary safeguards to ensure that this system does not cost further lives.”

      Background

      The floating dam system is described as one of the measures adopted in a broader attempt to secure maritime borders and prevent arrivals.

      In 2019, Greece received almost 60,000 sea arrivals, almost doubling the total number of sea arrivals in 2018. Between January and October, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) recorded 66 deaths on the Eastern Mediterranean route.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/01/31/amnesty-international-floating-fences-greece-refugees

    • Greece is building floating fences to stop migration flows in the Aegean

      Greece is planning to build floating fences in the Aegean Sea in order to prevent refugees and migrants to arrive from Turkey, The fences are reportedly to be set off the islands of the Eastern Aegean Sea that receive the overwhelming migration flows. The plan will be executed by the Greek Armed Forces as the tender launched by the Defense Ministry states.

      For this purpose the Defense Ministry has launched a tender for the supply of the floating fences.

      According to Lesvos media stonisi, the tender aims to supply the Defense Ministry with 2,700 meters of protection floating system of no military specifications.

      The floating fences will be used by the Armed Forces for their mission to manage a continuously increasing refugee/migration flows, as it is clearly stated in the tender text.

      It is indicative that the tender call to the companies states that the supply of the floating protection system “will restrict and, where appropriate, suspend the intent to enter the national territory, in order to counter the ever-increasing migration / refugee flows due to the imperative and urgent need to restrain the increased refugee flows.”

      The tender has been reportedly launched on Jan 24, 2020, in order to cover “urgent needs.” The floating fences will carry lights liker small lighthouses. The fences will be 1.10 m high with 60 cm under water.

      they are reportedly to be installed off the islands of Lesvos, Chios and Samos.

      The estimated cost of the floating system incl maintenance is at 500,000 euros.

      Government spokesman and Defense Minister confirmed the reports on Thursday following skeptical reactions. “It is the first phase of a pilot program,” to start initially of Lesvos, said spokesman Petsas. “We want to see if it works,” he added.

      The floating fences plan primarily raises the question on whether it violates the international law as it prevents people fleeing for their live to seek a safe haven.

      Another question is how these floating fences will prevent the sea traffic (ships, fishing boats)

      PS and the third question is, of course, political: Will these fences be installed at 6 or 12 nautical miles off the islands shores? Greece could use the opportunity to extend its territorial waters… etc etc But it only the usual mean Greeks making jokes about a measure without logic.

      https://twitter.com/Kapoiosmpla/status/1222496803154800641?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E12

      Meanwhile, opponents of the measure showed the length of the floating fence in proportion to the island of Lesvos. The comparison is shocking.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/01/29/floating-fences-greece-aegean-migration-armed-forces

    • La barrière marine anti-migrants en Grèce pourrait ressembler à ça

      Au large de Lesbos, 27km de filet vont être installés pour dissuader les réfugiés et les demandeurs d’asile d’atteindre les îles grecques.

      Un mur marin en filet pour dissuader de venir. Cela fait quelques jours que la Grèce a annoncé son intention d’ériger une barrière dans la mer pour empêcher les migrants d’arriver sur les côtes. On découvre à présent à quoi pourrait ressembler ce nouveau dispositif.

      Selon les informations du Guardianet de la BBC et modélisée en images par l’agence Reuters, la barrière anti-migrants voulue par la Grèce s’étendrait sur 27 kilomètres de long au large de Lesbos. Elle serait soutenue par des pylônes qui s’élèveraient à une cinquantaine de mètres au-dessus de l’eau. Équipée d’une signalisation lumineuse, elle pourrait dissuader les réfugiés de se rendre à Lesbos. C’est, du moins, l’intention du ministre grec de l’Intérieur, Nikos Panagiotopoulos.

      De telles barrières s’élevant au-dessus du niveau de la mer pourraient ainsi rendre difficile le passage des petits bateaux et pourraient poser un problème pour les navires à hélices. Le coût du projet s’élèverait à 500.000 euros ; il faudrait quatre ans pour le mener à bien.
      “Une idée stupide et inefficace”

      L’ONG Amnesty International a vivement critiqué le projet avertissant qu’il ne ferait qu’aggraver les dangers auxquels les réfugiés sont déjà confrontés dans leur quête de sécurité. L’ancien ministre grec des migrations, Dimitris Vitsas, a, lui, décrit la barrière comme une “idée stupide” qui devrait être inefficace. “L’idée qu’une clôture de cette longueur va fonctionner est totalement stupide, a-t-il déclaré. Cela n’empêchera personne de faire le voyage.”

      Mais pour le ministre grec de la Défense, Nikos Panagiotopoulos, l’expérience vécue avec les murs terrestres justifie le projet. ”À Evros, a-t-il déclaré sur radio Skai, l’une des plus grosses stations du pays, les barrières naturelles ont eu de [bons] résultats relatifs à contenir les flux.” Il fait ainsi référence à la clôture surmontée de barbelés que la Grèce a construite le long de sa frontière terrestre nord avec la Turquie en 2012 pour dissuader demandeurs d’asile. “Nous pensons qu’un résultat similaire peut être obtenu avec ces barrières flottantes. Nous essayons de trouver des solutions pour réduire les flux”, ajoute-t-il.

      La situation est tendue sur l’île grecque où les habitants se sont mobilisés fin janvier pour s’opposer à l’ouverture de nouveaux camps. Plus récemment, lundi 3 février, une manifestation des migrants à Lesbos contre le durcissement des lois d’asile a viré à l’affrontement avec les forces de l’ordre.


      https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/grece-mur-migrant-srefugies-lesbos-barriere_fr_5e397a4cc5b6ed0033acc5

    • Greece plans to build sea barrier off Lesbos to deter migrants

      Defence ministry says floating barrier will stop migrants crossing from Turkey.

      The Greek government has been criticised after announcing it will build a floating barrier to deter thousands of people from making often perilous sea journeys from Turkey to Aegean islands on Europe’s periphery.

      The centre-right administration unveiled the measure on Thursday, following its pledge to take a tougher stance on undocumented migrants accessing the country.

      The 2.7km-long netted barrier will be erected off Lesbos, the island that shot to prominence at the height of the Syrian civil war when close to a million Europe-bound refugees landed on its beaches. The bulwark will rise from pylons 50 metres above water and will be equipped with flashing lights to demarcate Greece’s sea borders.

      Greece’s defence minister, Nikos Panagiotopoulos, told Skai radio: “In Evros, natural barriers had relative [good] results in containing flows,” referring to the barbed-wire topped fence that Greece built along its northern land border with Turkey in 2012 to deter asylum seekers. “We believe a similar result can be had with these floating barriers. We are trying to find solutions to reduce flows.”

      Amnesty International slammed the plan, warning it would enhance the dangers asylum-seekers and refugees encountered as they attempted to seek safety.

      “This proposal marks an alarming escalation in the Greek government’s ongoing efforts to make it as difficult as possible for asylum-seekers and refugees to arrive on its shores,” said Massimo Moratti, the group’s Research Director for Europe.“The plan raises serious issues about rescuers’ ability to continue providing life-saving assistance to people attempting the dangerous sea crossing to Lesbos. The government must urgently clarify the operational details and necessary safeguards to ensure that this system does not cost further lives.”

      Greece’s former migration minister, Dimitris Vitsas, described the barrier as a “stupid idea” that was bound to be ineffective. “The idea that a fence of this length is going to work is totally stupid,” he said. “It’s not going to stop anybody making the journey.”

      Greece has seen more arrivals of refugees and migrants than any other part of Europe over the past year, as human traffickers along Turkey’s western coast target its outlying Aegean isles with renewed vigour. More than 44,000 people are in camps on the outposts designed to hold no more than 5,400 people. Human rights groups have described conditions in the facilities as deplorable. In Moria, the main reception centre on Lesbos, about 140 sick children are among an estimated 19,000 men, women and children crammed into vastly overcrowded tents and containers.

      Amid mounting tensions with Turkey over energy resources in the Mediterranean, Greece fears a further surge in arrivals in the spring despite numbers dropping radically since the EU struck a landmark accord with Ankara to curb the flows in March 2016.

      The prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, who trounced his predecessor, Alexis Tsipras, in July partly on the promise to bolster the country’s borders, has accused the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, of exploiting the refugee drama as political leverage both in dealings with Athens and the EU. As host to some 4 million displaced Syrians, Turkey has more refugees than anywhere else in the world, with Erdoğan facing mounting domestic pressure over the issue.

      Greek officials, who are also confronting growing outrage from local communities on Aegean islands, fear that the number of arrivals will rise further if, as looks likely, Idlib, Syria’s last opposition holdout falls. The area has come under renewed attack from regime forces in recent days.

      It is hoped the barrier will be in place by the end of April after an invitation by the Greek defence ministry for private contractors to submit offers.

      The project is expected to cost €500,000 (£421,000). Officials said it will be built by the military, which has also played a role in erecting camps across Greece, but with “non-military specifications” to ensure international maritime standards. The fence could extend 13 to 15km, with more parts being added if the initial pilot is deemed successful.

      “There will be a test run probably on land first for technological reasons,” said one official.

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jan/30/greece-plans-to-build-sea-barrier-off-lesbos-to-deter-migrants

    • Schwimmende Barrieren gegen Migranten: Die griechische Regierung will Flüchtlingsboote mit schwimmenden Barrikaden stoppen

      Griechenland denkt über eine umstrittene Methode nach, um die stark wachsende Zahle der Bootsflüchtlinge einzudämmen.

      Die Zahl der Flüchtlinge, die von der türkischen Küste her übers Meer zu den griechischen Ägäis­inseln kommen, steigt derzeit wieder deutlich an. Die Regierung in Athen hat jetzt eine neue Idee vorgestellt, wie sie die Flüchtlingsboote stoppen will: mit schwimmenden Grenzbarrieren mitten auf dem Meer.

      Der griechische Regierungssprecher Stelios Petsas bestätigte gestern die Pläne. Das griechische Verteidigungsministerium hat bereits einen entsprechenden Auftrag zum Bau eines Prototyps ausgeschrieben. Das Pilotprojekt sieht den Bau einer 2,7 Kilometer langen Barriere vor, die 1,10 Meter aus dem Wasser aufragt und 50 bis 60 Zentimeter tief ins Wasser reicht. Der schwimmende Zaun soll mit blinkenden Leuchten versehen sein, damit er in der Dunkelheit sichtbar ist.
      Israel hat Erfahrungen mit Sperranlagen im Meer

      Für den Bau der Sperranlage will das Verteidigungsministerium 500000 Euro bereitstellen. Das Unternehmen, das den Zuschlag bekommt, soll innerhalb von drei Monaten liefern und für vier Jahre die Wartung der Barriere übernehmen. Verteidigungsminister Nikos Panagiotopoulos sagte dem griechischen Fernsehsender Skai, man wolle in einer ersten Phase ausprobieren, «ob das System funktioniert und wo es eingesetzt werden kann».

      Über dem Projekt schweben allerdings viele Fragezeichen. Erfahrungen mit schwimmenden Barrieren hat Israel an den Grenzen zum Gazastreifen und zu Jordanien im Golf von Akaba gemacht. In der Ägäis sind die Bedingungen aber wegen der grossen Wassertiefe, der starken Strömungen und häufigen Stürme viel schwieriger. Schwimmende Barrieren müssten am Meeresboden verankert sein, damit sie nicht davontreiben.

      Fraglich ist auch, ob sich die Schleuser von solchen Sperren abhalten liessen. Sie würden vermutlich auf andere Routen ausweichen. Und selbst wenn Flüchtlingsboote an der Barriere «stranden» sollten, wäre die griechische Küstenwache verpflichtet, die Menschen als Schiffbrüchige zu retten.

      Ohnehin scheint die Regierung daran zu denken, nur besonders stark frequentierte Küstenabschnitte zu sichern. Die gesamte griechisch-türkische Seegrenze von der Insel Samothraki im Norden bis nach Rhodos im Süden mit einem schwimmenden Zaun abzuriegeln, wäre ein utopisches Projekt. Diese Grenze ist über 2000 Kilometer lang. Sie mit einer Barriere dicht zu machen, verstiesse überdies gegen das internationale Seerecht und würde den Schiffsverkehr in der Ägäis behindern. Experten sagen, dass letztlich nur die Türkei die Seegrenze zu Griechenland wirksam sichern kann – indem sie die Flüchtlingsboote gar nicht erst ablegen lässt. Dazu hat sich die Türkei im Flüchtlingspakt mit der EU verpflichtet. Dennoch kamen im vergangenen Jahr 59726 Schutzsuchende übers Meer aus der Türkei, ein Anstieg von fast 84 Prozent gegenüber 2018.

      https://www.luzernerzeitung.ch/international/schwimmende-barrieren-gegen-migranten-ld.1190264

    • EU fordert Erklärungen von Griechenland zu Barriere-Plänen

      Das griechische Verteidigungsministerium will Geflüchtete mit schwimmenden „Schutzsystemen“ vor der Küste zurückhalten. Die EU-Kommission dringt auf mehr Information - sie erfuhr aus den Medien von den Plänen.

      Griechenland will Migranten mit schwimmenden Barrieren in der Ägäis konfrontieren - zu den Plänen des Verteidigungsministeriums sind aber noch viele Fragen offen. Auch die EU-Kommission hat Erklärungsbedarf. „Wir werden die griechische Regierung kontaktieren, um besser zu verstehen, worum es sich handelt“, sagte Behördensprecher Adalbert Jahnz. Die Kommission habe aus den Medien von dem Vorhaben erfahren.

      Jahnz sagte, der Zweck des Vorhabens sei derzeit noch nicht ersichtlich. Klar sei, dass Barrieren dieser Art den Zugang zu einem Asylverfahren verhindern dürften. Der Grundsatz der Nichtzurückweisung und die Grundrechte müssten in jedem Fall gewahrt bleiben. „Ich kann nichts zur Moralität verschiedener Maßnahmen sagen“, fügte Jahnz hinzu. Die Errichtung der Barrieren an sich verstoße nicht gegen EU-Recht.

      Griechenlands Verteidigungsminister Nikos Panagiotopoulos, dessen Ministerium das Projekt ausgeschrieben hat, zeigte sich jedoch nicht sicher, ob der Plan erfolgreich sein kann. Zunächst sei nur ein Versuch geplant, sagte er dem Athener Nachrichtensender Skai. „Wir wollen sehen, ob das funktioniert und wo und ob es eingesetzt werden kann“, sagte Panagiotopoulos.

      Das Verteidigungsministerium hatte die Ausschreibung für das Projekt am Mittwoch auf seiner Homepage veröffentlicht. Die „schwimmenden Schutzsysteme“ sollen knapp drei Kilometer lang sein, etwa 50 Zentimeter über dem Wasser aufragen und mit Blinklichtern ausgestattet sein. Die griechische Presse verglich die geplanten Absperrungen technisch mit den Barrieren gegen Ölteppiche im Meer.
      Was können die Barrieren tatsächlich ausrichten?

      Eigentlich dürften gar keine Migranten illegal auf dem Seeweg von der Türkei nach Griechenland kommen: Die Europäische Union hat mit der Türkei eine Vereinbarung geschlossen, die Ankara verpflichtet, Migranten und ihre Schleuser abzufangen und von Griechenland zudem Migranten ohne Asylanspruch zurückzunehmen.

      Doch nach Angaben des Uno-Flüchtlingshilfswerks UNHCR stieg die Zahl der Migranten, die illegal aus der Türkei nach Griechenland kamen, 2019 von gut 50.500 auf mehr als 74.600. Seit Jahresbeginn 2020 setzen täglich im Durchschnitt gut 90 Menschen aus der Türkei zu den griechischen Ägäis-Inseln über.

      Die Frage ist, ob schwimmende Sperren daran etwas ändern. „Ich kann nicht genau verstehen, wie diese Barrieren die Migranten daran hindern sollen, nach Griechenland zu kommen“, sagte ein Offizier der Küstenwache. Denn wenn die Migranten die Barrieren erreichten, seien sie in griechischen Hoheitsgewässern und müssten gemäß dem Seerecht gerettet und aufgenommen werden.

      Der UNHCR-Sprecher in Athen, Boris Cheshirkov, verweist zudem auf die Pflicht Griechenlands, die Menschenrechte zu achten. Griechenland habe das legitime Recht, seine Grenzen so zu kontrollieren, „wie das Land es für richtig hält“, sagte er. „Dabei müssen aber die Menschenrechte geachtet werden. Zahlreiche Migranten, die aus der Türkei nach Griechenland übersetzen, sind nämlich Flüchtlinge.“

      In Athen wird der Barrierebau auch als innenpolitisches Manöver angesichts der wachsenden Unzufriedenheit über die Entwicklung der Einwanderung gewertet.

      https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/fluechtlinge-eu-fordert-erklaerungen-von-griechenland-zu-barriere-plaenen-a-

    • Un autre „mur flottant“, à #Gaza...

      Wie Israel tauchende und schwimmende Terroristen abwehrt

      Der Gazastreifen wird mit großem Aufwand weiter abgeriegelt. Die neue Seebarriere ergänzt die Mauer und die Luftabwehr gegen Hamas-Attacken.

      Am Sikim-Strand an Israels Mittelmeerküste, rund 70 Kilometer südlich von Tel Aviv, rollen dieser Tage die Bagger durch den feinen, beigefarbenen Sand. Sie arbeiten nicht an einer Strandverschönerung, sondern an einer Schutzvorrichtung, die Israel sicherer machen soll: eine Meeresbarriere – „die einzige dieser Art auf der Welt“, verkündete Verteidigungsminister Avigdor Lieberman stolz auf Twitter.

      Die neue Konstruktion soll tauchenden und schwimmenden Terroristen aus Gaza den Weg blockieren und aus drei Schichten bestehen: eine unter Wasser, eine aus Stein und eine aus Stacheldraht – ähnlich wie Wellenbrecher. Ein zusätzlicher Zaun soll um diese Barriere errichtet werden. „Das ist eine weitere Präventionsmaßnahme gegen die Hamas, die nun eine weitere strategische Möglichkeit verlieren wird, in deren Entwicklung sie viel Geld investiert hat“, schrieb Lieberman. Man werde die Bürger weiterhin mit Stärke und Raffinesse schützen.

      Tatsächlich ist die Meeresbarriere nicht das erste „raffinierte“ Konstrukt der Israelis, um sich vor Terrorangriffen aus dem Gazastreifen zu schützen. Seit 2011 setzt die Armee den selbst entwickelten Abfangschirm „Iron Dome“ ein, der Raketen rechtzeitig erkennt und noch in der Luft abschießt – zumindest dann, wenn der Flug lange dauert, das heißt das Angriffsziel nicht zu nahe am Abschussort liegt. Für einige Dörfer und Kibbuzim direkt am Gazastreifen bleiben die Raketen weiterhin eine große Gefahr.
      Einsatz von Drachen

      Seit vergangenem Jahr baut Israel auch eine bis tief in die Erde reichende Mauer. Umgerechnet mehr als 750 Millionen Euro kostet dieser Hightechbau, der mit Sensoren ausgestattet ist und Bewegungen auch unterhalb der Erde meldet. In den vergangenen Jahren und Monaten hat die Armee zahlreiche Tunnel entdeckt und zerstört. Dass Terrorgruppen nach Abschluss des Baus noch versuchen werden, unterirdisch vorzudringen, scheint unwahrscheinlich: „Mit dem Bau wird die Grenze hermetisch abgeriegelt“, sagt ein Sicherheitsexperte. Rund zehn der insgesamt 64 Kilometer langen Mauer seien bereits komplett fertiggestellt, bis Anfang kommenden Jahres soll der Bau abgeschlossen sein.

      Nun folgt der Seeweg: Während des Gazakrieges 2014 hatten Taucher der Hamas es geschafft, bewaffnet Israels Küste zu erreichen. Sie wurden dort von den israelischen Streitkräften getötet. Es waren seither wohl nicht die einzigen Versuche, ist Kobi Michael, einst stellvertretender Generaldirektor des Ministeriums für Strategische Angelegenheiten, überzeugt. „Es wurde nicht zwingend darüber berichtet, aber es gab Versuche.“

      Israel reagiert mit neuen Erfindungen auf die verschiedenen Angriffstaktiken der Terroristen in Gaza – doch die entwickeln bereits neue. Es bleibt ein Katz-und-Maus-Spiel. Jüngste Taktik ist der Einsatz von Drachen, die mit Molotowcocktails oder Dosen voller brennendem Benzin ausgestattet werden. Dutzende solcher Drachen wurden während der „Marsch der Rückkehr“-Proteste in den vergangenen zwei Monaten nach Israel geschickt.

      „Das ist eine neue und sehr primitive Art des Terrors“, so Kobi Michael. Aber eben auch eine wirkungsvolle, da Landwirtschaft im Süden eine große Rolle spielt und Israel zudem seine Natur schützen will. „Sie haben es geschafft, bereits Hunderte Hektar Weizenfelder und Wälder in Brand zu stecken.“ Israel setzt nun unter anderem spezielle Drohnen ein, um die brennenden Drachen noch in der Luft zu zerstören. Aber Michael ist sicher, auch hier bedarf es zukünftig eines besseren Abwehrsystems. Der Sicherheitsexperte sieht es positiv: „Sie fordern uns heraus und wir reagieren mit der Entwicklung hochtechnologischer Lösungen.“

      https://www.tagesspiegel.de/politik/seebarriere-noerdlich-des-gazastreifens-wie-israel-tauchende-und-schwimmende-terroristen-abwehrt/22617084.html
      #Israël #Palestine

    • La #barrière_maritime israélienne de Gaza est sur le point d’être achevée

      Un mur sous-marin de rochers et de détecteurs surmonté d’une clôture intelligente de 6 mètres de haut et d’un brise-lames comble un vide dans les défenses d’Israël.

      Plus de quatre ans après qu’une équipe de commandos du Hamas est entrée en Israël depuis la mer pendant la guerre de Gaza en 2014, les ingénieurs israéliens sont sur le point d’achever la construction d’une barrière maritime intelligente destinée à prévenir de futures attaques, a rapporté lundi la Dixième chaîne.

      La construction de la barrière de 200 mètres de long a été effectuée par le ministère de la Défense au large de la plage de Zikim, sur la frontière la plus au nord de Gaza. Le travail a duré sept mois.

      La barrière est destinée à combler un vide dans les défenses d’Israël le long de la frontière avec Gaza.

      Sur terre, Israël a une clôture en surface et construit un système complexe de barrières et de détecteurs souterrains pour empêcher le Hamas – l’organisation terroriste islamiste qui dirige Gaza et cherche à détruire Israël – de percer des tunnels en territoire israélien. En mer, la marine israélienne maintient une présence permanente capable de détecter les tentatives d’infiltration dans les eaux israéliennes.

      Mais il y avait une brèche juste au large de la plage de Zikim, dans la zone étroite des eaux peu profondes où ni les forces terrestres ni les navires de mer ne pouvaient opérer facilement.

      Les commandos du Hamas ont profité de cette faille en 2014 pour contourner facilement une clôture vétuste et délabrée et passer en Israël par les eaux peu profondes.

      Les forces du Hamas n’ont été arrêtées que lorsque les équipes de surveillance de Tsahal ont remarqué leurs mouvements lorsqu’elles sont arrivées sur la plage en Israël.

      La barrière est composée de plusieurs parties. Un mur sous-marin de blocs rocheux s’étend à environ 200 mètres dans la mer. A l’intérieur du mur de blocs rocheux se trouve un mur en béton revêtu de détecteurs sismiques et d’autres outils technologiques dont la fonction exacte est secrète.

      Au-dessus de l’eau, le long du côté ouest du mur nord-sud, une clôture intelligente hérissée de détecteurs s’élève à une hauteur de six mètres.

      Du côté est, un brise-lames avec une route au milieu s’étend sur toute la longueur du mur sous-marin.

      La construction a été rapide, bien qu’elle ait été entravée ponctuellement par les attaques du Hamas.

      Lors d’une de ces attaques, un combattant du Hamas a lancé des grenades sur les forces israéliennes qui gardaient les équipes de travail, avant d’être tué par les tirs israéliens en retour.

      https://fr.timesofisrael.com/la-barriere-maritime-israelienne-de-gaza-est-sur-le-point-detre-ac

    • Grèce : un mur flottant pour contrer l’arrivée de migrants

      Pour restreindre l’arrivée de migrants depuis la Turquie, le gouvernement grec vient de lancer un appel d’offres pour la construction, en pleine mer Égée, d’un « système de protection flottant ». Une annonce qui provoque de vives réactions.

      Athènes (Grèce), correspondance.– Depuis les côtes turques, les rivages de Lesbos surgissent après une douzaine de kilomètres de mer Égée. En 2019, ce bras de mer est redevenu la première porte d’entrée des demandeurs d’asile dans l’Union européenne, pour la plupart des Afghans et des Syriens. Mais un nouvel obstacle pourrait bientôt compliquer le passage, sinon couper la voie. À Athènes, le gouvernement conservateur estime détenir une solution pour réduire les arrivées : ériger une barrière flottante anti-migrants.

      Fin janvier, le ministère de la défense a ainsi publié un appel d’offres « pour la fourniture d’un système de protection flottant […] », visant « à gérer […] en cas d’urgence […] le flux de réfugiés et de migrants qui augmente sans cesse ». D’après ce document de 122 pages, le dispositif « de barrage ou filet […] de couleur jaune ou orange », composé de plusieurs sections de 25 à 50 mètres reliées entre elles, s’étendra sur 2,7 km.

      Il s’élèvera « d’au moins » 50 centimètres au-dessus des flots. Et de nuit, la clôture brillera grâce à « des bandes réfléchissantes […] et des lumières jaunes clignotantes ». Son coût estimé : 500 000 euros – dont 96 774 de TVA – incluant « quatre ans d’entretien et la formation du personnel » pour son installation en mer.

      Sollicitées, les autorités n’ont pas donné d’autres détails à Mediapart. Mais l’agence Reuters et les médias grecs précisent que le mur sera testé au nord de Lesbos, île qui a concentré 58 % des entrées de migrants dans le pays en 2019, d’après le Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR).

      Alors que la Grèce compte désormais 87 000 demandeurs d’asile, environ 42 000 (majoritairement des familles) sont bloqués à Lesbos, Leros, Chios, Kos et Samos, le temps du traitement de leur requête. Avec 6 000 places d’hébergement à peine sur ces cinq îles, la situation est devenue explosive (lire notre reportage à Samos).

      « Cela ne peut pas continuer ainsi, a justifié le ministre de la défense nationale, Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, le 30 janvier dernier, sur la radio privée Skaï. Il reste à savoir si [ce barrage] fonctionnera. »

      Joint par téléphone, un habitant de Mytilène (chef-lieu de Lesbos), souhaitant garder son anonymat, déclare ne voir dans ce mur qu’un « effet d’annonce ». « Impossible qu’il tienne en mer, les vents sont trop violents l’hiver. Et ce sera dangereux pour les pêcheurs du coin. Ce projet n’est pas sérieux, les autorités turques ne réagissent même pas, elles rigolent ! »

      Pour Amnesty International, il s’agit d’une « escalade inquiétante » ; pour Human Rights Watch, d’un projet « insensé qui peut mettre la vie [des migrants] en danger ».

      L’annonce de ce mur test a non seulement fait bondir les ONG, mais aussi provoqué un malaise au sein de certaines institutions. « Si une petite embarcation percute la barrière et se renverse, comment les secours pourront-ils accéder au lieu du naufrage ? », interroge également la chercheuse Vicky Skoumbi, directrice de programme au Collège international de philosophie de Paris. Selon elle, cette barrière est « contraire au droit international », notamment l’article 33 de la Convention de 1951 sur le statut des réfugiés et le droit d’asile, qui interdit les refoulements. « L’entrave à la liberté de circulation que constitue la barrière flottante équivaut à un refoulement implicite (ou en acte) du candidat à l’asile », poursuit Vicky Skoumbi.

      L’opposition de gauche Syriza, qui moque sa taille (trois kilomètres sur des centaines de kilomètres de frontière maritime), a aussi qualifié ce projet de « hideux » et de « violation des réglementations européennes ».

      Le porte-parole de la Commission européenne, Adalbert Jahnz, pris de court le 30 janvier lors d’un point presse, a par ailleurs déclaré : « L’installation de barrières n’est pas contraire en tant que telle au droit de l’UE […] cependant […] du point de vue du droit de l’[UE], des barrières de ce genre ou obstacles physiques ne peuvent pas rendre impossible l’accès à la procédure d’asile. »

      « Nous suivons le dossier et sommes en contact étroit avec le gouvernement grec », nous résume aujourd’hui Adalbert Jahnz. Boris Cheshirkov l’un des porte-parole du HCR, rappelle surtout à Mediapart que « 85 % des personnes qui arrivent aujourd’hui en Grèce sont des réfugiés et ont un profil éligible à l’asile ».

      Pour justifier son mur flottant, le gouvernement de droite affirme s’inspirer d’un projet terrestre ayant déjà vu le jour en 2012 : une barrière anti-migrants de 12,5 kilomètres de barbelés érigée entre la bourgade grecque de Nea Vyssa (nord-est du pays) et la ville turque d’Édirne, dans la région de l’Évros.

      L’UE avait à l’époque refusé le financement de cette clôture de près de 3 millions d’euros, finalement payée par l’État grec. Huit ans plus tard, le gouvernement salue son « efficacité » : « Les flux [de migrants] ont été réduits à [cette] frontière terrestre. Nous pensons que le système flottant pourrait avoir un impact similaire », a déclaré le ministre de la défense sur Skaï.

      Or pour la géographe Cristina Del Biaggio, maîtresse de conférences à l’université de Grenoble Alpes, ce mur de l’Évros n’a diminué les arrivées que « localement et temporairement » : « Il a modifié les parcours migratoires en les déplaçant vers le nord-est, à la frontière avec la Bulgarie. »

      En réponse, le voisin bulgare a érigé dans la foulée, en 2014, sa propre clôture anti-migrants à la frontière turque. Les arrivées se sont alors reportées sur les îles grecques du Dodécanèse, puis de nouveau dans la région de l’Évros. « En jouant à ce jeu cynique du chat et de la souris, le durcissement des frontières n’a que dévié (et non pas stoppé) les flux dans la région », conclut Cristina Del Biaggio.

      Selon elle, la construction d’une barrière flottante à des fins de contrôle frontalier serait une première. Le fait que ce « projet pilote » émane du ministère de la défense « est symbolique », ajoute Filippa Chatzistavrou, chercheuse en sciences politiques à l’université d’Athènes. « Depuis 2015, la Défense s’implique beaucoup dans les questions migratoires et c’est une approche qui en dit long : on perçoit les migrants comme une menace. »

      Théoriquement, « c’est le ministère de l’immigration qui devrait être en charge de ces projets, a reconnu le ministre de la défense. Mais il vient tout juste d’être recréé… ». Le gouvernement de droite conservatrice l’avait, de fait, supprimé à son arrivée en juillet dernier (avant de faire volte-face), en amorce d’autres réformes dures en matière d’immigration. En novembre, en particulier, une loi sur la procédure d’asile a été adoptée au Parlement, qui prolonge notamment la durée possible de rétention des demandeurs et réduit leurs possibilités de faire appel. Une politique qui n’a pas empêché la hausse des arrivées en Grèce.

      Porte-parole du HCR à Lesbos, Astrid Castelin observe l’île sombrer désormais « dans la haine des réfugiés et l’incertitude ». Reflet de la catastrophe en cours, le camp de Moria, en particulier, n’en finit pas de s’étaler dans les collines d’oliviers. « On y compte plus de 18 000 personnes, dont beaucoup d’enfants de moins de 12 ans, pour 3 000 places, s’inquiète ainsi Astrid Castelin. La municipalité ne peut plus ramasser l’ensemble des déchets, les files d’attente pour les douches ou les toilettes sont interminables. » Le 3 février, la police a fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes à l’encontre de 2 000 migrants qui manifestaient pour leurs droits.

      L’habitant de Lesbos déjà cité, lui, note qu’on parle davantage sur l’île de l’apparition de « milices d’extrême droite qui rôdent près de Moria, qui demandent leurs cartes d’identité aux passants » que du projet de barrage flottant. Le 7 février, en tout cas, la police grecque a annoncé avoir interpellé sept personnes soupçonnées de projeter une attaque de migrants.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/110220/grece-un-mur-flottant-pour-contrer-l-arrivee-de-migrants

    • Floating Anti-Refugee Fence for Greek Island Lesbos Nears Finish

      A 3-kilometer (1.864-mile) floating barrier more than 1 meter (3.28 feet) high designed to keep refugees and migrants from reaching the eastern Aegean island of Lesbos already holding nearly 20,000 is reportedly near completion.

      The project, widely mocked and assailed as unlikely to work and inhumane, was commissioned by the New Democracy government earlier in 2020 as one means to keep the refugees away although patrols by the Greek Coast Guard and European Union border agency Frontex haven’t worked to do that.

      The Greek Ministry of Defence said the project is in its final phase, reported The Brussels Times, the floating fence to be put off the northeast part of Lesbos with no explanation how it would work if boats steer around it.

      The Greek government launched bids on January 29 with the cost of the design, installation and maintenance for four years estimated at 500,000 euros ($560,250) but it wasn’t said who the builder was.

      The project went ahead during the COVID-19 pandemic, despite objections from critics and human rights groups. “This plan raises worrying questions about the possibility of rescuers continuing to provide assistance to people attempting the dangerous crossing of the sea,” Amnesty International said.

      During COVID-19, the numbers of arrival on islands near the coast of Turkey, which has allowed human traffickers to keep sending them during an essentially-suspended 2016 swap deal with the European Union dwindled.

      Turkey is holding about 5.5 million refugees and migrants who fled war and strife in their homelands, especially Afghanistan and Syria’s civil war, but also economic conditions in sub-Saharan Africa and other countries.

      They went to Turkey in hopes of reaching prosperous countries in the EU, which closed its borders to them and reneged on promises to help spread some of the overload, leaving them to go to Greece to seek asylum.

      Since April, only 350 arrived on Lesbos, the paper said, with the notorious Moria detention camp that the BBC called “the worst in the world,” holding nearly 18,000 people in what rights groups said were inhumane conditions.

      Greece has about 100,000 refugees and migrants, including more than 33,000 asylum seekers in five camps on the Aegean islands, with a capacity of only 5,400 people, and some 70,000 more in other facilities on the mainland.

      When the idea was announced, it drew immediate fire and criticism, with the European Union cool to the idea and Germany not even talking about it.

      Amnesty International and other human rights groups piled on against the scheme that was proposed after the government said it would replace camps on islands with detention centers to vet those ineligible for asylum.

      Island officials and residents were upset then, with compassion fatigue setting him even more after trying to deal with a crisis heading into its fifth year. The government said it would move 20,000 to the mainland.

      At the time, Migration Minister Notis Mitarakis said it was a “positive measure that will help monitor areas close to the Turkish coast,” and the barrier “sends out the message that we are not a free-for-all and that we’re taking all necessary measures to protect the borders.”

      Rights groups said it will increase risks faced by refugees and migrants trying to reach Greek islands in rickety craft and rubber dinghies, many of which have overturned or capsized since 2016, drowning scores of people.

      The barrier will and have lights to make it visible at night, said officials. “The invitation for floating barriers is in the right direction… We will see what the result, what its effect as a deterrent will be in practice,” Defence Minister Nikos Panagiotopoulos told SKAI Radio.

      “It will be a natural barrier. If it works like the one in Evros, I believe it can be effective,” he said, referring to a cement and barbed-wire fence that Greece set up in 2012 along its northern border with Turkey to keep out migrants and refugees, which hasn’t worked.

      The major opposition SYRIZA condemned the floating barrier plan as “a disgrace and an insult to humanity,” with other reports it would be only 19 inches above water or if it would be visible in rough seas that have sunk boats.

      Adding that the idea was “disgusting,” a SYRIZA statement said the barrier “offends humanity … and violates European and international rules,” said the party, calling the proposal absurd, unenforceable and dangerous. “Even a child knows that in the sea you cannot have a wall.”

      https://www.thenationalherald.com/greece_politics/arthro/floating_anti_refugee_fence_for_greek_island_lesbos_nears_finish-

  • Privatised Push-Back of the #Nivin

    In November 2018, five months after Matteo Salvini was made Italy’s Interior Minister, and began to close the country’s ports to rescued migrants, a group of 93 migrants was forcefully returned to Libya after they were ‘rescued’ by the Nivin, a merchant ship flying the Panamanian flag, in violation of their rights, and in breach of international refugee law.

    The migrants’ boat was first sighted in the Libyan Search and Rescue (SAR) Zone by a Spanish surveillance aircraft, part of Operation EUNAVFOR MED – Sophia, the EU’s anti-smuggling mission. The EUNAVFOR MED – Sophia Command passed information to the Italian and Libyan Coast Guards to facilitate the interception and ‘pull-back’ of the vessel to Libya. However, as the Libyan Coast Guard (LYCG) patrol vessels were unable to perform this task, the Italian Coast Guard (ICG) directly contacted the nearby Nivin ‘on behalf of the Libyan Coast Guard’, and tasked it with rescue.

    LYCG later assumed coordination of the operation, communicating from an Italian Navy ship moored in Tripoli, and, after the Nivin performed the rescue, directed it towards Libya.

    While the passengers were initially told they would be brought to Italy, when they realised they were being returned to Libya, they locked themselves in the hold of the ship.

    A standoff ensured in the port of Misrata which lasted ten days, until the captured passengers were violently removed from the vessel by Libyan security forces, detained, and subjected to multiple forms of ill-treatment, including torture.

    This case exemplifies a recurrent practice that we refer to as ‘privatised push-back’. This new strategy has been implemented by Italy, in collaboration with the LYCG, since mid-2018, as a new modality of delegated rescue, intended to enforce border control and contain the movement of migrants from the Global South seeking to reach Europe.

    This report is an investigation into this case and new pattern of practice.

    Using georeferencing and AIS tracking data, Forensic Oceanography reconstructed the trajectories of the migrants’ vessel and the Nivin.

    Tracking data was cross-referenced with the testimonies of passengers, the reports by rescue NGO WatchTheMed‘s ‘Alarm Phone’, a civilian hotline for migrants in need of emergency rescue; a report by the owner of the Nivin, which he shared with a civilian rescue organisation, the testimonies of MSF-France staff in Libya, an interview with a high-ranking LYCG official, official responses, and leaked reports from EUNAVFOR MED.

    Together, these pieces of evidence corroborate one other, and together form and clarify an overall picture: a system of strategic delegation of rescue, operated by a complex of European actors for the purpose of border enforcement.

    When the first–and preferred–modality of this strategic delegation, which operates through LYCG interception and pull-back of the migrants, did not succeed, those actors, including the Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Rome, opted for a second modality: privatised push-back, implemented through the LYCG and the merchant ship.

    Despite the impression of coordination between European actors and the LYCG, control and coordination of such operations remains constantly within the firm hands of European—and, in particular, Italian—actors.

    In this case, as well as in others documented in this report, the outcome of the strategy was to deny migrants fleeing Libya the right to leave and request protection in Italy, returning them to a country in which they have faced grave violations. Through this action, Italy has breached its obligation of non-refoulement, one of the cornerstones of international refugee law.

    This report is the basis for a legal submission to the United Nations Human Rights Committee by Global Legal Action Network (GLAN) on behalf of an individual who was shot and forcefully removed from the Nivin.

    https://forensic-architecture.org/investigation/nivin
    #Méditerranée #rapport #Charles_Heller #asile #frontières #migrations #réfugiés #mer_Méditerranée #push-back #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #privatisation #Italie #Libye #operation_sophia #EUNAVFOR_Med #gardes-côtes_libyens #sauvetage #Misrata #torture #privatised_push-back #push-back_privatisé #architecture_forensique #externalisation #navires_marchands #Salvini #Matteo_Salvini

    Pour télécharger le rapport :
    https://content.forensic-architecture.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/2019-12-18-FO-Nivin-Report.pdf

    –-----

    Sur le cas du Nivin, voir aussi, sur seenthis, ce fil de discussion :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/735627

    • Migrants refoulés en Libye : l’Italie accusée d’embrigader la marine marchande

      En marge du Forum mondial sur les réfugiés, plusieurs ONG ont annoncé mercredi saisir un comité de l’ONU dans l’espoir de faire cesser les refoulements de migrants vers la Libye .

      De son identité il n’a été révélé que ses initiales. SDG a fui la guerre au Soudan du Sud. En novembre 2018, avec une centaine d’autres migrants embarqués sur un canot pour traverser la Méditerranée, il est secouru par un cargo battant pavillon panaméen, le Nivin. Mais l’équipage, suivant ainsi les instructions des autorités italiennes, ramène les naufragés vers la Libye et le port de Misrata. Les migrants refusent de débarquer, affirmant qu’ils préfèrent mourir sur le navire plutôt que de retourner dans les centres de détention libyens.

      Il s’ensuit un bras de fer d’une dizaine de jours. Finalement, les Libyens donnent l’assaut et les migrants sont débarqués de force. SDG est blessé, puis emprisonné et maltraité. Il restera avec une balle en plastique dans la jambe pendant six mois. Le jeune homme est aujourd’hui à Malte, où il a pu déposer une demande d’asile. Il a finalement réussi la traversée, à sa huitième tentative.

      C’est en son nom que plusieurs ONG ont déposé une plainte contre l’Italie mercredi auprès du Comité des droits de l’homme de l’ONU. Cet organe, composé de 18 experts, n’émet que des avis consultatifs. « Cela ira plus vite que devant la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH). Nous visons l’Italie, car le comité de l’ONU ne se prononce que sur les violations commises par des Etats, nous ne pourrions attaquer l’Union européenne », justifie Violeta Moreno-Lax, de l’ONG Global Legal Action. L’Italie, en première ligne face à l’arrivée de boat people, avait déjà été condamnée par la CEDH en 2012 pour le refoulement de migrants en Libye. « Depuis, Rome fait tout pour contourner cet arrêt », dénonce la juriste.

      « Le choix impossible des équipages »

      L’une des tactiques, ont exposé les ONG lors d’une conférence de presse, est d’embrigader la marine marchande pour qu’elle ramène les naufragés en Libye. « La décision de l’ancien ministre de l’Intérieur Matteo Salvini de fermer les ports italiens aux navires de sauvetage en juin 2018 a créé une onde de choc en Méditerranée, décrit le chercheur suisse Charles Heller, qui documente la disparition de migrants en mer. Les autres pays européens ont retiré leurs bateaux, parce qu’ils risquaient d’être bloqués faute de ports où débarquer les migrants. Ce sont donc les navires marchands qui sont appelés à remplir le vide. Ces équipages sont face à un choix impossible. Soit ils se conforment aux instructions des autorités maritimes italiennes et violent le droit de la mer, qui oblige les marins à débarquer les naufragés vers un port sûr. Soit ils résistent et s’exposent à des poursuites judiciaires. Dans les faits, beaucoup de navires évitent de porter secours aux embarcations en détresse. »

      Ces derniers mois, Charles Heller a recensé 13 navires marchands qui ont refoulé des migrants en Libye. Parmi ces cas, deux tentatives n’ont pas réussi, les naufragés se rebellant contre un retour en Libye. « Il faut comprendre qu’une fois débarqués en Libye, les migrants sont détenus de façon totalement arbitraire. Les centres sont inadaptés, la nourriture est insuffisante, les maladies comme la tuberculose y font des ravages et les disparitions ne sont pas rares, en particulier les femmes », détaille Julien Raickman, le chef de mission de Médecins sans frontières en Libye.


      https://www.letemps.ch/monde/migrants-refoules-libye-litalie-accusee-dembrigader-marine-marchande

    • Migranti, un report accusa l’Italia: «Respingimento illegale dei 93 salvati dal mercantile Nivin e riportati in Libia con la forza»

      Le prove in un documento della Forensic Oceanography presso la Goldsmith University of London. Nell’ultimo anno, chiamando navi commerciali a soccorrere barche in difficoltà, sarebbero stati 13 i casi analoghi.

      «Qui MRCC Roma. A nome della Guardia costiera libica per la salvezza delle vite in mare vi preghiamo di procedere alla massima velocità per dare assistenza ad una barca in difficoltà con circa 70 persone a bordo. Vi preghiamo di contattare urgentemente la Guardia costiera libica attraverso questo centro di ricerca e soccorso ai seguenti numeri di telefono». Ai quali rispondono sempre gli italiani.

      Un dispaccio del centro di ricerca e soccorso di Roma delle 19.39 del 7 novembre del 2018 dimostra che a coordinare l’operazione di salvataggio di un gruppo di migranti poi riportati in Libia dal mercantile Nivin battente bandiera panamense fu l’Italia. In 93, segnalati prima da un aereo di Eunavformed, poi dal centralino Alarmphone, furono presi a bordo dal Nivin e, con l’inganno, sbarcati con la forza a Misurata dall’esercito libico dopo essere rimasti per dieci giorni asserragliati sul ponte del mercantile. Picchiati, feriti, rinchiusi di nuovo nei centri di detenzione in un paese in guerra.

      Un respingimento di massa illegittimo, contrario al diritto internazionale, che sarebbe stato dunque coordinato dall’Italia secondo una strategia di salvataggio delegato ai privati per applicare il controllo delle frontiere. Un «modello di pratica» che - secondo un rapporto redatto da Charles Heller di Forensic Oceanography, ramo della Forensic Architecture Agency basata alla Goldsmiths University of London - l’Italia e l’Europa avrebbero applicato ben 13 volte nell’ultimo anno, in coincidenza con la politica italiana dei porti chiusi.

      Caso finora unico, alcune delle persone riportate in Libia sono state rintracciate nei centri di detenzione da Msf che ne ha raccolto le testimonianze che - incrociate con i documenti e le risposte alle richieste di informazione date da Eunavformed e dalla stessa Guardia costiera libica - hanno consentito di ricostruire quello che viene definito nello studio «una pratica ricorrente di respingimenti, una nuova modalità di soccorso delegato ai privati» che verrebbe attuato quando le motovedette della guardia costiera libica, come avvenne nel caso del 7 novembre 2018, sono impegnate in altri interventi. «Impegnandosi in questa pratica - è l’accusa del report - l’Italia usa violenza extraterritoriale per contenere i movimenti dei migranti e viola l’obbligo di non respingimento». Per questo il Glan, l’organizzazione di avvocati, accademici e giornalisti investigativi Global Legal Action Network ha presentato una denuncia contro l’Italia al Comitato per i diritti umani delle Nazioni Unite per conto di uno dei migranti riportati indietro. E’ la prima volta che accade.

      La partenza
      Nella notte tra il 6 e 7 novembre 2018 dalla costa di Zlitan parte un gommone con 93 persone a bordo di sette nazionalità diverse. C’è anche una donna con un bimbo di quattro mesi. Alle 15.25 del 7 novembre la barca viene avvistata in zona Sar libica da un aereo spagnolo dell’operazione Sophia che - secondo quanto riferito da Eunavformed - «dichiara che non c’erano assetti navali nelle vicinanze». Tramite il quartier generale della missione che, in quel momento, era sulla nave San Marco della marina italiana, l’informazione con le coordinate navali della posizione della barca viene passata al centro di ricerca e soccorso di Roma che le trasmette a quello libico. Il commodoro libico Masoud Abdalsamd riferisce che le motovedette libiche sono impegnate in altre attività e il gommone continua la sua navigazione.

      La richiesta di soccorso
      Due ore dopo, alle 17.18, dal gommone un primo contatto con il centralino Alarm Phone che comunica le coordinate al centro di soccorso di Roma e monitora la zona: non ci sono navi vicine e l’unica Ong presente, la Mare Jonio, è a Lampedusa. Roma ( che era già informata) chiama Tripoli, la guardia costiera libica identifica la Nivin, un mercantile già in rotta verso Misurata ma le manca l’attrezzatura per comunicare e dirigere la Nivin e chiede a Roma di farlo «a suo nome». Da quel momento è MRCC a prendere in mano il coordinamento, dà istruzioni al comandante della Nivin e dirige il soccorso.

      L’arrivo dei libici
      Alle 21.34, un dispaccio del centro di ricerca e soccorso dei libici annuncia la presa del coordinamento delloperazione ma la comunicazione parte dallo stesso numero nella disponibilità della Marina italiana sulla nave di stanza a Tripoli. Alle 3.30 la Nivin soccorre i migranti. Saliti a bordo i marinai li tranquillizzano dicendo loro che saranno portati in Italia. Ma quando vedono arrivare una motovedetta libica i migranti capiscono di essere stati ingannati, rifiutano il trasbordo e si barricano sulla tolda della nave. I libici dopo un poò rinunciano e la Nivin prosegue verso Misurata dicendo ai migranti di essere in rotta verso Malta. Un’altra bugia.

      Lo sbarco a Misurata
      I migranti rimangono asserragliati anche quando la nave entra nel porto libico. Ci resteranno dieci giorni chiedendo disperatamente aiuto ai media internazionali con i telefoni cellulari. Il 20 novembre l’intervento di forza dei militari libici armati pone fine alla loro odissea. Alcuni migranti vengono picchiati, feriti, ricondotti nei centri di detenzione dove alcuni di loro vengono intercettati dall’equipe di Medici senza frontiere che raccoglie le loro testimonianze che si incrociano perfettamente con i documenti recuperati.

      Il ruolo dell’Italia
      Ne viene fuori un quadro che combacia perfettamente con quanto già evidenziato da un’inchiesta in via di conclusione della Procura di Agrigento coordinata dal procuratore aggiunto Salvatore Vella. Un quadro in cui l’Italia, nonostante gli accordi con la Libia, prevedono un ruolo di semplice assistenza e supporto tecnico alla Guardia costiera libica, di fatto svolge - tramite la nave della Marina militare di stanza a Tripoli - svolge una funzione di centro di comunicazione e coordinamento «dando un contributo decisivo - si legge nel report - alla capacità di controllo e coordinamento che ha saldamente in mano».
      «Quando i libici non sono in grado di intervenire - è l’accusa di Forensic Oceanography - Roma opta per una seconda modalità, quella del respingimento privato attraverso le mavi mercantili che - secondo un recente report semestrale di Eunavformed - ha prodotto 13 casi nell’ultimo anno con un aumento del 15-20 per cento».

      https://www.repubblica.it/cronaca/2019/12/18/news/migranti_l_italia_dietro_il_respingimento_dei_93_salvati_dal_mercantile_n

  • Un total de 655 personas han muerto o desaparecido en rutas migratorias de acceso a España en 2019, según una ONG

    El Colectivo Caminando Fronteras ha contabilizado 655 personas muertas y desaparecidas en su monitoreo anual del derecho a la vida en las rutas migratorias de acceso a España —Estrecho, #Mar_de_Alborán, Islas Canarias y ruta argelina—. Sin embargo, Caminando Fronteras ha alertado de que las cifras reales de muertes y desapariciones de personas migrantes que intentaron acceder a España en 2019 son «bastante superiores» a las recogidas por organismos oficiales.

    https://www.europapress.es/epsocial/migracion/noticia-total-655-personas-muerto-desaparecido-rutas-migratorias-acceso-
    #mourir_aux_frontières #Espagne #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Méditerranée #Mer_Méditerranée #Canaries #îles_Canaries #Etroit_de_Gibraltar #décès #morts

  • Malte permet à des garde-côtes libyens d’entrer dans sa zone de sauvetage pour intercepter des migrants

    Une embarcation de migrants a été interceptée vendredi dernier dans la zone de recherche et de sauvetage maltaise par une patrouille de garde-côtes libyens. Les 50 personnes qui se trouvaient à bord ont été ramenées en Libye. Pour la première fois, Alarm phone a pu documenter cette violation du #droit_maritime_international. Le HCR a ouvert une #enquête.

    L’agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) a annoncé mardi 22 octobre l’ouverture d’une enquête après que les autorités maltaises ont laissé des garde-côtes libyens intercepter une embarcation de migrants en détresse qui se trouvait dans la zone de recherche et de sauvetage (SAR) maltaise.

    Alarm phone, une organisation qui permet aux bateaux de migrants en difficultés de demander de l’aide, a retracé mercredi 23 octobre, dans un communiqué, le déroulé des événements qui ont conduit à l’emprisonnement des 50 migrants dans le centre de #Tarik_al_Sika, à #Tripoli.

    Tout commence le vendredi 18 octobre, en début d’après-midi, quand Alarm phone reçoit un appel de détresse d’un bateau surchargé. Environ 50 personnes, dont des femmes et des enfants, se trouvent à bord de ce rafiot en bois. Les coordonnées GPS que les migrants envoient à Alarm Phone indiquent qu’ils se trouvent dans la SAR zone maltaise.

    La plateforme téléphonique transmet alors la position de l’embarcation aux centres de coordination des secours en mer de Malte (#RCC) et de Rome (#MRCC). Malte ne tarde pas à répondre : “Nous avons reçu votre email. Nous nous occupons de tout", indique un officier maltais.

    Enfermement à Tripoli

    Dans les heures qui suivent, Alarm phone tente de garder le contact avec le RCC de Malte et le MRCC de Rome mais ne reçoit plus de réponse. À bord, les migrants donnent de nouvelles coordonnées GPS à l’organisation : ils se trouvent toujours dans la SAR zone maltaise. Le dernier contact entre Alarm phone et l’embarcation a lieu à 17h40.

    Quelques heures plus tard, le #PB_Fezzan, un navire appartenant aux garde-côtes libyens, a intercepté l’embarcation de migrants dans la zone de recherche et sauvetage de Malte. Les équipes d’Alarm phone apprennent, par un officier du RCC de Malte, qu’un hélicoptère des Forces armées maltaises avait été impliqué dans l’opération, en "supervisant la situation depuis les airs".

    Le PB Fezzan est ensuite rentré à Tripoli avec les migrants à son bord. Tous ont été placés dans le centre de détention de Tarik al Sika.

    Violation des conventions internationales et du principe de non-refoulement

    En ne portant pas secours à cette embarcation, le RCC de Malte a violé à la fois le droit de la mer et le principe de non-refoulement établi dans la Convention européenne des droits de l’Homme et celle relative au statut international de réfugiés.

    Le HCR a ouvert une enquête afin de déterminer pour quelles raisons Malte n’a pas porté secours à l’embarcation, a indiqué mardi Vincent Cochetel, l’envoyé spécial du HCR pour la Méditerranée centrale, à l’agence Associated press (AP).

    Selon lui, "des preuves existent que Malte a demandé à des garde-côtes libyens d’intervenir" dans sa propre zone de recherche et sauvetage le 18 octobre. "Le problème est que les migrants ont été débarqués en Libye. Il ne fait aucun doute qu’il s’agit d’une violation des lois maritimes. Il est clair que la Libye n’est pas un port sûr", a-t-il ajouté.

    Vincent Cochetel a également affirmé qu’il ne s’agissait pas de la première fois que Malte se rendait coupable d’une telle non-assistance.

    "Malte est particulièrement peu coopérant"

    Contacté par InfoMigrants, Maurice Stierl, membre d’Alarm phone, rappelle qu’il n’est pas rare que les garde-côtes européens ne remplissent pas leurs obligations. "Ce cas est particulièrement dramatique mais ce n’est pas une surprise pour nous tant nous avons vu [des autorités européennes] se dérober à leurs responsabilités", assure-t-il.

    "Malte est particulièrement peu coopérant ces dernières semaines. Quand nous les appelons, soit ils sont injoignables, soit ils ne nous communiquent pas d’informations sur les modalités de la mission de sauvetage qu’ils vont lancer", s’agace l’activiste.

    Malte n’est pas le seul pays européen à rechigner à secourir des migrants en Méditerranée centrale, précise Maurice Stierl. "Nous avons aussi eu de mauvaises expériences avec d’autres États membres dont le MRCC de Rome […] C’est un problème européen."

    https://twitter.com/alarm_phone/status/1187265157937991680?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E11

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/20377/malte-permet-a-des-garde-cotes-libyens-d-entrer-dans-sa-zone-de-sauvet
    #migrations #réfugiés #zone_SAR #SAR #gardes-côtes_libyens #sauvetage #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Méditerranée #pull-back #Mer_Méditerranée

  • Accord de Malte

    Nelle bozze dell’accordo di Malta si chiede a chi fa soccorso in mare di «conformarsi alle istruzioni dei competenti Centri di Coordinamento del Soccorso», e di «non ostruire» le operazioni della «Guardia costiera libica».

    Primo: la formula vi suona già sentita?

    Già, quando l’anno scorso il governo italiano negoziò fino a tarda notte al Consiglio europeo di giugno, le conclusioni contenevano queste parole:

    «Le imbarcazioni (...) non devono ostruire le operazioni della Guardia costiera libica».

    Nella bozza dell’accordo di Malta si va persino oltre, perché alle imbarcazioni di ricerca e soccorso si chiedono due cose:

    (1) non ostruite la Guardia costiera libica;
    (2) conformatevi alle richieste dello RCC competente.

    Quanto all’ostruzione delle operazioni della Guardia costiera libica, non si ricorda un caso recente.

    Al contrario, è generalmente la Guardia costiera libica a usare comportamenti aggressivi.
    @VITAnonprofit metteva in fila un po’ di fatti nel 2017.

    http://www.vita.it/it/article/2017/11/08/mediterraneo-tutti-gli-attacchi-della-guardia-costiera-libica-alle-ong/145042

    Ovviamente, non è che la Guardia costiera libica sia sempre aggressiva. C’è chi fa il suo lavoro in maniera professionale, chi no.

    Il punto è un altro: spesso non sappiamo chi operi dove. Come spiega @lmisculin, la Guardia costiera libica non esiste: https://www.ilpost.it/2017/08/26/guardia-costiera-libica

    Passando al «conformarsi alle istruzioni dei competenti Centri di Coordinamento del Soccorso», il discorso diventa ancora più spinoso.

    Si arriva rapidamente a un paradosso clamoroso, consentito da un diritto internazionale che ha più buchi di un groviera.

    Questo: la Libia è l’unico paese al mondo ad avere costituito un proprio Centro di Coordinamento del Soccorso (a giugno 2018) e, allo stesso tempo, a non essere considerato da @Refugees
    un «luogo sicuro» per lo sbarco delle persone soccorse.

    Pensateci un attimo: se soccorro qualcuno in quel tratto di mare amplissimo che è la zona #SAR libica, il diritto internazionale mi obbliga a contattare lo RCC libico.

    Ma lo stesso diritto internazionale obbliga lo #RCC libico a NON INDICARE SÉ STESSO come luogo di sbarco!

    Cosa succede di solito, invece? Prendiamo #OceanViking.

    Il 17 settembre dopo un salvataggio, manda un’email allo RCC libico chiedendo un «luogo sicuro» di sbarco.

    Dopo diverse ore, dalla Libia rispondono: perfetto, venite da noi, ad al Khums.

    Sarebbe un respingimento.

    Non è un evento raro, anzi, accade costantemente: se e quando lo RCC libico risponde, indica un suo porto come «luogo sicuro».

    Da #OceanViking rispondono che non si può fare. Certo che no: sbarcare le persone in Libia sarebbe un respingimento.

    Notate l’estrema pazienza.

    In questa situazione di estrema incertezza, chiedere a chi effettua soccorsi nel tratto di mare in cui il coordinamento del soccorso è tecnicamente di competenza libica di «conformarsi» senza condizioni alle richieste di Tripoli rischia di legittimare i respingimenti.

    CONCLUSIONE /1.

    «Non ostruire» le operazioni della «Guardia costiera libica» è una richiesta corretta solo se molto qualificata.

    Dipende da molte condizioni, prima tra tutte di quale Guardia costiera libica stiamo parlando, e da come si stia comportando.

    CONCLUSIONE /2.

    Con il suo linguaggio tranchant, la bozza di Malta chiede a chi effettua un soccorso in zona SAR libica di «conformarsi» alle richieste libiche.

    Senza specificare altro, gli Stati europei stanno implicitamente chiedendo alle Ong di effettuare respingimenti.

    source : https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1177518357773307904?s=19
    #Matteo_Villa
    #accord_de_Malte #sauvetage #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Méditerranée #gardes_côtes_libyens #Méditerranée #port_sûr #pays_sûr #mer_Méditerranée

    ping @isskein

  • Peut-on contrôler les contrôles de #Frontex ?

    À la veille des élections européennes, Bruxelles s’est empressée de voter le renforcement de Frontex. Jamais l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes n’a été aussi puissante. Aujourd’hui, il est devenu presque impossible de vérifier si cette autorité respecte les #droits_fondamentaux des migrants, et si elle tente vraiment de sauver des vies en mer. Mais des activistes ne lâchent rien. Une enquête de notre partenaire allemand Correctiv.

    Berlin, le 18 juin 2017. Arne Semsrott écrit à Frontex, la police des frontières de l’UE. « Je souhaite obtenir la liste de tous les bateaux déployés par Frontex en Méditerranée centrale et orientale. »

    Arne Semsrott est journaliste et activiste spécialisé dans la liberté de l’information. On pourrait dire : « activiste de la transparence ».

    Trois semaines plus tard, le 12 juillet 2017, Luisa Izuzquiza envoie depuis Madrid une requête similaire à Frontex. Elle sollicite des informations sur un meeting entre le directeur de l’agence et les représentants de l’Italie, auquel ont également participé d’autres pays membres de l’UE. Luisa est elle aussi activiste pour la liberté de l’information.

    Cet été-là, Arne et Luisa sont hantés par la même chose : le conflit entre les sauveteurs en mer privés et la #surveillance officielle des frontières en Méditerranée, qu’elle soit assurée par Frontex ou par les garde-côtes italiens. En juillet dernier, l’arrestation de la capitaine allemande Carola Rackete a déclenché un tollé en Europe ; en 2017, c’était le bateau humanitaire allemand Iuventa, saisi par les autorités italiennes.

    Notre enquête a pour ambition de faire la lumière sur un grave soupçon, une présomption dont les sauveteurs parlent à mots couverts, et qui pèse sur la conscience de l’Europe : les navires des garde-frontières européens éviteraient volontairement les secteurs où les embarcations de réfugiés chavirent, ces zones de la Méditerranée où des hommes et des femmes se noient sous nos yeux. Est-ce possible ?

    Frontex n’a de cesse d’affirmer qu’elle respecte le #droit_maritime_international. Et les sauveteurs en mer n’ont aucune preuve tangible de ce qu’ils avancent. C’est bien ce qui anime Arne Semsrott et Luisa Izuzquiza : avec leurs propres moyens, ils veulent sonder ce qui se trame en Méditerranée, rendre les événements plus transparents. De fait, lorsqu’un bateau de réfugiés ou de sauvetage envoie un SOS, ou quand les garde-côtes appellent à l’aide, les versions diffèrent nettement une fois l’incident terminé. Et les personnes extérieures sont impuissantes à démêler ce qui s’est vraiment passé.

    Luisa et Arne refusent d’accepter cette réalité. Ils sont fermement convaincus que les informations concernant les mouvements et les positions des bateaux, les rapports sur la gestion et les opérations de Frontex, ou encore les comptes rendus des échanges entre gouvernements sur la politique migratoire, devraient être accessibles à tout un chacun. Pour pouvoir contrôler les contrôleurs. Ils se sont choisi un adversaire de taille. Ce texte est le récit de leur combat.

    Frontex ne veut pas entendre le reproche qui lui est fait de négliger les droits des migrants. Interviewé par l’émission « Report München », son porte-parole Krzysztof Borowski déclare : « Notre agence attache beaucoup d’importance au respect des droits humains. Il existe chez Frontex différents mécanismes permettant de garantir que les droits des individus sont respectés au cours de nos opérations. »

    En 2011, au moment où les « indignados » investissent les rues de Madrid, Luisa vit encore dans la capitale espagnole. Ébranlé par la crise économique, le pays est exsangue, et les « indignés » règlent leurs comptes avec une classe politique qu’ils accusent d’être corrompue, et à mille lieues de leurs préoccupations. Luisa se rallie à la cause. L’une des revendications phares du mouvement : exiger plus de transparence. Cette revendication, Luisa va s’y vouer corps et âme. « La transparence est cruciale dans une démocratie. C’est l’outil qui permet de favoriser la participation politique et de demander des comptes aux dirigeants », affirme-t-elle aujourd’hui.

    Luisa Izuzquiza vit à deux pas du bureau de l’organisation espagnole Access Info, qui lutte pour améliorer la transparence dans le pays. Début 2014, la jeune femme tente sa chance et va frapper à leur porte. On lui donne du travail.

    En 2015, alors que la population syrienne est de plus en plus nombreuse à se réfugier en Europe pour fuir la guerre civile, Luisa s’engage aussi pour lui venir en aide. Elle travaille comme bénévole dans un camp de réfugiés en Grèce, et finit par faire de la lutte pour la transparence et de son engagement pour les réfugiés un seul et même combat.

    Elle ne tardera pas à entendre parler de Frontex. À l’époque, l’agence de protection des frontières, qui siège à Varsovie, loin du tumulte de Bruxelles, n’est pas connue de grand monde. Luisa se souvient : « Frontex sortait du lot : le nombre de demandes était très faible, et les réponses de l’agence, très floues. Ils rédigeaient leurs réponses sans faire valoir le moindre argument juridique. »

    L’Union européenne étend la protection de ses frontières en toute hâte, et l’agence Frontex constitue la pierre angulaire de ses efforts. Depuis sa création en 2004, l’agence frontalière se développe plus rapidement que toute autre administration de l’UE. Au départ, Frontex bénéficie d’un budget de 6 millions d’euros. Il atteindra 1,6 milliard d’euros en 2021. Si l’agence employait à l’origine 1 500 personnes, son effectif s’élève désormais à 10 000 – 10 000 employés pouvant être détachés à tout moment pour assurer la protection des frontières. Frontex avait organisé l’expulsion de 3 500 personnes au cours de l’année 2015. En 2017, ce sont 13 000 personnes qui ont été reconduites aux frontières.

    Il est difficile de quantifier le pouvoir, à plus forte raison avec des chiffres. Mais l’action de Frontex a des conséquences directes sur la vie des personnes en situation de détresse. À cet égard, l’agence est sans doute la plus puissante administration ayant jamais existé au sein de l’UE.

    « Frontex a désormais le droit de se servir d’armes à feu »

    Et Frontex continue de croître, tout en gagnant de plus en plus d’indépendance par rapport aux États membres. L’agence achète des bateaux, des avions, des véhicules terrestres. Évolution récente, ses employés sont désormais habilités à mener eux-mêmes des contrôles aux frontières et à recueillir des informations personnelles sur les migrants. Frontex signe en toute autonomie des traités avec des pays tels que la Serbie, le Nigeria ou le Cap-Vert, et dépêche ses agents de liaison en Turquie. Si les missions de cette administration se cantonnaient initialement à l’analyse des risques ou des tâches similaires, elle est aujourd’hui active le long de toutes les frontières extérieures de l’UE, coordonnant aussi bien les opérations en Méditerranée que le traitement des réfugiés arrivant dans les États membres ou dans d’autres pays.

    Et pourtant, force est de constater que Frontex ne fait pas l’objet d’un véritable contrôle parlementaire. Le Parlement européen ne peut contrôler cette institution qu’indirectement – par le biais de la commission des budgets, en lui allouant tout simplement moins de fonds. « Il faut renforcer le contrôle parlementaire, déclare Erik Marquardt, député vert européen. L’agence Frontex a désormais le droit de se servir d’armes à feu. »

    En Europe, seul un petit vivier d’activistes lutte pour renforcer la liberté de l’information. Tôt ou tard, on finit par se croiser. Début 2016, l’organisation de Luisa Izuzquiza invite des militants issus de dix pays à un rassemblement organisé à Madrid. Arne Semsrott sera de la partie.

    Aujourd’hui, Arne a 31 ans et vit à Berlin. Une loi sur la liberté de l’information a été votée en 2006 outre-Rhin. Elle permet à chaque citoyen – et pas seulement aux journalistes – de solliciter des documents officiels auprès des ministères et des institutions fédérales. Arne travaille pour la plateforme « FragDenStaat » (« Demande à l’État »), qui transmet les demandes de la société civile aux administrations concernées.

    Dans le sillage du rassemblement de Madrid, Arne lance une « sollicitation de masse ». Le principe : des activistes invitent l’ensemble de la sphère publique à adresser à l’État des demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information, afin d’augmenter la pression sur ces institutions qui refusent souvent de fournir des documents alors même que la loi l’autorise.

    Arne Semsrott crée alors le mouvement « FragDenBundestag » (« Demande au Parlement »), et réussit à obtenir du Bundestag qu’il publie dorénavant les expertises de son bureau scientifique.

    « J’étais impressionnée qu’une telle requête puisse aboutir à la publication de ces documents », se souvient Luisa Izuzquiza. Elle écrit à Arne pour lui demander si ces expertises ont un lien avec la politique migratoire. Ils restent en contact.

    Les journalistes aussi commencent à soumettre des demandes en invoquant la liberté d’informer. Mais tandis qu’ils ont l’habitude de garder pour eux les dossiers brûlants, soucieux de ne pas mettre la puce à l’oreille de la concurrence, les activistes de la trempe de Luisa, eux, publient systématiquement leurs requêtes sur des plateformes telles que « Demande à l’État » ou « AsktheEU.org ». Et ce n’est pas tout : ils parviennent même à obtenir que des jugements soient prononcés à l’encontre d’institutions récalcitrantes. Jugements auxquels citoyennes et citoyens pourront dorénavant se référer. Ce sont les pionniers de la transparence.

    En septembre 2017, Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott finissent par conjuguer leurs efforts : ils demandent à obtenir les positions des bateaux d’une opération Frontex en Méditerranée.

    Ce qu’ils veulent savoir : les équipes de l’agence de garde-côtes s’appliqueraient-elles à tourner en rond dans une zone de calme plat ? Éviteraient-elles à dessein les endroits où elles pourraient croiser des équipages en détresse qu’elles seraient forcées de sauver et de conduire jusqu’aux côtes de l’Europe ?

    Frontex garde jalousement les informations concernant ses navires. En prétextant que les passeurs pourraient échafauder de nouvelles stratégies si l’agence révélait trop de détails sur ses opérations.

    Frontex rejette leur demande. Les activistes font opposition.

    Arne Semsrott est en train de préparer une plainte au moment où son téléphone sonne. Au bout du fil, un employé de Frontex. « Il m’a dit que si nous retirions notre demande d’opposition, il se débrouillerait pour nous faire parvenir les informations qu’on réclamait », se rappelle Arne.

    Mais les deux activistes ne se laissent pas amadouer. Ils veulent qu’on leur livre ces informations par la voie officielle. Pour tenter d’obtenir ce que l’employé de l’agence, en leur proposant une « fuite », cherchait manifestement à éviter : un précédent juridique auquel d’autres pourront se référer à l’avenir. Ils portent plainte. C’est la toute première fois qu’une action en justice est menée contre Frontex pour forcer l’agence à livrer ses informations.

    Pendant que Luisa et Arne patientent devant la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne à Luxembourg, le succès les attend ailleurs : Frontex a inscrit à sa charte l’obligation de respecter les droits fondamentaux des migrants.

    Une « officière aux droits fondamentaux » recrutée par Frontex est censée s’en assurer. Elle n’a que neuf collaborateurs. En 2017, l’agence a dépensé 15 fois plus pour le travail médiatique que pour la garantie des droits humains. Même l’affranchissement des lettres lui a coûté plus cher.

    Mais la garante des droits humains chez Frontex sert quand même à quelque chose : elle rédige des rapports. L’ensemble des incidents déclarés par les équipes de Frontex aux frontières de l’Europe sont examinés par son service. Elle en reçoit une dizaine par an. L’officière en fait état dans ses « rapports de violation des droits fondamentaux ». Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott vont tous les recevoir, un par un. Il y en a 600.

    Ces documents offrent une rare incursion dans la philosophie de l’agence européenne.

    Au printemps 2017, l’officière aux droits fondamentaux, qui rend directement compte au conseil d’administration de Frontex – lequel est notamment composé de membres du gouvernement allemand –, a ainsi fait état de conflits avec la police hongroise. Après avoir découvert dix réfugiés âgés de 10 à 17 ans dans la zone frontalière de Horgoš, petite ville serbe, les policiers auraient lancé leur chien sur les garçons. L’officière rapporte que trois d’entre eux ont été mordus.

    La police serait ensuite entrée sur le territoire serbe, avant d’attaquer les membres du petit groupe à la matraque et en utilisant des sprays au poivre. Quatre réfugiés auraient alors été interpellés et passés à tabac, jusqu’à perdre connaissance. Frontex, qui coopère avec la police frontalière hongroise, a attiré l’attention des autorités sur l’affaire – mais peine perdue.

    Ce genre de débordement n’est pas inhabituel. L’année précédente, l’officière rapportait le cas d’un Marocain arrêté et maltraité le 8 février 2016, toujours par des policiers hongrois, qui lui auraient en outre dérobé 150 euros. Frontex a transmis les déclarations « extrêmement crédibles » du Marocain aux autorités hongroises. Mais « l’enquête est ensuite interrompue », écrit la garante des droits de Frontex (lire ici, en anglais, le rapport de Frontex).

    Ses rapports documentent d’innombrables cas de migrants retrouvés morts par les agents chargés de surveiller les frontières, mais aussi des viols constatés dans les camps de réfugiés, ou encore des blessures corporelles commises par les policiers des pays membres.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott décident de rencontrer l’officière aux droits fondamentaux : elle est allemande, elle s’appelle Annegret Kohler et a été employée par intérim chez Frontex. Sa prédécesseure est en arrêt maladie. Luisa écrit à Annegret Kohler.

    Et, miracle, l’officière accepte de les rencontrer. Luisa est surprise. « Je croyais qu’elle était nouvelle à ce poste. Mais peut-être qu’elle n’a tout bonnement pas vérifié qui on était », dit la jeune femme.

    La même année, en janvier, les deux activistes se rendent à Varsovie. Les drames qui assombrissent la Méditerranée ont fait oublier Frontex : à l’origine, l’agence était surtout censée tenir à l’œil les nouvelles frontières orientales de l’UE, dont le tracé venait d’être redéfini. C’est le ministère de l’intérieur polonais qui offre à l’agence son quartier général de Varsovie, bien loin des institutions de Bruxelles et de Strasbourg, mais à quelques encablures des frontières de la Biélorussie, de l’Ukraine et de la Russie.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott ont rendez-vous avec Annegret Kohler au neuvième étage du gratte-ciel de Frontex, une tour de verre qui domine la place de l’Europe, en plein centre de Varsovie. C’est la première fois qu’ils rencontrent une employée de l’agence en chair et en os. « La discussion s’est avérée fructueuse, bien plus sincère que ce à quoi je m’attendais », se rappelle Luisa.

    Ils évoquent surtout la Hongrie. Annegret Kohler s’est cassé les dents sur la police frontalière de Victor Orbán. « Actuellement, je me demande quelle sorte de pression nous pouvons exercer sur eux », leur confie-t-elle au cours de la discussion.

    Luisa ne s’attendait pas à pouvoir parler si ouvertement avec Annegret Kohler. Celle-ci n’est accompagnée d’aucun attaché de presse, comme c’est pourtant le cas d’habitude.

    En réponse aux critiques qui lui sont adressées, Frontex brandit volontiers son « mécanisme de traitement des plaintes », accessible aux réfugiés sur son site Internet. Mais dans la pratique, cet outil ne pèse en général pas bien lourd.

    En 2018, alors que Frontex avait été en contact avec des centaines de milliers de personnes, l’agence reçoit tout juste dix plaintes. Rares sont ceux qui osent élever la voix. Les individus concernés refusent de donner leur nom, concède Annegret Kohler au fil de la discussion, « parce qu’ils craignent d’être cités dans des documents et de se voir ainsi refuser l’accès aux procédures de demande d’asile ».

    Qui plus est, la plupart des réfugiés ignorent qu’ils ont le droit de se plaindre directement auprès de Frontex, notamment au sujet du processus d’expulsion par avion, également coordonné par l’agence frontalière. Il serait très difficile, toujours selon Kohler, de trouver le bon moment pour sensibiliser les migrants à ce mécanisme de traitement des plaintes : « À quel stade leur en parler ? Avant qu’ils soient reconduits à la frontière, à l’aéroport, ou une fois qu’on les a assis dans l’avion ? »

    Mais c’est bien l’avion qui serait le lieu le plus indiqué. Selon un rapport publié en mars 2019 par les officiers aux droits fondamentaux de Frontex, les employés de l’agence transgresseraient très fréquemment les normes internationales relatives aux droits humains lors de ces « vols d’expulsion » – mais aussi leurs propres directives. Ce document précise que des mineurs sont parfois reconduits aux frontières sans être accompagnés par des adultes, alors qu’une telle procédure est interdite. Le rapport fustige en outre l’utilisation des menottes : « Les bracelets métalliques n’ont pas été employés de manière réglementaire. La situation ne l’exigeait pas toujours. »

    La base juridique de l’agence Frontex lui permet de suspendre une opération lorsque des atteintes aux droits de la personne sont constatées sur place. Mais son directeur, Fabrice Leggeri, ne considère pas que ce soit nécessaire dans le cas de la Hongrie. Car la simple présence de l’agence suffirait à dissuader les policiers hongrois de se montrer violents, a-t-il répondu dans une lettre adressée à des organisations non gouvernementales qui réclamaient un retrait des équipes présentes en Hongrie. Sans compter qu’avoir des employés de Frontex sur place pourrait au moins permettre de documenter certains incidents.

    Même une procédure en manquement lancée par la Commission européenne contre la Hongrie et un jugement de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme n’ont rien changé à la position de Frontex. Les lois hongroises en matière de demande d’asile et les expulsions pratiquées dans ce pays ont beau être contraires à la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, l’agence n’accepte pas pour autant d’interrompre ses opérations sur place.

    Et les garde-frontières hongrois se déchaînent sous l’œil indifférent de Frontex.

    Surveiller pour renvoyer

    Le débat sur les sauvetages en Méditerranée et la répartition des réfugiés entre les pays membres constitue une épreuve de vérité pour l’UE. Les négociations censées mener à une réforme du système d’asile commun stagnent depuis des années. Le seul point sur lequel la politique européenne est unanime : donner à Frontex plus d’argent et donc plus d’agents, plus de bateaux, plus d’équipements.

    Voilà ce qui explique que l’UE, un mois avant le scrutin européen de mai 2019, ait voté en un temps record, via ses institutions, une réforme du règlement relatif à la base juridique de Frontex. Il aura fallu à la Commission, au Parlement et au Conseil à peine six mois pour s’accorder sur une ordonnance longue de 245 pages, déterminante pour les questions de politique sécuritaire et migratoire. Rappelons en comparaison que la réforme du droit d’auteur et le règlement général sur la protection des données, deux chantiers si ardemment controversés, n’avaient pu être adoptés qu’au bout de six ans, du début des concertations à leur mise en œuvre.

    « Au vu des nouvelles habilitations et du contrôle direct qu’exerce Frontex sur son personnel et ses équipements, il est plus important que jamais de forcer l’agence à respecter les lois », affirme Mariana Gkliati, chercheuse en droit européen à l’université de Leyde. « Petit à petit, le mandat des officiers aux droits fondamentaux s’est élargi, mais tant qu’ils n’auront pas à leur disposition suffisamment de personnel et de ressources, ils ne seront pas en mesure de remplir leur rôle. »

    Frontex récuse cette critique.

    « Le bureau des officiers aux droits fondamentaux a été considérablement renforcé au cours des dernières années. Cela va de pair avec l’élargissement de notre mandat, et il est bien évident que cette tendance ne fera que s’accroître au cours des années à venir, déclare Krzysztof Borowski, porte-parole de l’agence. Le bureau prend de l’ampleur à mesure que Frontex grandit. »

    Mais le travail des officiers aux droits fondamentaux s’annonce encore plus épineux. Car Frontex s’efforce de réduire le plus possible tout contact direct avec les migrants aux frontières extérieures de l’Europe. En suivant cette logique : si Frontex n’est pas présente sur place, personne ne pourra lui reprocher quoi que ce soit dans le cas où des atteintes aux droits humains seraient constatées. Ce qui explique que l’agence investisse massivement dans les systèmes de surveillance, et notamment Eurosur, vaste programme de surveillance aérienne.

    Depuis l’an dernier, Frontex, non contente de recevoir des images fournies par ses propres satellites de reconnaissance et par le constructeur aéronautique Airbus, en récolte aussi grâce à ses drones de reconnaissance.

    Eurosur relie Frontex à l’ensemble des services de garde-frontières des 28 États membres de l’UE. De concert avec l’élargissement d’autres banques de données européennes, comme celle de l’agence de gestion informatique eu-Lisa, destinée à collecter les informations personnelles de millions de voyageurs, l’UE met ainsi en place une banque de données qu’elle voudrait infaillible.

    Son but : aucun passage de frontière aux portes de l’Europe – et à plus forte raison en Méditerranée – ne doit échapper à Frontex. Or, la surveillance depuis les airs permet d’appréhender les réfugiés là où la responsabilité de Frontex n’est pas encore engagée. C’est du moins ce dont est persuadé Matthias Monroy, assistant parlementaire du député de gauche allemand Andrej Hunko, qui scrute depuis des années le comportement de Frontex en Méditerranée. « C’est là que réside à mon sens l’objectif de ces missions : fournir aux garde-côtes libyens des coordonnées permettant d’intercepter ces embarcations le plus tôt possible sur leur route vers l’Europe. »

    Autre exemple, cette fois-ci dans les Balkans : depuis mai 2019, des garde-frontières issus de douze pays de l’UE sont déployés dans le cadre d’une mission Frontex le long de la frontière entre l’Albanie et la Grèce – mais côté albanais. Ce qui leur permet de bénéficier de l’immunité contre toute poursuite civile et juridique en Grèce.

    Forte de ses nouvelles habilitations, Frontex pourrait bientôt poster ses propres agents frontaliers au Niger, en Tunisie ou même en Libye. L’agence collaborerait alors avec des pays où les droits humains ont une importance quasi nulle.

    Qu’à cela ne tienne : Luisa Izuzquiza va tout faire pour suivre cette évolution, en continuant à envoyer ses demandes d’information au contrôleur Frontex. Même s’il faut le contrôler jusqu’en Afrique. Et même si le combat doit être encore plus féroce.

    Mais de petits succès se font sentir : en mars 2016, l’UE négocie une solution avec la Turquie pour endiguer les flux de réfugiés en mer Égée. La Turquie se chargera de bloquer les migrants ; en contrepartie, l’UE lui promet des aides de plusieurs milliards d’euros pour s’occuper des personnes échouées sur son territoire.

    Cet accord entre l’UE et la Turquie a suscité de nombreuses critiques. Mais peut-être faut-il rappeler qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un accord en bonne et due forme, et que l’UE n’a rien signé. Ce que les médias ont qualifié de « deal » a simplement consisté en une négociation entre le Conseil de l’Europe, c’est-à-dire les États membres, et la Turquie. Le fameux accord n’existe pas, seul un communiqué officiel a été publié.

    Cela veut dire que les réfugiés expulsés de Grèce pour être ensuite acheminés vers la Turquie, en vertu du fameux « deal », n’ont presque aucun moyen de s’opposer à cet accord fantôme. Grâce à une demande relevant de la liberté de l’information, Luisa Izuzquiza est tout de même parvenue à obtenir l’expertise juridique sur laquelle s’est fondée la Commission européenne pour vérifier, par précaution, la validité légale de son « accord ». Ce qui s’est révélé avantageux pour les avocats de deux demandeurs d’asile ayant déposé plainte contre le Conseil de l’Europe.

    Luisa Izuzquiza et Arne Semsrott auront attendu un an et demi. En juillet dernier, l’heure a enfin sonné. Dans la « salle bleue » de la Cour de justice européenne, à Luxembourg, va avoir lieu la première négociation portant sur le volume d’informations que Frontex sera tenue de fournir au public sur son action.

    Il y a quelques années, Frontex rejetait encore les demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information sans invoquer aucun argument juridique. Ce jour-là, Frontex se présente au tribunal avec cinq avocats, secondés par un capitaine des garde-côtes finnois. « Il s’agit pour nous de sauver des vies humaines », plaide l’un des avocats à la barre, face au banc des juges, dans un anglais mâtiné d’accent allemand. Et justement, pour protéger des vies humaines, il est nécessaire de garder secrètes les informations qui touchent au travail de Frontex. L’avocat exige que la plainte soit rejetée.

    Après la séance de juillet, la Cour a maintenant quelques mois pour statuer sur l’issue de l’affaire. Si les activistes sortent vainqueurs, ils sauront quels bateaux l’agence Frontex a déployés en Méditerranée deux ans plus tôt, dans le cadre d’une mission qui n’existe plus. Dans le cas d’une décision défavorable à Frontex, l’agence redoute de devoir révéler des informations sur ses navires en activité, ce qui permettrait de suivre leurs mouvements. Mais rien n’est moins vrai. Car la flotte de Frontex a tout bonnement pour habitude de couper les transpondeurs permettant aux navires d’indiquer leur position et leur itinéraire par satellite.

    Mais c’est une autre question qui est en jeu face à la cour de Luxembourg : l’agence européenne devra-t-elle rendre des comptes à l’opinion publique, ou pourra-t-elle garder ses opérations sous le sceau du secret ? Frontex fait l’objet de nombreuses accusations, et il est très difficile de déterminer lesquelles d’entre elles sont justifiées.

    « Pour moi, les demandes relevant de la liberté de l’information constituent une arme contre l’impuissance, déclare Arne Semsrott. L’une des seules armes que les individus peuvent brandir contre la toute-puissance des institutions, même quand ils ont tout perdu. »

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160819/peut-controler-les-controles-de-frontex
    #frontières #migrations #réfugiés #asile #sauvetage #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #droits_humains #pouvoir #Serbie #Nigeria #Cap-Vert #externalisation #agents_de_liaison #Turquie #contrôle_parlementaire

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • Sicilian fishermen risk prison to rescue migrants: ‘No human would turn away’

    A father and son describe what it’s like to hear desperate cries on the sea at night as Italy hardens its stance against incomers.

    Captain #Carlo_Giarratano didn’t think twice when, late last month, during a night-time fishing expedition off the coast of Libya, he heard desperate cries of help from 50 migrants aboard a dinghy that had run out of fuel and was taking on water. The 36-year-old Sicilian lives by the law of the sea. He reached the migrants and offered them all the food and drink he had. While his father Gaspare coordinated the aid effort from land, Carlo waited almost 24 hours for an Italian coastguard ship that finally transferred the migrants to Sicily.

    News of that rescue spread around the world, because not only was it kind, it was brave. Ever since Italy’s far-right interior minister, Matteo Salvini, closed Italian ports to rescue ships, the Giarratanos have known that such an act could land them with a hefty fine or jail. But if confronted with the same situation again, they say they’d do it all over 1,000 times.

    “No seaman would ever return to port without the certainty of having saved those lives,” says Carlo, whose family has sailed the Mediterranean for four generations. “If I had ignored those cries for help, I wouldn’t have had the courage to face the sea again.”

    I meet the Giarratanos at the port of #Sciacca, a fishing village on the southwestern coast of Sicily. I know the town like the back of my hand, having been born and raised there among the low-rise, colourful homes built atop an enormous cliff overlooking the sea. I remember the Giarratanos from the days I’d skip school with my friends and secretly take to the sea aboard a small fishing boat. We’d stay near the pier and wait for the large vessels returning from several days of fishing along the Libyan coast.

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/40f43502497ca769131cd927a804fd478c18bbc5/0_274_6720_4032/master/6720.jpg?width=880&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=e0e5c05662b6fb682bf3a5

    Those men were our heroes, with their tired eyes, sunburnt skin and ships overflowing with fish. We wanted to be like them, because in my hometown those men – heroic and adventurous like Lord Jim, rough and fearless like Captain Ahab, stubborn and nostalgic like Hemingway’s “Old Man” Santiago – are not simply fishermen; they are demigods, mortals raised to a divine rank.

    Fishermen in Sciacca are the only ones authorised to carry, barefoot, the one-tonne statue of the Madonna del Soccorso during religious processions. Legend has it that the statue was found at sea and therefore the sea has a divine nature: ignoring its laws, for Sicilian people, means ignoring God. That’s why the fishing boats generally bear the names of saints and apostles – except for the Giarratanos’, which is called the Accursio Giarratano.

    “He was my son,” says Gaspare, his eyes swelling with tears. “He died in 2002 from a serious illness. He was 15. Now he guides me at sea. And since then, with every rescue, Accursio is present.”

    Having suffered such a loss themselves, they cannot bear the thought of other families, other parents, other brothers, enduring the same pain. So whenever they see people in need, they rescue them.

    “Last November we saved 149 migrants in the same area,” says Carlo. “But that rescue didn’t make news because the Italian government, which in any case had already closed the ports to rescue ships, still hadn’t passed the security decree.”

    In December 2018 the Italian government approved a security decree targeting asylum rights. The rules left hundreds in legal limbo by removing humanitarian protection for those not eligible for refugee status but otherwise unable to return home, and were applied by several Italian cities soon afterwards. Then, in June, Rome passed a new bill, once again drafted by Salvini, that punished non-governmental organisation rescue boats bringing migrants to Italy without permission with fines of up to €50,000 and possible imprisonment for crew members.

    “I’d be lying if I told you I didn’t think I might end up in prison when I saw that dinghy in distress,” says Carlo. “But I knew in my heart that a dirty conscience would have been worse than prison. I would have been haunted until my death, and maybe even beyond, by those desperate cries for help.” It was 3am when Giarratano and his crew located the dinghy in the waters between Malta and Libya, where the Giarratanos have cast their nets for scabbard fish for more than 50 years. The migrants had left Libya the previous day, but their dinghy had quickly run into difficulty.

    “We threw them a pail to empty the water,” says Carlo. “We had little food – just melba toast and water. But they needed it more than we did. Then I alerted the authorities. I told them I wouldn’t leave until the last migrant was safe. This is what we sailors do. If there are people in danger at sea, we save them, without asking where they come from or the colour of their skin.”

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fc15a50ae9797116761b7a8f379af4a644092435/0_224_6720_4032/master/6720.jpg?width=880&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=2af0085ebcf8bf6634dedc

    Malta was the nearest EU country, but the Maltese coastguard appears not to have responded to the SOS. Hours passed and the heat became unbearable. From land, Gaspare asked Carlo to wait while he contacted the press. Weighing on his mind was not only the duty to rescue the people, but also, as a father, to protect his son.

    “I wonder if even one of our politicians has ever heard desperate cries for help at high sea in the black of night,” Gaspare says. “I wonder what they would have done. No human being – sailor or not – would have turned away.” The Italian coastguard patrol boat arrived after almost 24 hours and the migrants were transferred to Sicily, where they disembarked a few days later.

    “They had no life vests or food,” says Carlo. “They ran out of fuel and their dinghy would have lost air in a few hours. If you decide to cross the sea in those conditions, then you’re willing to die. It means that what you’re leaving behind is even worse, hell.”

    Carlo reached Sciacca the following day. He was given a hero’s welcome from the townspeople and Italian press. Gaspare was there, too, eager to embrace his son. Shy and reserved, Carlo answered their questions.

    He doesn’t want to be a hero, he says, he was just doing his duty.

    “When the migrants were safely aboard the coastguard ship, they all turned to us in a gesture of gratitude, hands on their hearts. That’s the image I’ll carry with me for the rest of my life, which will allow me to face the sea every day without regret.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/03/sicilian-fishermen-risk-prison-to-rescue-migrants-off-libya-italy-salvi
    #sauvetage #pêcheurs #Sicile #pêcheurs_siciliens #délit_de_solidarité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Italie #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #Gaspare_Giarratano #Giarratano #témoignage

  • Militarisation des frontières en #Mer_Egée

    En Mer Egée c’est exactement la même stratégie qui se met en place, et notamment à #Samos, où une #zeppelin (#zeppelin_de_surveillance) de #Frontex surveillera le détroit entre l’île et la côte turque, afin de signaler tout départ de bateaux. L’objectif est d’arrêter « à temps » les embarcations des réfugiés en les signalant aux garde-corps turques. Comme l’a dit le vice-ministre de l’immigration Koumoutsakos « on saura l’heure de départ de l’embarcation, on va en informer les turques, on s’approcher du bateau... »
    S’approcher pourquoi faire, sinon, pour le repousser vers la côte turque ?
    Le fonctionnement de la montgolfière sera confié aux garde-cotes et à la police grecque, l’opération restant sous le contrôle de Frontex.

    –-> reçu via la mailing-list de Migreurop, le 30.07.2017

    #militarisation_des_frontières #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Turquie #Grèce #migrations #réfugiés #asile #police #gardes-côtes #surveillance

    –-----------

    Commentaire de Martin Clavey sur twitter :

    Cynisme absolu : Frontex utilise des drones pour surveiller les migrants en méditerranée ce qui permet à l’Union européenne de ne pas utiliser de bateau de surveillance et donc ne pas être soumis au #droit_maritime et à avoir à les sauver

    https://twitter.com/mart1oeil/status/1158396604648493058

    • Σε δοκιμαστική λειτουργία το αερόσταστο της FRONTEX

      Σε δοκιμαστική λειτουργία τίθεται από σήμερα για 28 ημέρες το αερόστατο της FRONTEX στη Σάμο, μήκους 35 μέτρων, προσδεμένο στο έδαφος, εξοπλισμένο με ραντάρ, θερμική κάμερα και σύστημα αυτόματης αναγνώρισης, το οποίο θα επιτηρεί αδιάλειπτα και σε πραγματικό χρόνο το θαλάσσιο πεδίο.

      Σύμφωνα με ανακοίνωση του Λιμενικού, στόχος είναι η αστυνόμευση του θαλάσσιου πεδίου και η καταπολέμηση του διασυνοριακού εγκλήματος. Δημιουργείται ωστόσο το ερώτημα αν οι πληροφορίες που θα συλλέγει το αερόστατο θα χρησιμοποιούνται για την αναχαίτιση ή την αποτροπή των πλεούμενων των προσφύγων που ξεκινούν από τα τουρκικά παράλια για να ζητήσουν διεθνή προστασία στην Ευρώπη.

      « Πρώτα απ’ όλα ξέρεις τι ώρα φεύγει από τους διακινητές το σκάφος, ενημερώνεις την τουρκική πλευρά, πηγαίνεις εσύ κοντά, δηλαδή είναι ένα σύνολο ενεργειών » σημείωνε την περασμένη εβδομάδα σε συνέντευξή του στον ΑΝΤ1 ο αναπληρωτής υπουργός Μεταναστευτικής Πολιτικής Γιώργος Κουμουτσάκος, μιλώντας για τα αποτελέσματα που αναμένεται να έχει το αερόστατο στην ενίσχυση της επιτήρησης των συνόρων.

      Το Λιμενικό είναι η πρώτη ακτοφυλακή κράτους-μέλους της Ε.Ε. που χρησιμοποιεί αερόστατο για την επιτήρηση της θάλασσας, δέκα μήνες μετά την πρώτη παρόμοια πανευρωπαϊκή χρήση μη επανδρωμένου αεροσκάφους μεσαίου ύψους μακράς εμβέλειας.

      « Αυτό καταδεικνύει την ισχυρή και ξεκάθαρη βούληση του Λ.Σ.-ΕΛ.ΑΚΤ. να καταβάλει κάθε δυνατή προσπάθεια, χρησιμοποιώντας τη διαθέσιμη τεχνολογία αιχμής, για την αποτελεσματική φύλαξη των εξωτερικών θαλάσσιων συνόρων της Ευρωπαϊκής Ενωσης, την πάταξη κάθε μορφής εγκληματικότητας καθώς και την προστασία της ανθρώπινης ζωής στη θάλασσα », σημειώνει το Λιμενικό.

      Η λειτουργία του αερόστατου εντάσσεται στην επιχείρηση « Ποσειδών » που συντονίζουν το Λιμενικό και η ΕΛ.ΑΣ. υπό την επιτήρηση της FRONTEX.

      Παράλληλα, στο νησί θα τεθεί σε λειτουργία φορτηγό εξοπλισμένο με παρόμοια συστήματα, προκειμένου να μπορούν να συγκριθούν τα αποτελέσματα και η λειτουργία του επίγειου και του εναέριου συστήματος.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/205553_se-dokimastiki-leitoyrgia-aerostasto-tis-frontex

    • Zeppelin over the island of Samos to monitor migrants trafficking

      Greek authorities and the Frontex will release a huge surveillance Zeppelin above the island of Samos to monitor migrants who illegally try to reach Greece and Europe. The installation of the ominous balloon will be certainly a grotesque attraction for the tourists who visit the island in the East Aegean Sea.

      Deputy Minister of Migration Policy Giorgos Koumoutsakos told private ANT1 TV that the Zeppelin will go in operation next week.

      “In Samos, at some point, I think it’s a matter of days or a week, a Zeppelin balloon will be installed in cooperation with FRONTEX, which will take a picture of a huge area. What does that mean? First of all, you know what time the ship moves away from the traffickers, inform the Turkish side, you go near, that is a set of actions,” Koumoutsakos said.

      The Zeppelin will be monitored by the GNR radar unit of the Frontext located at the port of Karlovasi, samiakienimerosi notes adding “It will give a picture of movements between the Turkish coast to Samos for the more effective guarding of our maritime borders.”

      The Deputy Minister did not elaborate on what exactly can the Greek Port Authority do when it comes “near” to the refugee and migrants boats.

      According to daily efimerida ton syntakton, the Norwegian NGO, Aegean Boat Report, revealed a video shot on July 17. The video shows how a Greek Coast Guard vessel approaches a boat with 34 people on board and leaves them at the open sea to be “collected” by Turkish authorities, while the passengers, among them 14 children, desperately are shouting “Not to Turkey!”

      It is not clear, whether the Greek Coast Guard vessel is in international waters as such vessels do not enter Turkish territorial waters. According to international law, the passengers ought to be rescued. The Greek Coast Guard has so far not taken position on the issue, saying it will need to evaluate the video first, efsyn notes.

      “There is no push backs. Everything will be done in accordance with the international law. Greece will do nothing beyond the international law,” Koumoutsakos stressed.

      PS I suppose, tourists will be cheered to have their vacation activities monitored by a plastic Big Brother. Not?

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2019/07/26/zeppelin-samos-migrants-refugees

    • Once migrants on Mediterranean were saved by naval patrols. Now they have to watch as #drones fly over
      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8a92adecf247b04c801a67a612766ee753738437/0_109_4332_2599/master/4332.jpg?width=605&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=c0051d5e4fff6aff063c70

      Amid the panicked shouting from the water and the smell of petrol from the sinking dinghy, the noise of an approaching engine briefly raises hope. Dozens of people fighting for their lives in the Mediterranean use their remaining energy to wave frantically for help. Nearly 2,000 miles away in the Polish capital, Warsaw, a drone operator watches their final moments via a live transmission. There is no ship to answer the SOS, just an unmanned aerial vehicle operated by the European border and coast guard agency, Frontex.

      This is not a scene from some nightmarish future on Europe’s maritime borders but a present-day probability. Frontex, which is based in Warsaw, is part of a £95m investment by the EU in unmanned aerial vehicles, the Observer has learned.

      This spending has come as the EU pulls back its naval missions in the Mediterranean and harasses almost all search-and-rescue charity boats out of the water. Frontex’s surveillance drones are flying over waters off Libya where not a single rescue has been carried out by the main EU naval mission since last August, in what is the deadliest stretch of water in the world.

      The replacement of naval vessels, which can conduct rescues, with drones, which cannot, is being condemned as a cynical abrogation of any European role in saving lives.

      “There is no obligation for drones to be equipped with life-saving appliances and to conduct rescue operations,” said a German Green party MEP, Erik Marquardt. “You need ships for that, and ships are exactly what there is a lack of at the moment.” This year the death rate for people attempting the Mediterranean crossing has risen from a historical average of 2% to as high as 14% last month. In total, 567 of the estimated 8,362 people who have attempted it so far this year have died.

      Gabriele Iacovino, director of one of Italy’s leading thinktanks, the Centre for International Studies, said the move into drones was “a way to spend money without having the responsibility to save lives”. Aerial surveillance without ships in the water amounted to a “naval mission without a naval force”, and was about avoiding embarrassing political rows in Europe over what to do with rescued migrants.

      Since March the EU’s main naval mission in the area, Operation Sophia, has withdrawn its ships from waters where the majority of migrant boats have sunk. While Sophia was not primarily a search-and-rescue mission, it was obliged under international and EU law to assist vessels in distress. The switch to drones is part of an apparent effort to monitor the Mediterranean without being pulled into rescue missions that deliver migrants to European shores.

      Marta Foresti, director of the Human Mobility Initiative at the Overseas Development Institute, an influential UK thinktank, said Europe had replaced migration policy with panic, with potentially lethal consequences. “We panicked in 2015 and that panic has turned into security budgets,” she said. “Frontex’s budget has doubled with very little oversight or design. It’s a knee-jerk reaction.”

      The strategy has seen Frontex, based in Warsaw, and its sister agency, the European Maritime Safety Agency, based in Lisbon, invest in pilotless aerial vehicles. The Observer has found three contracts – two under EMSA and one under Frontex – totalling £95m for drones that can supply intelligence to Frontex.

      The models include the Hermes, made by Elbit Systems, Israel’s biggest privately owned arms manufacturer, and the Heron, produced by Israel Aerospace Industries, a state-owned company. Both models were developed for use in combat missions in the occupied Palestinian territory of Gaza. Frontex said its drone suppliers met all “EU procurement rules and guidelines”.

      There is mounting concern both over how Frontex is spending EU taxpayers’ money and how it can be held accountable. The migration panic roiling Europe’s politics has been a boon for a once unfashionable EU outpost that coordinated national coastal and border guards. Ten years ago Frontex’s budget was £79m. In the latest budget cycle it has been awarded £10.4bn.

      Demand from member states for its services have largely been driven by its role in coordinating and carrying out deportations. The expansion of the deportation machine has caused concern among institutions tasked with monitoring the forced returns missions: a group of national ombudsmen, independent watchdogs appointed in all EU member states to safeguard human rights, has announced plans to begin its own independent monitoring group. The move follows frustration with the way their reports on past missions have been handled by Frontex.

      Andreas Pottakis, Greece’s ombudsman, is among those calling for an end to the agency policing itself: “Internal monitoring of Frontex by Frontex cannot substitute for the need for external monitoring by independent bodies. This is the only way the demand for transparency can be met and that the EU administration can effectively be held into account.”
      Acting to extradite helpless civilians to the hands of Libyan militias may amount to criminal liability

      The Frontex Consultative Forum, a body offering strategic advice to Frontex’s management board on how the agency can improve respect for fundamental rights, has also severely criticised it for a sloppy approach to accountability. An online archive of all Frontex operations, which was used by independent researchers, was recently removed.

      The switch to drones in the Mediterranean has also led to Frontex being accused of feeding intelligence on the position of migrant boats to Libya’s coast guards so they can intercept and return them to Libya. Although it receives EU funds, the Libyan coast guard remains a loosely defined outfit that often overlaps with smuggling gangs and detention centre owners.

      “The Libyan coast guard never patrols the sea,” said Tamino Böhm of the German rescue charity Sea-Watch. “They never leave port unless there is a boat to head to for a pullback. This means the information they have comes from the surveillance flights of Italy, Frontex and the EU.”

      A Frontex spokesperson said that incidents related to boats in distress were passed to the “responsible rescue coordination centre and to the neighbouring ones for situational awareness and potential coordination”. Thus the maritime rescue coordination centre in Rome has begun to share information with its Libyan counterpart in Tripoli, under the instructions of Italy’s far-right interior minister, Matteo Salvini.

      The EU is already accused of crimes against humanity in a submission before the International Criminal Court for “orchestrating a policy of forced transfer to concentration camp-like detention facilities [in Libya] where atrocious crimes are committed”.

      The case, brought by lawyers based in Paris, seeks to demonstrate that many of the people intercepted have faced human rights abuses ranging from slavery to torture and murder after being returned to Libya.

      Omer Shatz, an Israeli who teaches at Sciences Po university in Paris, and one of the two lawyers who brought the ICC case, said Frontex drone operators could be criminally liable for aiding pullbacks. “A drone operator that is aware of a migrant boat in distress is obliged to secure fundamental rights to life, body integrity, liberty and dignity. This means she has to take actions intended to search, rescue and disembark those rescued at safe port. Acting to extradite helpless vulnerable civilians to the hands of Libyan militias may amount to criminal liability.”

      Under international law, migrants rescued at sea by European vessels cannot be returned to Libya, where conflict and human rights abuses mean the UN has stated there is no safe port. Under the UN convention on the law of the sea (Unclos) all ships are obliged to report an encounter with a vessel in distress and offer assistance. This is partly why EU naval missions that were not mandated to conduct rescue missions found themselves pitched into them regardless.

      Drones, however, operate in a legal grey zone not covered by Unclos. The situation for private contractors to EU agencies, as in some of the current drone operations, is even less clear.

      Frontex told the Observer that all drone operators, staff or private contractors are subject to EU laws that mandate the protection of human life. The agency said it was unable to share a copy of the mission instructions given to drone operators that would tell them what to do in the event of encountering a boat in distress, asking the Observer to submit a freedom of information request. The agency said drones had encountered boats in distress on only four occasions – all in June this year – in the central Mediterranean, and that none had led to a “serious incident report” – Frontex jargon for a red flag. When EU naval vessels were deployed in similar areas in previous years, multiple serious incidents were reported every month, according to documents seen by the Observer.

      https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/04/drones-replace-patrol-ships-mediterranean-fears-more-migrant-deaths

      #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #Libye

    • L’uso dei droni per guardare i migranti che affogano mette a nudo tutta la disumanità delle pratiche di controllo sui confini

      In troppi crediamo al mito di una frontiera dal volto umano, solo perché ci spaventa guardare in faccia la realtà macchiata di sangue.

      “Se avessi ignorato quelle grida di aiuto, non avrei mai più trovato il coraggio di affrontare il mare”.

      Con queste parole il pescatore siciliano Carlo Giarratano ha commentato la sua decisione di sfidare il “decreto sicurezza” del Governo italiano, che prevede sanzioni o l’arresto nei confronti di chiunque trasporti in Italia migranti soccorsi in mare.

      La sua storia è un esempio della preoccupante tensione che si è creata ai confini della “Fortezza Europa” in materia di leggi e regolamenti. Secondo il diritto internazionale, il capitano di un’imbarcazione in mare è tenuto a fornire assistenza alle persone in difficoltà, “a prescindere dalla nazionalità o dalla cittadinanza delle persone stesse”. Al contempo, molti paesi europei, e la stessa UE, stanno cercando di limitare questo principio e queste attività, malgrado il tragico bilancio di morti nel Mediterraneo, in continua crescita.

      L’Agenzia di Confine e Guardia Costiera Europea, Frontex, sembra aver escogitato una soluzione ingegnosa: i droni. L’obbligo legale di aiutare un’imbarcazione in difficoltà non si applica a un veicolo aereo senza pilota (UAV, unmanned aerial vehicle). Si può aggirare la questione, politicamente calda, su chi sia responsabile di accogliere i migranti soccorsi, se questi semplicemente non vengono proprio soccorsi. Questo principio fa parte di una consolidata tendenza a mettere in atto politiche finalizzate a impedire che i migranti attraversino il Mediterraneo. Visto l’obbligo di soccorrere le persone che ci chiedono aiuto, la soluzione sembra essere questa: fare in modo di non sentire le loro richieste.

      Jean-Claude Juncker sostiene che le politiche europee di presidio ai confini sono concepite per “stroncare il business dei trafficanti”, perché nella moralità egocentrica che ispira la politica di frontiera europea, se non ci fossero trafficanti non ci sarebbero migranti.

      Ma non ci sono trafficanti che si fabbricano migranti in officina. Se le rotte ufficiali sono bloccate, le persone vanno a cercare quelle non ufficiali. Rendere la migrazione più difficile, ha fatto aumentare la richiesta di trafficanti e scafisti, certamente non l’ha fermata. Invece che stroncare il loro business, queste politiche lo hanno creato.

      Secondo la logica della foglia di fico, l’UE sostiene di non limitarsi a lasciare affogare i migranti, ma di fornire supporto alla guardia costiera libica perché intercetti le imbarcazioni che tentano la traversata e riporti le persone nei campi di detenzione in Libia.

      Ma il rapporto del Global Detention Project, a proposito delle condizioni in questi campi, riferisce: “I detenuti sono spesso sottoposti a gravi abusi e violenze, compresi stupri e torture, estorsioni, lavori forzati, schiavitù, condizioni di vita insopportabili, esecuzioni sommarie.” Human Rights Watch, in un rapporto intitolato Senza via di fuga dall’Inferno, descrive situazioni di sovraffollamento e malnutrizione e riporta testimonianze di bambini picchiati dalle guardie.

      L’Irish Times ha riportato accuse secondo cui le milizie associate con il GNA (Governo Libico di Alleanza Nazionale, riconosciuto dall’ONU), starebbero immagazzinando munizioni in questi campi e userebbero i rifugiati come “scudi umani”. Sembra quasi inevitabile, quindi, la notizia che il 3 luglio almeno 53 rifugiati sono stati uccisi durante un attacco dei ribelli appartenenti all’Esercito Nazionale Libico, nel campo di detenzione di Tajura, vicino a Tripoli.

      Secondo una testimonianza riportata dall’Associated Press, a Tajura i migranti erano costretti a pulire le armi delle milizie fedeli al GNA, armi che erano immagazzinate nel campo. Secondo i racconti di testimoni oculari dell’attacco, riportati dalle forze ONU, le guardie del campo avrebbero aperto il fuoco su chi tentava di scappare.

      Nel mondo occidentale, quando parliamo di immigrazione, tendiamo a focalizzarci sul cosiddetto “impatto sulle comunità” causato dai flussi di nuovi arrivati che si muovono da un posto all’altro.

      Nelle nostre discussioni, ci chiediamo se i migranti portino un guadagno per l’economia oppure intacchino risorse già scarse. Raramente ci fermiamo a guardare nella sua cruda e tecnica realtà la concreta applicazione del controllo alle frontiere, quando si traduce davvero in fucili e filo spinato.

      Ci ripetiamo che i costi vanno tutti in un’unica direzione: secondo la nostra narrazione preferita, i controlli di confine sono tutti gratis, è lasciare entrare i migranti la cosa che costa. Ma i costi da pagare ci sono sempre: non solo il tributo di morti che continua a crescere o i budget multimilionari e sempre in aumento delle nostre agenzie di frontiera, ma anche i costi morali e sociali che finiamo con l’estorcere a noi stessi.

      L’ossessione per la sicurezza dei confini deve fare i conti con alcune delle più antiche e radicate convinzioni etiche proprie delle società occidentali. Prendersi cura del più debole, fare agli altri quello che vogliamo sia fatto a noi, aiutare chi possiamo. Molti uomini e donne che lavorano in mare, quando soccorrono dei naufraghi non sono spinti solo da una legge che li obbliga a prestare aiuto, ma anche da un imperativo morale più essenziale. “Lo facciamo perché siamo gente di mare”, ha detto Giarratano al Guardian, “in mare, se ci sono persone in pericolo, le salviamo”.

      Ma i nostri governi hanno deciso che questo non vale per gli europei. Come se fosse una perversa sfida lanciata a istinti morali vecchi di migliaia di anni, nell’Europa moderna un marinaio che salva un migrante mentre sta per affogare, deve essere punito.

      Infrangere queste reti di reciproche responsabilità fra gli esseri umani, ha dei costi: divisioni e tensioni sociali. Ed è un amaro paradosso, perché proprio argomenti di questo genere sono in testa alle nostre preoccupazioni percepite quando si parla di migrazioni. E mentre l’UE fa di tutto per respingere un fronte del confine verso i deserti del Nord Africa, cercando di tenere i corpi dei rifugiati abbastanza lontani da non farceli vedere da vicino, intanto l’altro fronte continua a spingere verso di noi. L’Europa diventa un “ambiente ostile” e quindi noi diventiamo un popolo ostile.

      Ci auto-ingaggiamo come guardie di confine al nostro interno. Padroni di casa, infermiere, insegnanti, manager – ogni relazione sociale deve essere controllata. Il nostro regime di “frontiera quotidiana” crea “comunità sospette” all’interno della nostra società: sono persone sospette per il solo fatto di esistere e, nei loro confronti, si possono chiamare le forze dell’ordine in ogni momento, “giusto per dare un’occhiata”.

      Il confine non è solo un sistema per tenere gli estranei fuori dalla nostra società, ma per marchiare per sempre le persone come estranee, anche all’interno e per legittimare ufficialmente il pregiudizio, per garantire che “l’integrazione” – il Sacro Graal della narrazione progressista sull’immigrazione – resti illusoria e irrealizzabile, uno scherzo crudele giocato sulla pelle di persone destinate a rimanere etichettate come straniere e sospette. La nostra società nel suo insieme si mette al servizio di questo insaziabile confine, fino a definire la sua vera e propria identità nella capacità di respingere le persone.

      Malgrado arrivino continuamente immagini e notizie di tragedie e di morti, i media evitano di collegarle con le campagne di opinione che amplificano le cosiddette “legittime preoccupazioni” della gente e le trasformano in un inattaccabile “comune buon senso”.

      I compromessi che reggono le politiche di controllo dei confini non vengono messi in luce. Questo ci permette di guardare da un’altra parte, non perché siamo crudeli ma perché non possiamo sopportare di vedere quello che stiamo facendo. Ci sono persone e gruppi che, come denuncia Adam Serwer in un articolo su The Atlantic, sono proprio “Focalizzati sulla Crudeltà”. E anche se noi non siamo così, viviamo comunque nel loro stesso mondo, un mondo in cui degli esseri umani annegano e noi li guardiamo dall’alto dei nostri droni senza pilota, mentre lo stato punisce chi cerca di salvarli.

      In troppi crediamo nel mito di una frontiera dal volto umano, solo perché ci spaventa guardare in faccia la tragica e insanguinata realtà del concreto controllo quotidiano sui confini. E comunque, se fosse possibile, non avremmo ormai risolto questa contraddizione? Il fatto che non lo abbiamo fatto dovrebbe portarci a pensare che non ne siamo capaci e che ci si prospetta una cruda e desolante scelta morale per il futuro.

      D’ora in poi, il numero dei migranti non può che aumentare. I cambiamenti climatici saranno determinanti. La scelta di non respingerli non sarà certamente gratis: non c’è modo di condividere le nostre risorse con altri senza sostenere dei costi. Ma se non lo facciamo, scegliamo consapevolmente i naufragi, gli annegamenti, i campi di detenzione, scegliamo di destinare queste persone ad una vita da schiavi in zone di guerra. Scegliamo l’ambiente ostile. Scegliamo di “difendere il nostro stile di vita” semplicemente accettando di vivere a fianco di una popolazione sempre in aumento fatta di rifugiati senza patria, ammassati in baracche di lamiera e depositi soffocanti, sfiniti fino alla disperazione.

      Ma c’è un costo che, alla fine, giudicheremo troppo alto da pagare? Per il momento, sembra di no: ma, … cosa siamo diventati?

      https://dossierlibia.lasciatecientrare.it/luso-dei-droni-per-guardare-i-migranti-che-affogano-m

    • Et aussi... l’utilisation de moins en moins de #bateaux et de plus en plus de #avions a le même effet...

      Sophia : The EU naval mission without any ships

      Launched in 2015 to combat human smuggling in the Mediterranean, the operation has been all but dismantled, symbolizing European division on immigration policy.


      The Italian air base of Sigonella extends its wire fencing across the green and yellow fields of Sicily, 25 kilometers inland from the island’s coastline. Only the enormous cone of Mount Etna, visible in the distance, stands out over this flat land. Posters depicting a sniper taking aim indicate that this is a restricted-access military zone with armed surveillance.

      Inside, there is an enormous city with deserted avenues, runways and hangars. This is the departure point for aircraft patrolling the Central Mediterranean as part of EU Naval Force Mediterranean Operation Sophia, Europe’s military response to the human smuggling rings, launched in 2015. But since March of this year, the planes have been a reflection of a mutilated mission: Sophia is now a naval operation without any ships.

      The Spanish detachment in #Sigonella has just rotated some of its personnel. A group of newly arrived soldiers are being trained in a small room inside one of the makeshift containers where the group of 39 military members work. The aircraft that they use is standing just a few meters away, on a sun-drenched esplanade that smells of fuel. The plane has been designed for round-the-clock maritime surveillance, and it has a spherical infrared camera fitted on its nose that allows it to locate and identify seagoing vessels, as well as to detect illegal trafficking of people, arms and oil.

      If the EU had systematically shown more solidarity with Italy [...] Italian voters would not have made a dramatic swing to the far right

      Juan Fernando López Aguilar, EU Civil Liberties Committee

      This aircraft was also made to assist in sea rescues. But this activity is no longer taking place, now that there are no ships in the mission. Six aircraft are all that remain of Operation Sophia, which has been all but dismantled. Nobody would venture to say whether its mandate will be extended beyond the current deadline of September 30.

      The planes at Sigonella continue to patrol the Central Mediterranean and collect information to meet the ambitious if vague goal that triggered the mission back at the height of the refugee crisis: “To disrupt the business of human and weapons smuggling.” The operation’s most controversial task is still being carried out as well: training Libya’s Coast Guard so they will do the job of intercepting vessels filled with people fleeing Libyan war and chaos, and return them to the point of departure. Even official sources of Europe’s diplomatic service admitted, in a written reply, that the temporary suspension of naval assets “is not optimal,” and that the mission’s ability to fulfill its mandate “is more limited.”

      In these four years, the mission has had some tangible achievements: the arrest of 151 individuals suspected of human trafficking and smuggling, and the destruction of 551 boats used by criminal networks. Operation Sophia has also inspected three ships and seized banned goods; it has made radio contact with 2,462 vessels to check their identity, and made 161 friendly approaches. For European diplomats, the mission has been mainly useful in “significantly reducing smugglers’ ability to operate in high seas” and has generally contributed to “improving maritime safety and stability in the Central Mediterranean.”

      Sophia’s main mission was never to rescue people at sea, yet in these last years it has saved 45,000 lives, following the maritime obligation to aid people in distress. The reason why it has been stripped of its ships – a move that has been strongly criticized by non-profit groups – can be found 800 kilometers north of Sicily, in Rome, and also in the offices of European politicians. Last summer, Italy’s far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini began to apply a closed-port policy for ships carrying rescued migrants unless a previous relocation agreement existed with other countries. Salvini first targeted the non-profit groups performing sea rescues, and then he warned his European colleagues that Italy, which is leading the EU mission, would refuse to take in all the rescued migrants without first seeing a change in EU policy. A year later, no European deal has emerged, and every time a rescue is made, the issue of who takes in the migrants is negotiated on an ad hoc basis.

      Operation Sophia has saved 45,000 lives

      Although arrivals through this route have plummeted, Salvini insists that “Italy is not willing to accept all the migrants who arrive in Europe.” Political division among member states has had an effect on the European military mission. “Sophia has not been conducting rescues since August 2018,” says Matteo Villa, a migration expert at Italy’s Institute for International Policy Studies (ISPI). “Nobody in the EU wanted to see a mission ship with migrants on board being refused port entry, so the ‘solution’ was to suspend Sophia’s naval tasks.”

      The decision to maintain the operation without any ships was made at the last minute in March, in a move that prevented the dismantling of the mission just ahead of the European elections. “Operation Sophia has helped save lives, although that was not its main objective. It was a mistake for [the EU] to leave it with nothing but airplanes, without the ships that were able to save lives,” says Matteo de Bellis, a migration and refugee expert at Amnesty International. “What they are doing now, training the Libyans, only serves to empower the forces that intercept refugees and migrants and return them to Libya, where they face arbitrary detention in centers where there is torture, exploitation and rape.”

      Ever since the great maritime rescue operation developed by Italy in 2013, the Mare Nostrum, which saved 150,000 people, its European successors have been less ambitious in scope and their goals more focused on security and border patrolling. This is the case with Sophia, which by training the Libyan Coast Guard is contributing to the increasingly clear strategy of outsourcing EU migratory control, even to a country mired in chaos and war. “If Europe reduces search-and-rescue operations and encourages Libya to conduct them in its place, then it is being an accomplice to the violations taking place in Libya,” says Catherine Wollard, secretary general of the non-profit network integrated in the European Council of Refugees and Exiles (ECRE).

      Training the Libyans only serves to empower the forces that intercept refugees and migrants and return them to Libya, where they face torture, exploitation and rape

      Matteo de Bellis, Amnesty International

      The vision offered by official European sources regarding the training of the Libyan Coast Guard, and about Operation Sophia in general, is very different when it comes to reducing mortality on the Mediterranean’s most deadly migration route. “Operation Sophia was launched to fight criminal human smuggling networks that put lives at risk in the Central Mediterranean,” they say in a written response. European officials are aware of what is going on in Libya, but their response to the accusations of abuse perpetrated by the Libyan Coast Guard and the situation of migrants confined in detention centers in terrible conditions, is the following: “Everything that happens in Libyan territorial waters is Libya’s responsibility, not Europe’s, yet we are not looking the other way. […] Through Operation Sophia we have saved lives, fought traffickers and trained the Libyan Coast Guard […]. We are performing this last task because substantial loss of life at sea is taking place within Libyan territorial waters. That is why it is very important for Libya’s Coast Guard and Navy to know how to assist distressed migrants in line with international law and humanitarian standards. Also, because the contribution of Libya’s Coast Guard in the fight against traffickers operating in their waters is indispensable.”

      Criticism of Operation Sophia is also coming from the European Parliament, which funded the trip that made this feature story possible. Juan Fernando López Aguilar, president of the parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, attacks the decision to strip Sophia of its naval resources. The Socialist Party (PSOE) politician says that this decision was made “in the absolute absence of a global approach to the migration phenomenon that would include cooperative coordination of all the resources at member states’ disposal, such as development aid in Africa, cooperation with origin and transit countries, hirings in countries of origin and the creation of legal ways to access the EU. Now that would dismantle [the mafias’] business model,” he says.

      López Aguilar says that the EU is aware of Italy’s weariness of the situation, considering that “for years it dealt with a migratory pressure that exceeded its response capacity.” Between 2014 and 2017, around 624,000 people landed on Italy’s coasts. “If they EU had systematically shown more solidarity with Italy, if relocation programs for people in hotspots had been observed, very likely Italian voters would not have made a dramatic swing giving victory to the far right, nor would we have reached a point where a xenophobic closed-port narrative is claimed to represent the salvation of Italian interests.”

      Miguel Urbán, a European Member of Parliament for the Spanish leftist party Unidas Podemos, is highly critical of the way the EU has been managing immigration. He talks about a “militarization of the Mediterranean” and describes European policy as bowing to “the far right’s strategy.” He blames Italy’s attitude for turning Sophia into “an operation in the Mediterranean without a naval fleet. What the Italian government gets out of this is to rid itself of its humanitarian responsibility to disembark migrants on its coasts.”

      For now, no progress has been made on the underlying political problem of disembarkation and, by extension, on the long-delayed reform of the Dublin Regulation to balance out frontline states’ responsibility in taking in refugees with solidarity from other countries. Sophia will continue to hobble along until September after being all but given up for dead in March. After that, everything is still up in the air.

      https://elpais.com/elpais/2019/08/29/inenglish/1567088519_215547.html
      #Sophie #Opération_Sophia #Sicile

    • L’uso dei droni per guardare i migranti che affogano mette a nudo tutta la disumanità delle pratiche di controllo sui confini

      In troppi crediamo al mito di una frontiera dal volto umano, solo perché ci spaventa guardare in faccia la realtà macchiata di sangue.

      “Se avessi ignorato quelle grida di aiuto, non avrei mai più trovato il coraggio di affrontare il mare”.

      Con queste parole il pescatore siciliano Carlo Giarratano ha commentato la sua decisione di sfidare il “decreto sicurezza” del Governo italiano, che prevede sanzioni o l’arresto nei confronti di chiunque trasporti in Italia migranti soccorsi in mare.

      La sua storia è un esempio della preoccupante tensione che si è creata ai confini della “Fortezza Europa” in materia di leggi e regolamenti. Secondo il diritto internazionale, il capitano di un’imbarcazione in mare è tenuto a fornire assistenza alle persone in difficoltà, “a prescindere dalla nazionalità o dalla cittadinanza delle persone stesse”. Al contempo, molti paesi europei, e la stessa UE, stanno cercando di limitare questo principio e queste attività, malgrado il tragico bilancio di morti nel Mediterraneo, in continua crescita.

      L’Agenzia di Confine e Guardia Costiera Europea, Frontex, sembra aver escogitato una soluzione ingegnosa: i droni. L’obbligo legale di aiutare un’imbarcazione in difficoltà non si applica a un veicolo aereo senza pilota (UAV, unmanned aerial vehicle). Si può aggirare la questione, politicamente calda, su chi sia responsabile di accogliere i migranti soccorsi, se questi semplicemente non vengono proprio soccorsi. Questo principio fa parte di una consolidata tendenza a mettere in atto politiche finalizzate a impedire che i migranti attraversino il Mediterraneo. Visto l’obbligo di soccorrere le persone che ci chiedono aiuto, la soluzione sembra essere questa: fare in modo di non sentire le loro richieste.

      Jean-Claude Juncker sostiene che le politiche europee di presidio ai confini sono concepite per “stroncare il business dei trafficanti”, perché nella moralità egocentrica che ispira la politica di frontiera europea, se non ci fossero trafficanti non ci sarebbero migranti.

      Ma non ci sono trafficanti che si fabbricano migranti in officina. Se le rotte ufficiali sono bloccate, le persone vanno a cercare quelle non ufficiali. Rendere la migrazione più difficile, ha fatto aumentare la richiesta di trafficanti e scafisti, certamente non l’ha fermata. Invece che stroncare il loro business, queste politiche lo hanno creato.

      Secondo la logica della foglia di fico, l’UE sostiene di non limitarsi a lasciare affogare i migranti, ma di fornire supporto alla guardia costiera libica perché intercetti le imbarcazioni che tentano la traversata e riporti le persone nei campi di detenzione in Libia.

      Ma il rapporto del Global Detention Project, a proposito delle condizioni in questi campi, riferisce: “I detenuti sono spesso sottoposti a gravi abusi e violenze, compresi stupri e torture, estorsioni, lavori forzati, schiavitù, condizioni di vita insopportabili, esecuzioni sommarie.” Human Rights Watch, in un rapporto intitolato Senza via di fuga dall’Inferno, descrive situazioni di sovraffollamento e malnutrizione e riporta testimonianze di bambini picchiati dalle guardie.

      L’Irish Times ha riportato accuse secondo cui le milizie associate con il GNA (Governo Libico di Alleanza Nazionale, riconosciuto dall’ONU), starebbero immagazzinando munizioni in questi campi e userebbero i rifugiati come “scudi umani”. Sembra quasi inevitabile, quindi, la notizia che il 3 luglio almeno 53 rifugiati sono stati uccisi durante un attacco dei ribelli appartenenti all’Esercito Nazionale Libico, nel campo di detenzione di Tajura, vicino a Tripoli.

      Secondo una testimonianza riportata dall’Associated Press, a Tajura i migranti erano costretti a pulire le armi delle milizie fedeli al GNA, armi che erano immagazzinate nel campo. Secondo i racconti di testimoni oculari dell’attacco, riportati dalle forze ONU, le guardie del campo avrebbero aperto il fuoco su chi tentava di scappare.

      Nel mondo occidentale, quando parliamo di immigrazione, tendiamo a focalizzarci sul cosiddetto “impatto sulle comunità” causato dai flussi di nuovi arrivati che si muovono da un posto all’altro.

      Nelle nostre discussioni, ci chiediamo se i migranti portino un guadagno per l’economia oppure intacchino risorse già scarse. Raramente ci fermiamo a guardare nella sua cruda e tecnica realtà la concreta applicazione del controllo alle frontiere, quando si traduce davvero in fucili e filo spinato.

      Ci ripetiamo che i costi vanno tutti in un’unica direzione: secondo la nostra narrazione preferita, i controlli di confine sono tutti gratis, è lasciare entrare i migranti la cosa che costa. Ma i costi da pagare ci sono sempre: non solo il tributo di morti che continua a crescere o i budget multimilionari e sempre in aumento delle nostre agenzie di frontiera, ma anche i costi morali e sociali che finiamo con l’estorcere a noi stessi.

      L’ossessione per la sicurezza dei confini deve fare i conti con alcune delle più antiche e radicate convinzioni etiche proprie delle società occidentali. Prendersi cura del più debole, fare agli altri quello che vogliamo sia fatto a noi, aiutare chi possiamo. Molti uomini e donne che lavorano in mare, quando soccorrono dei naufraghi non sono spinti solo da una legge che li obbliga a prestare aiuto, ma anche da un imperativo morale più essenziale. “Lo facciamo perché siamo gente di mare”, ha detto Giarratano al Guardian, “in mare, se ci sono persone in pericolo, le salviamo”.

      Ma i nostri governi hanno deciso che questo non vale per gli europei. Come se fosse una perversa sfida lanciata a istinti morali vecchi di migliaia di anni, nell’Europa moderna un marinaio che salva un migrante mentre sta per affogare, deve essere punito.

      Infrangere queste reti di reciproche responsabilità fra gli esseri umani, ha dei costi: divisioni e tensioni sociali. Ed è un amaro paradosso, perché proprio argomenti di questo genere sono in testa alle nostre preoccupazioni percepite quando si parla di migrazioni. E mentre l’UE fa di tutto per respingere un fronte del confine verso i deserti del Nord Africa, cercando di tenere i corpi dei rifugiati abbastanza lontani da non farceli vedere da vicino, intanto l’altro fronte continua a spingere verso di noi. L’Europa diventa un “ambiente ostile” e quindi noi diventiamo un popolo ostile.

      Ci auto-ingaggiamo come guardie di confine al nostro interno. Padroni di casa, infermiere, insegnanti, manager – ogni relazione sociale deve essere controllata. Il nostro regime di “frontiera quotidiana” crea “comunità sospette” all’interno della nostra società: sono persone sospette per il solo fatto di esistere e, nei loro confronti, si possono chiamare le forze dell’ordine in ogni momento, “giusto per dare un’occhiata”.

      Il confine non è solo un sistema per tenere gli estranei fuori dalla nostra società, ma per marchiare per sempre le persone come estranee, anche all’interno e per legittimare ufficialmente il pregiudizio, per garantire che “l’integrazione” – il Sacro Graal della narrazione progressista sull’immigrazione – resti illusoria e irrealizzabile, uno scherzo crudele giocato sulla pelle di persone destinate a rimanere etichettate come straniere e sospette. La nostra società nel suo insieme si mette al servizio di questo insaziabile confine, fino a definire la sua vera e propria identità nella capacità di respingere le persone.

      Malgrado arrivino continuamente immagini e notizie di tragedie e di morti, i media evitano di collegarle con le campagne di opinione che amplificano le cosiddette “legittime preoccupazioni” della gente e le trasformano in un inattaccabile “comune buon senso”.

      I compromessi che reggono le politiche di controllo dei confini non vengono messi in luce. Questo ci permette di guardare da un’altra parte, non perché siamo crudeli ma perché non possiamo sopportare di vedere quello che stiamo facendo. Ci sono persone e gruppi che, come denuncia Adam Serwer in un articolo su The Atlantic, sono proprio “Focalizzati sulla Crudeltà”. E anche se noi non siamo così, viviamo comunque nel loro stesso mondo, un mondo in cui degli esseri umani annegano e noi li guardiamo dall’alto dei nostri droni senza pilota, mentre lo stato punisce chi cerca di salvarli.

      In troppi crediamo nel mito di una frontiera dal volto umano, solo perché ci spaventa guardare in faccia la tragica e insanguinata realtà del concreto controllo quotidiano sui confini. E comunque, se fosse possibile, non avremmo ormai risolto questa contraddizione? Il fatto che non lo abbiamo fatto dovrebbe portarci a pensare che non ne siamo capaci e che ci si prospetta una cruda e desolante scelta morale per il futuro.

      D’ora in poi, il numero dei migranti non può che aumentare. I cambiamenti climatici saranno determinanti. La scelta di non respingerli non sarà certamente gratis: non c’è modo di condividere le nostre risorse con altri senza sostenere dei costi. Ma se non lo facciamo, scegliamo consapevolmente i naufragi, gli annegamenti, i campi di detenzione, scegliamo di destinare queste persone ad una vita da schiavi in zone di guerra. Scegliamo l’ambiente ostile. Scegliamo di “difendere il nostro stile di vita” semplicemente accettando di vivere a fianco di una popolazione sempre in aumento fatta di rifugiati senza patria, ammassati in baracche di lamiera e depositi soffocanti, sfiniti fino alla disperazione.

      Ma c’è un costo che, alla fine, giudicheremo troppo alto da pagare? Per il momento, sembra di no: ma, … cosa siamo diventati?

      https://dossierlibia.lasciatecientrare.it/luso-dei-droni-per-guardare-i-migranti-che-affogano-m

    • Grèce : le gouvernement durcit nettement sa position et implique l’armée à la gestion de flux migratoire en Mer Egée

      Après deux conférences intergouvernementales ce we., le gouvernement Mitsotakis a décidé la participation active de l’Armée et des Forces Navales dans des opérations de dissuasion en Mer Egée. En même temps il a décidé de poursuivre les opérations de ’désengorgement’ des îlses, de renfoncer les forces de garde-côte en effectifs et en navires, et de pousser plus loin la coopération avec Frontex et les forces de l’Otan qui opèrent déjà dans la région.

      Le durcissement net de la politique gouvernementale se traduit aussi par le retour en force d’un discours ouvertement xénophobe. Le vice-président du gouvernement grec, Adonis Géorgiadis, connu pour ses positions à l’’extrême-droite de l’échiquier politique, a déclaré que parmi les nouveaux arrivants, il y aurait très peu de réfugiés, la plupart seraient des ‘clandestins’ et il n’a pas manqué de qualifier les flux d’ ‘invasion’.

      source – en grec - Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn : https://www.efsyn.gr/politiki/kybernisi/211786_kybernisi-sklirainei-ti-stasi-tis-sto-prosfygiko

      Il va de soi que cette militarisation de la gestion migratoire laisse craindre le pire dans la mesure où le but évident de l’implication de l’armée ne saurait être que la systématisation des opérations de push-back en pleine mer, ce qui est non seulement illégal mais ouvertement criminel.

      Reçu de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop, 23.09.2019