• Exilia Film | Koffi – Récit depuis le Centre fédéral de Giffers (FR)
    https://asile.ch/2020/09/22/exilia-film-koffi-recit-depuis-le-centre-federal-de-giffers-fr

    Koffi témoigne des nombreux actes de violences physiques et verbales dont il a été témoin au nouveau centre de Giffers. Il a également été lui-même victime de violence. En effet, après avoir passé plus de 6 mois dans ce centre de renvoi, alors que le maximum légal est de 140 jours, il est violenté physiquement, […]

  • #Rohingya refugees allege sexual assault on Bangladeshi island | World news | The Guardian

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/22/rohingya-refugees-allege-sexual-assault-on-bangladeshi-island

    Rohingya refugees allege they are being held against their will in jail-like conditions and subjected to rape and sexual assault on a Bangladeshi island in the Bay of the Bengal.

    A group of more than 300 refugees were taken to the uninhabited, silt island of Bhasan Char in April, when a boat they were travelling on was intercepted by Bangladeshi authorities.

    The refugees were attempting to sail from the sprawling camps of Cox’s Bazar on the Bangladeshi mainland to Malaysia. Like hundreds of thousands of others, they originally fled to Bangladesh from neighbouring Myanmar, where they faced violence and ethnic cleansing.

  • Le Liban, nouvelle terre de départ pour les migrants

    Depuis octobre dernier, le Liban est confronté à la pire crise économique et financière de son histoire. La situation s’est considérablement aggravée depuis la double explosion au port de Beyrouth, le 4 août, qui a fait 192 morts, plus de 6 500 blessés, et détruit une partie de la capitale. Face à la situation, de plus en plus de Libanais se tournent vers l’immigration.

    Un phénomène nouveau est aujourd’hui enregistré au Liban : la multiplication des tentatives de traversée de la mer vers l’île de Chypre, située à 160 kilomètres des côtes libanaises. Depuis début septembre, au moins cinq bateaux transportant quelque 200 migrants souhaitant se rendre à Chypre ont été repérés. L’une des embarcations a été interceptée par une patrouille de la marine libanaise qui l’a reconduit avec ses occupants vers la région de Tripoli, dans le nord du pays, d’où elle était partie. Une autre a été secourue par des bâtiments de la force navale de la Finul qui croise aux larges des côtes libanaises conformément à un mandat des Nations unies. Une personne à bord était déjà décédée. Un troisième bateau a été refoulé par les garde-côtes chypriotes D’autres ont réussi à accoster sur l’île, qui fait partie de l’Union européenne. Cette fréquence dans les tentatives de traversée vers Chypre est inédite.

    Des migrants libanais pour la plupart

    La majorité de ces migrants sont des Libanais qui ont perdu tout espoir de voir des jours meilleurs dans leur pays, frappé par des crises multiples et des drames en série. Mais il y a aussi des Syriens et des Palestiniens. Il y a au Liban plusieurs millions de migrants potentiels. Le pays du cèdre accueille sur son sol un million et demi de Syriens, dont un million de réfugiés, et 300 000 réfugiés palestiniens, qui vivent dans des conditions difficiles, aggravées par les crises actuelles. Il faut y ajouter des centaines de milliers de Libanais qui ne rêvent plus que de partir. Ceux qui en ont les moyens sont déjà partis ou s’apprêtent à le faire par des moyens légaux. Les plus démunis, on l’a vu, n’hésitent pas à emprunter des voies illégales.

    Une augmentation exponentielle des tentatives de traversée

    Une délégation chypriote est attendue à Beyrouth dans les jours qui viennent pour tenter de « gérer le phénomène de manière efficace », selon les propos du ministre chypriote de l’Intérieur. Les deux pays ont un accord de « renvoi » des migrants pour décourager les tentatives de traversée.

    Mais cela sera sans doute insuffisant pour enrayer ce phénomène. Des sources sécuritaires et humanitaires à Beyrouth s’attendent à une augmentation exponentielle des tentatives de traversée dans les mois à venir si la situation continue de se dégrader sur tous les plans au Liban.

    https://www.rfi.fr/fr/moyen-orient/20200917-le-liban-nouvelle-terre-d%C3%A9part-les-migrants
    #Liban #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_libanais #migrants_libanais

    –—

    voir aussi :
    ’They should have let us die in the water’ : desperate Lebanese migrants sent back by Cyprus
    https://seenthis.net/messages/877410

  • ’They should have let us die in the water’: desperate Lebanese migrants sent back by Cyprus

    For years, small boats have left northern Lebanon’s coast, packed with desperate migrants hoping to reach European shores. Until recently, they carried mostly Syrian and Palestinian refugees. But with Lebanon in freefall, its citizens have begun joining their ranks in larger numbers.

    Mohammad Ghandour never thought he’d be one of them. But he said Lebanon’s economic crisis, which has crashed the Lebanese pound and left him unable to feed his seven children, gave him no choice.

    “In Lebanon, we are being killed by poverty,” Ghandour told Reuters this week, from his mother’s cramped three-room apartment where he was staying with 12 other family members. He was back in Tripoli, one of Lebanon’s poorest cities, after being sent back by Cyprus.

    “This is worse than war … My children will either die on the streets or become criminals to survive.

    Ghandour, 37, is one of dozens of Lebanese who’ve attempted the journey since late August, when rights groups say a rise in the number of boats leaving Lebanon began. Exact figures are hard to come by, but the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has tracked 21 boats leaving Lebanon between July and Sept. 14. The previous year, there were 17 in total.

    The increase has worried Cypriot authorities, especially given the global pandemic. The island is the closest European Union member state to the Middle East and has seen a gradual rise in arrivals of undocumented migrants and refugees in the past two years, as other routes have become more difficult to cross.

    After 28 hours lost at sea, Ghandour said his boat, carrying his wife, children and other relatives, arrived on a beach near the seaside resort of Larnaca. He said his family was detained in a camp for several days, tested for Covid-19 and prevented from lodging a formal claim for asylum before being sent back to Lebanon.

    “I didn’t think they would send us back,” he said. “They should have just let us die in the water. It’s better than coming back here.”

    Cypriot authorities said about 230 Lebanese and Syrians were sent back to Lebanon by sea in early September. They had arrived in Cyprus on five boats during the previous weeks.

    “Following our government’s orders and after consultations between the two governments (Cyprus and Lebanon) we safely returned them on September 6, 7 and 8,” Stelios Papatheodorou, chief of the Cypriot police, told Reuters.

    He denied accusations that authorities had mistreated them and pushed back their boats.

    “We provided them with food and water and covered all their needs at our own expense,” Papatheodorou said.

    Lebanon’s General Security and Foreign Ministry did not respond to written requests for comment.

    ‘TREATED LIKE DOGS’

    Out of work for three years, Ghandour decided last month to pack up for good and try his luck in Cyprus. He left his apartment, sold his furniture, and had his older sons sell scrap metal to help buy a small boat and supplies for the perilous journey.

    Ghandour was one of four migrants interviewed by Reuters, who said they were swiftly sent back to Lebanon. According to UNHCR, the island has pushed back at least five boats, which carried Lebanese, Syrians, Palestinians and others.

    “You can’t just summarily send people back without considering their claims fully and fairly,” said Bill Frelick, the director of the refugee and migrant rights division at HRW, who has been monitoring the returns.

    Although Lebanon is not at war and economic hardship is not recognised as grounds for asylum, the multiple crises Lebanon is facing mean some of its nationals and residents could face serious threats, while others could qualify for refugee status on fear-of-persecution grounds, Frelick added.

    In interviews with Reuters, migrants said they told Cypriot authorities they feared violence and instability in Lebanon and did not want to return.

    In August a port blast killed nearly 200.

    Migrants also said they encountered aggressive tactics as they neared Cyprus. Chamseddine Kerdi said his boat, packed with 52 people, was encircled several times and ultimately damaged before being towed to shore by authorities.

    “My daughter begged me not to let them kill us,” Kerdi said.

    Ghandour was not expecting a hostile reception in Cyprus. He had previously tried looking for work in Germany, at the height of the migrant flows to Europe in 2015 and 2016, and said he was greeted with kindness. “This time, they treated us like dogs.”

    Despite this, both Ghandour and Kerdi are adamant they’ll set sail again soon.

    For others, however, their first journey would be their last.

    Mezhar Abdelhamid Mohammad’s son-in-law and nephew left Lebanon 11 days ago in a boat packed with about 50 men, women and children. Adrift for seven days, the boat was eventually rescued by UN peacekeepers off the coast of Lebanon, with only 36 people alive. But the two men weren’t on it.

    A survivor who returned to Lebanon told Mohammad that he had jumped in the water with Mohammad’s relatives to try and find help. They have not been found.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-lebanon-crisis-migrants-cyprus/they-should-have-let-us-die-in-the-water-desperate-lebanese-migrants-sent-b

    #Chypre #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_libanais #migrants_libanais #Liban

  • #François_Gemenne sur l’#appel_d'air : Ils ne vont pas venir pour une douche à Calais...

    3 minutes pour déconstruire magistralement une #idée_reçue...

    François Gemenne : « Je suis frappé de voir comment toute une série de concepts qui étaient réservées à l’#extrême_droite il y a quelques années encore, c’est le cas de l’appel d’air sont désormais passés dans le langage courant parfaitement acceptés dans le débat public, utilisés tant par la gauche que par la droite, et qu’on va, de surcroit, mener des politiques qui vont s’appuyer sur ces concepts. Et c’est absolument faux !
    L’idée de l’appel d’air c’est de dire que si on accueille des gens dans des conditions décentes, ça va les attirer, ça va faire venir davantage de gens. Or, pourquoi est-ce que ces gens migrent au départ ? Pourquoi est-ce qu’ils vont choisir d’abandonner leurs familles, leurs villages, de prendre tous les risques, de dépenser des milliers d’euro aux passeurs ? Parce qu’ils en ont absolument besoin pour sauver leur vie, pour nourrir leur famille, ou simplement pour accomplir le projet d’une vie meilleure. Ils ne vont pas venir pour une douche à Calais ou pour quelques centaines d’euro d’allocations familiales. Cela n’a aucun sens. Et très souvent ils ne savent pas avant de venir quelles sont les aides auxquelles ils auront droit et d’ailleurs beaucoup n’y prétendent même pas parce qu’ils ne savent pas qu’ils y ont droit. Et donc, vraiment, il y a ici quelque chose de complètement absurde que d’imaginer que les migrants viennent pour les conditions de réception dans le pays. Ce n’est pas ça du tout qui détermine le choix du pays de destination : ça va être la présence de membres de leur famille, d’anciens liens coloniaux, la langue qu’on y parle, l’état du marché du travail, mais pas du tout le niveau des aides disponibles pour les migrants. »

    Journaliste : "Le contre-argument utilisé : Allemagne, 2015, Angela Merkel ouvre les frontières, permet aux migrants de venir parce qu’il y a une crise énorme, et ils viennent. Et là du coup l’Allemagne est débordée...

    François Gemenne : "En réalité c’est un argument qui est assez fallacieux pour deux raisons. D’abord, en fait, parce que ça s’est assez bien passé, au final. Quand on fait le bilan 5 ans après, il est largement positif....

    Journaliste : Avec une poussée de l’extrême droite en Allemagne...

    François Gemenne : « Avec une poussée d’extrême droite en Allemagne, mais enfin soyons sérieux ! On a en France l’extrême droite à 30 ou 35% avec des frontières fermées et une politique complètement hostile aux migrants et aux demandeurs d’asile, en Allemagne ils ont une extrême droite à 10 ou 15% avec une politique bien plus généreuse. Qui sommes nous pour dire ’Ah, regardez en Allemagne, il y a un problème d’extrême droite !’
    Donc, d’une part ça s’est plutôt bien passé. Et d’autre part, les gens croient souvent que c’est la décision de Angela Merkel d’ouvrir les frontières qui a fait venir les réfugiés syriens en Allemagne. En réalité, c’est l’inverse : les réfugiés étaient déjà là et c’est Angela Merkel qui ouvre les frontières quelque part pour accompagner ce mouvement et donc c’est l’arrivée de réfugiés qui la décide à poser un geste humanitaire fort et à ne pas les renvoyer, mais ce n’est pas l’inverse. Au fond, la temporalité des événements... On imagine qu’il y a un lien de cause à effet entre l’ouverture des frontières et l’arrivée des réfugiés, alors qu’en réalité c’est tout l’inverse. »

    https://twitter.com/_alairlibre/status/1308104092745707521
    #frontières #ouverture_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #ressources_pédagogiques #vidéo #Merkel #Angela_Merkel #Wir_schaffen_das

    ping @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • Demo : « Alle 12.000 Menschen aus Moria sollen Platz in Wien finden »

    PULS 24 Reporter Paul Batruel hat mit Mo Sedlak, Mitorganisator der Demo, gesprochen. Er will Druck auf die österreichische Regierung ausüben.

    https://www.puls24.at/video/demo-alle-12000-menschen-aus-moria-sollen-platz-in-wien-finden/short
    #solidarité #manifestation #Autrice
    #incendie #Lesbos #feu #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Moria

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’incendie de septembre 2020 à Lesbos :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

  • The #Rohingya. A humanitarian emergency decades in the making

    The violent 2017 ouster of more than 700,000 Rohingya from Myanmar into Bangladesh captured the international spotlight, but the humanitarian crisis had been building for decades.

    In August 2017, Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown that pushed out hundreds of thousands of members of the minority Rohingya community from their homes in northern Rakhine State. Today, roughly 900,000 Rohingya live across the border in southern Bangladesh, in cramped refugee camps where basic needs often overwhelm stretched resources.

    The crisis has shifted from a short-term response to a protracted emergency. Conditions in the camps have worsened as humanitarian services are scaled back during the coronavirus pandemic. Government restrictions on refugees and aid groups have grown, along with grievances among local communities on the margins of a massive aid operation.

    The 2017 exodus was the culmination of decades of restrictive policies in Myanmar, which have stripped Rohingya of their rights over generations, denied them an identity, and driven them from their homes.

    Here’s an overview of the current crisis and a timeline of what led to it. A selection of our recent and archival reporting on the Rohingya crisis is available below.
    Who are the Rohingya?

    The Rohingya are a mostly Muslim minority in western Myanmar’s Rakhine State. Rohingya say they are native to the area, but in Myanmar they are largely viewed as illegal immigrants from neighbouring Bangladesh.

    Myanmar’s government does not consider the Rohingya one of the country’s 135 officially recognised ethnic groups. Over decades, government policies have stripped Rohingya of citizenship and enforced an apartheid-like system where they are isolated and marginalised.
    How did the current crisis unfold?

    In October 2016, a group of Rohingya fighters calling itself the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, or ARSA, staged attacks on border posts in northern Rakhine State, killing nine border officers and four soldiers. Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown, and 87,000 Rohingya civilians fled to Bangladesh over the next year.

    A month earlier, Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, had set up an advisory commission chaired by former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan to recommend a path forward in Rakhine and ease tensions between the Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities.

    On 24 August 2017, the commission issued its final report, which included recommendations to improve development in the region and tackle questions of citizenship for the Rohingya. Within hours, ARSA fighters again attacked border security posts.

    Myanmar’s military swept through the townships of northern Rakhine, razing villages and driving away civilians. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fled to Bangladesh in the ensuing weeks. They brought with them stories of burnt villages, rape, and killings at the hands of Myanmar’s military and groups of ethnic Rakhine neighbours. The refugee settlements of southern Bangladesh now have a population of roughly 900,000 people, including previous generations of refugees.

    What has the international community said?

    Multiple UN officials, rights investigators, and aid groups working in the refugee camps say there is evidence of brutal levels of violence against the Rohingya and the scorched-earth clearance of their villages in northern Rakhine State.

    A UN-mandated fact-finding mission on Myanmar says abuses and rights violations in Rakhine “undoubtedly amount to the gravest crimes under international law”; the rights probe is calling for Myanmar’s top generals to be investigated and prosecuted for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

    The UN’s top rights official has called the military purge a “textbook case of ethnic cleansing”. Médecins Sans Frontières estimates at least 6,700 Rohingya were killed in the days after military operations began in August 2017.

    Rights groups say there’s evidence that Myanmar security forces were preparing to strike weeks and months before the August 2017 attacks. The evidence included disarming Rohingya civilians, arming non-Rohingya, and increasing troop levels in the area.
    What has Myanmar said?

    Myanmar has denied almost all allegations of violence against the Rohingya. It says the August 2017 military crackdown was a direct response to the attacks by ARSA militants.

    Myanmar’s security forces admitted to the September 2017 killings of 10 Rohingya men in Inn Din village – a massacre exposed by a media investigation. Two Reuters journalists were arrested while researching the story. In September 2018, the reporters were convicted of breaking a state secrets law and sentenced to seven years in prison. They were released in May 2019, after more than a year behind bars.

    Myanmar continues to block international investigators from probing rights violations on its soil. This includes barring entry to the UN-mandated fact-finding mission and the UN’s special rapporteurs for the country.
    What is the situation in Bangladesh’s refugee camps?

    The swollen refugee camps of southern Bangladesh now have the population of a large city but little of the basic infrastructure.

    The dimensions of the response have changed as the months and years pass: medical operations focused on saving lives in 2017 must now also think of everyday illnesses and healthcare needs; a generation of young Rohingya have spent another year without formal schooling or ways to earn a living; women (and men) reported sexual violence at the hands of Myanmar’s military, but today the violence happens within the cramped confines of the camps.

    The coronavirus has magnified the problems and aid shortfalls in 2020. The government limited all but essential services and restricted aid access to the camps. Humanitarian groups say visits to health centres have dropped by half – driven in part by fear and misunderstandings. Gender-based violence has risen, and already-minimal services for women and girls are now even more rare.

    The majority of Rohingya refugees live in camps with population densities of less than 15 square metres per person – far below the minimum international guidelines for refugee camps (30 to 45 square metres per person). The risk of disease outbreaks is high in such crowded conditions, aid groups say.

    Rohingya refugees live in fragile shelters in the middle of floodplains and on landslide-prone hillsides. Aid groups say seasonal monsoon floods threaten large parts of the camps, which are also poorly prepared for powerful cyclones that typically peak along coastal Bangladesh in May and October.

    The funding request for the Rohingya response – totalling more than $1 billion in 2020 – represents one of the largest humanitarian appeals for a crisis this year. Previous appeals have been underfunded, which aid groups said had a direct impact on the quality of services available.

    What’s happening in Rakhine State?

    The UN estimates that 470,000 non-displaced Rohingya still live in Rakhine State. Aid groups say they continue to have extremely limited access to northern Rakhine State – the flashpoint of 2017’s military purge. There are “alarming” rates of malnutrition among children in northern Rakhine, according to UN agencies.

    Rohingya still living in northern Rakhine face heavy restrictions on working, going to school, and accessing healthcare. The UN says remaining Rohingya and ethnic Rakhine communities continue to live in fear of each other.

    Additionally, some 125,000 Rohingya live in barricaded camps in central Rakhine State. The government created these camps following clashes between Rohingya and Rakhine communities in 2012. Rohingya there face severe restrictions and depend on aid groups for basic services.

    A separate conflict between the military and the Arakan Army, an ethnic Rakhine armed group, has brought new displacement and civilian casualties. Clashes displaced tens of thousands of people in Rakhine and neighbouring Chin State by early 2020, and humanitarian access has again been severely restricted. In February 2020, Myanmar’s government re-imposed mobile internet blackouts in several townships in Rakhine and Chin states, later extending high-speed restrictions until the end of October. Rights groups say the blackout could risk lives and make it even harder for humanitarian aid to reach people trapped by conflict. Amnesty International has warned of a looming food insecurity crisis in Rakhine.

    What’s next?

    Rights groups have called on the UN Security Council to refer Myanmar to the International Criminal Court to investigate allegations of committing atrocity crimes. The UN body has not done so.

    There are at least three parallel attempts, in three separate courts, to pursue accountability. ICC judges have authorised prosecutor Fatou Bensouda to begin an investigation into one aspect: the alleged deportation of the Rohingya, which is a crime against humanity under international law.

    Separately, the West African nation of The Gambia filed a lawsuit at the International Court of Justice asking the UN’s highest court to hold Myanmar accountable for “state-sponsored genocide”. In an emergency injunction granted in January 2020, the court ordered Myanmar to “take all measures within its power” to protect the Rohingya.

    And in a third legal challenge, a Rohingya rights group launched a case calling on courts in Argentina to prosecute military and civilian officials – including Aung San Suu Kyi – under the concept of universal jurisdiction, which pushes for domestic courts to investigate international crimes.

    Bangladesh and Myanmar have pledged to begin the repatriation of Rohingya refugees, but three separate deadlines have come and gone with no movement. In June 2018, two UN agencies signed a controversial agreement with Myanmar – billed as a first step to participating in any eventual returns plan. The UN, rights groups, and refugees themselves say Rakhine State is not yet safe for Rohingya to return.

    With no resolution in sight in Myanmar and bleak prospects in Bangladesh, a growing number of Rohingya women and children are using once-dormant smuggling routes to travel to countries like Malaysia.

    A regional crisis erupted in 2020 as multiple countries shut their borders to Rohingya boats, citing the coronavirus, leaving hundreds of people stranded at sea for weeks. Dozens are believed to have died.

    Bangladesh has raised the possibility of transferring 100,000 Rohingya refugees to an uninhabited, flood-prone island – a plan that rights groups say would effectively create an “island detention centre”. Most Rohingya refuse to go, but Bangladeshi authorities detained more than 300 people on the island in 2020 after they were rescued at sea.

    The government has imposed growing restrictions on the Rohingya as the crisis continues. In recent months, authorities have enforced orders barring most Rohingya from leaving the camp areas, banned the sale of SIM cards and cut mobile internet, and tightened restrictions on NGOs. Local community tensions have also risen. Aid groups report a rise in anti-Rohingya hate speech and racism, as well as “rapidly deteriorating security dynamics”.

    Local NGOs and civil society groups are pushing for a greater role in leading the response, warning that international donor funding will dwindle over the long term.

    And rights groups say Rohingya refugees themselves have had little opportunity to participate in decisions that affect their futures – both in Bangladesh’s camps and when it comes to the possibility of returning to Myanmar.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/in-depth/myanmar-rohingya-refugee-crisis-humanitarian-aid-bangladesh
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Birmanie #Myanmar #chronologie #histoire #génocide #Bangladesh #réfugiés_rohingya #Rakhine #camps_de_réfugiés #timeline #time-line #Arakan_Rohingya_Salvation_Army (#ARSA) #nettoyage_ethnique #justice #Cour_internationale_de_Justice (#CIJ)

  • Fire breaks out outside migrant camp in Samos

    A fire broke out outside the reception and registration centre for migrants on the eastern Aegean island of Samos on Tuesday evening.

    The blaze burned near a forested area where 20 firemen with nine fire engines have been deployed.

    According to the fire service, the centre is currently not at risk.

    Earlier in the day, health authorities reported three coronavirus infections. The infected migrants went to the local hospital after showing symptoms.

    More than 4,600 people live in the camp that has a nominal capacity of 648.

    https://www.ekathimerini.com/257000/article/ekathimerini/news/fire-breaks-out-outside-migrant-camp-in-samos
    #incendie #Samos #Grèce #îles #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #septembre_2020

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les incendies en Grèce :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/851143

    • Μετά τα 21 κρούσματα, φωτιά στο ΚΥΤ Σάμου

      Πυρκαγιά εκδηλώθηκε σήμερα το βράδυ στο ΚΥΤ της Σάμου που αριθμεί περίπου 6.000 πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες. Συγκεκριμένα, η φωτιά ξέσπασε στη Ζώνη ανηλίκων, με τρία κοντέινερ να παραδίδονται στις φλόγες.

      Δυνάμεις της πυροσβεστικής έσπευσαν στο σημείο με 12 πυροσβέστες και 6 οχήματα και κατάφεραν να σβήσουν τη φωτιά. Την ίδια στιγμή, ορισμένοι πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες έφυγαν από το ΚΥΤ, με αφορμή το ξέσπασμα της πυρκαγιάς.

      Υπενθυμίζεται ότι και την περασμένη Τρίτη είχε ξεσπάσει πυρκαγιά στο ΚΥΤ, με τις αρχές να προχωρούν στη σύλληψη δύο ατόμων.

      Σημειώνεται επίσης ότι νωρίτερα σήμερα, ο ΕΟΔΥ ανακοίνωσε 22 κρούσματα κορονοϊού στο νησί, εκ των τα 21 ήταν στο ΚΥΤ της Σάμου.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/260582_meta-ta-21-kroysmata-fotia-sto-kyt-samoy

      –-

      Traduction de Vicky Skoumbi :
      Incendie dans le hot-spot de Samos après que 21 personnes y ont été testés positifs

      Un incendie s’est déclaré ce soir au centre de réception et d’identification de Samos, qui compte environ 6 000 réfugiés et migrants. Plus précisément, l’incendie s’est déclaré dans la zone réservée aux mineurs isolés, où trois conteneurs ont été livrés aux flammes.

      Les pompiers se sont précipités sur les lieux avec 12 pompiers et 6 véhicules et ont réussi à éteindre le feu. Pendant ce temps, quelques réfugiés et migrants ont pu quitter le hot-spot, à l’occasion du déclenchement de l’incendie.

      Mardi dernier un autre incendie s’est déclaré dans le CIR, les autorités procédant à l’arrestation de deux personnes.

      Il est également à noter que plus tôt dans la journée, l’Organisme Nationale de Santé Publique avait annoncé 22 cas de coronavirus sur l’île, dont 21 dans le camp de #Vathy, à Samos.

  • 20 refugees arrive in Italy with university scholarships

    Twenty refugees from Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo arrived in Italy on September 11 thanks to the project University Corridors for Refugees. They will be able to continue their studies at 10 Italian universities through a scholarship.

    Twenty refugees who arrived at Rome’s Fiumicino airport on September 11 will soon be able to continue their studies. They will attend one of 10 Italian universities that have joined the project #University_Corridors_for_Refugees (#UNICORE).
    According to a statement released by the UN refugee agency UNHCR, the students, including a woman, come from Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. They were selected according to their academic accomplishments and motivation by a commission appointed by all the universities participating in the project through a public competition.

    Once they have completed a mandatory quarantine period due to the COVID-19 emergency, the students will start attending courses at the universities of Cagliari, Florence, L’Aquila, Milan (Statale), Padua, Perugia, Pisa, Rome (Luiss), Sassari and Venice (Iuav).

    ’Extraordinary result’, UNHCR

    The project University Corridors for Refugees is promoted with the cooperation of the Italian foreign ministry, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), Italian charity Caritas, the Diaconia Valdese. It was also organized thanks to the support of the University of Bologna (promoter of the first edition in 2019) and a wide network of partners in Ethiopia (Gandhi Charity) and in Italy, which will provide the necessary support to students for the entire duration of the specialization course.

    “We are extremely happy for this extraordinary result,” said Chiara Cardoletti, UNHCR representative for Italy, the Holy See and San Marino.

    “With this initiative Italy proves it is ahead in finding innovative solutions for the protection of refugees.”

    UN goals for the education of refugees

    According to the UNHCR report ’Coming Together for Refugee Education’ published two weeks ago, only 3% of refugees at a global level have access to higher education.

    By 2030, the UN agency has the goal of reaching a 15% enrolment rate in higher education programs for refugees in host countries and third countries also by increasing safe pathways that take into account specific needs and the legitimate aspirations of refugees.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27244/20-refugees-arrive-in-italy-with-university-scholarships

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #université #universités-refuge #villes-refuge #Italie #bourses_d'étude

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste des villes-refuge:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Réfugiés : les Balkans jouent les « #chiens_de-garde » de l’UE

    La #Serbie a commencé durant l’été à construire une barrière de barbelés sur sa frontière avec la #Macédoine_du_Nord. Officiellement pour empêcher la propagation de la Covid-19... #Jasmin_Rexhepi, qui préside l’ONG Legis, dénonce la dérive sécuritaire des autocrates balkaniques. Entretien.

    D. Kožul (D.K.) : Que pensez-vous des raisons qui ont poussé la Serbie à construire une barrière à sa frontière avec la Macédoine du Nord ? Officiellement, il s’agit de lutter contre la propagation de l’épidémie de coronavirus. Or, on sait que le nombre de malades est minime chez les réfugiés...

    Jasmin Rexhepi (J.R.) : C’est une mauvaise excuse trouvée par un communicant. On construit des barbelés aux frontières des pays des Balkans depuis 2015. Ils sont posés par des gouvernements ultra-conservateurs, pour des raisons populistes. Les réfugiés ne sont pas une réelle menace sécuritaire pour nos pays en transition, ils ne sont pas plus porteurs du virus que ne le sont nos citoyens, et les barbelés n’ont jamais été efficaces contre les migrations.

    “Faute de pouvoir améliorer la vie de leurs citoyens, les populistes conservateurs se réfugient dans une prétendue défense de la nation contre des ennemis imaginaires.”

    D.K. : Peut-on parler d’une « orbanisation » des pays des Balkans occidentaux ? Quelle est la position à ce sujet des autorités de Macédoine du Nord ?

    J.R. : Tous les pays des Balkans aimeraient rejoindre l’Union européenne (UE), cela ne les empêche pas d’élever des barbelés sur leurs frontières mutuelles, ce qui est contraire aux principes européens de solidarité et d’unité. Quand les dirigeants populistes conservateurs ne peuvent offrir de progrès et d’avancées à leurs citoyens, ils se réfugient dans une prétendue défense de l’État, de la nation et de la religion contre des ennemis imaginaires. Dans le cas présent, ce sont les réfugiés, les basanés et les musulmans qui sont visés, mais il y a eu d’autres boucs émissaires par le passé.

    La Hongrie a ouvert la danse, mais elle n’est pas la seule, il y a eu aussi l’Autriche, la Bulgarie et la Macédoine du Nord en 2016, quand Gruevski était au pouvoir, et maintenant, malheureusement, c’est au tour de la Serbie. La xénophobie des dirigeants de ces États se voit clairement dans leurs discours. La barrière en question n’inquiète toutefois pas outre mesure les dirigeants macédoniens, car ils savent que rien de tout cela n’empêche réellement les migrations, et que ce ne sont pas des barbelés qui vont maintenir les réfugiés de notre côté de la frontière. Surtout pas maintenant qu’ils ont été habitués aux déportations de masse.

    D.K. : Certains disent que cette barrière pourrait couvrir la totalité de la frontière serbo-macédonienne, soit presque 150 km. Cela peut-il freiner les migrations ?

    J.R. : Tout d’abord, il est physiquement impossible d’installer une telle barrière dans les montagnes. À quoi bon couper tant d’arbres, détruire la nature ? Cette barrière ne s’étendra que dans les plaines, comme dans beaucoup d’autres pays. Là où, de toute façon, il n’y a déjà pas grand monde qui passe. La majorité des voies migratoires empruntent des routes de montagnes, qu’il est physiquement difficile de contrôler. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela que beaucoup de migrants entrent en Macédoine du Nord, parce qu’ils peuvent passer par les montagnes. Quant aux autres, ils coupent tout simplement les barbelés.

    “Ceinte de barbelés, l’Europe du XXIe siècle mène une politique hypocrite.”

    D.K. : Les pays des Balkans acceptent-ils de jouer le rôle de chien de garde de l’UE ? Il n’y a aucun pourtant aucune demande officielle de Bruxelles pour la construction de barrières physiques...

    J.R. : L’UE n’a jamais demandé officiellement la construction de barbelés. Ce sont certains de ses États membres ayant pris la responsabilité de « défendre » l’Europe qui ont imposé cette pratique, et offert des barbelés aux pays d’Europe du Sud-Est. C’est ainsi que la route des Balkans a été bloquée en mars 2016, sur la décision de l’Autriche, parce que l’Allemagne commençait soi-disant à refouler les réfugiés, et pas du fait d’une décision officielle des institutions européennes. De même, l’accord entre l’UE et la Turquie, survenu à la même période, a d’abord été signé par un pays de l’UE, qui a ensuite convaincu les autres de faire de même. Ceci étant, les barbelés facilitent le travail des patrouilles de Frontex, l’agence de l’Union européenne chargée du contrôle et de la gestion des frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. La position de l’UE n’est donc pas unifiée, d’où l’impression que cette Europe du XXIe siècle, ceinte de barbelés, mène une politique hypocrite et refuse d’assumer ses responsabilités.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/refugies-balkans-chiens-de-garde-UE
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #externalisation #murs #barrière_frontalière #frontières

    –—

    sur le mur entre Serbie et Macédoine :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/872957

  • Des villes en première ligne

    Face à la proposition minimale d’accueil de la Confédération, plusieurs villes, dont #Zurich, #Genève, #Lausanne, #Delémont ou #Fribourg ont annoncé qu’elles étaient prêtes à recevoir des requérant.e.s en provenance de Lesbos après l’incendie qui a ravagé le camp de #Moria.

    Le 8 septembre, un incendie a complètement détruit le tristement célèbre camp de réfugié.e.s de Moria, à quelques encablures maritimes de la Turquie. Dans ce lieu inauguré en 2013, devenu en 2015 un centre d’enregistrement et de contrôle (hotspot), plus de 13’000 personnes, dont 4000 enfants essaient de survivre depuis des mois voire des années dans une infrastructure prévue à la base pour 2000 personnes. Depuis quelques mois, l’apparition du Covid avait encore rendu plus dures les conditions de vie des habitant.e.s. « Depuis mars, les couvre-feux liés à l’épidémie de coronavirus et les restrictions de mouvements des demandeurs d’asile à Moria ont été prolongés sept fois pour une période totale de plus de 150 jours », relève ainsi Aurélie Ponthieu, spécialiste des questions humanitaires chez Médecins sans frontières.

    Cet enfermement sans aucune perspective a sans doute conduit à ce que certains réfugiés incendient par désespoir leur prison d’infortune. Et ce n’est pas la construction d’un nouveau camp de tentes de l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), bâties dans l’urgence par la Protection civile grecque, couplée à la volonté du ministre grec des migrations, Notis Mitarachi, de maintenir les requérants dans l’île qui rabattront la volonté de départ des requérants.

    Face à cette impasse, neuf villes suisses comme Zurich, Delémont, Fribourg, Genève ou Lausanne ont annoncé qu’elles seraient prêtes à accueillir rapidement des réfugiés en provenance de l’Île grecque. « Le chaos, d’une ampleur inédite, met en lumière le besoin immédiat de moyens et de soutien dans les régions en conflit, le long des voies d’exil et aux frontières de l’Europe. Les citoyennes et citoyens, ainsi que les responsables politiques de nombreuses villes de Suisse sont convaincus depuis longtemps que cette crise humanitaire nécessite un engage- ment plus important de notre pays pour l’accueil de réfugié.e.s », expliquent conjointement les deux villes lémaniques et leurs maires, Sami Kanaan et Grégoire Junod, tous deux du PS.

    « L’urgence de la situation n’a fait que s’aggraver entre la surcharge du camp, la gestion du Covid puis finalement cet incendie », argumente David Payot, municipal popiste de la Ville de Lausanne. « Notre objectif est que la Confédération organise dans les plus brefs délais une conférence nationale urgente sur le sujet. Cela permettrait de mettre tous les acteurs institutionnels – Confédération, cantons et villes – à une même table afin d’éviter de se renvoyer la balle. Il faut coordonner les acteurs plutôt que de diluer les responsabilités. Nous voulons aussi mettre la pression sur la Confédération et faire entendre notre voix, qui représente aussi celle de la population suisse », souligne-t-il.

    « L’accueil des migrants relève de la Confédération et l’hébergement des cantons. Par cet appel à la Confédération, nous indiquons que nous sommes prêts à collaborer étroitement avec les cantons pour accueillir des réfugiés dans nos villes », développe le Grégoire Junod. « Nous collaborons en permanence avec l’Etablissement vaudois d’accueil des migrants (EVAM) notamment lorsqu’il s’agit d’ouvrir de nouvelles structures ou de trouver des capacités supplémentaires d’accueil », explique-t-il encore.

    Il faut dire que la ministre PLR de la justice, Karin Keller-Sutter a décidé d’adopter une position minimaliste sur le sujet, déclarant que notre pays n’accueillerait que 20 jeunes migrants non-accompagnés. Très loin de l’Allemagne qui, par l’entremise de sa première ministre, Angela Merkel, vient de réviser sa position et se déclare favorable à l’accueil de 1’500 personnes, essentiellement des familles avec des enfants qui ont été reconnues comme réfugiés par les autorités grecques. A ce contingent s’ajouteront 100 à 150 mineurs isolés évacués du camp de Moria. La France fera de même.

    Rappelons aussi que l’Union européenne (UE) est en train de plancher sur un nouveau pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile, qui sera présenté à l’automne. Celui-ci vise à « créer un cadre global, durable et à l’épreuve des crises pour la gestion de la politique d’asile et de migration au sein de l’UE ». Du côté des organisations d’entraide comme l’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfu- giés (OSAR), qui a participé à la consultation, on voudrait « un renforcement des voies d’accès sûres et légales vers l’Europe afin de ne pas rendre les personnes vulnérables dépendantes des passeurs et de ne pas les exposer à la violence, à l’exploitation et aux mauvais traitements ».

    La Suisse peut faire beaucoup plus

    « La Suisse peut prendre plus de personnes du fait qu’un article de la loi sur l’asile stipule qu’il est possible d’octroyer, sous certaines conditions, un permis humanitaire ou de faire bénéficier les requérants d’un programme de réinstallation selon les critères du HCR », explique #David_Payot. Dans la pratique, la réception d’un nombre plus élevé de réfugiés ne poserait pas de problèmes. « A Lausanne, si l’on parle de l’accueil d’enfants, nos écoles reçoivent 14’000 élèves. Scolariser quelques dizaines d’élèves supplémentaires est tout à fait possible, et représente un investissement pour leur avenir et le nôtre », explique le Municipal.

    A titre personnel, le magistrat popiste lausannois tient à dénoncer les carences politiques des accords Schengen/Dublin. « Ce système charge les pays de la Méditerranée du plus gros des efforts d’accueil des requérants, alors qu’ils n’en ont pas les moyens. Cette assignation empêche les requérants de postuler dans des Etats ou ils.elles auraient plus de liens. Ce système accroît les problèmes plutôt que de les résoudre. Il faut le changer », soutient David Payot.

    En juin dernier, 132 organisations et plus de 50’000 personnes avaient déjà déposé une pétition demandant au Conseil fédéral de participer à l’évacuation immédiate des camps de réfugiés grecs et d’accueillir un nombre important de personnes en Suisse.
    Huit villes suisses avaient déjà proposé des offres concrètes comme le financement des vols d’évacuation et des hébergements. « C’est une concertation que nous souhaitons développer entre les maires et syndics des grandes villes suisses. 70% de la population vit en zone urbaine et les villes sont aux premières loges de nombreux problèmes, sociaux, migratoires, climatiques. Nous devons êtes mieux entendus », assure #Grégoire_Junod.« Proposer l’accueil de 20 mineurs non accompagnés, comme l’a indiqué le Conseil fédéral, fait honte à notre tradition humanitaire », martèle-t-il.
    Le Conseil fédéral pourra-t-il plus longtemps faire la sourde oreille ?

    https://www.gauchebdo.ch/2020/09/18/des-villes-en-premiere-ligne
    #Lesbos #Grèce #incendie #villes-refuge #asile #migrations #réfugiés #MNA #mineurs_non_accompagnés

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste autour de l’incendie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/876123

    Et à la métaliste sur les villes-refuge :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145

  • Cast away : the UK’s rushed charter flights to deport Channel crossers

    Warning: this document contains accounts of violence, attempted suicides and self harm.

    The British government has vowed to clamp down on migrants crossing the Channel in small boats, responding as ever to a tabloid media panic. One part of its strategy is a new wave of mass deportations: charter flights, specifically targeting channel-crossers, to France, Germany and Spain.

    There have been two flights so far, on the 12 and 26 August. The next one is planned for 3 September. The two recent flights stopped in both Germany (Duesseldorf) and France (Toulouse on the 12, Clermont-Ferrand on the 26). Another flight was planned to Spain on 27 August – but this was cancelled after lawyers managed to get everyone off the flight.

    Carried out in a rush by a panicked Home Office, these mass deportations have been particularly brutal, and may have involved serious legal irregularities. This report summarises what we know so far after talking to a number of the people deported and from other sources. It covers:

    The context: Calais boat crossings and the UK-France deal to stop them.

    In the UK: Yarl’s Wood repurposed as Channel-crosser processing centre; Britannia Hotels; Brook House detention centre as brutal as ever.

    The flights: detailed timeline of the 26 August charter to Dusseldorf and Clermont-Ferrand.

    Who’s on the flight: refugees including underage minors and torture survivors.

    Dumped on arrival: people arriving in Germany and France given no opportunity to claim asylum, served with immediate expulsion papers.

    The legalities: use of the Dublin III regulation to evade responsibility for refugees.

    Is it illegal?: rushed process leads to numerous irregularities.

    “that night, eight people cut themselves”

    “That night before the flight (25 August), when we were locked in our rooms and I heard that I had lost my appeal, I was desperate. I started to cut myself. I wasn’t the only one. Eight people self-harmed or tried to kill themselves rather than be taken on that plane. One guy threw a kettle of boiling water on himself. One man tried to hang himself with the cable of the TV in his room. Three of us were taken to hospital, but sent back to the detention centre after a few hours. The other five they just took to healthcare [the clinic in Brook House] and bandaged up. About 5 in the morning they came to my room, guards with riot shields. On the way to the van, they led me through a kind of corridor which was full of people – guards, managers, officials from the Home Office. They all watched while a doctor examined me, then the doctor said – ‘yes, he’s fit to fly’. On the plane later I saw one guy hurt really badly, fresh blood on his head and on his clothes. He hadn’t just tried to stop the ticket, he really wanted to kill himself. He was taken to Germany.”

    Testimony of a deported person.

    The context: boats and deals

    Since the 1990s, tens of thousands of people fleeing war, repression and poverty have crossed the “short straits” between Calais and Dover. Until 2018, people without papers attempting to cross the Channel did so mainly by getting into lorries or on trains through the Channel Tunnel. Security systems around the lorry parks, tunnel and highway were escalated massively following the eviction of the big Jungle in 2016. This forced people into seeking other, ever more dangerous, routes – including crossing one of the world’s busiest waterways in small boats. Around 300 people took this route in 2018, a further 2000 in 2019 – and reportedly more than 5,000 people already by August 2020.

    These crossings have been seized on by the UK media in their latest fit of xenophobic scaremongering. The pattern is all too familiar since the Sangatte camp of 1999: right-wing media outlets (most infamously the Daily Mail, but also others) push-out stories about dangerous “illegals” swarming across the Channel; the British government responds with clampdown promises.

    Further stoked by Brexit, recent measures have included:

    Home Secretary Priti Patel announcing a new “Fairer Borders” asylum and immigration law that she promises will “send the left into meltdown”.

    A formal request from the Home Office to the Royal Navy to assist in turning back migrants crossing by boat (although this would be illegal).

    Negotiations with the French government, leading to the announcement on 13 August of a “joint operational plan” aimed at “completely cutting this route.”

    The appointment of a “Clandestine Channel Threat Commander” to oversee operations on both sides of the Channel.

    The concrete measures are still emerging, but notable developments so far include:

    Further UK payments to France to increase security – reportedly France demanded £30 million.

    French warships from the Naval base at Cherbourg patrolling off the coast of Calais and Dunkirk.

    UK Border Force Cutters and Coastal Patrol Vessels patrolling the British side, supported by flights from Royal Air Force surveillance planes.

    The new charter flight deportation programme — reportedly named “Operation Sillath” by the Home Office.

    For the moment, at least, the governments are respecting their minimal legal obligations to protect life at sea. And there has not been evidence of illegal “push backs” or “pull backs”: where the British “push” or the French “pull” boats back across the border line by force. When these boats are intercepted in French waters the travellers are taken back to France. If they make it into UK waters, Border Force pick them up and disembark them at Dover. They are then able to claim asylum in the UK.

    There is no legal difference in claiming asylum after arriving by boat, on a plane, or any other way. However, these small boat crossers have been singled out by the government to be processed in a special way seemingly designed to deny them the right to asylum in the UK.

    Once people are safely on shore the second part of Priti Patel’s strategy to make this route unviable kicks in: systematically obstruct their asylum claims and, where possible, deport them to France or other European countries. In practice, there is no way the Home Office can deport everyone who makes it across. Rather, as with the vast majority of immigration policy, the aim is to display toughness with a spectacle of enforcement – not only in an attempt to deter other arrivals, but perhaps, above all else, to play to key media audiences.

    This is where the new wave of charter flights come in. Deportations require cooperation from the destination country, and the first flight took place on 12 August in the midst of the Franco-British negotiations. Most recently, the flights have fed a new media spectacle in the UK: the Home Office attacking “activist lawyers” for doing their job and challenging major legal flaws in these rushed removals.

    The Home Office has tried to present these deportation flights as a strong immediate response to the Channel crossings. The message is: if you make it across, you’ll be back again within days. Again, this is more spectacle than reality. All the people we know of on the flights were in the UK for several months before being deported.

    In the UK: Yarl’s Wood repurposed

    Once on shore people are taken to one of two places: either the Kent Intake Unit, which is a Home Office holding facility (i.e., a small prefab cell complex) in the Eastern Docks of Dover Port; or the Dover police station. This police stations seems increasingly to be the main location, as the small “intake unit” is often at capacity. There used to be a detention centre in Dover where new arrivals were held, notorious for its run-down state, but this was closed in October 2015.

    People are typically held in the police station for no more than a day. The next destination is usually Yarl’s Wood, the Bedfordshire detention centre run by Serco. This was, until recently, a longer term detention centre holding mainly women. However, on 18 August the Home Office announced Yarl’s Wood been repurposed as a “Short Term Holding Facility” (SHTF) specifically to process people who have crossed the Channel. People stay usually just a few days – the legal maximum stay for a “short term” facility is seven days.

    Yarl’s Wood has a normal capacity of 410 prisoners. According to sources at Yarl’s Wood:

    “last week it was almost full with over 350 people detained. A few days later this number
    had fallen to 150, showing how quickly people are moving through the centre. As of Tuesday 25th of August there was no one in the centre at all! It seems likely that numbers will fluctuate in line with Channel crossings.”

    The same source adds:

    “There is a concern about access to legal aid in Yarl’s Wood. Short Term Holding Facility regulations do not require legal advice to be available on site (in Manchester, for example, there are no duty lawyers). Apparently the rota for duty lawyers is continuing at Yarl’s Wood for the time being. But the speed with which people are being processed now means that it is practically impossible to sign up and get a meeting with the duty solicitor before being moved out.”

    The Home Office conducts people’s initial asylum screening interviews whilst they are at Yarl’s Wood. Sometimes these are done in person, or sometimes by phone.

    This is a crucial point, as this first interview decides many people’s chance of claiming asylum in the UK. The Home Office uses information from this interview to deport the Channel crossers to France and Germany under the Dublin III regulation. This is EU legislation which allows governments to pass on responsibility for assessing someone’s asylum claim to another state. That is: the UK doesn’t even begin to look at people’s asylum cases.

    From what we have seen, many of these Dublin III assessments were made in a rushed and irregular way. They often used only weak circumstantial evidence. Few people had any chance to access legal advice, or even interpreters to explain the process.

    We discuss Dublin III and these issues below in the Legal Framework section.
    In the UK: Britain’s worst hotels

    From Yarl’s Wood, people we spoke to were given immigration bail and sent to asylum accommodation. In the first instance this currently means a cheap hotel. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Home Office ordered its asylum contractors (Mears, Serco) to shut their usual initial asylum accommodation and move people into hotels. It is not clear why this decision was made, as numerous accounts suggest the hotels are much worse as possible COVID incubators. The results of this policy have already proved fatal – we refer to the death of Adnan Olbeh in a Glasgow hotel in April.

    Perhaps the government is trying to prop up chains such as Britannia Hotels, judged for seven years running “Britain’s worst hotel chain” by consumer magazine Which?. Several people on the flights were kept in Britannia hotels. The company’s main owner, multi-millionaire Alex Langsam, was dubbed the “asylum king” by British media after winning previous asylum contracts with his slum housing sideline.

    Some of the deportees we spoke to stayed in hotel accommodation for several weeks before being moved into normal “asylum dispersal” accommodation – shared houses in the cheapest parts of cities far from London. Others were picked up for deportation directly from the hotels.

    In both cases, the usual procedure is a morning raid: Immigration Enforcement squads grab people from their beds around dawn. As people are in collaborating hotels or assigned houses, they are easy to find and arrest when next on the list for deportation.

    After arrest, people were taken to the main detention centres near Heathrow (Colnbrook and Harmondsworth) or Gatwick (particularly Brook House). Some stopped first at a police station or Short Term Holding Facility for some hours or days.

    All the people we spoke to eventually ended up in Brook House, one of the two Gatwick centres.
    “they came with the shields”

    “One night in Brook House, after someone cut himself, they locked everyone in. One man panicked and started shouting asking the guards please open the door. But he didn’t speak much English, he was shouting in Arabic. He said – ‘if you don’t open the door I will boil water in my kettle and throw it on my face.’ But they didn’t understand him, they thought he was threatening them, saying he would throw it at them. So they came with the shields, took him out of his room and put him into a solitary cell. When they put him in there they kicked him and beat him, they said ‘don’t threaten us again’.” Testimony of a deported person.

    Brook House

    Brook House remains notorious, after exposure by a whistleblower of routine brutality and humiliation by guards then working for G4S. The contract has since been taken over by Mitie’s prison division – branded as “Care and Custody, a Mitie company”. Presumably, many of the same guards simply transferred over.

    In any case, according to what we heard from the deported people, nothing much has changed in Brook House – viciousness and violence from guards remains the norm. The stories included here give just a few examples. See recent detainee testimonies on the Detained Voices blog for much more.
    “they only care that you don’t die in front of them”

    “I was in my room in Brook House on my own for 12 days, I couldn’t eat or drink, just kept thinking, thinking about my situation. I called for the doctors maybe ten times. They did come a couple of times, they took my blood, but they didn’t do anything else. They don’t care about your health or your mental health. They are just scared you will die there. They don’t care what happens to you just so long as you don’t die in front of their eyes. It doesn’t matter if you die somewhere else.” Testimony of a deported person.
    Preparing the flights

    The Home Office issues papers called “Removal Directions” (RDs) to those they intend to deport. These specify the destination and day of the flight. People already in detention should be given at least 72 hours notice, including two working days, which allows them to make final appeals.

    See the Right to Remain toolkit for detailed information on notice periods and appeal procedures.

    All UK deportation flights, both tickets on normal scheduled flights and chartered planes, are booked by a private contractor called Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT). The main airline used by the Home Office for charter flights is a charter company called Titan Airways.

    See this 2018 Corporate Watch report for detailed information on charter flight procedures and the companies involved. And this 2020 update on deportations overall.

    On the 12 August flight, legal challenges managed to get 19 people with Removal Directions off the plane. However, the Home Office then substituted 14 different people who were on a “reserve list”. Lawyers suspect that these 14 people did not have sufficient access to legal representation before their flight which is why they were able to be removed.

    Of the 19 people whose lawyers successfully challenged their attempted deportation, 12 would be deported on the next charter flight on 26 August. 6 were flown to Dusseldorf in Germany, and 6 to Clermont-Ferrand in France.

    Another flight was scheduled for the 27 August to Spain. However, lawyers managed to get everyone taken off, and the Home Office cancelled the flight. A Whitehall source was quoted as saying “there was 100% legal attrition rate on the flight due to unprecedented and organised casework barriers sprung on the government by three law firms.” It is suspected that the Home Office will continue their efforts to deport these people on future charter flights.

    Who was deported?

    All the people on the flights were refugees who had claimed asylum in the UK immediately on arrival at Dover. While the tabloids paint deportation flights as carrying “dangerous criminals”, none of these people had any criminal charges.

    They come from countries including Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Syria, Afghanistan and Kuwait. (Ten further Yemenis were due to be on the failed flight to Spain. In June, the UK government said it will resume arms sales to Saudi Arabia to use in the bombardment of the country that has cost tens of thousands of lives).

    All have well-founded fears of persecution in their countries of origin, where there have been extensive and well-documented human rights abuses. At least some of the deportees are survivors of torture – and have been documented as such in the Home Office’s own assessments.

    One was a minor under 18 who was age assessed by the Home Office as 25 – despite them being in possession of his passport proving his real age. Unaccompanied minors should not legally be processed under the Dublin III regulation, let alone held in detention and deported.

    Many, if not all, have friends and families in the UK.

    No one had their asylum case assessed – all were removed under the Dublin III procedure (see Legal Framework section below).

    Timeline of the flight on 26 August

    Night of 25 August: Eight people due to be on the flight self-harm or attempt suicide. Others have been on hunger strike for more than a week already. Three are taken to hospital where they are hastily treated before being discharged so they can still be placed on the flight. Another five are simply bandaged up in Brook House’s healthcare facility. (See testimony above.)

    26 August, 4am onwards: Guards come to take deportees from their rooms in Brook House. There are numerous testimonies of violence: three or four guards enter rooms with shields, helmets, and riot gear and beat up prisoners if they show any resistance.

    4am onwards: The injured prisoners are taken by guards to be inspected by a doctor, in a corridor in front of officials, and are certified as “fit to fly”.

    5am onwards: Prisoners are taken one by one to waiting vans. Each is placed in a separate van with four guards. Vans are labelled with the Mitie “Care and Custody” logo. Prisoners are then kept sitting in the vans until everyone is loaded, which takes one to two hours.

    6am onwards: Vans drive from Brook House (near Gatwick Airport) to Stansted Airport. They enter straight into the airport charter flight area. Deportees are taken one by one from the vans and onto Titan’s waiting plane. It is an anonymous looking white Airbus A321-211 without the company’s livery, with the registration G-POWU. They are escorted up the steps with a guard on each side.

    On the plane there are four guards to each person: one seated on each side, one in the seat in front and one behind. Deportees are secured with restraint belts around their waists, so that their arms are handcuffed to the belts on each side. Besides the 12 deportees and 48 guards there are Home Office officials, Mitie managers, and two paramedics on the plane.

    7.48AM (BST): The Titan Airways plane (using flight number ZT311) departs Stansted airport.

    9.44AM (CEST): The flight lands in Dusseldorf. Six people are taken off the plane and are handed over to the German authorities.

    10.46AM (CEST): Titan’s Airbus takes off from Dusseldorf bound for Clermont-Ferrand, France with the remaining deportees.

    11.59AM (CEST): The Titan Airways plane (now with flight number ZT312) touches down at Clermont-Ferrand Auvergne airport and the remaining six deportees are disembarked from the plane and taken into the custody of the Police Aux Frontières (PAF, French border police).

    12:46PM (CEST): The plane leaves Clermont-Ferrand to return to the UK. It first lands in Gatwick, probably so the escorts and other officials get off, before continuing on to Stansted where the pilots finish their day.

    Dumped on arrival: Germany

    What happened to most of the deportees in Germany is not known, although it appears there was no comprehensive intake procedure by the German police. One deportee told us German police on arrival in Dusseldorf gave him a train ticket and told him to go to the asylum office in Berlin. When he arrived there, he was told to go back to his country. He told them he could not and that he had no money to stay in Berlin or travel to another country. The asylum office told him he could sleep on the streets of Berlin.

    Only one man appears to have been arrested on arrival. This was the person who had attempted suicide the night before, cutting his head and neck with razors, and had been bleeding throughout the flight.
    Dumped on arrival: France

    The deportees were taken to Clermont-Ferrand, a city in the middle of France, hundreds of kilometres away from metropolitan centres. Upon arrival they were subjected to a COVID nose swab test and then held by the PAF while French authorities decided their fate.

    Two were released around an hour and a half later with appointments to claim asylum in around one week’s time – in regional Prefectures far from Clermont-Ferrand. They were not offered any accommodation, further legal information, or means to travel to their appointments.

    The next person was released about another hour and a half after them. He was not given an appointment to claim asylum, but just provided with a hotel room for four nights.

    Throughout the rest of the day the three other detainees were taken from the airport to the police station to be fingerprinted. Beginning at 6PM these three began to be freed. The last one was released seven hours after the deportation flight landed. The police had been waiting for the Prefecture to decide whether or not to transfer them to the detention centre (Centre de Rétention Administrative – CRA). We don’t know if a factor in this was that the nearest detention centre, at Lyon, was full up.

    However, these people were not simply set free. They were given expulsion papers ordering them to leave France (OQTF: Obligation de quitter le territoire français), and banning them from returning (IRTF: Interdiction de retour sur le territoire français). These papers allowed them only 48 hours to appeal. The British government has said that people deported on flights to France have the opportunity to claim asylum in France. This is clearly not true.

    In a further bureaucratic contradiction, alongside expulsion papers people were also given orders that they must report to the Clermont-Ferrand police station every day at 10:00AM for the next 45 days (potentially to be arrested and detained at any point). They were told that if they failed to report, the police would consider them on the run.

    The Prefecture also reserved a place in a hotel many kilometres away from the airport for them for four nights, but not any further information or ways to receive food. They were also not provided any way to get to this hotel, and the police would not help them – stating that their duty finished once they gave the deportees their papers.

    “After giving me the expulsion papers the French policeman said ‘Now you can go to England.’” (Testimony of deported person)

    The PAF showed a general disregard for the health and well-being of the deportees who were in the custody throughout the day. One of the deportees had been in a wheel-chair throughout the day and was unable to walk due to the deep lacerations on his feet from self-harming. He was never taken to the hospital, despite the doctor’s recommendation, neither during the custody period nor after his release. In fact, the only reason for the doctor’s visit in the first place was to assess whether he was fit to be detained should the Prefecture decide that. The police kept him in his bloody clothes all day, and when they released him he did not have shoes and could barely walk. No crutches were given, nor did the police offer to help him get to the hotel. He was put out on the street having to carry all of his possessions in a Home Office issue plastic bag.
    “the hardest night of my life”

    “It was the hardest night of my life. My heart break was so great that I seriously thought of suicide. I put the razor in my mouth to swallow it; I saw my whole life pass quickly until the first hours of dawn. The treatment in detention was very bad, humiliating and degrading. I despised myself and felt that my life was destroyed, but it was too precious to lose it easily. I took the razor out from my mouth before I was taken out of the room, where four large-bodied people, wearing armour similar to riot police and carrying protective shields, violently took me to the large hall at the ground floor of the detention centre. I was exhausted, as I had been on hunger strike for several days. In a room next to me, one of the deportees tried to resist and was beaten so severely that blood dripping from his nose. In the big hall, they searched me carefully and took me to a car like a dangerous criminal, two people on my right and left, they drove for about two hours to the airport, there was a big passenger plane on the runway. […] That moment, I saw my dreams, my hopes, shattered in front of me when I entered the plane.”

    Testimony of deported person (from Detained Voices: https://detainedvoices.com/2020/08/27/brook-house-protestor-on-his-deportation-it-was-the-hardest-night-of).

    The Legal Framework: Dublin III

    These deportations are taking place under the Dublin III regulation. This is EU law that determines which European country is responsible for assessing a refugee’s asylum claim. The decision involves a number of criteria, the primary ones being ‘family unity’ and the best interests of children. Another criterion, in the case of people crossing borders without papers, is which country they first entered ‘irregularly’. In the law, this is supposed to be less important than family ties – but it is the most commonly used ground by governments seeking to pass on asylum applicants to other states. All the people we know of on these flights were “Dublined” because the UK claimed they had previously been in France, Germany or Spain.

    (See: House of Commons intro briefing; Right to Remain toolkit section:
    https://commonslibrary.parliament.uk/what-is-the-dublin-iii-regulation-will-it-be-affected-by-b
    https://righttoremain.org.uk/toolkit/dublin)

    By invoking the Dublin regulation, the UK evades actually assessing people’s asylum cases. These people were not deported because their asylum claims failed – their cases were simply never considered. The decision to apply Dublin III is made after the initial screening interview (now taking place in Yarl’s Wood). As we saw above, very few people are able to access any legal advice before these interviews are conducted and sometimes they are carried out by telephone or without adequate translation.

    Under Dublin III the UK must make a formal request to the other government it believes is responsible for considering the asylum claim to take the person back, and present evidence as to why that government should accept responsibility. Typically, the evidence provided is the record of the person’s fingerprints registered by another country on the Europe-wide EURODAC database.

    However, in the recent deportation cases the Home Office has not always provided fingerprints but instead relied on weak circumstantial evidence. Some countries have refused this evidence, but others have accepted – notably France.

    There seems to be a pattern in the cases so far where France is accepting Dublin III returns even when other countries have refused. The suspicion is that the French government may have been incentivised to accept ‘take-back’ requests based on very flimsy evidence as part of the recent Franco-British Channel crossing negotiations (France reportedly requested £30m to help Britain make the route ‘unviable’).

    In theory, accepting a Dublin III request means that France (or another country) has taken responsibility to process someone’s asylum claim. In practice, most of the people who arrived at Clermont-Ferrand on 26 August were not given any opportunity to claim asylum – instead they were issued with expulsion papers ordering them to leave France and Europe. They were also only given 48 hours to appeal these expulsions orders without any further legal information; a near impossibility for someone who has just endured a forceful expulsion and may require urgent medical treatment.

    Due to Brexit, the United Kingdom will no longer participate in Dublin III from 31 December 2020. While there are non-EU signatories to the agreement like Switzerland and Norway, it is unclear what arrangements the UK will have after that (as with basically everything else about Brexit). If there is no overall deal, the UK will have to negotiate numerous bilateral agreements with European countries. This pattern of expedited expulsion without a proper screening process established with France could be a taste of things to come.

    Conclusion: rushed – and illegal?

    Charter flight deportations are one of the most obviously brutal tools used by the UK Border Regime. They involve the use of soul-crushing violence by the Home Office and its contractors (Mitie, Titan Airways, Britannia Hotels, and all) against people who have already lived through histories of trauma.

    For these recent deportations of Channel crossers the process seems particularly rushed. People who have risked their lives in the Channel are scooped into a machine designed to deny their asylum rights and expel them ASAP – for the sake of a quick reaction to the latest media panic. New procedures appear to have been introduced off the cuff by Home Office officials and in under-the-table deals with French counterparts.

    As a result of this rush-job, there seem to be numerous irregularities in the process. Some have been already flagged up in the successful legal challenges to the Spanish flight on 27 August. The detention and deportation of boat-crossers may well be largely illegal, and is open to being challenged further on both sides of the Channel.

    Here we recap a few particular issues:

    The highly politicised nature of the expulsion process for small boat crossers means they are being denied access to a fair asylum procedure by the Home Office.

    The deportees include people who are victims of torture and of trafficking, as well as under-aged minors.

    People are being detained, rushed through screening interviews, and “Dublined” without access to legal advice and necessary information.

    In order to avoid considering asylum requests, Britain is applying Dublin III often just using flimsy circumstantial evidence – and France is accepting these requests, perhaps as a result of recent negotiations and financial arrangements.

    Many deportees have family ties in the UK – but the primary Dublin III criterion of ‘family unity’ is ignored.

    In accepting Dublin III requests France is taking legal responsibility for people’s asylum claims. But in fact it has denied people the chance to claim asylum, instead immediately issuing expulsion papers.

    These expulsion papers (‘Order to quit France’ and ‘Ban from returning to France’ or ‘OQTF’ and ‘IRTF’) are issued with only 48 hour appeal windows. This is completely inadequate to ensure a fair procedure – even more so for traumatised people who have just endured detention and deportation, then been dumped in the middle of nowhere in a country where they have no contacts and do not speak the language.

    This completely invalidates the Home Office’s argument that the people it deports will be able to access a fair asylum procedure in France.

    https://corporatewatch.org/cast-away-the-uks-rushed-charter-flights-to-deport-channel-crossers

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #UK #Angleterre #Dublin #expulsions #renvois #Royaume_Uni #vols #charter #France #Allemagne #Espagne #Home_Office #accord #témoignage #violence #Brexit #Priti_Patel #Royal_Navy #plan_opérationnel_conjoint #Manche #Commandant_de_la_menace_clandestine_dans_la_Manche #Cherbourg #militarisation_des_frontières #frontières #Calais #Dunkerque #navires #Border_Force_Cutters #avions_de_surveillance #Royal_Air_Force #Opération_Sillath #refoulements #push-backs #Douvres #Kent_Intake_Unit #Yarl’s_Wood #Bedfordshire #Serco #Short_Term_Holding_Facility (#SHTF) #hôtel #Mears #hôtels_Britannia #Alex_Langsam #Immigration_Enforcement_squads #Heathrow #Colnbrook #Harmondsworth #Gatwick #aéroport #Brook_Hous #G4S #Removal_Directions #Carlson_Wagonlit_Travel (#CWT) #privatisation #compagnies_aériennes #Titan_Airways #Clermont-Ferrand #Düsseldorf

    @karine4 —> il y a une section dédiée à l’arrivée des vols charter en France (à Clermont-Ferrand plus précisément) :
    Larguées à destination : la France

    ping @isskein

    • Traduction française :

      S’en débarrasser : le Royaume Uni se précipite pour expulser par vols charters les personnes qui traversent la Manche

      Attention : ce document contient des récits de violence, tentatives de suicide et automutilation.

      Le Royaume Uni s’attache à particulièrement réprimer les migrants traversant la Manche dans de petites embarcations, répondant comme toujours à la panique propagée par les tabloïds britanniques. Une partie de sa stratégie consiste en une nouvelle vague d’expulsions massives : des vols charters, ciblant spécifiquement les personnes traversant la Manche, vers la France, l’Allemagne et l’Espagne.

      Deux vols ont eu lieu jusqu’à présent, les 12 et 26 août. Le prochain est prévu pour le 3 septembre. Les deux vols récents ont fait escale à la fois en Allemagne (Düsseldorf) et en France (Toulouse le 12, Clermont-Ferrand le 26). Un autre vol était prévu pour l’Espagne le 27 août – mais il a été annulé après que les avocat-es aient réussi à faire descendre tout le monde de l’avion.

      Menées à la hâte par un Home Office en panique, ces déportations massives ont été particulièrement brutales, et ont pu impliquer de graves irrégularités juridiques. Ce rapport résume ce que nous savons jusqu’à présent après avoir parlé à un certain nombre de personnes expulsées et à d’autres sources. Il couvre :

      Le contexte : Les traversées en bateau de Calais et l’accord entre le Royaume-Uni et la France pour les faire cesser.
      Au Royaume-Uni : Yarl’s Wood reconverti en centre de traitement de personnes traversant la Manche ; Britannia Hotels ; le centre de détention de Brook House, toujours aussi brutal.
      Les vols : Calendrier détaillé du charter du 26 août vers Düsseldorf et Clermont-Ferrand.
      Qui est à bord du vol : Les personnes réfugiées, y compris des mineurs et des personnes torturées.
      Délaissé à l’arrivée : Les personnes arrivant en Allemagne et en France qui n’ont pas la possibilité de demander l’asile se voient délivrer immédiatement des documents d’expulsion.
      Les questions juridiques : Utilisation du règlement Dublin III pour se soustraire de la responsabilité à l’égard des réfugiés.
      Est-ce illégal ? : la précipitation du processus entraîne de nombreuses irrégularités.

      “cette nuit-là, huit personnes se sont automutilées”

      Cette nuit-là avant le vol (25 août), lorsque nous étions enfermés dans nos chambres et que j’ai appris que j’avais perdu en appel, j’étais désespéré. J’ai commencé à me mutiler. Je n’étais pas le seule. Huit personnes se sont automutilées ou ont tenté de se suicider plutôt que d’être emmenées dans cet avion. Un homme s’est jeté une bouilloire d’eau bouillante sur lui-même. Un homme a essayé de se pendre avec le câble de télé dans sa chambre. Trois d’entre nous ont été emmenés à l’hôpital, mais renvoyés au centre de détention après quelques heures. Les cinq autres ont été emmenés à l’infirmerie de Brook House où on leur a mis des pansements. Vers 5 heures du matin, ils sont venus dans ma chambre, des gardes avec des boucliers anti-émeutes. Sur le chemin pour aller au van, ils m’ont fait traverser une sorte de couloir rempli de gens – gardes, directeurs, fonctionnaires du Home Office. Ils ont tous regardé pendant qu’un médecin m’examinait, puis le médecin a dit : “oui, il est apte à voler”. Dans l’avion, plus tard, j’ai vu un homme très gravement blessé, du sang dégoulinant de sa tête et sur ses vêtements. Il n’avait pas seulement essayé d’arrêter le vol, il voulait vraiment se tuer. Il a été emmené en Allemagne.

      Témoignage d’une personne déportée.

      Le contexte : les bateaux et les accords

      Depuis les années 1990, des dizaines de milliers de personnes fuyant la guerre, la répression et la pauvreté ont franchi le “court détroit” entre Calais et Dover. Jusqu’en 2018, les personnes sans papiers qui tentaient de traverser la Manche le faisaient principalement en montant dans des camions ou des trains passant par le tunnel sous la Manche. Les systèmes de sécurité autour des parkings de camions, du tunnel et de l’autoroute ont été massivement renforcés après l’expulsion de la grande jungle en 2016. Cela a obligé les gens à chercher d’autres itinéraires, toujours plus dangereux, y compris en traversant l’une des voies navigables les plus fréquentées du monde à bord de petits bateaux. Environ 300 personnes ont emprunté cet itinéraire en 2018, 2000 autres en 2019 – et, selon les rapports, plus de 5000 personnes entre janvier et août 2020.

      Ces passages ont été relayés par les médias britanniques lors de leur dernière vague de publications xénophobiques et alarmistes. Le schéma n’est que trop familier depuis le camp Sangatte en 1999 : les médias de droite (le plus célèbre étant le Daily Mail, mais aussi d’autres) diffusent des articles abusifs sur les dangereux “illégaux” qui déferleraient à travers la Manche ; et le gouvernement britannique répond par des promesses de répression.

      Renforcé par le Brexit, les mesures et annonces récentes comprennent :

      Le ministre de l’intérieur, Priti Patel, annonce une nouvelle loi sur l’asile et l’immigration “plus juste” qui, promet-elle, “fera s’effondrer la gauche”.
      Une demande officielle du Home Office à la Royal Navy pour aider à refouler les migrants qui traversent par bateau (bien que cela soit illégal).
      Négociations avec le gouvernement français, qui ont abouti à l’annonce le 13 août d’un “plan opérationnel conjoint” visant “ à couper complètement cette route”.
      La nomination d’un “Commandant de la menace clandestine dans la Manche” pour superviser les opérations des deux côtés de la Manche.

      Les mesures concrètes se font encore attendre, mais les évolutions notables jusqu’à présent sont les suivantes :

      D’autres paiements du Royaume-Uni à la France pour accroître la sécurité – la France aurait demandé 30 millions de livres sterling.
      Des navires de guerre français de la base navale de Cherbourg patrouillant au large des côtes de Calais et de Dunkerque.
      Des Border Force Cutters (navires) et les patrouilleurs côtiers britanniques patrouillant du côté anglais soutenus par des avions de surveillance de la Royal Air Force.
      Le nouveau programme d’expulsion par vol charter – qui aurait été baptisé “Opération Sillath” par le ministère de l’intérieur.

      Pour l’instant, du moins, les gouvernements respectent leurs obligations légales minimales en matière de protection de la vie en mer. Et il n’y a pas eu de preuves de “push backs” (refoulement) ou de “pull backs” illégaux : où, de force, soit des bateaux britanniques “poussent”, soit des bateaux français “tirent” des bateaux vers l’un ou l’autre côté de la frontière. Lorsque ces bateaux sont interceptés dans les eaux françaises, les voyageurs sont ramenés en France. S’ils parviennent à entrer dans les eaux britanniques, la police aux frontières britannique les récupère et les débarque à Douvres. Ils peuvent alors demander l’asile au Royaume-Uni.

      Il n’y a pas de différence juridique entre demander l’asile après être arrivé par bateau, par avion ou de toute autre manière. Cependant, ces personnes traversant par petits bateaux ont été ciblées par le gouvernement pour être traitées d’une manière spéciale, semble-t-il conçue pour leur refuser le droit d’asile au Royaume-Uni.

      Une fois que les personnes sont à terre et en sécurité, le deuxième volet de la stratégie de Priti Patel visant à rendre cette voie non viable entre en jeu : systématiquement faire obstacle à leur demande d’asile et, si possible, les expulser vers la France ou d’autres pays européens. En pratique, il est impossible pour le Home Office d’expulser toutes les personnes qui réussissent à traverser. Il s’agit plutôt, comme dans la grande majorité des politiques d’immigration, de faire preuve de fermeté avec un spectacle de mise en vigueur – non seulement pour tenter de dissuader d’autres arrivant-es, mais peut-être surtout pour se mettre en scène devant les principaux médias.

      C’est là qu’intervient la nouvelle vague de vols charter. Les expulsions nécessitent la coopération du pays de destination, et le premier vol a eu lieu le 12 août en plein milieu des négociations franco-britanniques. Plus récemment, ces vols ont alimenté un nouveau spectacle médiatique au Royaume-Uni : le Home Office s’en prend aux “avocats militants” qui font leur travail en contestant les principales failles juridiques de ces renvois précipités.

      Le Home Office a tenté de présenter ces vols d’expulsion comme une réponse immédiate et forte aux traversées de la Manche. Le message est le suivant : si vous traversez la Manche, vous serez de retour dans les jours qui suivent. Là encore, il s’agit plus de spectacle que de réalité. Toutes les personnes que nous connaissons sur ces vols étaient au Royaume-Uni plusieurs mois avant d’être expulsées.

      Au Royaume-Uni : Yarl’s Wood réaffecté

      Une fois à terre en Angleterre, les personnes sont emmenées à l’un des deux endroits suivants : soit la Kent Intake Unit (Unité d’admission du Kent), qui est un centre de détention du ministère de l’intérieur (c’est-à-dire un petit complexe de cellules préfabriquées) dans les docks à l’est du port de Douvres ; soit le poste de police de Douvres. Ce poste de police semble être de plus en plus l’endroit principal, car la petite “unité d’admission” est souvent pleine. Il y avait autrefois un centre de détention à Douvres où étaient détenus les nouveaux arrivants, qui était connu pour son état de délabrement, mais a été fermé en octobre 2015.

      Les personnes sont généralement détenues au poste de police pendant une journée maximum. La destination suivante est généralement Yarl’s Wood, le centre de détention du Bedfordshire géré par Serco. Il s’agissait, jusqu’à récemment, d’un centre de détention à long terme qui accueillait principalement des femmes. Cependant, le 18 août, le ministère de l’intérieur a annoncé que Yarl’s Wood avait été réaménagé en “centre de détention de courte durée” (Short Term Holding Facility – SHTF) pour traiter spécifiquement les personnes qui ont traversé la Manche. Les personnes ne restent généralement que quelques jours – le séjour maximum légal pour un centre de “courte durée” est de sept jours.

      Yarl’s Wood a une capacité normale de 410 prisonniers. Selon des sources à Yarl’s Wood :

      “La semaine dernière, c’était presque plein avec plus de 350 personnes détenues. Quelques jours plus tard, ce nombre était tombé à 150, ce qui montre la rapidité avec laquelle les gens passent par le centre. Mardi 25 août, il n’y avait plus personne dans le centre ! Il semble probable que les chiffres fluctueront en fonction des traversées de la Manche.”

      La même source ajoute :

      “Il y a des inquiétudes concernant l’accès à l’aide juridique à Yarl’s Wood. La réglementation relative aux centres de détention provisoire n’exige pas que des conseils juridiques soient disponibles sur place (à Manchester, par exemple, il n’y a pas d’avocats de garde). Apparemment, le roulement des avocats de garde se poursuit à Yarl’s Wood pour l’instant. Mais la rapidité avec laquelle les personnes sont traitées maintenant signifie qu’il est pratiquement impossible de s’inscrire et d’obtenir un rendez-vous avec l’avocat de garde avant d’être transféré”.

      Le ministère de l’Intérieur mène les premiers entretiens d’évaluation des demandeurs d’asile pendant qu’ils sont à Yarl’s Wood. Ces entretiens se font parfois en personne, ou parfois par téléphone.

      C’est un moment crucial, car ce premier entretien détermine les chances de nombreuses personnes de demander l’asile au Royaume-Uni. Le ministère de l’intérieur utilise les informations issues de cet entretien pour expulser les personnes qui traversent la Manche vers la France et l’Allemagne en vertu du règlement Dublin III. Il s’agit d’une législation de l’Union Européenne (UE) qui permet aux gouvernements de transférer la responsabilité de l’évaluation de la demande d’asile d’une personne vers un autre État. Autrement dit, le Royaume-Uni ne commence même pas à examiner les demandes d’asile des personnes.

      D’après ce que nous avons vu, beaucoup de ces évaluations de Dublin III ont été faites de manière précipitée et irrégulière. Elles se sont souvent appuyées sur de faibles preuves circonstancielles. Peu de personnes ont eu la possibilité d’obtenir des conseils juridiques, ou même des interprètes pour expliquer le processus.

      Nous abordons Dublin III et les questions soulevées ci-dessous dans la section “Cadre juridique”.
      Au Royaume-Uni : les pires hôtels britanniques

      De Yarl’s Wood, les personnes à qui nous avons parlé ont été libérées sous caution (elles devaient respecter des conditions spécifiques aux personnes immigrées) dans des hébergement pour demandeurs d’asile. Dans un premier temps, cet hébergement signifie un hôtel à bas prix. En raison de l’épidémie du COVID-19, le Home Office a ordonné aux entreprises sous-traitantes (Mears, Serco) qui administrent habituellement les centres d’accueil pour demandeurs d’asile de fermer leurs places d’hébergement et d’envoyer les personnes à l’hôtel. Cette décision est loin d’être claire, du fait que de nombreux indicateurs suggèrent que les hôtels sont bien pires en ce qui concerne la propagation du COVID. Le résultat de cette politique s’est déjà avéré fatal – voir la mort d’Adnan Olbeh à l’hôtel Glasgow en avril.

      Peut-être le gouvernement essaie de soutenir des chaînes telles que Britannia Hotels, classée depuis sept ans à la suite comme la “pire chaîne d’hôtel britannique” par le magazine des consommateurs Which ?. Plusieurs personnes envoyées par charter avaient été placées dans des hôtels Britannia. Le principal propriétaire de cette chaîne, le multi-millionnaire Alex Langsam, a été surnommé « le roi de l’asile » par les médias britanniques après avoir remporté précédemment à l’aide de ses taudis d’autres contrats pour l’hébergement des demandeurs d’asile.

      Certaines des personnes déportées à qui nous avons parlé sont restées dans ce genre d’hôtels plusieurs semaines avant d’être envoyées dans des lieux de “dispersion des demandeurs d’asile” – des logements partagés situés dans les quartiers les plus pauvres de villes très éloignées de Londres. D’autres ont été mises dans l’avion directement depuis les hôtels.

      Dans les deux cas, la procédure habituelle est le raid matinal : Des équipes de mise-en-œuvre de l’immigration (Immigration Enforcement squads) arrachent les gens de leur lit à l’aube. Comme les personnes sont dans des hôtels qui collaborent ou assignées à des maisons, il est facile de les trouver et de les arrêter quand elles sont les prochains sur la liste des déportations.

      Après l’arrestation, les personnes ont été amenées aux principaux centres de détention près de Heathrow (Colnbrook et Harmondsworth) ou Gatwick (particulièrement Brook House). Quelques-unes ont d’abord été gardées au commissariat ou en détention pour des séjours de court terme pendant quelques heures ou quelques jours.

      Tous ceux à qui nous avons parlé ont finalement terminé à Brook House, un des deux centres de détention de Gatwick.
      « ils sont venus avec les boucliers »

      Une nuit, à Brook House, après que quelqu’un se soit mutilé, ils ont enfermé tout le monde. Un homme a paniqué et a commencé à crier en demandant aux gardes « S’il vous plaît, ouvrez la porte ». Mais il ne parlait pas bien anglais et criait en arabe. Il a dit : « Si vous n’ouvrez pas la porte je vais faire bouillir de l’eau dans ma bouilloire et me la verser sur le visage ». Mais ils ne l’ont pas compris, ils pensaient qu’il était en train de les menacer et qu’il était en train de dire qu’il allait jeter l’eau bouillante sur eux. Alors ils sont arrivés avec leurs boucliers, ils l’ont jeté hors de sa cellule et ils l’ont mis en isolement. Quand ils l’ont mis là-bas, ils lui ont donné des coups et ils l’ont battu, ils ont dit : « Ne nous menace plus jamais ». (Témoignage d’une personne déportée)

      Brook House

      Brook House reste tristement célèbre après les révélations d’un lanceur d’alerte sur les brutalités quotidiennes et les humiliations commises par les gardes qui travaillent pour G4S. Leur contrat a depuis été repris par la branche emprisonnement de Mitie – dont la devise est « Care and Custody, a Mitie company » (traduction : « Soins et détention, une entreprise Mitie »). Probablement que beaucoup des mêmes gardes sont simplement passés d’une entreprise à l’autre.

      Dans tous les cas, d’après ce que les personnes déportées nous ont dit, pas grand chose n’a changé à Brook House – le vice et la violence des gardes restent la norme. Les histoires rapportées ici en donnent juste quelques exemples. Vous pouvez lire davantage dans les récents témoignages de personnes détenues sur le blog Detained Voices.
      « ils s’assurent juste que tu ne meures pas devant eux »

      J’étais dans ma cellule à Brook House seul depuis 12 jours, je ne pouvais ni manger ni boire, juste penser, penser à ma situation. J’ai demandé un docteur peut-être dix fois. Ils sont venus plusieurs fois, ils ont pris mon sang, mais ils n’ont rien fait d’autre. Ils s’en foutent de ta santé ou de ta santé mentale. Ils ont juste peur que tu meures là. Ils s’en foutent de ce qui t’arrive du moment que tu ne meures pas devant leurs yeux. Et ça n’a pas d’importance pour eux si tu meurs ailleurs.
      Témoignage d’une personne déportée.

      Préparation des vols

      Le Home Office délivre des papiers appelés « Instructions d’expulsion » (« Removal Directions » – Rds) aux personnes qu’ils ont l’intention de déporter. Y sont stipulés la destination et le jour du vol. Les personnes qui sont déjà en détention doivent recevoir ce papier au moins 72 heures à l’avance, incluant deux jours ouvrés, afin de leur permettre de faire un ultime appel de la décision.

      Voir Right to Remain toolkit pour des informations détaillés sur les délais légaux et sur les procédures d’appel.

      Tous les vols de déportation du Royaume Uni, les tickets qu’ils soient pour un avion de ligne régulier ou un vol charter sont réservés via une agence de voyage privée appelée Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT). La principale compagnie aérienne utilisée par le Home Office pour les vols charter est la compagnie de charter qui s’appelle Titan Airways.

      Voir 2018 Corporate Watch report pour les informations détaillées sur les procédures de vols charter et les compagnies impliquées. Et la mise-à-jour de 2020 sur les déportations en général.

      Concernant le vol du 12 août, des recours légaux ont réussi à faire sortir 19 personnes de l’avion qui avaient des Instructions d’expulsion ( Rds ). Cependant, le Home Office les a remplacées par 14 autres personnes qui étaient sur la « liste d’attente ». Les avocats suspectent que ces 14 personnes n’ont pas eu suffisamment accès à leur droit à être représentés par un-e avocat-e avant le vol, ce qui a permis qu’elles soient expulsés.

      Parmi les 19 personnes dont les avocat.es ont réussi à empêcher l’expulsion prévue, 12 ont finalement été déportées par le vol charter du 26 août : 6 personnes envoyées à Dusseldorf en Allemagne et 6 autres à Clermont-Ferrand en France.

      Un autre vol a été programmé le 27 août pour l’Espagne. Cependant les avocat-es ont réussi à faire retirer tout le monde, et le Home Office a annulé le vol. L’administration anglaise (Whitehall) a dit dans les médias : “le taux d’attrition juridique a été de 100 % pour ce vol en raison des obstacles sans précédent et organisés que trois cabinets d’avocats ont imposés au gouvernement.” Il y a donc de fortes chances que Home Office mettra tous ses moyens à disposition pour continuer à expulser ces personnes lors de prochains vols charters.

      Qui a été expulsé ?

      L’ensemble des personnes expulsées par avion sont des personnes réfugiées qui ont déposé leur demande d’asile au Royaume-Uni immédiatement après leur arrivée à Dover. La une des médias expose les personnes expulsées comme « de dangereux criminels », mais aucune d’entre elles n’a fait l’objet de poursuites.

      Ils viennent de différents pays dont l’Irak, le Yemen, le Soudan, la Syrie, l’Afghanistan et le Koweit. (Dix autres Yéménis devaient être expulsés par le vol annulé pour l’Espagne. Au mois de juin, le gouvernement du Royaume-Uni a annoncé la reprise des accords commerciaux de vente d’armes avec l’Arabie Saoudite qui les utilise dans des bombardements au Yemen qui ont déjà coûté la vie à des dizaines de milliers de personnes).

      Toutes ces personnes craignent à raison des persécution dans leurs pays d’origine – où les abus des Droits de l’Homme sont nombreux et ont été largement documentés. Au moins plusieurs des personnes expulsées ont survécu à la torture, ce qui a été documenté par le Home Office lui-même lors d’entretiens.

      Parmi eux, un mineur âgé de moins de 18 ans a été enregistré par le Home Office comme ayant 25 ans – alors même qu’ils étaient en possession de son passeport prouvant son âge réel. Les mineurs isolés ne devraient légalement pas être traités avec la procédure Dublin III, et encore moins être placés en détention et être expulsés.

      Beaucoup de ces personnes, si ce ne sont toutes, ont des ami-es et de la famille au Royaume-Uni.

      Aucune de leurs demandes d’asile n’a été évaluée – toutes ont été refusées dans le cadre de la procédure Dublin III (cf. Cadre Légal plus bas).

      Chronologie du vol du 26 août

      Nuit du 25 août : Huit des personnes en attente de leur expulsion se mutilent ou tentent de se suicider. D’autres personnes font une grève de la faim depuis plus d’une semaine. Trois d’entre elles sont amenées à l’hôpital, hâtivement prises en charge pour qu’elles puissent être placées dans l’avion. Cinq autres se sont simplement vus délivrer quelques compresses au service des soins du centre de détention de Brook House. (cf. le témoignage ci-dessus)

      26 août, vers 4 heure du matin : Les gardiens récupèrent les personnes expulsables dans leurs cellules. Il y a de nombreux témoignages de violence : trois ou quatre gardiens en tenue anti-émeute avec casques et boucliers s’introduisent dans les cellules et tabassent les détenus à la moindre résistance.

      vers 4 heure du matin : Les détenus blessés sont amenés par les gardiens pour être examinés par un médecin dans un couloir, face aux fonctionnaires, et sont jugés « apte à prendre l’avion ».

      vers 5 heure du matin : Les détenus sont amenés un par un dans les fourgons. Chacun est placé dans un fourgon séparé, entouré de quatre gardiens. Les fourgons portent le logo de l’entreprise Mitie « Care and Custody ». Les détenus sont gardés dans les fourgons le temps de faire monter tout le monde, ce qui prend une à deux heures.

      vers 6 heure du matin : Les fourgons vont du centre de détention de Brook House (près de l’Aéroport Gatwick) à l’Aéroport Stansted et entrent directement dans la zone réservée aux vols charters. Les détenus sont sortis un par un des fourgons vers l’avion de la compagnie aérienne Titan. Il s’agit d’un avion Airbus A321-211, avec le numéro d’enregistrement G-POWU, au caractère anonyme, qui ne porte aucun signe distinctif de la compagnie aérienne. Les détenus sont escortés en haut des escaliers avec un gardien de chaque côté.

      Dans l’avion quatre gardiens sont assignés à chaque personne : deux de part et d’autre sur les sièges mitoyens, un sur le siège devant et un sur le siège derrière. Les détenus sont maintenus avec une ceinture de restriction au niveau de leur taille à laquelle sont également attachées leurs mains par des menottes. En plus des 12 détenus et 48 gardiens, il y a des fonctionnaires du Home Office, des managers de Mitie, et deux personnels paramédicaux dans l’avion.

      7h58 (BST) : L’avion de la compagnie Titan (dont le numéro de vol est ZT311) décolle de l’Aéroport Stansted.

      9h44 (CEST) : Le vol atterrit à Dusseldorf. Six personnes sont sorties de l’avion, laissées aux mains des autorités allemandes.

      10h46 (CEST) : L’avion Titan décolle de Dusseldorf pour rejoindre Clermont-Ferrand avec le reste des détenus.

      11h59 (CEST) : L’avion (dont le numéro de vol est maintenant ZT312) atterrit à l’Aéroport de Clermont-Ferrand Auvergne et les six autres détenus sont débarqués et amenés aux douanes de la Police Aux Frontières (PAF).

      12h46 (CEST) : L’avion quitte Clermont-Ferrand pour retourner au Royaume-Uni. Il atterrit d’abord à l’Aéroport Gatwick, probablement pour déposer les gardiens et les fonctionnaires, avant de finir sa route à l’Aéroport Stansted où les pilotes achèvent leur journée.

      Larguées à destination : l’Allemagne

      Ce qu’il est arrivé aux personnes expulsées en Allemagne n’est pas connu, même s’il semblerait qu’il n’y ait pas eu de procédure claire engagée par la police allemande. Un des expulsés nous a rapporté qu’à son arrivée à Dusseldorf, la police allemande lui a donné un billet de train en lui disant de se rendre au bureau de la demande d’asile à Berlin. Une fois là-bas, on lui a dit de retourner dans son pays. Ce à quoi il a répondu qu’il ne pouvait pas y retourner et qu’il n’avait pas non plus d’argent pour rester à Berlin ou voyager dans un autre pays. Le bureau de la demande d’asile a répondu qu’il pouvait dormir dans les rues de Berlin.

      Un seul homme a été arrêté à son arrivée. Il s’agit d’une personne qui avait tenté de se suicider la veille en se mutilant à la tête et au coup au rasoir, et qui avait saigné tout au long du vol.
      Larguées à destination : la France

      Les expulsés ont été transportés à Clermont-Ferrand, une ville située au milieu de la France, à des centaines de kilomètres des centres métropolitains. Dès leur arrivée ils ont été testés pour le COVID par voie nasale et retenus par la PAF pendant que les autorités françaises décidaient de leur sort.

      Deux d’entre eux ont été libérés à peu près une heure et demi après, une fois donnés des rendez-vous au cours de la semaine suivante pour faire des demandes d’asile dans des Préfectures de région eloignées de Clermont-Ferrand. Il ne leur a été proposé aucun logement, ni information légale, ni moyen pour se déplacer jusqu’à leurs rendez-vous.

      La personne suivante a été libérée environ une heure et demi après eux. Il ne lui a pas été donné de rendez-vous pour demander l’asile, mais il lui a juste été proposé une chambre d’hotel pour quatre nuits.

      Pendant le reste de la journée, les trois autres détenus ont été emmenés de l’aéroport au commisariat pour prendre leurs empreintes. On a commencé à les libérer à partir de 18h. Le dernier a été libéré sept heures après que le vol de déportation soit arrivé. La police a attendu que la Préfecture décide de les transférer ou non au Centre de Rétention Administrative (CRA). On ne sait pas si la raison à cela était que le centre le plus proche, à Lyon, était plein.

      Cependant, ces personnes n’ont pas été simplement laissées libres. Il leur a été donné des ordres d’expulsion (OQTF : Obligation de quitter le territoire francais) et des interdictions de retour sur le territoire francais (IRTF). Ces document ne leur donnent que48h pour faire appel. Le gouverment britannique a dit que les personnes déportées par avion en France avaient la possibilité de demander l’asile en France. C’est clairement faux.

      Pour aller plus loin dans les contradictions bureaucratique, avec les ordres d’expulsion leurs ont été donnés l’ordre de devoir se présenter à la station de police de Clermont-Ferrand tous les jours à dix heures du matin dans les 45 prochains jours (pour potentiellement y être arrêtés et detenus à ces occasions). Ils leur a été dit que si ils ne s’y présentaient pas la police
      les considèrerait comme en fuite.

      La police a aussi réservé une place dans un hotel à plusieurs kilomètre de l’aéroport pour quatres nuits, mais sans aucune autre information ni aide pour se procurer de quoi s’alimenter. Il ne leur a été fourni aucun moyen de se rendre à cet hôtel et la police a refusé de les aider – disant que leur mission s’arretait à la délivrance de leurs documents d’expulsion.

      Après m’avoir donné les papiers d’expulsion, le policier francais a dit
      ‘Maintenant tu peux aller en Angleterre’.
      Temoignage de la personne expulsée

      La police aux frontières (PAF) a ignoré la question de la santé et du
      bien-être des personnes expulsées qui étaient gardées toute la journée.
      Une des personnes était en chaise roulante toute la journée et était
      incapable de marcher du fait des blessures profondes à son pied, qu’il
      s’était lui même infligées. Il n’a jamais été emmené à l’hôpital malgré les
      recommendations du médecin, ni durant la période de détention, ni après
      sa libération. En fait, la seule raison à la visite du médecin était initialement d’évaluer s’il était en mesure d’être detenu au cas où la Préfecture le déciderait. La police l’a laissé dans ses vêtements souillés de sang toute la journée et quand ils l’ont libéré il n’avait pas eu de chaussures et pouvait à peine marcher. Ni béquilles, ni aide pour rejoindre l’hotel ne lui ont été donnés par la police. Il a été laissé dans la rue, devant porter toutes ses
      affaires dans un sac en plastique du Home Office.
      “La nuit la plus dure de ma vie”

      Ce fut la nuit la plus dure de ma vie. Mon coeur était brisé si fort que j’ai sérieusement pensé au suicide. J’ai mis le rasoir dans ma bouche pour l’avaler ; j’ai vu ma vie entière passer rapidement jusqu’aux premières heures du jour. Le traitement en détention était très mauvais, humiliant et dégradant. Je me suis haï et je sentais que ma vie était détruite mais au même temps elle était trop précieuse pour la perdre si facilement. J’ai recraché le razoir de ma bouche avant d’être sorti de la chambre où quatre personnes à l’allure impossante, portant la même tenue de CRS et des boucliers de protéction, m’ont violemment emmené dans le grand hall au rez-de-chaussée du centre de détention. J’étais épuisé puisque j’avais fait une grève de la faim depuis plusieurs jours. Dans la chambre à côte de moi un des déportés a essayé de resister et a été battu si sévèrement que du sang a coulé de son nez. Dans le grand hall ils m’ont fouillé avec soin et m’ont escorté jusqu’à la voiture comme un dangerux criminel, deux personnes à ma gauche et à ma droite. Ils ont conduit environ deux heures jusqu’à l’aéroport, il y avait un grand avion sur la piste de décollage. […] A ce moment, j’ai vu mes rêves, mes espoirs, brisés devant moi en entrant dans l’avion.
      Temoignage d’une personne déportée (de Detained Voices)

      Le cade légal : Dublin III

      Ces expulsions se déroulent dans le cadre du règlement Dublin III. Il s’agit de la législation déterminant quel pays européen doit évaluer la demande d’asile d’une personne réfugiée. Cette décision implique un certain nombre de critères, l’un des principaux étant le regroupement familial et l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant. Un autre critère, dans le cas des personnes franchissant la frontières sans papiers, est le premier pays dans lequel ils entrent « irrégulièrement ». Dans cette loi, ce critère est supposé être moins important que les attaches familiales. Mais il est communément employé par les gouvernements cherchant à rediriger les demandes d’asile à d’autres Etats. Toutes les personnes que nous connaissions sur ces vols étaient « dublinés » car le Royaume-Uni prétendait qu’ils avaient été en France, en Allemagne ou en Espagne.

      (Voir : briefing à l’introduction du House of Commons ; Home Office staff handbook (manuel du personnel du ministère de l’intérieur ; section Dublin Right to remain .)

      En se référant au règlement Dublin, le Royaume-Uni évite d’examiner les cas de demande d’asile. Ces personnes ne sont pas expulsées parce que leur demande d’asile a été refusée. Leurs demandes ne sont simplement jamais examinées. La décision d’appliquer le règlement Dublin est prise après la premier entretien filmé ( à ce jour, au centre de détention de Yarl’s Wood). Comme nous l’avons vu plus haut, peu de personnes sont dans la capacité d’avoir accès à une assistance juridique avant ces entretiens, quelquefois menés par téléphone et sans traduction adéquate.

      Avec le Dublin III, le Royaume-Uni doit faire la demande formelle au gouvernement qu’il croit responsable d’examiner la demande d’asile, de reprendre le demandeur et de lui présenter la preuve à savoir pourquoi ce gouvernement devrait en accepter la responsabilité. Généralement, la preuve produite est le fichier des empreintes enregistrées par un autre pays sur la base de données EURODAC, à travers toute l’Europe.

      Cependant, lors des récents cas d’expulsion, le Home Office n’a pas toujours produit les empreintes, mais a choisi de se reposer sur de fragiles preuves circonstantielles. Certains pays ont refusé ce type de preuve, d’autres en revanche l’ont accepté, notamment la France.

      Il semble y avoir un mode de fonctionnement récurrent dans ces affaires où la France accepte les retours de Dublin III, quand bien même d’autres pays l’ont refusé. Le gouvernement français pourrait avoir été encouragé à accepter les « reprises/retours » fondés sur des preuves fragiles, dans le cadre des récentes négociations américano-britanniques sur la traversée de la Manche (La France aurait apparemment demandé 30 millions de livres pour aider la Grande-Bretagne à rendre la route non viable.)

      En théorie, accepter une demande Dublin III signifie que la France (ou tout autre pays) a pris la responsabilité de prendre en charge la demande d’asile d’un individu. Dans la pratique, la plupart des individus arrivés à Clermont-Ferrand le 26 août n’ont pas eu l’opportunité de demander l’asile. A la place, des arrêtés d’expulsion leur ont été adressés, leur ordonnant de quitter la France et l’Europe. On ne leur donne que 48h pour faire appel de l’ordre d’expulsion, sans plus d’information sur le dispositif légal. Ce qui apparaît souvent comme quasi impossible pour une personne venant d’endurer une expulsion forcée et qui pourrait nécessiter des soins médicaux urgents.

      Suite au Brexit, le Royaume-Uni ne participera pas plus au Dublin III à partir du 31 décembre 2020. Puisqu’il y a des signataires de cet accord hors Union-Européenne, comme la Suisse et la Norvège, le devenir de ces arrangements est encore flou (comme tout ce qui concerne le Brexit). S’il n’y a d’accord global, le Royaume-Uni devra négocier plusieurs accords bilatéraux avec les pays européens. Le schéma d’expulsion accéléré établi par la France sans processus d’évaluation adéquat de la demande d’asile pourrait être un avant-goût des choses à venir.
      Conclusion : expéditif – et illégal ?

      Évidemment, les expulsions par charter sont l’un des outils les plus manifestement brutaux employés par le régime frontalier du Royaume Uni. Elles impliquent l’emploi d’une violence moralement dévastatrice par le Home Office et ses entrepreneurs ((Mitie, Titan Airways, Britannia Hotels, et les autres) contre des personnes ayant déjà traversé des histoires traumatiques.

      Car les récentes expulsions de ceux qui ont traversé la Manche semblent particulièrement expéditives. Des personnes qui ont risqué le vie dans la Manche sont récupérées par une machine destinée à nier leur droit d’asile et à les expulser aussi vite que possible, pour satisfaire le besoin d’une réaction rapide à la dernière panique médiatique. De nouvelles procédures semblent avoir mises en place spontanément par des officiels du Ministère de l’Intérieur ainsi que des accords officieux avec leurs homologues français.

      En résultat de ce travail bâclé, il semble y avoir un certain nombre d’irrégularités dans la procédure. Certaines ont déjà été signalées dans des recours juridiques efficaces contre le vol vers l’Espagne du 27 août. La détention et l’expulsion des personnes qui ont traversé la Manche en bateau peut avoir été largement illégale et est susceptible d’être remise en cause plus profondément des deux côtés de la Manche.

      Ici, nous résumerons quelques enjeux spécifiques.

      La nature profondément politique du processus d’expulsion pour ces personnes qui ont fait la traversée sur de petits bateaux, ce qui signifie qu’on leur refuse l’accès à une procédure de demande d’asile évaluée par le Home Office.
      Les personnes réfugiées incluent des personnes victimes de torture, de trafic humain, aussi bien que des mineurs.
      Des individus sont détenus, précipités d’entretiens en entretiens, et « dublinés » sans la possibilité d’avoir accès à une assistance juridique et aux informations nécessaires.
      Afin d’éviter d’avoir à considérer des demandes d’asile, la Grande-Bretagne applique le règlement Dublin III, souvent en employant de faibles preuves circonstancielles – et la France accepte ces demandes, peut-être en conséquence des récentes négociations et arrangements financiers.
      De nombreuses personnes expulsées ont des attaches familiales au Royaume-Uni, mais le critère primordial du rapprochement familial du rêglement Dublin III est ignoré
      En acceptant les demandes Dublin, la France prend la responsabilité légale des demandes d’asile. Mais en réalité, elle prive ces personnes de la possibilité de demander l’asile, en leur assignant des papiers d’expulsion.
      Ces papiers d’expulsions (« Obligation de quitter le territoire français » and « Interdiction de retour sur le territoire français » ou OQTF et IRTF) sont assignées et il n’est possible de faire appel que dans les 48 heures qui suivent. C’est inadéquat pour assurer une procédure correcte, à plus forte raison pour des personnes traumatisées, passées par la détention, l’expulsion, larguées au milieu de nulle part, dans un pays où elles n’ont aucun contact et dont elles ne parlent pas la langue.
      Tout cela invalide complètement les arguments du Home Office qui soutient que les personnes qu’il expulse peuvent avoir accès à une procédure de demande d’asile équitable en France.

      https://calaismigrantsolidarity.wordpress.com/2020/08/31/sen-debarrasser-le-royaume-uni-se-precipite-pour-

  • How Climate Migration Will Reshape America. Millions will be displaced. Where will they go?

    August besieged California with a heat unseen in generations. A surge in air-conditioning broke the state’s electrical grid, leaving a population already ravaged by the coronavirus to work remotely by the dim light of their cellphones. By midmonth, the state had recorded possibly the hottest temperature ever measured on earth — 130 degrees in Death Valley — and an otherworldly storm of lightning had cracked open the sky. From Santa Cruz to Lake Tahoe, thousands of bolts of electricity exploded down onto withered grasslands and forests, some of them already hollowed out by climate-driven infestations of beetles and kiln-dried by the worst five-year drought on record. Soon, California was on fire.

    This article, the second in a series on global climate migration, is a partnership between ProPublica and The New York Times Magazine, with support from the Pulitzer Center. Read Part 1.

    Over the next two weeks, 900 blazes incinerated six times as much land as all the state’s 2019 wildfires combined, forcing 100,000 people from their homes. Three of the largest fires in history burned simultaneously in a ring around the San Francisco Bay Area. Another fire burned just 12 miles from my home in Marin County. I watched as towering plumes of smoke billowed from distant hills in all directions and air tankers crisscrossed the skies. Like many Californians, I spent those weeks worrying about what might happen next, wondering how long it would be before an inferno of 60-foot flames swept up the steep, grassy hillside on its way toward my own house, rehearsing in my mind what my family would do to escape.

    But I also had a longer-term question, about what would happen once this unprecedented fire season ended. Was it finally time to leave for good?

    I had an unusual perspective on the matter. For two years, I have been studying how climate change will influence global migration. My sense was that of all the devastating consequences of a warming planet — changing landscapes, pandemics, mass extinctions — the potential movement of hundreds of millions of climate refugees across the planet stands to be among the most important. I traveled across four countries to witness how rising temperatures were driving climate refugees away from some of the poorest and hottest parts of the world. I had also helped create an enormous computer simulation to analyze how global demographics might shift, and now I was working on a data-mapping project about migration here in the United States.

    So it was with some sense of recognition that I faced the fires these last few weeks. In recent years, summer has brought a season of fear to California, with ever-worsening wildfires closing in. But this year felt different. The hopelessness of the pattern was now clear, and the pandemic had already uprooted so many Americans. Relocation no longer seemed like such a distant prospect. Like the subjects of my reporting, climate change had found me, its indiscriminate forces erasing all semblance of normalcy. Suddenly I had to ask myself the very question I’d been asking others: Was it time to move?

    I am far from the only American facing such questions. This summer has seen more fires, more heat, more storms — all of it making life increasingly untenable in larger areas of the nation. Already, droughts regularly threaten food crops across the West, while destructive floods inundate towns and fields from the Dakotas to Maryland, collapsing dams in Michigan and raising the shorelines of the Great Lakes. Rising seas and increasingly violent hurricanes are making thousands of miles of American shoreline nearly uninhabitable. As California burned, Hurricane Laura pounded the Louisiana coast with 150-mile-an-hour winds, killing at least 25 people; it was the 12th named storm to form by that point in 2020, another record. Phoenix, meanwhile, endured 53 days of 110-degree heat — 20 more days than the previous record.

    For years, Americans have avoided confronting these changes in their own backyards. The decisions we make about where to live are distorted not just by politics that play down climate risks, but also by expensive subsidies and incentives aimed at defying nature. In much of the developing world, vulnerable people will attempt to flee the emerging perils of global warming, seeking cooler temperatures, more fresh water and safety. But here in the United States, people have largely gravitated toward environmental danger, building along coastlines from New Jersey to Florida and settling across the cloudless deserts of the Southwest.

    I wanted to know if this was beginning to change. Might Americans finally be waking up to how climate is about to transform their lives? And if so — if a great domestic relocation might be in the offing — was it possible to project where we might go? To answer these questions, I interviewed more than four dozen experts: economists and demographers, climate scientists and insurance executives, architects and urban planners, and I mapped out the danger zones that will close in on Americans over the next 30 years. The maps for the first time combined exclusive climate data from the Rhodium Group, an independent data-analytics firm; wildfire projections modeled by United States Forest Service researchers and others; and data about America’s shifting climate niches, an evolution of work first published by The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences last spring. (See a detailed analysis of the maps.)

    What I found was a nation on the cusp of a great transformation. Across the United States, some 162 million people — nearly one in two — will most likely experience a decline in the quality of their environment, namely more heat and less water. For 93 million of them, the changes could be particularly severe, and by 2070, our analysis suggests, if carbon emissions rise at extreme levels, at least four million Americans could find themselves living at the fringe, in places decidedly outside the ideal niche for human life. The cost of resisting the new climate reality is mounting. Florida officials have already acknowledged that defending some roadways against the sea will be unaffordable. And the nation’s federal flood-insurance program is for the first time requiring that some of its payouts be used to retreat from climate threats across the country. It will soon prove too expensive to maintain the status quo.

    Then what? One influential 2018 study, published in The Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, suggests that one in 12 Americans in the Southern half of the country will move toward California, the Mountain West or the Northwest over the next 45 years because of climate influences alone. Such a shift in population is likely to increase poverty and widen the gulf between the rich and the poor. It will accelerate rapid, perhaps chaotic, urbanization of cities ill-equipped for the burden, testing their capacity to provide basic services and amplifying existing inequities. It will eat away at prosperity, dealing repeated economic blows to coastal, rural and Southern regions, which could in turn push entire communities to the brink of collapse. This process has already begun in rural Louisiana and coastal Georgia, where low-income and Black and Indigenous communities face environmental change on top of poor health and extreme poverty. Mobility itself, global-migration experts point out, is often a reflection of relative wealth, and as some move, many others will be left behind. Those who stay risk becoming trapped as the land and the society around them ceases to offer any more support.

    There are signs that the message is breaking through. Half of Americans now rank climate as a top political priority, up from roughly one-third in 2016, and three out of four now describe climate change as either “a crisis” or “a major problem.” This year, Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa, where tens of thousands of acres of farmland flooded in 2019, ranked climate second only to health care as an issue. A poll by researchers at Yale and George Mason Universities found that even Republicans’ views are shifting: One in three now think climate change should be declared a national emergency.

    Policymakers, having left America unprepared for what’s next, now face brutal choices about which communities to save — often at exorbitant costs — and which to sacrifice. Their decisions will almost inevitably make the nation more divided, with those worst off relegated to a nightmare future in which they are left to fend for themselves. Nor will these disruptions wait for the worst environmental changes to occur. The wave begins when individual perception of risk starts to shift, when the environmental threat reaches past the least fortunate and rattles the physical and financial security of broader, wealthier parts of the population. It begins when even places like California’s suburbs are no longer safe.

    It has already begun.

    Let’s start with some basics. Across the country, it’s going to get hot. Buffalo may feel in a few decades like Tempe, Ariz., does today, and Tempe itself will sustain 100-degree average summer temperatures by the end of the century. Extreme humidity from New Orleans to northern Wisconsin will make summers increasingly unbearable, turning otherwise seemingly survivable heat waves into debilitating health threats. Fresh water will also be in short supply, not only in the West but also in places like Florida, Georgia and Alabama, where droughts now regularly wither cotton fields. By 2040, according to federal government projections, extreme water shortages will be nearly ubiquitous west of Missouri. The Memphis Sands Aquifer, a crucial water supply for Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana, is already overdrawn by hundreds of millions of gallons a day. Much of the Ogallala Aquifer — which supplies nearly a third of the nation’s irrigation groundwater — could be gone by the end of the century.

    It can be difficult to see the challenges clearly because so many factors are in play. At least 28 million Americans are likely to face megafires like the ones we are now seeing in California, in places like Texas and Florida and Georgia. At the same time, 100 million Americans — largely in the Mississippi River Basin from Louisiana to Wisconsin — will increasingly face humidity so extreme that working outside or playing school sports could cause heatstroke. Crop yields will be decimated from Texas to Alabama and all the way north through Oklahoma and Kansas and into Nebraska.

    The challenges are so widespread and so interrelated that Americans seeking to flee one could well run into another. I live on a hilltop, 400 feet above sea level, and my home will never be touched by rising waters. But by the end of this century, if the more extreme projections of eight to 10 feet of sea-level rise come to fruition, the shoreline of San Francisco Bay will move three miles closer to my house, as it subsumes some 166 square miles of land, including a high school, a new county hospital and the store where I buy groceries. The freeway to San Francisco will need to be raised, and to the east, a new bridge will be required to connect the community of Point Richmond to the city of Berkeley. The Latino, Asian and Black communities who live in the most-vulnerable low-lying districts will be displaced first, but research from Mathew Hauer, a sociologist at Florida State University who published some of the first modeling of American climate migration in the journal Nature Climate Change in 2017, suggests that the toll will eventually be far more widespread: Nearly one in three people here in Marin County will leave, part of the roughly 700,000 who his models suggest may abandon the broader Bay Area as a result of sea-level rise alone.

    From Maine to North Carolina to Texas, rising sea levels are not just chewing up shorelines but also raising rivers and swamping the subterranean infrastructure of coastal communities, making a stable life there all but impossible. Coastal high points will be cut off from roadways, amenities and escape routes, and even far inland, saltwater will seep into underground drinking-water supplies. Eight of the nation’s 20 largest metropolitan areas — Miami, New York and Boston among them — will be profoundly altered, indirectly affecting some 50 million people. Imagine large concrete walls separating Fort Lauderdale condominiums from a beachless waterfront, or dozens of new bridges connecting the islands of Philadelphia. Not every city can spend $100 billion on a sea wall, as New York most likely will. Barrier islands? Rural areas along the coast without a strong tax base? They are likely, in the long term, unsalvageable.

    In all, Hauer projects that 13 million Americans will be forced to move away from submerged coastlines. Add to that the people contending with wildfires and other risks, and the number of Americans who might move — though difficult to predict precisely — could easily be tens of millions larger. Even 13 million climate migrants, though, would rank as the largest migration in North American history. The Great Migration — of six million Black Americans out of the South from 1916 to 1970 — transformed almost everything we know about America, from the fate of its labor movement to the shape of its cities to the sound of its music. What would it look like when twice that many people moved? What might change?

    Americans have been conditioned not to respond to geographical climate threats as people in the rest of the world do. It is natural that rural Guatemalans or subsistence farmers in Kenya, facing drought or scorching heat, would seek out someplace more stable and resilient. Even a subtle environmental change — a dry well, say — can mean life or death, and without money to address the problem, migration is often simply a question of survival.

    By comparison, Americans are richer, often much richer, and more insulated from the shocks of climate change. They are distanced from the food and water sources they depend on, and they are part of a culture that sees every problem as capable of being solved by money. So even as the average flow of the Colorado River — the water supply for 40 million Western Americans and the backbone of the nation’s vegetable and cattle farming — has declined for most of the last 33 years, the population of Nevada has doubled. At the same time, more than 1.5 million people have moved to the Phoenix metro area, despite its dependence on that same river (and the fact that temperatures there now regularly hit 115 degrees). Since Hurricane Andrew devastated Florida in 1992 — and even as that state has become a global example of the threat of sea-level rise — more than five million people have moved to Florida’s shorelines, driving a historic boom in building and real estate.

    Similar patterns are evident across the country. Census data show us how Americans move: toward heat, toward coastlines, toward drought, regardless of evidence of increasing storms and flooding and other disasters.

    The sense that money and technology can overcome nature has emboldened Americans. Where money and technology fail, though, it inevitably falls to government policies — and government subsidies — to pick up the slack. Thanks to federally subsidized canals, for example, water in part of the Desert Southwest costs less than it does in Philadelphia. The federal National Flood Insurance Program has paid to rebuild houses that have flooded six times over in the same spot. And federal agriculture aid withholds subsidies from farmers who switch to drought-resistant crops, while paying growers to replant the same ones that failed. Farmers, seed manufacturers, real estate developers and a few homeowners benefit, at least momentarily, but the gap between what the climate can destroy and what money can replace is growing.

    Perhaps no market force has proved more influential — and more misguided — than the nation’s property-insurance system. From state to state, readily available and affordable policies have made it attractive to buy or replace homes even where they are at high risk of disasters, systematically obscuring the reality of the climate threat and fooling many Americans into thinking that their decisions are safer than they actually are. Part of the problem is that most policies look only 12 months into the future, ignoring long-term trends even as insurance availability influences development and drives people’s long-term decision-making.

    Even where insurers have tried to withdraw policies or raise rates to reduce climate-related liabilities, state regulators have forced them to provide affordable coverage anyway, simply subsidizing the cost of underwriting such a risky policy or, in some cases, offering it themselves. The regulations — called Fair Access to Insurance Requirements — are justified by developers and local politicians alike as economic lifeboats “of last resort” in regions where climate change threatens to interrupt economic growth. While they do protect some entrenched and vulnerable communities, the laws also satisfy the demand of wealthier homeowners who still want to be able to buy insurance.

    At least 30 states, including Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina and Texas, have developed so-called FAIR plans, and today they serve as a market backstop in the places facing the highest risks of climate-driven disasters, including coastal flooding, hurricanes and wildfires.

    In an era of climate change, though, such policies amount to a sort of shell game, meant to keep growth going even when other obvious signs and scientific research suggest that it should stop.

    That’s what happened in Florida. Hurricane Andrew reduced parts of cities to landfill and cost insurers nearly $16 billion in payouts. Many insurance companies, recognizing the likelihood that it would happen again, declined to renew policies and left the state. So the Florida Legislature created a state-run company to insure properties itself, preventing both an exodus and an economic collapse by essentially pretending that the climate vulnerabilities didn’t exist.

    As a result, Florida’s taxpayers by 2012 had assumed liabilities worth some $511 billion — more than seven times the state’s total budget — as the value of coastal property topped $2.8 trillion. Another direct hurricane risked bankrupting the state. Florida, concerned that it had taken on too much risk, has since scaled back its self-insurance plan. But the development that resulted is still in place.

    On a sweltering afternoon last October, with the skies above me full of wildfire smoke, I called Jesse Keenan, an urban-planning and climate-change specialist then at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, who advises the federal Commodity Futures Trading Commission on market hazards from climate change. Keenan, who is now an associate professor of real estate at Tulane University’s School of Architecture, had been in the news last year for projecting where people might move to — suggesting that Duluth, Minn., for instance, should brace for a coming real estate boom as climate migrants move north. But like other scientists I’d spoken with, Keenan had been reluctant to draw conclusions about where these migrants would be driven from.

    Last fall, though, as the previous round of fires ravaged California, his phone began to ring, with private-equity investors and bankers all looking for his read on the state’s future. Their interest suggested a growing investor-grade nervousness about swiftly mounting environmental risk in the hottest real estate markets in the country. It’s an early sign, he told me, that the momentum is about to switch directions. “And once this flips,” he added, “it’s likely to flip very quickly.”

    In fact, the correction — a newfound respect for the destructive power of nature, coupled with a sudden disavowal of Americans’ appetite for reckless development — had begun two years earlier, when a frightening surge in disasters offered a jolting preview of how the climate crisis was changing the rules.

    On October 9, 2017, a wildfire blazed through the suburban blue-collar neighborhood of Coffey Park in Santa Rosa, Calif., virtually in my own backyard. I awoke to learn that more than 1,800 buildings were reduced to ashes, less than 35 miles from where I slept. Inchlong cinders had piled on my windowsills like falling snow.

    The Tubbs Fire, as it was called, shouldn’t have been possible. Coffey Park is surrounded not by vegetation but by concrete and malls and freeways. So insurers had rated it as “basically zero risk,” according to Kevin Van Leer, then a risk modeler from the global insurance liability firm Risk Management Solutions. (He now does similar work for Cape Analytics.) But Van Leer, who had spent seven years picking through the debris left by disasters to understand how insurers could anticipate — and price — the risk of their happening again, had begun to see other “impossible” fires. After a 2016 fire tornado ripped through northern Canada and a firestorm consumed Gatlinburg, Tenn., he said, “alarm bells started going off” for the insurance industry.

    What Van Leer saw when he walked through Coffey Park a week after the Tubbs Fire changed the way he would model and project fire risk forever. Typically, fire would spread along the ground, burning maybe 50 percent of structures. In Santa Rosa, more than 90 percent had been leveled. “The destruction was complete,” he told me. Van Leer determined that the fire had jumped through the forest canopy, spawning 70-mile-per-hour winds that kicked a storm of embers into the modest homes of Coffey Park, which burned at an acre a second as homes ignited spontaneously from the radiant heat. It was the kind of thing that might never have been possible if California’s autumn winds weren’t getting fiercer and drier every year, colliding with intensifying, climate-driven heat and ever-expanding development. “It’s hard to forecast something you’ve never seen before,” he said.

    For me, the awakening to imminent climate risk came with California’s rolling power blackouts last fall — an effort to pre-emptively avoid the risk of a live wire sparking a fire — which showed me that all my notional perspective about climate risk and my own life choices were on a collision course. After the first one, all the food in our refrigerator was lost. When power was interrupted six more times in three weeks, we stopped trying to keep it stocked. All around us, small fires burned. Thick smoke produced fits of coughing. Then, as now, I packed an ax and a go-bag in my car, ready to evacuate. As former Gov. Jerry Brown said, it was beginning to feel like the “new abnormal.”

    It was no surprise, then, that California’s property insurers — having watched 26 years’ worth of profits dissolve over 24 months — began dropping policies, or that California’s insurance commissioner, trying to slow the slide, placed a moratorium on insurance cancellations for parts of the state in 2020. In February, the Legislature introduced a bill compelling California to, in the words of one consumer advocacy group, “follow the lead of Florida” by mandating that insurance remain available, in this case with a requirement that homeowners first harden their properties against fire. At the same time, participation in California’s FAIR plan for catastrophic fires has grown by at least 180 percent since 2015, and in Santa Rosa, houses are being rebuilt in the very same wildfire-vulnerable zones that proved so deadly in 2017. Given that a new study projects a 20 percent increase in extreme-fire-weather days by 2035, such practices suggest a special form of climate negligence.

    It’s only a matter of time before homeowners begin to recognize the unsustainability of this approach. Market shock, when driven by the sort of cultural awakening to risk that Keenan observes, can strike a neighborhood like an infectious disease, with fear spreading doubt — and devaluation — from door to door. It happened that way in the foreclosure crisis.

    Keenan calls the practice of drawing arbitrary lending boundaries around areas of perceived environmental risk “bluelining,” and indeed many of the neighborhoods that banks are bluelining are the same as the ones that were hit by the racist redlining practice in days past. This summer, climate-data analysts at the First Street Foundation released maps showing that 70 percent more buildings in the United States were vulnerable to flood risk than previously thought; most of the underestimated risk was in low-income neighborhoods.

    Such neighborhoods see little in the way of flood-prevention investment. My Bay Area neighborhood, on the other hand, has benefited from consistent investment in efforts to defend it against the ravages of climate change. That questions of livability had reached me, here, were testament to Keenan’s belief that the bluelining phenomenon will eventually affect large majorities of equity-holding middle-class Americans too, with broad implications for the overall economy, starting in the nation’s largest state.

    Under the radar, a new class of dangerous debt — climate-distressed mortgage loans — might already be threatening the financial system. Lending data analyzed by Keenan and his co-author, Jacob Bradt, for a study published in the journal Climatic Change in June shows that small banks are liberally making loans on environmentally threatened homes, but then quickly passing them along to federal mortgage backers. At the same time, they have all but stopped lending money for the higher-end properties worth too much for the government to accept, suggesting that the banks are knowingly passing climate liabilities along to taxpayers as stranded assets.

    Once home values begin a one-way plummet, it’s easy for economists to see how entire communities spin out of control. The tax base declines and the school system and civic services falter, creating a negative feedback loop that pushes more people to leave. Rising insurance costs and the perception of risk force credit-rating agencies to downgrade towns, making it more difficult for them to issue bonds and plug the springing financial leaks. Local banks, meanwhile, keep securitizing their mortgage debt, sloughing off their own liabilities.

    Keenan, though, had a bigger point: All the structural disincentives that had built Americans’ irrational response to the climate risk were now reaching their logical endpoint. A pandemic-induced economic collapse will only heighten the vulnerabilities and speed the transition, reducing to nothing whatever thin margin of financial protection has kept people in place. Until now, the market mechanisms had essentially socialized the consequences of high-risk development. But as the costs rise — and the insurers quit, and the bankers divest, and the farm subsidies prove too wasteful, and so on — the full weight of responsibility will fall on individual people.

    And that’s when the real migration might begin.

    As I spoke with Keenan last year, I looked out my own kitchen window onto hillsides of parkland, singed brown by months of dry summer heat. This was precisely the land that my utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, had three times identified as such an imperiled tinderbox that it had to shut off power to avoid fire. It was precisely the kind of wildland-urban interface that all the studies I read blamed for heightening Californians’ exposure to climate risks. I mentioned this on the phone and then asked Keenan, “Should I be selling my house and getting — ”

    He cut me off: “Yes.”

    Americans have dealt with climate disaster before. The Dust Bowl started after the federal government expanded the Homestead Act to offer more land to settlers willing to work the marginal soil of the Great Plains. Millions took up the invitation, replacing hardy prairie grass with thirsty crops like corn, wheat and cotton. Then, entirely predictably, came the drought. From 1929 to 1934, crop yields across Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri plunged by 60 percent, leaving farmers destitute and exposing the now-barren topsoil to dry winds and soaring temperatures. The resulting dust storms, some of them taller than skyscrapers, buried homes whole and blew as far east as Washington. The disaster propelled an exodus of some 2.5 million people, mostly to the West, where newcomers — “Okies” not just from Oklahoma but also Texas, Arkansas and Missouri — unsettled communities and competed for jobs. Colorado tried to seal its border from the climate refugees; in California, they were funneled into squalid shanty towns. Only after the migrants settled and had years to claw back a decent life did some towns bounce back stronger.

    The places migrants left behind never fully recovered. Eighty years later, Dust Bowl towns still have slower economic growth and lower per capita income than the rest of the country. Dust Bowl survivors and their children are less likely to go to college and more likely to live in poverty. Climatic change made them poor, and it has kept them poor ever since.

    A Dust Bowl event will most likely happen again. The Great Plains states today provide nearly half of the nation’s wheat, sorghum and cattle and much of its corn; the farmers and ranchers there export that food to Africa, South America and Asia. Crop yields, though, will drop sharply with every degree of warming. By 2050, researchers at the University of Chicago and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies found, Dust Bowl-era yields will be the norm, even as demand for scarce water jumps by as much as 20 percent. Another extreme drought would drive near-total crop losses worse than the Dust Bowl, kneecapping the broader economy. At that point, the authors write, “abandonment is one option.”

    Projections are inherently imprecise, but the gradual changes to America’s cropland — plus the steady baking and burning and flooding — suggest that we are already witnessing a slower-forming but much larger replay of the Dust Bowl that will destroy more than just crops. In 2017, Solomon Hsiang, a climate economist at the University of California, Berkeley, led an analysis of the economic impact of climate-driven changes like rising mortality and rising energy costs, finding that the poorest counties in the United States — mostly across the South and the Southwest — will in some extreme cases face damages equal to more than a third of their gross domestic products. The 2018 National Climate Assessment also warns that the U.S. economy over all could contract by 10 percent.

    That kind of loss typically drives people toward cities, and researchers expect that trend to continue after the Covid-19 pandemic ends. In 1950, less than 65 percent of Americans lived in cities. By 2050, only 10 percent will live outside them, in part because of climatic change. By 2100, Hauer estimates, Atlanta, Orlando, Houston and Austin could each receive more than a quarter million new residents as a result of sea-level displacement alone, meaning it may be those cities — not the places that empty out — that wind up bearing the brunt of America’s reshuffling. The World Bank warns that fast-moving climate urbanization leads to rising unemployment, competition for services and deepening poverty.

    So what will happen to Atlanta — a metro area of 5.8 million people that may lose its water supply to drought and that our data also shows will face an increase in heat-driven wildfires? Hauer estimates that hundreds of thousands of climate refugees will move into the city by 2100, swelling its population and stressing its infrastructure. Atlanta — where poor transportation and water systems contributed to the state’s C+ infrastructure grade last year — already suffers greater income inequality than any other large American city, making it a virtual tinderbox for social conflict. One in 10 households earns less than $10,000 a year, and rings of extreme poverty are growing on its outskirts even as the city center grows wealthier.

    Atlanta has started bolstering its defenses against climate change, but in some cases this has only exacerbated divisions. When the city converted an old Westside rock quarry into a reservoir, part of a larger greenbelt to expand parkland, clean the air and protect against drought, the project also fueled rapid upscale growth, driving the poorest Black communities further into impoverished suburbs. That Atlanta hasn’t “fully grappled with” such challenges now, says Na’Taki Osborne Jelks, chair of the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, means that with more people and higher temperatures, “the city might be pushed to what’s manageable.”

    So might Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, Boston and other cities with long-neglected systems suddenly pressed to expand under increasingly adverse conditions.

    Once you accept that climate change is fast making large parts of the United States nearly uninhabitable, the future looks like this: With time, the bottom half of the country grows inhospitable, dangerous and hot. Something like a tenth of the people who live in the South and the Southwest — from South Carolina to Alabama to Texas to Southern California — decide to move north in search of a better economy and a more temperate environment. Those who stay behind are disproportionately poor and elderly.

    In these places, heat alone will cause as many as 80 additional deaths per 100,000 people — the nation’s opioid crisis, by comparison, produces 15 additional deaths per 100,000. The most affected people, meanwhile, will pay 20 percent more for energy, and their crops will yield half as much food or in some cases virtually none at all. That collective burden will drag down regional incomes by roughly 10 percent, amounting to one of the largest transfers of wealth in American history, as people who live farther north will benefit from that change and see their fortunes rise.

    The millions of people moving north will mostly head to the cities of the Northeast and Northwest, which will see their populations grow by roughly 10 percent, according to one model. Once-chilly places like Minnesota and Michigan and Vermont will become more temperate, verdant and inviting. Vast regions will prosper; just as Hsiang’s research forecast that Southern counties could see a tenth of their economy dry up, he projects that others as far as North Dakota and Minnesota will enjoy a corresponding expansion. Cities like Detroit, Rochester, Buffalo and Milwaukee will see a renaissance, with their excess capacity in infrastructure, water supplies and highways once again put to good use. One day, it’s possible that a high-speed rail line could race across the Dakotas, through Idaho’s up-and-coming wine country and the country’s new breadbasket along the Canadian border, to the megalopolis of Seattle, which by then has nearly merged with Vancouver to its north.

    Sitting in my own backyard one afternoon this summer, my wife and I talked through the implications of this looming American future. The facts were clear and increasingly foreboding. Yet there were so many intangibles — a love of nature, the busy pace of life, the high cost of moving — that conspired to keep us from leaving. Nobody wants to migrate away from home, even when an inexorable danger is inching ever closer. They do it when there is no longer any other choice.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/09/15/magazine/climate-crisis-migration-america.html?smid=tw-share

    Quelques cartes:

    #migrations_environnementales #USA #Etats-Unis #réfugiés_climatiques #climat #changement_climatique #déplacés_internes #IDPs

    • lien propre :

      https://www.zdf.de/nachrichten/politik/trump-establishment-mauer-usa-mexiko-100.html

      –-------------------------

      « ... das ist ein tötlicher Fehler, Donald Trump zu unterschätzen .... » 1:30 min

      "... c’est une erreur fatale de sous-estimer Donald Trump..."

      Im oben zugehörigen Link wird ein Überblick zur 45-minütigen ZDF-Dokumentation über Trumps 1. Wahlperiode geboten .

      Le lien ci-dessus donne un résumé du #documentaire de 45 minutes de la ZDF sur la première #période_législative de Trump.

      ------------------------

      US-Wahl 2020 : Donald #Trump
      Der unterschätzte Präsident / Le #Président sous-estimé

      https://www.zdf.de/dokumentation/zdfzeit/us-wahl-2020-zdfzeit---donald-trump-100.html

      Aber der größte Erfolg in der Bilanz von US-Präsident Donald Trump ist er selbst: Er ist immer noch da. Kaum einer seiner Gegner, Verbündeten oder selbst Parteifreunde hat ihm das 2016 zugetraut. Er hat alle Fehltritte und Tabubrüche, ja sogar ein Amtsenthebungsverfahren überstanden. Und er hat allen Zweiflern gezeigt, wie sehr sie diesen Präsidenten unterschätzt haben.

      Hinter Donald Trump stehen viele Millionen amerikanische Wähler, die ihn niemals einfach nur als politischen Clown und planlosen Irrläufer abgetan haben. Für sie ist er der Mann, der ihre Sprache spricht und ihre Probleme anpackt, anstatt zu schwafeln. Der für ihre Interessen und ihren amerikanischen Traum kämpft, den sie lange nicht mehr zu träumen wagten. Der alles tut, um seine Wahlversprechen einzulösen.
      Das Phänomen Donald Trump

      Der Film zieht eine Bilanz der Trump-Präsidentschaft aus der Sicht seiner Anhänger. Ein Perspektivwechsel, der den Blick öffnet für Fragen, die jenseits der aufgeladenen Dauerpolemik das Phänomen Trump besser verstehen lassen: Wie kann ein Multimilliardär zum Hoffnungsträger der Verarmten und Vergessenen werden? Warum halten so viele Amerikaner gerade ihn für authentisch und glaubwürdig, im Gegensatz zu allen anderen Politikern? Und schließlich: Welches seiner Wahlversprechen hat er eingelöst, womit ist er gescheitert?

      Der Film überprüft die Bilanz von Donald Trump anhand seiner eigenen Versprechen zu Wirtschaft, Einwanderung, Außenpolitik und dem Kampf gegen das Establishment und begibt sich dafür tief ins „Trump-Land“, ins Amerika des kleinen Mannes in den Hochburgen der alten Industriereviere. Aus dem Zentrum der Macht berichten Insider wie Trumps ehemaliger Pressesprecher Sean Spicer, dessen Nachfolger Anthony Scaramucci sowie die schillernde Omarosa Manigault, die es von der Kandidatin in Trumps TV-Show „The Apprentice“ bis ins Weiße Haus schaffte. Namhafte Experten und Kritiker wie die Trump-Biografin Gwenda Blair runden das Bild mit biografischen und politischen Hintergründen ab.
      Fast vier Jahre US-Präsident Trump: Wie lautet die Bilanz?

      Doku | ZDFzeit -
      Kampf gegen Etablierte
      (1/4)

      Trump macht regelmäßig seinem Ärger über Gegner, Medien und das Establishment ungefiltert auf Twitter Luft. Und das ohne Politiker-Sprech - so holt er viele Menschen ab.

      Mexiko und die Mauer
      (2/4)

      Trumps Versprechen: Eine Mauer an der Grenze zu Mexiko, um illegale Einwanderer zu stoppen. Bis 2021 sollten 800 Kilometer gebaut sein. Bisher wurden hauptsächlich bestehende Teile erneuert.

      #AmericaFirst
      (3/4)

      US-Truppen außerhalb der USA wie hier in Ramstein? Das möchte Trump in dem Umfang nicht mehr und will weltweit Soldaten abziehen. „America First“ - man wolle sich nicht mehr ausnutzen lassen.

      Jobs, Jobs, Jobs
      (4/4)

      Trump wollte Jobs schaffen. Die Arbeitslosenquote sinkt unter ihm auf 3,5%, neue Stellen entstehen auch in der viel kritisierten Kohleindustrie. Doch dank Corona schnellt die Quote auf 15%.

      #États-Unis #élections_présidentielles

      #chômage #charbon #covid-19

      #migrations
      #militaire
      #establishment

      #auf_deutsch

  • Migrants : le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

  • Machine-Readable Refugees

    Hassan (not his real name; other details have also been changed) paused mid-story to take out his wallet and show me his ID card. Its edges were frayed. The grainy, black-and-white photo was of a gawky teenager. He ran his thumb over the words at the top: ‘Jamhuri ya Kenya/Republic of Kenya’. ‘Somehow,’ he said, ‘no one has found out that I am registered as a Kenyan.’

    He was born in the Kenyan town of Mandera, on the country’s borders with Somalia and Ethiopia, and grew up with relatives who had escaped the Somali civil war in the early 1990s. When his aunt, who fled Mogadishu, applied for refugee resettlement through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, she listed Hassan as one of her sons – a description which, if understood outside the confines of biological kinship, accurately reflected their relationship.

    They were among the lucky few to pass through the competitive and labyrinthine resettlement process for Somalis and, in 2005, Hassan – by then a young adult – was relocated to Minnesota. It would be several years before US Citizenship and Immigration Services introduced DNA tests to assess the veracity of East African refugee petitions. The adoption of genetic testing by Denmark, France and the US, among others, has narrowed the ways in which family relationships can be defined, while giving the resettlement process the air of an impartial audit culture.

    In recent years, biometrics (the application of statistical methods to biological data, such as fingerprints or DNA) have been hailed as a solution to the elusive problem of identity fraud. Many governments and international agencies, including the UNHCR, see biometric identifiers and centralised databases as ways to determine the authenticity of people’s claims to refugee and citizenship status, to ensure that no one is passing as someone or something they’re not. But biometrics can be a blunt instrument, while the term ‘fraud’ is too absolute to describe a situation like Hassan’s.

    Biometrics infiltrated the humanitarian sector after 9/11. The US and EU were already building centralised fingerprint registries for the purposes of border control. But with the start of the War on Terror, biometric fever peaked, most evidently at the borders between nations, where the images of the terrorist and the migrant were blurred. A few weeks after the attacks, the UNHCR was advocating the collection and sharing of biometric data from refugees and asylum seekers. A year later, it was experimenting with iris scans along the Afghanistan/Pakistan frontier. On the insistence of the US, its top donor, the agency developed a standardised biometric enrolment system, now in use in more than fifty countries worldwide. By 2006, UNHCR agents were taking fingerprints in Kenya’s refugee camps, beginning with both index fingers and later expanding to all ten digits and both eyes.

    Reeling from 9/11, the US and its allies saw biometrics as a way to root out the new faceless enemy. At the same time, for humanitarian workers on the ground, it was an apparently simple answer to an intractable problem: how to identify a ‘genuine’ refugee. Those claiming refugee status could be crossed-checked against a host country’s citizenship records. Officials could detect refugees who tried to register under more than one name in order to get additional aid. Biometric technologies were laden with promises: improved accountability, increased efficiency, greater objectivity, an end to the heavy-handed tactics of herding people around and keeping them under surveillance.

    When refugees relinquish their fingerprints in return for aid, they don’t know how traces of themselves can travel through an invisible digital architecture. A centralised biometric infrastructure enables opaque, automated data-sharing with third parties. Human rights advocates worry about sensitive identifying information falling into thehands of governments or security agencies. According to a recent privacy-impact report, the UNHCR shares biometric data with the Department of Homeland Security when referring refugees for resettlement in the US. ‘The very nature of digitalised refugee data,’ as the political scientist Katja Jacobsen says, ‘means that it might also become accessible to other actors beyond the UNHCR’s own biometric identity management system.’

    Navigating a complex landscape of interstate sovereignty, caught between host and donor countries, refugee aid organisations often hold contradictory, inconsistent views on data protection. UNHCR officials have long been hesitant about sharing information with the Kenyan state, for instance. Their reservations are grounded in concerns that ‘confidential asylum-seeker data could be used for non-protection-related purposes’. Kenya has a poor record of refugee protection. Its security forces have a history of harassing Somalis, whether refugees or Kenyan citizens, who are widely mistrusted as ‘foreigners’.

    Such well-founded concerns did not deter the UNHCR from sharing data with, funding and training Kenya’s Department of Refugee Affairs (now the Refugee Affairs Secretariat), which since 2011 has slowly and unevenly taken over refugee registration in the country. The UNHCR hasconducted joint verification exercises with the Kenyan government to weed out cases of double registration. According to the anthropologist Claire Walkey, these efforts were ‘part of the externalisation of European asylum policy ... and general burden shifting to the Global South’, where more than 80 per cent of the world’s refugees live. Biometrics collected for protection purposes have been used by the Kenyan government to keep people out. Tens of thousands of ethnic Somali Kenyan citizens who have tried to get a Kenyan national ID have been turned away in recent years because their fingerprints are in the state’s refugee database.

    Over the last decade, biometrics have become part of the global development agenda, allegedly a panacea for a range of problems. One of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals is to provide everyone with a legal identity by 2030. Governments, multinational tech companies and international bodies from the World Bank to the World Food Programme have been promoting the use of digital identity systems. Across the Global South, biometric identifiers are increasingly linked to voting, aid distribution, refugee management and financial services. Countries with some of the least robust privacy laws and most vulnerable populations are now laboratories for experimental tech.

    Biometric identifiers promise to tie legal status directly to the body. They offer seductively easy solutions to the problems of administering large populations. But it is worth asking what (and who) gets lost when countries and international bodies turn to data-driven, automated solutions. Administrative failures, data gaps and clunky analogue systems had posed huge challenges for people at the mercy of dispassionate bureaucracies, but also provided others with room for manoeuvre.

    Biometrics may close the gap between an ID and its holder, but it opens a gulf between streamlined bureaucracies and people’s messy lives, their constrained choices, their survival strategies, their hopes for a better future, none of which can be captured on a digital scanner or encoded into a database.

    https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2020/september/machine-readable-refugees
    #biométrie #identité #réfugiés #citoyenneté #asile #migrations #ADN #tests_ADN #tests_génétiques #génétique #nationalité #famille #base_de_donnée #database #HCR #UNHCR #fraude #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #iris #technologie #contrôle #réinstallation #protection_des_données #empreintes_digitales #identité_digitale

    ping @etraces @karine4
    via @isskein

  • "Si un migrant est dans la région de Vintimille, c’est qu’il veut partir"

    À la frontière italo-française, des dizaines de migrants venus de tous horizons sont refoulés chaque jour après avoir tenté de passer en France. Solution de repli pour les refoulés fatigués de ce jeu du chat et de la souris, la ville de Vintimille, située à 10 kilomètres, est devenue ces derniers mois un territoire sans pitié pour les migrants.

    « Comme un ballon de foot »

    Visage masqué et pieds nus, Mohamed Ahmed a les yeux tournés vers la mer. Depuis le muret en pierres sur lequel il est assis à l’ombre des pins, il a une vue imprenable, splendide. La Méditerranée scintillante. La côte vallonnée - italienne d’abord, puis française un peu plus loin. Et la ville de Menton, facilement reconnaissable de l’autre côté de la baie, première cité de l’Hexagone en venant de cette partie de l’Italie. Mais le jeune homme ne semble pas apprécier ce paysage digne d’une carte postale. Il le regarde sans le voir. Bien que proche, Menton, et donc la France, lui est inaccessible.

    Inaccessible car Mohamed Ahmed est un migrant, soudanais, âgé de 25 ans, originaire du Darfour. Il a passé une partie de la nuit à marcher, dans l’espoir de traverser illégalement la frontière. L’autre partie, il l’a passée dans un préfabriqué exigu et sans toit appartenant à la PAF (police aux frontières) de Menton. Le matin venu, il a été remis sur la route avec pour ordre de retourner en Italie à pieds. L’Italie ne veut pourtant pas plus que la France de Mohamed Ahmed. « Je me sens comme un ballon de football sur un terrain entre deux équipes. L’une c’est l’Italie, l’autre c’est la France », dit-il.

    Face aux « difficultés migratoires », les deux pays semblent pourtant faire front commun. Fin juillet, Rome et Paris ont même annoncé la création prochaine d’une brigade conjointe à leur frontière pour lutter contre les filières de passeurs. De quoi compliquer davantage les passages. « Si les gens sont ici, c’est qu’ils veulent partir, ils sont déterminés. La police ne fait que les ralentir et les pousse à prendre plus de risques », regrette Maurizio Marmo, responsable de l’ONG Caritas Vintimille qui vient en aide aux migrants dans cette région italienne. En moyenne, il faut cinq essais à une personne avant de parvenir à passer en France. Mohamed Ahmed est dans la moyenne haute : c’est sa septième tentative en cinq jours. Il y en aura d’autres.

    Depuis la fin du confinement, et la reprise des voyages de migrants qui s’en est suivie, des dizaines de personnes essaient chaque jour de franchir cette frontière dans la région de Vintimille. Les moyens sont divers pour ceux qui ne sont pas conduits dans des véhicules de passeurs : à pieds, il y a le long de la mer - chemin qui n’a ’’quasiment aucune chance’’ étant donné la surveillance policière, glisse le membre d’une association -, les voies de chemins de fer ou, plus risqué, la montagne via un sentier surnommé sans équivoque ’’le passage de la mort’’. Il y a également les trains et les risques d’électrocutions pour ceux qui s’aventurent dessus.

    Chaque jour, aussi, des dizaines de personnes sont interpellées par la police française et sont refoulées. Des « #push-backs » souvent considérés comme illégaux car menés au mépris de l’asile demandé par les intéressés. La PAF de #Menton est d’ailleurs bien connue pour son fonctionnement opaque. Déjà visée par une enquête sur de possibles infractions, cette police avait refusé, en octobre 2019, à une députée le droit de visiter les lieux où sont retenus les migrants.

    Ce jeudi, ils sont une cinquantaine, comme Mohamed Ahmed, à avoir été renvoyés par la police dès le matin, selon un registre tenu par les associations. Un chiffre constant.

    L’apprentissage de la #méfiance

    Sur le bord de la route qui ramène à Vintimille, ville de repli et de transit pour les migrants, des associations ont installé un poste de ravitaillement pour accueillir les refoulés sur le retour. Au frais sous les arbres, du pain, des biscuits, des fruits et des réchauds pour faire du café les attendent. Une infirmière italienne est aussi là pour examiner les éventuelles blessures. Exténués et en sueur après une longue montée, ceux qui arrivent devant cette tablée affichent de larges sourires, agréablement surpris de voir qu’ici, pour une fois, des gens les attendent pour les aider. ’’C’est gratuit, c’est gratuit’’, rassure l’un des participants, les enjoignant à se servir.

    Au soulagement qu’apporte ce réconfort cède toutefois rapidement l’inquiétude. Car beaucoup de ceux présents - pour la plupart très jeunes - semblent dans un état de confusion totale. Faut-il prendre le bus pour se reposer à Vintimille ou retenter sa chance tout de suite ? Quel chemin emprunter ? Est-ce vrai que des militaires se cachent dans les buissons sur le sentier ’’de la mort’’ pour attraper les migrants qui y marchent la nuit ? « Est-ce que je dois dire que je veux demander l’asile en France quand un policier m’interpelle ? Tu peux m’écrire sur un bout de papier comment on dit ça en français ? » Les questions et les regards perdus se bousculent. Le silence tombe aussi soudainement, parfois. Au jeu du chat et de la souris qui se déroule à cette frontière, les grands perdants sont ceux qui ne maîtrisent pas les règles.

    Au point de ravitaillement les migrants peuvent acheter des tickets de bus pour aller Vintimille Crdit InfoMigrants

    « On m’a volé mon sac à dos dans la PAF », lance Nabil Maouche, Algérien de 27 ans, l’air hagard. À l’intérieur se trouvait tout ce qu’il possédait : ses vêtements, 50 euros et, surtout, son téléphone et son chargeur. « Je ne peux plus appeler ma famille », lance le jeune homme qui a embarqué début août depuis les côtes africaines à bord d’un petit bateau de fortune ayant, assure-t-il, réussi à atteindre la Sardaigne. Selon Chiara, membre de l’association italienne Projetto 20k, les pertes d’objets personnels sont monnaie courante durant les nuits au poste : « Les affaires des migrants sont gardées dans un vestiaire dans la PAF, c’est une pièce dans laquelle il y a beaucoup de passage… »

    Binu Lama, Tibétaine de 22 ans, montre pour sa part des documents dont elle peine à comprendre la signification. Un « refus d’entrée » de la police française et un procès verbal des forces de l’ordre italiennes, qui lui ont été délivrés coup sur coup. Elle ne parle ni français, ni italien, ne sait pas ce qu’elle doit en faire. Mais elle jure que, si près du but, cette paperasse ne l’empêchera pas de retenter sa chance dans quelques heures seulement. Accompagnée de son mari et d’un groupe d’amis, elle veut « trouver du travail et envoyer de l’argent à [sa] famille » depuis la France, où elle croit savoir qu’elle pourra obtenir l’asile plus facilement qu’en Italie. « Je ne suis pas découragée et je n’ai pas peur. Je suis habituée maintenant à traverser les frontières », lance celle qui a déjà marché à travers la Turquie, la Grèce, l’Albanie, le Monténégro, la Bosnie, la Croatie et la Slovénie.

    Phénomène vieux de plusieurs années, ces tentatives de passages dans la région de Vintimille ont ceci de nouveau qu’elles rassemblent désormais des personnes aux profils et aux origines plus variés qu’avant. Des Tibétains, par exemple, Jacopo Colomba, représentant de l’ONG We World, n’en avait pas vus dans le coin depuis deux ans. Il y a par ailleurs davantage de migrants désillusionnés par l’Italie « qui veulent tenter leur chance ailleurs », affirme Maurizio Marmo, de Caritas Vintimille. Ils s’ajoutent aux primo-arrivants dans le pays, largement majoritaires parmi ceux qui tentent le passage. Venus de la route des Balkans ou de l’île de Lampedusa dans le but de rejoindre la France ou d’autres pays du nord de l’Europe, ils sont nombreux à expliquer leur désir de quitter la péninsule par le fait qu’ils ne parlent pas italien, qu’ils ne connaissent personne dans ce pays ou, tout simplement, par l’ordre qu’ils ont reçu d’en partir.

    Ce dernier cas de figure est celui de Mohamed Ahmed et de ses deux compagnons de voyage, eux aussi originaires du Darfour. L’un d’eux tchipe lorsqu’on lui demande son prénom, en signe de refus. Il ne le donnera pas. Il tchipe de plus belle, en guise de désapprobation, lorsque son ami accepte, lui, de donner le sien. Le parcours migratoire de ce trentenaire l’a rendu méfiant, sur la défensive. Il ne sait plus qui croire ni à quel sein se vouer. Comme beaucoup de migrants, il a appris la méfiance envers les autorités, envers les journalistes, la méfiance des uns envers les autres.

    Et pour cause : cet homme sans nom est allé de mauvaises surprises en désillusions. Comme Mohamed Ahmed, il a fui le Soudan en guerre pour aller travailler en Libye, pays qu’il croyait prospère alors qu’il est en proie au chaos et à la loi du plus fort depuis 2011. Il y restera bloqué deux ans. À leur arrivée à Lampedusa au terme d’une traversée en bateau, les comparses soudanais sont placés en quarantaine pour détecter d’éventuels cas de coronavirus. Cette période censée durer 14 jours sera renouvelée et doublée, sans qu’on leur fournisse la moindre explication. À leur sortie, les autorités italiennes leur ont donné sept jours pour quitter le territoire.

    « À Vintimille, il n’y a plus d’endroit pour les choses intimes »

    Une fois refoulés par les autorités françaises, les migrants n’ont guère d’autres choix que d’aller à Vintimille, cité balnéaire de 24 000 habitants, loin d’être accueillante mais qui a l’avantage de se trouver à seulement 10 kilomètres de la frontière. Dans les rues de la ville, ils sont désoeuvrés. Chaque nuit, les associations dénombrent entre 100 et 200 migrants qui dorment où ils peuvent, gare, plages, arrière des buissons, sans tente. « Regardez comment c’est ici », lance, écœuré, un jeune Tchadien, arrivé depuis seulement trois jours, en pointant le bitume jonché de déchets. « Moi je dors plus bas, près de la rivière. » Il n’est pas le seul : les berges de la rivière Roya, recouvertes de végétation, sont habitées par de nombreux sangliers imposants et peu farouches.

    Le nombre de migrants à la rue à Vintimille représente une situation inhabituelle ces dernières années. Elle résulte, en grande partie, de la fermeture fin juillet d’un camp humanitaire situé en périphérie de la ville et géré par la Croix-Rouge italienne. Cette fermeture décrétée par la préfecture d’Imperia a été un coup dur pour les migrants qui pouvaient, depuis 2016, y faire étape. Les différents bâtiments de ce camp de transit pouvaient accueillir quelque 300 personnes - mais en avait accueillis jusqu’à 750 au plus fort de la crise migratoire. Des sanitaires, des lits, un accès aux soins ainsi qu’à une aide juridique pour ceux qui souhaitaient déposer une demande d’asile en Italie : autant de services qui font désormais partie du passé.

    « On ne comprend pas », lâche simplement Maurizio Marmo. « Depuis deux ans, les choses s’étaient calmées dans la ville. Il n’y avait pas de polémique, pas de controverse. Personne ne réclamait la fermeture de ce camp. Maintenant, voilà le résultat. Tout le monde est perdant, la ville comme les migrants. »

    Alors, qu’est-ce qui explique cette fermeture ? La préfecture est restée silencieuse à nos questions. Selon des associations, les autorités en auraient eu assez du cadre juridique bancal sur lequel avait été ouvert ce camp, unique en son genre dans le nord de l’Italie. D’autres avancent que la tenue prochaine d’élections régionales, fin septembre, aurait motivé cette décision dans l’espoir de glaner les votes de l’électorat anti-migrants. Difficile à savoir. Début septembre, plus d’un mois après sa fermeture, les préfabriqués du « campo » n’étaient en tout cas toujours pas démantelés, permettant à certains de parier sur une réouverture future.

    Toujours est-il qu’en attendant, la vie des migrants s’organise désormais à l’intérieur même de la ville, autour de la Via Tenda. Sur un parking, entre le cimetière et une voie rapide, l’association Kesha Niya distribue de la nourriture et de l’eau les soirs. Les matins, des collations sont servies dans les locaux de Caritas Vintimille, à proximité. Entre les deux, plus grand chose.

    « Les mineurs et les familles n’ont aucun accueil, s’offusque Maurizio Marmo. Les mineurs restent dehors. » En solution d’urgence, l’église San Nicola a récemment accepté, sous l’impulsion de Caritas, d’ouvrir ses portes aux familles le temps de quelques nuits seulement.

    Mais les portes, en général, se ferment davantage qu’elles ne s’ouvrent. « Avant, on louait un local là, près de la rivière, dit Chiara de Projetto 20k. Les migrants pouvaient s’y reposer en sécurité, charger leur téléphone, passer du temps tranquilles pour les choses intimes… Ça marchait bien. Mais le propriétaire a voulu mettre fin à cette location en janvier 2019. Maintenant le lieu est fermé et il n’y a plus d’endroit sécurisé à Vintimille pour ce genre de choses. »

    Même des services aussi essentiels que les douches ne sont plus accessibles aux migrants dans la ville. Les salles de bains de l’association Caritas, seules options, sont fermées pendant la belle saison. « Les douches sont très compliquées à gérer, justifie Maurizio Marmo, alors, l’été, ils vont dans la mer. »

    Abdelkhair a choisi la rivière. Accroupi sous un pont, penché en avant, il lave un t-shirt dans le faible débit de la Roya, asséchée en cette fin d’été. Il en profite pour se mouiller le visage. Originaires du Bangladesh, lui et ses compagnons ne peuvent pas s’attarder ici. « C’est le coin des Somaliens », prévient un autre migrant, qui s’est levé à la hâte du matelas encrassé sur lequel il était allongé à la vue d’un visiteur. Des murmures et des frémissements nous font comprendre que d’autres hommes se cachent tout autour, dans les interstices du pont, d’où dépasse un pan de couette, et dans les buissons. Les sangliers, eux, gambadent en plein jour non loin de là.

    À la recherche des femmes

    Les passeurs, aussi, agissent à découvert dans Vintimille. Dans le centre-ville, il n’est pas rare que des groupes d’hommes, connus pour être là pour du business, rodent autour de la gare. « Quand on les voit se diriger vers les quais, c’est qu’ils ont été prévenus qu’un train arrivait », indique un membre d’une association qui préfère garder l’anonymat.

    Mohamed Sheraz, rencontré en dehors de la ville, est si à l’aise qu’il donne son nom. Âgé de 25 ans, ce réfugié pakistanais en France dit venir en Italie pour « aider ses frères » en parallèle de son travail dans le secteur du bâtiment. En l’occurrence, il « aide » cinq hommes, quatre Pakistanais et un Afghan, moyennant 150 euros par tête. La nuit dernière, les migrants n’en ont pas eu pour leur argent, ce fut un échec.

    Mais d’autres trafics, plus secrets, inquiètent davantage les associations. Parmi les migrants livrés à eux-mêmes, les femmes, particulièrement vulnérables, sont l’objet de plusieurs attentions. « Dans les deux derniers mois, on a pu entrer - brièvement - en contact avec trois femmes, dit Jacopo Colomba, de l’ONG We World. Elles semblaient être contraintes par quelque chose et cherchaient une manière de s’échapper mais des hommes ont interrompu notre conversation. Nous ne les avons pas revues. »

    Grâce à des maraudes hebdomadaires, Jacopo Colomba, qui a rejoint le projet « Hope this helps » financé par le département et la région Ligurie pour documenter ces trafics, estime qu’environ 50 femmes transitent tous les mois par Vintimille. Avant de disparaître, sitôt les pieds posés dans la ville.

    « C’est une dynamique facile à observer, détaille Jacopo Colomba. Des femmes, généralement ivoiriennes [la mafia nigériane, très active il y a quelques années dans la ville, a elle vu son activité baisser, NDLR] arrivent par train de Milan ou de Gêne et sont tout de suite accueillies par une personne de leur nationalité. Elles sont menées près du fleuve. D’autres personnes les attendent et un échange de papiers a lieu. Puis, elles sont conduites dans des maisons, nous ne savons pas où exactement. » L’humanitaire, qui précise avoir prévenu la police mais ne pas savoir si « le mot a circulé », assure que ces femmes sont par la suite intégrées à des réseaux de prostitution en France et notamment à Marseille.

    « Les femmes ne sont pas inexistantes à Vintimille mais elles sont invisibles », affirme pour sa part Adèle, membre de l’association Kesha Niya, durant une distribution de nourriture à laquelle participent uniquement des hommes. « C’est dur de savoir comment elles vont et où elles sont. »

    Auparavant le camp de la Croix-Rouge hébergeait plusieurs d’entre elles. En cela non plus, sa fermeture n’a pas été bénéfique.

    Loin des trafics et des luttes de pouvoir, il reste un lieu à Vintimille où le business est un vilain mot. Le café Hobbit, tenu par la charismatique Delia, engrange même si peu de recettes que le commerce peine à ne pas mettre la clé sous la porte. Car Delia sert boissons et focaccias gratuites aux personnes dans le besoin depuis plusieurs années. Cet élan de générosité, inspiré par l’afflux de migrants dans la ville, a fait fuir les locaux. Eux ne mettent plus les pieds dans « le café des migrants ». « Mon commerce est un désastre », dit Delia, sans songer une seconde à changer de stratégie. Pour la gérante, les passeurs, les migrants laissés à l’abandon, la frontière italo-française et ses contrôles incessants, tout cela s’inscrit dans une même logique, qu’elle refuse de suivre. « Tout dans ce monde est affaire d’argent et de profit. La seule chose qui ne rapporte rien, c’est sauver les êtres humains. »

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/webdoc/209/si-un-migrant-est-dans-la-region-de-vintimille-c-est-qu-il-veut-partir

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontière_sud-alpine #Italie #frontières #France #Vintimille #refoulement #refoulements #push-back #café_Hobbit #femmes #SDF #sans-abri #camp_humanitaire #Croix-Rouge #fermeture #Delia

  • Migrants à la frontière italienne : « On ralentit le voyage, mais on ne l’empêche certainement pas »

    Depuis le déconfinement, les passages vers la France reprennent. Tous les jours, la police refoule des dizaines de migrants en Italie.

    Le « manège » a très vite repris. Passé la période de confinement, les gens se sont remis en mouvement. A la frontière franco-italienne, les personnes migrantes ont de nouveau entrepris de passer en France, par le train, en voiture ou en camion, essayant de tromper une surveillance policière rodée au « manège », donc. C’est, avec ironie, le terme que choisit un militant associatif pour désigner les va-et-vient qu’il observe ce mardi 7 juillet devant le poste de la police aux frontières (PAF) de #Menton (#Alpes-Maritimes). Il participe à une mission d’observation menée par plusieurs associations (Amnesty International, la Cimade, Médecins du monde, Médecins sans frontières et le Secours catholique) pour documenter les pratiques des autorités. Chaque jour, des migrants interpellés à leur arrivée en France sont conduits à la PAF puis refoulés quelques mètres plus loin, en Italie. Jusqu’à ce qu’ils retentent leur chance.

    Lundi, 38 personnes ont ainsi été renvoyées en Italie, et 45 le lendemain. Djilani (le prénom a été modifié) a été interpellé vers 17 heures lundi à la gare de Tende. Ce Tunisien a passé la nuit dans les locaux préfabriqués attenants à la PAF de Menton. Pourtant, jure-t-il à sa sortie, il ne souhaitait pas se rendre en France. « J’avais pris un train depuis Turin pour rendre visite à un cousin à Vintimille », dit-il. Se jouant des frontières, la voie ferrée serpente jusqu’à la côte méditerranéenne en traversant un bout de territoire français. Djilani a eu beau montrer son billet de train Turin-Vintimille aux policiers qui l’ont contrôlé, il a dû descendre à quai et s’est vu notifier un refus d’entrée sur le territoire. « Je travaille dans l’agriculture en Calabre depuis un an et demi et j’ai déposé une demande de régularisation le 2 juillet », proteste-t-il, documents à l’appui.


    https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2020/07/08/migrants-a-la-frontiere-italienne-on-ralentit-le-voyage-mais-on-ne-l-empeche

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontière_sud-alpine #Italie #frontières #France #Vintimille

    #paywall

  • #Briançon : « L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique »

    Le nouveau maire a décidé de mettre l’association d’aide aux migrants à la porte de ses locaux. Dans la ville, la mobilisation citoyenne s’organise

    #Arnaud_Murgia, élu maire de Briançon en juin, avait promis de « redresser » sa ville. Il vient, au-delà même de ce qu’il affichait dans son programme, de s’attaquer brutalement aux structures associatives clefs du mouvement citoyen d’accueil des migrants qui transitent en nombre par la vallée haut-alpine depuis quatre ans, après avoir traversé la montagne à pied depuis l’Italie voisine.

    A 35 ans, Arnaud Murgia, ex-président départemental des Républicains et toujours conseiller départemental, a également pris la tête de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (CCB) cet été. C’est en tant que président de la CCB qu’il a décidé de mettre l’association Refuges solidaires à la porte des locaux dont elle disposait par convention depuis sa création en juillet 2017. Par un courrier daté du 26 août, il a annoncé à Refuges solidaires qu’il ne renouvellerait pas la convention, arrivée à son terme. Et « mis en demeure » l’association de « libérer » le bâtiment situé près de la gare de Briançon pour « graves négligences dans la gestion des locaux et de leurs occupants ». Ultimatum au 28 octobre. Il a renouvelé sa mise en demeure par un courrier le 11 septembre, ajoutant à ses griefs l’alerte Covid pesant sur le refuge, qui l’oblige à ne plus accueillir de nouveaux migrants jusqu’au 19 septembre en vertu d’un arrêté préfectoral.
    « Autoritarisme mêlé d’idées xénophobes »

    Un peu abasourdis, les responsables de Refuges solidaires n’avaient pas révélé l’information, dans l’attente d’une rencontre avec le maire qui leur aurait peut être permis une négociation. Peine perdue : Arnaud Murgia les a enfin reçus lundi, pour la première fois depuis son élection, mais il n’a fait que réitérer son ultimatum. Refuges solidaires s’est donc résolu à monter publiquement au créneau. « M. Murgia a dégainé sans discuter, avec une méconnaissance totale de ce que nous faisons, gronde Philippe Wyon, l’un des administrateurs. Cette fin de non-recevoir est un refus de prise en compte de l’accueil humanitaire des exilés, autant que de la paix sociale que nous apportons aux Briançonnais. C’est irresponsable ! » La coordinatrice du refuge, Pauline Rey, s’insurge : « Il vient casser une dynamique qui a parfaitement marché depuis trois ans : nous avons accueilli, nourri, soigné, réconforté près de 11 000 personnes. Il est illusoire d’imaginer que sans nous, le flux d’exilés va se tarir ! D’autant qu’il est reparti à la hausse, avec 350 personnes sur le seul mois d’août, avec de plus en plus de familles, notamment iraniennes et afghanes, avec des bébés parfois… Cet hiver, où iront-ils ? »

    Il faut avoir vu les bénévoles, au cœur des nuits d’hiver, prendre en charge avec une énergie et une efficacité admirables les naufragés de la montagne épuisés, frigorifiés, gelés parfois, pour comprendre ce qu’elle redoute. Les migrants, après avoir emprunté de sentiers d’altitude pour échapper à la police, arrivent à grand-peine à Briançon ou sont redescendus parfois par les maraudeurs montagnards ou ceux de Médecins du monde qui les secourent après leur passage de la frontière. L’association Tous migrants, qui soutient ces maraudeurs, est elle aussi dans le collimateur d’Arnaud Murgia : il lui a sèchement signifié qu’il récupérerait les deux préfabriqués où elle entrepose le matériel de secours en montagne le 30 décembre, là encore sans la moindre discussion. L’un des porte-parole de Tous migrants, Michel Rousseau, fustige « une forme d’autoritarisme mêlée d’idées xénophobes : le maire désigne les exilés comme des indésirables et associe nos associations au désordre. Ses décisions vont en réalité semer la zizanie, puisque nous évitons aux exilés d’utiliser des moyens problématiques pour s’abriter et se nourrir. Ce mouvement a permis aux Briançonnais de donner le meilleur d’eux-mêmes. C’est une expérience très riche pour le territoire, nous n’avons pas l’intention que cela s’arrête ».

    La conseillère municipale d’opposition Aurélie Poyau (liste citoyenne, d’union de la gauche et écologistes), adjointe au maire sortant, l’assure : « Il va y avoir une mobilisation citoyenne, j’en suis persuadée. J’ose aussi espérer que des élus communautaires demanderont des discussions entre collectivités, associations, ONG et Etat pour que des décisions éclairées soient prises, afin de pérenniser l’accueil digne de ces personnes de passage chez nous. Depuis la création du refuge, il n’y a pas eu le moindre problème entre elles et la population. L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique. »
    « Peine profonde »

    Ce mardi, au refuge, en application de l’arrêté préfectoral pris après la découverte de trois cas positif au Covid, Hamed, migrant algérien, se réveille après sa troisième nuit passée dans un duvet, sur des palettes de bois devant le bâtiment et confie : « Il faut essayer de ne pas fermer ce lieu, c’est très important, on a de bons repas, on reprend de l’énergie. C’est rare, ce genre d’endroit. » Y., jeune Iranien, est lui bien plus frais : arrivé la veille après vingt heures de marche dans la montagne, il a passé la nuit chez un couple de sexagénaires de Briançon qui ont répondu à l’appel d’urgence de Refuges solidaires. Il montre fièrement la photo rayonnante prise avec eux au petit-déjeuner. Nathalie, bénévole fidèle du refuge, soupire : « J’ai une peine profonde, je ne comprends pas la décision du maire, ni un tel manque d’humanité. Nous faisons le maximum sur le sanitaire, en collaboration avec l’hôpital, avec MDM, il n’y a jamais eu de problème ici. Hier, j’ai dû refuser l’entrée à onze jeunes, dont un blessé. Même si une partie a trouvé refuge chez des habitants solidaires, cela m’a été très douloureux. »

    Arnaud Murgia nous a pour sa part annoncé ce mardi soir qu’il ne souhaitait pas « s’exprimer publiquement, en accord avec les associations, pour ne pas créer de polémiques qui pénaliseraient une issue amiable »… Issue dont il n’a pourtant pas esquissé le moindre contour la veille face aux solidaires.

    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2020/09/16/briancon-l-expulsion-de-refuges-solidaires-est-une-vraie-catastrophe-pour

    #refuge_solidaire #expulsion #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #Hautes-Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #Refuges_solidaires #mise_en_demeure #Murgia

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • A Briançon, le nouveau maire LR veut fermer le refuge solidaire des migrants

      Depuis trois ans, ce lieu emblématique accueille de façon inconditionnelle et temporaire les personnes exilées franchissant la frontière franco-italienne par la montagne. Mais l’élection d’un nouveau maire Les Républicains, Arnaud Murgia, risque de tout changer.

      Briançon (Hautes-Alpes).– La nouvelle est tombée lundi, tel un coup de massue, après un rendez-vous très attendu avec la nouvelle municipalité. « Le maire nous a confirmé que nous allions devoir fermer, sans nous proposer aucune alternative », soupire Philippe, l’un des référents du refuge solidaire de Briançon. En 2017, l’association Refuges solidaires avait récupéré un ancien bâtiment inoccupé pour en faire un lieu unique à Briançon, tout près du col de Montgenèvre et de la gare, qui permet d’offrir une pause précieuse aux exilés dans leur parcours migratoire.

      Fin août, l’équipe du refuge découvrait avec effarement, dans un courrier signé de la main du président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais, qui n’est autre qu’Arnaud Murgia, également maire de Briançon (Les Républicains), que la convention leur mettant les lieux à disposition ne serait pas renouvelée.

      Philippe avait pourtant pris les devants en juillet en adressant un courrier à Arnaud Murgia, en vue d’une rencontre et d’une éventuelle visite du refuge. « La seule réponse que nous avons eue a été ce courrier recommandé mettant fin à la convention », déplore-t-il, plein de lassitude.

      Contacté, le maire n’a pas souhaité s’exprimer mais évoque une question de sécurité dans son courrier, la jauge de 15 personnes accueillies n’étant pas respectée. « Il est en discussion avec les associations concernées afin de gérer au mieux cet épineux problème, et cela dans le plus grand respect des personnes en situation difficile », a indiqué son cabinet.

      Interrogée sur l’accueil d’urgence des exilés à l’avenir, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes préfère ne pas « commenter la décision d’une collectivité portant sur l’affectation d’un bâtiment dont elle a la gestion ». « Dans les Hautes-Alpes comme pour tout point d’entrée sur le territoire national, les services de l’État et les forces de sécurité intérieure s’assurent que toute personne souhaitant entrer en France bénéficie du droit de séjourner sur notre territoire. »

      Sur le parking de la MJC de Briançon, mercredi dernier, Pauline se disait déjà inquiète. « Sur le plan humain, il ne peut pas laisser les gens à la rue comme ça, lâche-t-elle, en référence au maire. Il a une responsabilité ! » Cette ancienne bénévole de l’association, désormais salariée, se souvient des prémices du refuge.

      « Je revois les exilés dormir à même le sol devant la MJC. On a investi ces locaux inoccupés parce qu’il y avait un réel besoin d’accueil d’urgence sur la ville. » Trois ans plus tard et avec un total de 10 000 personnes accueillies, le besoin n’a jamais été aussi fort. L’équipe évoque même une « courbe exponentielle » depuis le mois de juin, graphique à l’appui. 106 personnes en juin, 216 en juillet, 355 en août.

      Une quarantaine de personnes est hébergée au refuge ce jour-là, pour une durée moyenne de deux à trois jours. La façade des locaux laisse apparaître le graffiti d’un poing levé en l’air qui arrache des fils barbelés. Pauline s’engouffre dans les locaux et passe par la salle commune, dont les murs sont décorés de dessins, drapeaux et mots de remerciement.

      De grands thermos trônent sur une table près du cabinet médical (tenu en partenariat avec Médecins du monde) et les exilés vont et viennent pour se servir un thé chaud. À droite, un bureau sert à Céline, la deuxième salariée chargée de l’accueil des migrants à leur arrivée.

      Prénom, nationalité, date d’arrivée, problèmes médicaux… « Nous avons des fiches confidentielles, que nous détruisons au bout d’un moment et qui nous servent à faire des statistiques anonymes que nous rendons publiques », précise Céline, tout en demandant à deux exilés de patienter dans un anglais courant. Durant leur séjour, la jeune femme leur vient en aide pour trouver les billets de train les moins chers ou pour leur procurer des recharges téléphoniques.

      « Depuis plusieurs mois, le profil des exilés a beaucoup changé, note Philippe. On a 90 % d’Afghans et d’Iraniens, alors que notre public était auparavant composé de jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest. » Désormais, ce sont aussi des familles, avec des enfants en bas âge, qui viennent chercher refuge en France en passant par la dangereuse route des Balkans.

      Dehors, dans la cour, deux petites filles jouent à se courir après, riant aux éclats. Selon Céline, l’aînée n’avait que huit mois quand ses parents sont partis. La deuxième est née sur la route.

      « Récemment, je suis tombée sur une famille afghane avec un garçon âgé de trois ans lors d’une maraude au col de Montgenèvre. Quand j’ai félicité l’enfant parce qu’il marchait vite, presque aussi vite que moi, il m’a répondu : “Ben oui, sinon la police va nous arrêter” », raconte Stéphanie Besson, coprésidente de l’association Tous migrants, qui vient de fêter ses cinq ans.

      L’auteure de Trouver refuge : histoires vécues par-delà les frontières n’a retrouvé le sourire que lorsqu’elle l’a aperçu, dans la cour devant le refuge, en train de s’amuser sur un mini-tracteur. « Il a retrouvé toute son innocence l’espace d’un instant. C’est pour ça que ce lieu est essentiel : la population qui passe par la montagne aujourd’hui est bien plus vulnérable. »

      Vers 16 heures, Pauline s’enfonce dans les couloirs en direction du réfectoire, où des biologistes vêtus d’une blouse blanche, dont le visage est encombré d’une charlotte et d’un masque, testent les résidents à tour de rôle. Un migrant a été positif au Covid-19 quelques jours plus tôt et la préfecture, dans un arrêté, a exigé la fermeture du refuge pour la journée du 10 septembre.

      Deux longues rangées de tables occupent la pièce, avec, d’un côté, un espace cuisine aménagé, de l’autre, une porte de secours donnant sur l’école Oronce fine. Là aussi, les murs ont servi de cimaises à de nombreux exilés souhaitant laisser une trace de leur passage au refuge. Dans un coin de la salle, des dizaines de matelas forment une pile et prennent la place des tables et des chaises, le soir venu, lorsque l’affluence est trop importante.

      « On a dû aménager deux dortoirs en plus de ceux du premier étage pour répondre aux besoins actuels », souligne Pauline, qui préfère ne laisser entrer personne d’autre que les exilés dans les chambres pour respecter leur intimité. Vers 17 heures, Samia se lève de sa chaise et commence à couper des concombres qu’elle laisse tomber dans un grand saladier.

      Cela fait trois ans que cette trentenaire a pris la route avec sa sœur depuis l’Afghanistan. « Au départ, on était avec notre frère, mais il a été arrêté en Turquie et renvoyé chez nous. On a décidé de poursuivre notre chemin malgré tout », chuchote-t-elle, ajoutant que c’est particulièrement dur et dangereux pour les femmes seules. Son regard semble triste et contraste avec son sourire.

      Évoquant des problèmes personnels mais aussi la présence des talibans, les sœurs expliquent avoir dû quitter leur pays dans l’espoir d’une vie meilleure en Europe. « Le refuge est une vraie chance pour nous. On a pu se reposer, dormir en toute sécurité et manger à notre faim. Chaque jour, je remercie les personnes qui s’en occupent », confie-t-elle en dari, l’un des dialectes afghans.

      Samia ne peut s’empêcher de comparer avec la Croatie, où de nombreux exilés décrivent les violences subies de la part de la police. « Ils ont frappé une des femmes qui était avec nous, ont cassé nos téléphones et ont brûlé une partie de nos affaires », raconte-t-elle.

      Ici, depuis des années, la police n’approche pas du refuge ni même de la gare, respectant dans une sorte d’accord informel la tranquillité des lieux et des exilés. « Je n’avais encore jamais vu de policiers aux alentours mais, récemment, deux agents de la PAF [police aux frontières] ont raccompagné une petite fille qui s’était perdue et ont filmé l’intérieur du refuge avec leur smartphone », assure Céline.

      À 18 heures, le repas est servi. Les parents convoquent les enfants, qui rappliquent en courant et s’installent sur une chaise. La fumée de la bolognaise s’échappe des assiettes, tandis qu’un joli brouhaha s’empare de la pièce. « Le dîner est servi tôt car on tient compte des exilés qui prennent le train du soir pour Paris, à 20 heures », explique Pauline.

      Paul*, 25 ans, en fait partie. C’est la deuxième fois qu’il vient au refuge, mais il a fait trois fois le tour de la ville de nuit pour pouvoir le retrouver. « J’avais une photo de la façade mais impossible de me rappeler l’emplacement », sourit-il. L’Ivoirien aspire à « une vie tranquille » qui lui permettrait de réaliser tous « les projets qu’il a en tête ».

      Le lendemain, une affiche collée à la porte d’entrée du refuge indique qu’un arrêté préfectoral impose la fermeture des lieux pour la journée. Aucun nouvel arrivant ne peut entrer.

      Pour Stéphanie Besson, la fermeture définitive du refuge aurait de lourdes conséquences sur les migrants et l’image de la ville. « Briançon est un exemple de fraternité. La responsabilité de ceux qui mettront fin à ce jeu de la fraternité avec des mesures politiques sera immense. »

      Parmi les bénévoles de Tous migrants, des professeurs, des agriculteurs, des banquiers et des retraités … « On a des soutiens partout, en France comme à l’étranger. Mais il ne faut pas croire qu’on tire une satisfaction de nos actions. Faire des maraudes une routine me brise, c’est une honte pour la France », poursuit cette accompagnatrice en montagne.

      Si elle se dit inquiète pour les cinq années à venir, c’est surtout pour l’énergie que les acteurs du tissu associatif vont devoir dépenser pour continuer à défendre les droits des exilés. L’association vient d’apprendre que le local qui sert à entreposer le matériel des maraudeurs, mis à disposition par la ville, va leur être retiré pour permettre l’extension de la cour de l’école Oronce fine.

      Contactée, l’inspectrice de l’Éducation nationale n’a pas confirmé ce projet d’agrandissement de l’établissement. « On a aussi une crainte pour la “maisonnette”, qui appartient à la ville, et qui loge les demandeurs d’asile sans hébergement », souffle Stéphanie.

      « Tout s’enchaîne, ça n’arrête pas depuis un mois », lâche Agnès Antoine, bénévole à Tous migrants. Cela fait plusieurs années que la militante accueille des exilés chez elle, souvent après leur passage au refuge solidaire, en plus de ses trois grands enfants.

      Depuis trois ans, Agnès héberge un adolescent guinéen inscrit au lycée, en passe d’obtenir son titre de séjour. « Il a 18 ans aujourd’hui et a obtenu les félicitations au dernier trimestre », lance-t-elle fièrement, ajoutant que c’est aussi cela qui l’encourage à poursuivre son engagement.

      Pour elle, Arnaud Murgia est dans un positionnement politique clair : « le rejet des exilés » et « la fermeture des frontières » pour empêcher tout passage par le col de Montgenèvre. « C’est illusoire ! Les migrants sont et seront toujours là, ils emprunteront des parcours plus dangereux pour y arriver et se retrouveront à la rue sans le refuge, qui remplit un rôle social indéniable. »

      Dans la vallée de Serre Chevalier, à l’abri des regards, un projet de tourisme solidaire est porté par le collectif d’architectes Quatorze. Il faut longer la rivière Guisane, au milieu des chalets touristiques de cette station et des montagnes, pour apercevoir la maison Bessoulie, au village du Bez. À l’intérieur, Laure et David s’activent pour tenir les délais, entre démolition, récup’ et réaménagement des lieux.

      « L’idée est de créer un refuge pour de l’accueil à moyen et long terme, où des exilés pourraient se former tout en côtoyant des touristes », développe Laure. Au rez-de-chaussée de cette ancienne auberge de jeunesse, une cuisine et une grande salle commune sont rénovées. Ici, divers ateliers (cuisine du monde, low tech, découverte des routes de l’exil) seront proposés.

      À l’étage, un autre espace commun est aménagé. « Il y a aussi la salle de bains et le futur studio du volontaire en service civique. » Un premier dortoir pour deux prend forme, près des chambres réservées aux saisonniers. « On va repeindre le lambris et mettre du parquet flottant », indique la jeune architecte.

      Deux autres dortoirs, l’un pour trois, l’autre pour quatre, sont prévus au deuxième étage, pour une capacité d’accueil de neuf personnes exilées. À chaque fois, un espace de travail est prévu pour elles. « Elles seront accompagnées par un gestionnaire présent à l’année, chargé de les suivre dans leur formation et leur insertion. »

      « C’est un projet qui donne du sens à notre travail », poursuit David en passant une main dans sa longue barbe. Peu sensible aux questions migratoires au départ, il découvre ces problématiques sur le tas. « On a une conscience architecturale et on compte tout faire pour offrir les meilleures conditions d’accueil aux exilés qui viendront. » Reste à déterminer les critères de sélection pour le public qui sera accueilli à la maison Bessoulie à compter de janvier 2021.

      Pour l’heure, le maire de la commune, comme le voisinage, ignore la finalité du projet. « Il est ami avec Arnaud Murgia, alors ça nous inquiète. Comme il y a une station là-bas, il pourrait être tenté de “protéger” le tourisme classique », confie Philippe, du refuge solidaire. Mais le bâtiment appartient à la Fédération unie des auberges de jeunesse (Fuaj) et non à la ville, ce qui est déjà une petite victoire pour les acteurs locaux. « Le moyen et long terme est un échelon manquant sur le territoire, on encourage donc tous cette démarche », relève Stéphanie Besson.

      Aurélie Poyau, élue de l’opposition, veut croire que le maire de Briançon saura prendre la meilleure décision pour ne pas entacher l’image de la ville. « En trois ans, il n’y a jamais eu aucun problème lié à la présence des migrants. Arnaud Murgia n’a pas la connaissance de cet accueil propre à la solidarité montagnarde, de son histoire. Il doit s’intéresser à cet élan », note-t-elle.

      Son optimisme reste relatif. Deux jours plus tôt, l’élue a pris connaissance d’un courrier adressé par la ville aux commerçants du marché de Briançon leur rappelant que la mendicité était interdite. « Personne ne mendie. On sait que ça vise les bénévoles des associations d’aide aux migrants, qui récupèrent des invendus en fin de marché. Mais c’est du don, et voilà comment on joue sur les peurs avec le poids des mots ! »

      Vendredi, avant la réunion avec le maire, un arrêté préfectoral est déjà venu prolonger la fermeture du refuge jusqu’au 19 septembre, après que deux nouvelles personnes ont été testées positives au Covid-19. Une décision que respecte Philippe, même s’il ne lâchera rien par la suite, au risque d’aller jusqu’à l’expulsion. Est-elle évitable ?

      « Évidemment, les cas Covid sont un argument de plus pour le maire, qui mélange tout. Mais nous lui avons signifié que nous n’arrêterons pas d’accueillir les personnes exilées de passage dans le Briançonnais, même après le délai de deux mois qu’il nous a imposé pour quitter les lieux », prévient Philippe. « On va organiser une riposte juridique et faire pression sur l’État pour qu’il prenne ses responsabilités », conclut Agnès.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/160920/briancon-le-nouveau-maire-lr-veut-fermer-le-refuge-solidaire-des-migrants?

      @sinehebdo : c’est l’article que tu as signalé, mais avec tout le texte, j’efface donc ton signalement pour ne pas avoir de doublons

    • Lettre d’information Tous Migrants. Septembre 2020

      Edito :

      Aylan. Moria. Qu’avons-nous fait en cinq ans ?

      Un petit garçon en exil, échoué mort sur une plage de la rive nord de la Méditerranée. Le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe ravagé par les flammes, laissant 12.000 personnes vulnérables sans abri.

      Cinq ans presque jour pour jour sont passés entre ces deux « occasions », terribles, données à nos dirigeants, et à nous, citoyens européens, de réveiller l’Europe endormie et indigne de ses principes fondateurs. De mettre partout en acte la fraternité et la solidarité, en mer, en montagne, aux frontières, dans nos territoires. Et pourtant, si l’on en juge par la situation dans le Briançonnais, la fraternité et la solidarité ne semblent jamais avoir été aussi menacées qu’à présent...

      Dénoncer, informer, alerter, protéger. Il y a cinq ans, le 5 septembre 2015, se mettait en route le mouvement Tous Migrants. C’était une première manifestation place de l’Europe à Briançon, sous la bannière Pas en notre nom. Il n’y avait pas encore d’exilés dans nos montagnes (10.000 depuis sont passés par nos chemins), mais des morts par centaines en Méditerranée... Que de chemin parcouru depuis 2015, des dizaines d’initiatives par an ont été menées par des centaines de bénévoles, des relais médiatiques dans le monde entier, que de rencontres riches avec les exilés, les solidaires, les journalistes, les autres associations...

      Mais hormis quelques avancées juridiques fortes de symboles - tels la consécration du principe de fraternité par le Conseil Constitutionnel, ou l’innocentement de Pierre, maraudeur solidaire -, force est de constater que la situation des droits fondamentaux des exilés n’a guère progressé. L’actualité internationale, nationale et locale nous en livre chaque jour la preuve glaçante, de Lesbos à Malte, de Calais à Gap et Briançon. Triste ironie du sort, cinq ans après la naissance de Tous Migrants, presque jour pour jour, le nouveau maire à peine élu à Briançon s’est mis en tête de faire fermer le lieu d’accueil d’urgence et d’entraver les maraudes... Quelles drôles d’idées. Comme des relents d’Histoire.

      Comment, dès lors, ne pas se sentir des Sisyphe*, consumés de l’intérieur par un sentiment tout à la fois d’injustice, d’impuissance, voire d’absurdité ? En se rappelant simplement qu’en cinq ans, la mobilisation citoyenne n’a pas faibli. Que Tous Migrants a reçu l’année dernière la mention spéciale du Prix des Droits de l’Homme. Que nous sommes nombreux à rester indignés.

      Alors, tant qu’il y aura des hommes et des femmes qui passeront la frontière franco-italienne, au péril de leur vie à cause de lois illégitimes, nous poursuivrons le combat. Pour eux, pour leurs enfants... pour les nôtres.

      Marie Dorléans, cofondatrice de Tous Migrants

      Reçue via mail, le 16.09.2020

    • Briançon bientôt comme #Vintimille ?

      Le nombre de migrants à la rue à Vintimille représente une situation inhabituelle ces dernières années. Elle résulte, en grande partie, de la fermeture fin juillet d’un camp humanitaire situé en périphérie de la ville et géré par la Croix-Rouge italienne. Cette fermeture décrétée par la préfecture d’Imperia a été un coup dur pour les migrants qui pouvaient, depuis 2016, y faire étape. Les différents bâtiments de ce camp de transit pouvaient accueillir quelque 300 personnes - mais en avait accueillis jusqu’à 750 au plus fort de la crise migratoire. Des sanitaires, des lits, un accès aux soins ainsi qu’à une aide juridique pour ceux qui souhaitaient déposer une demande d’asile en Italie : autant de services qui font désormais partie du passé.

      « On ne comprend pas », lâche simplement Maurizio Marmo. « Depuis deux ans, les choses s’étaient calmées dans la ville. Il n’y avait pas de polémique, pas de controverse. Personne ne réclamait la fermeture de ce camp. Maintenant, voilà le résultat. Tout le monde est perdant, la ville comme les migrants. »

      https://seenthis.net/messages/876523

    • Aide aux migrants : les bénévoles de Briançon inquiets pour leurs locaux

      C’est un non-renouvellement de convention qui inquiète les bénévoles venant en aide aux migrants dans le Briançonnais. Celui de l’occupation de deux préfabriqués, situés derrière le Refuge solidaire, par l’association Tous migrants. Ceux-ci servent à entreposer du matériel pour les maraudeurs – des personnes qui apportent leur aide aux réfugiés passant la frontière italo-française à pied dans les montagnes – et à préparer leurs missions.

      La Ville de Briançon, propriétaire des locaux, n’a pas souhaité renouveler cette convention, provoquant l’ire de certains maraudeurs.


      https://twitter.com/nos_pas/status/1298504847273197569

      Le maire de Briançon Arnaud Murgia se défend, lui, de vouloir engager des travaux d’agrandissement de la cour de l’école Oronce-Fine. “La Ville de Briançon a acquis le terrain attenant à la caserne de CRS voilà déjà plusieurs années afin de réaliser l’agrandissement et la remise à neuf de la cour de l’école municipale d’Oronce-Fine”, fait-il savoir par son cabinet.

      Une inquiétude qui peut s’ajouter à celle des bénévoles du Refuge solidaire. Car la convention liant l’association gérant le lieu d’hébergement temporaire de la rue Pasteur, signée avec la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (présidée par Arnaud Murgia), est caduque depuis le mois de juin dernier.

      https://www.ledauphine.com/politique/2020/08/28/hautes-alpes-briancon-aide-aux-migrants-les-benevoles-inquiets-pour-leur

      #solidarité_montagnarde

  • Greece: Refugee children only with negative Covid-19 test in schools

    Greece’ Education Ministry demands negative COVID-19 test refugee children in order to enroll them in school, even though there is no official epidemiological data to justify such a discriminating move.

    According to a circular issued by Deputy Education Minister Sofia Zacharaki, refugee and asylum-seeking children that want to attend primary education classes across the country will have to show a Covid-19 test with negative result. The test has to be carried out 72 hours before.

    The circular uploaded by newspaper documentonews stipulates that next to the international certificate of vaccination or prophylaxis, necessary to ensure the public health, registrations of minor applicants or minor children of applicants for international protection in school units will have to submit also “a COVID-19 test with negative result carried out 72 hours before enrollment.”

    Most likely, it is the parents that will carry the cost.

    Worth noting that domestic students are not required to submit a negative Covid-19 test in order to attend schools.

    Apart from the fact that a negative test is not a scientific-based panacea against coronavirus in the class-rooms, the Ministry decision raises serious questions regarding the issue of discrimination in a very sensitive area such as health and thus in times of pandemic.

    Main opposition party SYRIZA demanded the immediate withdrawal of this criterion and spoke of “inadmissible categorization of students which is not based on any scientific or epidemiological data.”

    https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/12/covid-19-test-refgugee-children

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #éducation #école #test_covid #ségrégation #discriminations #covid-19 #coronavirus #enfants #enfance #Grèce

    ping @thomas_lacroix @luciebacon

  • Grèce : énorme #manifestation de #réfugiés bloqués à Lesbos : Liberté, #nous_voulons_partir

    –-> « Θέλουμε να φύγουμε » : Χιλιάδες στο μπλόκο της Αστυνομίας
    Διαδήλωση- διαμαρτυρία αιτούντων άσυλο στον Καρά- Τεπέ για να φύγουν από τη Λέσβο.

    15:10 Εκατοντάδες διαδηλωτές αποπειράθηκαν να μπουν στον καταυλισμό του Δήμου Μυτιλήνης από την πίσω πλευρά- καταυλισμός που λειτουργεί από το 2015 στην περιοχή του Καρά- Τεπέ, και δεν τα κατάφεραν.

    15:15 Διαμαρτυρία χιλιάδων προσφύγων και μεταναστών μεταβαίνει προς τις κλούβες του αστυνομικού μπλόκου στον Καρά- Τεπέ και επιστρέφει μόνη της στις εγκαταστάσης του υποκαταστήματος Honda. Δεν έχει γίνει μέχρι στιγμής επέμβαση της αστυνομίας.

    14:15 : Διαδήλωση και τεράστια διαμαρτυρία χιλιάδων αιτούντων άσυλο ξεκίνησε μετά τις 2 το μεσημέρι της Παρασκευής στην περιοχή του Καρά- Τεπέ, εκεί που παραμένουν επί τρεις ημέρες πάνω από 10.000 πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες μετά την πυρκαγιά της Τρίτης που έκαψε τον καταυλισμό του ΚΥΤ Μόριας.

    « Θέλουμε να φύγουμε, αφήστε μας ελεύθερους » φωνάζουν κατά του μπλόκου της Αστυνομίας. Κλούβες των ΜΑΤ έχουν περικυκλώσει τη διαμαρτυρία και όλοι ζητούν να φύγουν από τη Λέσβο, ενώ σε εξέλιξη βρίσκεται η εγκατάσταση σκηνών, όπου θα μεταφερθούν όσοι διέμεναν στους δρόμους.

    https://www.stonisi.gr/post/11341/theloyme-na-fygoyme-xiliades-sto-mploko-ths-astynomias-pics-video

    #Kara-Tepe #Kara_Tepe #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Lesbos #hotspot #incendie #camps_de_réfugiés #feu #septembre_2020 #Grèce

    –-

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’incendie de septembre 2020 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/876123

    • Lesbos refugees protest after devastating camp fire – video report

      Thousands of refugees on Lesbos protested in the street on Friday outside what was the largest migrant camp in Europe, which burned to the ground on Tuesday night.

      Greek officials have pledged new temporary tents for the close to 13,000 refugees who were staying in Moria, as 11 European countries agreed to take 400 unaccompanied minors from among those left homeless by the fire.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=n0RCpH0NeT8&feature=emb_logo


      https://www.theguardian.com/world/video/2020/sep/11/lesbos-refugees-protest-after-devastating-camp-fire-video-report
      #vidéo

    • Et cette Une du Manifesto...
      Lacrimogeni di coccodrillo

      Dopo il cordoglio il gas. Per Atene i profughi sono solo un problema di ordine pubblico da tenere confinati sulle isole. La polizia carica i migranti che chiedono di essere trasferiti sulla terraferma. Il governo avvia la costruzione di un nuovo campo in cui rinchiuderli. E l’Europa resta fredda, dieci paesi si fanno avanti per accogliere solo 400 minori

      https://www.facebook.com/ilmanifesto/photos/a.86900427984/10159493041962985/?type=3

    • Refugees demand rescue from Lesbos after Moria camp blaze

      Greek authorities struggle to persuade former camp residents to move to a new temporary site as protests continue

      Greece is facing mounting demands from refugees displaced by the devastating Moria refugee camp fire to either let them leave Lesbos or deport them.

      The Greek authorities are struggling to persuade former residents of the camp to move to a new temporary site, and many people continue to sleep on the streets of the island.

      The latest protests in Lesbos, where police have fired teargas at refugees, came as Greek prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said he hoped plans to build a new reception centre to replace Moria would be an opportunity to reset policy on handling migrant arrivals.

      The fire at the overcrowded camp, engulfed in a blaze last week, has left more than 12,000 people – from 70 different countries, although many from Afghanistan – without shelter or proper sanitation.

      Blazes broke out last week in several locations across the camp after 35 residents tested positive for Covid-19, prompting a lockdown by Greek authorities that in turn triggered protests by residents during which fires were lit.

      The disaster has served to underline chronic problems surrounding the conditions for residents and the wider EU policy surrounding those in the camp – which was originally built to house 3,000 people – many of whom are now demanding to be resettled in Europe.

      Although the EU initially said 10 countries had agreed to take 400 unaccompanied minors, it was criticised for doing too little and too late. Germany – which had originally pledged to take 150 child refugees – announced on Monday that it was in talks to take more families.

      Reflecting the views of many of those sleeping rough, a crowd of women and children protesting again on Monday, some holding banners asking the EU to save them.

      “We have been here for more than one year,” said Maryam, a 25-year-old mother. “There is no rescue. No freedom. If they can’t support us then they should deport us all together.

      “We are asking for the European community to help. Why are they not listening to us? Where are the human rights? We took refuge in the European Union but where are they? There are no toilets, no showers, no water. Nothing. Not any security or safety. We die here every day.”

      While a temporary camp was set up after the fire, both islanders and former residents oppose the Greek government’s plan for a new camp. Some former residents were arrested at the weekend for reportedly encouraging others not to enter the new camp.

      Moria has long been a symbol of the deep political divisions in Europe over Mediterranean migration, as it initially featured as a transit point for hundreds of thousands of people – many from Syria and Afghanistan – heading for Europe.

      After the closure of Europe’s borders to refugees four years ago, Moria has become largely a dead end, plagued by mental health issues and a pervasive sense of desperation.

      The Guardian also met Zahara, another member of the group of women protesting. She cried as she produced a doctor’s note dated the end of August stating she is pregnant and depressed, and requesting a move to new accommodation in the now burned out camp.

      “This lady is depressed and suicidal,” the doctor’s note said. A friend patted her arm and tried to reassure her.

      Another woman said: “Is it similar in Athens? Is it similar on the mainland?”

      Marina Papatoukaki, a midwife with a field clinic run by charity Médecins Sans Frontières, said she was deeply concerned about some of the pregnant women they had been treating, but who they have been unable to locate since the fire.

      “Europe and the state need to understand that these women shouldn’t have been on the island in the first place. They need to be transferred on the mainland,” she said.

      Papatoukaki said pregnant women and babies they were treating in the clinic were not getting enough food and water. “Babies are sleeping on the street where they can’t be washed, they are getting skin rashes and other conditions. These are vulnerable people and Europe and the Greek government need to move them.”

      Germany’s intention to take in more children from the camp was announced by Angela Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert in Berlin, who said that the move to take minors was a first step, but that more needed to be done.

      “Talks are now ongoing in the federal government about how else Germany can help, what other substantial contribution our country can make,” he said.

      A second step would focus on families with children from the camp, Seibert said. Seibert’s comments follow remarks by development minister Gerd Müller, who criticised the initial quota of 150 minors and called for Germany to take 2,000 people.

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/sep/14/refugees-demand-rescue-from-lesbos-after-moria-camp-blaze

  • Des villes allemandes proposent d’accueillir des migrants du camp de l’île de Lesbos ravagé par les flammes

    Cinq ans après l’accueil de centaines de milliers de réfugiés, ces appels de la gauche, des Verts mais aussi de certains responsables conservateurs font resurgir le débat qui avait agité le pays à l’époque.

    Cinq ans après avoir accueilli des centaines de milliers de réfugiés, des villes et des régions allemandes réclament de prendre en charge des migrants après l’incendie qui a ravagé mercredi le camp de Moria, en Grèce. Qualifié de « catastrophe humanitaire », par le ministre des affaires étrangères, Heiko Maas, l’incendie du camp insalubre et surpeuplé occupait la « une » de tous les grands titres de la presse allemande jeudi 10 septembre.

    Ces appels qui proviennent de la gauche, des Verts mais aussi de certains responsables conservateurs font ressurgir le débat ayant agité le pays en 2015. Des manifestations dans tout le pays, en particulier à Berlin, ont également rassemblé plusieurs milliers de personnes mercredi soir, assurant sur leurs banderoles : « Nous avons de la place ! » L’Allemagne compte actuellement quelque 1,8 million de personnes ayant obtenu ou demandé le statut de réfugié, toutes nationalités confondues.

    « Un impératif humanitaire »

    La Rhénanie du Nord-Westphalie, la région la plus peuplée d’Allemagne, s’est notamment dite prête à prendre en charge jusqu’à un millier de migrants coincés à Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. « Nous avons besoin de deux choses : une aide immédiate pour Moria et une aide européenne durable pour la prise en charge des enfants et des familles », a affirmé le dirigeant de la région, Armin Laschet, successeur potentiel d’Angela Merkel l’an prochain et qui brigue la tête de leur parti conservateur en décembre. Fait notable : Armin Laschet est un des rares responsables politiques à s’être rendus en août dans le camp qualifié de « honte pour l’Europe entière » par plusieurs ONG alors que son parti, l’Union chrétienne-démocrate (CDU), a mis la barre à droite sur les questions d’immigration depuis 2016.

    D’autres Länder comme la Basse-Saxe ou la Thuringe lui ont emboîté le pas. Le gouvernement fédéral leur a toutefois opposé à ce jour une fin de non-recevoir en réaffirmant privilégier un compromis européen sur la répartition des migrants sur le continent.

    Evacuer les milliers de migrants de l’île de Lesbos « est un impératif humanitaire », a de son côté alerté jeudi le président de la Fédération internationale de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge (FICR), Francesco Rocca, lors d’une conférence de presse organisée par l’Association des correspondants accrédités auprès des Nations unies. La FICR a présenté un rapport sur les risques menaçant migrants et réfugiés avec la pandémie de Covid-19. Les migrants « sont maintenant dans une situation terrible. La population locale, les ONG, la Croix-Rouge… Tout le monde fait le maximum, mais pour combien de temps ? », s’interroge M. Rocca.

    « Les capacités d’accueil existent »

    « Les capacités d’accueil, la place existe, il y a la bonne volonté extrêmement grande de Länder et de communes », a insisté la coprésidente des Verts allemands, Annalena Baerbock. Depuis des mois, des maires enjoignent au gouvernement d’Angela Merkel d’agir. Dans les villes comme Berlin ou Hambourg, des banderoles fleurissent aux fenêtres depuis le printemps : « Evacuer Moria » ou « #LeaveNoOneBehind » (« ne laisser personne derrière »).

    Un collectif d’ONG a fait installer lundi 13 000 chaises devant le Reichstag, le bâtiment qui abrite la chambre des députés, pour réclamer l’évacuation des migrants de Lesbos. Plus de 170 communes, de Hambourg à Cologne en passant par Munich, se sont également regroupées pour réclamer la prise en charge des personnes sauvées en mer Méditerranée.

    Une décision qui contraste avec l’automne et l’hiver 2015 quand de nombreuses villes avaient été contraintes, faute de place, d’installer des réfugiés dans des casernes désaffectées, des gymnases et des containers. A l’époque, beaucoup avaient tiré la sonnette d’alarme, affirmant être débordés.

    Cinq ans plus tard, des élus locaux assurent disposer de nombreux lits vides dans des foyers de demandeurs d’asile. « Notre ville a les capacités en termes de personnel et d’organisation », a ainsi réaffirmé le responsable des affaires intérieures de la ville de Berlin, Andreas Geisel. La gestion de la « crise » par la capitale allemande avait pourtant été l’une des plus erratiques, avec des gens contraints d’attendre dehors des jours durant pour se faire enregistrer. « C’est pour moi incompréhensible que l’Etat fédéral ne permette pas aux communes qui y sont prêtes de fournir une aide rapide et solidaire », a déploré le maire de Berlin, Michael Müller. La municipalité veut présenter un programme d’accueil devant les représentants des Etats régionaux au Bundesrat.

    L’arrivée de centaines de milliers de réfugiés en 2015 avait dans un premier temps suscité un immense élan de solidarité parmi les Allemands. Mais le vent avait ensuite tourné, notamment à la lumière des agressions sexuelles du Nouvel An 2016 à Cologne attribuées à des migrants nord-africains, et de faits divers utilisés par l’extrême droite pour dénoncer la politique d’accueil.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/09/10/des-villes-allemandes-proposent-d-accueillir-des-migrants-du-camp-de-moria-r

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Allemagne #villes-refuge
    #incendie #Lesbos #Grèce

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les villes-refuge :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’incendie de Lesbos de septembre 2020 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/876123

  • Transmis à @isskein par des « ami·es berlinois·es » (#septembre_2020) :

    #Berlin ce soir : sans doute 10 000 personnes dans la rue (et des manifs prévues ce soir, demain et après-demain dans une cinquantaine de villes allemandes) pour demander l’accueil des réfugiés du camp de Moria. Slogan scandé « #wir_haben_Platz » (nous avons de la place), et demande de démission du ministre fédéral de l’intérieur Horst Seehofer (CSU).

    #solidarité #manifestation #Allemagne
    #incendie #Lesbos #feu #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Moria

    –—

    sur l’incendie à Lesbos, voir le fil de discussion :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

    • Indignation en Allemagne après les incendies du camp de migrants en Grèce

      La classe politique affiche son indignation après les incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria et aggravé encore plus les conditions de vie de 12 000 migrants sur l’Île de Lesbos en Grèce.

      Si l’Allemagne propose de répartir au sein de l’Union européenne les réfugiés, nombre de voix s’élèvent pour agir dans l’urgence et accueillir le plus rapidement ces personnes en immense détresse. Mais, si certains Länder sont déjà prêts à aider, il en va autrement du gouvernement fédéral.

      « Une catastrophe pour les gens, un désastre pour la politique », dit le journal du soir de la ZDF, la seconde grande chaîne de télévision publique allemande. Dans le viseur, le gouvernement d’Angela Merkel qui par la voix de son ministre de l’intérieur, Horst Seehofer, a répété ces derniers mois, son refus d’accueillir desréfugiés de Moria, malgré la volonté affichée de certains Länder de prendre en charge ces personnes. Joachim Stamp, ministre de l’intégration du Land de Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie, a pris les devants, mercredi, face à l’urgence. Nous avons touché le fond, la situation est dramatique et nous devons aider tout de suite ces personnes à se loger et à se nourrir. En tant que Land, nous avons confirmé au gouvernement grec notre volonté d’apporter une aide financière. Mais, si la solution ne peut se trouver qu’au niveau européen, nous sommes prêts de notre côté, à accueillir 1000 personnes en grand danger", dit Joachim Stamp.

      https://twitter.com/ZDFnrw/status/1303663535222915075

      Toute l’Allemagne mobilisée

      La Basse-Saxe a également fait part de ses capacités à accueillir 500 réfugiés, en plusieurs étapes. Et l’opposition met la pression sur Berlin, notamment les Verts, par la voix de Claudia Roth, vice-présidente du Bundestag. « C’est du ressort du pays qui a, en charge, la présidence du Conseil de l’Union européenne, de mettre enfin un terme à cette course à la mesquinerie qui se fait sur le dos de celles et ceux qui ont tout perdu », s’indigne Claudia Roth.

      Membre du groupe des chrétiens-démocrates au parlement européen, Elmar Brock appelle, lui à une solution européenne :

      « Bien sûr, on peut toujours dire que l’Europe ne fait pas assez. Mais il y a des mesures qui sont sur la table en matière de demandes d’asile et il est urgent de les appliquer. Nous devons enfin trouver un compromis pour répartir les réfugiés parmi les états membres de l’Union. Quitte à les aider financièrement. »

      La balle est désormais dans le camp d’Angela Merkel et de son ministre de l’intérieur. Et pour le secrétaire général du SPD, le partenaire de coalition de la CDU," il n’y a plus d’excuses".

      Plusieurs milliers de personnes ont manifesté spontanément dans plusieurs villes pour exiger des autorités de prendre en charge des migrants. « Droit de séjour, partout, personne n’est illégal » ou encore « nous avons de la place » ont scandé des manifestants à Berlin, Hambourg, Hanovre ou encore Münster.

      Ces dernières années, le camp de Moria a été décrié pour son manque d’hygiène et son surpeuplement par les ONG qui appellent régulièrement les autorités grecques à transférer les demandeurs d’asile les plus vulnérables vers le continent.

      L’île de Lesbos, d’une population de 85.000 personnes, a été déclarée en état d’urgence mercredi matin.

      https://www.dw.com/fr/indignation-en-allemagne-apr%C3%A8s-les-incendies-du-camp-de-migrants-en-gr%C3%A8ce/a-54877738

    • #Appel pour une évacuation immédiate du camp de Moria

      Ce camp, l’un des plus importants en Méditerranée, a été détruit mercredi par un incendie, laissant près de 13 000 réfugiés dans le dénuement le plus total. Des intellectuels de plusieurs pays lancent un appel pour qu’ils soient accueillis dignement.

      Au moment où 12 500 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile errent sans abri sur les routes et les collines de Lesbos, où les intoxiqués et les blessés de l’incendie de Moria sont empêchés par la police de rejoindre l’hôpital de Mytilène, où des collectifs solidaires apportant des produits de première nécessité sont bloqués par les forces de l’ordre ou pris à partie par de groupuscules d’extrême droite, où la seule réponse apportée par le gouvernement grec à cette urgence est national-sécuritaire, nous, citoyen·ne·s européen·ne·s ne pouvons plus nous taire.

      L’incendie qui a ravagé le camp de Moria ne peut être considéré ni comme un accident ni comme le fait d’une action désespérée. Il est le résultat inévitable et prévisible de la politique européenne qui impose l’enfermement dans les îles grecques, dans des conditions inhumaines, de dizaines de milliers de réfugiés. C’est le résultat de la stratégie du gouvernement grec qui, en lieu et place de mesures effectives contre la propagation du Covid-19 dans des « hot-spots », a imposé à ses habitants, depuis six mois déjà, des restrictions de circulation extrêmement contraignantes. A cet enfermement prolongé, est venu s’ajouter depuis une semaine un confinement total dont l’efficacité sanitaire est plus que problématique, tandis que les personnes porteuses du virus ont été sommées de rester enfermées vingt-quatre heures sur vingt-quatre dans un hangar. Ces conditions menaient tout droit au désastre.

      Cette situation intolérable qui fait la honte de l’Europe ne saurait durer un jour de plus.

      L’évacuation immédiate de Moria, dont les habitants peuvent être accueillis par les différentes villes de l’Europe prêtes à les recevoir, est plus qu’urgente. Il en va de même pour tous les autres camps dans les îles grecques et sur le continent. Faut-il rappeler ici que le gouvernement grec a déjà entrepris de travaux pour transformer non seulement les hot-spots, mais toute autre structure d’accueil sur le continent, en centres fermés entourés de double clôture et dotés de portiques de sécurité ? Que serait-il arrivé si l’incendie de Moria s’était déclaré dans un camp entouré d’une double série de barbelés avec des sorties bloquées ? Combien de milliers de morts aurions-nous à déplorer aujourd’hui ?

      Ne laissons pas des dizaines de milliers de personnes, dont le seul crime est de demander la protection internationale, livrées à une politique ultra-sécuritaire extrêmement dangereuse pour leur sécurité voire leur vie. Le gouvernement grec, au nom de la défense des frontières européennes et de la sécurité nationale, non seulement se croit autorisé à violer le droit international avec les refoulements systématiques en mer Egée et à la frontière d’Evros, mais interdit tout transfert sur le continent des victimes de l’incendie de Moria. Car, mis à part le transfert de 406 mineurs isolés au nord de la Grèce, le gouvernement Mitsotakis compte « punir » pour l’incendie les résidents du camp en les bloquant à Lesbos ! Actuellement, 12 500 réfugié·e·s sont actuellement en danger, privé·e·s de tout accès à des infrastructures sanitaires et exposé·e·s aux attaques de groupes d’extrême droite.

      Nous ne saurions tolérer que les requérants d’asile soient privés de tout droit, qu’ils soient réduits à des non-personnes. Joignons nos voix pour exiger des instances européennes et de nos gouvernements l’évacuation immédiate de Moria et la fermeture de tous les camps en Grèce, ainsi que le transfert urgent de leurs résidentes et résidents vers les villes et communes européennes qui se sont déclarées prêtes à les accueillir. Maintenant et non pas demain.

      Il y va de la dignité et de la vie de dizaines de milliers de personnes, mais aussi de notre dignité à nous, toutes et tous.

      Contre les politiques d’exclusion et de criminalisations des réfugié·e·s, il est plus qu’urgent de construire un monde « un », commun à toutes et à tous. Sinon, chacun de nous risque, à n’importe quel moment, de se retrouver du mauvais côté de la frontière.

      Evacuation immédiate de Moria !

      Transfert de tous ses habitants vers les villes européennes prêtes à les accueillir !

      Giorgio Agamben, philosophe. Michel Agier, directeur d’études à l’Ehess. Athena Athanasiou, professeure d’anthropologie sociale, université Panteion, Grèce. Alain Badiou, philosophe. Etienne Balibar, professeur émérite de philosophie, université de Paris-Ouest. Wendy Brown, université de Californie, Berkeley. Judith Butler, université de Californie, Berkeley. Claude Calame, directeur d’études à l’Ehess. Patrick Chamoiseau, écrivain. Zeineb Ben Said Cherni, professeure émérite à l’université de Tunis. Costas Douzinas, université de Londres. Natacha Godrèche, psychanalyste. Virginie Guirodon, directrice de recherches, CNRS. Sabine Hess, directrice des Centers for Global Migration Studies de Göttingen. Rada Iveković, professeur de philosophie, Paris. Leonie Jegen, chercheuse à l’université Albert-Ludwigs de Fribourg. Chloe Kolyri, psychiatre-psychanalyste. Konstantína Koúneva, députée européenne de 2014 à 2019, Gauche unitaire européenne/Gauche verte nordique. Michael Löwy, directeur de recherches émérite, CNRS. Eirini Markidi, psychologue. Gustave Massiah, membre du Conseil international du Forum social mondial. Katerina Matsa, psychiatre. Sandro Mezzadra,université de Bologne. Savas Matsas, écrivain. Warren Montag, Occidental College, Los Angeles. Adi Ophir, professeur invite des humanités, université de Brown, professeur émérite, université de Tel-Aviv. Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc, professeur de philosophie, université Paris-8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis. Didier Sicard, ancien président du Comité consultatif national d’éthique de France. Nikos Sigalas, historien. Athéna Skoulariki, professeure assistante, université de Crète. Vicky Skoumbi, directrice de programme au Collège international de philosophie. Barbara Spinelli, journaliste, Italie. Eleni Varikas, professeure émérite, université Paris-8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis. Dimitris Vergetis, psychanalyste, directeur de la revue grecque αληthεια (Aletheia). Frieder Otto Wolf, université libre de Berlin. Thodoris Zeis, avocat.

      https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/09/11/appel-pour-une-evacuation-immediate-du-camp-de-moria_1799245

    • Greece and EU Must Take Action Now

      A Civil Society Action Committee statement calling for an immediate humanitarian and human rights response to the Moria camp tragedy

      The Civil Society Action Committee expresses grave concern over the lives and health of all who were residing in the Reception and Identification Facility in Moria, on the Greek island of Lesvos, which was ravaged by fire this week. We call upon the Greek government and the European Union (EU) to provide immediate and needed support, including safe shelter, to all who have been affected, and with special emphasis to those at risk.

      For many years, civil society has provided support and assistance to people suffering inhumane conditions in the Moria camp. At the same time, civil society has been continuously calling for much-needed sustainable solutions, and a reversal of failed European policies rooted in xenophobia.

      For a Europe that positions itself as a champion of human rights and human dignity, the very existence and overall situation of a camp like that in Moria, is appalling.

      For a Europe that positions itself as a champion of human rights and human dignity, the very existence and overall situation of a camp like that in Moria, is appalling. Other solutions have always been available and possible, and these must now be urgently implemented. A humanitarian and human rights approach must be at the heart of the Greek government’s and EU’s responses.

      As the Civil Society Action Committee, we call for:

      A coherent plan that maximises all available resources for all those who have had to flee the fire in the Moria camp. They should be provided with safe housing, access to healthcare, and sufficient protection from possible violence. National support and consideration should also be given to cities across Europe who have expressed willingness to receive and accommodate those who have had to flee the Moria camp.
      Planning of alternative sustainable solutions for all those that suffer similar conditions in other sites in Greece and elsewhere;
      Lessons learnt and accountability on the failure to act so far.

      As civil society, we stand ready to support such actions to assist and protect all migrants and asylum-seekers suffering in the Moria camp aftermath and elsewhere.

      https://csactioncommittee.org/greece-and-eu-must-take-action-now

    • Migrants : cette fois, Berlin ne veut pas faire cavalier seul

      Malgré la mobilisation des ONG et des partis en faveur d’une prise en charge massive, et faute d’accord européen, l’Allemagne n’accueillera pas plus de 150 migrants mineurs.

      Les Allemands ont accueilli plus de 1,7 million de demandeurs d’asile au cours des cinq dernières années. Malgré toutes les difficultés liées à l’intégration, le manque de solidarité européenne et les tentatives de l’extrême droite de saper le moral de la population, ils sont disposés à rouvrir leurs portes aux enfants et aux familles du camp de Moria. Pour l’instant, les Allemands proréfugiés ont fait plus de bruit que l’extrême droite.

      Des manifestations ont eu lieu dans tout le pays aux cris de « Nous avons de la place ! » Un collectif d’ONG a fait installer, lundi dernier, 13 000 chaises vides devant le Reichstag, le siège de l’Assemblée fédérale (Bundestag), pour symboliser l’absurdité de la situation, alors que 180 communes se sont déclarées prêtes à accueillir des réfugiés. Hambourg, Cologne, Brême, Berlin ou Munich réclament depuis des mois la prise en charge des personnes sauvées en mer Méditerranée. Dix maires de grandes villes, dont Düsseldorf, Fribourg ou Göttingen, ont de nouveau protesté auprès de la chancellerie. « Nous sommes prêts à accueillir des gens pour éviter une catastrophe humanitaire à Moria », ont-ils insisté auprès d’Angela Merkel. Selon l’union des syndicats des services publics (DBB), les places se sont libérées dans les centres d’accueil. Les trois quarts des réfugiés arrivés en 2015 ont trouvé un logement ou ont quitté l’Allemagne. Les capacités sont actuellement de 25 000 places dans le pays, avec la possibilité de monter rapidement jusqu’à 65 000.

      « Détresse »

      A part l’extrême droite (AfD), qui refuse d’accueillir « des gens qui mettent le feu la nuit et qui attaquent les services de secours », tous les partis politiques allemands sont favorables au retour d’une « politique de l’accueil », y compris l’Union chrétienne démocrate (CDU). « Nos valeurs chrétiennes et démocratiques nous obligent à les aider », a insisté Norbert Röttgen, l’un des trois candidats à la présidence de la CDU, successeur potentiel de Merkel à la chancellerie. « Ce n’est pas le moment de trouver une solution européenne mais de répondre à une détresse humaine. L’Allemagne doit accueillir immédiatement 5 000 réfugiés, […] toute seule si nécessaire », estime-t-il dans une lettre signée par 16 autres députés conservateurs.

      Ces 5 000 réfugiés de Grèce seraient déjà en Allemagne si le ministre de l’Intérieur n’avait pas bloqué toutes les procédures. Le Bavarois conservateur Horst Seehofer (CSU), qui fut le grand détracteur de Merkel pendant la « crise des réfugiés », craint un appel d’air et une nouvelle « vague » incontrôlée, comme à l’été 2015, où des centaines de milliers de réfugiés s’étaient mis en route vers l’Allemagne après que la chancelière avait accepté d’en accueillir quelques milliers bloqués en Hongrie.
      « Complice »

      « Cela ne doit pas se reproduire », a prévenu Horst Seehofer, qui est sorti de son silence en fin de semaine. Sachant que l’objectif de la majorité des migrants est l’Allemagne, le ministre a refusé que son pays fasse cette fois cavalier seul. Sans solution européenne, Berlin ne bougera pas. « Nous avons été agréablement surpris d’apprendre que les Néerlandais ont accepté 50 personnes. Jusqu’ici, la position [des Pays-Bas] était différente », s’est félicité le ministre, qui a interprété cette concession néerlandaise comme un premier signe favorable à la mise en place d’un système de répartition en Europe.

      Pour sa part, l’Allemagne se contentera d’accueillir « 100 à 150 mineurs non accompagnés ». Un chiffre jugé scandaleux par les partis de la majorité et par l’opposition, alors que tant de communes sont prêtes à accueillir des réfugiés. « Monsieur Seehofer, vous vous faites le complice de la souffrance endurée par ces gens aux portes de l’Europe », a critiqué Claudia Roth, la vice-présidente des écologistes au Bundestag. « Votre façon de faire n’est pas chrétienne, elle est inhumaine », a accusé Dietmar Bartsch, président du groupe parlementaire de la gauche radicale (Die Linke). « Il a fallu attendre une catastrophe pour qu’on accueille des enfants », a déploré Dietlind Grabe-Bolz, maire sociale-démocrate (SPD) de Giessen, en Hesse, une ville qui fait partie des communes « volontaires » pour l’accueil.

      Une position jugée courageuse par les Allemands, car les élus risquent désormais leur vie pour leur engagement. Dans cette région où se trouve la capitale financière (Francfort-sur-le-Main), le conservateur proréfugiés Walter Lübcke a été abattu d’une balle dans la tête dans son jardin en juin 2019 par un néonazi qui voulait le « punir ». Un assassinat politique sans précédent depuis la fin de la guerre.
      Paris pusillanime

      Une « centaine ». C’est le nombre de migrants que Paris est prêt à accueillir après l’incendie de Moria. Il s’agira « notamment des mineurs isolés », précise au Parisien le secrétaire d’Etat aux Affaires européennes, Clément Beaune. Soit peu ou prou l’engagement d’autres pays de l’UE, comme l’Allemagne ou les Pays-Bas. « Il y a la réponse d’urgence et d’humanité », fait valoir Beaune, qui réclame une solution européenne « pérenne ». Selon lui, la France a participé aux efforts de répartition des réfugiés « à chaque fois qu’il y a eu des urgences humanitaires douloureuses » depuis 2018. Il cite le cas de l’Aquarius en septembre 2018. Sauf qu’à l’époque, Paris n’avaient pas accepté que le navire de secours aux migrants accoste en France et n’avait accueilli 18 des 58 réfugiés sauvés qu’une fois que Malte avait ouvert ses ports au navire humanitaire.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/13/cette-fois-berlin-ne-veut-pas-faire-cavalier-seul_1799396

    • Bild: Germany could take thousands from Greek refugee camp

      Germany is considering taking in thousands of refugees from the destroyed Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos as a one-off gesture and hopes the camp can be rebuilt and run by the European Union, Bild newspaper reported on Monday.

      Berlin has been facing growing calls from regional and local politicians who have said they would take in people from the camp, which burned down last week, if the federal government allowed them to.

      Officials, led by federal Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, have been reluctant to move unilaterally, saying a European agreement is needed to disperse the camp’s more than 12,000 former residents across the European Union.

      Citing government and EU sources, Bild said conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel was now leaning towards taking in more refugees, ahead of a meeting with her Social Democrat coalition partners due to take place on Monday.

      She, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen aim to build a new refugee camp on Lesbos that would be run by the European Union, Bild reported. Currently, Greece runs the camp.

      There was no immediate comment from the government.

      The newspaper said the government was likely to agree to take in at least hundreds of children from the camp along with their parents, with thousands also a possibility.

      Earlier, Social Democrat Finance Minister Olaf Scholz, told a news conference Germany had to be ready to play a role in taking in refugees, though this could only be a stepping stone to finding a Europe-wide way of housing refugees arriving at Europe’s borders.

      “It can’t stand as it is now, where each time we decide on a case-by-case basis,” he said.

      Bild said Merkel hoped the coalition partners could agree by Wednesday on how many refugees Germany will take.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/256934/article/ekathimerini/news/bild-germany-could-take-thousands-from-greek-refugee-camp

    • Thousands of protesters call on Germany to take in Moria refugees

      Thousands of people took to the streets of cities across Germany on Wednesday to show their solidarity and to call on the German government and the EU to take in more than 12,000 migrants left homeless by fires at Moria camp on Lesbos.

      The protesters in cities across Germany including Berlin, Frankfurt and Hamburg appealed to the government to evacuate all camps on the Greek islands and to bring to Germany migrants and refugees left homeless by the fires in Moria.

      An estimated 3,000 people demonstrated in Berlin on Wednesday evening, some 1,200 took to the streets in Hamburg, and another 300 in Frankfurt, according to police. There were also rallies in Leipzig and other cities across the country.

      Protesters chanted the motto of the demonstration, “We have room,” (Wir haben Platz), as can be heard in a video posted on Twitter by a member of the Sea-Watch charity. They also held up banners that said. “Evacuate Moria” and “Shame on you EU”. Speakers at the rallies said European leaders should have acted even before the fire happened.

      https://twitter.com/J_Pahlke/status/1303735477971935234

      They also called for the resignation of the interior minister, Horst Seehofer, who has so far blocked the arrival of refugees through federal reception initiatives.

      Refugee policy a sticking point

      Districts and states in Germany in the past months have offered to take in refugees from Greece to ease the overcrowding in camps – a move that Seehofer opposes.

      According to German law, refugee policy is decided on the federal level and states and districts may only accept refugees if they receive the green light from the federal government.

      Seehofer has also argued that regional efforts would undermine attempts at agreeing a long-overdue European mechanism for the distribution of refugees across the bloc.

      ’Ready to help’

      Although Foreign Minister Heiko Maas has said Germany was ready to help the residents of Moria, he called for the support of all EU member states. “What happened in Moria is a humanitarian catastrophe. With the European Commission and other EU member states that are ready to help, we need to quickly clarify how we can help Greece,” Maas said on Twitter. “That includes the distribution of refugees among those in the EU who are willing to take them in,” he added.

      https://twitter.com/HeikoMaas/status/1303617869897445376

      The fires at Moria this week have burnt down nearly the entire camp, leaving nearly 13,000 people in need of emergency housing. Many spent the first night after the fire on Tuesday evening sleeping in the fields, by the side of the road or in a small graveyard, AP reported.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27190/thousands-of-protesters-call-on-germany-to-take-in-moria-refugees

  • Le #nouveau_camp de #Lesbos, #Grèce (#septembre_2020) :


    –-> photo : #Giorgos_Moutafis
    https://twitter.com/AneIrazabal/status/1305225485769740288

    –----

    Un nouveau camp pour réfugiés sur l’île de Lesbos après les incendies

    Environ 500 demandeurs d’asile ont été installés dans un nouveau camp sur l’île grecque de Lesbos qui doit accueillir des milliers de #sans-abri après la destruction du grand centre de Moria. De nombreux migrants manifestent toutefois pour quitter l’île.

    « Dans cinq jours l’opération sera achevée. Tout le monde sera installé dans le nouveau camp », a assuré le ministre des Migrations, Notis Mitarachi, en visite à Lesbos depuis deux jours pour coordonner les travaux du nouveau camp. Situé à trois kilomètres du port de Mytilène, chef-lieu de l’île, ce camp « sera fermé pendant la nuit pour des raisons de sécurité », selon un communiqué ministériel.

    « Tout est parti en fumée à Moria. On ne peut plus rester dans la rue, dans le camp ce sera mieux », a indiqué à l’AFP une Somalienne qui attendait son tour devant l’entrée du camp pour être enregistrée.
    Migrants contaminés

    Notis Mitarachi a estimé que « 200 personnes » parmi les demandeurs d’asile pourraient être contaminées par le Covid-19 et que des restrictions strictes sont prévues pour les sorties des migrants du nouveau camp.

    Des milliers de familles vivent sur le bitume, sur les trottoirs ou dans les champs à Lesbos depuis les gigantesques incendies de mardi et mercredi qui ont détruit le centre d’enregistrement et d’identification de Moria, sans faire de victimes.

    Mis en place en 2015 pour limiter le nombre de migrants venant de la Turquie voisine à destination de l’Europe, ce centre abritait plus de 12’000 personnes dont 4000 enfants, soit quatre fois plus que sa capacité initiale.

    Refus d’entrer

    Des migrants ont à nouveau manifesté dans le calme dimanche en fin matinée, réclamant leur transfert vers la Grèce continentale, selon des journalistes de l’AFP. De nombreux demandeurs d’asile refusent d’entrer dans le nouveau camp, disant leur ras-le-bol après avoir attendu dans celui de Moria durant des mois, certains des années, d’être transférés dans des structures en Grèce continentale.

    Mais le ministre des Migrations, Notis Mitarachi, a souligné que « toute personne qui est dans la rue sera transférée dans le nouveau camp ». « Ceux qui rêvent quitter l’île, il faut qu’ils l’oublient », a-t-il affirmé.

    https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/11600300-un-nouveau-camp-pour-refugies-sur-lile-de-lesbos-apres-les-incendies.ht

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #tentes #HCR #SDF

    Sur l’incendie du mois de septembre 2020 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

    #comme_en_Afrique...

    –----

    Fil de discussion sur le dernier incendie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Just 800 of Greek island’s 12,500 homeless migrants rehoused

      Just over 6% of the 12,500 people left homeless last week by the fire that destroyed Greece’s biggest camp for refugees and migrants have been rehoused in a new temporary facility under construction on the island of Lesvos, authorities said Monday.

      By Monday afternoon, about 800 people had entered the new tent city, hastily set up by the sea a few kilometers from the gutted Moria camp, migration ministry officials said.

      Thousands remained camped out for a sixth day along a road leading from Moria to the island capital of Mytilene, with police blocking the way into town to prevent asylum-seekers trying to board ferries for the Greek mainland instead of entering the new camp.

      Authorities say the blazes last Tuesday and Wednesday in Moria, where thousands of people arrive every year after crossing illegally from nearby Turkey, were started by camp residents angry at quarantine orders imposed after 35 people in the facility tested positive for Covid-19.

      Migration Minister Notis Mitarakis said there’s space for about 5,000 people so far in the new camp, on a former military firing range at Kara Tepe near Mytilene. He also said everyone left homeless by the Moria fire will be able to relocate to Kara Tepe within the next few days.

      Officials said the gap between available spaces and residents in the new camp is largely due to the unwillingness of many asylum-seekers to settle in. Many had hoped that with Moria destroyed they would be allowed to head for the Greek mainland, or even other European Union countries.

      Several hundred women and children held a protest march along the Moria-to-Mytilene road Monday, chanting: “No camp, freedom.”

      But government officials said the only way for former Moria camp residents to leave Lesbos would be to move to the new facility and successfully apply there for asylum.

      “Moving to the new camp is not optional, it’s obligatory,” Mitarakis said in an interview with Parapolitika Radio.

      Under EU rules, people reaching Greece’s eastern Aegean islands from Turkey must stay in camps at their points of arrival pending examination of their asylum bids. This led to overcrowding and squalid living conditions for camp residents that were repeatedly criticised by human rights organizations. It also triggered resentment among Lesbos’ Greek population.

      Asylum-seekers entering Kara Tepe are tested for Covid-19 as part of the registration process, and 15 infected people have been recorded so far. All were moved to isolation facilities.

      Greece’s minister responsible for public order, Michalis Chryssohoidis, said Monday he hoped a continued reduction in migration flows from nearby Turkey and a speedy processing of asylum applications should mean the last of the refugees and migrants currently on Lesbos would have left by spring.

      Greek authorities plan to build a new facility for future arrivals that will replace Moria.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/256958/article/ekathimerini/news/just-800-of-greek-islands-12500-homeless-migrants-rehoused

    • 2,9 εκατομμύρια για νοίκια στον Καρά Τεπέ μέχρι το… 2025, στην κατά τα άλλα προσωρινή δομή !
      142.051 για τους τέσσερις μήνες του 2020 και από 550.000 το χρόνο, για τα έτη 2021 έως 2025, προκειμένου να νοικιαστούν οι εκτάσεις του Καρά Τεπέ από το Υπουργείο Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου

      « Λεφτά με το τσουβάλι » αλλά και απόδειξη ότι η προσωρινή δομή του Καρά Τεπέ κάθε άλλο παρά προσωρινή είναι. Το « Ν » αποκαλύπτει σήμερα, δημοσιοποιώντας τα σχετικά έγγραφα, ότι για την περίοδο Σεπτέμβριος 2020 έως 31 Δεκεμβρίου 2025, το Υπουργείο μετανάστευσης και ασύλου δίνει το αστρονομικό ποσό των 2.9 εκατομμυρίων ευρώ μόνο για την ενοικίαση εκτάσεων ξερής και εγκαταλειμμένης γης στον Καρά Τεπέ. Προκειμένου να δημιουργήσει ένα νέο μόνιμο ΚΥΤ.

      Συγκεκριμένα με δυο χθεσινές (14.9.2020) αποφάσεις του Υπουργείου Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου που αναρτήθηκαν στο « Διαύγεια » δεσμεύονται τα παρακάτω ποσά :

      – 142.051 ευρώ για την ενοικίαση γεωτεμαχίων για τη λειτουργία προσωρινής δομής φιλοξενίας προσφύγων και μεταναστών έως τις 31.12.2020.

      – Επίσης δεσμεύονται άλλα 2.750.000 ευρώ (550.000 ευρώ το χρόνο) για τη μίσθωση των ίδιων γεωτεμαχίων στην περιοχή Καρά Τεπέ !

      Ας σημειώσουμε ότι στις εκτάσεις αυτές που ανήκουν εξ αδιαιρέτως σε απογόνους γνωστής οικογένειας της παλιάς Μυτιλήνης, έχουν αρχίσει ήδη να πραγματοποιούνται χωματουργικές εργασίες, σε κάποια δε τμήματα στήνονται και σκηνές. Εκτείνονται δε πέραν του οικοπέδου του πεδίου βολής ιδιοκτησίας του υπουργείου Εθνικής Άμυνας και φτάνει μέχρι και πίσω από το σούπερ μάρκετ Lidl, Σε επαφή δηλαδή από τη μια μεριά με επιχειρήσεις κατά μήκος του δρόμου από την παλιά ΕΦΑΜ μέχρι και το πεδίο βολής και από την άλλη μεριά, μέχρι τη θάλασσα.

      Η ενοικίαση του συγκεκριμένου χώρου αποδεικνύει προφανώς ότι η νέα, κατ’ ευφημισμό αποκαλούμενη « προσωρινή », δομή στον Καρά Τεπέ είναι ο χώρος όπου θα αναπτυχθεί το μόνιμο ΚΥΤ που εξήγγειλε ο Πρωθυπουργός Κυριάκος Μητσοτάκης από τη Θεσσαλονίκη.

      Το μέγεθος δε της όλης έκτασης, πολλές εκατοντάδες στρέμματα, συμπεριλαμβανομένης και της έκτασης του υπουργείου Εθνικής Άμυνας, δείχνει ότι θα είναι ένα τεράστιο ΚΥΤ πολύ μεγαλύτερο αυτό της Μόριας, το μεγαλύτερο στην Ελλάδα αλλά και σε όλη την Ευρωπαϊκή Ένωση, σε άμεση επαφή με κατοικημένες περιοχές και πολλές δεκάδες επιχειρήσεις, λίγες εκατοντάδες μέτρα από το χωριό Παναγιύδα.

      Ας σημειωθεί ότι όπως λέχθηκε από ανθρώπους της κτηματαγοράς στη Μυτιλήνη, το ύψος του ενοικίου είναι ίσως μεγαλύτερο και από το ύψος του ποσού που απαιτείτο μέχρι πρότινος για την αγορά της έκτασης.
      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/11449/29-ekatommyria-gia-noikia-ston-kara-tepe-mexri-to-2025-sthn-kata-ta-alla-pro

      –—

      Commentaire et traduction de quelques extraits par Vicky Skoumbi :

      Voici quelques extraits de l’article du média locale sto nisi qui révèle les véritables intentions du gouvernement, qui loin de programmer l’évacuation des îles d’ici Pâques, prévoit la création du plus grand hot-spot de l’Europe à Kara-Tepe à Lesbos, beaucoup plus grand que Moria !
      Si en plus, on tient compte les intentions affichés du gouvernement de créer non pas un RIC fonctionnant comme avant, mais un centre de réception et d’identification fermé sous surveillance policière 24h sur 24h, on voit que le pire est devant nous et les déclaration sur le départ de tout réfugié d’ici Päques n’est que poudre aux yeux de la population locale et de la communauté internationale

      2,9 millions prévus pour la location de terrains à Kara Tepe jusqu’en… 2025, tout ça pour une structure censément provisoire !

      142051 pour les quatre mois de 2020 et de 550000 par an, de 2021 à 2025, afin de louer les terrains de Kara Tepe par le ministère de l’Immigration et de l’Asile.

      La location de ces terrains prouve évidemment que la nouvelle structure à Kara Tepe appelée par euphémisme « temporaire » est l’endroit où sera installé le RIC (Reception Identification Center), le hot-spot permanent annoncé par le Premier ministre Kyriakos Mitsotakis à Thessalonique.

      L’étendue de l’ensemble de la zone, plusieurs centaines d’hectares, y compris la zone du ministère de la Défense nationale, montre qu’il s’agira d’un hot-spot énorme, beaucoup plus grand que celui de Moria, le plus grand de Grèce et de toute l’Union européenne, en contact direct avec des zones résidentielles et de très nombreuses d’entreprises, à quelques centaines de mètres du village de Panagouda.

      Il est à noter que comme l’ont dit les gens du marché immobilier à Mytilène, le montant du loyer est probablement supérieur du montant requis pour l’achat même du terrain.

    • Lesbos : les migrants à la rue évacués par la police vers un nouveau camp « provisoire »

      La police grecque a commencé jeudi à évacuer une partie des milliers de réfugiés jetés à la rue par l’incendie de Moria vers un nouveau camp, « provisoire » selon l’ONU et les autorités grecques. Ces dernières ont évoqué Pâques comme date butoir pour transférer les exilés de l’île de Lesbos.

      La police grecque a commencé jeudi 17 septembre à évacuer une partie des milliers de réfugiés jetés à la rue par l’incendie de Moria vers un nouveau camp.

      Vers 7h locales (4h GMT), la police faisait le tour des tentes, dans le calme. Progressivement ils ont entrepris de vider le secteur de ses sans-abri et les emmener vers le nouveau camp érigé à la hâte après l’incendie, il y a une semaine.

      https://twitter.com/rspaegean/status/1306301897368797187?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E13

      Sous un soleil déjà chaud, et sur fond de pleurs d’enfants, plusieurs réfugiés, dont des femmes et des enfants, pliaient leurs couvertures, apportaient des sacs contenant leurs affaires sauvées des flammes la semaine dernière, ou se mettaient à démonter les tentes de bric et de broc installées sur l’asphalte, selon des informations de l’AFP. Ces transferts s’ajoutent aux plusieurs centaines de migrants, déjà arrivés dans le camp mardi et mercredi, selon des humanitaires. D’après les derniers chiffres des autorités grecques, mardi, 1 200 personnes y étaient logées.

      Mercredi soir, 1 000 tentes, pouvant chacune accueillir 8 à 10 personnes, y étaient érigées. Des tentes médicales doivent encore être dressées, et deux zones de quarantaine sont prévues alors que quelque dizaines de cas de coronavirus ont été détectés - mais pour l’heure sans gravité.

      « L’objectif est de protéger la santé publique »

      Depuis l’incendie du camp de Moria, le plus grand d’Europe où vivaient près de 13 000 réfugiés dans des conditions dramatiques, les migrants se sont entassés sous des abris de fortune sur un coin de route et des parkings de supermarché fermés, dans une précarité extrême.

      Dans ce contexte, toute distanciation sociale pour se protéger du Covid-19 semble impossible et, surtout, l’urgence est ailleurs, ont observé des journalistes d’InfoMigrants sur place. « La plus grande préoccupation de ces personnes actuellement, c’est d’avoir accès à de la nourriture et de l’eau », a expliqué Dimitra Chasioti, psychologue pour Médecins sans frontières (MSF) présente sur les lieux.

      « L’objectif est de protéger la santé publique », a déclaré à l’AFP Theodoros Chronopoulos, porte-parole de la police. Il a confirmé une « opération en cours » qui « répond à des fins humanitaires ».

      MSF, qui a ouvert une clinique d’urgence dans cette zone, s’est vu interdire l’accès dans la nuit, alors que des rumeurs d’évacuation couraient, a indiqué l’ONG à l’AFP. À 7h30 (4h30 GMT), ses membres ne pouvaient toujours pas rejoindre leur clinique.

      https://twitter.com/MSF_Sea/status/1306455464071356416?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E13

      « Une opération de police est en cours pour emmener les réfugiés vers le nouveau camp. Cela ne devrait pas empêcher l’aide médicale », a twitté l’ONG. La zone a également été restreinte aux médias.

      https://twitter.com/MortazaBehboudi/status/1306468926830903296?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E13

      Objectif : « quitter l’île pour Athènes »

      Ce nouveau camp, qui crée de nombreuses réticences parmi la population migrante angoissée à l’idée de se retrouver à nouveau enfermée, sera seulement « provisoire » ont promis l’ONU et les autorités grecques.

      Construit depuis samedi, il a pour objectif que les réfugiés « puissent progressivement, et dans le calme, quitter l’île pour Athènes » ou « être réinstallés ailleurs », a indiqué mercredi le représentant en Grèce du Haut commissariat de l’ONU aux réfugiés (HCR) en Grèce, Philippe Leclerc. « Le HCR pousse les autorités (grecques) à accélérer le processus (de demande d’asile) pour que les gens ne restent pas trop longtemps » ici, a-t-il ajouté.

      Le ministre grec de la Protection civile Michalis Chrysochoidis a pour sa part estimé que « la moitié » des exilés pourrait quitter Lesbos « d’ici Noël » et « les autres d’ici Pâques ».

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27338/lesbos-les-migrants-a-la-rue-evacues-par-la-police-vers-un-nouveau-cam

    • "It is a terrible, inhuman situation". #Marisa_Matias visits Kara Tepe refugee camp

      Marisa Matias says that more than three thousand people have arrived in Kara Tepe and another six thousand are yet to arrive. In this refugee camp, people who test positive for Covid-6 are placed “in spaces surrounded by barbed wire where they have no water,” said the MEP.

      Presidential candidate Marisa Matias visited Kara Tepe in Greece this Friday, who is receiving refugees from the Moria camp, which suffered from a fire on the night of September XNUMX.

      “It is a terrible, inhuman situation”, guaranteed Marisa Matias in a video published on her Facebook page. “It is welcoming the people of Moria, after the fire, it is an immense extension”, said the MEP, pointing out the high number of people passing by around her.

      https://jornaleconomico.sapo.pt/en/news/It-is-a-terrible-inhumane-situation-Marisa-Matias-visits-the-re
      #paywall

  • Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556