• January 2020 Report on Rights Violations and Resistance in Lesvos

    A. Situation Report in Lesvos, as of 15/1/2020

    Total population of registered asylum seekers and refugees on Lesvos: 21,268
    Registered Population of Moria Camp & Olive Grove: 19,184
    Registered unaccompanied minors: 1,049
    Total Detained: 88
    Total Arrivals in Lesvos from Turkey in 2020: 1,015

    Over 19,000 people are now living in Moria Camp – the main refugee camp on the island – yet the Camp lacks any official infrastructure, such as housing, security, electricity, sewage, schools, health care, etc. While technically, most individuals are allowed to leave this camp, it has become an open-air prison, as they must spend most of their day in hours long lines for food, toilets, doctors, and the asylum office. Sexual and physical violence is common – and three people have died as a result of violence and desperation in as many weeks. The Greek government has also implemented a new asylum law 1 January 2020 with draconian measures that restrict the rights of migrants. This new law expands grounds to detain asylum seekers, increases bureaucratic hurdles to make appeals, and removes previous protections for vulnerable individuals who arrive to the Greek islands. Specifically, all individuals that arrive from Turkey are now prohibited from leaving the islands until their applications are processed, unless geographic restrictions are lifted at the discretion of the authorities. These changes ultimately will lead to an increased population of asylum seekers trapped in Lesvos, and an increasing number of people trapped here who have had their asylum claims rejected and face deportation to Turkey. We will not detail here the current catastrophic conditions on the island for migrants, as they have already been detailed by others.

    B. Legal Updates

    Since the implementation of the new asylum law in Greece in January 2020, 4636/2019, it remains to be seen to what extent the Greek state will have the capacity to implement the various draconian provisions enacted into law. Below we have documented the following violations in the first few weeks of 2020, and procedural and practical complications in the implementation of the new law.

    1. Right to Work Denied: According to article 53 of the Law 4636/2019, asylum seekers have the right to work six (6) months after they have submitted their asylum application, if they have not yet received a negative first instance decision. Under the previously enforced asylum law, 4375/2016, asylum seekers had the right to work with no limitations. However, as one of its first acts after the New Democracy party came into power in Greece, on the 11 July 2019 the Minister of Employment & Social Affairs, Mr Vroutsis, issued a decision stopping the issuance of social security numbers (AMKA) to asylum seekers (Protocol number: Φ.80320/οικ.31355 /Δ18.2084). Although the newly enacted law allows for the issuance of a “temporary insurance number and healthcare of foreigners” (Π.Α.Α.Υ.Π.Α.) to asylum seekers, under Article 55 para. 2, the joint ministerial decision regulating this has not been issued, and it has yet to be set in force. The possession of a Π.Α.Α.Υ.Π.Α. or AMKA is a prerequisite to be hired in Greece, therefore, it is practically impossible for asylum seekers who have not already obtained an AMKA to work and have access to healthcare, despite having the right to do so.

    2. Access to Asylum Procedure Effectively Denied: According to article 65 para. 7 of the Law 4636/2019, there is a deadline of seven (7) days between the simple and full registration of an applicant’s asylum application. If the applicant does not present themselves before the competent authorities within 7 days, the case is archived with a decision of the head of the competent asylum office (article 65 para. 7 and 5). However, because of the number of asylum seekers currently living in Lesvos, many cannot access the asylum office on the day they are scheduled to register, as there are always hundreds of people waiting outside – and the asylum office is heavily guarded by the private security company G4S. This could lead to many people missing the deadline and being denied the right to apply for asylum. As a result their asylum cases could be closed, and they could face detention and deportation.

    3. Risk of Rejection of Asylum Claims Due to Inability to Renew Asylum Seeker ID Card: For asylum applications being examined under the border procedure (the procedure implemented for all those who arrive to the Greek islands from Turkey), the renewal of the asylum seeker’s card must take place every 15 days, under article 70 para. 4(c) of law 4636/2019. With over 20.000 asylum seekers currently in Lesvos, it is nearly impossible for them to access the office in order to renew an asylum seeker card that is expiring. Some have reported they have to pay (20 Euros) to other asylum seekers who are ‘controlling’ the line just to get a spot on line, where they must wait overnight in extreme weather conditions. After implementing the new law for the first few weeks of 2020 and requiring renewal of asylum seeker’s cards every 15 days, the Lesvos Regional Asylum Office (RAO) realized this is a practical impossibility and returned to the former system of renewing every 30 days, as announced to legal actors via UNHCR this week. Despite this, it still remains extremely difficult to access the asylum office, given the demand. Often the assistance of a lawyer is needed just to book an appointment or get in the door. The consequences of failing to renew an asylum seeker card under the new legislation are extremely harsh – asylum seekers must appear at the asylum office within one day of the expiration date, otherwise the asylum seeker’s card stops being valid ex officio, according to article 70 para. 6 of law 4636/2019. Their asylum claim will be implicitly withdrawn under article 81 para. 2 law 4636/2019, and this implicit withdrawal will be considered a final decision on the merits of their asylum claim, under article 81 para. 1 of law 4636/2019, despite never having had their asylum claim heard (if the implicit withdrawal is prior to their interview). While it may sound like a technical and insignificant difference, receiving a final decision on the merits means that they would need to appeal this denial to the Appeals Committee, rather than simply requesting the continuation of their case – which as described below involves additional obstacles that are likely to be impossible to overcome for many asylum seekers.

    4. Prioritization of Claims Filed in 2020: The new asylum law allows for the accelerated processing of asylum application under the border procedures – i.e. for all those who arrive to Lesvos from Turkey. As RAO and EASO transition to the new law, they have prioritized the processing of the asylum claims of new arrivals, at the expense of the thousands of asylum seekers who arrived and applied for asylum in Lesvos in 2018/2019. Those that have arrived in 2020 are registered and scheduled for interviews with the EASO within a few days of arrival. This means that it is extremely difficult for these individuals to access legal information or legal aid prior to their asylum interviews. Individuals who arrived last year, however, and are waiting months to be heard, are having their interviews postponed in order to accommodate the scheduling of interviews for new arrivals. We have also received information that EASO has not only prioritized new arrivals for interviews, but also prioritized the issuance of opinions for the cases of new arrivals, meaning that decisions for those who were interviewed in 2019 will also be delayed.

    5. Delay in Designation of Vulnerabilities Results in Continued Imposition of Geographic Restrictions for pre-2020 Arrivals: The designation of vulnerability under the previous asylum law led to the lifting of geographic restrictions to Lesvos, as ‘vulnerable’ individuals were referred form the border procedure to the regular asylum procedure. Vulnerable groups, as defined by pre 2020 law included: unaccompanied minors; persons who have a disability or suffering from an incurable or serious illness; the elderly; women in pregnancy or having recently given birth; single parents with minor children; victims of torture, rape or other serious forms of psychological, physical or sexual violence or exploitation; persons with a post-traumatic disorder, in particularly survivors and relatives of victims of ship-wrecks; victims of human trafficking. In 2018, 80% of asylum seekers in Lesvos were designated vulnerable (or approved for transfer to another European State under the Dublin III Regulation), and therefore able to leave Lesvos prior to the final processing of their asylum claims. Under the new legislation, however, vulnerable individuals continue to have their asylum claims processed under the border procedures, as specified in article 39 para. 6 of law 4636/2019. Many individuals who arrived in 2019 and should have been designated vulnerable through the Reception and Identification Procedures’ mandatory medical screening, provided by Article 9 para. 1c of the law 4375/2016, were not designated as such in 2019 due to delays and failure to have a thorough medical screening. For example, just in the past two weeks we have met with survivors of torture, sexual assault and people suffering from serious illnesses who arrived to Lesvos months ago, but have not been designated vulnerable due to a lack of a thorough medical assessment. If designated vulnerable in 2020, the State is currently applying the new law to these individuals, and continues to process their claims under the border procedures, rather than lifting geographic restrictions and referring to the regular asylum procedure. They have now missed the opportunity to have geographic restrictions lifted while they await their interviews, through fault of the Greek state. We should also note that the new legislation also requires a medical screening under Article 39, para. 5 4636/2019, however, this does not carry the same legal consequences, as those found vulnerable under the new legislation are not referred from the border to regular procedure.

    This week the Legal Centre Lesvos represented one couple from Afghanistan, in which the wife is pregnant (a category of vulnerability). In late 2019, they had been designated vulnerable and referred to the regular procedure, however, when in 2020 they were issued their asylum seeker card, it was with geographic restrictions. Only after the intervention of the Legal Centre Lesvos, were they advised that this was merely a ‘mistake’ and they would be referred back to the regular procedure and geographic restrictions would be lifted when they next renewed their asylum seeker card. Meanwhile, for the next two weeks they are unlawfully restricted to Lesvos.

    6. Insurmountable Hurdles to Appeal Negative Decisions: Under the new legislation, asylum applicants who receive a negative decision must describe specifically the grounds in which they are making an appeal in order for their appeal to be admissible by the Appeals Committees, according to articles 92 and 93 of 4636/2019. This is practically impossible without a lawyer to assess the decision and determine the grounds of appeal. Although the state is obligated to provide a lawyer on appeal (article 71 para. 3), this right has been denied for over two years in Lesvos. Nevertheless, the Lesvos RAO appears to be enforcing the new provision of the law requiring individuals to provide the grounds for appeal in order to lodge an appeal, but continues to deny applicants lawyers on appeal in order to determine these grounds – meaning that many are practically unable to lodge an appeal. Others are physically blocked from even accessing the asylum office in order to lodge the appeal due to the hundreds of people attempting to access the asylum office at any given time. We have documented at least one case of a family with two small children, that were arbitrarily given a five day deadline to lodge their appeal and moreover they were unable to enter the asylum office despite trying every day. Only through the intervention of a Legal Centre Lesvos attorney – accompanying the family on multiple days – the family was able to access the asylum office in order to lodge their appeal in due time. Furthermore, it will be a practical impossibility to accompany every asylum seeker whose case is rejected, and many are or will likely miss the deadline to lodge their appeal, if practices are not immediately changed.

    7. Denial of Interpreter for Detained Asylum Seekers Speaking Rare Languages at Every Stage of the Procedure: In November 2019, 28 asylum seekers’ claims were rejected with no interview having taken place, on the basis that no interpreter could be found to translate for them in their languages. The Legal Centre Lesvos and other legal actors represented these individuals on appeal, and denounced this illegal practice. Now, it appears the Lesvos RAO is attempting a new practice to reject the asylum claims of detained asylum seekers. Last week several men from sub-Saharan African countries who were detained upon arrival (based on the practice of arbitrarily detaining ‘low profile refugees’ based on nationality) were scheduled for interviews this week in either French or English, depending on whether they came from an area of the African continent that had previously been colonized by France or by Great Britain. This is despite the fact that they requested an interview in their native language, as is their right, under article 77 para. 12 of 4636/2019. The lasting effects of colonization – also a driving factor in continued migration from Africa to Europe – has continued to haunt these individuals, as even after they have managed to make it into Europe, they are now expected to explain their eligibility for asylum in their former colonizer’s language. The clear attempt to reject detained asylum seekers’ claims without regard to the law is a worrying trend, combined with the provisions of the new legislation which allow for expanded grounds for detention and expanded length of detention of asylum seekers. The Legal Centre has taken on representation of one of these individuals in order to advocate for the right of asylum seekers to be interviewed in a language they can communicate comfortably and fluently in.

    8. Apparent Suicide in Moria Detention Centre Followed Failure by Greek State to Provide Obligated Care. On 6 January a 31-year-old Iranian man was found dead, hung in a cell inside the PRO.KE.K.A. (Pre-Removal Detention Centre) According to other people detained with him, he spent just a short time with other people, before being moved to isolation for approximately two weeks. While in solitary confinement, even for the hours he was taken outside, he was alone, as it was at a different time than other people. For multiple days he was locked in his cell without being allowed to leave at all, as far as others detained saw. His food was served to him through the window in his cell during these days. His distressed mental state was obvious to all the others detained with him and to the police. He cried during the nights and banged on his door. He had also previously threatened to harm himself. Others detained with him never saw anyone visit him, or saw him taken out of his cell for psychological support or psychiatric evaluation. Healthcare in the PRO.KE.K.A is run by AEMY (a healthcare utility supervised by the Greek state). Its medical team supposedly consists of one social worker and one psychologist. However, the social worker quit in April 2019 and was never replaced. The psychologist was on leave between 19 December and 3 January. The man was found dead on 6 January meaning that there were only two working days in which AEMY was staffed during the last three weeks of his life, when he could have received psychological support. This is dangerously inadequate in a prison currently holding approximately 100 people. EODY is the only other state institution able to make mental health assessments, yet it has publicly declared that it will not intervene in the absence of AEMY staff, not even in emergencies, and that in any case it will not reassess somebody’s mental health. For more details, see Legal Centre Lesvos publication, here. Of note is that there is no permanent interpretation service inside the detention centre.

    C. Legal Centre Lesvos Updates

    Despite the hostile political environment in Lesvos, a few significant successes confirm the importance of continued monitoring, litigation, and coordination with other actors in advocating for migrant rights in Lesvos.

    On 25th November 2019 we joined other legal actors on Lesvos in representing 28 men from African countries whose asylum claims were rejected before they had even had an interview on their claims. These individuals – through the long denounced ‘pilot’ project – were arbitrarily detained upon arrival to Lesvos from Turkey, based only on their nationality – as they are from countries with a ‘low refugee profile.’ The RAO further denied these individuals their rights in November 2019, when their asylum claims were rejected on the basis that there was a lack of interpreter to carry out the interviews. In the case of the Legal Centre Lesvos client, he was rejected because apparently a Portuguese interpreter could not be found! We collaborated with other legal actors on the island and UNHCR in representing these individuals on appeal, and engaging in joint advocacy to denounce this illegal practice. Following this joint advocacy initiative, the Lesvos RAO has continued the illegal practice of arbitrary detention based on nationality, and has attempted new tactics to accelerate the procedure, rejection, and ultimate deportation of these individuals (as described above), but there have been no reports of denial of asylum claims based on lack of interpretation since our joint advocacy in November 2019.

    Following our successful submission to the European Court of Human Rights in November 2019, which led to the last minute halting of a scheduled deportation, the police appeared to have changed their policies. In the month prior to our filing, at least six individuals were deported to Turkey, after having filing appeals in administrative court, and motions to suspend their deportation pending resolution of their appeals. Despite the fact that the administrative court had not yet ruled on the suspension motions, these individuals were forcibly deported to Turkey. Since our petition to the ECHR, in which we raised the lack of effective remedy in Greece, there have been no reported cases of deportation of individuals who have filed administrative appeals on their asylum claims. Our efforts in making this change were not alone, as advocacy from other legal actors and the Ombudsman’s Office against this practice likely contributed to the changed policy.

    Dublin Successes in Increasingly hostile climate: Since late 2017, there has been an increase in the number of refusals of ‘take charge’ requests for family reunification sent by the Greek Dublin Unit to Germany under the Dublin III regulations, with a variety of reasons used to deny the reunification of families who have often been separated by war and persecution. The family reunification procedure under the Dublin regulations is one of the rare legal routes protecting family unity and allowing for legal migration for asylum seekers out of Greece to other European states.

    In the period of October 2019 – December 2019 four families we represented had their applications for family reunification through Dublin III Regulations approved, enabling our clients to reunite with family members in France, Germany, and Sweden.

    Our most recent Dublin success involved the reunification of a family with two minor sons who are living in Germany. The two minor sons had left Afghanistan 5 years ago and had been separated from their family ever since. There is a trend from the German Dublin Unit to reject the cases in which families make the difficult decision to first send their minor children to safety when the entire family is not able to leave together. The German Dublin Unit has denied these cases on the basis that it is not in the best interest of the child to reunite minor children with parents who used smugglers to send their children to safety. We have consistently argued that when the children’s life is at risk, the parents should not be punished for using whatever means they can to find safety for their children, when legal and safe routes of migration are denied to them. The German Dublin Unit agreed in this case after advocacy from the Legal Centre Lesvos and the Greek Dublin Unit.

    https://legalcentrelesvos.org/2020/01/22/january-2020-report-on-rights-violations-and-resistance-in-lesvos
    #Lesbos #Moria #hotspots #droits #hotspot #Grèce #violation #statistiques #chiffres #surpopulation #Dublin #règlement_Dublin #accès_aux_droits

  • CALL FOR ACCOUNTABILITY: Apparent #Suicide in #Moria Detention Centre followed failure by Greek State to provide obligated care.

    On 6 January a 31-year-old man from Iran was found dead, hung in a cell inside the Pre Removal Detention Centre (#PRO.KE.K.A.), the prison within Moria camp on Lesvos island. Police knew before they detained him that he had serious mental health issues, according to reports from several detained with him. Despite this, for approximately two weeks prior to his death he was kept in isolation.

    Within this PRO.KE.K.A. prison, those that are held there are the “undesirables” of the European Union and Greek State: the majority are arrested after arriving to Lesvos from Turkey, and held there immediately upon arrival, based only on their nationality. Others are considered ‘public security threats’ but they have never been tried or convicted. Others have had their asylum cases rejected, but they were judged in an unfair asylum system built to exclude migrants from Europe and maintain an undocumented and therefore exploitable population.

    This policy of collective punishment is commonly reproduced in courts and the media, which criminalize migrants and categorizes them as having a ‘low refugee profile’ before anything is even known about them individually. This concept of a ‘low refugee profile’ is implemented in PRO.KE.K.A. in Lesvos and Kos, through a pilot project. Those who come from countries where, statistically, less than 25% are granted international protection, are detained upon arrival from Turkey. This is mainly people from African states. Men from these countries who arrive to Lesvos without family, are arrested upon arrival and detained for up to three months. The new asylum law allows for increasing detention time for up to 18 months.

    PRO.KE.K.A. operates with little oversight or accountability. There, people are held with limited access to legal, medical or psychological support. People are detained in overcrowded cells 22 hours a day. According to detainees, psychological and physical abuse is common. Detainees have reported the following abuses: People are woken up at random hours of the night using noise and light. They are forced to spend two hours outside each day, even in the winter. Recently, there are reports that they are taken to where there are no cameras and beaten by the police, and beaten by the police while in handcuffs. People are granted access to their phones only at weekends, cutting them off most of the week from their families and support networks, and making communication with legal support almost impossible. Visits from friends and family are at times prohibited. Because of these reasons, reporting abuse is practically impossible for detainees. Also many report that they fear retaliation by the police and do not trust government or official organizations because they see abuse continue with no consequences for the police, even though the abuse happens under everyone’s eye.

    Almost no basic need is met. No adequate warm clothing, and only one blanket, meaning they must freeze in the winter months. Without interpreters present, detainees have limited means of communicating with prison officers, meaning that many do not know why they are detained or for how long. The food is inadequate and unhealthy, with many going hungry. At times, only one meal a day is served, and no food can be brought in from contacts outside. They are provided no basic hygiene products like soap or toothpaste, and outbreaks of scabies have occurred.

    The asylum claims of those detained in PRO.KE.K.A. are accelerated, and people are scheduled for interviews on their asylum claims within a few days of arrival, and access to legal aid is severely limited. Legal aid on appeal is routinely denied, despite having a right to a lawyer. Trapped in prison, detainees face huge difficulties submitting evidence to the asylum service to support their claims.

    The illegal detention of minors is commonplace because European Border Agency FRONTEX is systematically registering minors as adults. Torture survivors are also commonly detained despite an obligation by the state to screen for any vulnerabilities. Those with serious medical and psychological conditions are routinely denied access to healthcare. For example people with prescription medicine are not provided with this medication, even if they had it on their person when arrested. When people ask to see a doctor or psychologist, the police and AEMY – a private institution supervised by the Greek Ministry of Health – pass responsibility between each other and often people are never treated. Self harm is tragically common in PRO.KE.K.A.. At times, those with severe illnesses have been detained and deported by police and FRONTEX to Turkey, under the knowledge of UNHCR.

    Here in PROK.E.K.A. is where the man who died found himself in December 2019, when he was taken into detention. According to other people detained in PRO.KE.K.A., he spent just a short time with other people, before being moved to isolation for approximately two weeks. While in solitary confinement, even for the hours he was taken outside, he was alone, as it was at a different time than other people. For multiple days he was locked in his cell without being allowed to leave at all, as far as others detained saw. His food was served to him through the window in his cell during these days. His distressed mental state was obvious to all the others detained with him and to the police. He cried during the nights and banged on his door. He had also previously threatened to harm himself. Others detained with him never saw anyone visit him, or saw him taken out of his cell for psychological support or psychiatric evaluation.

    Healthcare in the prison is run by AEMY and the Greek state is its sole shareholder. Its medical team supposedly consists of one social worker and one psychologist. However, the social worker quit in April 2019 and was never replaced. The psychologist was on leave between 19 December and 3 January. The man was found dead on 6 January meaning that there were only two working days in which AEMY was staffed during the last three weeks of his life, when he could have received psychological support. This is dangerously inadequate in a prison currently holding approximately 100 people. KEELPNO is the only other state institution able to make mental health assessments, yet it has publicly declared that it will not intervene in the absence of AEMY staff, not even in emergencies, and that in any case it will not reassess somebody’s mental health.

    If we believe that this individual took his own life in order to escape from the abyss of PRO.KE.K.A., then it was the result of prison conditions that push people to despair, and the failure of multiple state agencies to provide him obligated mental health care.

    One death is too many. We call for an independent investigation into the circumstances surrounding the death on 6 January.

    https://legalcentrelesvos.org/2020/01/19/call-for-accountability-apparent-suicide-in-moria-detention-centr
    #Grèce #décès #mort #Lesbos #rétention #détention_administrative #mourir_en_rétention

  • GREECE REFLECTION: Poems from the Brink of Despair; powerful voices of refugees in detention of Moria

    In Moria, refugees are proud to be sick.
    I broke my arm to get a medical certificate.

    If you have been tortured you can sell yourself as vulnerable.
    Being mentally ill is the price to pay for safe passage.
    It’s easier for a sinner to enter paradise
    than for a refugee to get asylum in Greece.

    Why do you, all the guilty ones,
    Want to teach us lessons in morality?
    You prevent us from being happy.
    Us, the brave ones.

    #moria #lesbos #greece #refugees #migrants #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce

    https://www.cpt.org/cptnet/2017/08/15/greece-reflection-poems-brink-despair-powerful-voices-refugees-detention-moria

    • Refugee protest on Lesvos, February 3rd, 2020
      On February 3rd 2020 about 2000 refugees demonstrated in Mitilini against arbitrary deportations and horrific conditions in Moria camp as well as demanded freedom of movement. Peaceful protest was stopped by riot police which used tear gas against refugees, journalists and internationals. ReFOCUS team was caught between police and demonstrators when walking to our everyday classes. This is what we experienced over three hours of being stuck in the protest.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHjqNjGfx-o&feature=youtu.be

  • « Moria, Not Good »

    Πορεία διαμαρτυρίας από περίπου 500 γυναικόπαιδα στο κέντρο της Προκυμαίας για τις άθλιες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στο ΚΥΤ Μόριας και τη « ζούγκλα » του ελαιώνα.

    Πορεία στο κέντρο της Μυτιλήνης πραγματοποιήσαν σήμερα, νωρίς το μεσημέρι, περίπου 500 γυναίκες, μαζί με παιδιά, αιτούντες άσυλο που διαμένουν στο ΚΥΤ της Μόριας και στη « ζούγκλα » του ελαιώνα.

    Μία ώρα μετά, στο πρώτο γκρουπ διαδηλωτριών προστέθηκε και ένα δεύτερο. Όλοι μαζί ξεκίνησαν πορεία με κατεύθυνση την οδό Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, όπου στο τρίγωνο έκαναν καθιστική διαμαρτυρία για λίγα λεπτά.

    Ακολούθως πέρασαν μπροστά από τα Κεντρικά Λύκεια και βγήκαν ξανά στην Προκυμαία, όπου έκλεισαν και τα δύο ρεύματα κυκλοφορίας, προκαλώντας κυκλοφοριακό κομφούζιο.

    Από την πλευρά τους οι αστυνομικοί προσπαθούσαν να εκτρέψουν την κυκλοφορία μέσα από την Αγορά, ωστόσο υπήρξαν φορτηγά, λεωφορεία και βαρέα οχήματα που ακινητοποιήθηκαν στην Προκυμαία, ενώ άλλοι οδηγοί με αναστροφή προσπαθούσαν να ξεμπλέξουν από το μποτιλιάρισμα.

    Οι διαδηλώτριες έκαναν καθιστική διαμαρτυρία και μπροστά στη Μεγάλη Βρετάνια, διαμαρτυρόμενες για τις άθλιες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στη Μόρια, καθώς και τις καθυστερήσεις που παρατηρούνται ως προς την εξέταση των αιτήσεων ασύλου τους. Λίγη ώρα αργότερα, συγεντρώθηκαν μπροστά από την Πλατεία Σαπφούς, φωνάζοντας επί ώρα το σύνθημα « Moria, Not Good », πριν ολοκληρώσουν τη διαδήλωσή τους και επιστρέψουν στο ΚΥΤ Μόριας.

    https://www.stonisi.gr/post/6616/moria-not-good-pics-video
    #résistance #hotspot #Grèce #île #Lesbos #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    • « Ελευθερία » ζητούν οι πρόσφυγες στη Μόρια
      Πρωτοφανή επεισόδια σημειώθηκαν σήμερα στη Μυτιλήνη,

      μετά τη μαζική πορεία προσφύγων που ξεκίνησαν το πρωί από τον καταυλισμό ζητώντας να σταματήσει ο εγκλεισμός τους και να επιταχυνθούν οι διαδικασίες χορήγησης ασύλου. Η λέξη « ελευθερία » κυριαρχεί στα αυτοσχέδια πλακάτ.

      Ακολουθεί φωτορεπορτάζ από τη δυναμική κινητοποίηση τουλάχιστον 2.000 προσφύγων, μεταξύ των οποίων πολλές γυναίκες και παιδιά, και τα επεισόδια με τις αστυνομικές δυνάμεις που προχώρησαν επανειλημμένα στη χρήση χημικών.


      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/229678_eleytheria-zitoyn-oi-prosfyges-sti-moria

    • « Λάδι στη φωτιά » οι σημερινές διαδηλώσεις

      Η διαμαρτυρία Αφγανών και τα επεισόδια της Δευτέρας με την αστυνομία.

      Στις 4 το απόγευμα έληξε η διαμαρτυρία των Αφγανών προσφύγων έξω από το Δημοτικό Θέατρο Μυτιλήνης ενάντια στο νέο νόμο για το Άσυλο, που σύμφωνα με τα λεγόμενά τους, τους υποχρεώνει σε νέο εγκλωβισμό- καθώς πλέον έχουν προτεραιότητα οι νεοεισερχόμενοι αιτούντες άσυλο.

      Ειδικότερα, συγκρούσεις μεταξύ Αφγανών που διαμένουν στο ΚΥΤ ης Μόριας, ανδρών και γυναικών κάθε ηλικίας και της Αστυνομίας σημάδεψαν τις σημερινές κινητοποιήσεις, οι οποίες είναι από τις λίγες φορές που έλαβαν χώρα εκτός του ΚΥΤ.

      Η διαδήλωση έφτασε περίπου στις 10.30 το πρωί, σχεδόν στην είσοδο της πόλης της Μυτιλήνης, λίγο μετά το δημοτικό καταυλισμό του Καρά Τεπέ. Εκεί τους περίμενε ισχυρή Αστυνομική δύναμη που δεν τους επέτρεψε να συνεχίζουν. Μια ομάδα περίπου 1000 από τους διαδηλωτές τότε έφυγε μέσω γειτονικών χωραφιών με σκοπό να φτάσουν πίσω από το εργοστάσιο της ΔΕΗ στο δρόμο της βόρειας παράκαμψης και από εκεί να μπουν για να διαμαρτυρηθούν στην πόλη. Στην πορεία τους άναψαν φωτιές για αντιπερισπασμό. Ας σημειωθεί εδώ ότι προς στιγμή η φωτιά έκαιγε και σε κτήματα που γειτνιάζουν με τις εγκαταστάσεις του εργοστασίου της ΔΕΗ. Οι φωτιές επεκτάθηκαν και τότε άρχισαν οδομαχίες προκειμένου να μην ενισχυθεί ο αριθμός όσων προσπαθούσαν να φτάσουν στην πόλη.

      Με ρίψη δακρυγόνων απωθήθηκε ο μεγάλος αριθμός των νεαρών κυρίων Αφγανών που είχαν μείνει στο δρόμο και πίεζαν τις Αστυνομικές δυνάμεις να περάσουν. Ενώ το κλείσιμο του δρόμου δεν επέτρεπε και την έξοδο των οχημάτων της Πυροσβεστικής από τις εγκαταστάσεις της υπηρεσίας που βρίσκονται στην περιοχή.

      Την ίδια ώρα περίπου 500 άτομα που κατάφεραν και μπήκαν στην πόλη από τη βόρεια συνοικία της ενισχυμένη με νεαρούς Αφγανούς πάντα που βρισκόταν στην πόλη κατάλαβαν το δρόμο της Προκυμαίας μπροστά στο Δημοτικό Θέατρο της πόλης ενώ κάποιοι έστησαν και σκηνές.

      Σύμφωνα με επιβεβαιωμένες πληροφορίες του ΑΠΕ η κινητοποίηση ήταν γνωστή στις Αστυνομικές αρχές από την Παρασκευή για αυτό και το Σαββατοκύριακο υπήρξε ενίσχυση της αστυνομικής δύναμης με προσωπικό από την Αθήνα.

      Εδώ η συνεχής ενημέρωση του « Ν », με έξτρα φωτογραφίες και βίντεο.

      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/6677/ladi-sth-fwtia-oi-shmerines-diadhlwseis-pics

    • Manifestation à Lesbos : incidents entre forces de l’ordre et migrants

      Les forces anti-émeutes ont fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes lundi sur l’île grecque de Lesbos contre des migrants qui manifestaient contre une nouvelle loi durcissant les procédures d’asile en Grèce, a-t-on appris de source policière.

      Brandissant des banderoles sur lesquelles on pouvait lire en anglais « Freedom » (liberté), quelque 2.000 migrants réclamaient l’examen de leur demande d’asile, que certains attendent depuis des mois voire des années, et protestaient contre les conditions de vie à proximité et à l’intérieur du camp de Moria, le plus grand des camps de Grèce.

      Ils avaient parcouru une distance d’environ 7 km entre le camp de Moria et le port de Mytilène, quand des policiers anti-émeutes leur ont barré la route en lançant des gaz lacrymogènes, selon la même source.

      Toutefois, des centaines de demandeurs d’asile ont réussi à atteindre le port pour y manifester, a constaté une correspondante de l’AFP.

      Le Haut commissariat des réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR) en Grèce souligne les « retards significatifs » pris par les services grecs de l’asile, avec près de 90.000 demandes en souffrance dans un pays qui compte actuellement 112.300 migrants sur les îles et sur le continent, selon les chiffres du HCR.

      « L’accumulation significative des candidatures à l’asile et les graves retards pris dans les procédures d’asile contribuent de manière importante aux conditions dangereuses de surpopulation observée sur les îles », a déclaré à l’AFP Boris Cheshirkov, porte-parole de la section grecque du HCR.

      Face au nombre constant d’arrivées de demandeurs d’asile sur les îles grecques en provenance de la Turquie voisine, le gouvernement de droite a fait voter une loi, entrée en vigueur en janvier, prévoyant des délais brefs pour examiner les demandes d’asile, en vue de renvoyer les demandeurs non éligibles ou déboutés dans leurs pays d’origine ou vers la Turquie voisine.

      Dans les camps, des dizaines de milliers de migrants, arrivés avant janvier, protestent contre les retards importants dans le traitement de leurs demandes d’asile, les empêchant de quitter les îles.

      « Les autorités donnent la priorité à ceux qui sont arrivés récemment » et non pas aux demandeurs d’asile qui attendent depuis longtemps, a souligné Boris Cheshirkov.

      La majorité des 19.000 migrants attendant au camp de Moria, dont la capacité est de 2.700 personnes, « vivent dans des conditions terribles, sans accès à l’eau ou l’électricité », a-t-il rappelé.

      Le HCR-Grèce a appelé « les autorités à mettre en place des procédures justes et efficaces pour identifier ceux qui ont besoin d’une protection internationale en respectant les normes et les garanties adéquates ».

      La situation est devenue explosive à Lesbos, Samos, Kos, Chios et Leros, sur la mer Egée, où vivent 42.000 demandeurs d’asile pour 6.200 places.

      Les bagarres entre demandeurs d’asile y sont en outre fréquentes, et au moins quatre personnes ont perdu la vie ces derniers mois.

      https://information.tv5monde.com/info/manifestation-lesbos-incidents-entre-forces-de-l-ordre-et-migr

    • Réfugiés : à Lesbos, une situation explosive et une #chasse_à_l'homme

      Après une montée de tensions aux relents xénophobes et une manifestation violemment réprimée, l’île grecque a été le théâtre de #heurts les habitants et les migrants, qui s’entassent en nombre dans des camps insalubres.

      « Allez, allez ! Courez ! » hurlent des voix en anglais. Puis aussitôt, en grec : « Cassez-vous d’ici ! » Les images qui circulent sur les réseaux sociaux, où l’on voit des hommes en colère à la poursuite de migrants, sont aussi glaçantes que le ciel gris qui enveloppe Lesbos. Après deux jours de fortes tensions, cette île située à l’extrémité orientale de la Grèce a été le théâtre d’une véritable chasse à l’homme en ce début de semaine.

      Tout a commencé lundi, avec une manifestation de migrants très durement réprimée par les forces de l’ordre. Puis mardi soir, des habitants excédés sont à leur tour sortis dans la rue, revendiquant leur droit de « prendre la situation en main ». Ce n’est pas la première fois que des tensions explosent sur l’île, devenue depuis quatre ans une prison à ciel ouvert pour les réfugiés, coincés sur ce bout de terre européen en attendant le résultat de leur demande d’asile. Mais les événements de ce début de semaine constituent une dérive inédite et inquiétante.
      « Plus de toilettes ni d’électricité »

      Comme toutes les îles grecques qui font face à la Turquie, Lesbos se retrouve en première ligne de l’afflux migratoire vers l’Europe. Et malgré un deal controversé conclu entre Bruxelles et Ankara en 2016, les arrivées n’ont jamais cessé. Elles sont même reparties à la hausse : en 2019, la Grèce est redevenue la première porte d’entrée en Europe, avec 74 000 arrivées en un an.

      Sur les îles, la surpopulation tourne au cauchemar : les nouveaux venus se retrouvent « entassés dans des camps insalubres où il faut faire à chaque fois la queue pendant plusieurs heures pour manger, puis pour prendre une douche ou même aller aux toilettes », rappelle Tommaso Santo, chef de mission à Médecins sans frontières (MSF), joint par téléphone à Athènes.

      A Lesbos, le camp de Moria, prévu pour 3 000 places, accueille désormais plus de 20 000 personnes, abritées tant bien que mal sous des tentes qui grignotent les champs d’olives environnants. « Dans l’extension la plus récente, il n’y a même plus de toilettes ni d’électricité », souligne le responsable de MSF. L’ONG gère une clinique de santé mentale sur l’île. Parmi les patients, on y croise notamment des enfants qui ne parlent plus, refusent de se nourrir. Parfois ils s’automutilent ou ont tenté de se suicider. C’est d’ailleurs pour protester contre cette précarité inhumaine que les réfugiés ont, une fois de plus, manifesté lundi à Lesbos.
      « Climat de peur »

      La colère des habitants n’est pas non plus surprenante. Eux aussi subissent la présence de ces camps insalubres, qui croulent sous les ordures, et autour desquels errent des désespérés condamnés à une attente qui semble sans fin. Mais pour certains observateurs, la montée de tension récente est aussi le résultat de la nouvelle donne politique : « Le retour au pouvoir des conservateurs de Nouvelle Démocratie, en juillet, a implicitement encouragé les pulsions les plus xénophobes. Ils ont fait campagne sur le durcissement des lois migratoires, ils ont promis de se montrer plus durs, et nous y voilà. Aujourd’hui, ce ne sont pas seulement les migrants qui sont ciblés, mais aussi les ONG qui les soutiennent et les habitants qui refusent de les chasser. Certains ont vu leurs maisons caillassées mardi soir », soupire Petros (1), volontaire pour une ONG locale qui dénonce « l’instauration d’un climat de peur ».

      A partir de 2015, les Grecs avaient pourtant fait preuve d’une générosité exemplaire, en accueillant à bras ouverts les premières vagues de réfugiés malgré leurs propres difficultés économiques. Certes, le temps a joué dans la montée du ras-le-bol alors même que les partenaires européens de la Grèce n’ont pas tenu leurs promesses d’offres de relocalisations. Mais la nouvelle politique imposée par la droite grecque s’est effectivement traduite par une stigmatisation des candidats à l’asile dont les conditions d’admission ont été récemment durcies. En outre, ils se trouvent désormais privés de la carte sociale qui leur donnait accès aux soins gratuits. Malgré les demandes pressantes de MSF, le gouvernement de Kyriákos Mitsotákis refuse toujours d’évacuer de Moria 140 enfants qui ont besoin de soins médicaux urgents, indisponibles à Lesbos. Et la promesse de désengorger les îles en transférant des réfugiés en Grèce continentale s’effectue à un rythme ralenti.

      Pendant ce temps, certains relèvent peu à peu la tête : les néonazis d’Aube dorée, qui avaient quasiment disparu de la scène publique ces dernières années, sont de retour depuis quelques mois. A Lesbos, leurs partisans recruteraient notamment parmi de jeunes hommes de « 18 ou 20 ans » : « Ils sont souvent vêtus de passe-montagnes et porteurs de bâton », décrit Petros, le volontaire grec. Des « pitsirikia », de très jeunes garçons, comme les a désignés un journal local. Ils étaient eux aussi dans les rues de Lesbos mardi soir.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/02/05/refugies-a-lesbos-une-situation-explosive-et-une-chasse-a-l-homme_1777401

      –-----

      Commentaire reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      Climat explosif à Lesbos, retour en force de l’#Aube_Dorée
      A Mytilène et à #Moria des milices d’extrêmes droite, font la chasse aux ONG et aux migrants -une camionnette appartenant à une ONG a été attaquée dans le village de Moria, tandis qu’un groupe de jeunes cagoulés et armés de bâtons faisait irruption dans les maisons pour vérifier la présence éventuelle de réfugiés, solidaires et des membres des ONG. Le soir du 4 février une maison abandonnée, toujours dans le village de Moria fut incendiée, heureusement les trois réfugiés qui s’y abritaient étaient partis à temps
      A #Mytilène, chef-lieu de Lesbos, après la dispersion d’une manifestation anti-fasciste organisée principalement par des étudiants, un café fréquenté par ceux-ci, fut encerclé par un groupe portant des casques armé de bâtes qui ne se sont éloignés qu’après l’arrivée d’autres étudiants solidaires.

      #extrême_droite #xénophobie #racisme

    • Refugee children amid crowds of protesters tear gassed on Lesbos

      Tensions mount as asylum seekers living in Moria, a notoriously overcrowded Greek camp, rally against poor conditions.

      Greek police have fired tear gas at thousands of refugees and migrants trapped on the overcrowded island of Lesbos, from where they are not allowed to travel to the mainland under a 2016 EU-Turkey deal aimed at curbing migratory flows.

      In tense scenes on Monday, children and babies were caught up in plumes of tear gas during protests by about 2,000 people.

      The clashes broke out around Moria, a notoriously cramped camp which was never designed to hold more than 3,000. Currently, there are nearly 20,000 people in and around the camp.

      Protesters rallied against the continued containment of people on Lesbos island and the unbearable living conditions inside the camp.

      In footage seen by Al Jazeera, children can be seen recovering from being hit with tear gas fired by riot police. Some wore face masks to protect themselves from inhalation.

      Riot police fired the tear gas to try and quell protesters and prevent them from marching on foot to Mytilene, Lesbos’s capital more than four miles away.

      But many Moria residents did reach the port city and continued protesting there on Tuesday.

      Abdul (not his real name), an Afghan refugee, told Al Jazeera: “I participated because people are dying in Moria and nobody cares. We feel like we don’t have a future here, if we wanted to die then we could have stayed in Afghanistan. We came here to look for a good future and to be safe, this is not a place for living.”

      At least two people have died in Moria so far this year in stabbing attacks, according to local media.

      In previous years, refugees at the camp have died in fires, because of extreme weather and as some - including babies - lack access to proper medical facilities.
      Tense mood

      The mood in the centre of Mytilene on Tuesday was tense as nearly 200 people, mainly men and women from Afghanistan, congregated in the central square.

      “Freedom, Freedom,” they chanted, as well as “Lesbos people, we are sorry,” - an apparent apology to Greek residents for the highly charged atmosphere.

      Franziska Grillmeier, a German journalist, told Al Jazeera that she witnessed families being tear gassed on Monday.

      "Yesterday, as the people were trying to move the protest from Moria to Mytilene, the police tried to deter them by using roadblocks. Some families, however, broke through using the olive grove fields next to the camp and tried to find an alternative way to get to Mytilene. The police then started using heavy tear gas, throwing it into the fields by the olive grove, which also set some of the olive trees on fire.

      “There were men holding their kids up, kids who were foaming at the mouth, kids having panic attacks and babies unable to breathe and dehydrating through the gas.”

      She claimed the police reaction appeared to be excessive.

      “There weren’t really any threats to the police at that point, it was just really a tactic of the police to immediately throw tear gas at people who were peacefully trying to make their way to Mytilene.”

      Police reportedly detained dozens of protesters. Al Jazeera contacted the Ministry of Citizen Protection but had not received a response by the time of publication.

      “I saw serious attacks on people, beatings with sticks. I also saw people screaming, holding their kids in the air and saying: ’Look what you’ve done’,” Grillmeier said.

      Paolo Amadei, a freelance photographer from Italy, said: "There were police throwing gas, women and kids and infants got gassed and there were many kids crying.

      “They (refugees) came in peace, that’s what I saw: they weren’t looking for a clash.”

      Boris Cheshirkov, a spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, told Al Jazeera he was concerned by the escalation, which has been “exacerbated by the dire conditions and long wait”.

      He said UNHCR has urged the Greek government to transfer people to the mainland and explained that European solidarity and responsibility-sharing was now crucial.


      https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/02/refugee-children-crowds-protesters-tear-gassed-lesbos-200204133656056.htm

    • À Lesbos, des migrants manifestent et se heurtent aux forces anti-émeutes

      Les forces anti-émeutes ont fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes lundi sur l’île grecque de Lesbos contre des migrants, qui manifestaient contre une nouvelle loi durcissant les procédures d’asile en Grèce.

      Brandissant des banderoles sur lesquelles on pouvait lire en anglais « Freedom », quelque 2 000 migrants ont manifesté ce lundi 3 février à Lesbos. Ils réclamaient l’examen de leur demande d’asile, que certaines attendent depuis des mois, voire des années, et protestaient contre les conditions de vie à proximité et à l’intérieur du camp de Moria, le plus grand de Grèce.

      Les manifestants avaient parcouru environ 7 km entre le camp de Moria et le port de Mytilène, quand des policiers anti-émeutes leur ont barré la route en lançant des gaz lacrymogènes, rapporte une source policière citée par l’AFP. Des centaines de demandeurs d’asile ont toutefois réussi à atteindre le port pour y manifester.

      Le Haut Commissariat des réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR) en Grèce souligne les « retards significatifs » pris par les services grecs de l’asile, avec près de 90 000 demandes en souffrance dans un pays qui compte actuellement 112 300 migrants sur les îles et sur le continent, selon les chiffres de l’organisation. Des retards qui participent aux conditions de vie désastreuses des exilés sur les îles grecques.

      Situation explosive

      La situation est devenue explosive à Lesbos, Samos, Kos, Chios et Leros, sur la mer Égée, où vivent 42 000 demandeurs d’asile pour 6 200 places. « À Lesbos on a des milliers de gens qui vivent hors des structures du camp de Moria, sous les arbres, sous de petites tentes », rapporte Boris Cheshirkov, porte-parole de la section grecque du HCR, joint par RFI. Sur ces îles, les bagarres entre demandeurs d’asile sont en outre fréquentes, et au moins quatre personnes ont perdu la vie ces derniers mois.

      « La première chose à faire est de transférer plusieurs milliers de personnes sur le continent dans de meilleures conditions de vie, parce que si on ne réduit pas sérieusement le nombre de personnes sur les îles, il n’y aura pas de solution. En parallèle, il faut plus de personnel, plus de services, plus d’hygiène et des procédures administratives plus rapides. Dans le même temps, les pays européens peuvent faire beaucoup plus en ouvrant des places de relocalisation. Le HCR a notamment demandé à des États de prendre en charge une partie des enfants seuls. Il y a eu un programme de relocalisation, mais il a pris fin en 2017 », déplore Boris Cheshirkov.

      Face au nombre constant d’arrivées depuis la Turquie voisine, le gouvernement grec de droite a fait voter une loi, entrée en vigueur en janvier, prévoyant des délais brefs pour examiner les demandes d’asile, en vue de renvoyer les demandeurs non éligibles ou déboutés dans leurs pays d’origine ou vers la Turquie.

      Le HCR-Grèce a appelé « les autorités à mettre en place des procédures justes et efficaces pour identifier ceux qui ont besoin d’une protection internationale en respectant les normes et les garanties adéquates ».

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/europe/20200203-gr%C3%A8ce-lesbos-migrants-manifestent-heurtent-forces-anti-%C3%A9meute

    • Police arrests Greek extremists acting like “raid battalion” in Moria village (UPD)

      Police on the island of Lesvos has arrested seven Greek extremists who were conducting street and house to Greeks and foreign nationals in the village of Moria. All members of the so-called “control squad” or “raid battalion” were wearing helmets and holding bats when they arrested on Thursday night.

      All arrestees are men, police is looking for two more.

      Authorities investigate illegal acts conducted by the extremists both in Moria and the wide area of Mytilini in recent days.

      According to local media stonisi and lesvosnews.net, they are to appear before the prosecutor and face charges for violating gun laws and for setting up a criminal group acting like a “raid battalion.” Later it was reported that they will be charged also for violating “anti-racism laws. Authorities reportedly investigate also whether they were involved in criminal acts in the past, ANT1 reported.

      UPDATE: According to latest information for the island, five of the arrestees are Greeks, one is Bulgarian national and one Albanian, all aged 17-24. The two still sought by the police are a Greek and a foreigner, both minors.

      Seized have been 5 wooden bats and one metal stick as well as full face mask, reports, levsosnews.net.

      Although authorities have been denying the existence of such groups, a exclusive video captured them as they terrorized customers of a bar in downtown Mytilini two days ago. They men wear masks, black jackets and threaten the bar’s customers they “do not like.”

      According to eyewitnesses, these young men were also checking Greeks and foreign nationals passing by the main commercial Ermou street.

      The “squad” has also “raided” a cafeteria on the same street, where students, workers and volunteers of non-governmental organizations involved in the refugee crisis hang out.

      These reports were also confirmed by police, local media stonisi stresses.

      The same group of people, always with masks and bats, had reportedly conducted controls in the village of Moria on Tuesday night.

      They checked in homes and shops for foreign nationals, asylum seekers, volunteers and NGO-workers. According to confirmed reports, they broke the car of an Italian NGO worker with two asylum-seekers on board. Police intervened following locals’ phone calls.

      The atmosphere on the island is tense not only due to the asylum-seekers’ protest beginning of the week but also due to the objection of local authorities and residents to the government plans for closed accommodation centers.

      Far-right extremists try to take advantage of the situation, fake news against refugees, migrants and asylum seekers are spread on daily basis.

      A local group has reportedly also posted on internet calling on “armed violence” against the refugees.

      Police on Lesvos has not been famous for its intervention against far-right extremists.

      The last think the government wants, though, is a spark to provoke unprecedented situations on the island.

      https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/02/07/lesvos-moria-extremists-greeks-arrests

    • Greece tightens rules for refugee NGOs

      The parliament in Athens has pushed through a law aimed at restoring order on the Aegean islands. The laws puts restrictions on non-government organizations, which have been accused of inciting migrants to stage violent protests.
      Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said on Wednesday that NGOs will no longer be allowed to “operate unchecked” and in future they would be “strictly vetted,” the Greek newspaper, Proto Thema, reports.

      Speaking at a celebration for the centenary of the Hellenic Coast Guard, Mitsotakis said “Most NGOs do a great job. They are helpful in tackling the problem. But we know, we know it, beyond any doubt, that there are some who do not fulfill the role they are claiming. We will not tolerate this anymore.”

      NGOs providing medical, legal and other assistance to migrants on the Greek Aegean islands include Oxfam, the Danish Refugee Council, Doctors of the World, European Lawyers in Lesbos, Terre des Hommes, Refugee Support Aegean, Medecins Sans Frontieres and others.

      The prime minister’s remarks came after the deputy migration minister, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, told Proto Thema Radio that the NGOs had sprung up “like mushrooms after the rain.” "Some behave like bloodsuckers," he said.

      Inciting migrant protests

      Koumoutsakos accused some of the organizations operating on the islands, where tens of thousands of migrants are stranded after arriving from Turkey, of abusing the volatile situation to get money directly from the European Union.

      The deputy migration minister also suggested that some NGOs had incited thousands of migrants on Lesbos to hold a protest, which ended with police firing tear gas to disperse the people occupying the island capital Mytilini.

      The government began transferring refugees from the overcrowded islands to the Greek mainland last year, but an estimated 42,000 people continue to suffer in squalid and unsafe conditions in and around the island camps.

      Last week, the Greek government opened a tender for the construction of a floating barrier off Lesbos aimed at deterring migrants from crossing from the Turkish coast, which is about 10-12 kilometers away.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/22606/greece-tightens-rules-for-refugee-ngos
      #ONG #associations #NGOs

    • New request for state of emergency on #Lesvos, #Chios, #Samos

      The regional governor of the Northern Aegean, Kostas Moutzouris submitted a new call on Wednesday to declare a state of emergency on three islands, following two days of protest marches by asylum seekers demanding better living conditions and a quicker asylum procedure, and attacks by extremists in Lesvos.

      “The government was wrong to reject our request to declare a state of emergency on Lesvos, Chios and Samos. If the current situation is not an emergency, then what is?” he asked.

      “The government is imposing the creation of new migrant camps that will cost hundreds of millions and which, based on simple arithmetics, will not solve any problem – on the contrary, they will deteriorate it,” he added.

      On Tuesday, a group of about 250 asylum seekers, mostly Afghan residents of Moria, rallied outside the Municipal Theater in the island’s capital Mytilene demanding “freedom” and shouting, “Lesvos people, we are sorry.” The police intervened to prevent protesters from blocking traffic. One woman was injured in a stampede as demonstrators fled the scene to avoid possible arrest.

      On Monday riot police clashed with about 2,000 Afghan asylum seekers who tried to march to Mytilene. Reacting to the incident, residents of the village of Moria Tuesday barged into the Mytilene offices of the General Secretariat for Aegean and Island Policy demanding the closure of Moria, intensified sea patrols, and stricter monitoring of NGOs.

      Despite the tension, the government on Tuesday rejected Moutzouris’ request.

      Meanwhile, a group of about 20 youths wearing helmets and holding clubs attacked regulars at a bar in Mytilene where students and NGO employees were gathered.

      The same group roamed the town of Mytilene after midnight asking locals and foreigners to identify themselves, according to eye witnesses who talked to the police.

      Authorities believe the same individuals were in the village of Moria earlier in the afternoon checking if foreigners, asylum seekers or employees in NGOs lived or worked there.

      The masked group smashed the car of an Italian national who works for an NGO. Two asylum seekers were passengers when the incident happened.

      Police was alerted after the attacks.

      http://www.ekathimerini.com/249223/article/ekathimerini/news/new-request-for-state-of-emergency-on-lesvos-chios-samos
      #état_d'urgence

    • Crisis in Lesbos as more refugees arrive

      Greek island a ‘powder keg ready to explode’ as boat landings lead to tensions with local people.

      Greek authorities are struggling to cope with rising tension on islands where pressure from a new influx of refugees and migrants has reached a critical point.

      Friction is growing between local people and asylum seekers landing in boats from Turkey. Last week the region’s most senior official likened the situation on Lesbos to a “powder keg ready to explode”. Kostas Moutzouris, governor of the north Aegean, said: “It’s crucial that a state of emergency is called.”

      More than 42,000 men, women and children are estimated to be on Lesbos, Samos, Chios, Leros and Kos. Unable to leave because of a containment policy determined by the EU, they are forced to remain on the islands until their asylum requests are processed by a system both understaffed and overstretched.

      Aid groups have repeatedly called for the islands to be evacuated. On Friday an estimated 20,000 refugees were on Lesbos, forced to endure the grim reality of Moria, a camp designed to host 3,000 at most.

      “They are living in squalid, medieval-like conditions … with barely any access to basic services, including clean and hot water, electricity, sanitation and healthcare,” said Sophie McCann, Médecins Sans Frontières’ advocacy officer. “On a daily basis our medical teams are treating the consequential deterioration of health and wellbeing.”

      But she added that the local people had also been given short shrift. “The Lesbos community has been abandoned by its own government for almost five years to deal with the consequences of a failed reception system. Like the refugee community, it is tired.”

      As anti-immigrant sentiment has surged, vigilante groups believed to be infiltrated by supporters of the far-right Golden Dawn party have surfaced. On Friday seven men armed with wooden clubs were arrested in the hilltop village of Moria on suspicion of being members of a gang apparently linked to Golden Dawn.

      “People have seen their properties destroyed, their sheep and goats have been slaughtered, their homes broken into,” said Nikos Trakellis, a community leader. “A few years back, when there were 5,000 on the island, things seemed bad enough. Now there’s a sense that the situation has really got out of hand.”

      NGOs have also been targeted. In recent weeks cars have been vandalised. Foreigners perceived to be helping refugees have spoken of intimidation. Ciaran Carney, a volunteer filmmaker teaching refugees on the island, said: “There was a week when no one [in the NGOs] wanted to leave their flats. It definitely feels like it could explode and that no one knows what will come next.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/09/tensions-refugees-and-islanders-crisis-on-lesbos?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_G

  • Sur les #îles grecques... un nouvel #hiver...

    Winter warnings for Europe’s largest refugee camp

    ‘This year it’s worse than ever because so many people came.’

    With winter approaching, aid workers and refugee advocates on Lesvos are worried: there doesn’t appear to be a plan in place to prepare Moria – Europe’s largest refugee camp – for the rain, cold weather, and potential snow that winter will bring.

    The road leading to Moria runs along the shoreline on the Greek island of Lesvos, passing fish restaurants and a rocky beach. On sunny days, the water sparkles and dances in the 20-kilometer stretch of the Aegean Sea separating the island from the Turkish coast. But in the winter, the weather is often grey, a strong wind blows off the water, and the temperature in bitingly cold.

    Moria was built to house around 3,000 people and was already over capacity in May this year, holding around 4,500. Then, starting in July, the number of people crossing the Aegean from Turkey to Greece spiked, compared to the past three years, and the population of asylum seekers and migrants on the Greek islands exploded. Following a recent visit, the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights, Dunja Mijatovic, called the situation on the islands “explosive”.

    By the beginning of October, when TNH visited, around 13,500 people were living in Moria – the highest number ever, up to that point – and conditions were like “hell on Earth”, according to Salam Aldeen, an aid worker who has been on Lesvos since 2015 and runs an NGO called Team Humanity.

    Every year, when summer comes, the weather gets better and the number of people crossing the Aegean increases. But this year, more people have crossed than at any time since the EU and Turkey signed an agreement, known as the EU-Turkey deal, in March 2016 to curb migration from Turkey to Greece.

    So far this year, more than 47,000 people have landed on the Greek islands compared to around 32,500 all of last year – led by Afghans, accounting for nearly 40 percent of arrivals, and Syrians, around 25 percent. Even though numbers are up, they are still a far cry from the more than one million people who crossed the Aegean between the beginning of 2015 and early 2016.

    “People are going to die. It’s going to happen. You have 10,000 people in tents.”

    In Moria, the first home in Europe for many of the people who arrive to Greece, there’s a chronic shortage of toilets and showers; the quality of the food is terrible; people sleep rough outside or in cramped, flimsy tents; bed bugs, lice, scabies, and other vermin thrive in the unsanitary environment; raw sewage flows into tents; people’s mental health suffers; fights break out; there are suicide attempts, including among children; domestic violence increases; small sparks lead to fires; people have died.

    “Every year it’s like this,” Aldeen said. “[But] this year it’s worse than ever because so many people came.”

    The lack of preparation for winter is unfortunately nothing new, according to Sophie McCann an advocacy manager for medical charity Médecins Sans Frontières. “It is incredible how the Greek authorities have... completely failed to put in place any kind of system [to] manage it properly,” McCann said. “Winter is not a surprise to anyone.”

    The severe overcrowding this year will likely only make the situation in Moria even more miserable and dangerous than it has been in the past. “People are going to die,” Aldeen said. “It’s going to happen. You have 10,000 people in tents.”
    ‘A policy-made humanitarian crisis’

    Moria has been overcrowded and plagued by problems since the signing of the EU-Turkey, which requires Greece to hold people on the islands until their asylum claims can be processed – something that can take as long as two years.

    Read more → Briefing: How will Greece new asylum law affect refugees?

    “It’s very predictable what is happening,” said Efi Latsoudi, from the NGO Refugee Support Aegean, referring to the overcrowding and terrible conditions this year.

    RSA released a report in June calling the situation on the islands “a policy-made humanitarian crisis” stemming from “the status quo put in place by the EU-Turkey [deal]”. The report predicted that Greece’s migration reception system “would not manage to absorb a sudden and significant increase in refugee arrivals”, which is exactly what happened this summer.

    “It’s very predictable what is happening.”

    According to the report, Greek authorities have failed to adopt a comprehensive and proactive strategy for dealing with the reality of ongoing migration across the Aegean. Bureaucratic deficiencies, political expediency, a lack of financial transparency and the broader EU priority of reducing migration have also contributed to the “structural failure” of Greece’s migration reception system, it says.

    As a result, Moria today looks more like a chaotic settlement on the edge of a war zone than an organised reception centre in a European country that has received almost $2.5 billion in funding from the EU since 2015 to support its response to migration.
    Tents a luxury for new arrivals

    Inside the barbed wire fences of the official camp, people are housed in trailer-like containers, each one holding four or five families. Outside, there is a sea of tents filling up the olive groves surrounding the camp. The more permanent tents are basic wooden structures covered in tarps bearing the logos of various organisations – the UN’s refugee agency, European Humanitarian Aid, the Greek Red Cross.

    Newer arrivals have been given small, brightly coloured camping tents as temporary shelters that aren’t waterproof or winterised. These are scattered, seemingly at random, between the olive trees, and even these appear to be a luxury for the newly arrived.

    Most of the asylum seekers TNH spoke to said they spent days or weeks sleeping outside before they were given a tent.

    Large mounds of blue and black garbage bags are piled up along the main arteries of Moria. The air stinks of the garbage and is thickened by cooking smoke laced with plastic. Portable toilets with thin streams of liquid trickling out from under them line the edge of one road.

    Hundreds of children wander around in small clusters. A mother hunches over her small daughter, picking lice from her hair. Other women squat on their heels and plunge their arms into basins of soapy water, washing clothes. Hundreds of clothes lines criss-cross between trees and blankets, and clothing is draped over fences and tree branches to dry. A tangle of electrical wires from a makeshift grid runs haywire between the tents. A faulty connection or errant spark could lead to a blaze.

    Drainage ditches and small berms have been dug in preparation for rain.

    There are people everywhere: carrying fishing poles that they take to the sea to catch extra food; bending to pray between the trees; resting in their tents; collecting dry tree branches to build cooking fires; baking bread in homemade clay ovens dug into the dirt; jostling and whittling away time in the hours-long food line; wandering off on their own for a moment’s respite.
    ‘Little by little, I’ll die’

    “Staying in this place is making us crazy,” said Hussain, a 15-year-old Afghan asylum seeker. An amateur guitarist in Afghanistan, he was threatened by the Taliban for his music playing and fled with his family, but was separated from them while crossing the border from Iran to Turkey. “The situation [in Moria] is not good,” he said. “Every[body has] stress here. They want to leave… because it is not a good place for a child, for anyone.”

    “The situation here is hard,” said Mohammad, an Iraqi asylum seeker who has been in the camp with his pregnant wife since the end of July. “It’s harder than it is in Iraq.”

    “[My wife] is going to have a baby. Is she going to have it here?” Mohammad continued. “Where will [the baby] live? When they child comes, it’s one day old and we’re going to keep it in a tent? This isn’t possible. But if you return to Iraq, what will happen?”

    “If I go back to Iraq, I’ll die.” Mohammad said, answering his own question. “[But] if I stay here I’ll die… Right now, I won’t die. But little by little, I’ll die.”
    More arrivals than relocations

    People have been dying in Moria almost since the camp began operating. In November 2016, a 66-year-old woman and her six-year-old granddaughter were killed when a cooking gas container exploded, setting a section of the camp ablaze. In January 2017, three people died in one week due to cold weather. And in January this year, another man died during a cold snap.

    At the end of September, shortly before TNH’s visit, a toddler playing in a cardboard box was run over by a garbage truck outside of Moria. A few days later a fire broke out killing a woman and sparking angry protests over the dismal living conditions.

    Greece’s centre-right government, which took office in July, responded to the deaths and protests in Moria by overhauling the country’s asylum system to accelerate the processing of applications, cutting out a number of protections along the way, promising to return more people to Turkey under the terms of the EU-Turkey deal and pledging to rapidly decongest the islands by moving 20,000 people to the mainland by the end of the year.

    As of 12 November, just over 8,000 people have been transported from the islands to the mainland by the Greek government since the fire. Over the same period of time, nearly 11,000 people arrived by sea, and the population of Moria has continued to grow, reaching around 15,000.

    With winter rapidly approaching, the situation on the islands is only growing more desperate, and there’s no end in sight.

    Transfers to the mainland won’t be able to solve the problem, according to Latsoudi from RSA. There simply aren’t enough reception spaces to accommodate all of the people who need to be moved, and the ones that do exist are often in remote areas, lack facilities, and will also be hit by harsh winter weather.

    “[The] mainland is totally unprepared to receive people,” Latsoudi said. “It’s not a real solution… The problems are still there [in Moria] and other problems are created all over Greece.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2019/11/14/Greece-Moria-winter-refugees
    #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #réfugiés #asile #Grèce #île #Lesbos #Moria #froid

  • Letters to the world from Moria hotspot

    The first letter :

    “Put yourself in our shoes! We are not safe in Moria. We didn’t escape from our homelands to stay hidden and trapped. We didn’t pass the borders and played with our lifes to live in fear and danger.

    Put yourself in our shoes! Can you live in a place , that you can not walk alone even when you just want to go the toilette. Can you live in a place, where there are hundreds of unaccompanied minors that no one can stop attempting suicides. That no one stops them from drinking.

    No one can go out after 9:00 pm because the thieves will steal anything you have and if you don’t give them what they want, they will hurt you. We should go to the police? We went alot and they just tell that we should find the thief by ourselves. They say: ‘We can not do anything for you.’ In a camp of 14.000 refugees you won’t see anyone to protect us anywhere even at midnight. Two days ago there was a big fight, but util it finished no one came for help. Many tents burned. When the people went to complain, no one cared and and even the police told us: ‘This is your own problem.’

    In this situation the first thing that comes to my mind to tell you is, we didn’t come here to Europe for money, and not for becoming a European citizen. It was just to breathe a day in peace.

    Instead, hundreds of minors here became addicted, but no one cares.

    Five human beings burned, but no one cares.

    Thousands of children didn’t undergo vaccination, but no one cares.

    I am writing to you to share and I am hoping for change…”

    http://infomobile.w2eu.net/2019/10/23/letter-to-the-world-1-from-moria-hotspot

    Les 3 autres sur le site infomobile :
    http://infomobile.w2eu.net/2019/10/27/letter-to-the-world-from-moria-no-2
    http://infomobile.w2eu.net/2019/10/27/letter-to-the-world-from-moria-no-3
    http://infomobile.w2eu.net/2019/10/27/letter-to-the-world-from-moria-no-4

    Et la traduction en italien des lettres sur le site Meltingpot :
    https://www.meltingpot.org/Lettera-al-mondo-dal-campo-profughi-di-Moria-sull-isola.html

    #Moria #lettre #lettres #asile #migrations #hotspot #réfugiés #Grèce #îles #témoignage

  • Migranti, incendio e rivolta nel campo di Lesbo: muoiono una donna e un bambino, 15 feriti

    Scontri con la polizia nel campo dove sono ospitati 13mila migranti a fronte di una capienza di 3mila.

    Tragedia nel campo profughi di Lesbo dove la situazione era già insostenibile da mesi con oltre 13.000 persone in una struttura che ne può ospitare 3500. Una donna e un bambino sono morti nell’incendio (sembra accidentale) di un container dove abitano diverse famiglie ma le vittime potrebbero essere di più. Una quindicina i feriti che sono stati curati nella clinica pediatrica che Medici senza frontiere ha fuori dal campo e che è stata aperta eccezionalmente.

    «Nessuno può dire che questo è un incidente - è la dura accusa di Msf - E’ la diretta conseguenza di intrappolare 13.000 persone in uno spazio che ne può contenere 3.000».

    Dopo l’incendio nel campo è esplosa una vera e propria rivolta con i migranti, costretti a vivere in condizioni disumane, che hanno dato vita a duri scontri con la polizia e hanno appiccato altri incendi all’interno e all’esterno del campo di Moria, chiedendo a gran voce di essere trasferiti sulla terraferma. Ancora confuse le notizie che arrivano dall’isola greca dove negli ultimi mesi gli sbarchi di migranti provenienti dalla Turchia sono aumentati in maniera esponenziale.

    https://www.repubblica.it/cronaca/2019/09/29/news/incendio_e_rivolta_nel_campo_di_moria_a_lesbo_muoiono_una_donna_e_un_bamb
    #Moria #révolte #incendie #feu #Lesbos #Grèce #réfugiés #asile #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #hotspot #camp_de_réfugiés #îles #décès #morts

    • Μία γυναίκα νεκρή και ένα μωρό από τις αναθυμιάσεις στη Μόρια

      Φωτιά ξέσπασε το απόγευμα σε κοντέινερ στο ΚΥΤ Μόριας, με τις μέχρι τώρα πληροφορίες μια γυναίκα είναι νεκρή και ένα μωρό.

      Μετά τη φωτιά στο κοντέινερ, ξέσπασε εξέγερση. Η πυροσβεστική μπήκε να σβήσει τη φωτιά, ενώ αρχικά εμποδίστηκε από τα επεισόδια η αστυνομία αυτή τη στιγμή προσπαθεί να παρέμβει.

      Νεότερα εντός ολίγου.

      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/4319/mia-gynaika-nekrh-kai-ena-mwro-apo-tis-anathymiaseis-sth-moria-updated

    • Fire, clashes, one dead at crowded Greek migrant camp on Lesbos

      A fire broke out on Sunday at a container inside a crowded refugee camp on the eastern Greek island of Lesbos close to Turkey and one person was killed, emergency services said.

      Refugees clashed with police as thick smoke rose over the Moria camp, which currently houses about 12,000 people in overcrowded conditions and firefighters fought to extinguish the blaze.

      Police said one burned body was taken to hospital in the island’s capital Mytilini for identification by the coroner. Police sent reinforcements to the island along with the chief of police to help restore order.

      Police could not immediately reach an area of containers, where there were unconfirmed reports of another burned body.

      Greece has been dealing with a resurgence in refugee and migrant flows in recent weeks from neighboring Turkey. Nearly a million refugees fleeing war in Syria and migrants crossed from Turkey to Greece’s islands in 2015.

      More than 9,000 people arrived in August, the highest number in the three years since the European Union and Ankara implemented a deal to shut off the Aegean migrant route. More than 8,000 people have arrived so far in September.

      Turks have also attempted to cross to Greece in recent years following a failed coup attempt against Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan in 2016.

      On Friday seven Turkish nationals, two women and five children, drowned when a boat carrying them capsized near Greece’s Chios island.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-greece-lesbos-moria/fire-clashes-at-crowded-migrant-camp-on-greek-island-lesbos-idUSKBN1WE0NJ

    • Incendio nel campo rifugiati di Moria. Amnesty: “Abbietto fallimento delle politiche di protezione del governo greco e dell’Ue”

      Incendio nel campo rifugiati di Moria. Amnesty International denuncia: “Abbietto fallimento delle politiche di protezione del governo greco e dell’Ue”

      “L’incendio di Moria ha evidenziato l’abietto fallimento del governo greco e dell’Unione europea, incapaci di gestire la deplorevole situazione dei rifugiati in Grecia“.

      Così Massimo Moratti, direttore delle ricerche sull’Europa di Amnesty International, ha commentato la notizia dell’incendio di domenica 29 settembre nel campo rifugiati di Moria, sull’isola greca di Lesbo, nel quale è morta una donna.

      “Con 12.503 persone presenti in un campo che potrebbe ospitarne 3000 e dati gli incendi già scoppiati nel campo, le autorità greche non possono sostenere che questa tragedia fosse inevitabile. Solo un mese fa erano morte altre tre persone“, ha aggiunto Moratti.

      “L’accordo tra Unione europea e Turchia ha solo peggiorato le cose, negando dignità a migliaia di persone intrappolate sulle isole dell’Egeo e violando i loro diritti“, ha sottolineato Moratti.

      “Il campo di Moria è sovraffollato e insicuro. Le autorità greche devono immediatamente evacuarlo, assistere, anche fornendo le cure mediche necessarie, le persone che hanno subito le conseguenze dell’incendio e accelerare il trasferimento dei richiedenti asilo e dei rifugiati in strutture adeguate in terraferma. Gli altri stati membri dell’Unione europea devono collaborare accettando urgentemente i programmi di ricollocazione che potrebbero ridurre la pressione sulla Grecia“, ha concluso Moratti.

      Ulteriori informazioni

      Nelle ultime settimane, Amnesty International ha riscontrato un drammatico peggioramento delle condizioni dei rifugiati sulle isole dell’Egeo, nelle quali si trovano ormai oltre 30.000 persone.

      Il sovraffollamento ha raggiunto il livello peggiore dal 2016. Le isole di Lesbo e Samo ospitano un numero di persone superiore rispettivamente di quattro e otto volte i posti a disposizione.

      La situazione dei minori è, a sua volta, drasticamente peggiorata. La morte di un afgano di 15 anni nella cosiddetta “zona sicura” del campo di Moria testimonia la fondamentale mancanza di sicurezza per le migliaia di minori costretti a vivere in quel centro.

      All’inizio di settembre il governo greco ha annunciato l’inizio dei trasferimenti dei richiedenti asilo e dei rifugiati sulla terraferma. Questi trasferimenti, effettuati in cooperazione con l’Organizzazione internazionale delle migrazioni, si sono rivelati finora una serie di iniziative frammentarie.

      All’indomani dell’incendio di Moria le autorità di Atene hanno espresso l’intenzione di arrivare a 3000 trasferimenti entro la fine di ottobre: un numero insufficiente a fare fronte all’aumento degli approdi da luglio, considerando che solo la settimana scorsa sono arrivate altre 3000 persone.

      La politica di trattenimento dei nuovi arrivati sulle isole dell’Egeo resta dunque immutata, poiché le misure adottate sono clamorosamente insufficienti a risolvere i problemi dell’insicurezza e delle condizioni indegne cui i richiedenti asilo e i rifugiati sono stati condannati a convivere a partire dall’attuazione dell’accordo tra Unione europea e Turchia.

      https://www.amnesty.it/incendio-campo-rifugiati-moria-grecia

    • This was not an accident!

      They died because of Europe’s cruel deterrence and detention regime!

      Yesterday, on Sunday 29 September 2019, a fire broke out in the so-called hotspot of Moria on Lesvos Island in Greece. A woman and probably also a child lost their lives in the fire and it remains unclear how many others were injured. Many people lost all their small belongings, including identity documents, in the fire. The people imprisoned on Lesvos have fled wars and conflicts and now experience violence within Europe. Many were re-traumatised by these tragic events and some escaped and spent the night in the forest, scared to death.

      Over the past weeks, we had to witness two more deaths in the hotspot of Moria: In August a 15-year-old Afghan minor was killed during a violent fight among minors inside the so-called “safe space” of the camp. On September 24, a 5-year-old boy lost his life when he was run-over by a truck in front of the gate.

      The fire yesterday was no surprise and no accident. It is not the first, and it will not be the last. The hotspot burned already several times, most tragically in November 2016 when large parts burned down. Europe’s cruel regime of deterrence and detention has now killed again.

      In the meantime, in the media, a story was immediately invented, saying that the refugees themselves set the camp on fire. It was also stated that they blocked the fire brigade from entering. We have spoken to many people who witnessed the events directly. They tell us a very different story: In fact, the fire broke out most probably due to an electricity short circuit. The fire brigade arrived very late, which is no surprise given the overcrowdedness of this monstrous hotspot. Despite its official capacity for 3,000 people, it now detains at least 12,500 people who suffer there in horrible living conditions. On mobile phone videos taken by the prisoners of the camp, one can see how in this chaos, inhabitants and the fire brigade tried their best together to at least prevent an even bigger catastrophe.

      There simply cannot be a functioning emergency plan in a camp that has exceeded its capacity four times. When several containers burned in a huge fire that generated a lot of smoke, the imprisoned who were locked in the closed sector of the camp started in panic to try to break the doors. The only response the authorities had, was to immediately bring police to shoot tear-gas at them, which created an even more toxic smoke.

      Anger and grief about all these senseless deaths and injuries added to the already explosive atmosphere in Moria where thousands have suffered while waiting too long for any change in their lives. Those who criminalise and condemn this outcry in form of a riot of the people of Moria cannot even imagine the sheer inhumanity they experience daily. The real violence is the camp itself, conditions that are the result of the EU border regime’s desire for deterrence.

      We raise our voices in solidarity with the people of Moria and demand once again: The only possibility to end this suffering and dying is to open the islands and to have freedom of movement for everybody. Those who arrive on the islands have to continue their journeys to hopefully find a place of safety and dignity elsewhere. We demand ferries to transfer the exhausted and re-traumatised people immediately to the Greek mainland. We need ferries not Frontex. We need open borders, so that everyone can continue to move on, even beyond Greece. Those who escape the islands should not be imprisoned once more in camps in mainland Greece, with conditions that are the same as the ones here on the islands.

      Close down Moria!

      Open the islands!

      Freedom of Movement for everyone!

      http://lesvos.w2eu.net/2019/09/30/this-was-not-an-accident

    • Grèce : quand s’embrase le plus grand camp de réfugiés d’Europe

      Sur l’île de Lesbos, le camp de Moria accueille 13 000 personnes dans des installations prévues pour 3000. Un incendie y a fait au moins deux morts et a déclenché un début d’"émeutes dimanche. En Autriche, les Verts créent la sensation aux législatives alors que l’extrême-droite perd 10 points.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/revue-de-presse-internationale/la-revue-de-presse-internationale-emission-du-lundi-30-septembre-2019

    • Riots at Greek refugee camp on Lesbos after fatal fire

      Government says it will step up transfers to the mainland after unrest at overcrowded camp.
      Greek authorities are scrambling to deal with unrest at a heavily overcrowded migrant camp on Lesbos after a fire there left at least one person dead.

      Officials said they had found the charred remains of an Afghan woman after the blaze erupted inside a container used to house refugees at the Moria reception centre on Sunday. The fire was eventually extinguished by plane.

      More than 13,000 people are now crammed into tents and shipping containers with facilities for just 3,000 at Moria, a disused military barracks outside Mytilene, the island’s capital, where tensions are rising.

      “A charred body was found, causing foreign [migrants] to rebel,” said Lefteris Economou, Greece’s deputy minister for citizen protection. “Stones and other objects were hurled, damaging three fire engines and slightly injuring four policemen and a fireman.”

      The health ministry said 19 people including four children were injured, most of them in the clashes. There were separate claims that a child died with the Afghan woman.

      Greece’s centre-right government said it would immediately step up transfers to the mainland. The camp is four times over capacity. “By the end of Monday 250 people will have been moved,” Economou said.

      Like other Aegean isles near the Turkish coast, Lesbos has witnessed a sharp rise in arrivals of asylum seekers desperate to reach Europe in recent months.

      “The situation was totally out of control,” said the local police chief, Vasillis Rodopoulos, describing the melee sparked by the fire. “Their behaviour was very aggressive, they wouldn’t let the fire engines pass to put out the blaze, and for the first time they were shouting: kill police.”

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ed39991b42492c24aba4f85e701b66e48521375c/0_178_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=356be51355ebcb04a111f2

      But NGO workers on Lesbos said the chaos reflected growing frustration among the camp’s occupants. There have been several fires at the facility since the EU struck a deal with Turkey in 2016 to stem the flow of migrants. A woman and child died in a similar blaze three years ago.

      “No one can call the fire and these deaths an accident,” said Marco Sandrone, a field officer with Médecins Sans Frontières. “This tragedy is the direct result of a brutal policy that is trapping 13,000 people in a camp made for 3,000.

      “European and Greek authorities who continue to contain these people in these conditions have a responsibility in the repetition of these dramatic episodes. It is high time to stop the EU-Turkey deal and this inhumane policy of containment. People must be urgently evacuated out of the hell that Moria has become.”

      Greece currently hosts around 85,000 refugees, mostly from Syria although recent arrivals have also been from Afghanistan and Africa. Close to 35,000 have arrived this year, outstripping the numbers in Italy and Spain.

      It is a critical issue for the prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, who won office two months ago promising to crack down on migration.
      Aid workers warn of catastrophe in Greek refugee camps
      Read more

      Mitsotakis raised the matter with Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, on the sidelines of the UN general assembly in New York last week, and Greece’s migration minister and the head of the coastguard will fly to Turkey for talks this week.

      Ministers admit the island camps can no longer deal with the rise in numbers.

      Government spokesman Stelios Petsas announced that a cabinet meeting called to debate emergency measures had on Monday decided to radically increase the number of deportations of asylum seekers whose requests are rejected.

      “There will be an increase in returns [to Turkey],” he said. “From 1,806 returned in 4.5 years under the previous Syriza government, 10,000 will be returned by the end of 2020.”

      Closed detention centres would also be established for those who had illegally entered the EU member state and did not qualify for asylum, he added.

      However, Spyros Galinos, until recently the mayor of Lesbos, who held the post when close to a million Syrian refugees landed on the island, told the Guardian: “This is a bomb that will explode. Decongestion efforts aren’t enough. You move more to the mainland and others come. It’s a cycle that will continue repeating itself with devastating effect until the big explosion comes.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/sep/30/riots-at-greek-refugee-camp-on-lesbos-after-fatal-fire

    • Grèce : incendie meurtrier à Moria suivi d’émeutes

      Au moins une personne a péri dans un incendie survenu dimanche dans le camp surpeuplé de Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos. Ce drame a été suivi d’émeutes provoquées par la colère des habitants du camp, excédés par leurs conditions de vie indignes.

      Un incendie survenu, dimanche 29 septembre, au sein du camp de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce a fait au moins un mort parmi les habitants. "Nous n’avons qu’une personne morte confirmée pour l’instant", a déclaré le ministre adjoint à la protection civile Lefteris Oikonomou, lundi. La veille, plusieurs sources ont indiqué que la victime était décédée avec son enfant portant le nombre de décès à au moins deux.

      Selon les médias grecs, une couverture brûlée retrouvée à côté de la femme morte, contiendrait des résidus de peau qui pourraient appartenir à l’enfant de la défunte, un nouveau-né. Des examens médico-légaux sont en cours.

      Selon l’Agence de presse grecque ANA, citant des sources policières, la femme a été transportée à l’hôpital de Lesbos, tandis que l’enfant a été remis aux autorités par les migrants qui l’avait recouvert d’une couverture. Un correspondant de l’AFP a confirmé avoir vu deux corps, l’un transporté au bureau de l’ONG Médecins sans frontières (MSF), l’autre devant lequel “sanglotaient des proches”.

      Il a fallu, d’après un témoin cité par l’AFP, plus de 30 minutes pour éteindre l’incendie et les pompier ont tardé à arriver. C’est un avion bombardier d’eau qui a permis de stopper le brasier qui aurait démarré dans un petit commerce ambulant avant de s’étendre aux conteneurs d’habitation voisins.

      Dans un communiqué, la police fait état de deux incendies, le premier à l’extérieur du camp, puis un autre à l’intérieur, à 20 minutes d’intervalle. Les émeutes ont débuté juste après que le second feu s’est déclaré.
      "Six ou sept conteneurs [hébergeant des migrants] étaient en flammes. On a appelé les pompiers qui sont arrivés après 20 minutes. On s’est mis en colère", a déclaré Fedouz, 15 ans, interrogé par l’AFP. Le jeune Afghan affirme avoir trouvé deux enfants “complètement carbonisés et une femme morte” en voulant essayer, avec ses proches, d’aider les personnes qui se trouvaient dans les conteneurs.

      Afin de reprendre le contrôle sur la foule en colère à cause de la lenteur des secours, la police a tiré des gaz lacrymogènes. Peu après 23h locales (20h GMT), le camp avait retrouvé son calme, selon des sources policières.

      Plus de 20 blessés dans les émeutes soignés par MSF

      “Nous sommes outrés”, a réagi Marco Sandrone, le coordinateur de Médecins sans frontières (MSF) en Grèce. “L’équipe médicale de notre clinique située juste à l’extérieur du camp a porté secours à au moins 15 personnes blessées à la suite des émeutes entre les migrants et la police, juste après l’incendie.” L’ONG a ensuite revu le nombre de patients à la hausse indiquant que 21 personnes avaient été prises en charge dans leur clinique.

      Pour Marco Sandrone cet incendie et ces émeutes n’ont rien d’un banal incident. “Cette tragédie est le résultat d’une politique brutale qui piègent 13 000 migrants dans un camp qui ne peut en accueillir que 3 000. Les autorités européennes et grecques qui maintiennent ces personnes dans ces conditions de vie ont une part de responsabilité dans ce genre d’épisode”, a-t-il déclaré.

      Moria est le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe. La Grèce compte actuellement 70 000 migrants, principalement des réfugiés syriens, qui ont fui leur pays depuis 2015 et risqué la traversée depuis les côtes turques voisines.

      Le gouvernement grec doit se pencher, à compter de lundi, sur une modernisation de la procédure d’asile afin d’essayer de désengorger ses camps de migrants. En vertu d’un accord conclu au printemps 2016 entre la Turquie et l’Union européenne, la Turquie avait mis un frein aux flux des départs de migrants vers les cinq îles grecques les plus proches de son rivage, en échange d’une aide de six milliards de dollars. Mais le nombre des arrivées en grèce est reparti à la hausse ces derniers mois.

      Quelque 3 000 migrants arrivés dans les îles grecques cette semaine

      Ainsi, en seulement 24 heures, entre samedi matin et dimanche matin, près de 400 migrants au total sont arrivés en Grèce, selon les autorités. En outre, le Premier ministre grec Kyriakos Mitsotakis a déclaré plus tôt cette semaine qu’environ 3 000 personnes étaient arrivées depuis la Turquie ces dernier jours, ce qui ajoute à la pression sur des installations d’accueil déjà surpeuplées.

      Début septembre, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan, dont le pays accueille près de quatre millions de réfugiés, a menacé "d’ouvrir les portes" aux migrants vers l’Union européenne s’il n’obtient pas davantage d’aide internationale.

      “Il est grand temps d’arrêter cet accord entre la Grèce et la Turquie ainsi que cette politique de rétention des migrants dans les camps. Il faut évacuer d’urgence les personnes de cet enfer qu’est devenu Moria”, a commenté Marco Sandrone de MSF.

      Le gouvernement grec, pour sa part, a réitéré la nécessité de continuer à transférer vers le continent les migrants hébergés dans les centres d’enregistrement et d’identification sur les îles du nord de la mer Égée.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19850/grece-incendie-meurtrier-a-moria-suivi-d-emeutes

    • “Il y a au moins 500 manifestants en ce moment dans le camp de Moria, la police anti-émeute est sur place”

      InfoMigrants a recueilli le témoignage d’un habitant du camp de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce au lendemain d’un incendie meurtrier et d’émeutes survenus dimanche 30 septembre. Les manifestations ont repris mardi et la situation semble se tendre d’heure en heure.

      Je m’appelle Lionel*, je viens d’Afrique de l’Ouest* et je vis dans le camp de Moria depuis le mois de mai. Depuis un mois, des vagues de nouvelles personnes se succèdent, la situation se dégrade de jour en jour. Ce sont surtout des gens qui arrivent depuis la Turquie. Il paraît que le gouvernement turc laisse de nouveau passer des gens à la frontière malgré l’accord [qui a été signé avec l’Union européenne au printemps 2016].

      Il y a eu un grave incendie suivi d’émeutes dimanche. J’habite juste en face de là où le feu a démarré. Les autorités disent qu’il y a eu un mort mais nous on en a vu plus.

      Hier soir [lundi], des personnes ont organisé une veillée musulmane sur les lieux de l’incendie en hommage aux victimes. Il y avait des bougies, c’était plutôt calme.

      Depuis ce matin, les Afghans, Irakiens et Syriens se sont mis à manifester en face de l’entrée principale du camp. Ils protestent contre les conditions de vie qui sont horribles ici. Ils veulent également transporter, eux-mêmes, le corps d’une autre victime de l’incendie jusqu’à Mytilène pour montrer à la population et aux dirigeants ce qu’il se passe ici.

      Il doit y avoir au moins 500 personnes rassemblées. La police anti-émeute est sur place et empêche les manifestants de sortir du camp pour porter le corps jusqu’à Mytilène. Un autre bus de policiers est arrivé ce matin mais en revanche, personne ne se soucie de comment on va.

      Moi j’ai trop peur que ça dégénère encore plus alors j’ai quitté le camp. Je fais les cent pas à l’écart pour rester en dehors des problèmes et pour me protéger. On ne sait pas ce qui va arriver, j’ai peur et cette situation est très frustrante.

      « Le matin, on part se cacher dans les oliviers pour rester à l’écart de la foule »

      Tous les matins, on doit se lever à 5h pour aller faire la queue et espérer avoir quelque chose à boire ou à manger. Après le petit-déjeuner, on part se cacher et s’abriter dans les oliviers pour rester à l’écart de la foule. Il y a tellement de gens que l’air est devenu irrespirable dans le camp.

      Je retourne dans ma tente en fin d’après-midi et j’essaie de dormir pour pouvoir me lever le plus tôt possible le matin, sinon je n’aurai pas à manger.

      On ne nous dit rien, la situation est désastreuse, je dirais même que je n’ai pas connu pire depuis mon arrivée à Moria il y a près de cinq mois. J’ai fait une demande d’asile mais je me sens totalement piégé ici et je ne vois pas comment je vais m’en sortir à moins d’un miracle.

      Au final, la situation est presque semblable à celle de mon pays d’origine. La seule différence, c’est qu’il n’y a pas les coups de feu. Ils sont remplacés par les tirs de gaz lacrymogènes de la police grecque. Cela me déclenche des flashback, c’est traumatisant.

      * Le prénom et le pays d’origine ont été changés à la demande du témoin, par souci de sécurité.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19879/il-y-a-au-moins-500-manifestants-en-ce-moment-dans-le-camp-de-moria-la

    • Greece must act to end dangerous overcrowding in island reception centres, EU support crucial

      This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Liz Throssell – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

      UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is today calling on Greece to urgently move thousands of asylum-seekers out of dangerously overcrowded reception centres on the Greek Aegean islands. Sea arrivals in September, mostly of Afghan and Syrian families, increased to 10,258 - the highest monthly level since 2016 – worsening conditions on the islands which now host 30,000 asylum-seekers.

      The situation on Lesvos, Samos and Kos is critical. The Moria centre on Lesvos is already at five times its capacity with 12,600 people. At a nearby informal settlement, 100 people share a single toilet. Tensions remain high at Moria where a fire on Sunday in a container used to house people killed one woman. An ensuing riot by frustrated asylum-seekers led to clashes with police.

      On Samos, the Vathy reception centre houses 5,500 people – eight times its capacity. Most sleep in tents with little access to latrines, clean water, or medical care. Conditions have also deteriorated sharply on Kos, where 3,000 people are staying in a space for 700.

      Keeping people on the islands in these inadequate and insecure conditions is inhumane and must come to an end.

      The Greek Government has said that alleviating pressure on the islands and protecting unaccompanied children are priorities, which we welcome. We also take note of government measures to speed up and tighten asylum procedures and manage flows to Greece announced at an exceptional cabinet meeting on Monday. We look forward to receiving details in writing to which we can provide comments.

      But urgent steps are needed and we urge the Greek authorities to fast-track plans to transfer over 5,000 asylum-seekers already authorized to continue their asylum procedure on the mainland. In parallel, new accommodation places must be provided to prevent pressure from the islands spilling over into mainland Greece, where most sites are operating at capacity. UNHCR will continue to support transfers to the mainland in October at the request of the government.

      Longer-term solutions are also needed, including supporting refugees to become self-reliant and integrate in Greece.

      The plight of unaccompanied children, who overall number more than 4,400, is particularly worrying, with only one in four in a shelter appropriate for their age.

      Some 500 children are housed with unrelated adults in a large warehouse tent in Moria. On Samos, more than a dozen unaccompanied girls take turns to sleep in a small container, while other children are forced to sleep on container roofs. Given the extremely risky and potentially abusive conditions faced by unaccompanied children, UNHCR appeals to European States to open up places for their relocation as a matter of priority and speed up transfers for children eligible to join family members.

      UNHCR continues to work with the Greek authorities to build the capacity needed to meet the challenges. We manage over 25,000 apartment places for some of the most vulnerable asylum-seekers and refugees, under the EU-funded ESTIA scheme. Some 75,000 people receive monthly cash assistance under the same programme. UNHCR is prepared, with the continuous support of the EU and other donors, to expand its support through a cash for shelter scheme which would allow authorized asylum-seekers to move from the islands and establish themselves on the mainland.

      Greece has received the majority of arrivals across the Mediterranean region this year, some 45,600 of 77,400 – more than Spain, Italy, Malta, and Cyprus combined.

      https://www.unhcr.org/news/briefing/2019/10/5d930c194/greece-must-act-end-dangerous-overcrowding-island-reception-centres-eu.html

    • Migration : Lesbos, un #échec européen

      Plus de 45 000 personnes ont débarqué en Grèce, en 2019. Au centre de la crise migratoire européenne depuis 2015, l’île de Lesbos est au bord de la rupture.
      Le terrain, un ancien centre militaire, est accidenté de toutes parts. Entre ses terrassements qu’ont recouverts des rangées de tentes et de conteneurs, des dénivelés abrupts. Sur les quelques pentes goudronnées, des grappes d’enfants dévalent en glissant sur des bouteilles de plastique aplaties. Leurs visages sont salis par la poussière que soulèvent des bourrasques de vent dans les oliveraies alentours. Ils courent partout, se faufilent à travers des grilles métalliques éventrées ici et là, et disparaissent en un mouvement. On les croirait seuls.

      Vue du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, le 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Ici, l’un s’est accroupi pour uriner, à la vue de tous. Un autre joue à plonger ses mains dans la boue formée au sol par un mélange d’eau sale et de terre. D’autres se jettent des cailloux. Alors que le jour est tombé, une gamine erre au hasard des allées étroites, dessinées par l’implantation anarchique de cabanes de fortune. Les flammes des fours à pain, faits de pierres et de terre séchée, éclairent par endroits la nuit qui a enveloppé Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos.

      Article réservé à nos abonnés Lire aussi
      Migrants : A Bruxelles, un débat miné par l’égoïsme des Etats
      Un moment, à jauger le plus grand camp d’Europe, à détailler ses barbelés, sa crasse et le dénuement de ses 13 000 habitants – dont 40 % d’enfants –, on se croirait projetés quatre-vingts ans en arrière, dans les camps d’internement des réfugiés espagnols lors de la Retirada [l’exode de milliers de républicains espagnols durant la guerre civile, de 1936 à 1939]. Ici, les gens balayent les pierres devant leur tente pour sauvegarder ce qui leur reste d’hygiène, d’intimité. Depuis cet été, ils arrivent par centaines tous les jours, après avoir traversé en rafiot lesquelques kilomètres de mer Egée qui séparent Lesbos de la Turquie. Ce sont des familles afghanes, en majorité, qui demandent l’asile en Europe. Mais viennent aussi des Syriens, des Congolais, des Irakiens, des Palestiniens…

      « Ceci n’est pas une crise »

      Au fur et à mesure que les heures passent, les nouveaux venus apprennent qu’ils devront se contenter d’une toile de tente et d’un sol dur pour abri, qu’il n’y a pas assez de couvertures pour tous, qu’il faut faire la queue deux heures pour obtenir une ration alimentaire et que plusieurs centaines d’entre elles viennent à manquer tous les jours… Très vite, à parler avec les anciens, ils réalisent que beaucoup endurent cette situation depuis plus d’un an, en attendant de voir leur demande d’asile enfin examinée et d’être peut-être autorisés à rejoindre le continent grec.

      Lire aussi
      En Grèce, dans l’enfer du camp de réfugiés de Moria, en BD
      Plus de 45 000 personnes ont afflué en Grèce, en 2019, dont plus de la moitié entre juillet et septembre. « Ceci n’est pas une crise », répète Frontex, l’agence européenne de gardes frontières et de gardes-côtes, présente dans cette porte d’entrée en Europe. Les chiffres ne sont en effet guère comparables avec 2015, quand plus de 860 000 personnes sont arrivées sur les rivages grecs, provoquant une crise majeure dans toute l’Europe.

      C’est fin 2015 que le « hot spot » de Moria, nom donné à ces centres d’accueil contrôlés pour demandeurs d’asile, a été créé. D’autres centres de transit sont apparus sur les îles grecques de Chios, Samos, Leros, Kos ainsi qu’en Italie. Face à la « crise », l’Europe cherchait à s’armer. Dans les « hot spots », les personnes migrantes sont identifiées, enregistrées, et leur situation examinée. Aux réfugiés, l’asile. Aux autres, le retour vers des territoires hors de l’Union européenne (UE).

      L’accord UE-Turquie

      Pour soulager les pays d’entrée, un programme temporaire de relocalisations a été mis en place pour permettre de transférer une partie des réfugiés vers d’autres Etats membres. Une façon de mettre en musique une solidarité européenne de circonstance, sans toucher au sacro-saint règlement de Dublin qui fait de l’Etat d’entrée en Europe le seul responsable de l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un réfugié.

      Dans la foulée, en mars 2016, l’accord UE-Turquie prévoyait qu’Ankara renforce le contrôle de ses frontières et accepte le renvoi rapide de demandeurs d’asile arrivés sur les îles grecques, en contrepartie, notamment, d’un versement de 6 milliards d’euros et d’une relance du processus d’adhésion à l’UE.

      Quatre années se sont écoulées depuis le pic de la crise migratoire et ses cortèges de migrants traversant l’Europe à pied, le long de la route des Balkans, jusqu’à l’eldorado allemand. Si les flux d’arrivées en Europe ont considérablement chuté, Lesbos incarne plus que jamais l’échec du continent face aux phénomènes migratoires.

      Le mécanisme de relocalisation, une lointaine chimère

      Sur les 100 000 relocalisations programmées depuis l’Italie et la Grèce, à peine 34 000 ont eu lieu. « Les Etats n’ont pas joué le jeu », analyse Yves Pascouau, fondateur du site European Migration Law. Plusieurs pays (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie, Autriche, Bulgarie) n’ont pas du tout participé à l’effort. Seuls Malte, le Luxembourg et la Finlande ont atteint leur quota. « Il y a aussi eu des difficultés techniques et organisationnelles liées à un processus nouveau », reconnaît M. Pascouau.

      L’ONG Lighthouse Relief accueille un groupe de réfugiés qui vient d’être intercepté en mer par Frontex puis transféré à terre par l’ONG Refugee Rescue, entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, sur l’île de Lesbos, le 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      Le 19 septembre au petit matin, 37 personnes, des familles et des mineurs tous originaires d’Afghanistan viennent de débarquer entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, sur l’île de Lesbos. Ils sont pris en charge et dirigés vers le camp de transit Stage 2 géré par l’UNHCR et administré par les autorités grecques. À l’horizon, la côte turque. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Le mécanisme de relocalisation n’est plus aujourd’hui qu’une lointaine chimère, comme l’ont été les « hot spots » italiens, Rome choisissant de laisser ses centres ouverts et ses occupants se disperser en Europe. « On a été dans une double impasse côté italien, analyse l’ancien directeur de l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides (Ofpra), Pascal Brice. Les Italiens se sont satisfaits d’une situation où les migrants ne faisaient que passer, car ils ne voulaient pas s’installer dans le pays. Et les autres Etats, en particulier les Français et les Allemands, se sont accrochés à Dublin. C’est ce qui a provoqué cette dérive italienne jusqu’à Salvini et la fermeture des ports. »

      Le système est à l’agonie, les personnes qui arrivent aujourd’hui se voient donner des rendez-vous pour leur entretien d’asile… en 2021
      Seule la Grèce a continué de jouer le jeu des « hot spots » insulaires. Résultat : plus de 30 000 personnes s’entassent désormais dans des dispositifs prévus pour 5 400 personnes. « Nous n’avons pas vu autant de monde depuis la fermeture de la frontière nord de la Grèce et l’accord UE-Turquie, souligne Philippe Leclerc, représentant du Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés des Nations unies (HCR) en Grèce. Plus de 7 500 personnes devraient être transférées des îles vers le continent et ne le sont pas, faute de capacités d’accueil. On arrive à saturation. » Le système est à l’agonie, les personnes qui arrivent aujourd’hui se voient donner des rendez-vous pour leur entretien d’asile… en 2021.

      A Lesbos, 13 000 personnes s’agglutinent à l’intérieur et autour du camp de Moria, pour une capacité d’accueil officielle de 3 100 personnes. Les deux tiers de cette population sont sous tente. Et leur nombre enfle chaque jour. Cette promiscuité est mortifère. Dimanche 29 septembre, un incendie a ravagé plusieurs conteneurs hébergeant des demandeurs d’asile et tué au moins une femme. « Tous les dirigeants européens sont responsables de la situation inhumaine dans les îles grecques et ont la responsabilité d’empêcher toute nouvelle mort et souffrance », a réagi le jour même Médecins sans frontières (MSF). La même semaine, un enfant de 5 ans qui jouait dans un carton sur le bord d’une route a été accidentellement écrasé par un camion. Fin août, déjà, un adolescent afghan de 15 ans avait succombé à un coup de couteau dans une bagarre.

      Un bateau vient de débarquer entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, avec à son bord 37 personnes originaires d’Afghanistan. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      « Personne ne fait rien pour nous », lâche Mahdi Mohammadi, un Afghan de 27 ans arrivé il y a neuf mois. Il doit passer son entretien de demande d’asile en juin 2020. En attendant, il dort dans une étroite cabane, recouverte de bâches blanches estampillées Union européenne, avec trois autres compatriotes. A côté, une femme de plus de 60 ans dort sous une toile de tente avec son fils et sa nièce adolescente.

      « Nous n’avons aucun contrôle sur la situation »

      « Des années ont passé depuis la crise et on est incapables de gérer, se désespère une humanitaire de Lesbos. Les autorités sont dépassées. C’est de plus en plus tendu. » Un fonctionnaire européen est plus alarmiste encore : « Nous n’avons aucun contrôle sur la situation », confie-t-il.

      En Grèce, le sort des mineurs non accompagnés est particulièrement préoccupant. Ils sont 4 400 dans le pays (sur près de 90 000 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile), dont près d’un millier rien qu’à Lesbos. La moitié dort en présence d’adultes dans une sorte de grand barnum. Sur l’île de Samos, des enfants sont obligés de dormir sur le toit des conteneurs.

      Le 19 septembre, dans la partie extérieure du camp de Moria appelée « Jungle », une famille Syrienne de 7 personnes originaire de la ville de Deir Ez Zor, en Syrie. Ils sont arrivés à Moria il y a deux jours. La jeune femme dans la tente attend un enfant. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      Dans la clinique pédiatrique de MSF, qui jouxte le camp de Moria, le personnel soignant mesure les effets d’un tel abandon. « Sur les deux derniers mois, un quart de nos patients enfants nous ont été envoyés pour des comportements d’automutilation, déclare Katrin Brubakk, pédopsychologue. Ça va d’adolescents qui se scarifient à des enfants de deux ans qui se tapent la tête contre les murs jusqu’à saigner, qui se mordent ou qui s’arrachent les cheveux. » « A long terme, cela va affecter leur vie sociale, leurs apprentissages et, in fine, leur santé mentale », prévient-elle. Présidente de l’ONG grecque d’aide aux mineursMETAdrasi, Lora Pappa s’emporte : « Ça fait des années qu’on dit que plus d’un tiers des mineurs non accompagnés ont un membre de leur famille en Allemagne ou ailleurs. Mais chaque enfant, c’est trente pages de procédure et, si tout se passe bien, ça prend dix mois pour obtenir une réunification familiale. Le service d’asile grec est saturé, et les Etats membres imposent des conditions de plus en plus insensées. »

      Dans le petit port de plaisance de Panayouda, à quelques kilomètres de Moria, des adolescents jouent à appâter des petits poissons argentés avec des boules de mie de pain. Samir, un Afghan de 21 ans, les regarde en riant. A Moria, il connaît des jeunes qui désespèrent de rejoindre leur famille en Suède. « Leur demande a déjà été rejetée trois fois », assure-t-il. Samir a passé deux ans sur l’île, avant d’être autorisé à gagner le continent. Il est finalement revenu à Lesbos il y a une semaine pour retrouver son frère de 14 ans. « Ça faisait cinq ans qu’on s’était perdus de vue, explique-t-il. Notre famille a été séparée en Turquie et, depuis, je les cherche. Je ne quitterai pas Athènes tant que je n’aurai pas retrouvé mes parents. »

      « Les “hot spots” sont la preuve de l’absurdité et de l’échec de Dublin »

      « Il faudrait repenser à des mécanismes de répartition, affirme Philippe Leclerc, du HCR. C’est l’une des urgences de solidarité, mais il n’y a pas de discussion formelle à ce sujet au niveau de l’UE. » « La relocalisation, ça n’a jamais marché parce que ça repose sur le volontariat des Etats, tranche Claire Rodier, directrice du Gisti (Groupe d’information et de soutien des immigrés). Les “hot spots” sont la preuve de l’absurdité et de l’échec de Dublin, qui fait peser tout le poids des arrivées sur les pays des berges de l’Europe. » Yves Pascouau appuie : « Les Etats ont eu le tort de penser qu’on pouvait jouir d’un espace de libre circulation sans avoir une politique d’asile et d’immigration commune. Ce qui se passe à Lesbos doit nous interroger sur toutes les idées qu’on peut avoir de créer des zones de débarquement et de traitement des demandes d’asile. » Marco Sandrone, coordinateur de MSF à Lesbos, va plus loin : « Il est grand temps d’arrêter cet accord UE-Turquie et sa politique inhumaine de confinement et d’évacuer de toute urgence des personnes en dehors de cet enfer qu’est devenu Moria. »

      Des policiers portugais de Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes surveillent la mer au large de la côte Nord de l’île, dans la nuit du 18 au 19 septembre. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde

      A Skala Sikamineas, les équipes de FRONTEX procèdent à la destruction sommaire d’un bateau clandestin. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Dans les faits, l’accord UE-Turquie est soumis à « forte pression », a reconnu récemment le nouveau premier ministre grec, Kyriakos Mitsotakis. Jusqu’ici, en vertu de cet accord, Athènes a renvoyé moins de 2 000 migrants vers la Turquie, en majorité des ressortissants pakistanais (38 %), syriens (18 %), algériens (11 %), afghans (6 %) et d’autres. Mais le nouveau gouvernement conservateur, arrivé au pouvoir en juillet, envisage d’augmenter les renvois. Lundi 30 septembre, il a annoncé un objectif de 10 000 migrants d’ici à la fin 2020, en plus de mesures visant à accélérer la procédure d’asile, à augmenter les transferts vers le continent ou encore à construire des centres fermés pour les migrants ne relevant pas de l’asile.

      Dans le même temps, le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan n’a eu de cesse, ces derniers mois, de menacer d’« ouvrir les portes » de son pays aux migrants afin de les laisser rejoindre l’Europe. « Si nous ne recevons pas le soutien nécessaire pour partager le fardeau des réfugiés, avec l’UE et le reste du monde, nous allons ouvrir nos frontières », a-t-il averti.

      « Entre Erdogan qui montre les dents et le nouveau gouvernement grec qui est beaucoup plus dur, ça ne m’étonnerait pas que l’accord se casse la figure », redoute le fonctionnaire européen. Le thème migratoire est devenu tellement brûlant qu’il a servi de prétexte à la première rencontre, en marge de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies à New York, entre le président turc et le premier ministre grec, le 26 septembre. A l’issue, M. Mitsotakis a dit souhaiter la signature d’« un nouvel accord », assorti d’un soutien financier supplémentaire de l’UE à la Turquie.

      La Turquie héberge officiellement 3,6 millions de réfugiés syriens, soit quatre fois plus que l’ensemble des Etats de l’UE. L’absence de perspectives pour un règlement politique en Syrie, le caractère improbable de la reconstruction, l’hostilité manifestée par Damas envers les éventuels candidats au retour, menacés d’expropriation selon le décret-loi 63 du gouvernement de Bachar Al-Assad, ont réduit à néant l’espoir de voir les réfugiés syriens rentrer chez eux. Le pays ne pourra assumer seul un nouvel afflux de déplacés en provenance d’Idlib, le dernier bastion de la rébellion syrienne actuellement sous le feu d’une offensive militaire menée par le régime et son allié russe.

      Un « ferrailleur de la mer » sur la côte entre Skala Sikamineas et Molivos, le 19 septembre. Après l’évacuation d’une embarcation de 37 réfugiés d’origine Afghane, un homme vient récupérer des morceaux du bateau. A l’horizon la côte turque, toute proche. Samuel Gratacap pour Le Monde
      Le président turc presse les Etats-Unis de lui accorder une « zone de sécurité » au nord-est de la Syrie, où il envisage d’installer jusqu’à 3 millions de Syriens. « Nous voulons créer un corridor de paix pour y loger 2 millions de Syriens. (…) Si nous pouvions étendre cette zone jusqu’à Deir ez-Zor et Raqqa, nous installerions jusqu’à 3 millions d’entre eux, dont certains venus d’Europe », a-t-il déclaré depuis la tribune des Nations unies à New-York.

      Climat de peur

      La population turque s’est jusqu’ici montrée accueillante envers les « invités » syriens, ainsi qu’on désigne les réfugiés en Turquie, dont le statut se limite à une « protection temporaire ». Mais récemment, les réflexes de rejet se sont accrus. Touchée de plein fouet par l’inflation, la perte de leur pouvoir d’achat, la montée du chômage, la population s’est mise à désapprouver la politique d’accueil imposée à partir de 2012 par M. Erdogan. D’après une enquête publiée en juillet par le centre d’étude de l’opinion PIAR, 82,3 % des répondants se disent favorables au renvoi « de tous les réfugiés syriens ».

      A la mi-juillet, la préfecture d’Istanbul a lancé une campagne d’arrestations et d’expulsions à l’encontre de dizaines de milliers de réfugiés, syriens et aussi afghans. Le climat de peur suscité par ces coups de filet n’est peut être pas étranger à l’augmentation des arrivées de réfugiés en Grèce ces derniers mois.

      « La plupart des gens à qui on porte secours ces derniers temps disent qu’ils ont passé un mois seulement en Turquie, alors qu’avant ils avaient pu y vivre un an, observe Roman Kutzowitz, de l’ONG Refugee Rescue, qui dispose de la seule embarcation humanitaire en Méditerranée orientale, à quai dans le petit port de Skala Sikamineas, distant d’une dizaine de kilomètres de la rive turque. Ils savent que le pays n’est plus un lieu d’accueil. »

      La décharge de l’île de Lesbos, située à côté de la ville de Molivos. Ici s’amassent des gilets de sauvetages, des bouées et des restes d’embarcations qui ont servi aux réfugiés pour effectuer la traversée depuis la Turquie. Samuel Gratacap pour "Le Monde"
      Au large de Lesbos, dans le mouchoir de poche qui sépare la Grèce et la Turquie, les gardes-côtes des deux pays et les équipes de Frontex tentent d’intercepter les migrants. Cette nuit-là, un bateau de la police maritime portugaise – mobilisé par Frontex – patrouille le long de la ligne de démarcation des eaux. « Les Turcs sont présents aussi, c’est sûr, mais on ne les voit pas forcément », explique Joao Pacheco Antunes, à la tête de l’équipe portugaise.

      Dix jours « sans nourriture, par terre »

      Sur les hauteurs de l’île, des collègues balayent la mer à l’aide d’une caméra thermique de longue portée, à la recherche d’un point noir suspect qui pourrait indiquer une embarcation. « S’ils voient un bateau dans les eaux turques, le centre maritime de coordination des secours grec est prévenu et appelle Ankara », nous explique Joao Pacheco Antunes. Plusieurs canots seront interceptés avant d’avoir atteint les eaux grecques.

      Sur une plage de galets, à l’aube, un groupe de trente-sept personnes a accosté. Il y a treize enfants parmi eux, qui toussent, grelottent. Un Afghan de 28 ans, originaire de la province de Ghazi, explique avoir passé dix jours « sans nourriture, par terre », caché dans les champs d’oliviers turcs avant de pouvoir traverser. « J’ai perdu dix kilos », nous assure-t-il, en désignant ses jambes et son buste amaigris. Un peu plus tard, une autre embarcation est convoyée jusqu’au port de Skala Sikamineas par des gardes-côtes italiens, en mission pour Frontex. « Il y a trois femmes enceintes parmi nous », prévient un Afghan de 27 ans, qui a fui Daech [acronyme arabe de l’organisation Etat islamique] et les talibans. Arrive presque aussitôt un troisième canot, intercepté par les gardes-côtes portugais de Frontex. Tous iront rejoindre le camp de Moria.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/10/04/migration-lesbos-un-echec-europeen_6014219_3210.html

    • Grèce : une politique anti-réfugiés « aux relents d’extrême-droite »

      Suite à l’incendie mortel qui s’est déclenché dimanche dans le camp de Moria à Lesbos, le gouvernement grec a convoqué en urgence un conseil des ministres et annoncé des mesures pour faire face à la crise. Parmi elles, distinguer les réfugiés des migrants économiques. Revue de presse.
      Suite à l’incendie qui s’est déclenché dimanche dans le camp

      surpeuplé de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, et qui a fait une morte – une

      réfugiée afghane mère d’un nourrisson – le gouvernement s’est réuni en

      urgence lundi et a présenté un plan d’actions. Athènes veut notamment

      renvoyer 10 000 réfugiés et migrants d’ici à 2020 dans leur pays

      d’origine ou en Turquie, renforcer les patrouilles en mer, créer des

      camps fermés pour les immigrés illégaux et continuer à transférer les

      réfugiés des îles vers le continent grec pour désengorger les camps sur

      les îles de la mer Egée. D’après Efimerida Ton Syntakton, le

      Parlement doit voter dans les jours à venir un texte réformant les

      procédures de demande d’asile, en les rendant plus rapides.

      « L’immigration constitue une bombe pour le pays », estime le site

      iefimerida.gr. « Le gouvernement sait que c’est Erdoğan qui détient la

      solution au problème. Si le sultan n’impose pas plus de contrôles et ne

      veut pas diminuer les flux, alors les mesures prises n’auront pas plus

      d’effet qu’une aspirine. » Le quotidien de centre droit Kathimerini

      rappelle que la Grèce est « première en arrivées de migrants » en

      Europe. « La Grèce a accueilli cette année 45 600 migrants sur les

      77 400 arrivés en Méditerranée, devant l’Espagne et l’Italie », tandis

      qu’en septembre 10 258 arrivées ont été enregistrés par le

      Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés.

      Comme à la loterie

      Dans l’édition du 1er octobre,

      une caricature d’Andreas Petroulakis montre un officiel tenant un

      papier près d’un boulier pour le tirage du loto. « Nous allons enfin

      différencier les réfugiés des immigrés ! Les réfugiés seront ceux qui

      ont les numéro 12, 31, 11... » Le dessin se moque des annonces du

      gouvernement qui a affirmé vouloir accepter les réfugiés en Grèce, mais

      renvoyer chez eux les migrants économiques, et selon qui la Grèce n’est

      plus confrontée à une crise des réfugiés mais des migrants. « De la

      désinformation de la part du gouvernement », estime Efimerida Ton Syntakton,

      car « les statistiques montrent bien que la majorité des personnes

      actuellement sur les îles sont originaires d’Afghanistan, de Syrie,

      d’Irak, du Congo, de pays en guerre ou en situation de guerre civile ».

      « Le nouveau dogme du gouvernement est que les réfugiés et les immigrés sont deux catégories différentes », souligne la chaîne de télévision Star.

      Le gouvernement veut « être plus sévère avec les immigrés, mais

      intégrer les réfugiés », précise le journal télévisé de mardi. Le

      journal de centre-gauche Ta Nea indique que « huit réfugiés sur

      dix seront transférés des îles vers des hôtels ou des appartements », le

      gouvernement souhaitant décongestionner au plus vite les îles de la mer

      Égée comme Lesbos.

      Pour le magazine LIFO, « la grande pression exercée sur le

      gouvernement Mitsotakis concernant l’immigration vient de ses

      électeurs ». « Les annonces selon lesquelles les demandes d’asile seront

      examinées immédiatement, tandis que ceux qui ne remplissent pas les

      critères seront renvoyés dans les trois jours, sont irréalistes car il y

      a des standards européens à respecter. Ces annonces sont faites

      uniquement pour soulager quelques électeurs. » Enfin, pour le site

      News247, « depuis longtemps à Moria un crime se déroule sous nos yeux,

      les responsables sont les décideurs à Bruxelles et les gouvernements en

      Grèce. Des mesures respectant les êtres humains doivent être prises ou

      bien l’avenir risque de nous réserver d’autres tragédies ».

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Grece-le-gouvernement-grec-face-a-une-nouvelle-augmentation-des-f

  • Διαμαρτυρία ανηλίκων στη Μόρια

    Oλοένα και αυξάνεται η πίεση στο καζάνι της Μόριας. Μόλις μία μέρα μετά την αναχώρηση σχεδόν 1.500 προσφύγων από το ΚΥΤ, μια μίνι εξέγερση των ανήλικων εγκλωβισμένων ήρθε να υπενθυμίσει ότι η κατάσταση συνεχίζει να είναι απελπιστική. Και θα συνεχίσει, όσο σε έναν χώρο που είναι φτιαγμένος για 3.000 ανθρώπους στοιβάζονται αυτή τη στιγμή πάνω από 9.400 ψυχές, εκ των οποίων οι 750 είναι ανήλικοι.

    Μερίδα αυτών των ανηλίκων και ειδικότερα των νεοεισερχομένων ήταν αυτή που ξεκίνησε τη χθεσινή διαμαρτυρία, ζητώντας την άμεση αναχώρησή τους από τη Λέσβο ή έστω τη μεταφορά τους σε ξενοδοχεία, αφού από τη μέρα που πάτησαν το πόδι τους στο ΚΥΤ είναι υποχρεωμένοι να ζουν όλοι μαζί στοιβαγμένοι σε μια μεγάλη σκηνή που έχει στηθεί στον χώρο της Πρώτης Υποδοχής και η οποία μέχρι πρόσφατα έπαιζε τον ρόλο της ρεσεψιόν για όλους τους νεοαφιχθέντες, αλλά πλέον έχει μετατραπεί σε χώρο προσωρινής διαμονής ανηλίκων, έως ότου δοθεί κάποια λύση.

    Η ένταση ξεκίνησε το μεσημέρι της Τετάρτης, όταν ομάδα ανηλίκων έσπασε την πόρτα της σκηνής και ορισμένοι επιχείρησαν να βάλουν φωτιά σε κάδους απορριμμάτων. Παράλληλα, άλλη ομάδα από τους 300 ανήλικους που βρίσκονται στην τέντα κινήθηκε προς την έξοδο και μπλόκαρε τον δρόμο έξω από την πύλη, φωνάζοντας συνθήματα όπως Athens-Athens και Hotel-Hotel, θέλοντας έτσι να κάνουν κατανοητά τα αιτήματά τους.

    Σύντομα, στον χώρο επενέβη η Αστυνομία, που απώθησε με δακρυγόνα τους ανήλικους, και όταν η κατάσταση ηρέμησε ξεκίνησαν κάποιες διαπραγματεύσεις μεταξύ των δύο πλευρών, χωρίς να καταγραφούν μέχρι αυτή την ώρα συλλήψεις ή τραυματισμοί.

    Παρών στη Μόρια κατά τη διάρκεια των επεισοδίων ήταν και ο ύπατος αρμοστής της UNHR, Φίλιπ Λεκλέρκ, που έφθασε στη Μυτιλήνη προκειμένου να έχει προσωπική εικόνα της κατάστασης που έχει δημιουργηθεί, αλλά και για να συμμετάσχει σε σύσκεψη όλων των δημάρχων του Βορείου Αιγαίου που πραγματοποιήθηκε υπό τον νέο περιφερειάρχη, Κώστα Μουτζούρη.
    Ακροδεξιά λογική Μουτζούρη και δημάρχων

    Σε αυτήν, κυριολεκτικά επικράτησε η ακροδεξιά λογική, με τους συμμετέχοντες να καταλήγουν σε ένα πλαίσιο που βρίθει ξενοφοβικών και ρατσιστικών στερεοτύπων. Στην τετράωρη σύσκεψη -και με τη συμμετοχή των περιφερειακών διευθυντών Αστυνομίας και Λιμενικού-, οι δήμαρχοι με τον περιφερειάρχη κατέληξαν ομόφωνα σε ένα κείμενο με αιτήματα που θα αποσταλεί στο υπουργείο Προστασίας του Πολίτη, όπου θα ζητούν την εφαρμογή όσων υποσχόταν προεκλογικά η Ν.Δ. Αναλυτικά οι αυτοδιοικητικοί ζητούν :

    ● Να μη δημιουργηθεί καμία νέα δομή για πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες στα νησιά της περιφέρειας.

    ● Την άμεση μεταφορά των υφισταμένων δομών εκτός των αστικών ιστών και την οριστική διακοπή λειτουργίας των ΚΥΤ της Σάμου, της Μόριας και της ΒΙΑΛ στη Χίο.

    ● Την αναλογική διασπορά των προσφύγων στο σύνολο της χώρας, με άμεση αποσυμφόρηση των νησιών και μαζικές επιστροφές στην Τουρκία, στο πλαίσιο της κοινής δήλωσης Ε.Ε. – Τουρκίας, ώστε η σημερινή αναλογία του 1:7 (μετανάστες προς γηγενείς) των νησιών να μειωθεί στο 1:170 της ηπειρωτικής χώρας.

    ● Την άμεση και πλήρη αποζημίωση των κατοίκων που έχουν υποστεί καταπάτηση και ζημιές στο φυτικό και ζωικό κεφάλαιο από τους πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες.

    ● Την άμεση καταγραφή και τον έλεγχο των ΜΚΟ που δραστηριοποιούνται στην περιφέρεια.

    ● Την αποτελεσματική φύλαξη των θαλάσσιων συνόρων και την άμεση υλοποίηση των προεκλογικών δεσμεύσεων της κυβέρνησης και των πρόσφατων αποφάσεων του ΚΥΣΕΑ.

    ● Τη στήριξη των εμπλεκόμενων δημόσιων υπηρεσιών και πρωτίστως του Λιμενικού Σώματος, της ΕΛ.ΑΣ. και των ενόπλων δυνάμεων για την καθοριστική συμβολή τους στην αντιμετώπιση του προβλήματος και την απαίτηση για άμεση ενίσχυσή τους με προσωπικό και μέσα.


    https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209598_diamartyria-anilikon-sti-moria

    Avec ce commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop, reçu le 05.09.2019 :

    Le reportage du quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn donne plus des précisions sur les incidents qui ont éclaté hier mercredi au hot-spot de Moria à Lesbos. Il s’agissait d’une mini-révolte des mineurs bloqués sur l’île, qui demandaient d’être transférés à Athènes ou du moins d’être logés à l’hôtel. Même après le transfert 1.500 personnes au continent, il y a actuellement à Moria 9.400 personnes dont 750 mineurs pour une capacité d’accueil de 3.000. Les mineurs qui arrivent depuis quelques jours sont entassés dans une grande #tente qui servait jusqu’à maintenant de lieu de Premier Accueil, une sorte de réception-desk pour tous les arrivants, qui s’est transformé en gîte provisoire pour 300 mineurs. Hier,vers midi, un groupe de mineurs ont cassé la porte de la tente et ont essayé de mettre le feu à des poubelles, tandis qu’un deuxième groupe de mineurs avait bloqué la route vers la porte du camp en criant Athens-Athens et Hotel-Hotel, faisant ainsi comprendre qu’ils réclament leur transfert à Athènes ou à défaut à des chambres d’hôtel. La police est intervenue en lançant de gaz lacrymogènes, et une fois le calme répandu ; des pourparlers se sont engagés avec les deux groupes. Il n’y a pas eu ni arrestations ni blessés.

    En même temps la situation est encore plus désespérante au hot-spot de Samos où pour une capacité d’accueil de 648 personnes y sont actuellement entassées presque 5.000 dans des conditions de vie inimaginables. Voir le tableau édité par le Ministère de Protection du Citoyen (alias de l’Ordre Public) (https://infocrisis.gov.gr/5869/national-situational-picture-regarding-the-islands-at-eastern-aegean-sea-4-9-2019/?lang=en)

    #Moria #Lesbos #Lesvos #migrations #asile #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce #hotspot #révolte #résistance #mineurs #MNA #enfants #enfance #violence

    • Διαμαρτυρία εκατοντάδων ανηλίκων για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στη Μόρια

      Ένταση επικράτησε το μεσημέρι της Τετάρτης στο Κέντρο Υποδοχής και Ταυτοποίησης Προσφύγων στην Μόρια, καθώς περίπου 300 ανήλικοι πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες διαμαρτυρήθηκαν για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης στο κέντρο, που έχουν γίνει ακόμα χειρότερες τις τελευταίες μέρες λόγω της άφιξης εκατοντάδων νέων ανθρώπων.

      Όπως αναφέρουν πληροφορίες της ιστοσελίδας stonisi.gr, περίπου 300 ανήλικοι πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες προχώρησαν σε συγκέντρωση διαμαρτυρίας έξω από το κέντρο της Μόριας, θέλοντας να διαμαρτυρηθούν για τις απάνθρωπες συνθήκες διαβίωσης.

      Οι ίδιες πληροφορίες αναφέρουν ότι πάρθηκε απόφαση να εκκενωθεί η πτέρυγα των ανηλίκων ενώ έγινε και περιορισμένη χρήση χημικών από την αστυνομία. Σημειώνεται ότι τη Δευτέρα έφτασαν στο νησί εκατοντάδες άνθρωποι, που πλέον κατευθύνθηκαν σε δομές της Βόρειας Ελλάδας, όπου είναι ήδη αδύνατη η στέγαση περισσότερων ανθρώπων.

      https://thepressproject.gr/diamartyria-ekatontadon-anilikon-gia-tis-apanthropes-synthikes-diavi

      –------

      Avec ce commentaire de Vicky Skoumbi (05.09.2019) :

      Des centaines de mineurs protestent contre les conditions de vie inhumaines en Moria
      La tension a monté d’un cran mercredi à midi au centre de réception et d’identification des réfugiés de Moria. Environ 300 réfugiés et immigrants ont protesté contre les conditions de vie inhumaines dans le centre, qui se sont encore aggravées ces derniers jours avec l’arrivée de centaines de personnes.

      Selon des informations du site Internet stonisi.gr , quelque 300 réfugiés et migrants mineurs se sont rassemblés hors du centre de la Moria, dans le but de protester contre ces conditions de vie inhumaines.

      La même source d’’information indique qu’une décision a été prise d’évacuer l’aile des mineurs tandis que la police a fait un usage moderé de gaz chimiques. Il est à noter que lundi, des centaines de personnes sont arrivées sur l’île, se dirigeant maintenant vers des structures situées dans le nord de la Grèce, où il est déjà impossible d’accueillir plus de personnes.

  • #Migrerrance... de camp en camp en #Grèce...
    Des personnes traitées comme des #paquets de la poste

    Greece moves 1400 asylum-seekers from crowded Lesbos camp as migrant numbers climb

    Greek officials and aid workers on Monday began an emergency operation to evacuate 1,400 migrants from a dangerously overcrowded camp on Lesbos as numbers of arrivals on the island continue to climb.

    Six hundred and forty people were bussed away from Moria camp, which has become notorious for violence and poor hygiene, with 800 more following.

    “I hope to get out of this hell quickly,” 21-year-old Mohamed Akberi, who arrived at the camp five days earlier, told Agence-France Presse.

    Lesbos has been hit hard by the migrant crisis, with authorities deadlocked over what to do with new arrivals. Some 11,000 have been put in Moria camp, an old army barracks in a remote part of the island which has a capacity of around 3,000.

    The camp has been criticised sharply by human rights organisations for its squalid living conditions and poor security. Last month, a 14-year-old Afghan boy was killed in a fight and women in the camp are targets for sexual violence.

    The migrants removed from Moria on Monday will be taken by ferry to Thessaloniki, where they will be transported to Nea Kavala, a small camp in northern Greece near the border with North Macedonia.

    Lesbos saw 3,000 new arrivals in August, with around 650 arriving in just one day last week, and another 400 over the weekend.

    The emergency transfer from Moria was agreed by the government at an emergency meeting on Saturday, with unaccompanied minors and other vulnerable people given priority.

    The Greek government agreed to do away with the appeal procedures for asylum seekers to facilitate their swift return to Turkey.

    Greece will also step up border patrols with the help of the EU border control agency Frontex.

    Nearly 1,900 migrants have been forcibly returned to Turkey under a deal brokered by the European Union in 2016, and 17,000 migrants have voluntarily left Greece for their home countries over the last three years.

    Aid workers have questioned whether the emergency move provides a meaningful solution to Greece’s migrant problem.

    “While the situation in Moria is certainly diabolical, the government’s response to move people doesn’t solve the problem of overcrowding and is more of a PR exercise without addressing the issues that will be exacerbated by the move,” one aid worker with Nea Kavala, who wished to remain anonymous, told the Telegraph. “It’s very much an out-of-the-frying-pan-into- the-fire situation.”

    Stella Nanou, a spokesperson at the UNHCR in Greece, told the Daily Telegraph: “The situation is an urgent one in Moria and requires urgent relief. It is obvious more needs to be done in the short term. In the long term, solutions need to be provided to decongest and relieve the situation on the islands. We stand ready to help.”

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/09/02/greece-moves-1400-asylum-seekers-crowded-lesbos-camp-migrant
    #Moria #Lesbos #Lesvos #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce_du_Nord #déplacement #asile #migrations #réfugiés
    #paquets_postaux
    ping @isskein

    • Grèce : Plus de 1 000 migrants transférés de l’île de Lesbos vers le continent

      Un premier groupe de 600 migrants ont été transférés lundi matin du camp de Moria, à Lesbos, vers le continent. Un deuxième contingent de 700 personnes devraient aussi être acheminé vers le continent grec dans l’après-midi. Ce week-end, le gouvernement avait annoncé une série de mesure pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants, notamment le transfert rapide des mineurs non accompagnés et des personnes les plus vulnérables des îles vers le continent.

      Les premières évacuations de l’île grecque de Lesbos vers le continent ont débuté lundi 2 septembre. Un premier contingent de 600 migrants installés dans le camp saturé de Moria ont été évacués lundi matin.

      Six cent trente-cinq Afghans, transportant des bagages encombrants, se sont précipités pour monter dans les bus de la police, sous la supervision du Haut-commissariat des Nations unies aux réfugiés (#HCR).

      Dans la cohue générale, ils ont ensuite embarqué sur le navire « Caldera Vista » vers le port de Thessalonique, où ils doivent être acheminés vers le camp de réfugiés de Nea Kavala, dans la ville de Kilkis situé dans le nord de la Grèce.

      Un autre groupe de 700 migrants devaient également être transférés dans l’après-midi vers le même lieu, dans le cadre de la décision du gouvernement grec de désengorger le camp de Moria.

      « 3 000 arrivées rien qu’au mois d’août »

      Samedi 31 août, le gouvernement grec a annoncé une série de mesure pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants, notamment le transfert rapide des mineurs non accompagnés et des personnes les plus vulnérables des îles vers le continent mais aussi la suppression des procédure d’appels aux demandes d’asile pour faciliter les retours des réfugiés en Turquie.

      Le camp de Moria, centre d’enregistrement et d’identification de Lesbos, héberge déjà près de 11 000 personnes, soit quatre fois la capacité évaluée par le HCR.

      Le nombre de migrants n’a cessé de grossir cet été. L’agence onusienne parle de « plus de 3 000 arrivées rien qu’au mois d’août ». Jeudi soir, 13 bateaux sont arrivés à Lesbos avec plus de 540 personnes dont 240 enfants, une hausse sans précédent qui inquiète le gouvernement conservateur arrivé au pouvoir le 7 juillet dernier.

      Ce week-end, 280 autres migrants sont arrivés en Grèce, souvent interceptés en pleine mer par les garde-côtes de l’Union européenne et de la Grèce.

      Sur la côte nord de l’île où les canots pneumatiques chargés de migrants débarquent le plus souvent, la surveillance a été renforcée dimanche. Une équipe de l’AFP a pu constater les allers et venues des patrouilleurs en mer, et la vigilance accrue des policiers sur les rives grecques.
      Depuis l’accord UE-Turquie signé en mars 2016, le contrôle aux frontières a été renforcé, rendant l’accès à l’île depuis la Turquie de plus en plus difficile. Mais, ces derniers mois près de 100 personnes en moyenne parviennent chaque jour à effectuer cette traversée.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19227/grece-plus-de-1-000-migrants-transferes-de-l-ile-de-lesbos-vers-le-con

    • Message de Vicky Skoumbi reçu via la mailing-list de Migreurop, 03.09.2019:

      Des scènes qui rappellent l’été 2015 se passent actuellement à Lesbos.

      Le nombre particulièrement élevé d’arrivées récentes à Lesbos (Grèce) – plus que 3.600 pour le seul mois d’août- a obligé le nouveau gouvernement de transférer 1.300 personnes vulnérables vers le continent et notamment vers la commune Nouvelle Kavalla à Kilkis, au nord-ouest du pays. Il s’agit juste d’un tiers de réfugiés reconnus comme vulnérables qui restent bloqués dans l’île, malgré la levée de leur confinement géographique. Jusqu’à ce jour le gouvernement Mitsotakis avait bloqué tout transfert vers le continent, même au moment où la population de Moria avait dépassé les 10.000 dont 4.000 étaient obligés de vivre en dehors du camp, dans des abris de fortune sur les champs d’alentours. Le service médical à Moria y est désormais quasi-inexistant, dans la mesure où des 40 médecins qui y travaillaient, il ne reste actuellement que deux qui ne peuvent s’occuper que des urgences – et encore-, tandis qu’il n’y a plus aucune ambulance disponible sur place. Ceci a comme résultant que les personnes qui arrivent ne passent plus de contrôle médical avec tous les risques sanitaires que cela puisse créer dans un camp si surpeuplé.

      Le nouveau président de la Région de l’Egée du Nord, M. Costas Moutzouris, de droite sans affiliation, avait déclaré que toutes les régions de la Grèce doivent partager le ‘fardeau’, car « les îles ne doivent pas subir une déformation, une altération raciale, religieuse, et ethnique ».

      Source (en grec) Efimerida tôn Syntaktôn (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209204_sti-moria-kai-sti-sykamnia-i-lesbos-anastenazei)

      C’est sans doute l’arrivée de 13 bateaux avec 550 personnes à Sykamia (Lesbos) samedi dernier, qui a obligé le gouvernement de céder et d’organiser un convoi vers le continent. Mais l’endroit choisi pour l’installation de personnes transférées est un campement déjà surchargé – pour une capacité d’accueil de 700 personnes, 924 y sont installés dans de containers et 450 dans des tentes. Avec l’arrivée de 1.300 de plus ni le réseau d’eau potable, ni les deux générateurs électriques ne sauraient tenir. La situation risque de devenir totalement chaotique, d’autant plus que le centre d’accueil en question est géré sans aucune structure administrative par une ONG, le Conseil danois pour les Réfugiés. En même temps, l’endroit est exposé aux vents et les tentes qui y sont montés pour les nouveaux arrivants risquent de s’envoler à la première rafale. D’après le quotidien grec Efimerida tôn Syntktôn (https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/dikaiomata/209222_giati-i-boreia-ellada-kathistatai-afiloxeni-sto-neo-kyma-prosfygon) toutes les structures du Nord de la Grèce ont déjà dépassé la limite de leurs capacités d’accueil.

    • Greece to increase border patrols and deportations to curb migrant influx

      Greece is to step up border patrols, move asylum-seekers from its islands to the mainland and speed up deportations in an effort to deal with a resurgence in migrant flows from neighboring Turkey.

      The government’s Council for Foreign Affairs and Defence convened on Saturday for an emergency session after the arrival on Thursday of more than a dozen migrant boats carrying around 600 people, the first simultaneous arrival of its kind in three years.

      The increase in arrivals has piled additional pressure on Greece’s overcrowded island camps, all of which are operating at least twice their capacity.

      Arrivals - mostly of Afghan families - have picked up over the summer, and August saw the highest number of monthly landings in three years.

      Greece’s Moria camp on the island of Lesbos - a sprawling facility where conditions have been described by aid organizations as inhumane - is also holding the largest number of people since the deal was agreed.

      On Saturday, the government said it would move asylum-seekers to mainland facilities, increase border surveillance together with the European Union’s border patrol agency Frontex and NATO, and boost police patrols across Greece to identify rejected asylum seekers who have remained in the country.

      It also plans to cut back a lengthy asylum process, which can take several months to conclude, by abolishing the second stage of appeals when an application is rejected, and deporting the applicant either to Turkey or to their country of origin.

      “The asylum process in our country was the longest, the most time consuming and, in the end, the most ineffective in Europe,” Greece’s deputy citizen protection minister responsible for migration policy, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, told state television.

      Responding to criticism from the opposition that the move was unfair and unlawful, Koumoutsakos said:

      “Asylum must move quickly so that those who are entitled to international protection are vindicated ... and for us to know who should not stay in Greece.”

      The government was “determined to push ahead with a robust returns policy because that is what the law and the country’s best interest impose, in accordance with human rights,” he said.

      Greece was the main gateway to northern Europe in 2015 for nearly a million migrants and refugees from war-torn and poverty-stricken countries in the Middle East and Africa.

      A deal between the EU and Turkey in March 2016 reduced the influx to a trickle, but closures of borders across the Balkans resulted in tens of thousands of people stranded in Greece.

      Humanitarian organizations have criticized Greece for not doing enough to improve living conditions at its camps, which they have described as “shameful”.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-europe-migrants-greece/greece-to-increase-border-patrols-and-deportations-to-curb-migrant-influx-i

    • Grèce : les migrants de Lesbos désemparés dans leur nouveau camp

      « Nous avons quitté Moria en espérant quelque chose de mieux et finalement, c’est pire » : Sazan, un Afghan de 20 ans, vient d’être transféré, avec mille compatriotes, de l’île grecque de Lesbos saturée, dans le camp de #Nea_Kavala, dans le nord de la Grèce.

      Après six mois dans « l’enfer » de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos, Sazan se sent désemparé à son arrivée à Nea Kavala, où il constate « la difficulté d’accès à l’eau courante et à l’électricité ».

      A côté de lui, Mohamed Nour, 28 ans, entouré de ses trois enfants, creuse la terre devant sa tente de fortune pour fabriquer une rigole « pour protéger la famille en cas de pluie ».

      Mille réfugiés et migrants sont installés dans 200 tentes, les autres seront transférés « dans d’autres camps dans le nord du pays », a indiqué une source du ministère de la Protection du citoyen, sans plus de détails.

      L’arrivée massive de centaines de migrants et réfugiés la semaine dernière à Lesbos, principale porte d’entrée migratoire en Europe, a pris de court les autorités grecques, qui ont décidé leur transfert sur des camps du continent.

      Car le camp de Moria, le principal de Lesbos, l’un des plus importants et insalubres d’Europe, a dépassé de quatre fois sa capacité ces derniers mois.

      En juillet seulement, plus de 5.520 personnes ont débarqué à Lesbos - un record depuis le début de l’année - auxquelles se sont ajoutés 3.250 migrants au cours de quinze premiers jours d’août, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM).

      – Tensions à Moria -

      Quelque 300 mineurs non accompagnés ont protesté mercredi contre leurs conditions de vie dans le camp de Moria et demandé leur transfert immédiat à Athènes. De jeunes réfugiés ont mis le feu à des poubelles et la police a dispersé la foule avec des gaz lacrymogènes, a rapporté l’agence de presse grecque ANA.

      « Nous pensions que Moria était la pire chose qui pourrait nous arriver », explique Mohamed, qui s’efforce d’installer sa famille sous une tente de Nea Kavala.

      « On nous a dit que notre séjour serait temporaire mais nous y sommes déjà depuis deux jours et les conditions ne sont pas bonnes, j’espère partir d’ici très vite », assène-t-il.

      Des équipes du camp œuvrent depuis lundi à installer des tentes supplémentaires, mais les toilettes et les infrastructures d’hygiène ne suffisent pas.

      Le ministère a promis qu’avant la fin du mois, les migrants seraient transférés dans d’autres camps.

      Mais Tamim, 15 ans, séjourne à Nea Kavala depuis trois mois : « On nous a dit la même chose (que nous serions transférés) quand nous sommes arrivés (...). A Moria, c’était mieux, au moins on avait des cours d’anglais, ici on ne fait rien », confie-t-il à l’AFP.

      Pour Angelos, 35 ans, employé du camp, « il faut plus de médecins et des infrastructures pour répondre aux besoins de centaines d’enfants ».

      – « Garder espoir » -

      Plus de 70.000 migrants et réfugiés sont actuellement bloqués en Grèce depuis la fermeture des frontières en Europe après la déclaration UE-Turquie de mars 2016 destinée à freiner la route migratoire vers les îles grecques.

      Le Premier ministre de droite Kyriakos Mitsotakis, élu début juillet, a supprimé le ministère de la Politique migratoire, créé lors de la crise migratoire de 2015, et ce dossier est désormais confié au ministère de la Protection du citoyen.

      Face à la recrudescence des arrivées en Grèce via les frontières terrestre et maritime gréco-turques depuis janvier 2019, le gouvernement a annoncé samedi un train de mesures allant du renforcement du contrôle des frontières et des sans-papiers à la suppression du droit d’appel pour les demandes d’asile rejetées en première instance.

      Des ONG de défense des réfugiés ont critiqué ces mesures, dénonçant « le durcissement » de la politique migratoire.

      La majorité des migrants arrivés en Grèce espère, comme destination « finale », un pays d’Europe centrale ou occidentale.

      « Je suis avec ma famille ici, nous souhaitons aller vivre en Autriche », confirme Korban, 19 ans, arrivé mardi à Nea Kavala.

      « A Moria, les rixes et la bousculade étaient quotidiennes, c’était l’enfer. La seule chose qui nous reste maintenant, c’est d’être patients et de garder espoir », confie-t-il.

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/Migrants-transferes-Grece-Ici-pire-Lesbos-2019-09-04-1301045157

  • UNHCR shocked at death of Afghan boy on #Lesvos; urges transfer of unaccompanied children to safe shelters

    UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, is deeply saddened by news that a 15-year-old Afghan boy was killed and two other teenage boys injured after a fight broke out last night at the Moria reception centre on the Greek island of Lesvos. Despite the prompt actions by authorities and medical personnel, the boy was pronounced dead at Vostaneio Hospital in Mytilene, the main port town on Lesvos. The two other boys were admitted at the hospital where one required life-saving surgery. A fourth teenager, also from Afghanistan, was arrested by police in connection with the violence.

    The safe area at the Moria Reception and Identification Centre, RIC, hosts nearly 70 unaccompanied children, but more than 500 other boys and girls are staying in various parts of the overcrowded facility without a guardian and exposed to exploitation and abuse. Some of them are accommodated with unknown adults.

    “I was shocked to hear about the boy’s death”, said UNHCR Representative in Greece, Philippe Leclerc. “Moria is not the place for children who are alone and have faced profound trauma from events at home and the hardship of their flight. They need special care in dedicated shelters. The Greek government must take urgent measures to ensure that these children are transferred to a safe place and to end the overcrowding we see on Lesvos and other islands,” he said, adding that UNHCR stands ready to support by all means necessary.

    Frustration and tensions can easily boil over in Moria RIC which now hosts over 8,500 refugees and migrants – four times its capacity. Access to services such as health and psychological support are limited while security is woefully insufficient for the number of people. Unaccompanied children especially can face unsafe conditions for months while waiting for an authorized transfer to appropriate shelter. Their prolonged stay in such difficult conditions further affects their psychology and well-being.

    Nearly 2,000 refugees and migrants arrived by sea to Greece between 12 and 18 August, bringing the number of entries this year to 21,947. Some 22,700 people, including nearly 1,000 unaccompanied and separated children, are now staying on the Greek Aegean islands, the highest number in three years.

    https://www.unhcr.org/gr/en/12705-unhcr-shocked-at-death-of-afghan-boy-on-lesvos-urges-transfer-of-unacco

    #MNA #mineurs #enfants #enfance #Moria #décès #mort #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #camps_de_réfugiés #Lesbos #bagarre #dispute #surpopulation

    • Cet article du HCR, m’a fait pensé à la #forme_camps telle qu’elle est illustrée dans l’article... j’ai partagé cette réflexion avec mes collègues du comité scientifique du Centre du patrimoine arménien de Valence.

      Je la reproduis ici :

      Je vous avais parlé du film documentaire « #Refugistan » (https://seenthis.net/messages/502311), que beaucoup d’entre vous ont vu.

      Je vous disais, lors de la dernière réunion, qu’une des choses qui m’avait le plus frappé dans ce film, c’est ce rapprochement géographique du « camp de réfugié tel que l’on se l’imagine avec des #tentes blanches avec estampillons HCR »... cet #idéal-type de #camp on le voit dans le film avant tout en Afrique centrale, puis dans les pays d’Afrique du Nord et puis, à la fin... en Macédoine. Chez nous, donc.

      J’ai repensé à cela, ce matin, en voyant cette triste nouvelle annoncée par le HCR du décès d’un jeune dans le camps de Moria à Lesbos suite à une bagarre entre jeunes qui a lieu dans le camp.

      Regardez l’image qui accompagne l’article :

      Des tentes blanches avec l’estampillons « UNHCR »... en Grèce, encore plus proche, en Grèce, pays de l’Union européenne...

      Des pensées... que je voulais partager avec vous.

      #altérité #cpa_camps #altérisation

      ping @reka @isskein @karine4

    • Greek refugee camp unable to house new arrivals

      Authorities on the Greek island of Lesvos say they can’t house more newly arrived migrants at a perpetually overcrowded refugee camp that now is 400 percent overcapacity.

      Two officials told AP the Moria camp has a population of 12,000 and no way to accommodate additional occupants.

      The officials say newcomers are sleeping in the open or in tents outside the camp, which was built to hold 3,000 refugees.

      Some were taken to a small transit camp run by the United Nations’ refugee agency on the north coast of Lesvos.

      The island authorities said at least 410 migrants coming in boats from Turkey reached Lesvos on Friday.

      The officials asked not to be identified pending official announcements about the camp.

      http://www.ekathimerini.com/244771/article/ekathimerini/news/greek-refugee-camp-unable-to-house-new-arrivals

  • Message de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 24.08.2019:

    Le #Hotspot de #Moria fonctionne actuellement avec un #taux_d’occupation qui atteint presque au triple de sa #capacité_d’accueil : voir les #chiffres donnés par le ministère pour le 15 août où on voit que pour une capacité d’accueil de 3.000 il y avait 8. 218 occupants, chiffre qui a sans doute augmenté depuis, étant donné les arrivées plus récentes. Début août déjà il y avait 2.500 personnes vivant à l’extérieur du camp dans des tentes et de abris de fortune. Au moment où plus que 10.000 réfugiés sont bloqués dans l’île de #Lesbos, il y a, selon un rapport du directeur du hot-spot, 3.000 d’entre eux, pour qui le confinement géographique a été levé ; malgré le fait qu’ils ont le droit de se déplacer librement en Grèce continental, aucune mesure n’est prévue pour leur transfert au continent.

    Source:


    https://infocrisis.gov.gr/5503/national-situational-picture-regarding-the-islands-at-eastern-aegean-sea-15-8-2019/?lang=en

    #statistiques #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #îles #2019

  • Refugee, volunteer, prisoner: #Sarah_Mardini and Europe’s hardening line on migration

    Early last August, Sarah Mardini sat on a balcony on the Greek island of Lesvos. As the sun started to fade, a summer breeze rose off the Aegean Sea. She leaned back in her chair and relaxed, while the Turkish coastline, only 16 kilometres away, formed a silhouette behind her.

    Three years before, Mardini had arrived on this island from Syria – a dramatic journey that made international headlines. Now she was volunteering her time helping other refugees. She didn’t know it yet, but in a few weeks that work would land her in prison.

    Mardini had crossed the narrow stretch of water from Turkey in August 2015, landing on Lesvos after fleeing her home in Damascus to escape the Syrian civil war. On the way, she almost drowned when the engine of the inflatable dinghy she was travelling in broke down.

    More than 800,000 people followed a similar route from the Turkish coast to the Greek Islands that year. Almost 800 of them are now dead or missing.

    As the boat Mardini was in pitched and spun, she slipped overboard and struggled to hold it steady in the violent waves. Her sister, Yusra, three years younger, soon joined. Both girls were swimmers, and their act of heroism likely saved the 18 other people on board. They eventually made it to Germany and received asylum. Yusra went on to compete in the 2016 Olympics for the first ever Refugee Olympic Team. Sarah, held back from swimming by an injury, returned to Lesvos to help other refugees.

    On the balcony, Mardini, 23, was enjoying a rare moment of respite from long days spent working in the squalid Moria refugee camp. For the first time in a long time, she was looking forward to the future. After years spent between Lesvos and Berlin, she had decided to return to her university studies in Germany.

    But when she went to the airport to leave, shortly after The New Humanitarian visited her, Mardini was arrested. Along with several other volunteers from Emergency Response Centre International, or ERCI, the Greek non-profit where she volunteered, Mardini was charged with belonging to a criminal organisation, people smuggling, money laundering, and espionage.

    According to watchdog groups, the case against Mardini is not an isolated incident. Amnesty International says it is part of a broader trend of European governments taking a harder line on immigration and using anti-smuggling laws to de-legitimise humanitarian assistance to refugees and migrants.

    Far-right Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini recently pushed through legislation that ends humanitarian protection for migrants and asylum seekers, while Italy and Greece have ramped up pressure on maritime search and rescue NGOs, forcing them to shutter operations. At the end of March, the EU ended naval patrols in the Mediterranean that had saved the lives of thousands of migrants.

    In 2016, five other international volunteers were arrested on Lesvos on similar charges to Mardini. They were eventually acquitted, but dozens of other cases across Europe fit a similar pattern: from Denmark to France, people have been arrested, charged, and sometimes successfully prosecuted under anti-smuggling regulations based on actions they took to assist migrants.

    Late last month, Salam Kamal-Aldeen, a Danish national who founded the rescue non-governmental organisation Team Humanity, filed an application with the European Court of Human Rights, challenging what he says is a Greek crackdown on lifesaving activities.

    According to Maria Serrano, senior campaigner on migration at Amnesty International, collectively the cases have done tremendous damage in terms of public perception of humanitarian work in Europe. “The atmosphere… is very hostile for anyone that is trying to help, and this [has a] chilling effect on other people that want to help,” she said.

    As for the case against Mardini and the other ERCI volunteers, Human Rights Watch concluded that the accusations are baseless. “It seems like a bad joke, and a scary one as well because of what the implications are for humanitarian activists and NGOs just trying to save people’s lives,” said Bill Van Esveld, who researched the case for HRW.

    While the Lesvos prosecutor could not be reached for comment, the Greek police said in a statement after Mardini’s arrest that she and other aid workers were “active in the systematic facilitation of illegal entrance of foreigners” – a violation of the country’s Migration Code.

    Mardini spent 108 days in pre-trial detention before being released on bail at the beginning of December. The case against her is still open. Her lawyer expects news on what will happen next in June or July. If convicted, Mardini could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison.

    “It seems like a bad joke, and a scary one as well because of what the implications are for humanitarian activists and NGOs just trying to save people’s lives.”

    Return to Lesvos

    The arrest and pending trial are the latest in a series of events, starting with the beginning of the Syrian war in 2011, that have disrupted any sense of normalcy in Mardini’s life.

    Even after making it to Germany in 2015, Mardini never really settled in. She was 20 years old and in an unfamiliar city. The secure world she grew up in had been destroyed, and the future felt like a blank and confusing canvas. “I missed Syria and Damascus and just this warmness in everything,” she said.

    While wading through these emotions, Mardini received a Facebook message in 2016 from an ERCI volunteer. The swimming sisters from Syria who saved a boat full of refugees were an inspiration. Volunteers on Lesvos told their story to children on the island to give them hope for the future, the volunteer said, inviting Mardini to visit. “It totally touched my heart,” Mardini recalled. “Somebody saw me as a hope… and there is somebody asking for my help.”

    So Mardini flew back to Lesvos in August 2016. Just one year earlier she had nearly died trying to reach the island, before enduring a journey across the Balkans that involved hiding from police officers in forests, narrowly escaping being kidnapped, sneaking across tightly controlled borders, and spending a night in police custody in a barn. Now, all it took was a flight to retrace the route.

    Her first day on the island, Mardini was trained to help refugees disembark safely when their boats reached the shores. By nighttime, she was sitting on the beach watching for approaching vessels. It was past midnight, and the sea was calm. Lights from the Turkish coastline twinkled serenely across the water. After about half an hour, a walkie talkie crackled. The Greek Coast Guard had spotted a boat.

    Volunteers switched on the headlights of their cars, giving the refugees something to aim for. Thin lines of silver from the reflective strips on the refugees’ life jackets glinted in the darkness, and the rumble of a motor and chatter of voices drifted across the water. As the boat came into view, volunteers yelled: “You are in Greece. You are safe. Turn the engine off.”

    Mardini was in the water again, holding the boat steady, helping people disembark. When the rush of activity ended, a feeling of guilt washed over her. “I felt it was unfair that they were on a refugee boat and I’m a rescuer,” she said.

    But Mardini was hooked. She spent the next two weeks assisting with boat landings and teaching swimming lessons to the kids who idolised her and her sister. Even after returning to Germany, she couldn’t stop thinking about Lesvos. “I decided to come back for one month,” she said, “and I never left.”
    Moria camp

    The island became the centre of Mardini’s life. She put her studies at Bard College Berlin on hold to spend more time in Greece. “I found what I love,” she explained.

    Meanwhile, the situation on the Greek islands was changing. In 2017, just under 30,000 people crossed the Aegean Sea to Greece, compared to some 850,000 in 2015. There were fewer arrivals, but those who did come were spending more time in camps with dismal conditions.

    “You have people who are dying and living in a four-metre tent with seven relatives. They have limited access to water. Hygiene is zero. Privacy is zero. Security: zero. Children’s rights: zero. Human rights: zero… You feel useless. You feel very useless.”

    The volunteer response shifted accordingly, towards the camps, and when TNH visited Mardini she moved around the island with a sense of purpose and familiarity, joking with other volunteers and greeting refugees she knew from her work in the streets.

    Much of her time was spent as a translator for ERCI’s medical team in Moria. The camp, the main one on Lesvos, was built to accommodate around 3,000 people, but by 2018 housed close to 9,000. Streams of sewage ran between tents. People were forced to stand in line for hours for food. The wait to see a doctor could take months, and conditions were causing intense psychological strain. Self-harm and suicide attempts were increasing, especially among children, and sexual and gender-based violence were commonplace.

    Mardini was on the front lines. “What we do in Moria is fighting the fire,” she said. “You have people who are dying and living in a four-metre tent with seven relatives. They have limited access to water. Hygiene is zero. Privacy is zero. Security: zero. Children’s rights: zero. Human rights: zero… You feel useless. You feel very useless.”

    By then, Mardini had been on Lesvos almost continuously for nine months, and it was taking a toll. She seemed to be weighed down, slipping into long moments of silence. “I’m taking in. I’m taking in. I’m taking in. But it’s going to come out at some point,” she said.

    It was time for a break. Mardini had decided to return to Berlin at the end of the month to resume her studies and make an effort to invest in her life there. But she planned to remain connected to Lesvos. “I love this island… the sad thing is that it’s not nice for everybody. Others see it as just a jail.”
    Investigation and Arrest

    The airport on Lesvos is on the shoreline close to where Mardini helped with the boat landing her first night as a volunteer. On 21 August, when she went to check in for her flight to Berlin, she was surrounded by five Greek police officers. “They kind of circled around me, and they said that I should come with [them],” Mardini recalled.

    Mardini knew that the police on Lesvos had been investigating her and some of the other volunteers from ERCI, but at first she still didn’t realise what was happening. Seven months earlier, in February 2018, she was briefly detained with a volunteer named Sean Binder, a German national. They had been driving one of ERCI’s 4X4s when police stopped them, searched the vehicle, and found Greek military license plates hidden under the civilian plates.

    When Mardini was arrested at the airport, Binder turned himself in too, and the police released a statement saying they were investigating 30 people – six Greeks and 24 foreigners – for involvement in “organised migrant trafficking rings”. Two Greek nationals, including ERCI’s founder, were also arrested at the time.

    While it is still not clear what the plates were doing on the vehicle, according Van Esveld from HRW, “it does seem clear… neither Sarah or Sean had any idea that these plates were [there]”.

    The felony charges against Mardini and Binder were ultimately unconnected to the plates, and HRW’s Van Esveld said the police work appears to either have been appallingly shoddy or done in bad faith. HRW took the unusual step of commenting on the ongoing case because it appeared authorities were “literally just [taking] a humanitarian activity and labelling it as a crime”, he added.
    Detention

    After two weeks in a cell on Lesvos, Mardini was sent to a prison in Athens. On the ferry ride to the mainland, her hands were shackled. That’s when it sank in: “Ok, it’s official,” she thought. “They’re transferring me to jail.”

    In prison, Mardini was locked in a cell with eight other women from 8pm to 8am. During the day, she would go to Greek classes and art classes, drink coffee with other prisoners, and watch the news.

    She was able to make phone calls, and her mother, who was also granted asylum in Germany, came to visit a number of times. “The first time we saw each other we just broke down in tears,” Mardini recalled. It had been months since they’d seen each other, and now they could only speak for 20 minutes, separated by a plastic barrier.

    Most of the time, Mardini just read, finishing more than 40 books, including Nelson Mandela’s autobiography, which helped her come to terms with her situation. “I decided this is my life right now, and I need to get something out of it,” she explained. “I just accepted what’s going on.”

    People can be held in pre-trial detention for up to 18 months in Greece. But at the beginning of December, a judge accepted Mardini’s lawyer’s request for bail. Binder was released the same day.
    Lingering fear

    On Lesvos, where everyone in the volunteer community knows each other, the case came as a shock. “People started to be... scared,” said Claudia Drost, a 23-year-old from the Netherlands and close friend of Mardini’s who started volunteering on the island in 2016. “There was a feeling of fear that if the police… put [Mardini] in prison, they can put anyone in prison.”

    “We are standing [up] for what we are doing because we are saving people and we are helping people.”

    That feeling was heightened by the knowledge that humanitarians across Europe were being charged with crimes for helping refugees and migrants.

    During the height of the migration crisis in Europe, between the fall of 2015 and winter 2016, some 300 people were arrested in Denmark on charges related to helping refugees. In August 2016, French farmer Cédric Herrou was arrested for helping migrants and asylum seekers cross the French-Italian border. In October 2017, 12 people were charged with facilitating illegal migration in Belgium for letting asylum seekers stay in their homes and use their cellphones. And last June, the captain of a search and rescue boat belonging to the German NGO Mission Lifeline was arrested in Malta and charged with operating the vessel without proper registration or license.

    Drost said that after Mardini was released the fear faded a bit, but still lingers. There is also a sense of defiance. “We are standing [up] for what we are doing because we are saving people and we are helping people,” Drost said.

    As for Mardini, the charges have forced her to disengage from humanitarian work on Lesvos, at least until the case is over. She is back in Berlin and has started university again. “I think because I’m not in Lesvos anymore I’m just finding it very good to be here,” she said. “I’m kind of in a stable moment just to reflect about my life and what I want to do.”

    But she also knows the stability could very well be fleeting. With the prospect of more time in prison hanging over her, the future is still a blank canvas. People often ask if she is optimistic about the case. “No,” she said. “In the first place, they put me in… jail.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/feature/2019/05/02/refugee-volunteer-prisoner-sarah-mardini-and-europe-s-hardening-
    #criminalisation #délit_de_solidarité #asile #migrations #solidarité #réfugiés #Grèce #Lesbos #Moria #camps_de_réfugiés #Europe

    Avec une frise chronologique:

    ping @reka

    • Demand the charges against Sarah and Seán are dropped

      In Greece, you can go to jail for trying to save a life. It happened to Seán Binder, 25, and Sarah Mardini, 24, when they helped to spot refugee boats in distress. They risk facing up to 25 years in prison.

      Sarah and Seán met when they volunteered together as trained rescue workers in Lesvos, Greece. Sarah is a refugee from Syria. Her journey to Europe made international news - she and her sister saved 18 people by dragging their drowning boat to safety. Seán Binder is a son of a Vietnamese refugee. They couldn’t watch refugees drown and do nothing.

      Their humanitarian work saved lives, but like many others across Europe, they are being criminalised for helping refugees. The pair risk facing up to 25 years in prison on ‘people smuggling’ charges. They already spent more than 100 days in prison before being released on bail in December 2018.

      “Humanitarian work isn’t criminal, nor is it heroic. Helping others should be normal. The real people who are suffering and dying are those already fleeing persecution." Seán Binder

      Criminalising humanitarian workers and abandoning refugees at sea won’t stop refugees crossing the sea, but it will cause many more deaths.

      Solidarity is not a crime. Call on the Greek authorities to:

      Drop the charges against Sarah Mardini and Seán Binder
      Publicly acknowledge the legitimacy of humanitarian work which supports refugee and migrant rights

      https://www.amnesty.org/en/get-involved/write-for-rights/?viewCampaign=48221

  • A #Lesbos, la dignité perdue des migrants afghans dans le camp de Moria - Asialyst
    https://asialyst.com/fr/2018/10/20/lesbos-dignite-perdue-migrants-afghans-camp-moria

    uir la guerre en Afghanistan, traverser mille morts et se retrouver parqués dans une île grecque. Et attendre. C’est le quotidien des migrants afghans arrivés à Lesbos en Grêce. Ici, le camp de Moria abrite la majorité des 10 000 demandeurs d’asile résidant sur l’île. Marine Jeannin et Sarah Samya Anfis sont parvenues à entrer illégalement dans ce camp interdit aux journalistes par peur des reportages alarmistes. Elles ont trouvé une communauté afghane en proie à la violence, et qui ne reçoit plus ni soins, ni justice.

    #migrations #asile #grèce #camps #méditerranée cc @cdb_77

  • The Vulnerability Contest

    Traumatized Afghan child soldiers who were forced to fight in Syria struggle to find protection in Europe’s asylum lottery.

    Mosa did not choose to come forward. Word had spread among the thousands of asylum seekers huddled inside Moria that social workers were looking for lone children among the general population. High up on the hillside, in the Afghan area of the chaotic refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos, some residents knew someone they suspected was still a minor. They led the aid workers to Mosa.

    The boy, whose broad and beardless face mark him out as a member of the Hazara ethnic group, had little reason to trust strangers. It was hard to persuade him just to sit with them and listen. Like many lone children, Mosa had slipped through the age assessment carried out on first arrival at Moria: He was registered as 27 years old. With the help of a translator, the social worker explained that there was still time to challenge his classification as an adult. But Mosa did not seem to be able to engage with what he was being told. It would take weeks to establish trust and reveal his real age and background.

    Most new arrivals experience shock when their hopes of a new life in Europe collide with Moria, the refugee camp most synonymous with the miserable consequences of Europe’s efforts to contain the flow of refugees and migrants across the Aegean. When it was built, the camp was meant to provide temporary shelter for fewer than 2,000 people. Since the European Union struck a deal in March 2016 with Turkey under which new arrivals are confined to Greece’s islands, Moria’s population has swollen to 9,000. It has become notorious for overcrowding, snowbound tents, freezing winter deaths, violent protests and suicides by adults and children alike.

    While all asylum systems are subjective, he said that the situation on Greece’s islands has turned the search for protection into a “lottery.”

    Stathis Poularakis is a lawyer who previously served for two years on an appeal committee dealing with asylum cases in Greece and has worked extensively on Lesbos. While all asylum systems are subjective, he said that the situation on Greece’s islands has turned the search for protection into a “lottery.”

    Asylum claims on Lesbos can take anywhere between six months and more than two years to be resolved. In the second quarter of 2018, Greece faced nearly four times as many asylum claims per capita as Germany. The E.U. has responded by increasing the presence of the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) and broadening its remit so that EASO officials can conduct asylum interviews. But the promises that EASO will bring Dutch-style efficiency conceal the fact that the vast majority of its hires are not seconded from other member states but drawn from the same pool of Greeks as the national asylum service.

    Asylum caseworkers at Moria face an overwhelming backlog and plummeting morale. A serving EASO official describes extraordinary “pressure to go faster” and said there was “so much subjectivity in the system.” The official also said that it was human nature to reject more claims “when you see every other country is closing its borders.”

    Meanwhile, the only way to escape Moria while your claim is being processed is to be recognized as a “vulnerable” case. Vulnerables get permission to move to the mainland or to more humane accommodation elsewhere on the island. The term is elastic and can apply to lone children and women, families or severely physically or mentally ill people. In all cases the onus is on the asylum seeker ultimately to persuade the asylum service, Greek doctors or the United Nations Refugee Agency that they are especially vulnerable.

    The ensuing scramble to get out of Moria has turned the camp into a vast “vulnerability contest,” said Poularakis. It is a ruthless competition that the most heavily traumatized are often in no condition to understand, let alone win.

    Twice a Refugee

    Mosa arrived at Moria in October 2017 and spent his first night in Europe sleeping rough outside the arrivals tent. While he slept someone stole his phone. When he awoke he was more worried about the lost phone than disputing the decision of the Frontex officer who registered him as an adult. Poularakis said age assessors are on the lookout for adults claiming to be children, but “if you say you’re an adult, no one is going to object.”

    Being a child has never afforded Mosa any protection in the past: He did not understand that his entire future could be at stake. Smugglers often warn refugee children not to reveal their real age, telling them that they will be prevented from traveling further if they do not pretend to be over 18 years old.

    Like many other Hazara of his generation, Mosa was born in Iran, the child of refugees who fled Afghanistan. Sometimes called “the cursed people,” the Hazara are followers of Shia Islam and an ethnic and religious minority in Afghanistan, a country whose wars are usually won by larger ethnic groups and followers of Sunni Islam. Their ancestry, traced by some historians to Genghis Khan, also means they are highly visible and have been targets for persecution by Afghan warlords from 19th-century Pashtun kings to today’s Taliban.

    In recent decades, millions of Hazara have fled Afghanistan, many of them to Iran, where their language, Dari, is a dialect of Persian Farsi, the country’s main language.

    “We had a life where we went from work to home, which were both underground in a basement,” he said. “There was nothing (for us) like strolling the streets. I was trying not to be seen by anyone. I ran from the police like I would from a street dog.”

    Iran hosts 950,000 Afghan refugees who are registered with the U.N. and another 1.5 million undocumented Afghans. There are no official refugee camps, making displaced Afghans one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world. For those without the money to pay bribes, there is no route to permanent residency or citizenship. Most refugees survive without papers on the outskirts of cities such as the capital, Tehran. Those who received permits, before Iran stopped issuing them altogether in 2007, must renew them annually. The charges are unpredictable and high. Mostly, the Afghan Hazara survive as an underclass, providing cheap labor in workshops and constructions sites. This was how Mosa grew up.

    “We had a life where we went from work to home, which were both underground in a basement,” he said. “There was nothing (for us) like strolling the streets. I was trying not to be seen by anyone. I ran from the police like I would from a street dog.”

    But he could not remain invisible forever and one day in October 2016, on his way home from work, he was detained by police for not having papers.

    Sitting in one of the cantinas opposite the entrance to Moria, Mosa haltingly explained what happened next. How he was threatened with prison in Iran or deportation to Afghanistan, a country in which he has never set foot. How he was told that that the only way out was to agree to fight in Syria – for which they would pay him and reward him with legal residence in Iran.

    “In Iran, you have to pay for papers,” said Mosa. “If you don’t pay, you don’t have papers. I do not know Afghanistan. I did not have a choice.”

    As he talked, Mosa spread out a sheaf of papers from a battered plastic wallet. Along with asylum documents was a small notepad decorated with pink and mauve elephants where he keeps the phone numbers of friends and family. It also contains a passport-sized green booklet with the crest of the Islamic Republic of Iran. It is a temporary residence permit. Inside its shiny cover is the photograph of a scared-looking boy, whom the document claims was born 27 years ago. It is the only I.D. he has ever owned and the date of birth has been faked to hide the fact that the country that issues it has been sending children to war.

    Mosa is not alone among the Hazara boys who have arrived in Greece seeking protection, carrying identification papers with inflated ages. Refugees Deeply has documented the cases of three Hazara child soldiers and corroborated their accounts with testimony from two other underage survivors. Their stories are of childhoods twice denied: once in Syria, where they were forced to fight, and then again after fleeing to Europe, where they are caught up in a system more focused on hard borders than on identifying the most damaged and vulnerable refugees.

    From Teenage Kicks to Adult Nightmares

    Karim’s descent into hell began with a prank. Together with a couple of friends, he recorded an angsty song riffing on growing up as a Hazara teenager in Tehran. Made when he was 16 years old, the song was meant to be funny. His band did not even have a name. The boys uploaded the track on a local file-sharing platform in 2014 and were as surprised as anyone when it was downloaded thousands of times. But after the surprise came a creeping sense of fear. Undocumented Afghan refugee families living in Tehran usually try to avoid drawing attention to themselves. Karim tried to have the song deleted, but after two months there was a knock on the door. It was the police.

    “I asked them how they found me,” he said. “I had no documents but they knew where I lived.”

    Already estranged from his family, the teenager was transported from his life of working in a pharmacy and staying with friends to life in a prison outside the capital. After two weeks inside, he was given three choices: to serve a five-year sentence; to be deported to Afghanistan; or to redeem himself by joining the Fatemiyoun.

    According to Iranian propaganda, the Fatemiyoun are Afghan volunteers deployed to Syria to protect the tomb of Zainab, the granddaughter of the Prophet Mohammad. In reality, the Fatemiyoun Brigade is a unit of Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard, drawn overwhelmingly from Hazara communities, and it has fought in Iraq and Yemen, as well as Syria. Some estimates put its full strength at 15,000, which would make it the second-largest foreign force in support of the Assad regime, behind the Lebanese militia group Hezbollah.

    Karim was told he would be paid and given a one-year residence permit during leave back in Iran. Conscripts are promised that if they are “martyred,” their family will receive a pension and permanent status. “I wasn’t going to Afghanistan and I wasn’t going to prison,” said Karim. So he found himself forced to serve in the #Fatemiyoun.

    His first taste of the new life came when he was transferred to a training base outside Tehran, where the recruits, including other children, were given basic weapons training and religious indoctrination. They marched, crawled and prayed under the brigade’s yellow flag with a green arch, crossed by assault rifles and a Koranic phrase: “With the Help of God.”

    “Imagine me at 16,” said Karim. “I have no idea how to kill a bird. They got us to slaughter animals to get us ready. First, they prepare your brain to kill.”

    The 16-year-old’s first deployment was to Mosul in Iraq, where he served four months. When he was given leave back in Iran, Karim was told that to qualify for his residence permit he would need to serve a second term, this time in Syria. They were first sent into the fight against the so-called Islamic State in Raqqa. Because of his age and physique, Karim and some of the other underage soldiers were moved to the medical corps. He said that there were boys as young as 14 and he remembers a 15-year-old who fought using a rocket-propelled grenade launcher.

    “One prisoner was killed by being hung by his hair from a tree. They cut off his fingers one by one and cauterized the wounds with gunpowder.”

    “I knew nothing about Syria. I was just trying to survive. They were making us hate ISIS, dehumanizing them. Telling us not to leave one of them alive.” Since media reports revealed the existence of the Fatemiyoun, the brigade has set up a page on Facebook. Among pictures of “proud volunteers,” it shows stories of captured ISIS prisoners being fed and cared for. Karim recalls a different story.

    “One prisoner was killed by being hung by his hair from a tree. They cut off his fingers one by one and cauterized the wounds with gunpowder.”

    The casualties on both sides were overwhelming. At the al-Razi hospital in Aleppo, the young medic saw the morgue overwhelmed with bodies being stored two or three to a compartment. Despite promises to reward the families of martyrs, Karim said many of the bodies were not sent back to Iran.

    Mosa’s basic training passed in a blur. A shy boy whose parents had divorced when he was young and whose father became an opium addict, he had always shrunk from violence. He never wanted to touch the toy guns that other boys played with. Now he was being taught to break down, clean and fire an assault rifle.

    The trainees were taken three times a day to the imam, who preached to them about their holy duty and the iniquities of ISIS, often referred to as Daesh.

    “They told us that Daesh was the same but worse than the Taliban,” said Mosa. “I didn’t listen to them. I didn’t go to Syria by choice. They forced me to. I just needed the paper.”

    Mosa was born in 2001. Before being deployed to Syria, the recruits were given I.D. tags and papers that deliberately overstated their age: In 2017, Human Rights Watch released photographs of the tombstones of eight Afghan children who had died in Syria and whose families identified them as having been under 18 years old. The clerk who filled out Mosa’s forms did not trouble himself with complex math: He just changed 2001 to 1991. Mosa was one of four underage soldiers in his group. The boys were scared – their hands shook so hard they kept dropping their weapons. Two of them were dead within days of reaching the front lines.

    “I didn’t even know where we were exactly, somewhere in the mountains in a foreign country. I was scared all the time. Every time I saw a friend dying in front of my eyes I was thinking I would be next,” said Mosa.

    He has flashbacks of a friend who died next to him after being shot in the face by a sniper. After the incident, he could not sleep for four nights. The worst, he said, were the sudden raids by ISIS when they would capture Fatemiyoun fighters: “God knows what happened to them.”

    Iran does not release figures on the number of Fatemiyoun casualties. In a rare interview earlier this year, a senior officer in the Iranian Revolutionary Guard suggested as many as 1,500 Fatemiyoun had been killed in Syria. In Mashhad, an Iranian city near the border with Afghanistan where the brigade was first recruited, video footage has emerged of families demanding the bodies of their young men believed to have died in Syria. Mosa recalls patrols in Syria where 150 men and boys would go out and only 120 would return.

    Escaping Syria

    Abbas had two weeks left in Syria before going back to Iran on leave. After 10 weeks in what he describes as a “living hell,” he had begun to believe he might make it out alive. It was his second stint in Syria and, still only 17 years old, he had been chosen to be a paramedic, riding in the back of a 2008 Chevrolet truck converted into a makeshift ambulance.

    He remembers thinking that the ambulance and the hospital would have to be better than the bitter cold of the front line. His abiding memory from then was the sound of incoming 120mm shells. “They had a special voice,” Abbas said. “And when you hear it, you must lie down.”

    Following 15 days of nursing training, during which he was taught how to find a vein and administer injections, he was now an ambulance man, collecting the dead and wounded from the battlefields on which the Fatemiyoun were fighting ISIS.

    Abbas grew up in Ghazni in Afghanistan, but his childhood ended when his father died from cancer in 2013. Now the provider for the family, he traveled with smugglers across the border into Iran, to work for a tailor in Tehran who had known his father. He worked without documents and faced the same threats as the undocumented Hazara children born in Iran. Even more dangerous were the few attempts he made to return to Ghazni. The third time he attempted to hop the border he was captured by Iranian police.

    Abbas was packed onto a transport, along with 23 other children, and sent to Ordugah-i Muhaceran, a camplike detention center outside Mashhad. When they got there the Shia Hazara boys were separated from Sunni Pashtuns, Afghanistan’s largest ethnic group, who were pushed back across the border. Abbas was given the same choice as Karim and Mosa before him: Afghanistan or Syria. Many of the other forced recruits Abbas met in training, and later fought alongside in Syria, were addicts with a history of substance abuse.

    Testimony from three Fatemiyoun child soldiers confirmed that Tramadol was routinely used by recruits to deaden their senses, leaving them “feeling nothing” even in combat situations but, nonetheless, able to stay awake for days at a time.

    The Fatemiyoun officers dealt with withdrawal symptoms by handing out Tramadol, an opioid painkiller that is used to treat back pain but sometimes abused as a cheap alternative to methadone. The drug is a slow-release analgesic. Testimony from three Fatemiyoun child soldiers confirmed that it was routinely used by recruits to deaden their senses, leaving them “feeling nothing” even in combat situations but, nonetheless, able to stay awake for days at a time. One of the children reiterated that the painkiller meant he felt nothing. Users describe feeling intensely thirsty but say they avoid drinking water because it triggers serious nausea and vomiting. Tramadol is addictive and prolonged use can lead to insomnia and seizures.

    Life in the ambulance had not met Abbas’ expectations. He was still sent to the front line, only now it was to collect the dead and mutilated. Some soldiers shot themselves in the feet to escape the conflict.

    “We picked up people with no feet and no hands. Some of them were my friends,” Abbas said. “One man was in small, small pieces. We collected body parts I could not recognize and I didn’t know if they were Syrian or Iranian or Afghan. We just put them in bags.”

    Abbas did not make it to the 12th week. One morning, driving along a rubble-strewn road, his ambulance collided with an anti-tank mine. Abbas’ last memory of Syria is seeing the back doors of the vehicle blasted outward as he was thrown onto the road.

    When he awoke he was in a hospital bed in Iran. He would later learn that the Syrian ambulance driver had been killed and that the other Afghan medic in the vehicle had lost both his legs. At the time, his only thought was to escape.

    The Toll on Child Soldiers

    Alice Roorda first came into contact with child soldiers in 2001 in the refugee camps of Sierra Leone in West Africa. A child psychologist, she was sent there by the United Kingdom-based charity War Child. She was one of three psychologists for a camp of more than 5,000 heavily traumatized survivors of one of West Africa’s more brutal conflicts.

    “There was almost nothing we could do,” she admitted.

    The experience, together with later work in Uganda, has given her a deep grounding in the effects of war and post-conflict trauma on children. She said prolonged exposure to conflict zones has physical as well as psychological effects.

    “If you are chronically stressed, as in a war zone, you have consistently high levels of the two basic stress hormones: adrenaline and cortisol.”

    Even after reaching a calmer situation, the “stress baseline” remains high, she said. This impacts everything from the immune system to bowel movements. Veterans often suffer from complications related to the continual engagement of the psoas, or “fear muscle” – the deepest muscles in the body’s core, which connect the spine, through the pelvis, to the femurs.

    “With prolonged stress you start to see the world around you as more dangerous.” The medial prefrontal cortex, the section of the brain that interprets threat levels, is also affected, said Roorda. This part of the brain is sometimes called the “watchtower.”

    “When your watchtower isn’t functioning well you see everything as more dangerous. You are on high alert. This is not a conscious response; it is because the stress is already so close to the surface.”

    Psychological conditions that can be expected to develop include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Left untreated, these stress levels can lead to physical symptoms ranging from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS or ME) to high blood pressure or irritable bowel syndrome. Also common are heightened sensitivity to noise and insomnia.

    The trauma of war can also leave children frozen at the point when they were traumatized. “Their life is organized as if the trauma is still ongoing,” said Roorda. “It is difficult for them to take care of themselves, to make rational well informed choices, and to trust people.”

    The starting point for any treatment of child soldiers, said Roorda, is a calm environment. They need to release the tension with support groups and physical therapy, she said, and “a normal bedtime.”

    The Dutch psychologist, who is now based in Athens, acknowledged that what she is describing is the exact opposite of the conditions at #Moria.

    Endgame

    Karim is convinced that his facility for English has saved his life. While most Hazara boys arrive in Europe speaking only Farsi, Karim had taught himself some basic English before reaching Greece. As a boy in Tehran he had spent hours every day trying to pick up words and phrases from movies that he watched with subtitles on his phone. His favorite was The Godfather, which he said he must have seen 25 times. He now calls English his “safe zone” and said he prefers it to Farsi.

    When Karim reached Greece in March 2016, new arrivals were not yet confined to the islands. No one asked him if he was a child or an adult. He paid smugglers to help him escape Iran while on leave from Syria and after crossing through Turkey landed on Chios. Within a day and a half, he had passed through the port of Piraeus and reached Greece’s northern border with Macedonia, at Idomeni.

    When he realized the border was closed, he talked to some of the international aid workers who had come to help at the makeshift encampment where tens of thousands of refugees and migrants waited for a border that would not reopen. They ended up hiring him as a translator. Two years on, his English is now much improved and Karim has worked for a string of international NGOs and a branch of the Greek armed forces, where he was helped to successfully apply for asylum.

    The same job has also brought him to Moria. He earns an above-average salary for Greece and at first he said that his work on Lesbos is positive: “I’m not the only one who has a shitty background. It balances my mind to know that I’m not the only one.”

    But then he admits that it is difficult hearing and interpreting versions of his own life story from Afghan asylum seekers every day at work. He has had problems with depression and suffered flashbacks, “even though I’m in a safe country now.”

    Abbas got the help he needed to win the vulnerability contest. After he was initially registered as an adult, his age assessment was overturned and he was transferred from Moria to a shelter for children on Lesbos. He has since been moved again to a shelter in mainland Greece. While he waits to hear the decision on his protection status, Abbas – like other asylum seekers in Greece – receives 150 euros ($170) a month. This amount needs to cover all his expenses, from food and clothing to phone credit. The money is not enough to cover a regular course of the antidepressant Prozac and the sleeping pills he was prescribed by the psychiatrist he was able to see on Lesbos.

    “I save them for when it gets really bad,” he said.

    Since moving to the mainland he has been hospitalized once with convulsions, but his main worry is the pain in his groin. Abbas underwent a hernia operation in Iran, the result of injuries sustained as a child lifting adult bodies into the ambulance. He has been told that he will need to wait for four months to see a doctor in Greece who can tell him if he needs another operation.

    “I would like to go back to school,” he said. But in reality, Abbas knows that he will need to work and there is little future for an Afghan boy who can no longer lift heavy weights.

    Walking into an Afghan restaurant in downtown Athens – near Victoria Square, where the people smugglers do business – Abbas is thrilled to see Farsi singers performing on the television above the door. “I haven’t been in an Afghan restaurant for maybe three years,” he said to explain his excitement. His face brightens again when he catches sight of Ghormeh sabzi, a herb stew popular in Afghanistan and Iran that reminds him of his mother. “I miss being with them,” he said, “being among my family.”

    When the dish arrives he pauses before eating, taking out his phone and carefully photographing the plate from every angle.

    Mosa is about to mark the end of a full year in Moria. He remains in the same drab tent that reminds him every day of Syria. Serious weight loss has made his long limbs – the ones that made it easier for adults to pretend he was not a child – almost comically thin. His skin is laced with scars, but he refuses to go into detail about how he got them. Mosa has now turned 18 and seems to realize that his best chance of getting help may have gone.

    “Those people who don’t have problems, they give them vulnerability (status),” he said with evident anger. “If you tell them the truth, they don’t help you.”

    Then he apologises for the flash of temper. “I get upset and angry and my body shakes,” he said.

    Mosa explained that now when he gets angry he has learned to remove himself: “Sometimes I stuff my ears with toilet paper to make it quiet.”

    It is 10 months since Mosa had his asylum interview. The questions he expected about his time in the Fatemiyoun never came up. Instead, the interviewers asked him why he had not stayed in Turkey after reaching that country, having run away while on leave in Iran.

    The questions they did ask him point to his likely rejection and deportation. Why, he was asked, was his fear of being persecuted in Afghanistan credible? He told them that he has heard from other Afghan boys that police and security services in the capital, Kabul, were arresting ex-combatants from Syria.

    Like teenagers everywhere, many of the younger Fatemiyoun conscripts took selfies in Syria and posted them on Facebook or shared them on WhatsApp. The images, which include uniforms and insignia, can make him a target for Sunni reprisals. These pictures now haunt him as much as the faces of his dead comrades.

    Meanwhile, the fate he suffered two tours in Syria to avoid now seems to be the most that Europe can offer him. Without any of his earlier anger, he said, “I prefer to kill myself here than go to Afghanistan.”

    #enfants-soldats #syrie #réfugiés #asile #migrations #guerre #conflit #réfugiés_afghans #Afghanistan #ISIS #EI #Etat_islamique #trauma #traumatisme #vulnérabilité

    ping @isskein

  • Grèce : à Lesbos, le camp réservé aux migrants « est un monstre qui ne cesse de s’étendre » - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/09/20/grece-a-lesbos-le-camp-reserve-aux-migrants-est-un-monstre-qui-ne-cesse-d

    Alors que les dirigeants européens sont réunis à Salzbourg pour évoquer notamment les questions migratoires et la création de « centres fermés », les hotspots surpeuplés des îles grecques se trouvent dans une situation explosive.

    L’annonce n’aurait pu mieux tomber : mardi, le gouvernement grec s’est enfin engagé à transférer 2 000 migrants de l’île de Lesbos vers la Grèce continentale d’ici la fin du mois. Une décision censée décongestionner quelque peu le camp surpeuplé de Moria qui abrite près de 9 000 personnes, dont un tiers d’enfants. Or, depuis plusieurs jours, les ONG installés sur place ne cessent d’alerter sur les conditions de vie abjectes dans ce camp, aux allures de caserne, prévu au départ pour 3 000 personnes.

    Car #Moria est censé accueillir l’immense majorité de réfugiés et migrants qui accostent sur l’île (ils sont aujourd’hui plus de 11 000 au total à Lesbos), en provenance des côtes turques qu’on distingue à l’œil nu au large. Généraliser les #hotspots, ou centres fermés, en Europe : c’est justement l’une des options envisagées par les dirigeants européens réunis jeudi et vendredi à Salzbourg en Autriche. En Grèce, les hotspots créés il y a plus de deux ans, ont pourtant abouti à une situation explosive.

    Moria, comme les autres hotspots des îles grecques, n’est certes pas un centre fermé : ses occupants ont le droit de circuler sur l’île, mais pas de la quitter. En mars 2016, un accord inédit entre l’Union européenne et la Turquie devait tarir le flot des arrivées sur cette façade maritime. Comme Ankara avait conditionné le rapatriement éventuel en Turquie de ces naufragés à leur maintien sur les hotspots d’arrivée, les îles grecques qui lui font face se sont rapidement transformées en prison. Condamnant les demandeurs d’asile à attendre de longs mois le résultat de leurs démarches auprès des services concernés. Certains attendent même une réponse depuis déjà deux ans. Et plus le temps passe, plus les candidats sont nombreux.

    Silence

    Si le deal UE-Turquie a fait baisser le nombre des arrivées, elles n’ont jamais cessé. Rien que pour l’année 2018, ce sont près de 20 000 nouveaux arrivants qui ont échoué sur les îles grecques, où l’afflux des barques venues de Turquie reste quasi quotidien. Selon le quotidien grec Kathimerini, 615 personnes sont arrivées rien que le week-end dernier. Pour le seul mois d’août, Lesbos a accueilli plus de 1 800 nouveaux arrivants. Des arrivées désormais peu médiatisées alors que les dirigeants européens se sont écharpés cet été sur l’accueil de bateaux en provenance de Libye. Et pendant ce temps à Lesbos, la situation vire au cauchemar dans un silence assourdissant.

    Il y a une semaine, 19 ONG, dont Oxfam, ont pourtant tiré la sonnette d’alarme dans une déclaration commune, dénonçant des conditions de vie scandaleuses, et appelant les dirigeants européens à abandonner l’idée de créer d’autres centres fermés à travers l’Europe.

    « Moria, c’est un monstre qui n’a cessé de s’étendre. Faute de place on installe désormais des tentes dans les champs d’oliviers voisins, des enfants y dorment au milieu des serpents, des scorpions et de torrents d’eau pestilentiels qui servent d’égouts. A l’intérieur même du camp, il y a une toilette pour 72 résidents, une douche pour 80 personnes. Et encore, ce sont les chiffres du mois de juin, c’est pire aujourd’hui », dénonce Marion Bouchetel, chargée sur place du plaidoyer d’Oxfam, et jointe par téléphone. « Ce sont des gens vulnérables, qui ont vécu des situations traumatisantes, ont été parfois torturés. Quand ils arrivent ici, ils sont piégés pour une durée indéterminée. Ils n’ont souvent aucune information, vivent dans une incertitude totale », ajoute-t-elle.

    Avec un seul médecin pour tout le camp de Moria, les premiers examens psychologiques sont forcément sommaires et de nombreuses personnes vulnérables restent livrées à elles-mêmes. Dans la promiscuité insupportable du camp, les agressions sont devenues fréquentes, les tentatives de suicide et d’automutilations aussi. Elles concernent désormais souvent des adolescents, voire de très jeunes enfants.

    « Enfer »

    « J’ai travaillé quatorze ans dans une clinique psychiatrique de santé mentale à Trieste en Italie », explique dans une lettre ouverte publiée lundi, le docteur Alessandro Barberio, employé par Médecins sans frontières (MSF), à Lesbos. « Pendant toutes ces années de pratique médicale, jamais je n’ai vu un nombre aussi phénoménal qu’à Lesbos de gens en souffrance psychique », poursuit le médecin, qui dénonce la tension extrême dans laquelle vivent les réfugiés mais aussi les personnels soignants. Sans compter le cas particulier des enfants « qui viennent de pays en guerre, ont fait l’expérience de la violence et des traumatismes. Et qui, au lieu de recevoir soins et protection en Europe, sont soumis à la peur, au stress et à la violence », renchérit dans une vidéo récemment postée sur les réseaux sociaux le coordinateur de MSF en Grèce Declan Barry.

    « Comment voulez vous aider quelqu’un qui a subi des violences sexuelles ou a fait une tentative de suicide, si vous le renvoyez chaque soir dans l’enfer du camp de Moria ? Tout en lui annonçant qu’il aura son premier entretien pour sa demande d’asile en avril 2019 ? Actuellement, il n’y a même plus d’avocat sur place pour les seconder dans la procédure d’appel », s’indigne Marion Bouchetel d’Oxfam.

    Il y a une dizaine de jours, la gouverneure pour les îles d’Egée du Nord avait menacé de fermer Moria pour cause d’insalubrité. Est-ce cette annonce, malgré tout difficile à appliquer, qui a poussé le gouvernement grec a annoncé le transfert de 2 000 personnes en Grèce continentale ? Le porte-parole du gouvernement grec a admis mardi que la situation à Moria était « borderline ». Mais de toute façon, ce transfert éventuel ne réglera pas le problème de fond.

    « Il a déjà eu d’autres transferts, au coup par coup, sur le continent. Le problème, c’est que ceux qui partent sont rapidement remplacés par de nouveaux arrivants », soupire Marion Bouchetel. Longtemps, les ONG sur place ont soupçonné les autorités grecques et européennes de laisser la situation se dégrader afin d’envoyer un message négatif aux candidats au départ. Lesquels ne se sont visiblement pas découragés.
    Maria Malagardis

    Cette photo me déglingue ! Cette gamine plantée là les bras collés contre le buste, jambes et pieds serrés, comme au garde à vous. Et ce regard, cette expression, je sais pas mais je n’arrive pas à m’en détacher ! Et forcément le T-shirt ! Et le contexte du camp avec l’article, ça me flingue.

    #immigration #grèce #Lesbos #camps #MSF #europe

  • EU steps up planning for refugee exodus if Assad attacks #Idlib

    Thousands to be moved from Greek island camps to make space in case of mass arrivals.

    Children walk past the remains of burned-out tents after an outbreak of violence at the Moria migrant centre on Lesbos. Aid groups say conditions at the camps on Greek islands are ’shameful’ © Reuters

    Michael Peel in Brussels September 14, 2018

    Thousands of migrants will be moved from Greek island camps within weeks to ease chronic overcrowding and make space if Syrians flee from an assault on rebel-held Idlib province, under plans being discussed by Brussels and Athens.

    Dimitris Avramopoulos, the EU’s migration commissioner, is due to meet senior Greek officials next week including Alexis Tsipras, prime minister, to hammer out a plan to move an initial 3,000 people.

    The proposal is primarily aimed at dealing with what 19 non-governmental groups on Thursday branded “shameful” conditions at the island migrant centres. The strategy also dovetails with contingency planning in case Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s Russian-backed regime launches a full-scale offensive to retake Idlib and triggers an exodus of refugees to Greece via Turkey.

    The numbers in the planned first Greek migrant transfer would go only partway to easing the island overcrowding — and they are just a small fraction of the several million people estimated to be gathered in the Syrian opposition enclave on the Turkish border.

    “It’s important to get those numbers down,” said one EU diplomat of the Greek island camps. “If we have mass arrivals in Greece, it’s going to be very tough. There is no spare capacity.”

    Syria’s Idlib awaits major assault The UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs said this week that 30,000 people had been displaced from their homes by air and ground attacks by the Syrian regime and its allies in the Idlib area, while a full assault could drive out 800,000.

    Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission president, this week warned that the “impending humanitarian disaster” in Idlib must be a “deep and direct concern to us all”.

    17,000 Number of migrants crammed into camps designed for 6,000 The European Commission wants to help Athens accelerate an existing programme to send migrants to the Greek mainland and provide accommodation there to ease the island overcrowding, EU diplomats say.

    The commission said it was working with the Greeks to move 3,000 “vulnerable” people whom Athens has made eligible for transfer, in many cases because they have already applied for asylum and are awaiting the results of their claims.

    Migrant numbers in the island camps have climbed this year, in part because of the time taken to process asylum cases. More than 17,000 are crammed into facilities with capacity of barely 6,000, the NGOs said on Thursday, adding that Moria camp on the island of Lesbos was awash with raw sewage and reports of sexual violence and abuse.

    “It is nothing short of shameful that people are expected to endure such horrific conditions on European soil,” the NGOs said in a statement.

    Mr Avramopoulos, the EU migration commissioner, told reporters on Thursday he knew there were “problems right now, especially in the camp of Moria”. The commission was doing “everything in our power” to support the Greek authorities operationally and financially, he added.

    Recommended The FT View The editorial board The high price of Syria’s next disaster “Money is not an issue,” he said. “Greece has had and will continue having all the financial support to address the migration challenges.

    ” The Greek government has already transferred some asylum seekers to the mainland. It has urged the EU to give it more funds and support.

    EU diplomats say the effect of the Idlib conflict on the Greek situation is hard to judge. One uncertainty is whether Ankara would open its frontier to allow people to escape. Even if civilians do cross the border, it is not certain that they would try to move on to the EU: Turkey already hosts more than 3.5m Syrian refugees.

    The EU secured a 2016 deal with Turkey under which Brussels agreed to pay €6bn in exchange for Ankara taking back migrants who cross from its territory to the Greek islands. The agreement has helped drive a sharp fall in Mediterranean migrant arrival numbers to a fraction of their 2015-16 highs.

    https://www.ft.com/content/0aada630-b77a-11e8-bbc3-ccd7de085ffe
    #Syrie #réfugiés_syriens #asile #migrations #Grèce #guerre #réfugiés_syriens #Moria #vide #plein #géographie_du_vide #géographie_du_plein (on vide le camp pour être prêt à le remplir au cas où...) #politique_migratoire
    cc @reka

  • http://www.migreurop.org/article2893.html

    « Au terme d’un procès bouclé en une semaine à Chios, 32 personnes ont été condamnées, le 27 avril 2018, à 26 mois de prison avec sursis pour coups et blessures sur policiers. Elles avaient été arrêtées un an plus tôt à l’issue d’une manifestation de protestation dans le hotspot de Moria (île de Lesbos) où sont confiné·e·s les migrant·e·s arrivé·e·s par mer.
    (...)
    Le procès : une justice d’exception
    Un système de prison à ciel ouvert organisé à l’échelle européenne
    Instrumentalisation et nouveau système de dissuasion
    Dans quelle mesure ces poursuites ne servent-elles pas un autre dessein ? En interpellant des demandeurs d’asile pour des motifs de type délictuel, instrumentalisant par là même la justice, il est alors possible de les sortir du parcours d’asile et d’organiser leur renvoi vers le(s) pays qu’ils ont fui.

    Cette nouvelle stratégie semble couronner des politiques migratoires de plus en plus dures à l’égard des exilé·e·s, qui s’inscrivent plus que jamais dans une logique de criminalisation. En outre, poussant le cynisme à son paroxysme, les États ont trouvé là une autre manière de décongestionner les hotspots : si le renvoi forcé de la Grèce vers la Turquie n’est pas possible en application de l’arrangement UE/Turquie, si les personnes migrantes ne peuvent être admises sur le territoire européen, il restera toujours l’instrumentalisation de la justice, alternative supplémentaire pour dissuader, punir et éloigner collectivement toute une population ciblée. »

    #grèce-moria #migration #criminalisation

  • Nuit de violences à #Lesbos : des centaines de militants d’#extrême_droite attaquent des migrants

    23 avril 2018 – 11h30 La police a évacué à l’aube ce lundi matin plusieurs dizaines de migrants qui campaient depuis le 18 avril sur la place principale de Mytilène. Ces hommes, femmes et enfants, pour la plupart originaires d’Afghanistan, ont été transportés en bus vers le camp de #Moria. Cette opération a été mise en œuvre après une nuit de violences.

    Dans la soirée de dimanche, environ 200 hommes ont attaqué les migrants en scandant « Brûlez-les vivants » et d’autres slogans racistes. Ils ont jeté des fumigènes, des pétards, des pavés et tout ce qui leur tombait sous la main en direction du campement de fortune. Des militants pro-migrants sont venus en renfort pour protéger la place, tandis que les rangs des assaillants grossissaient.

    Vers 1h du matin, les #affrontements ont atteint la mairie de #Mytilène. Les militants d’extrême-droite ont mis le feu à des poubelles et attaqué la police. Les affrontements n’ont pris in qu’avec l’#évacuation des migrants, dont plusieurs ont été blessés. La situation reste tendue, avec toujours un important dispositif policier déployé.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/les-dernieres-infos-nuit-violences-lesbos
    #asile #migrations #anti-migrants #attaques_racistes #anti-réfugiés #réfugiés #Grèce #it_has_begun #hotspot #violence

    • Non, Mouvement patriotique de Mytilène II. Le gouvernement avait autorisé une manifestation des fascistes à proximité de la place qu’occupaient les réfugiés depuis 5 jours…

      Πόσους φασίστες είπαμε συλλάβατε στη Μυτιλήνη ; | Γνώμες | News 24/7
      http://www.news247.gr/gnomes/leyterhs-arvaniths/posoys-fasistes-eipame-syllavate-sti-mytilini.6605215.html

      Πάμε όμως να δούμε πως λειτουργεί το βαθύ κράτος. Η διαδικτυακή ομάδα « Πατριωτική Κίνηση Μυτιλήνης ΙΙ » αναρτά στο διαδίκτυο μια ανακοίνωση που ζητούσε από τον κόσμο να προσέλθει μαζικά στην υποστολή σημαίας στις 19:00 το απόγευμα της Κυριακής, με την υποσημείωση όμως « Φτάνει πια ». Εφημερίδες του νησιού και μεγάλα αθηναϊκά sites αναπαράγουν το κάλεσμα, τονίζοντας πως πρόκειται για συγκέντρωση υποστήριξης των δύο Ελλήνων αξιωματικών που κρατούνται στην Ανδριανούπολη. Οι δε αστυνομικές αρχές, όχι μόνο δεν ανησυχούν, αλλά επιτρέπουν στους φασίστες να εξαπολύουν επί ώρες επιθέσεις στους πρόσφυγες, δίχως να συλλάβουν ούτε έναν από την ομάδα των ακροδεξιών.

    • Far-right hooligans attack migrants on Lesvos, turn town into battleground

      Police forced dozens of migrants, most Afghan asylum-seekers, who had been camped out on the main square of Lesvos island’s capital since last week, onto buses and transported them to the Moria camp in the early hours of Monday after downtown Mytilini turned into a battleground on Sunday.

      The operation was intended to end clashes that raged all night in the center of the eastern Aegean island’s capital after a group of some 200 men chanting far-right slogans attacked the migrants who had been squatting on the square since last Wednesday in protest at their detention in Moria camp and delays in asylum processing.

      The attack started at around 8 p.m. in the wake of a gathering of several hundred people at a flag ceremony in support of two Greek soldiers who have been in a prison in Turkey since early March, when some 200 men from that group tried to break through a police cordon guarding the protesting migrants on Sapphous Square.


      http://www.ekathimerini.com/227956/article/ekathimerini/news/far-right-hooligans-attack-migrants-on-lesvos-turn-town-into-battlegro

    • Lesbo, il racconto minuto per minuto dell’aggressione ai profughi afghani

      VIta.it ha raggiunto Walesa Porcellato, operatore umanitario sull’isola greca da quasi tre anni che era presente durante le 10 drammatiche ore almeno 200 estremisti di destra hanno attaccato altrettante persone scappate dall’Afghanistan che con un sit in di piazza protestavano contro le condizioni disastrose dell’hotspot di Moria in cui sono trattenute da mesi


      http://www.vita.it/it/article/2018/04/24/lesbo-il-racconto-minuto-per-minuto-dellaggressione-ai-profughi-afghan/146651

    • League for Human Rights expresses “dismay” over the racists attacks on Lesvos”

      The Hellenic League for Human Rights condemns the racist violent attacks against refugees and migrants on the island of Lesvos on Sunday. Expressing its particular concern, the HLHR said in a statement issued on Monday, the attacks ’cause dismay’, the ‘no arrests of perpetrators pose serious questions and requite further investigation.” The HLHR urges the Greek state to

      http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2018/04/23/hlhr-lesvos-statement

    • Συνέλαβαν... τους πρόσφυγες στη Μόρια

      Στη σκιά των επιθέσεων ακροδεξιών η αστυνομία συνέλαβε 120 πρόσφυγες και δύο Έλληνες υπήκοους για τα Κυριακάτικα γεγονότα στη Μυτιλήνη.

      Η αστυνομική επιχείρηση ξεκίνησε στις 05:30 τα ξημερώματα και διήρκεσε μόλις λίγα λεπτά, με τις αστυνομικές δυνάμεις να απομακρύνουν τους διαμαρτυρόμενους από την κεντρική πλατεία Σαπφούς.

      Πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες, που αρνούνταν να εγκαταλείψουν την πλατεία σχηματίζοντας μια σφιχτή ανθρώπινη αλυσίδα, αποσπάστηκαν με τη βία από το σημείο.


      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/astynomiki-epiheirisi-meta-ta-epeisodia-akrodexion

    • Le procès des « #Moria_35 » sur l’île grecque de Chios : entre iniquité et instrumentalisation de la justice sur le dos des exilés

      Le 28 avril 2018, 32 des 35 personnes migrantes poursuivies pour incendie volontaire, rébellion, dégradation des biens, tentative de violences ou de trouble à l’ordre public ont été condamnées à 26 mois de prison avec sursis par le tribunal de Chios (Grèce) après quatre jours d’une audience entachée de nombreuses irrégularités. Elles ont finalement été reconnues coupables d’avoir blessé des fonctionnaires de police, et ont été acquittées de toutes les autres charges.

      Avant cette sentence, les 32 condamnés ont subi neuf longs mois de détention provisoire sur une base très contestable, voire sur des actes non prouvés. En effet, les 35 personnes incriminées avaient été arrêtées en juillet 2017 à la suite d’une manifestation pacifique par laquelle plusieurs centaines d’exilés bloqués dans le hotspot de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, dénonçaient leurs conditions de vie indignes et inhumaines. Toutes ont nié avoir commis les délits qu’on leur reprochait. Certaines ont même démontré qu’elles n’avaient pas participé à la manifestation.

      Les membres de la délégation d’observateurs internationaux présents au procès ont pu y mesurer les graves entorses au droit à un procès équitable : interprétariat lacunaire, manque d’impartialité des juges, temps limité accordé à la défense, mais surtout absence de preuves des faits reprochés. En condamnant injustement les exilés de Moria, le tribunal de Chios a pris le relais du gouvernement grec – qui confine depuis plus de deux ans des milliers de personnes dans les hotspots de la mer Égée – et de l’Union européenne (UE) qui finance la Grèce pour son rôle de garde-frontière de l’Europe.

      Sorties de détention, elles n’ont cependant pas retrouvé la liberté. Les « 35 de Moria », assignés à nouveau dans le hotspot de l’île de Lesbos, ont été interdits de quitter l’île jusqu’au traitement de leur demande d’asile. Pourtant, le Conseil d’État grec avait décidé, le 17 avril 2018, de lever ces restrictions géographiques à la liberté d’aller et venir jugées illégales et discriminatoires. C’était sans compter la réplique du gouvernement grec qui a immédiatement pris un décret rétablissant les restrictions, privant ainsi d’effets la décision du Conseil d’État grec.

      La demande d’asile de la plupart de ces 35 personnes est encore en cours d’examen, ou en appel contre la décision de refus d’octroi du statut de réfugié. Au mépris des normes élémentaires, certains n’ont pas pu bénéficier d’assistance juridique pour faire appel de cette décision. Deux d’entre elles ont finalement été expulsées en juin 2018 vers la Turquie (considéré comme « pays sûr » par la Grèce), en vertu de l’accord UE-Turquie conclu le 16 mars 2016.

      Le 17 juillet prochain, à 19h30, au « Consulat » , à Paris, sera présenté le film documentaire « Moria 35 », de Fridoon Joinda, qui revient sur ces événements et donne la parole aux 35 personnes concernées. Cette projection sera suivie de la présentation, par les membres de la délégation d’observateurs, du rapport réalisé à la suite de ce procès qui démontre, une fois de plus, la grave violation des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes en Grèce, et en Europe.

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2892.html

    • Ouverture du procès des « #Moria_35 » le 20 avril prochain sur l’île grecque de Chios

      Le 18 juillet 2017, 35 résidents du hotspot de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce ont été arrêtés à la suite d’une manifestation organisée quelques heures plus tôt dans le camp et à laquelle plusieurs centaines d’exilés avaient participé pour protester contre leurs conditions de vie indignes et inhumaines.

      Quelques jours plus tard, Amnesty International appelait, dans une déclaration publique, les autorités grecques à enquêter immédiatement sur les allégations de recours excessif à la force et de mauvais traitements qui auraient été infligés par la police aux personnes arrêtées. Ces violences policières ont été filmées et les images diffusées dans les médias dans les jours qui ont suivi la manifestation.

      Ce sont pourtant aujourd’hui ces mêmes personnes qui se retrouvent sur le banc des accusés.

      Le procès des « Moria 35 », s’ouvre le 20 avril prochain sur l’île de Chios en Grèce.

      Poursuivis pour incendie volontaire, rébellion, dégradation de biens, tentative de violences ou encore trouble à l’ordre public, ils encourent des peines de prison pouvant aller jusqu’à 10 ans, leur exclusion du droit d’asile et leur renvoi vers les pays qu’ils ont fui. Trente d’entre eux sont en détention provisoire depuis juillet 2017.

      Il a semblé essentiel aux organisations signataires de ce texte de ne pas laisser ce procès se dérouler sans témoins. C’est pourquoi chacune de nos organisations sera présente, tour à tour, sur toute la durée du procès afin d’observer les conditions dans lesquelles il se déroulera au regard notamment des principes d’indépendance et d’impartialité des tribunaux et du respect des règles relatives au procès équitable.

      https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article5897

    • Reporter’s Diary: Back to Lesvos

      I first visited the Greek island of Lesvos in 2016. It was the tail end of the great migration that saw over a million people cross from Turkey to Greece in the span of a year. Even then, Moria, the camp set up to house the refugees streaming across the sea, was overcrowded and squalid.

      I recently returned to discover that conditions have only become worse and the people forced to spend time inside its barbed wire fences have only grown more desperate. The regional government is now threatening to close Moria if the national government doesn’t clean up the camp.

      Parts of Lesvos look like an island paradise. Its sandy beaches end abruptly at the turquoise waters of the Aegean Sea, houses with red tile roofs are clustered together in small towns, and olive trees blanket its rocky hills. When I visited last month, the summer sun had bleached the grass yellow, wooden fishing boats bobbed in the harbor, and people on holiday splashed in the surf. But in Moria sewage was flowing into tents, reports of sexual abuse were on the rise, and overcrowding was so severe the UN described the situation at Greece’s most populous refugee camp as “reaching boiling point”.

      More than one million people fleeing war and violence in places like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan crossed from Turkey to the Greek islands between January 2015 and early 2016. Over half of them first set foot in Greece, and on European soil, in Lesvos. But in March 2016, the European Union and Turkey signed an agreement that led to a dramatic reduction in the number of people arriving to Greece. So far this year, just over 17,000 people have landed on the islands. At times in 2015, more than 10,000 people would arrive on Lesvos in a single day.

      Despite the drop in numbers, the saga isn’t over, and visiting Lesvos today is a stark reminder of that. Thousands of people are still stranded on the island and, shortly after I left, the regional governor threatened to close Moria, citing “uncontrollable amounts of waste”, broken sewage pipes, and overflowing rubbish bins. Public health inspectors deemed the camp “unsuitable and dangerous for public health and the environment”. Soon after, a group of 19 NGOs said in a statement that “it is nothing short of shameful that people are expected to endure such horrific conditions on European soil.”

      The Greek government is under increasing pressure to house refugees on the mainland – where conditions for refugees are also poor – but right now no one really knows what would happen to those on Lesvos should Moria be closed down.
      Razor wire and hunger strikes

      In some places in the north and the east, Lesvos is separated from Turkey by a strait no wider than 10 or 15 kilometres. This narrow distance is what makes the island such an appealing destination for those desperate to reach Europe. From the Turkish seaside town of Ayvalik, the ferry to Lesvos takes less than an hour. I sat on the upper deck as it churned across the sea in April 2016, a month after Macedonia shut its border to refugees crossing from Greece, effectively closing the route that more than a million people had taken to reach Western Europe the previous year.

      The Greek government had been slow to respond when large numbers of refugees started landing on its shores. Volunteers and NGOs stepped in to provide the services that people needed. On Lesvos there were volunteer-run camps providing shelter, food, and medical assistance to new arrivals. But the EU-Turkey deal required that people be kept in official camps like Moria so they could be processed and potentially deported.

      By the time I got there, the volunteer-run camps were being dismantled and the people staying in them were being corralled into Moria, a former military base. Once inside, people weren’t allowed to leave, a policy enforced by multiple layers of fences topped in spools of razor wire.

      Moria had space for around 2,500 people, but even in 2016 it was already over capacity. While walking along the perimeter I scrawled my phone number on a piece of paper, wrapped it around a rock, and threw it over the fence to an Iranian refugee named Mohamed.

      For months afterwards he sent me pictures and videos of women and children sleeping on the ground, bathrooms flooded with water and dirt, and people staging hunger strikes inside the camp to protest the squalid conditions.
      “The image of Europe is a lie”

      Two and a half years later, refugees now have more freedom of movement on Lesvos – they can move about the island but not leave it.

      I arrived in Mytilene, the main city on the island, in August. At first glance it was easy to forget that these were people who had fled wars and risked their lives to cross the sea. People were queuing at cash points to withdraw their monthly 90 euro ($104) stipends from UNHCR, the UN’s refugee agency. Some sat at restaurants that served Greek kebabs, enjoyed ice cream cones in the afternoon heat, or walked along the sidewalks pushing babies in strollers next to tourists and locals.

      The conditions on Lesvos break people down.

      The illusion of normalcy melted away at the bus stop where people waited to catch a ride back to Moria. There were no Greeks or tourists standing in line, and the bus that arrived advertised its destination in Arabic and English. Buildings along the winding road inland were spray-painted with graffiti saying “stop deportations” and “no human is illegal”.

      Moria is located in a shallow valley between olive groves. It looked more or less the same as it had two and a half years ago. Fences topped with razor wire stilled ringed the prefabricated buildings and tents inside. A collection of cafes outside the fences had expanded, and people calling out in Arabic hawked fruits and vegetables from carts as people filtered in and out of the main gate.

      Médecins Sans Frontières estimates that more than 8,000 people now live in Moria; an annex has sprung up outside the fences. People shuffled along a narrow path separating the annex from the main camp or sat in the shade smoking cigarettes, women washed dishes and clothing at outdoor faucets, and streams of foul-smelling liquid leaked out from under latrines.

      I met a group of young Palestinian men at a cafe. “The image of Europe is a lie,” one of them told me. They described how the food in the camp was terrible, how criminals had slipped in, and how violence regularly broke out because of the stress and anger caused by the overcrowding and poor conditions.

      A doctor who volunteers in Moria later told me that self-harm and suicide attempts are common and sexual violence is pervasive. It takes at least six months, and sometimes up to a year and a half, for people to have their asylum claims processed. If accepted, they are given a document that allows them to travel to mainland Greece. If denied, they are sent to Turkey. In the meantime, the conditions on Lesvos break people down.

      “Ninety-nine percent of refugees... [are] vulnerable because of what happened to them in their home country [and] what happened to them during the crossing of borders,” Jalal Barekzai, an Afghan refugee who volunteers with NGOs in Lesvos, told me. “When they are arriving here they have to stay in Moria in this bad condition. They get more and more vulnerable.”

      Many of the problems that existed in April 2016 when people were first rounded up into Moria, and when I first visited Lesvos, still exist today. They have only been amplified by time and neglect.

      Jalal said the international community has abandoned those stuck on the island. “They want Moria,” he said. “Moria is a good thing for them to keep people away.”


      https://www.irinnews.org/feature/2018/09/18/reporter-s-diary-back-lesvos
      #graffitis

    • Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 11.09.2018, envoyé par Vicky Skoumbi:

      En effet le camp de Moria est plus que surpeuplé, avec 8.750 résidents actuellement pour à peine 3.000 places, chiffre assez large car selon d’autres estimations la capacité d’accueil du camp ne dépasse pas les 2.100 places. Selon le Journal de Rédacteurs,(Efimerida ton Syntakton)
      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/30-meres-prothesmia
      Il y a déjà une liste de 1.500 personnes qui auraient dû être transférés au continent, à titre de vulnérabilité ou comme ayant droit à l’asile,mais ils restent coincés là faute de place aux structures d’accueil sur la Grèce continentale. Les trois derniers jours 500 nouveaux arrivants se sont ajoutés à la population du camp. La plan de décongestionn du camp du Ministère de l’immigration est rendu caduc par les arrivées massives pendant l’été.
      La situation sanitaire y est effrayante avec des eaux usées qui coulent à ciel ouvert au milieu du camp, avant de rejoindre un torrent qui débouche à la mer. Le dernier rapport du service sanitaire, qui juge le lieu impropre et constituant un danger pour la santé publique et l ’ environnement, constate non seulement le surpeuplement, mais aussi la présence des eaux stagnantes, des véritables viviers pour toute sorte d’insectes et de rongeurs et bien sûr l’absence d’un nombre proportionnel à la population de structures sanitaires. En s’appuyant sur ce rapport, la présidente de la région menace de fermer le camp si des mesures nécessaires pour la reconstruction du réseau d’eaux usées ne sont pas prises d’ici 30 jours. Le geste de la présidente de la Région est tout sauf humanitaire, et il s’inscrit très probablement dans une agenda xénophobe, d’autant plus qu’elle ne propose aucune solution alternative pour l’hébergement de 9,000 personnes actuellement à Moria. N’empêche les problèmes sanitaires sont énormes et bien réels, le surpeuplement aussi, et les conditions de vie si effrayantes qu’on dirait qu’elles ont une fonction punitive. Rendons- leur la vie impossible pour qu’ils ne pensent plus venir en Europe...

    • L’affaire des « Moria 35 » en appel : audience le 3 février 2020 à Lesbos

      Lundi 3 février aura lieu le procès en appel de 32 exilés, jugés en première instance, en avril 2018 pour incendie volontaire, rébellion, dégradation des biens, tentative de violences ou de trouble à l’ordre public à la suite d’une manifestation pacifique par laquelle plusieurs centaines de personnes bloquées dans le « hotspot » de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, dénonçaient leurs conditions de vie indignes et inhumaines.

      Sur 35 personnes poursuivies (les « Moria 35 »), 32 ont été reconnues coupables d’avoir blessé des fonctionnaires de police et condamnées à 26 mois de prison avec sursis par le tribunal de Chios (Grèce) après quatre jours d’une audience dont les membres de la délégation d’observateurs internationaux présents au procès avaient recensé, dans un rapport d’observation paru en juin 2018 (https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6080), les graves entorses au droit à un procès équitable : interprétariat lacunaire, manque d’impartialité des juges, temps limité accordé à la défense, mais surtout absence de preuves des faits reprochés.

      Les 32 exilés ont fait appel de leur condamnation. L’audience d’appel aura lieu le 3 février prochain, soit près de 2 ans plus tard, cette fois-ci sur l’île de Lesbos où se sont passés les faits.

      Le Gisti sera à nouveau présent à l’audience afin d’achever sa mission d’observation dans cette procédure criminelle visant des exilés.

      http://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6306

  • HCR | Grèce : situation des femmes et enfants réfugiés
    https://asile.ch/2018/02/20/hcr-grece-situation-femmes-enfants-refugies

    Le HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, est très préoccupé par les déclarations de certains demandeurs d’asile dénonçant harcèlement et violences sexuels dans les centres d’accueil situés sur les îles grecques qui ne respectent pas les normes d’accueil requises. Le HCR se félicite toutefois des mesures prises par le gouvernement en vue de […]

  • Nearly 13,000 migrants and refugees registered at Moria camp in 2017

    A total of 12,726 migrants and refugees, hailing form 64 countries in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, South America and even the Caribbean, were registered at the official processing center on Lesvos last year.

    According to official figures from the hot spot at Moria on the eastern Aegean island, 40 percent of the arrivals processed at the center were men, 24 percent were women and 36 percent were minors.

    In terms of ethnicities, the Moria camp processed 5,281 Syrians, 2,184 Afghans and 1,800 Iraqis. It also received 826 people from Congo, 352 from Cameroon, 341 from Iran and 282 from Algeria. The remaining 1,660 asylum seekers came from 57 other countries, the data showed.


    http://www.ekathimerini.com/225403/article/ekathimerini/news/nearly-13000-migrants-and-refugees-registered-at-moria-camp-in-2017
    #statistiques #chiffres #arrivées #Grèce #Moria #Lesbos #hotspots #asile #migrations #réfugiés
    cc @isskein

    • MSF : des enfants tentent de se suicider dans le camp de Moria en Grèce

      Le camp de réfugiés de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos a été à plusieurs reprises au centre de la crise migratoire européenne, mais les conditions de vie désastreuses semblent s’être encore détériorées. Luca Fontana, co-coordinateur des opérations de Médecins sans frontières (MSF) sur l’île, raconte notamment à InfoMigrants le désespoir des jeunes demandeurs d’asile.

      #Surpeuplement. #Violence. #Saleté. Ce ne sont là que quelques-uns des mots utilisés pour décrire le camp de migrants de Moria, en Grèce, à Lesbos. Dans une interview accordée à InfoMigrants, Luca Fontana, le co-coordinateur des opérations sur l’île pour MSF, a déclaré que des enfants y tentent même de mettre fin à leurs jours. « Il y a des enfants qui essaient de se faire du mal ainsi que des enfants qui ne peuvent pas dormir à cause d’idées suicidaires », explique-t-il. Ces enfants sont souvent traumatisés par les conflits qu’ils ont connus dans leur pays d’origine. Et les mauvaises conditions de vie dans le camp de Moria, qu’il décrit comme une « jungle », ne font qu’aggraver leur situation.

      Manque d’#accès_aux_soins de santé mentale

      « Nous dirigeons un programme de santé mentale pour les #enfants, avec des groupes de thérapie et des consultations pour les cas les plus graves », raconte-t-il. « Mais le problème est qu’il n’y a pas de psychologue ou de psychiatre pour enfants sur l’île : ils n’ont donc pas accès aux soins médicaux parce qu’ils ne sont pas transférés à Athènes pour y recevoir des soins spécialisés. »

      La clinique de santé mentale de MSF est située à #Mytilene, la capitale de Lesbos, et l’organisation est la seule ONG qui fournit des soins psychologiques à la population migrante de l’île. A la clinique, les enfants dessinent pour exorciser les traumatismes qu’ils ont subis dans leur pays, pendant l’exil ou en Europe.

      Les demandeurs d’asile sur l’île ont fui la Syrie, l’Afghanistan, l’Irak, le Soudan et le Congo, des pays où la guerre est souvent une réalité quotidienne.

      Bien qu’il y ait eu des tentatives de suicide, aucune n’a abouti, précise Luca Fontana.

      Les temps d’attente pour les services de base sont longs, les conditions de vie « horribles »

      Les migrants doivent attendre longtemps avant d’obtenir des #soins médicaux, car le camp est surpeuplé. La capacité d’accueil est de 3 000 personnes, mais ils sont plus du triple, dont beaucoup vivent dans des tentes. Surtout, près de 3 000 occupants sont des enfants.

      A Moria, il y a très peu de #toilettes - environ 1 toilette pour 50 à 60 personnes. Les migrants reçoivent trois repas par jour, mais l’attente est longue. « Ils faut parfois attendre trois heures par repas. Les gens doivent se battre pour la nourriture et les services médicaux. »

      En juillet, MSF a lancé sur son site web plusieurs demandes d’aide urgentes. L’ONG souhaite que les personnes vulnérables soient déplacées vers des logements plus sûrs, pour « décongestionner le camp ».

      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/11769/msf-des-enfants-tentent-de-se-suicider-dans-le-camp-de-moria-en-grece
      #suicides #santé_mentale #tentative_de_suicide

    • Réaction de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop (11.09.2018):

      En effet le camp de Moria est plus que surpeuplé, avec 8.750 résidents actuellement pour à peine 3.000 places, chiffre assez large car selon d’autres estimations la capacité d’accueil du camp ne dépasse pas les 2.100 places. Selon le Journal de Rédacteurs,(Efimerida ton Syntakton)
      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/30-meres-prothesmia
      Il y a déjà une liste de 1.500 personnes qui auraient dû être transférés au continent, à titre de vulnérabilité ou comme ayant droit à l’asile,mais ils restent coincés là faute de place aux structures d’accueil sur la Grèce continentale. Les trois derniers jours 500 nouveaux arrivants se sont ajoutés à la population du camp. La plan de décongestionn du camp du Ministère de l’immigration est rendu caduc par les arrivées massives pendant l’été.
      La situation sanitaire y est effrayante avec des eaux usées qui coulent à ciel ouvert au milieu du camp, avant de rejoindre un torrent qui débouche à la mer. Le dernier rapport du service sanitaire, qui juge le lieu impropre et constituant un danger pour la santé publique et l ’ environnement, constate non seulement le surpeuplement, mais aussi la présence des eaux stagnantes, des véritables viviers pour toute sorte d’insectes et de rongeurs et bien sûr l’absence d’un nombre proportionnel à la population de structures sanitaires. En s’appuyant sur ce rapport, la présidente de la région menace de fermer le camp si des mesures nécessaires pour la reconstruction du réseau d’eaux usées ne sont pas prises d’ici 30 jours. Le geste de la présidente de la Région est tout sauf humanitaire, et il s’inscrit très probablement dans une agenda xénophobe, d’autant plus qu’elle ne propose aucune solution alternative pour l’hébergement de 9,000 personnes actuellement à Moria. N’empêche les problèmes sanitaires sont énormes et bien réels, le surpeuplement aussi, et les conditions de vie si effrayantes qu’on dirait qu’elles ont une fonction punitive. Rendons- leur la vie impossible pour qu’ils ne pensent plus venir en Europe...

    • La prison dans la #prison_dans_la_prison : le centre de détention du camp de Moria

      Nous proposons ici une traduction d’un article publié initialement en anglais sur le site Deportation Monitoring Aegean (http://dm-aegean.bordermonitoring.eu/2018/09/23/the-prison-within-the-prison-within-the-prison-the-detent) le 23 septembre 2018. Alors que la Commission européenne et les principaux États membres de l’Union européenne souhaitent l’implantation de nouveaux centres de tri dans et hors de l’Europe, il semble important de revenir sur le système coercitif des #hotspots mis en place depuis deux ans et demi maintenant.

      Depuis la signature de l’accord UE-Turquie le 18 mars 2016, il est interdit aux migrants arrivant de Turquie sur les îles grecques – sur le sol de l’UE – de voyager librement à l’intérieur de la Grèce. Leur mouvement est limité aux petites îles de Lesbos, Chios, Leros, Samos ou Kos où se trouvent les hotspots européens. Certaines personnes ont été contraintes de rester dans ces « prisons à ciel ouvert » pour des périodes allant jusqu’à deux ans dans l’attente de la décision concernant leur demande d’asile. De nombreux migrants n’ont d’autres possibilités que de vivre dans les hotspots européens tels que le camp de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos pendant toute leur procédure d’asile. Tandis que l’apparence des fils de fer barbelés et les portes sécurisées donnent aux camps une apparence de prison, la majorité des migrants est en mesure de passer librement par les entrées sécurisées par la police du camp. Après leur enregistrement complet, les demandeurs d’asile sont techniquement autorisés à vivre en dehors du camp, ce qui n’est cependant pratiquement pas possible, principalement en raison du nombre limité de logements et de la possibilité de payer des loyers.

      Certaines personnes ne sont pas seulement obligées de rester sur une île dans un #camp, mais sont également détenues dans des centres de détention. À Lesbos, par exemple, les nouveaux arrivants sont régulièrement détenus à court terme au cours de leur procédure d’enregistrement dans un camp spécial du camp de Moria. En outre, ce camp dispose également d’une prison, appelée “#centre_de_pré-renvoi” (« #pre-removal_centre ») située dans l’enceinte du camp. Il s’agit d’une zone hautement sécurisée qui contient actuellement environ 200 personnes, avec une capacité officielle de détenir jusqu’à 420 personnes [AIDA]. Les détenus sont des migrants, tous des hommes, la plupart d’entre eux étant venus en Europe pour obtenir une protection internationale. Ils sont détenus dans un centre de pré-renvoi divisé en différentes sections, séparant les personnes en fonction de leurs motifs de détention et de leurs nationalités / ethnies. La plupart du temps, les détenus sont enfermés dans des conteneurs et ne sont autorisés à entrer dans la cour de la prison qu’une ou deux fois par jour pendant une heure. En outre, d’anciens détenus ont fait état d’une cellule d’isolement où des personnes pourraient être détenues en cas de désobéissance ou mauvais comportement pendant deux semaines au maximum, parfois même sans lumière.

      Motifs légaux de détention

      L’article 46 de la loi n°4375/2016 (faisant référence à la loi n°3907/2011 et transposant la directive d’accueil 2016/0222 dans le droit national) prévoit cinq motifs de détention des migrants : 1) afin de déterminer leur identité ou leur nationalité, 2) pour « déterminer les éléments sur lesquels est fondée la demande de protection internationale qui n’ont pas pu être obtenus », 3) dans le cas « où il existe des motifs raisonnables de croire que le demandeur introduit la demande de protection internationale dans le seul but de retarder ou d’empêcher l’exécution de décision de retour » (les décisions de retour sont en réalité largement adressées aux nouveaux arrivants et sont suspendues ou révoquées pour la durée de la procédure d’asile), 4) si la personne est considérée comme « constituant un danger pour la sécurité nationale ou l’ordre public » ou 5) pour prévenir le risque de fuite [Loi 4375/2016, art.46]. Cette diversité de motifs légaux de détention ouvre la possibilité de garder un grand nombre de personnes en quête de protection internationale dans des lieux de détention. Les avocats signalent qu’il est extrêmement difficile de contester juridiquement les ordonnances de détention, entre autre parce que les motifs des ordonnances de détention sont très vagues.

      Pour les demandeurs d’asile, la durée de la détention est généralement limitée à trois mois. Cependant, elle peut être prolongée si, par exemple, des accusations pénales sont portées contre eux (cela peut par exemple se produire après des émeutes dans le centre de détention). La détention des migrants dont la demande d’asile a été rejetée ou des personnes qui se sont inscrites pour un retour volontaire peut dépasser trois mois. Dans certains cas, les personnes doivent rester particulièrement longtemps en détention et dans un état d’incertitude lorsque leur demande d’asile et leur recours sont rejetés, mais qu’elles ne peuvent pas être expulsées car la Turquie refuse de les reprendre. Les avocats peuvent généralement accéder à la détention sur la recommandation du service d’asile, même s’il n’existe pas de motivation particulière justifiant la détention. À Lesbos, mis à part la participation de quelques avocats, l’assistance judiciaire pour contester les ordonnances de détention est presque inexistante, ce qui renvoi à un manque de possibilités et à des problèmes systématiques dans la manière dont les tribunaux traitent les « objections à la détention ».

      Détention en pratique – Le projet pilote visant certaines nationalités

      De nombreuses personnes sont détenues dans le centre de pré-renvoi après que leur demande d’asile ait été rejetée ou déclarée irrecevable et après avoir perdu le recours contre cette décision. D’autres sont détenus parce qu’ils ont accepté le soi-disant « retour volontaire » dans leur pays d’origine avec l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) et sont enfermés dans l’attente de leur transfert dans un autre centre fermé situé sur le continent dans l’attente de leur déportation [voir notamment cet article sur les retour volontaires]. Un autre moyen extrêmement problématique utilisé pour détenir des demandeurs d’asile est la classification comme danger pour la sécurité nationale ou l’ordre public. La circulaire de police « Gestion des étrangers sans-papiers dans les centres d’accueil et d’identification (CRI) » illustre bien l’aspect pratique de cette loi. Dans le document, les termes « comportement enfreignant la loi » ou « comportement offensant » sont utilisés comme motif de détention. La circulaire de police, par exemple, énumère des exemples de « comportement enfreignant la loi », tel que « vols, menaces, blessures corporelles, etc. ». Par conséquent, le classement d’une personne qui a commis des infractions mineures et pouvant ainsi être détenu, est laissé à la discrétion de la police. Les avocats rapportent que le paragraphe est souvent utilisé dans la pratique pour détenir des personnes qui ne respectent pas les limites géographiques imposées.

      En outre, la possibilité de détenir des personnes en supposant qu’elles demandent l’asile afin d’éviter ou d’entraver la préparation du processus de retour ou d’éloignement est largement utilisée comme justification de la détention. Dans la pratique, la décision de mise en détention dépend souvent des chances présumées qu’un demandeur d’asile se voit accorder un statut de protection, ce qui est également lié à l’appartenance nationale du demandeur d’asile. En fait, cela conduit à la détention automatique de migrants appartenant à certains milieux nationaux immédiatement après leur arrivée. Alors que la Commission européenne recommande fréquemment une utilisation accrue de la détention des migrants afin de faciliter les retours, la détention spécifique basée sur la nationalité remonte à un soi-disant projet pilote qui est reflété dans la circulaire de la police locale grecque de juin 2016 mentionnée ci-dessus. Dans ce document, le ministère de l’Intérieur décrit les migrants d’Algérie, de Tunisie, du Maroc, du Pakistan, du Bangladesh et du Sri Lanka comme des “étrangers indésirables” au “profil économique”, dont les données doivent être collectées non seulement dans le système d’information Schengen, mais également dans une base de données grecque appelée “Catalogue d’État pour les étrangers indésirables” (EKANA). Ce projet pilote comportait deux phases et a finalement été étendu à toutes les personnes dont le taux d’acceptation de l’asile – établi par nationalité – est statistiquement inférieur à 25%. Cela s’applique à de nombreuses personnes originaires de pays africains et était également utilisé auparavant pour les Syriens. (Les Syriens avaient un taux de rejet élevé parce que leur demande d’asile était souvent déclarée irrecevable, la Turquie étant considérée comme un pays sûr pour les Syriens.)

      Ce processus arbitraire contredit fortement l’idée de la Convention de Genève de donner aux individus les droits d’un examen impartial et individualisé de leur demande d’asile. En outre, en détention, les demandeurs d’asile ont moins accès aux conseils juridiques et sont soumis à de fortes pressions, ce qui multiplie d’autant les conditions d’être ré-incarcéré ou déporté. Dans de nombreux cas, ils ne disposent que d’un à deux jours pour préparer leur entretien d’asile et ne sont pas en mesure d’informer les avocats de leur prochain entretien d’asile, car ils ont une priorité dans les procédures. Ces facteurs réduisent considérablement leurs chances de bien présenter leur demande d’asile lors des auditions afin d’obtenir le statut de protection internationale. Pendant leur détention, ils sont souvent menottés lors de l’enregistrement et de l’entretien, ce qui les stigmatise comme dangereux et suggère un danger potentiel à la fois pour le demandeur d’asile et pour le premier service d’accueil / d’asile. Une personne, par exemple, a déclaré avoir été menottée au cours de son interrogatoire, le laissant incapable de prononcer un seul mot lors de son enregistrement où il aurait été crucial d’exprimer clairement sa volonté de demander l’asile.

      La rationalité de la détention de demandeurs d’asile présentant un faible taux de reconnaissance semble viser à les rejeter et à les expulser dans les trois mois de leur détention – ce qui n’a même pas été réalisé jusqu’à présent dans la plupart des cas. Au lieu de cela, cela aboutit principalement à une procédure automatique de détention injustifiée. Des ressortissants de nationalités telles que l’Algérie et le Cameroun sont arrêtés directement à leur arrivée. Ils sont simplement condamnés à attendre l’expiration de leurs trois mois de détention et à être libérés par la suite. Une fois libérés, ils se retrouvent dans le camp surpeuplé de Moria, sans aucun lieu ou dormir ni sac de couchage, et ils ne savent pas où trouver une orientation dans un environnement où ils ne sont pas traités comme des êtres humains à la recherche de protection, mais comme des criminels.

      Conditions de détention

      Dans le centre de pré-renvoi, les détenus manquent de biens de première nécessité, tels que des vêtements et des produits d’hygiène en quantité suffisante. À part deux jours par semaine, leurs téléphones sont confisqués. Les visites ne peuvent être effectuées que par des proches parents et – s’ils sont assez chanceux – par un avocat et par deux personnes travaillant pour une société de santé publique. Malgré leur présence, de nombreux détenus ont signalé de graves problèmes de santé mentale et physique. Dans certains cas, les personnes malades sont transférées à l’hôpital local, mais cela dépend de la décision discrétionnaire de la police et de sa capacité à l’escorter. Plusieurs détenus ont décrit des problèmes tels que fortes douleurs à la tête, insomnie, crises de panique et flashbacks similaires aux symptômes de l’état de stress post-traumatique, par exemple. Certains détenus s’automutilent en se coupant lourdement le corps et certains ont tenté de se suicider. Bien que les personnes classées comme vulnérables ne soient pas censées être détenues, il y a eu plusieurs cas où la vulnérabilité n’a été reconnue qu’après des semaines ou des mois de détention ou seulement après leur libération.

      Certaines personnes sortant du centre de pré-renvoi ont déclaré être des survivants de torture et de peines de prison dans leur pays, ce qui explique souvent pourquoi elles ont fui en Europe pour rechercher la sécurité mais se retrouvent à nouveau enfermés en Grèce. Les examens médicaux ont montré que certaines personnes détenues dans le centre de pré-renvoi étaient des mineurs. Bien qu’ils aient répété à plusieurs reprises qu’ils étaient mineurs, ils ont été retenus pendant encore de nombreuses semaines jusqu’à ce que l’évaluation de l’âge soit finalisée. D’autres personnes sont maintenues en détention, bien qu’elles parlent des langues rares telles que le krio, pour laquelle aucune traduction n’est disponible et, par conséquent, aucun entretien d’asile ne peut être mené.

      Les histoires d’individus dans le centre de pré-renvoi de Moria

      Ci-après, quelques comptes rendus récents de migrants sur leur détention dans le centre de pré-renvoi de Moria sont illustrés afin de mettre en évidence l’impact du régime de détention sur le destin de chacun. Un jeune Camerounais a été arrêté au centre de pré-renvoi de Moria, dès son arrivée dans le cadre du projet pilote. Il a signalé qu’il avait tenté de se suicider dans la nuit du 7 au 8 septembre, mais que son ami l’avait empêché de le faire. Il était en détention depuis la fin du mois de juin 2018. Il se plaignait d’insomnie et de fortes angoisses liées aux expériences du passé, notamment la mort de son frère et la crainte que son enfant et sa mère fussent également décédés. Il a reporté la date de son entretien d’asile à quatre reprises, car il se sentait mentalement incapable de mener l’entretien à son terme.

      Un ressortissant syrien de 22 ans, arrivé à Lesbos avec de graves problèmes de dos, a été arrêté au centre de pré-renvoi de Moria après s’être inscrit pour un “retour volontaire”. En Turquie, il avait été opéré à la suite d’un accident et le laissant avec des vis dans le dos. Il a décidé de retourner en Turquie, car il a constaté que l’opération chirurgicale nécessaire pour retirer les vis ne pouvait être effectuée que sur place. Le 18 juillet, il aurait été sévèrement battu par un officier de police dans le centre de détention du camp. Le même jour, des volontaires indépendants ont porté plainte dans un bureau de conciliation grec. Un médiateur lui a rendu visite le 20 juillet et lui a demandé s’il déposait officiellement plainte, mais il a refusé par crainte des conséquences. Quatre jours plus tard seulement, le 24 juillet, l’homme a été expulsé.

      Un Pakistanais a été arrêté le 18 avril sur l’île de Kos après le rejet de l’appel effectué contre le rejet de sa demande d’asile en première instance. Quelques mois plus tard, il a été transféré au centre de pré-enlèvement situé dans le camp de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos. Les autorités voulaient l’expulser vers la Turquie, mais le pays ne l’a pas accepté. L’homme a déclaré qu’il vomissait régulièrement du sang et souffrait toujours d’une crise cardiaque qu’il avait subie un an auparavant. Selon son récit, les autorités lui avaient promis de le conduire à l’hôpital le 10 septembre. Cependant, il a été transféré au centre de pré-renvoi d’Amygdaleza, près d’Athènes, le 9 septembre, où il attend maintenant son expulsion vers le Pakistan.

      Quatre jeunes individus qui affirment être des ressortissants afghans mais qui ont été classés comme Pakistanais lors du dépistage par FRONTEX ont été arrêtés bien qu’ils se soient déclarés mineurs. L’un d’entre eux avait été arrêté sur le continent dans le centre de pré-renvoi d’Alledopon Petrou Ralli et avait été transféré au centre de renvoi de Lesbos au bout d’un mois. Il a ensuite été contraint d’y rester quelques mois de plus, avant d’être finalement reconnu comme mineur par le biais d’une évaluation de son âge puis libéré avec une autre personne également reconnue comme mineure. Une des personnes était considérée comme un adulte après l’évaluation de l’âge et le résultat pour la quatrième personne est toujours en attente.

      L’expulsion d’un ressortissant algérien détenu dans le centre de pré-renvoi à Lesbos a été suspendue à la dernière minute grâce à la participation du HCR. Il était censé être renvoyé en Turquie le 2 août, six heures seulement après le deuxième rejet de sa demande d’asile, ce qui le laissait dans l’impossibilité de contester la décision devant les instances judiciaires au moyen d’une prétendue demande d’annulation. Il a été amené à l’embarcadère pour la déportation et n’a été enlevé à la dernière minute que parce que le HCR a indiqué qu’il n’avait pas eu la chance d’épuiser ses recours légaux en Grèce et qu’il risquait d’obtenir un statut vulnérable. Cependant, compte tenu de l’absence d’avocats à Lesbos, des coûts et du travail charge de la demande en annulation, il ne put finalement s’opposer à l’expulsion et ne fut déporté que deux semaines plus tard, le 16 août.

      L’impact de la politique de détention

      L’utilisation généralisée de nouvelles possibilités juridiques de détenir des migrants a atteint une nouveau seuil à la frontière extérieure de l’UE dans la mer Égée. La liberté de mouvement est progressivement restreinte. Des milliers de personnes sont obligées de rester dans la zone de transit de l’île de Lesbos pendant de longues périodes et la plupart d’entre elles n’ont d’autres choix que de vivre dans le hotspot européen de Moria. D’autres sont même détenus dans le centre de détention situé dans le camp. Au niveau de l’UE, la pression augmente pour imposer des mesures de détention. La loi grecque, qui repose finalement sur la directive de l’UE sur l’accueil, offre de meilleures possibilités de maintenir les migrants en détention. Dans la mise en œuvre pratique, ils sont largement utilisés principalement pour les migrants de sexe masculin. Plus que pour faciliter les retours – qui sont relativement peu nombreux – les mesures de détention remplissent une fonction disciplinaire profonde. Ils créent une forte insécurité et de la peur.

      En particulier, le fait d’être arrêté immédiatement à l’arrivée envoie un message fort à la personne touchée, tel qu’il est exprimé dans la circulaire de la police : Vous êtes un « étranger indésirable ». Il s’agit d’une stigmatisation prédéterminée bien que la procédure d’asile n’ait même pas encore commencé et que les raisons pour lesquelles une personne soit venue sur l’île soient inconnues. Les personnes affectées ont déclaré se sentir traitées comme des criminels. Dans de nombreux cas, ils ne comprennent pas les motifs procéduraux de leur détention et sont donc soumis à un stress encore plus grand. Les personnes qui ont déjà été détenues arbitrairement dans leur pays d’origine et lors de leur périple signalent des flashbacks et des problèmes psychologiques résultant des conditions de détention pouvant conduire à de nouveaux traumatismes.

      Même s’ils sont finalement libérés, ils sont toujours dans un état mental d’angoisse permanente lié à la peur constante de pouvoir être arrêtés et expulsés à tout moment, sans aucune option légale pour se défendre. Ces politiques de détention des migrants ne visent pas à résoudre les problèmes de la prétendue “crise des réfugiés”. Au lieu de cela, ils visent avec un succès limité à faire en sorte que l’accord UE-Turquie fonctionne et à ce qu’au moins une partie des migrants rentrent en Turquie. Au niveau local, les politiques de détention sont en outre avant tout des mesures d’oppression, conçues pour pouvoir prévenir les émeutes et soi-disant pour “gérer” une situation qui est en fait “impossible à gérer” : la concentration de milliers de personnes – dont beaucoup souffrent de maladies psychologiques telles que des traumatismes – pendant des mois et des années dans des conditions de vie extrêmement précaires sur une île où les gens perdent progressivement tout espoir de trouver un meilleur avenir.

      https://cevennessansfrontieres.noblogs.org/post/2018/10/24/la-prison-dans-la-prison-dans-la-prison-le-centre-de
      #détention #prison #centre_de_détention #hotspot

    • Moria: la crisi della salute mentale alle porte d’Europa

      Migliaia di persone vivono ammassate in tende, suddivise in base al gruppo etnico di appartenenza. Siamo a Moria, sull’isola di Lesbo, il centro per migranti tristemente noto per le terribili condizioni in cui versa e per i problemi di salute delle persone che ospita. Tra gli assistiti dal International Rescue Committee 64% soffre di depressione, il 60% ha pensieri suicidi e il 29% ha provato a togliersi la vita. Marianna Karakoulaki ci racconta i loro sogni, le speranze e la realtà che invece sono costretti a vivere.

      In una delle centinaia di tende fuori da Moria, il centro di accoglienza e identificazione sull’isola greca di Lesbo, tre donne siriane parlano della vita nel loro paese prima della guerra e delle condizioni sull’isola. Temono che le loro dichiarazioni possano compromettere l’esito delle loro richieste di asilo, perciò non vogliono essere identificate né fotografate. Ma sono più che disposte a raccontare le esperienze che hanno vissuto dal loro arrivo a Moria.

      Quando parlano della Siria prima della guerra, a tutte e tre brillano gli occhi; lo descrivono come un paradiso in terra. Poi però è arrivata la guerra e tutto è cambiato; sono dovute fuggire.

      Due di loro sono sbarcate sull’isola sette mesi fa, mentre l’altra è qui solo da un mese. Quando passano a descrivere Moria e la vita che conducono qui, i loro occhi si riempiono di lacrime. Moria è un luogo orribile, paragonabile alla Siria devastata dalla guerra.

      “Se avessi saputo com’era la situazione qui, sarei rimasta in Siria sotto ai bombardamenti. Almeno lì avevano case al posto di tende”, dichiara la più anziana.

      Da quando è stata adottata la dichiarazione UE-Turchia per arrestare il flusso dei migranti in Europa, in Grecia è stato avviato il meccanismo europeo degli hotspot. Questo approccio era stato presentato per la prima volta con l’Agenda europea sulla migrazione 2017, ed è sostanzialmente basato sulla creazione di centri di accoglienza e identificazione nelle zone in cui arrivano i rifugiati. Fra queste c’è l’isola di Lesbo, e Moria è stato usato come centro di accoglienza per i rifugiati, diventando di fatto il primo hotspot greco. In un certo senso, la dichiarazione UE-Turchia ha legittimato l’approccio complessivo dell’Unione Europea al fenomeno migratorio.

      Moria è anche il più tristemente noto degli hotspot greci, per via del sovraffollamento e delle terribili condizioni di vita. Al momento della pubblicazione di questo articolo, più di 5800 persone risiedono in un’area che ha una capacità massima di 3100. Già base militare, oggi ha gli stessi abitanti di una cittadina greca, ma le condizioni di vita sono inadatte per chiunque. Si verificano regolarmente rivolte e aggressioni, e i rifugiati temono per la propria incolumità. A causa del sovraffollamento, gli operatori hanno allestito centinaia di tende in una zona chiamata Oliveto, che a prima vista sembra suddivisa in zone, ciascuna abitata da un gruppo etnico diverso.
      Una crisi della salute mentale

      Le organizzazioni internazionali per i diritti umani hanno condannato la situazione a Moria e ribadito la necessità di un decongestionamento. Un rapporto pubblicato a settembre dall’IRC (International Rescue Committee, Comitato internazionale di soccorso) ha sottolineato i gravi costi per la salute mentale dei rifugiati e parla di una vera e propria crisi.

      I dati forniti nel rapporto sono impressionanti. Dei 126 assistiti da IRC, il 64% soffre di depressione, il 60% ha pensieri suicidi e il 29% ha provato a togliersi la vita; il 15% ha invece compiuto atti di autolesionismo, mentre il 41% presenta sintomi di disturbo da stress post traumatico e il 6% manifesta sintomi di psicosi.

      La più anziana delle tre donne è arrivata in Grecia insieme alla famiglia, fra cui il figlio ventenne. Lo ricorda in Siria come un giovane attivo e pieno di amici, ma quando è arrivato in Grecia la sua salute mentale è peggiorata per via delle condizioni del campo. Un giorno, mentre era da ore in fila per un pasto, è stato aggredito e pugnalato. Non è mai più tornato a fare la fila. Ha anche pensieri suicidi ed esce a stento dalla sua tenda.

      Ascoltando il suo racconto, la più giovane delle tre donne dice di riconoscere alcuni degli stessi sintomi nel comportamento di suo marito.

      “Mio marito aveva già problemi di salute mentale nel nostro paese. Ma gli hanno dato del paracetamolo”, racconta.

      Le esperienze vissute dai rifugiati di Moria prima e durante la fuga dai paesi di origine possono essere traumatiche. Alcuni di loro sono stati imprigionati, torturati o violentati. Le condizioni di vita nell’hotspot possono amplificare questi traumi.

      Secondo Alessandro Barberio, psichiatra di Medici senza frontiere e del Dipartimento di salute mentale di Trieste, chi arriva sull’isola ha già patito grandi avversità nel paese di origine. Tuttavia l’assenza di alloggi adeguati, le attese interminabili e le condizioni deplorevoli possono riportare alla luce traumi passati o crearne di nuovi.

      “Quelli che arrivano qui, prima o poi – ma spesso dopo poco tempo – iniziano a manifestare sintomi di psicosi. Credo che ciò sia legato ai grossi traumi vissuti in patria e poi alle condizioni di vita dell’hotspot di Moria, che possono facilmente scatenare sintomi psicotici e non sono disturbi da stress post traumatico”, spiega.

      Barberio definisce poi negative e controproducenti le condizioni di vita all’interno del campo.

      L’assenza di speranze e di qualsiasi aspettativa, l’assenza di risposte, di diritti e della più elementare umanità sono legate ai traumi dei rifugiati e al tempo stesso li aggravano. Fra i sintomi che Barberio ha riscontrato nei pazienti ci sono disorientamento, stato confusionale, incapacità di rapportarsi agli altri o partecipare alle attività quotidiane. I traumi passati, unitamente alle condizioni attuali, possono portare i pazienti a sentire voci o a sperimentare visioni.

      “So riconoscere quel che vedo, e sto assistendo a nuovi casi di persone con sintomi psichiatrici. Si tratta di persone che non erano già pazienti psichiatrici. I loro sintomi, sebbene legati a eventi traumatici passati, sono del tutto nuovi.”
      Mancano le garanzie di base per la salute mentale

      Morteza* vive nella parte superiore dell’Oliveto, nella zona afgana del campo, che sembra essere stata dimenticata dalle autorità e dagli operatori in quanto occupa una proprietà privata. Ci vive insieme alla sorella, al cognato e ai loro bambini. Prima viveva in Iran, dove i diritti degli afgani erano fortemente limitati; poi si è trasferito in Afghanistan da adulto, ma è dovuto fuggire in seguito a un attacco dei talebani in cui è rimasto ferito.

      Morteza soffre di depressione e disturbo da deficit di attenzione e iperattività (ADHD). Quando viveva in Iran seguiva una terapia farmacologica per tenere a bada i sintomi, ma una volta arrivato in Grecia ha dovuto interromperla. Le farmacie del luogo non accettavano la sua ricetta, e all’ospedale di Mitilene, dove ha richiesto una visita, gli hanno prospettato un’attesa di mesi.

      “L’ADHD può essere molto problematica per gli adulti. Non riesco a concentrarmi, mi interrompo mentre parlo perché dimentico cosa volevo dire. Mi scordo le cose di continuo, e questo mi preoccupa in vista del colloquio per l’asilo. Devo annotarmi tutto in un taccuino”, spiega, mostrandomi un mazzetto di post-it gialli che porta sempre con sé.

      Nel campo di Moria vengono prestate le cure di base, ma le condizioni di sovraffollamento hanno messo in ginocchio i servizi sanitari. Stando al rapporto dell’IRC, le autorità statali greche responsabili della gestione di Moria sono incapaci di fornire sostegno ai rifugiati, non potendo venire incontro alle loro necessità di base, fra cui la salute fisica e mentale.

      Morteza appare disperato. La sua salute mentale è peggiorata e pensa ogni giorno al suicidio. Il suo colloquio per la richiesta di asilo è fissato per la primavera del 2019, ma lui sembra aver perso ogni speranza.

      “Lo so che non resterò qui per sempre, ma quando vedo i diritti umani calpestati non vedo la differenza rispetto a dove mi trovavo prima. Come posso continuare ad avere speranze per il futuro? Non voglio restare intrappolato su quest’isola per anni”, spiega.
      Una crisi europea

      Benché l’anno scorso varie ONG abbiano lanciato un appello congiunto per decongestionare l’isola e migliorare le condizioni dei rifugiati, ciò appare impossibile. Da quando è stata adottata la dichiarazione UE-Turchia sulla migrazione, i rifugiati sono soggetti a restrizioni di movimento, per cui non possono lasciare l’isola finché non hanno completato la procedura di asilo o se vengono dichiarati vulnerabili. Tuttavia, stando al rapporto dell’IRC, “i cambiamenti continui dei criteri di vulnerabilità e le rispettive procedure operative fanno temere l’insorgere di una tendenza alla riduzione del numero di richiedenti asilo riconosciuti come vulnerabili”.

      Il sistema di accoglienza ai rifugiati dell’Unione Europea costringe i rifugiati di Lesbo a un processo che ha conseguenze dirette sulla loro vita e un impatto potenzialmente gravissimo sulla loro salute mentale. Senza una strategia o una pianificazione ad hoc da parte delle autorità greche per risolvere tale crisi, i rifugiati sono abbandonati in un limbo.

      Secondo Alessandro Barberio, il soggiorno prolungato sull’isola nelle condizioni attuali priva le persone di tutti i sogni e le speranze che potevano nutrire per il futuro.

      “I rifugiati non hanno la possibilità di pensare che domani è un altro giorno, perché sono bloccati qui. Naturalmente c’è chi è più bravo a resistere, chi si organizza in gruppi, chi partecipa a varie attività, ma alla fine della giornata devono tutti rientrare a Moria”, dice.

      Per le tre donne siriane Moria è un luogo terrificante. Temono per la loro incolumità, temono per la salute dei figli e dei mariti. Ma dato che sono siriane, prima o poi potranno lasciare Moria e forse trovare asilo in Grecia.

      Per Morteza, invece, le cose saranno sempre più difficili e lui sembra già saperlo. Mentre ascolta musica metal sul telefono, parla del suo unico sogno: andare all’università e studiare filosofia, materia secondo lui in grado di guarire l’anima.

      Dal nostro ultimo incontro, Morteza è fuggito dall’isola.

      https://openmigration.org/analisi/moria-la-crisi-della-salute-mentale-alle-porte-deuropa/?platform=hootsuite

    • Lesbos à bout de souffle

      A Lesbos, en Grèce, où se trouve le plus grand camp de migrants d’Europe, la pression monte. Depuis la signature d’un accord avec la Turquie en 2016, les demandeurs d’asile n’ont pas le droit de quitter l’île sans autorisation. Problème ? Les démarches administratives sont très longues, et en attendant leur entretien, les individus restent confinés dans un camp surpeuplé où les conditions sanitaires sont très difficiles. Résultat, Médecins Sans Frontières est confronté à de nombreux problèmes de santé mentale. Le système, à bout de souffle, ne tient que grâce au travail des nombreuses ONG locales tandis que l’Europe reste impuissante.

      https://guitinews.fr/video/2019/05/25/hot-spots-2-lesbos-a-bout-de-souffle
      #vidéo

  • #Grèce : les migrants arrivent toujours à Lesbos, sans pouvoir en partir

    4 décembre 2017 Par Elisa Perrigueur

    Plus de 8 500 demandeurs d’asile sont actuellement bloqués sur l’île de #Lesbos, avec interdiction de se rendre sur le continent grec. Alors que le principal camp de l’île, #Moria, est largement surpeuplé, des migrants arrivent chaque jour depuis la Turquie, située à une dizaine de kilomètres.

    Lesbos (Grèce), envoyée spéciale.– Lorsqu’il a voulu traverser la dizaine de kilomètres de la mer Égée qui séparent la Turquie de l’île grecque de Lesbos, l’Irakien Muhammad n’a eu aucun mal à trouver un passeur. Aux frontières de l’Europe, ce business obscur est enraciné. Concurrentiel, selon l’étudiant de 26 ans. « Dans le quartier d’Aksaray à Istanbul, il y en a plein… »

    Muhammad, veste de cuir marron et l’air sûr de lui, a pu choisir son tarif en négociant avec « des Syriens, des Irakiens, de [son] âge, qui travaillent sous pseudo ». Avec toujours la même stratégie commerciale. « Au début, ils étaient sympas avec moi pour me vendre leur trajet, ils m’emmenaient boire du thé, plaisantaient. » Mais une fois l’argent déposé auprès d’une épicerie d’Istanbul, la relation a changé. « Ils ne répondaient plus au téléphone, ils m’ont abandonné près de la plage de Dikili [à l’ouest de la Turquie – ndlr] avec des migrants syriens. » Après avoir dormi plusieurs jours dans une forêt de la côte turque égéenne, le 20 novembre, Muhammad a finalement gagné les rives de Lesbos sur un bateau pneumatique, pour 500 euros.

    En 2015, lorsque près d’un million de migrants avaient franchi cette frontière maritime, la traversée coûtait de 1 500 à 2 000 euros. Juste après la signature de l’accord controversé entre l’Union européenne (UE) et la Turquie, en mars 2016, le nombre des passages avait chuté. Mais ces derniers mois, il repart à la hausse : 26 167 personnes sont arrivées dans le pays en 2017, par la mer pour une majorité d’entre elles, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations. « On enregistre une hausse des venues cet automne, précise Astrid Castelein, responsable au Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR). Cela peut s’expliquer par la météo, la mer est très calme. »
    Désormais, chaque jour, comme Muhammad, en moyenne 120 migrants arrivent sur les îles grecques situées en face de la Turquie, notamment Lesbos, Samos ou Chios, indique Georges Christianos, commandant de la garde côtière hellénique et directeur du bureau de surveillance maritime.

    Et les trafiquants prospèrent toujours sur la misère. « Les passeurs sont nombreux. Nous en avons arrêté 800 depuis 2015 dans les eaux territoriales grecques, dont 210 cette année », affirme-t-il. Condamnés sur la base de témoignages de migrants et de flagrants délits, ils écopent de peines allant jusqu’à dix ans de prison et d’une amende de 1 000 euros par migrant transporté. « Ces trafiquants sont souvent des hommes entre 25 et 30 ans. Sur les 800 arrestations, 20 femmes ont été interpellées. Un quart de toutes ces personnes arrêtées sont d’origine turque. » Pour beaucoup, des pêcheurs familiers des rivages montagneux près d’Izmir, Ayvalik, Bodrum, qui connaissent les eaux et maîtrisent leurs courants. Mais les passeurs sont aussi syriens, irakiens, pakistanais et ces deux dernières années, issus d’ex-pays soviétiques comme l’Ukraine.
    Leurs « clients », des Syriens, Afghans, Soudanais, Congolais… payent 300 euros pour une place dans un canot pneumatique surchargé, 1 000 euros pour un passage dans un hors-bord et 2 000 euros pour une traversée sur un voilier de luxe. Certains passeurs restent à terre. D’autres accompagnent les embarcations sur des canots annexes, selon le ministère grec de la marine, pour pouvoir récupérer les moteurs et bateaux après la traversée. Avec la distance pour avantage. « La Grèce et la Turquie sont parfois si proches qu’un passeur peut rejoindre les deux rives en une dizaine de minutes », explique Georges Christianos. Mais une traversée peut aussi durer plus de deux heures, en fonction du point de départ en Turquie.

    Aujourd’hui, ces trafiquants d’hommes doivent être plus stratégiques pour rester invisibles. Car depuis mars 2016, la frontière maritime a été barricadée. Vers 18 heures, le 24 novembre, un voile noir enveloppe les hauteurs de Lesbos. La patrouille portugaise de l’agence Frontex, chargée de surveiller les frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne, largue les amarres du petit port de Molivos, dans le Nord. Les trois agents ainsi qu’un officier de liaison grec longent les montagnes obscures de Turquie, dans les eaux territoriales grecques. Comme cette patrouille, 42 autres, en bateau, avion et hélicoptère, dont 17 de Frontex, arpentent la mer Égée, précise le ministère grec de la marine. Depuis mars 2016, ces équipages arrêtent les passeurs et récupèrent les embarcations de migrants. Mais ces interceptions sont presque indécelables : aucun bateau n’arrive directement sur les plages de galets, comme en 2015. Les opérations de secours ont lieu en mer Égée, le plus souvent au cœur de la nuit.

    Ce soir de novembre, le navire battant pavillon portugais croise, phares éteints. « Sans lumières, nous détectons mieux les embarcations au loin », précise Paulo, le jeune commandant. Alors, dans leur étroite cabine, les agents scrutent durant des heures un radar et un écran où défilent les images des eaux alentour, filmées en caméra infrarouge. Seule une chanson de Marilyn Manson en fond sonore trahit leur présence dans la pénombre. L’étendue d’eau calme paraît déserte, mais deux faibles lumières rouges clignotent : les gardes-côtes turcs. « Dès que Frontex ou les gardes-côtes grecs détectent au loin des embarcations de migrants dans les eaux territoriales turques, nous les prévenons pour qu’ils les ramènent en sécurité en Turquie », indique le responsable grec Georges Christianos. Car si 120 personnes parviennent chaque jour à gagner la rive grecque, dans le même temps, 120 autres sont rapatriées en Turquie par les gardes-côtes turcs. La hantise des candidats à l’Europe.

    Au même moment, un canot d’une capacité de 15 places quitte le rivage turc. Soixante-six personnes à bord. Durant la traversée, un mouvement de panique s’empare du bateau surchargé. Un enfant afghan de 10 ans ne survivra pas. « D’après le témoignage du père, il est mort peu après avoir quitté la Turquie. Le bateau était trop plein, l’enfant était au centre, il a été piétiné », rapporte Georges Christianos. Le bateau a ensuite été récupéré par une patrouille bulgare de Frontex. D’après l’agence de presse grecque ANA, l’arrivée du navire européen a suscité l’affolement. Les passagers ont cru que le navire appartenait aux gardes-côtes turcs. Et imaginé un retour forcé vers la Turquie.

    « On a toujours un doute, on ne sait jamais si ce sont des Grecs ou des Turcs lorsqu’ils arrivent vers nous. » Eddy, pasteur congolais de 40 ans, arrivé à Lesbos en juin, se souvient de la peur qui l’a tétanisé lors de son sauvetage. Parti de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), celui qui se décrit comme « opposant politique, évadé de la prison de Makala [prison de Kinshasa – ndlr] », a pris la mer de nuit avec 50 personnes. « Il y a eu des mouvements de panique à cause des vagues. Deux hommes sont tombés à l’eau mais ont réussi à remonter. » Après deux heures et demie à dériver seuls, un hélicoptère a survolé leur embarcation. « Un navire a commencé à s’approcher. J’avais tellement peur que ce soit des Turcs. En anglais, des hommes disaient : “Restez calmes, nous sommes là pour vous sauver.” » Peu à peu, le drapeau grec du bateau est apparu à l’horizon. Les passagers ont poussé des cris de joie. « Vous êtes maintenant en sécurité, nous allons à Lesbos », ont répété les gardes-côtes aux exilés. Mais Eddy ne s’attendait pas à une escale interminable. Même s’il avait entendu parler du « piège » du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque.

    Moria, 2 000 places, 6 700 personnes, « Welcome to prison »

    L’étudiant Muhammad, lui, s’était « mentalement préparé » à Moria. Avant de quitter l’Irak, il s’était inscrit dans un groupe Facebook privé « où discutent des passeurs et des Syriens et des Irakiens voulant venir en Grèce ». Et ce nom revenait régulièrement dans les messages. « Je savais qu’ici, certains deviennent fous. Je voyais des vidéos des bagarres, fréquentes à cause de l’alcool, du shit, de la tension. Et je savais que je passerais au moins l’hiver ici », dit-il. Comme une condamnation. Lorsqu’il est arrivé devant les grilles du camp, le 23 novembre, il a lu ce tag le long du mur de béton : « Welcome to prison. »

    Ce lieu illustre l’éternel contraste de Lesbos. Une tragédie humaine au cœur d’un paysage idyllique de mer azur et de collines arborées. Nichée au milieu de cette nature, cette forteresse de barbelés, dans le village de 1 000 âmes de Moria, « loge » désormais 6 700 migrants. De plus en plus confinés, bien au-delà des 2 000 places prévues. Soixante-quinze nationalités rapprochées de force par leur quête d’Europe : des Syriens, Afghans, Irakiens, Érythréens, Éthiopiens, Congolais, Camerounais, Ivoiriens… Hommes, femmes et enfants, répartis par origines.

    L’Irakien Muhammad montre sa petite tente de deux places dans un champ d’oliviers. « Nous dormons à cinq dedans. Les autres sont aussi des Irakiens que je ne connaissais pas avant de venir. » Plusieurs centaines de tentes ont été plantées dans l’urgence autour des containers, hors de l’enceinte de Moria, pour accueillir les migrants qui arrivent régulièrement sur l’île. 67 par jour en octobre, selon un calcul du HCR. Le linge qui pend sur ses grillages ne sèche pas. L’hiver s’approche, l’air est frais. L’odeur de poubelle et d’urine a supplanté celle des oliviers. Au bout d’un sentier d’herbes folles, jonché de préservatifs usagés, de canettes vides et d’excréments humains, coule un filet d’eau sorti d’un tuyau percé. C’est « la douche » pour des milliers de migrants qui n’accèdent pas aux centaines d’installations sanitaires du camp.
    Depuis l’accord UE-Turquie, les migrants restent bloqués dans ce camp avec interdiction de quitter Lesbos dans l’attente du traitement de leur demande d’asile. Mamoudou, 27 ans, espère une réponse depuis sept mois. Cet Ivoirien exhibe sa carte de demandeur, renouvelée chaque mois par le Bureau européen en charge des demandes. Avec toujours cette même inscription en rouge : « Droit de circuler à Lesbos. » Mais nulle part ailleurs. Ce petit papier reste précieux : il lui permet de toucher 90 euros par mois. De fausses cartes circulent parfois dans le camp, d’après une source anonyme interne à Moria… L’Ivoirien a atterri en Turquie avec de faux papiers, avant de gagner les côtes grecques.

    Comme lui, quelques milliers d’Africains désormais bloqués ont pris la route de la Grèce pour rejoindre l’Europe, voulant « éviter la Libye où les Noirs sont réduits à l’esclavage. […] Je l’ai vu sur le Net », explique Mamoudou. Mais pour Sami, autre résident du camp venu de RDC, la Turquie est aussi un « calvaire », raconte-t-il en serrant sa Bible. « Au départ, je voulais rester à Istanbul. Mais à l’aéroport, des policiers turcs m’ont arrêté plusieurs jours et ne m’ont pas laissé prier. Je suis chrétien, et ils étaient musulmans… Puis certaines personnes, dans la rue, se bouchaient le nez sur mon passage », assure le jeune homme de 20 ans.

    À plusieurs reprises, des ONG, comme Amnesty International, ont alerté sur les risques qu’encourent les migrants en Turquie. Assis sur un banc face à Sami, trois visiteurs venus de France, « de passage quelques jours », écoutent son récit avec un air compassionnel. « Nous sommes venus pour apporter notre soutien et la parole de Dieu à ces gens », prêchent ces religieux anonymes, qui disent être venus à titre « personnel ». À quelques mètres, derrière les rangées de barbelés, des policiers épient l’étranger du regard. Un policier contrôle les images d’une journaliste vidéo. L’inscription « No photo » est placardée sur les clôtures.

    L’Europe pourrait oublier Moria et ses âmes égarées, isolées en ses confins. Mais les autorités de Lesbos élèvent la voix. Le 20 novembre, à l’appel de la mairie, des centaines d’habitants grecs ont défilé sur le port aux façades pastel du chef-lieu de l’île, Mytilène. « Il y a au total 8 500 candidats à l’asile bloqués sur l’île. C’est une mauvaise gestion de la crise de l’UE et du gouvernement, dénonce Marios Andriotis, porte-parole de la municipalité. La frustration monte. Des Afghans ont fait une grève de la faim sur la petite place de la ville pendant deux semaines. »

    Lesbos, impuissante et explosive, réclame « le transport des migrants vers le continent [grec] ». En mars 2016, Marios Andriotis se disait pourtant satisfait de l’accord UE-Turquie. « Jamais nous n’aurions imaginé la situation actuelle, nous pensions que les déboutés de l’asile seraient renvoyés en Turquie. » Le politicien ne s’attendait pas à ce que « seules » plusieurs centaines de personnes soient déportées de l’autre côté. « Nous pensions aussi que les demandes d’asile seraient traitées rapidement. » La réponse concernant le droit d’asile s’éternise. Inquiet, Marios Andriotis estime que « les migrants pourront désormais attendre jusqu’à un an pour savoir ce qu’ils deviendront ». Certains ne tiendront pas. Régulièrement, des migrants tentent de rejoindre Athènes en montant illégalement à bord des ferries qui partent chaque jour de Lesbos.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/041217/grece-les-migrants-arrivent-toujours-lesbos-sans-pouvoir-en-partir?onglet=
    #statistiques #chiffres de personnes bloquées sur l’île :

    Ce lieu illustre l’éternel contraste de Lesbos. Une tragédie humaine au cœur d’un paysage idyllique de mer azur et de collines arborées. Nichée au milieu de cette nature, cette forteresse de barbelés, dans le village de 1 000 âmes de Moria, « loge » désormais 6 700 migrants.

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations

  • Lesbos : « Je veux que le monde m’écoute »

    Dans le camp de Moria, près de 5 000 réfugiés s’entassent dans des conditions effroyables, non loin des touristes. Les ONG dénoncent le cynisme des dirigeants européens alors qu’en trois mois, plus de 10 000 personnes sont arrivées dans les îles grecques.


    http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2017/10/11/lesbos-je-veux-que-le-monde-m-ecoute_1602491

    Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop avec ce commentaire d’Emmanuel Blanchard :

    Un article bien documenté qui a le mérite de rappeler que l’arrangement UE-Turquie n’a pas complètement tari les arrivées en Grèce. Elles sont même reparties à la hausses ces derniers mois (plus de 3000 arrivées mensuelles sur l’île de #Lesbos). 5000 réfugiés sont piégés dans le camp de #Moria où l’armée est de plus en plus visible et les ONG de moins en moins nombreuses.
    L’article ne dit rien de l’échec annoncé d’un plan de #relocalisation arrivé à son terme fin septembre et qui, en deux ans, n’a permis de répartir en Europe que 20 000 personnes arrivées par les #îles grecques.

    #accord_UE-turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Grèce #statistiques #chiffres #arrivées