• Je signale ici un #réseau / #projet de recherche sur les #morts aux #frontières :
    Morts en migration

    Le réseau MECMI regroupe des expertises de chercheurs et de praticiens encore cloisonnés, et met en œuvre des recherches permettant de développer un regard croisé sur les différentes façons de concevoir, de traiter et de gérer la mort en contexte migratoire.
    Ce réseau a pour objectif de documenter et d’interroger les dimensions matérielles, juridiques, institutionnelles, associatives, familiales, morales et émotionnelles de la mort en migration. Cela suppose d’intégrer pleinement la mort dans le phénomène migratoire, à la fois comme réalité et comme potentialité aux effets multiples.
    C’est aussi à partir d’un regard croisé de plusieurs disciplines, d’univers de pratiques et d’aires culturelles différentes sur cette problématique que la programmation s’inscrit autour de trois axes :
    1. Gestion des morts ;
    2. Imaginaires de la mort ;
    3. Accompagnement des mourants et des endeuillés.
    Si tous les noyaux thématiques sont traversés par les dimensions juridiques, institutionnelles, symboliques, morales et émotionnelles, il s’agit à chaque fois d’insister sur une dimension particulière du rapport qu’entretiennent les migrant.e.s à la mort – que ce soit la leur ou celle des proches – et qu’elle se produise dans la société d’accueil (ici, en terre d’immigration) ou à distance (ailleurs, dans le monde ou en terre d’émigration). Il s’agit enfin de faire ressortir les singularités et les différences des divers contextes nationaux.

    https://mortsenmigration.uqam.ca
    #mourir_aux_frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #décès #témoignage #celles_qui_restent #ceux_qui_restent
    ping @reka @_kg_


  • #métaliste autour de...
    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #Briançon #Mongenèvre #Hautes_Alpes #Briançonnais #Claviere #Clavière #Italie #France #frontières

    Le fil de discussion initié en avril 2018 (mais avec des liens plus anciens car il s’agit déjà d’une recomposition de liens) est en train de devenir beaucoup trop long, comme @_kg_ l’a bien mentionné dans un récent message (https://seenthis.net/messages/733643).

    Du coup, je me dis que c’est l’heure de commencer un nouveau fil et de créer une métaliste, qui pourra être améliorer dans le futur.
    Mais voici déjà, en ordre chronologique, la première compilation (composée de plus de 300 messages) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/688734

    Et la suite de la liste —> je vous invite à compléter celle-ci désormais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733720

    Ici, la querelle frontalière entre Italie (gouvernement #Salvini) et France :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/730361

    Un lien sur les interventions de #Erri_de_Luca concernant la frontière sud-alpine :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/697047

    Sur le #procès des #7_de_Briançon (ou #3+4_de_Briançon) —> attention que à partir de novembre 2018, d’autres documents existent sur le long fil de discussion initial :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/734863

    #militarisation_des_frontières #mourir_aux_frontières #morts #décès

    ping @_kg_ @sinehebdo @isskein


  • 56,800 migrant dead and missing : ’They are human beings’

    One by one, five to a grave, the coffins are buried in the red earth of this ill-kept corner of a South African cemetery. The scrawl on the cheap wood attests to their anonymity: “Unknown B/Male.”

    These men were migrants from elsewhere in Africa with next to nothing who sought a living in the thriving underground economy of Gauteng province, a name that roughly translates to “land of gold.” Instead of fortune, many found death, their bodies unnamed and unclaimed — more than 4,300 in Gauteng between 2014 and 2017 alone.

    Some of those lives ended here at the Olifantsvlei cemetery, in silence, among tufts of grass growing over tiny placards that read: Pauper Block. There are coffins so tiny that they could belong only to children.

    As migration worldwide soars to record highs, far less visible has been its toll: The tens of thousands of people who die or simply disappear during their journeys, never to be seen again. In most cases, nobody is keeping track: Barely counted in life, these people don’t register in death , as if they never lived at all.

    An Associated Press tally has documented at least 56,800 migrants dead or missing worldwide since 2014 — almost double the number found in the world’s only official attempt to try to count them, by the U.N.’s International Organization for Migration. The IOM toll as of Oct. 1 was more than 28,500. The AP came up with almost 28,300 additional dead or missing migrants by compiling information from other international groups, requesting forensic records, missing persons reports and death records, and sifting through data from thousands of interviews with migrants.

    The toll is the result of migration that is up 49 percent since the turn of the century, with more than 258 million international migrants in 2017, according to the United Nations. A growing number have drowned, died in deserts or fallen prey to traffickers, leaving their families to wonder what on earth happened to them. At the same time, anonymous bodies are filling cemeteries around the world, like the one in Gauteng.

    The AP’s tally is still low. More bodies of migrants lie undiscovered in desert sands or at the bottom of the sea. And families don’t always report loved ones as missing because they migrated illegally, or because they left home without saying exactly where they were headed.

    The official U.N. toll focuses mostly on Europe, but even there cases fall through the cracks. The political tide is turning against migrants in Europe just as in the United States, where the government is cracking down heavily on caravans of Central Americans trying to get in . One result is that money is drying up for projects to track migration and its costs.

    For example, when more than 800 people died in an April 2015 shipwreck off the coast of Italy, Europe’s deadliest migrant sea disaster, Italian investigators pledged to identify them and find their families. More than three years later, under a new populist government, funding for this work is being cut off.

    Beyond Europe, information is even more scarce. Little is known about the toll in South America, where the Venezuelan migration is among the world’s biggest today, and in Asia, the top region for numbers of migrants.

    The result is that governments vastly underestimate the toll of migration, a major political and social issue in most of the world today.

    “No matter where you stand on the whole migration management debate....these are still human beings on the move,” said Bram Frouws, the head of the Mixed Migration Centre , based in Geneva, which has done surveys of more than 20,000 migrants in its 4Mi project since 2014. “Whether it’s refugees or people moving for jobs, they are human beings.”

    They leave behind families caught between hope and mourning, like that of Safi al-Bahri. Her son, Majdi Barhoumi, left their hometown of Ras Jebel, Tunisia, on May 7, 2011, headed for Europe in a small boat with a dozen other migrants. The boat sank and Barhoumi hasn’t been heard from since. In a sign of faith that he is still alive, his parents built an animal pen with a brood of hens, a few cows and a dog to stand watch until he returns.

    “I just wait for him. I always imagine him behind me, at home, in the market, everywhere,” said al-Bahari. “When I hear a voice at night, I think he’s come back. When I hear the sound of a motorcycle, I think my son is back.”

    ———————————————————————

    EUROPE: BOATS THAT NEVER ARRIVE

    Of the world’s migration crises, Europe’s has been the most cruelly visible. Images of the lifeless body of a Kurdish toddler on a beach, frozen tent camps in Eastern Europe, and a nearly numbing succession of deadly shipwrecks have been transmitted around the world, adding to the furor over migration.

    In the Mediterranean, scores of tankers, cargo boats, cruise ships and military vessels tower over tiny, crowded rafts powered by an outboard motor for a one-way trip. Even larger boats carrying hundreds of migrants may go down when soft breezes turn into battering winds and thrashing waves further from shore.

    Two shipwrecks and the deaths of at least 368 people off the coast of Italy in October 2013 prompted the IOM’s research into migrant deaths. The organization has focused on deaths in the Mediterranean, although its researchers plead for more data from elsewhere in the world. This year alone, the IOM has found more than 1,700 deaths in the waters that divide Africa and Europe.

    Like the lost Tunisians of Ras Jebel, most of them set off to look for work. Barhoumi, his friends, cousins and other would-be migrants camped in the seaside brush the night before their departure, listening to the crash of the waves that ultimately would sink their raft.

    Khalid Arfaoui had planned to be among them. When the group knocked at his door, it wasn’t fear that held him back, but a lack of cash. Everyone needed to chip in to pay for the boat, gas and supplies, and he was short about $100. So he sat inside and watched as they left for the beachside campsite where even today locals spend the night before embarking to Europe.

    Propelled by a feeble outboard motor and overburdened with its passengers, the rubber raft flipped, possibly after grazing rocks below the surface on an uninhabited island just offshore. Two bodies were retrieved. The lone survivor was found clinging to debris eight hours later.

    The Tunisian government has never tallied its missing, and the group never made it close enough to Europe to catch the attention of authorities there. So these migrants never have been counted among the dead and missing.

    “If I had gone with them, I’d be lost like the others,” Arfaoui said recently, standing on the rocky shoreline with a group of friends, all of whom vaguely planned to leave for Europe. “If I get the chance, I’ll do it. Even if I fear the sea and I know I might die, I’ll do it.”

    With him that day was 30-year-old Mounir Aguida, who had already made the trip once, drifting for 19 hours after the boat engine cut out. In late August this year, he crammed into another raft with seven friends, feeling the waves slam the flimsy bow. At the last minute he and another young man jumped out.

    “It didn’t feel right,” Aguida said.

    There has been no word from the other six — yet another group of Ras Jebel’s youth lost to the sea. With no shipwreck reported, no survivors to rescue and no bodies to identify, the six young men are not counted in any toll.

    In addition to watching its own youth flee, Tunisia and to a lesser degree neighboring Algeria are transit points for other Africans north bound for Europe. Tunisia has its own cemetery for unidentified migrants, as do Greece, Italy and Turkey. The one at Tunisia’s southern coast is tended by an unemployed sailor named Chamseddin Marzouk.

    Of around 400 bodies interred in the coastal graveyard since it opened in 2005, only one has ever been identified. As for the others who lie beneath piles of dirt, Marzouk couldn’t imagine how their families would ever learn their fate.

    “Their families may think that the person is still alive, or that he’ll return one day to visit,” Marzouk said. “They don’t know that those they await are buried here, in Zarzis, Tunisia.”

    ——————

    AFRICA: VANISHING WITHOUT A TRACE

    Despite talk of the ’waves’ of African migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean, as many migrate within Africa — 16 million — as leave for Europe. In all, since 2014, at least 18,400 African migrants have died traveling within Africa, according to the figures compiled from AP and IOM records. That includes more than 4,300 unidentified bodies in a single South African province, and 8,700 whose traveling companions reported their disappearance en route out of the Horn of Africa in interviews with 4Mi.

    When people vanish while migrating in Africa, it is often without a trace. The IOM says the Sahara Desert may well have killed more migrants than the Mediterranean. But no one will ever know for sure in a region where borders are little more than lines drawn on maps and no government is searching an expanse as large as the continental United States. The harsh sun and swirling desert sands quickly decompose and bury bodies of migrants, so that even when they turn up, they are usually impossible to identify .

    With a prosperous economy and stable government, South Africa draws more migrants than any other country in Africa. The government is a meticulous collector of fingerprints — nearly every legal resident and citizen has a file somewhere — so bodies without any records are assumed to have been living and working in the country illegally. The corpses are fingerprinted when possible, but there is no regular DNA collection.

    South Africa also has one of the world’s highest rates of violent crime and police are more focused on solving domestic cases than identifying migrants.

    “There’s logic to that, as sad as it is....You want to find the killer if you’re a policeman, because the killer could kill more people,” said Jeanine Vellema, the chief specialist of the province’s eight mortuaries. Migrant identification, meanwhile, is largely an issue for foreign families — and poor ones at that.

    Vellema has tried to patch into the police missing persons system, to build a system of electronic mortuary records and to establish a protocol where a DNA sample is taken from every set of remains that arrive at the morgue. She sighs: “Resources.” It’s a word that comes up 10 times in a half-hour conversation.

    So the bodies end up at Olifantsvlei or a cemetery like it, in unnamed graves. On a recent visit by AP, a series of open rectangles awaited the bodies of the unidentified and unclaimed. They did not wait long: a pickup truck drove up, piled with about 10 coffins, five per grave. There were at least 180 grave markers for the anonymous dead, with multiple bodies in each grave.

    The International Committee of the Red Cross, which is working with Vellema, has started a pilot project with one Gauteng morgue to take detailed photos, fingerprints, dental information and DNA samples of unidentified bodies. That information goes to a database where, in theory, the bodies can be traced.

    “Every person has a right to their dignity. And to their identity,” said Stephen Fonseca, the ICRC regional forensic manager.

    ————————————

    THE UNITED STATES: “THAT’S HOW MY BROTHER USED TO SLEEP”

    More than 6,000 miles (9,000 kilometers) away, in the deserts that straddle the U.S.-Mexico border, lie the bodies of migrants who perished trying to cross land as unforgiving as the waters of the Mediterranean. Many fled the violence and poverty of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador or Mexico. Some are found months or years later as mere skeletons. Others make a last, desperate phone call and are never heard from again.

    In 2010 the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team and the local morgue in Pima County, Ariz., began to organize efforts to put names to the anonymous bodies found on both sides of the border. The “Border Project” has since identified more than 183 people — a fraction of the total.

    At least 3,861 migrants are dead and missing on the route from Mexico to the United States since 2014, according to the combined AP and IOM total. The tally includes missing person reports from the Colibri Center for Human Rights on the U.S. side as well as the Argentine group’s data from the Mexican side. The painstaking work of identification can take years, hampered by a lack of resources, official records and coordination between countries — and even between states.

    For many families of the missing, it is their only hope, but for the families of Juan Lorenzo Luna and Armando Reyes, that hope is fading.

    Luna, 27, and Reyes, 22, were brothers-in-law who left their small northern Mexico town of Gomez Palacio in August 2016. They had tried to cross to the U.S. four months earlier, but surrendered to border patrol agents in exhaustion and were deported.

    They knew they were risking their lives — Reyes’ father died migrating in 1995, and an uncle went missing in 2004. But Luna, a quiet family man, wanted to make enough money to buy a pickup truck and then return to his wife and two children. Reyes wanted a job where he wouldn’t get his shoes dirty and could give his newborn daughter a better life.

    Of the five who left Gomez Palacio together, two men made it to safety, and one man turned back. The only information he gave was that the brothers-in-law had stopped walking and planned to turn themselves in again. That is the last that is known of them.

    Officials told their families that they had scoured prisons and detention centers, but there was no sign of the missing men. Cesaria Orona even consulted a fortune teller about her missing son, Armando, and was told he had died in the desert.

    One weekend in June 2017, volunteers found eight bodies next to a military area of the Arizona desert and posted the images online in the hopes of finding family. Maria Elena Luna came across a Facebook photo of a decaying body found in an arid landscape dotted with cactus and shrubs, lying face-up with one leg bent outward. There was something horribly familiar about the pose.

    “That’s how my brother used to sleep,” she whispered.

    Along with the bodies, the volunteers found a credential of a boy from Guatemala, a photo and a piece of paper with a number written on it. The photo was of Juan Lorenzo Luna, and the number on the paper was for cousins of the family. But investigators warned that a wallet or credential could have been stolen, as migrants are frequently robbed.

    “We all cried,” Luna recalled. “But I said, we cannot be sure until we have the DNA test. Let’s wait.”

    Luna and Orona gave DNA samples to the Mexican government and the Argentine group. In November 2017, Orona received a letter from the Mexican government saying that there was the possibility of a match for Armando with some bone remains found in Nuevo Leon, a state that borders Texas. But the test was negative.

    The women are still waiting for results from the Argentine pathologists. Until then, their relatives remain among the uncounted.

    Orona holds out hope that the men may be locked up, or held by “bad people.” Every time Luna hears about clandestine graves or unidentified bodies in the news, the anguish is sharp.

    “Suddenly all the memories come back,” she said. “I do not want to think.”

    ————————

    SOUTH AMERICA: “NO ONE WANTS TO ADMIT THIS IS A REALITY”

    The toll of the dead and the missing has been all but ignored in one of the largest population movements in the world today — that of nearly 2 million Venezuelans fleeing from their country’s collapse. These migrants have hopped buses across the borders, boarded flimsy boats in the Caribbean, and — when all else failed — walked for days along scorching highways and freezing mountain trails. Vulnerable to violence from drug cartels, hunger and illness that lingers even after reaching their destination, they have disappeared or died by the hundreds.

    “They can’t withstand a trip that hard, because the journey is very long,” said Carlos Valdes, director of neighboring Colombia’s national forensic institute. “And many times, they only eat once a day. They don’t eat. And they die.” Valdes said authorities don’t always recover the bodies of those who die, as some migrants who have entered the country illegally are afraid to seek help.

    Valdes believes hypothermia has killed some as they trek through the mountain tundra region, but he had no idea how many. One migrant told the AP he saw a family burying someone wrapped in a white blanket with red flowers along the frigid journey.

    Marta Duque, 55, has had a front seat to the Venezuela migration crisis from her home in Pamplona, Colombia. She opens her doors nightly to provide shelter for families with young children. Pamplona is one of the last cities migrants reach before venturing up a frigid mountain paramo, one of the most dangerous parts of the trip for migrants traveling by foot. Temperatures dip well below freezing.

    She said inaction from authorities has forced citizens like her to step in.

    “Everyone just seems to pass the ball,” she said. “No one wants to admit this is a reality.”

    Those deaths are uncounted, as are dozens in the sea. Also uncounted are those reported missing in Colombia, Peru and Ecuador. In all at least 3,410 Venezuelans have been reported missing or dead in a migration within Latin America whose dangers have gone relatively unnoticed; many of the dead perished from illnesses on the rise in Venezuela that easily would have found treatment in better times.

    Among the missing is Randy Javier Gutierrez, who was walking through Colombia with a cousin and his aunt in hopes of reaching Peru to reunite with his mother.

    Gutierrez’s mother, Mariela Gamboa, said that a driver offered a ride to the two women, but refused to take her son. The women agreed to wait for him at the bus station in Cali, about 160 miles (257 kilometers) ahead, but he never arrived. Messages sent to his phone since that day four months ago have gone unread.

    “I’m very worried,” his mother said. “I don’t even know what to do.”

    ———————————

    ASIA: A VAST UNKNOWN

    The region with the largest overall migration, Asia, also has the least information on the fate of those who disappear after leaving their homelands. Governments are unwilling or unable to account for citizens who leave for elsewhere in the region or in the Mideast, two of the most common destinations, although there’s a growing push to do so.

    Asians make up 40 percent of the world’s migrants, and more than half of them never leave the region. The Associated Press was able to document more than 8,200 migrants who disappeared or died after leaving home in Asia and the Mideast, including thousands in the Philippines and Indonesia.

    Thirteen of the top 20 migration pathways from Asia take place within the region. These include Indian workers heading to the United Arab Emirates, Bangladeshis heading to India, Rohingya Muslims escaping persecution in Myanmar, and Afghans crossing the nearest border to escape war. But with large-scale smuggling and trafficking of labor, and violent displacements, the low numbers of dead and missing indicate not safe travel but rather a vast unknown.

    Almass was just 14 when his widowed mother reluctantly sent him and his 11-year-old brother from their home in Khost, Afghanistan, into that unknown. The payment for their trip was supposed to get them away from the Taliban and all the way to Germany via a chain of smugglers. The pair crammed first into a pickup with around 40 people, walked for a few days at the border, crammed into a car, waited a bit in Tehran, and walked a few more days.

    His brother Murtaza was exhausted by the time they reached the Iran-Turkey border. But the smuggler said it wasn’t the time to rest — there were at least two border posts nearby and the risk that children far younger travelling with them would make noise.

    Almass was carrying a baby in his arms and holding his brother’s hand when they heard the shout of Iranian guards. Bullets whistled past as he tumbled head over heels into a ravine and lost consciousness.

    Alone all that day and the next, Almass stumbled upon three other boys in the ravine who had also become separated from the group, then another four. No one had seen his brother. And although the younger boy had his ID, it had been up to Almass to memorize the crucial contact information for the smuggler.

    When Almass eventually called home, from Turkey, he couldn’t bear to tell his mother what had happened. He said Murtaza couldn’t come to the phone but sent his love.

    That was in early 2014. Almass, who is now 18, hasn’t spoken to his family since.

    Almass said he searched for his brother among the 2,773 children reported to the Red Cross as missing en route to Europe. He also looked for himself among the 2,097 adults reported missing by children. They weren’t on the list.

    With one of the world’s longest-running exoduses, Afghans face particular dangers in bordering countries that are neither safe nor welcoming. Over a period of 10 months from June 2017 to April 2018, 4Mi carried out a total of 962 interviews with Afghan migrants and refugees in their native languages around the world, systematically asking a series of questions about the specific dangers they had faced and what they had witnessed.

    A total of 247 migrant deaths were witnessed by the interviewed migrants, who reported seeing people killed in violence from security forces or starving to death. The effort is the first time any organization has successfully captured the perils facing Afghans in transit to destinations in Asia and Europe.

    Almass made it from Asia to Europe and speaks halting French now to the woman who has given him a home in a drafty 400-year-old farmhouse in France’s Limousin region. But his family is lost to him. Their phone number in Afghanistan no longer works, their village is overrun with Taliban, and he has no idea how to find them — or the child whose hand slipped from his grasp four years ago.

    “I don’t know now where they are,” he said, his face anguished, as he sat on a sun-dappled bench. “They also don’t know where I am.”

    https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/global-lost-56800-migrants-dead-missing-years-58890913
    #décès #morts #migrations #réfugiés #asile #statistiques #chiffres #monde #Europe #Asie #Amérique_latine #Afrique #USA #Etats-Unis #2014 #2015 #2016 #2017 #2018
    ping @reka @simplicissimus


  • #Données_fantômes : ce qui n’est pas compté et qui compte

    La #discrimination par la collecte de données et la #catégorisation_informatique.

    Certaines données sont collectées, d’autres sont manquantes. Qu’est-ce qui préside à ce choix ? L’artiste et chercheuse nigérienne-américaine #Mimi_Onuoha interroge les façons dont les individus sont catégorisés. Elle s’attache à mettre en évidence que la #collecte, l’#enregistrement et l’#archivage des données sont liés aux questions de #contrôle et de #pouvoir.

    Le travail de Mimi Onuoha autour des « #banques_de_données_manquantes » éclaire la discrimination et la #violence algorithmique qui est infligée aux #queers, aux #migrants et aux #minorités, souvent exclus et mal représentés par les systèmes de #décision_automatique. Alors que les algorithmes sont de plus en plus utilisés dans l’élaboration des politiques civiques, sociales et culturelles, il devient crucial de réfléchir de manière critique aux politiques qui façonnent nos infrastructures numériques.

    https://gaite-lyrique.net/article/donnees-fantomes-ce-qui-nest-pas-compte-et-qui-compte
    #données #bases_de_données #invisibilité #catégorisation #inclus #exclus #exclusion #algorithmes
    signalé par @fil

    • –-> même si il ne s’agit pas de systèmes de décisions automatiques, cela me fait penser la différence de traitement des #corps des personnes en exil quand ces corps sont en vie ou quand ils ne le sont plus.
      Alors qu’on compte, surveille, contrôle les corps en vie, personne ne se préoccupe de faire de même avec les #morts.

      Là-dessus, un numéro de Plein Droit :
      Homicides aux #frontières

      Depuis des dizaines d’années, des migrant·e·s meurent aux frontières de l’Europe. On peut s’étonner de la différence de traitement réservé aux vivants et aux morts. Pour les premiers, les technologies les plus avancées pour identifier et garantir la traçabilité des nouveaux arrivants.
      Pour les seconds, le silence et l’anonymat. Objet anthropologique par excellence pour appréhender une société donnée, la mort pose d’autres questions dès lors qu’elle touche des personnes qui n’en sont pas membres.


      https://www.cairn.info/revue-plein-droit-2016-2-p-6.htm


  • Scirocco : A Case Against Deportations

    EU governments are implementing security-oriented policies to govern migration. Higher walls, more controls, detention, expulsion. Deporting migrants to their country of origin will not tackle nor change people’s needs to migrate. Tunisians re-migrate to Italy short after being deported, as the uncertainty of travel is preferred to the certainty of unemployment and poverty.

    This animation tells the story of one to show the movement of many.
    Deportation is no deterrent to migration.

    https://vimeo.com/278007474


    #tunisie #migrations #vidéo #film #film_d'animation #remittances #fermeture_des_frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #smuggling #smugglers #mourir_en_mer #décès #morts #travail_au_noir #travail #économie #CIE #Italie #détention_administrative #renvois #expulsions #dissuasion #sans-papiers
    ping @_kg_

    • Deportation is no deterrent to migration - témoignage d’un migrant sfaxien rencontré à Briancon en janvier 2018 : « J’ai traversé la mer sept fois. Au début j’ai été renvoyé encore et encore. La septième fois le policier italien m’a dit ’Toi encore ? Vas-y ! On ne veut plus te voir ici’ et il m’a laissé rentrer en Italie »


    • Nell’ex fabbrica di penicillina, un #ghetto di Roma

      Oggi viene presentata la seconda edizione di “Fuori campo”, il rapporto di Medici Senza Frontiere sulla marginalità, secondo il quale “sono almeno 10.000 le persone escluse dall’accoglienza, tra richiedenti e titolari di protezione internazionale e umanitaria, con limitato o nessun accesso ai beni essenziali e alle cure mediche”. Una cinquantina gli insediamenti mappati dall’organizzazione in tutta Italia, 3500 le persone che vivono in occupazioni, baracche e “ghetti” nella sola Roma. Open Migration è entrata dentro il “gran ghetto” della capitale: un’ex fabbrica di penicillina in cui le condizioni di vita sono estreme.

      Appena finisce di spaccare le cassette della frutta e il legname di recupero, Alecu Romel entra nella casa in cui vive con la moglie Maria. Nella stanza d’ingresso, una luce fioca illumina il fornello, collegato ad una bombola a gas. A destra, in un locale spoglio, la coppia tiene una bicicletta e dei passeggini, riadattati per raccogliere ferrivecchi e oggetti abbandonati per strada. Sulla sinistra, una porta rossa separa dalla zona notte: una camera con due letti, la televisione e stampe colorate appese alle pareti.

      “Viviamo in questo appartamento da cinque anni e cerchiamo di tenerlo sempre in ordine”, dice Maria. A cedere loro lo spazio, un altro cittadino della Romania, che dentro la Ex-Penicillina, una delle più grandi aree industriali dismesse di Roma, si era inventato un angolo di intimità arredando alcuni dei locali più piccoli, che un tempo erano probabilmente uffici. In cinque anni di vita fra i capannoni scrostati, Alecu e Maria hanno visto cambiare l’insediamento. “Prima eravamo più rumeni e ci sono state anche famiglie italiane”, continua la donna, “mentre adesso gli abitanti sono cresciuti, e quasi tutti sono africani”.

      Oggi, come allora, il sogno di ricongiungersi con i due figli, affidati ai nonni in Romania, appare lontano: “questo non è un posto per bambini, ci sono topi e sporcizia, non ci si sente sicuri, ma almeno quei pochi soldi che guadagnamo ci permettono di mantenerli a casa, di fargli fare una vita migliore della nostra”, conclude Maria, la voce rassegnata.
      Fra i capannoni del “grande ghetto”

      Sempre più sogni si infrangono dietro la facciata del complesso, che costeggia via Tiburtina, una delle arterie più trafficate della città. Qui i cantieri per il raddoppio della carreggiata vanno avanti da anni: “finite ‘sti lavori!! più che una consolare sembra una via Crucis” è l’urlo che i cittadini hanno affidato ai cartelli affissi sui muri. Siamo all’altezza della periferia operaia di San Basilio, oggi nota alle cronache anche come base per lo spaccio di stupefacenti.

      Rifugiati e richiedenti asilo, arrivati in Italia negli ultimi anni e usciti dal sistema d’accoglienza, hanno infatti trovato qui un riparo precario, aprendo un nuovo capitolo nella storia del complesso, un tempo orgoglio dell’industria italiana. Aperta come Leo – Industrie Chimiche Farmaceutiche Roma, la Ex-Penicillina è stata la prima fabbrica italiana a produrre antibiotici. Una storia complessa, intrecciata ai piani di investimento del secondo dopoguerra, supportati dagli Usa, e alle speculazioni edilizie che avrebbero cambiato il volto della capitale.

      All’inaugurazione dell’impianto, nel 1950, fu invitato lo stesso sir Alexander Fleming, scopritore della penicillina. Un graffito, nello scheletro esterno della struttura, lo ritrae pensieroso: “ti ricordi quando eravamo i più grandi?”, recita la scritta. Il quotidiano “L’Unità” aveva dedicato un paginone all’evento, col titolo “la più grande fabbrica di penicillina d’Europa inaugurata a Roma”. Dagli oltre 1300 operai degli anni Sessanta, si passò però presto a poche centinaia, fino all’abbandono totale dell’attività, alla fine degli anni Novanta. Un altro sogno, quello di una cordata di imprenditori, che volevano demolirla per fare spazio a un maxi-albergo di alta categoria, si infranse di fronte ai costi per lo smaltimento di rifiuti chimici e amianto, tuttora presenti nell’area.

      “Questo posto lo chiamano il grande ghetto”, ci dice Ahmad Al Rousan, coordinatore per Medici senza frontiere dell’intervento nei campi informali, mentre entriamo dentro uno degli stabilimenti con una torcia, perché qui manca tutto, anche l’elettricità. Camminiamo tra spazzatura, escrementi e resti della vecchia fabbrica: ampolle, fiale, scatole di medicinali su cui c’è ancora la bolla di accompagnamento. “C’è un posto qui vicino, il piccolo ghetto, qui ci sono circa 500 persone, lì 150”, aggiunge. “Non solo chiamano questi luoghi ghetti, ma chi ci vive si sente anche ghettizzato”.

      In questa area industriale abbandonata ci sono persone che arrivano da diverse parti del mondo: nord Africa, Sub Sahara, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Romania, e c’è anche un italiano. La maggior parte sono titolari di protezione internazionale, altri in attesa di essere ascoltati dalla commissione territoriale che dovrà decidere sulla richiesta d’asilo, altri ancora hanno il permesso di soggiorno scaduto. Tutti sono fuori dall’accoglienza per qualche motivo.
      Il rapporto di Medici Senza Frontiere

      Come denuncia “Fuori campo”, l’ultimo rapporto di Medici Senza Frontiere, in tutta Italia ci sono almeno 10 mila persone in questa condizione, alloggiate in insediamenti informali con limitato o nessun accesso ai beni essenziali e alle cure mediche. Nella capitale la maggior parte si concentra proprio qui, nella zona est, tra la Tiburtina e la Casilina, passando per Tor Cervara. Edifici abbandonati, ex fabbriche e capannoni, sono diventati la casa di centinaia tra migranti e rifugiati. Che ci vivono da invisibili in condizioni disumane, senza acqua, luce e gas, spesso a ridosso di discariche abusive.

      Da novembre 2017, l’Ong ha avviato un intervento con un’unità mobile composta da un medico, uno psicologo e un mediatore culturale, e da qualche settimana il camper è arrivato anche all’ex Leo. Quella di Msf è l’unica presenza esterna negli spazi dell’occupazione: gli operatori vengono qui una volta alla settimana, dal primo pomeriggio alla sera, per portare assistenza medica e psicologica agli abitanti. Un piccolo gazebo allestito nella parte esterna degli edifici fa da ambulatorio, la sala d’attesa è, invece, lo spazio antistante, un tavolino da campeggio, qualche sedia pieghevole e una lampada. Per chi abita qui questo momento è diventato un rito, c’è chi viene per la prima volta, chi torna per un controllo, chi viene solo per chiacchierare.

      Un ragazzo si avvicina con aria timida: “they rescued me”, ci dice, raccontando di aver riconosciuto il logo di Msf sul gazebo, lo stesso visto sulla pettorina delle persone che lo avevano soccorso nel mezzo del Mediterraneo, nel 2016. Ora, due anni dopo l’approdo in Italia, è sbarcato anche lui all’ex fabbrica della penicillina. Entra e inizia la sua prima visita: lamenta mal di testa frequenti. La dottoressa misura la pressione e compila una scheda.

      “I problemi di salute qui sono legati soprattutto alle condizioni di vita: non ci sono servizi igienici e c’è solo una presa d’acqua fredda, per centinaia di persone”, spiega Al Rousan. La patologia più comune, aggiunge “è quella respiratoria dovuta al freddo o all’aria che respirano; l’unico modo che hanno per scaldarsi è accendere il fuoco, con tutti i rischi connessi: qualche giorno fa abbiamo assistito una persona completamente ustionata, in modo grave. Ha aspettato il nostro arrivo, non ha voluto andare a farsi vedere in un ospedale”. Di incendi qui ce ne sono stati diversi, come rivelano i muri anneriti di interi spazi. L’ultimo, a fine gennaio 2018, ha richiesto l’intervento dei vigili del fuoco, dopo l’esplosione di una bombola del gas. Quando cala la sera, le luci dei fuochi accesi e le fiammelle delle candele spezzano il buio totale degli edifici.

      “Questo è un posto estremo, dove l’esclusione è totale”, sottolinea Al Rousan. Dopo aver subito vari traumi nel viaggio e poi in Libia, trovarsi in questa condizione significa vedere infranto il sogno di potersi integrare, di costruirsi una nuova vita. Lavoro da tanti anni in situazioni simili, ma non ho mai visto una cosa del genere. E non pensavo potesse esserci un posto così a Roma”.
      La normalità dell’esclusione

      La fabbrica è occupata da diversi anni, e come in tutti gli insediamenti informali, gli abitanti hanno ricostruito una parvenza di normalità. Lamin, che viene dal Gambia, gestisce un piccolo market all’ingresso di uno dei capannoni principali. I prodotti li acquista al mercato di piazza Vittorio, dove si trovano i cibi di tutto il mondo. Qui vende aranciata, farina, zucchero, fagioli, candele e i dadi marca Jumbo, indispensabili – ci dice – per preparare qualsiasi piatto africano.

      Ha poco più di vent’anni e prima di arrivare qui viveva a via Vannina, in un altro stabile occupato, poco lontano. Nel violento sgombero del giugno 2017, è volato giù dalle scale e ancora, dice, “ho dolori frequenti alle ossa”. La fabbrica è diventata la sua nuova casa.

      Victor, 23 anni, è arrivato invece all’ex Penicillina dopo un periodo trascorso in un centro di accoglienza a Lecce, mentre era in corso la sua domanda d’asilo. Ottenuto lo status di rifugiato ha deciso di spostarsi a Roma per cercare lavoro, ma non parla neanche una parola di italiano. Il suo sogno è fare il giornalista. Nel suo paese, la Nigeria, ha studiato Comunicazione: “sono grato al governo italiano per quanto ha fatto per me”, dice, “ma non pensavo che una volta arrivato in Italia mi sarei trovato in questa situazione: quando sono arrivato a Roma ho vissuto un periodo alla stazione Termini. Faceva freddo e la temperatura di notte arrivava quasi allo zero. Un connazionale mi ha parlato di questo posto, mi ha detto che qui almeno potevo farmi una doccia. Invece, una volta arrivato ho scoperto che c’era solo una fontanella per l’acqua”. Come tutti, spera di andarsene presto. “Questo luogo cambia le persone, rallenta ogni aspirazione e io, invece, il mio sogno lo vorrei realizzare”, ci dice con uno sguardo vivace.

      Nel reticolo di capannoni, corridoi e cortili, ci sono altri piccoli bar e negozi: l’ultimo è stato aperto pochi giorni fa. Sulla facciata troneggia la bandiera giallorossa della squadra di calcio della Roma. Raffigura la lupa capitolina che allatta Romolo e Remo: qui è quasi un paradosso, quell’immagine simbolo di mamma Roma, patria dell’accoglienza.


      http://openmigration.org/analisi/nellex-fabbrica-di-penicillina-il-grande-ghetto-di-roma
      #Rome

    • Il sistema di accoglienza italiano verso il default organizzativo e morale

      Sono pubblicate da tempo le relazioni della Commissione di inchiesta della Camera dei deputati sui Centri per stranieri. Relazioni che censuravano l’utilizzo degli Hotspot come strutture detentive e chiedevano la chiusura del mega CARA di Mineo. Ma il governo e le prefetture non hanno svolto quel lavoro di pulizia con la estromissione del marcio che risultava largamente diffuso da nord e sud. Una operazione che sarebbe stata doverosa per difendere i tanti operatori e gestori dell’accoglienza che fanno il proprio dovere e che avrebbe permesso di rintuzzare uno degli argomenti elettorali più in voga nella propaganda politica delle destre, appunto gli sprechi e gli abusi verificati da tutti ormai all’interno dei centri di accoglienza, soprattutto in quelli appaltati direttamente dalle prefetture, i Centri di accoglienza straordinaria (CAS), la parte più consistente del sistema di accoglienza italiano.

      https://www.a-dif.org/2018/02/27/il-sistema-di-accoglienza-italiano-verso-il-default-organizzativo-e-morale

    • Ventimiglia. Prima della neve. Un report del gruppo di medici volontari del 27 febbraio scorso tratto dal blog Parole sul Confine

      Sabato 27 febbraio è stata una giornata di lavoro intenso sotto al ponte di via Tenda.

      Avremmo fatto almeno 40 visite.

      Rispetto alla scorsa estate ci sono più persone che vivono sotto al ponte del cavalcavia lungo al fiume, con un numero senza precedenti di donne e bambini anche molto piccoli.

      L’insediamento sembra sempre più stabile, con baracche costruite con pezzi di legno e teli di plastica. Le persone che vivono lì sono prevalentemente eritree e sudanesi. Al momento, tutte le donne sole e le madri sono eritree.

      Le persone che abbiamo visitato erano giovanissime. Tantissime affette da scabbia. Spesso con sovra-infezioni molto importanti. Grazie alla nostra disponibilità di farmaci e grazie alle scorte di indumenti stivati presso l’infopoint Eufemia abbiamo potuto somministrare il trattamento anti scabbia a molte persone, dopo esserci assicurati che avessero compreso come eseguire correttamente tutta la procedura.


      http://www.meltingpot.org/Ventimiglia-Prima-della-neve.html
      #froid #hiver

    • Purgatory on the Riviera

      Ventimiglia is idyllic. It sits just across the Italian border from the French Riviera. The piercingly blue waters of the Mediterranean churn against its rocky beaches, and its buildings, painted in earthy pastels, back up against the foothills of the Alps. On Fridays, the normally quiet streets are bustling with French tourists who cross the border by car, train, and bicycle to shop in its famous markets where artisans and farmers sell clothes, leather items, fresh produce, truffles, cheeses and decadent pastries. Families with young children and elderly couples stroll along the streets and sit at sidewalk cafes or eat in one of the many restaurants along the shore.


      https://www.irinnews.org/special-report/2017/12/04/purgatory-riviera

    • Ex Penicillina. Dall’evacuazione alla bonifica: 4 mosse per uscire dal ghetto

      La proposta degli abitanti per evitare lo sgombero coatto, più volte annunciato dal ministro Salvini. All’interno circa 200 persone, tra cui alcuni italiani. “Va data a tutti un’alternativa e la fabbrica bonificata e riconsegnata alla città”


      http://www.redattoresociale.it/Notiziario/Articolo/606113/Ex-Penicillina-Dall-evacuazione-alla-bonifica-4-mosse-per-uscire-da




  • #métaliste sur les #statistiques et #chiffre des #arrivées de personnes en exil en Europe via la #Méditerranée (#Espagne, #Italie #Grèce) et sur les #départs de #Libye.

    Arrivées en Europe via la Méditerranée :
    2018 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705781
    2017 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/667569

    Les #raisons de la baisse des arrivées en Europe, en lien avec la politique d’externalisation en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/676632

    Départs de Libye (ou non-départs car refoulements et interceptations par les gardes-côtes libyens) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/719759
    –-> à mettre en lien avec les politiques d’#externalisation en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705401

    Et le tout à mettre en lien avec les statistiques sur les #morts et #naufrages en Méditerranée.
    2018 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705934
    #mourir_en_mer #décès #mortalité

    #2014 #2015 #2016 #2017 (et estimations 2018) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/732058

    Il faudrait trouver les liens vers les statistiques des années précédentes (mais hélas pas le temps maintenant...)

    cc @isskein @reka @simplicissimus

    • Un bon article de #Matteo_Villa qui résume ces questions, paru en septembre 2018 :

      Outsourcing European Border Control : Recent Trends in Departures, Deaths and Search and Rescue Activities in the Central Mediterranean

      In our previous blog post ‘Border Deaths in the Mediterranean: what we can learn from the latest data?’ on Border Criminologies (March 2017) we discussed the existing data sources on Mediterranean Sea migration and provided an analysis of key patterns and trends. We found that Search and Rescue (SAR) has little or no effect on the number of arrivals, and it is rather the absence of SAR that leads to more deaths. These results, which are in line with other research, were covered by various European media outlets and also resulted in a peer reviewed publication in Sociology (also available as a free preprint).

      These findings covered the period until December 2016. Since then, however, the context of European border policy has changed considerably:

      Through a mix of political pressure, financial incentives and military assistance, the EU has tried to induce transit countries in the Sahel to close their borders to Europe-bound migrants. According to European parliament president Tajani, this resulted in a 95% drop in crossings through Niger, a key transition point for migrants on the way to Libya, although it cannot be excluded that migrants are taking different, more dangerous routes in order to reach Northern African countries (either via Niger or through Algeria).
      From the beginning of 2017 onwards, the Italian government backed by the EU has increasingly cooperated with Libyan authorities to block depatures in exchange for financial and logistical support. The UN-backed government in Libya in turn, has allegedly forged deals with a number of militias.
      Increased European support for the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG), resulting in an increase in interceptions and the declaration of a Libyan SAR zone.
      Increasing legal and political attacks on NGOs engaged in SAR have culminated in Italy’s decision to declare its ports to be “closed” to NGO vessels and (temporarily) to EU rescue ships in June 2018.

      Each of these developments can be seen as part of a broader strategy to close the European borders by externalizing border control to third countries, a practice that was tried earlier with Turkey, and to relax commitments enshrined in international law, such as search and rescue at sea and non refoulement.

      In view of these recent developments, we document estimated trends in arrivals, deaths, mortality rates and rescue activities covering the most recent period, between January 2016 and July 2018. In doing so, we strongly rely on detailed statistical analyses conducted by the Italian research institute ISPI. Our analyses are based on publicly available data from the IOM and the UNHCR for arrivals and interceptions, and IOM’s Missing Migrants Project for deaths. It is important to note that recorded deaths are a lower bound estimate of the actual death toll, because some deaths are likely to remain unreported. We provide an extensive discussion of data sources, data quality and challenges for their interpretation in our academic article on the issue. Since most of the above developments relate to the situation in Libya, we focus on migrants departing from that country. Libya is also the only Northern African country where interceptions at sea by the Coast Guard are independently monitored by both IOM and UNHCR personnel at disembarkation points.

      Although each of these individual developments have been reported elsewhere, together they paint a picture of Europe’s resolve to close its external borders and deter irregular migration, regardless of the (human) cost.

      Trend #1: A sharp drop in departures

      Figure 1 plots trends in the number of migrants departing irregularly from Libya by sea since January 2016. Until mid-2017, migrant departures show a remarkably regular seasonal pattern, with around 20,000 departures during the summer months. As of July 2017, however, the number of arrivals dropped dramatically, and it has stayed at comparatively low levels up to the present. The decrease in arrivals occurred after alleged ’deals’ between Libyan authorities and the militias in Western Libya that control the smuggling networks, and a few months after the signing of a memorandum of understanding between Italy and Libya. Convergent diplomatic action induced some militias to switch from smuggling to preventing departures. Other factors, such as the activity of the LCG, private and public SAR providers, or dynamics in the rate of dead and missing along the route, are relevant per se but appear to play no significant role in the decrease in arrivals to Europe. Europe’s efforts to block migrants passing though transit countries may have played a role as well, but evidence is still too sparse to be reliably assessed.

      Trend #2: An increased risk of interception by the Libyan Coast Guard

      The Libyan Coast Guard plays a pivotal role in Europe’s strategy of externalizing migration control to third countries. A report by Human Rights Watch suggests that in recent months “the Italian Maritime Rescue Coordination Center (IMRCC) has routinized a practice, tested since at least May 2017, of transferring responsibility to Libyan coast guard forces in international waters even when there are other, better-equipped vessels, including its own patrol boats or Italian navy vessels, closer to the scene.” This practice has been termed ’refoulement by proxy’ because the LCG is financed, equipped and instructed by the Italian and European authorities, as described in this recent investigative report. Migrants who are forcibly returned to Libya are imprisoned in detention centres for indefinite periods, and they face systematic violence—including torture and rape—as has been documented in numerous reports.

      The new Italian government intensified and formalized the policy of transferring responsibility to the LCG. Since June, it has instructed ships undertaking rescues in the Libyan SAR zone to refer all emergency calls to the Libyan authorities, who will then arrange their interception and pull-back to Libya. The declarations that Italian ports are “closed” to NGO ships are also part of this strategy, as their operations are considered to interfere with LCG interceptions. In late July, this practice resulted in the first instance of a non-Libyan vessel, the Asso Ventotto, being instructed to coordinate with the Tripoli Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre (JRCC). The ship ultimately disembarked the rescued persons on Libyan territory and thus effectively engaged in refoulement and collective expulsion of migrants.

      The practice of outsourcing European border control to the Libyan Coast Guard has brought about a sharp increase in its activity: by the end of July 2018, the LCG had intercepted 12,490 migrants at sea compared to 8,851 during the same period in the previous year, which amounts to a 41% increase. In combination with the drop in departures, this policy has resulted in a rapid increase in the risk of interception. To illustrate this fact, in July 2017 just 6% of migrants leaving Libya by sea ended up being caught and brought back, while almost 94% made it to Europe. In July 2018, instead, 71% of migrants leaving Libya’s shores were intercepted and brought back, while just 24% arrived safely in a European country (see Figure 2).

      Trend #3: An increase in the absolute and relative mortality rate between mid-June and July 2018

      In this section, we look at trends in absolute mortality (the number of dead and missing people at sea) and relative mortality (the risk of crossing) of migrants departing from Libya. In particular, we analyse the widely reported spike in deaths that occurred in late June 2018, after virtually all SAR NGOs had been prevented from operating as a result of policies introduced by the new Italian Minister of Interior Salvini from the far-right Lega and the continued denial by the Maltese authorities to offer Valetta as a port of entry. On June 10, Italy unilaterally decided to declare its ports to be “closed” to NGO rescue ships, as well as (temporarily) to commercial and EU vessels carrying rescued migrants. Also Malta tightened its position on rescue activities and cracked down on two SAR NGOs in early July. Since then, rescue operations close to the Libyan coast have been almost entirely delegated to the LCG.

      First, we look at trends in the absolute mortality rate. Figure 3 shows a reduction in the monthly number of deaths since July 2017, commensurate with the reduction in the number of departures described above. For example, 20 deaths were recorded in April 2018, and 11 in May (Figure 3). In June, however, an estimated 451 migrants died on their way from Libya to Europe—of which 370 between 16 and 30 June. It is important to note that these deaths occurred during a time when departures were comparatively low. As a result, the risk of crossing has increased from 2.8% in the previous months to a staggering 7% since mid-June 2018 (Figure 4). These findings are also robust to using different time frames for the pre-NGO absence period, including the entire period since the drop of arrivals in July 2017 until the NGO ban. Whereas relative mortality has fluctuated in recent years, 7% constitute an extraordinary spike.

      Figure 5 maps shipwreck events occurring between 16 June and 31 July 2018 with at least estimated 15 dead or missing persons, using geocoded data provided by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project. While the precise location of each shipwreck is only an estimate, as “precise locations are not often known” (as explained in the “Methodology” section of the Missing Migrants Project), such estimates do provide an indication of where such shipwrecks have taken place. In particular, IOM data shows that shipwrecks between 16 June and 31 July took place well within 50 nautical miles from Libya’s shores, an area which used to be patrolled by either the LCG or NGO vessels. Yet, during the time when deaths spiked, only two NGO vessels had been operating, and only discontinuously.

      These observations are reminiscent of what happened in 2015, when the withdrawal of competent SAR providers (the Italian mission Mare Nostrum) similarly created the conditions for avoidable loss of life. Although these findings are based on a relatively short time period, they are suggestive of the risk of leaving the Libyan SAR zone to the operations of the LCG alone. Continuous monitoring of the situation remains of utmost importance.

      Conclusion

      In combination, the three trends described above highlight the harsh realities of recent European migration policies, which seek to limit irregular migration regardless of the moral, legal and humanitarian consequences. The current European obsession with reducing migration at all costs is even less comprehensible when considering that arrivals decreased drastically prior to the most recent escalation of rhetoric and externalization of migration control. Arrivals to Italy in the first half of 2018 were down by 79% compared to the same time frame in 2017. Although increasingly inhumane policies are often cloaked in a rhetoric about reducing deaths at sea, it is important to remember that those who are prevented from crossing or forcibly returned are generally not safe but remain subject to precarious and often lethal conditions in countries of transit. Rather than providing a sustainable response to the complex challenges involved in irregular migration, Europe has outsourced the management of its migration ’problem’ to countries like Libya and Niger, where violence and death often remains hidden from the public view.

      https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/research-subject-groups/centre-criminology/centreborder-criminologies/blog/2018/09/outsourcing


  • Justice restaurative : la fin de la logique punitive ?
    https://oip.org/analyse/justice-restaurative-la-fin-de-la-logique-punitive

    Howard Zher définit la justice restaurative comme « un processus qui vise à impliquer, dans la mesure du possible, toutes les parties concernées par une infraction spécifique, et qui cherche à identifier et à traiter de manière collective les souffrances, les besoins et les obligations, de façon à guérir et réparer autant que faire se peut » (4). Les crimes et délits sont, dans cette approche, considérés non pas comme une infraction à la loi, une atteinte à l’ordre public et à l’État, mais comme une atteinte aux personnes et au lien social. En outre, le choix de la réponse à ces crimes et délits n’est plus le monopole de l’État et des professionnels du droit, mais repose sur la participation active des principaux intéressés et du corps social, à travers un processus d’échange direct – ou indirect – entre les personnes en conflit. Surtout, dans cette perspective, c’est l’objectif même de la justice qui est reformulé : « Plutôt que de se préoccuper de savoir si les « délinquants » ont reçu la punition qu’ils méritent, la justice réparatrice se concentre sur la réparation des préjudices causés par le crime. » « La justice n’a [donc plus] pour fonction de punir, de traiter ou de protéger mais de (faire) réparer ou compenser le plus possible les préjudices causés par un délit », appuie Lode Walgrave, l’un des principaux théoriciens de ce champ de recherche en construction [lire son interview page 26]. À partir de ce socle de principes communs, les approches divergent. Lode Walgrave distingue deux principaux courants : le premier, minimaliste, souligne les avantages liés aux arrangements volontaires et informels et exclut toute intervention étatique. L’ambition des minimalistes est alors d’élargir au maximum les possibilités de traitement des infractions en dehors de l’institution judiciaire. Le second courant, maximaliste, a au contraire pour objectif de coloniser la justice pénale actuelle : « en cas d’échec des délibérations, cette deuxième optique envisage le recours à des obligations prononcées par la justice classique en vue de réparations ou compensations partielles. (…) La vision maximaliste prolonge donc l’objectif réparateur jusque dans la justice criminelle elle-même, et pénètre la sanction judiciaire », afin de lui donner une visée réparatrice plutôt qu’afflictive. Mais que ce soit dans l’une ou dans l’autre des perspectives, « la justice restauratrice incarne pour ses promoteurs « un futur où la punition serait marginalisée » »


  • Dead Mom Talking
    “If you want to talk to me when I’m dead, go to the bench.”
    https://www.thirdcoastfestival.org/feature/dead-mom-talking

    Elaine Mitchell said those words to her daughter Rachel a few days before she died last July. Her memorial bench now sits in a Toronto ravine under tall trees. Elaine was a teacher, writer and avid traveler. During the last seven weeks of her life she and Rachel binge-watched TV, traded dark humor, and they talked. Rachel recorded the conversations. That way, months after Elaine’s death, Rachel was able to get in one more conversation with the person she needed most.

    https://s3.amazonaws.com//tciaf-audio/ic2k5_16_matlow_deadmomtalking.mp.m4a

    #audio #creation #morts #vivants #radio
    ping @intempestive



  • #métaliste sur la « #nouvelle_route_des_Balkans », soit l’après-2015 (probablement à compléter) :

    1. Les nouvelles routes des Balkans... qui passent au nord (#Bulgarie, #Roumanie, #Hongrie, #Autriche) et au sud (#Grèce, #Albanie, #Monténégro, #Bosnie, #Croatie, #Slovénie, #Autriche) par rapport l’ « originale », celle de l’automne 2015 :

    2. Description de cette nouvelle route et news :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/669257

    3. #Bosnie, nouveau pays de transit (route du nord) ?
    https://seenthis.net/messages/639454
    3a. sur la fermeture des #frontières entre #Bosnie et #Croatie
    https://seenthis.net/messages/702915

    4. #Bulgarie, nouveau pays de transit (route du sud) ?
    https://seenthis.net/messages/609387
    https://seenthis.net/messages/575032
    https://seenthis.net/messages/554021

    1. sur les #morts sur cette route :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/714897
    #décès #mourir_dans_la_forteresse_europe

    #route_des_Balkans

    cc @isskein @reka


  • Migrant deaths in Croatia highlight alternative Balkan route

    Two migrants have been found dead in a Croatian forest, apparent victims of a landslide. The men are thought to have been traveling through Bosnia, where authorities say 4,000 migrants are waiting to enter the EU.

    https://www.dw.com/en/migrant-deaths-in-croatia-highlight-alternative-balkan-route/a-45054897
    #décès #morts #mourir_dans_la_forteresse_europe #Croatie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #route_des_balkans

    Et une description de la #nouvelle_route_des_balkans, passant par la #Bosnie


    • La prison de Fleury-Mérogis secouée par une série de suicides, Le Monde

      Onze personnes détenues se sont suicidées à la maison d’arrêt de Fleury-Mérogis (Essonne) depuis le début de l’année 2018 : dix hommes et une femme. En sept mois, ce compteur macabre a déjà dépassé le cumul des deux années précédentes. Une situation inédite qui préoccupe l’administration pénitentiaire comme le parquet d’Evry, mais à laquelle ils affirment aujourd’hui ne pas trouver d’explication.

      Dernier en date, un homme de 48 ans a été retrouvé pendu dans sa cellule mardi 7 août au matin. Il était en détention provisoire pour une affaire criminelle (viol sur son ex-compagne). Détenu au quartier des « arrivants », il avait été identifié comme fragile, et un surveillant s’assurait de son état toutes les heures dans le cadre des dispositifs de prévention du suicide. « A la ronde de 6 heures, il dormait sur sa couchette, à celle de 7 heures, c’était trop tard », apprend-on de source pénitentiaire.

      A chaque décès en détention, quelle que soit l’apparence des faits (mort naturelle, suicide, agression), une enquête judiciaire est systématiquement ouverte. « Nous n’avons, à ce stade, pas d’élément troublant ni de facteur d’explication de cette série de suicides à Fleury-Mérogis », assure-t-on au parquet du tribunal d’Evry, dans le ressort duquel est implantée la plus grande prison d’Europe avec ses quelque 4 300 détenus. La justice y voit des cas individuels, indépendants les uns des autres.

      Pour le coordonnateur du pôle enquête de l’Observatoire international des prisons (OIP), François Bès, cela pourrait s’expliquer par « un climat de tensions permanentes et de pression » spécifique à cet établissement. Les conditions de détention y sont pourtant, a priori, moins dures que dans d’autres maisons d’arrêt franciliennes. A Fresnes (Val-de-Marne), dont la vétusté des locaux n’est plus à démontrer, où les cellules n’ont pas de douche et où le nombre de détenus atteint 193 % de la capacité (contre 143 % à #Fleury-Mérogis), on ne déplore « que » deux suicides depuis le début de l’année pour 2 550 détenus. A Villepinte, en Seine-Saint-Denis, aucun suicide malgré une densité carcérale de 182 %. Au niveau national, on observe une légère hausse, mais la tendance sur plusieurs années est orientée à la baisse : 64 suicides en détention depuis le début de l’année, contre 59 pour la période équivalente en 2017 et 71 en 2016.

      Lire aussi : Nouveau record pour les prisons françaises avec 70 710 personnes incarcérées

      Certains cas polémiques

      Le phénomène a pris à Fleury une dimension oppressante, tant pour les personnels pénitentiaires que pour les détenus et leurs familles. Au point que certains cas deviennent polémiques. Tel celui de Lucas H., 21 ans, qui se serait pendu le 21 juillet au quartier disciplinaire où il avait été conduit à la suite d’une altercation avec des surveillants au sortir d’un parloir avec sa mère. Sa famille refuse de croire à un geste désespéré du jeune homme censé sortir de prison en septembre. Plusieurs dizaines de personnes ont manifesté samedi 4 août devant la maison d’arrêt à l’appel d’un collectif Justice pour Lucas et conspué aux cris de « Matons assassins ! » les surveillants qui quittaient leur service.

      Selon le parquet d’Evry, qui a eu les conclusions orales de l’autopsie pratiquée le 26 juillet, « rien de suspect ne remet en cause pour le moment la thèse du suicide » de Lucas. Mais, l’enquête ne devrait pas être bouclée avant septembre, en attendant le rapport complet du médecin légiste et le résultat de plusieurs auditions auxquelles les gendarmes comptent encore procéder.

      D’autres suicides ne sont pas contestés, mais peuvent nourrir des questions sur le sens de la détention [ça alors...] , en particulier pour les courtes peines. Comme celui de cet homme de 25 ans, condamné à trois mois de prison pour « voyage habituel sans titre de transport ». Il s’est pendu le 17 mars, quelques semaines après son incarcération. Ou ce père de famille, plus âgé, qui s’est suicidé en avril, à peine arrivé pour exécuter une peine de deux mois pour « conduite sans assurance ». Ces sanctions pénales semblent disproportionnées au regard du délit, mais les tribunaux les justifient par le caractère multirécidiviste de ces personnes.

      Taux de suicides six fois supérieur

      Autre sujet questionné, celui des détentions provisoires qui s’allongent. La jeune femme de 24 ans qui s’est donné la mort à la maison d’arrêt des femmes de Fleury le 21 avril attendait depuis trois ans que la justice fixe son sort. « Une situation plus difficile à vivre que pour les condamnés, qui, eux, savent quand ils sortiront et peuvent, même si c’est dans longtemps, se projeter dans un avenir », explique un surveillant de cette prison géante.

      Le 12 juin, c’est un Albanais de 38 ans, qui se suicidait peu de temps après que sa détention provisoire qui durait déjà depuis dix-huit mois fut renouvelée. Il était mis en examen dans l’enquête sur l’attentat de Nice (86 morts) pour « association de malfaiteur terroriste » pour avoir fourni des armes à un couple d’Albanais qui les avaient lui-même revendues à un proche du conducteur du camion meurtrier. Selon l’Agence France-Presse, la qualification « terroriste » de son dossier était sur le point d’être abandonnée alors que cet homme, dont la tendance suicidaire avait été signalée, clamait depuis le début son aversion pour les djihadistes.

      Le taux de suicides en prison est en moyenne six fois supérieur à celui de l’ensemble de la population. De fait, elle concentre des personnes qui cumulent les handicaps sociaux, scolaires, économiques, sanitaires, familiaux, etc. « Ce n’est pas la prison qui crée leurs problèmes ni leurs fragilités », se défend-on à la direction des services pénitentiaires d’Ile-de-France. La direction assure que les retours d’expérience réalisés par une équipe pluridisciplinaire après chaque décès « n’ont pas révélé de faille dans la prévention du suicide, que ce soit dans la transmission des informations sur les signes avant-coureurs ou la prise en charge des personnes fragiles ».

      Dégradation des actions préventives

      Il n’empêche, le plan antisuicide mis en place en 2009 par la direction de l’administration pénitentiaire a porté ses fruits et a ainsi fait la preuve que ce n’était pas une fatalité. Le dispositif ne se limite pas à la ronde toutes les heures. Le dialogue du surveillant avec le détenu, par exemple au retour d’un parloir annulé ou qui s’est mal passé ou d’une audience chez le juge, est essentiel. « Lorsqu’un détenu que l’on a pris en charge se suicide, on ressent la même chose que le chirurgien qui perd un patient sur sa table d’opération », témoigne un ex-directeur de Fleury-Mérogis.

      Lire aussi : La mise en place d’un bureau de vote pour les détenus à l’étude

      Mais les surveillants ont-ils encore le temps pour cette partie valorisante de leur métier ? L’OIP voit dans la surpopulation carcérale et la proportion importante de surveillants stagiaires la cause d’une dégradation de ces actions préventives.

      Un autre dispositif de prévention qui semble avoir fait ses preuves à Villepinte depuis plusieurs années et a été implanté il y a quelques mois à Fresnes devrait prochainement être mis en place à Fleury-Mérogis, dans deux bâtiments sur cinq pour commencer. Des « codétenus de soutien », volontaires, formés avec des psychologues de la Croix-Rouge partageront la cellule de personnes considérées comme à risque en matière de passage à l’acte.

      Les statistiques sur la prévention n’existent pas, mais la direction des services pénitentiaires d’Ile-de-France assure qu’il y a dix fois plus de tentatives sérieuses de suicide prises à temps par les personnels que de suicides constatés.

    • La prison, « une humiliation pour la République », Editorial, Le Monde
      https://lemonde.fr/idees/article/2018/08/08/la-prison-une-humiliation-pour-la-republique_5340462_3232.html

      L’inflation de la population carcérale provoque des conditions de détention indignes et incompatibles avec les objectifs de réinsertion assignés à l’administration pénitentiaire.

      Nouveau record pour les prisons françaises avec 70 710 personnes incarcérées
      https://lemonde.fr/societe/article/2018/07/26/nouveau-record-pour-les-prisons-francaises-avec-70-710-personnes-incarcerees

    • https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/linvite-des-matins-dete-1ere-partie/prisons-francaises-un-systeme-a-bout-de-souffle

      Confrontée à une vague de suicides à Fleury-Mérogis, l’administration pénitentiaire française pourrait bien devoir reconsidérer les faiblesses de son #système. Pour en parler, Julie Gacon reçoit #François_Bès, coordinateur du pôle enquête de l’Observatoire international des prisons (OIP).
      #administration_pénitentiaire





  • Over 200 Migrants Drown in Three Days in Mediterranean — Death Toll for 2018 Passes 1,000

    This weekend, some 204 migrants have died at sea off Libya, pushing the total number of migrant drownings in the entire Mediterranean so far this year to over 1,000 people.

    Today (1/07), a small rubber boat packed with migrants capsized off AlKhums, east of Tripoli, with an estimated 41 people surviving after rescue. On Friday (28/06), three babies were among the 103, who died in a shipwreck similar to Sunday’s incident, also caused by smugglers taking migrants to sea in completely unsafe vessels.

    So far this year, the Libyan Coast Guard has returned some 10,000 people to shore from small vessels.

    “I am traveling to Tripoli once again this week and will see firsthand the conditions of migrants who have been rescued as well as those returned to shore by the Libya Coast Guard,” said William Lacy Swing, IOM Director General. “IOM is determined to ensure that the human rights of all migrants are respected as together we all make efforts to stop the people smuggling trade, which is so exploitative of migrants,” said Swing.

    IOM staff were deployed to provide support and first aid to the the 41 migrants who survived the capsize of their small rubber vessel that capsized off AlKhums. This is the second major shipwreck in as many few days. On Friday, a rubber dinghy capsized north of Tripoli and the 16 survivors (young men from Gambia, Sudan, Yemen, Niger and Guinea) were rescued by the Libyan Cost Guard. However, an estimated 103 people lost their lives.

    Adding to grim and tragic scene, the bodies of three babies were taken from the sea by the Libyan Coast Guard. IOM provided assistance at the disembarkation point, including provision of food and water and health assistance. IOM is also in the process of providing psychosocial aid at Tajoura detention centre where the survivors have been transferred. The need for physcosocial support is high as the survivors spent traumatizing time in the water as their engine broke only 30 minutes after departing Garaboli. The survivors have received psychosocial first aid at the detention centre and IOM continues to monitor their condition.
    From Friday to Sunday, close to 1,000 migrants were returned to Libyan shore by the Libyan Coast Guard, who intercepted small crafts as they made their way towards the open sea. Upon disembarkation to shore, migrants have received emergency direct assistance, including food and water, health assistance and IOM protection staff has provided vulnerability interviews. Those rescued and returned by the Libyan Coast Guard are transferred by the Libyan authorities to the detention centres where IOM continues humanitarian assistance.
    “There is an alarming increase in deaths at sea off Libya Coast,” said IOM Libya Chief of Mission Othman Belbeisi, adding: “Smugglers are exploiting the desperation of migrants to leave before there are further crackdowns on Mediterranean crossings by Europe.”

    “Migrants returned by the coast guard should not automatically be transferred to detention and we are deeply concerned that the detention centres will yet again be overcrowded and that living conditions will deteriorate with the recent influx of migrants,” added Belbeisi.

    https://www.iom.int/news/over-200-migrants-drown-three-days-mediterranean-death-toll-2018-passes-1000
    #Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #mourir_en_mer #morts #décès #statistiques #chiffres #2018 #mer_Méditerranée

    en français:
    https://news.un.org/fr/story/2018/07/1018032

    • Dopo l’allontanamento delle ONG è strage quotidiana sulla rotta del Mediterraneo centrale

      Nel giorno in cui il ministro dell’interno e vice-presidente del Consiglio rilancia da Pontida l’ennesimo attacco contro le ONG, che vedranno “solo in cartolina” i porti italiani, e mentre tre navi umanitarie sono bloccate nel porto de La Valletta, per decisione del governo maltese, nelle acque del Mediterraneo Centrale si continua a morire. Si continua a morire nell’indifferenza della maggior parte della popolazione italiana, schierata con chi ha promesso che, chiudendo i porti, e le vie di fuga, ai migranti da soccorrere in mare, le condizioni di vita degli italiani colpiti dalla crisi potranno migliorare. Una tragica illusione. Il vero pericolo per tutti oggi non viene dal mare, ma dalla costituzione di un fronte sovranista ed identitario europeo, che potrebbe cancellare lo stato di diritto e la democrazia rappresentativa. E allora non ci sarà più spazio nè per i diritti umani nè per i diritti sociali. i più forti imporranno le loro leggi ai più deboli.

      Questa volta nessuno potrà accusare le navi umanitarie, come hanno fatto fino a oggi direttori di giornali in Italia ed esponenti della sedicente Guardia costiera libica. Adesso i libici, in assenza delle navi umanitarie, sono costretti ad avvalersi delle navi commerciali in navigazione nelle loro acque, per operazioni di soccorso che da soli non sono in grado di garantire, salvo poi attaccare le ONG. Per le persone “soccorse” in mare da questi mezzi il destino è segnato, lo sbarco avviene a Tripoli, porto più vicino ma non “place of safety“, e dopo poche ore, per coloro che sono trasferiti dal centro di prima accoglienza al porto, ai vari centri di detenzione gestiti dalle milizie, il destino è segnato.

      Si ripetono intanto attacchi scomposti contro gli operatori umanitari, che rilanciano la macchina del fango che da oltre un anno si rivolge contro le ONG, accusate di tutti i possibili reati, per il solo fatto di salvare vite umane in mare. Si vogliono eliminare tutti i testimoni dell’Olocausto nel Mediterraneo. Senza un voto del Parlamento si è cercato di introdurre in via surrettizia il reato di solidarietà, in spregio al principio di legalità, affermato dalla Costituzione italiana.

      Questa striscia di morte, che si allunga giorno dopo giorno, con una cadenza mai vista prima, deriva direttamente dalla eliminazione delle navi umanitarie e dall’arretramento degli assetti militari italiani ed europei che in passato, anche se si verificavano gravi stragi, riuscivano tuttavia a garantire più solleciti interventi di soccorso. Il blocco di tre navi umanitarie a Malta, come il sequestro della Juventa lo scorso anno, potrebbero essere stati causa di una forte riduzione della capacità di soccorso in acque internazionali, tra la Libia e ‘Europa, una capacità di soccorso che gli stati non hanno voluto mantenere negli standards imposti dalle Convenzioni internazionali a ciascun paese responsabile di una zona SAR ( ricerca e soccorso). La presenza delle navi umanitarie è stata bollata come un fattore di attrazione delle partenze, se non come vera e propria complicità con i trafficanti, come ha ripetuto in più occasioni Salvini. Ne vediamo oggi le conseguenze mortali.

      Anche l’UNHCR ha espresso la sua preoccupazione per la diminuzione degli assetti navali in grado di operare interventi di soccorso nelle acque del Mediterraneo centrale. Secondo l’OIM negli ultimi tre giorni sono annegate oltre 200 persone, una serie di stragi ignorate dall’oipinione pubblica italiana e nascoste dai politici concentrati nel rinnovato attacco contro le ONG. La “banalità” della strage quotidiana in mare costituisce la cifra morale del governo Salvini-Di Maio. Con il sommarsi delle vittime, e l’allontanamento dei testimoni, si vuole produrre una totale assuefazione nella popolazione italiana. Per alimentare altro odio ed altra insicurezza, utili per le prossime scadenze elettorali.

      Nelle prime settimane di insediamento del nuovo governo, ed in vista del Consiglio europeo di Bruxelles del 28-29 giugno scorso, il ministero dell’interno ha disposto in modo informale la chiusura dei porti ed il divieto di ingresso nelle acque territoriali, per alcune imbarcazioni delle Organizzazioni non governative che avevano effettuato soccorsi nelle acque internazionali antistanti le coste libiche. Sono state anche ritardate le operazioni di sbarco di centinaia di persone, soccorse da unità militari ( come la nave americana Trenton), o commerciali ( come il cargo Alexander Maersk), che, solo dopo lunghi giorni di attesa, hanno potuto trasbordare i naufraghi che avevamo a bordo e proseguire per la loro rotta. In molti casi si sono trasferite le responsabilità di coordinamento dei soccorsi alle autorità libiche, con i risultati che sono sotto gli occhi di tutti.

      Le ultime vicende delle navi umanitarie Acquarius , Lifeline e Open Arms, dopo il sequestro, lo scorso anno, della nave Juventa, ancora bloccata a Trapani, hanno aperto una nuova fase di tensioni anche a livello internazionale, in particolare con il governo maltese e con le autorità spagnole. Il governo italiano ha chiuso i porti alle poche navi umanitarie ancora impegnate nelle attività di ricerca e salvataggio (SAR) sulla rotta del Mediterraneo centrale, mentre si è rilanciata la criminalizzazione delle Ong, e più in generale di chiunque rispetti il dovere di salvare vite umane in mare, malgrado importanti decisioni della magistratura (di Ragusa e di Palermo) riconoscessero come lecite, anzi doverose, le attività di soccorso umanitario delle stesse Ong sotto inchiesta.

      Da ultimo si è appreso che ci sarebbero motivi “di ordine pubblico” alla base della decisione del ministro dell’Interno Matteo Salvini di vietare l’accesso ai porti italiani alla Open Arms.
Questi motivi, stando a informazioni che non sono state formalizzate in un provvedimento notificato agli interessati, sarebbero costituiti dalle “vicende giudiziarie” in cui è stata coinvolta la nave delle Ong spagnola, dissequestrata con una sentenza del Gip poi confermata dal tribunale di Ragusa, e dalle “manifestazioni”(rischio proteste) che si sono verificate in occasione del sequestro preventivo alla quale era stata sottoposta nel porto di Pozzallo.

      Si configura così come problema di “ordine pubblico” il doveroso espletamento di una operazione SAR che si è svolta nel pieno rispetto della legge e del diritto internazionale, per legittimare un provvedimento, ancora segretato, forse una circolare probabilmente da redigere, del ministro Toninelli, che vieta l’ingresso alle navi delle Ong nelle acque territoriali e nei porti italiani .

      L’allontanamento delle ONG per effetto delle “chiusure” informali dei porti, e la istituzione unilaterale di una zona SAR libica, oltre al blocco imposto alle navi umanitarie dalle autorità maltesi, riducono la presenza dei mezzi di soccorso nel Mediterraneo centrale e hanno già comportato un aumento esponenziale delle vittime.

      La realizzazione del progetto italiano di istituire una zona SAR , completata con una forte pressione sull’IMO a Londra, sta producendo tutti i suoi effetti mortali, considerando che la Guardia costiera “libica” non può coprire tutte le azioni di soccorso che è chiamata ad operare (spesso da assetti italiani), avendo a disposizione soltanto sei motovedette. Si tratta di mezzi ceduti dai precedenti governi italiani, oggi abbastanza logorati malgrado siano stati curati nella manutenzione dai marinai delle unità italiane, di stanza nel porto di Tripoli, nell’ambito della missione NAURAS. Non si sa come e quando arriveranno in Libia le 12 motovedette promesse alla Guardia costiera di Tripoli da Salvini, che doveva fare approvare la sua proposta in Consiglio dei ministri, approvazione che ancora non c’e’ stata. Una iniziativa che potrebbe infuocare ancora di più lo scontro tra le milizie libiche per il controllo dei porti, e del traffico di gas e petrolio.
      La creazione fittizia di una zona SAR libica, che sembra sia stata notificata anche all’IMO, sta legittimando gli interventi più frequenti della Guardia costiera di Tripoli, che arrivano a minacciare anche gli operatori umanitari mentre sono impegnati negli interventi di soccorso in acque internazionali. Interventi di soccorso che sono sempre monitorati dalle autorità militari italiane ed europee, che però non intervengono con la stessa tempestività che permetteva in passato il salvataggio di migliaia di vite.

      Il cerchio si chiude. Adesso arriva anche il supporto europeo alla chiusura contro le ONG, anche se non si traduce in alcun atto dotato di forza normativa vinclante. Tutte le politiche europee sull’immigrazione, anche i respingimenti, avverranno “su base volontaria”. Ma le navi di Frontex ( e di Eunavfor Med) rimangono vincolate agli obblighi di soccorso previsti dai Regolamenti europei n.656 del 2014 e 1624 del 2016. Atti normativi, vincolanti anche per i ministri,che subordinano le azioni contro i trafficanti alla salvaguardia della vita delle vittime, non esternazioni di leader sull’orlo di una crisi di nervi alla fine di un Consiglio europeo estenuante ed inconcludente.

      L’illegalità di scelte politiche e militari che vanno contro il diritto internazionale viene giustificata con lo spauracchio di manifestazioni democratiche di protesta. Non e’ a rischio soltanto la libertà di manifestazione o il diritto a svolgere attività di assistenza e di soccorso umanitario. Il messaggio lanciato dal governo italiano, e ripreso dal governo maltese, è chiaro, riguarda tutti, non solo i migranti. E’ la strategia mortale della dissuasione, rivolta ai migranti ed agli operatori umanitari. Altro che “pacchia”. Per chi si trova costretto a fuggire dalla Libia, senza alternative sicure per salvare la vita, il rischio del naufragio si fa sempre più concreto. Anche se gli “sbarchi” sono drasticamente calati, rispetto allo scorso anno, è in forte aumento il numero delle vittime, morti e dispersi, abbandonati nelle acque del Mediterraneo.

      In questa situazione la magistratura italiana è chiamata a fare rispettare le regole dello stato di diritto e gli impegni assunti dall’Italia con la firma e la ratifica delle Convenzioni internazionali di diritto del mare. Ma è anche importante il contributo della società civile organizzata, delle associazioni, di tutto quel mondo del volontariato che in questi ultimi mesi è stato messo sotto accusa con lo slogan della “lotta al business dell’immigrazione”. Quando erano state proprio le Organizzazioni non governative a denunciare chi faceva affari sulla pelle dei migranti e chi ometteva i controlli, denunce fatte in Parlamento e nel lavoro quotidiano di tanti cittadini solidali. L’attacco contro il sistema di accoglienza è stato utilizzato per delegittimare e bloccare chi portava soccorso in mare, mentre gli stati venivano meno ai loro obblighi di salvataggio. Verranno dalla società civile europea e dagli operatori umanitari le denunce che inchioderanno i responsabili delle stragi per omissione.

      Rispetto alle richieste di soccorso, e persino rispetto alle istanze che si stanno proponendo per avere chiarite le basi normative e i contenuti dei provvedimenti amministrativi, sulla base dei quali si sta interdicendo l’ingresso nelle acque territoriali e nei porti italiani alle navi delle ONG, impegnate in attività SAR nelle acque internazionali a nord delle coste libiche, silenzi e ritardi. Si può riscontrare silenzio e ritardo nell’attività delle pubbliche amministrazioni riconducibili al Ministero delle infrastrutture ( quanto al divieto di ingresso) e dell’interno (quanto alle note di rilevazione ed alla dichiarazione di una situazione di pericolo per l’ordine pubblico). Le decisioni dei ministri, su materie così importanti che incidono sulla vita ( e sulla morte) delle persone, non possono essere comunicate sui social, con messaggi Twitter o attraverso Facebook.

      Se gli avvistamenti iniziali ed il coordinamento “di fatto” (come rilevato dalla magistratura) della Guardia costiera “libica” sono effettuati da parte di autorità militari italiane, in sinergia con gli assetti aero-navali europei delle missioni Themis di Frontex ed Eunavfor MED, le autorità italiane non possono dismettere la loro responsabilità di soccorso.

      In questi casi il ministero dell’interno italiano ha l’obbligo di indicare un porto sicuro (place of safety) di sbarco in Italia, dal momento che la Libia non offre porti sicuri, e che Malta ha negato in diverse occasioni l’attracco a navi commerciali o umanitarie, che avevano operato soccorsi nelle acque del Mediterraneo centrale.

      Contro la scelta di chiudere i porti e di interdire l’ingresso delle navi delle ONG nelle acque territoriali, tanto per sbarcare naufraghi soccorsi in alto mare, quanto per effettuare rifornimenti e cambi di equipaggio, occorre rilanciare una forte iniziativa sul piano sociale, politico e legale. Per affermare il diritto alla vita, un diritto incondizionato, che non può essere piegato a finalità politiche o giudiziarie. Per battere quell’ondata di disinformazione e di rancore sociale che sta disintegrando il tessuto umano della nostra Repubblica, e la stessa Unione Europea, indicando nei migranti e in chi li assiste la ragione di tutti i mali che affliggono i cittadini italiani. Come se si trattasse di nemici interni da eliminare. Di fronte a tutto questo, la resistenza è un dovere.

      https://www.a-dif.org/2018/07/01/dopo-lallontanamento-delle-ong-e-strage-quotidiana-sulla-rotta-del-mediterran

    • La rotta più pericolosa del mondo

      Nel primo weekend in cui Tripoli ha coordinato i soccorsi in mare ci sono stati tre naufragi che hanno portato il numero complessivo dei morti e dei dispersi nel solo mese di giugno a 679. Secondo l’Alto commissariato delle Nazioni Unite per i rifugiati (Unhcr), il dato in meno di un mese è più che raddoppiato. Matteo Villa, un ricercatore dell’Ispi, ha elaborato i dati dell’Unhcr e dell’Organizzazione internazionale delle migrazioni (Oim) sulle morti registrate in relazione alle partenze dalla Libia e ha stabilito che dal 1 giugno la rotta del Mediterraneo è diventata la più pericolosa al mondo: “Muore una persona ogni dieci”.
      Un dato allarmante che riporta il tasso di mortalità e il numero assoluto dei morti ai livelli di quelli registrati prima della riduzione delle partenze nel luglio del 2017. “Dopo la repentina diminuzione delle partenze dal 16 luglio 2017, il numero assoluto dei morti e dei dispersi si è ridotto, ma ora siamo tornati incredibilmente ai livelli di prima”, afferma Villa (il tasso di mortalità invece era comunque aumentato nell’ultimo anno). Per il ricercatore questo fattore è legato a tre elementi: “Le ong sono coinvolte sempre di meno nei salvataggi, i mercantili non intervengono perché temono di essere bloccati per giorni in attesa di avere indicazioni sul porto di sbarco (come è successo al cargo danese Maersk) e la guardia costiera libica non ha né i mezzi né la competenza per occuparsi dei salvataggi”.


      https://www.internazionale.it/bloc-notes/annalisa-camilli/2018/07/03/morti-migranti-mediterraneo-libia
      #mortalité

    • Les tweet de Matteo Villa sur les morts en 2018 :

      Since June 1st, #migrant attempted crossings from #Libya have become THE RISKIEST since accurate public recordings started in 2016. ALMOST 1 IN 10 died or went missing upon departure from the Libyan coast bettween June 1st and July 2nd.

      After the sudden drop in #migrant departures from #Libya since 16 July 2017, the absolute number of dead and missing had abated. Astoundingly, we are now BACK to pre-drop levels. 679 persons have died or gone missing upon leaving Libya since June 1st.

      n 2018 so far, only about HALF of those departing from #Libya has made it to Italy (vs 86% last year). 44% have been brought back by the Libyan Coast Guard (vs 12% last year). 4.5% have died or gone missing (vs 2.3% last year).

      The increase in absolute dead and missings and in the risk of journey has occurred WHILE the Libyan Coast Guard rescued the highest number of persons in a single month since May 2016.

      Why is this happening: - NGOs carry out less and less SARs, may stop altogether; - commercial ships fear high losses if they do SARs and are held for days waiting for port; - Libyan Coast Guard understaffed and underequipped.

      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1014068492872704000

      data set
      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ncHxOHIx4ptt4YFXgGi9TIbwd53HaR3oFbrfBm67ak4/edit#gid=0
      (si @simplicissimus n’a rien à faire dans les prochains jours...)

      MAJOR CORRECTION: dead and missing from Libya since 1 June amount to 565, not 679 as previously stated. Risk of journey skyrocketed from 2.3% in Jan-May 2018 to 7.6% (NOT 9.0%). Absolute levels are still maximum since drop in sea arrivals in July 2017.

      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1014266248094474240

    • Record deaths at sea: will ‘regional disembarkation’ help save lives?

      Never has it been more dangerous for people in search of protection to make the crossing to Europe. The estimated death rate on boat migration journeys across the Mediterranean has risen from 4 per 1000 in 2015 to 24 per 1000 in the first four months of 2018, according to available data.

      While the death rate is higher than ever, the size of migration flows across the Mediterranean has shrunk dramatically. The number of refugees and other migrants who crossed the Mediterranean in June was down 94% compared to the peak of the migration and refugee crisis in 2015. This means that migration policy-makers now have an opportunity to move on from crisis response to a search for long-term solutions.

      Yet, Mediterranean boat migration is an increasingly thorny issue for intra-European relations, and a new surge in arrivals remains imaginable. It still dominates the political discourses of all major European countries. In Germany, Angela Merkel’s coalition remains wobbly due to disagreements over migration policy. Anxiety about migration is therefore much higher than the current number of border-crossings would suggest, and continues to shape policy-making. This was evident in the fraught discussions in the lead-up to the agreement reached by the European Council on 29 June. In fact, the pressure to reach agreement and deliver action seems to have overshadowed concerns about the feasibility of the proposed schemes.


      https://blogs.prio.org/2018/07/record-deaths-at-sea-will-regional-disembarkation-help-save-lives
      #mortalité
      signalé par @isskein

    • Responsibility for surging death toll in Central Med laid squarely at Europe’s door

      The number of people drowning in the Central Mediterranean or being taken back to squalid detention centres in Libya has surged as a result of European policies aimed at closing the central Mediterranean route, Amnesty International said in a new briefing published today.

      https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2018/08/surging-death-toll-in-central-med
      #responsabilité

      Lien vers le briefing:
      https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur30/8906/2018/en

    • Combien de migrants sont morts en Méditerranée ? Où sont-ils enterrés ?
      L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) recense près de 17000 morts et disparus en Méditerranée depuis 2014

      Bonjour,

      Votre question renvoie vers un tweet de Pierre Sautarel (administrateur de Fdesouche, revue de presse consacrée aux thèmes favoris de l’extrême droite - immigration, sécurité, identité, etc.) qui s’appuie sur une erreur de chiffre dans une dépêche Reuters pour remettre en cause le décompte du nombre de migrants décédés en Méditerranée.

      « Plus de 100 000 migrants sont morts noyés [entre la Libye et l’Italie] depuis 2014, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) », lit-on dans l’extrait du texte de l’agence que poste Sautarel. Et celui-ci de commenter : « Mais pas trace d’un cadavre sur une plage ou dans un filet de pêche… Plus c’est gros plus ça passe… »

      De fait, il y a un « 0 » de trop dans la dépêche Reuters dont Sautarel reproduit un extrait. Il s’agit probablement d’une erreur de traduction, puisque sur le site de Reuters, le texte en français fait état de « plus 100 000 morts », mais la version originale en anglais, en compte « more than [plus de] 10 000 ». Cette erreur a donné l’occasion à Pierre Sautarel (et à d’autres) de remettre en cause le décompte des migrants morts, s’appuyant par ailleurs sur le fait que (selon lui) il n’y a aucune trace des cadavres.

      Comment, et par qui, sont comptés les morts ? Où sont-ils enterrés ?
      16862 morts et disparus en Méditerranée depuis 2014, selon l’OIM

      La source de Reuters (et de quasiment tous les médias) sur ce sujet est l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). Entre le 1er janvier 2014 et le 30 juillet 2018, l’OIM, rattachée à l’ONU, a recensé 5773 « morts », dont on a retrouvé les corps, et 11089 « disparus », dont les dépouilles n’ont pas été récupérées immédiatement après les naufrages mais qui ont généralement été signalés par des survivants.

      Au total, l’OIM comptabilise donc 16 862 victimes en Méditerranée en quatre ans et demi.

      Selon l’organisation, dans leur immense majorité, ces décès et ces disparitions surviennent en Méditerranée centrale, entre la Libye, la Tunisie, Malte et l’Italie : 14587 morts et disparus dans cette zone selon l’OIM (on retrouve les « plus de 10 000 » dont parle Reuters).

      Cela représente plus de 86% du total méditerranéen. Il s’agit de la route migratoire la plus meurtrière au monde, selon l’OIM.
      Des sources essentiellement secondaires

      L’Organisation internationale pour les migrants collecte ces chiffres via le Missing Migrants Project (Programme des migrants disparus). Dans une publication de 2017, des chercheurs en charge du MMP précisent (en anglais) la méthodologie de cette comptabilité : « La base de données du MMP fournit une vue d’ensemble des données sur les morts des migrants, mais il dépend premièrement de sources secondaires d’information. » Ces sources secondaires sont évaluées en fonction de leurs avantages et de leurs inconvénients.

      Dans chaque cas (CheckNews a isolé ceux survenus en Méditerranée) l’OIM recense la date, le « nombre de morts », le « nombre minimum estimé de disparus », « le nombre de survivants ». Et renvoie vers des sources en ligne. A chaque type de source un chiffre (voir la méthodologie de collecte des données) : 1 quand un seul média a rapporté l’événement, 2 pour des témoignages de migrants à l’OIM, 3 quand plusieurs médias en font état, 4 si une organisation non-gouvernementale ou internationale en atteste, et 5 s’il y a au moins une source officielle (étatique ou gardes-côtes notamment) ou plusieurs sources humanitaires.

      Par exemple, le 30 juillet une personne meurt et deux survivent dans un naufrage près de Tanger selon un média local arabophone (indice : 1). Autre exemple : le 18 juillet, l’OIM enregistre 19 morts et (au moins) 25 disparus dans un naufrage au nord de Chypre, dont 103 personnes réchappent. Elle s’appuie sur Reuters, CNN en turc et un média turc, qui tiennent leurs infos des gardes-côtes turcs (indice : 5).

      L’OIM estime que le décompte n’est pas exhaustif, des cas de décès pouvant ne pas être portés à la connaissance des médias, ONG ou autorités locales. « Dans la plupart des régions, les chiffres sont probablement largement sous-estimés par rapport au nombre de vies perdues », selon un de ses rapports (en anglais).
      « Mortes sans laisser de traces »

      Autre source pour prendre la mesure des morts sur les routes migratoires : le réseau United for intercultural action. Se fondant également sur les articles de presse et les rapports d’ONG, une équipe basée à Amsterdam a compté, entre 1993 et 2018, 34 361 migrants morts lors de leur voyage vers l’Europe ou après leur arrivée. La liste a été publiée dans le quotidien britannique The Guardian, le 20 juin 2018, journée mondiale des réfugiés. Près de 80% de ces personnes sont mortes en mer.

      Le Guardian précise que cette liste non plus n’a pas de prétention exhaustive : « le vrai nombre pourrait être beaucoup plus élevé, puisqu’au fil des ans plusieurs milliers de personnes sont mortes sans laisser de traces lors de leur voyage par la terre ou la mer. »
      « Les Etats ne semblent pas faire d’efforts »

      Vous nous demandez aussi où sont les dépouilles des noyés de la Méditerranée. Comme nous l’écrivions plus haut, une majorité des corps ne sont pas retrouvés. Interrogée par CheckNews, Julia Black, qui coordonne le Missing Migrants Project à l’OIM fait le point : « 5773 corps et 11 089 disparus ont été enregistrés par le MMP depuis 2014, ce qui veut dire qu’à peu près 34% des migrants morts sont effectivement retrouvés. » Mais, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations « n’a malheureusement pas de données sur où sont enterrées ces personnes », regrette Julia Black.

      « En général, les corps sont récupérés quand cela peut être fait sans compromettre les efforts de sauvetage », résume pour CheckNews Simon Robins, chercheur à l’université de York et responsable du projet Mediterranean Missing (auquel prend part l’OIM), qui vise à retrouver et identifier les morts en mer. Et de déplorer : « Les Etats ne semblent pas faire du tout d’effort pour recenser et publier des données concernant les corps qu’ils récupèrent. Cela est fait par la société civile et l’OIM. »
      « Cadavres traités comme des déchets »

      D’abord, donc, une majorité des victimes n’est pas retrouvée après les naufrages. Mais quand des corps arrivent sur des plages, la gestion s’avère compliquée. D’autant que « renvoyer une dépouille coûte cher et nécessite de la documentation. Cela n’est fait que si la famille est prête à investir la somme nécessaire et à remplir les papiers administratifs. Surtout, il faut que le corps soit identifié », souligne Simon Robins.

      Il incombe donc aux locaux de s’occuper des dépouilles non réclamées. Mediterranean Missing a consacré des rapports à la gestion des corps en Sicile (Italie) et à Lesbos (Grèce). Dans de nombreux cas, impossible d’identifier les migrants. Début 2016, la BBC publiait une enquête rapportant l’existence (d’au moins) 1278 tombes anonymes réparties dans 70 sites entre la Turquie, la Grèce et l’Italie (à l’époque, l’OIM recensait 8412 morts et disparus depuis 2014). Et le média britannique d’écrire : « En Turquie et en Grèce, les autorités locales, qui ont du mal à faire face à l’afflux de migrants et à la quantité inédite de corps qui s’échouent sur leurs plages, ont reconnu ne pas pouvoir tenir un compte précis des enterrements. » Des cimetières anonymes existent aussi en Tunisie, a constaté La Croix, et en Espagne, remarque RFI.

      En Libye, l’existence de fosses communes a même été rapportée (ici ou là). Les fondateurs de l’association Last Rights, qui veut donner un nom et une sépulture à tous les morts des migrations, Syd Bolton et Catriona Jarvis, confirment à CheckNews avoir recueilli « plusieurs témoignages » allant dans ce sens : « En Afrique, les autorités sont débordées et on entend parfois parler de cadavres traités comme des déchets. Ce n’est pas le cas, à notre connaissance, en Europe. »
      « Catastrophe »

      Cependant, « l’Union européenne n’a pas de politique vis-à-vis des migrants morts. C’est un problème qui incombe à chaque Etat, en fonction de sa loi et de ses pratiques nationales et régionales. Ces lois ne sont pas coordonnées ou harmonisées », détaille auprès de CheckNews la juriste Stefanie Grant, qui a rédigé un mémo juridique sur la question (en anglais) pour Mediterranean Missing. En revanche, au mois de juillet 2018, tous les Etats membres à l’exception de la Hongrie ont signé un engagement auprès de l’ONU sur les migrations. Le chapitre « Sauver des vies et faire des efforts coordonnés pour les migrants disparus » impose aux signataires de :

      Collecter, centraliser et systématiser les données concernant les corps, et assurer la traçabilité après l’enterrement […] établir des chaînes de coordination au niveau transnational pour faciliter l’identification et l’information des familles […] faire tous les efforts, y compris au travers de la coopération internationale pour retrouver, identifier et rapatrier les restes des migrants décédées à leurs pays d’origine […] et dans le cas d’invididus non identifiés, faciliter l’identification et la récupération des restes mortuaires.

      « Il ne manque plus qu’aux dirigeants de faire preuve de bonne volonté, c’est un processus très long », estiment les fondateurs de Last Rights, Syd Bolton et Catriona Jarvis. Ils expliquent à CheckNews que pour l’heure « les municipalités européennes doivent enterrer les morts qui arrivent sur leur territoire », mais qu’en termes de statistiques et de décompte, les pratiques varient d’une ville à l’autre.

      Pour les militants de Last Rights, cette situation explique pour partie le scepticisme de certains citoyens devant le drame des migrants : « Si l’Europe avait pris le parti de recenser exactement les disparus en mer et de s’occuper des dépouilles, personne ne pourrait douter de la catastrophe qui se déroule en Méditerranée. »

      http://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2018/08/09/combien-de-migrants-sont-morts-en-mediterranee-ou-sont-ils-enterres_16713

    • « La traversée de la Méditerranée se révèle plus mortelle que jamais »

      Plus de 1600 personnes ont trouvé la mort durant les premiers mois de 2018 lors de leur traversée de la Méditerranée. Selon un nouveau rapport publié lundi par le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), la route maritime « est plus mortelle que jamais pour les migrants ».

      Le rapport, intitulé Voyages désespérés, constate que, même si le nombre de migrants tentant de rejoindre l’Europe a diminué, le taux des décès a augmenté vertigineusement. Entre janvier et juillet 2018, une personne sur 18 tentant la traversée est morte ou a disparu en mer. Au cours de la même période en 2017, on enregistrait un décès pour 42 personnes s’entassant dans les embarcations de fortune.

      « Le rapport confirme une fois de plus que la route méditerranéenne est l’un des passages maritimes les plus meurtriers du monde », affirme Pascale Moreau, directrice du bureau du HCR pour l’Europe, dans un communiqué.
      Mesures sécuritaires en ligne de mire

      Les mesures européennes de contrôle qui visent l’immigration irrégulière, les restrictions infligées aux ONG qui limitent les opérations de secours, ainsi que l’accès restreint aux ports italiens, en particulier depuis le changement de gouvernement dans la Péninsule, ont certes conduit à une diminution du flux migratoire. Mais le HCR tient à souligner que ces mesures entraînent une hausse du taux de mortalité.

      Comme solution, le HCR appelle les pays européens à s’engager en faveur de la mise en place de voies d’accès alternatives, légales et sécurisées pour les personnes fuyant la guerre et les persécutions. L’organisation onusienne suggère aussi aux Européens de s’entendre sur des ports de débarquement dans plusieurs pays, afin que l’accueil des migrants ne repose pas uniquement sur l’Espagne, la Grèce et l’Italie.

      https://www.letemps.ch/monde/traversee-mediterranee-se-revele-plus-mortelle-jamais

    • La traversée de la Méditerranée est plus meurtrière que jamais, selon un nouveau rapport du HCR

      Trois ans après la diffusion des images choquantes d’Alan Kurdi, cet enfant syrien dont le corps sans vie avait été retrouvé échoué sur une plage turque, la traversée de la mer Méditerranée est un itinéraire encore plus meurtrier qu’auparavant, indique un nouveau rapport du HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés.

      Selon le nouveau rapport « Voyage du désespoir », plus de 1600 personnes ont déjà perdu la vie ou ont disparu cette année en tentant de rejoindre l’Europe.

      Si le nombre de personnes arrivées en Europe est en diminution, le taux de décès, surtout parmi ceux qui rejoignent le continent par la Méditerranée, a considérablement augmenté, souligne le rapport. En Méditerranée centrale, pour chaque groupe de 18 personnes ayant entrepris la traversée entre janvier et juillet 2018, une personne est décédée ou a disparu, contre une sur 42 au cours de la même période en 2017.

      « Ce rapport confirme une fois de plus que la traversée de la Méditerranée est l’une des voies les plus meurtrières au monde », a déclaré Pascale Moreau, la Directrice du bureau du HCR pour l’Europe. « Alors même que le nombre d’arrivants sur les côtes européennes diminue, il ne s’agit plus de tester la capacité de l’Europe à gérer les chiffres mais à faire preuve de l’humanité nécessaire pour sauver des vies. »

      Ces derniers mois, le HCR et l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) ont appelé à une approche prévisible et régionale afin de garantir le sauvetage et le débarquement des personnes en détresse en mer Méditerranée.

      Le HCR exhorte également l’Europe à accroître les possibilités de voies d’accès légales et sûres pour les réfugiés, notamment en augmentant le nombre de places de réinstallation et en éliminant les obstacles au regroupement familial – ce qui permettrait de fournir d’autres options à des périples dont l’issue risque d’être fatale.

      Le rapport souligne également les dangers auxquels sont confrontés les réfugiés lorsqu’ils voyagent le long des routes terrestres vers l’Europe ou lorsqu’ils traversent celle-ci. Notant les mesures prises par certains pour empêcher les réfugiés et les migrants d’accéder à leur territoire, le rapport exhorte les États à faire en sorte que les personnes cherchant la protection internationale puissent facilement accéder aux procédures d’asile. Il lance également un appel aux États afin que ceux-ci renforcent les mécanismes de protection des enfants qui voyagent seuls et demandent l’asile.

      L’auteur à succès et Ambassadeur de bonne volonté du HCR, Khaled Hosseini, lui-même réfugié afghan, a publié un livre illustré dont la parution coïncide avec le tragique troisième anniversaire de la mort d’Alan Kurdi. Intitulé « Sea Prayer », l’ouvrage rend hommage aux milliers de réfugiés qui ont perdu la vie en fuyant la guerre, la violence et les persécutions à travers le monde.

      « Quand j’ai vu ces images épouvantables du corps d’Alan Kurdi, j’ai eu le cœur brisé », a déclaré Khaled Hosseini. « Pourtant, trois ans plus tard et malgré le fait que des milliers d’autres personnes perdent la vie en mer, notre mémoire collective et l’urgence que nous avions à vouloir faire mieux semblent s’être estompées. »

      En juin et juillet 2018, Khaled Hosseini s’est rendu au Liban et en Italie, où il a pu constater les conséquences désastreuses pour les familles qui ont perdu des proches alors que ceux-ci tentaient de rejoindre l’Europe.

      « En Sicile, j’ai vu un cimetière isolé et mal entretenu qui était rempli de tombes d’anonymes, dont de nombreux enfants, qui se sont noyés durant leur périple ces dernières années, comme Alan Kurdi », a-t-il expliqué. « Chacune de ces personnes n’est plus qu’un chiffre, un code sur une tombe, mais il s’agissait d’hommes, de femmes et d’enfants qui ont osé rêver d’un avenir plus prometteur. Trois ans après le décès d’Alan, il est temps d’unir nos forces pour éviter d’autres tragédies et rappeler à nos amis, nos familles, nos communautés et nos gouvernements que nous sommes solidaires avec les réfugiés. »

      L’intégralité du rapport (en anglais) est disponible à l’adresse : http://www.unhcr.org/desperatejourneys

      Faits marquants

      Le long de l’itinéraire de la Méditerranée centrale, dix incidents ont eu lieu depuis le début de l’année, au cours desquels 50 personnes, voire davantage, sont décédées. La plupart d’entre elles étaient parties de Libye. Parmi ces incidents, sept se sont déroulés depuis juin.
      Depuis l’Afrique du Nord vers l’Espagne, plus de 300 personnes ont perdu la vie jusqu’à présent, soit déjà une nette augmentation par rapport au total de l’année 2017, durant laquelle 200 décès avaient été enregistrés.
      En avril dernier, lorsque 1200 personnes ont rejoint l’Espagne par la mer, le taux de décès est passé à une personne qui trouve la mort pour chaque groupe de 14 personnes qui arrive en Espagne par la mer.
      Plus de 78 décès de réfugiés et de migrants ont été enregistrés jusqu’à présent le long des routes terrestres en Europe ou aux frontières de celle-ci, contre 45 au cours de la même période l’an dernier.

      http://www.unhcr.org/fr/news/press/2018/9/5b8ccee9a/traversee-mediterranee-meurtriere-jamais-nouveau-rapport-hcr.html

      Lien vers le #rapport :
      http://www.unhcr.org/desperatejourneys

    • En septembre, près d’un migrant sur 5 partant de Libye aurait disparu en Méditerranée

      Sur les six premiers mois de 2018, une personne sur 18 qui tentait de traverser la Méditerranée y a disparu. D’après un chercheur italien, en septembre ce chiffre a radicalement augmenté, passant à un mort ou disparu sur cinq.

      Ils sont plus de 30 000. Trente mille hommes, femmes et enfants, qui ont trouvé la mort en Méditerranée en essayant d’atteindre l’Europe sur des embarcations de fortune. Depuis le début de l’année, et encore plus au cours des quatre derniers mois, la mortalité du trajet a explosé. Et ce, même si le nombre de personnes qui tentent la traversée a chuté.

      En septembre, le Haut commissariat aux réfugiés de l’ONU (HCR) révélait qu’en 2017, une personne qui essayait d’atteindre l’Europe sur 42 trouvait la mort en Méditerranée et qu’en 2018, ce chiffre était passé à une personne sur 18. En septembre, ce chiffre a encore grimpé : ils étaient un sur cinq à perdre la vie ou à « disparaître » entre la Libye et l’Europe, selon le chercheur Matteo Villa, de l’Institut italien pour les études de politique internationale. Il a compilé, sur la base des chiffres officiels du HCR, de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM), des récits publiés dans la presse et de témoignages récoltés lui-même, les données concernant les départs de Libye, les arrivées en Europe et les interceptions réalisées par les garde-côtes libyens (1). Il en ressort, pour le mois de septembre, qu’une personne sur dix a réussi à atteindre l’Europe, sept sur dix ont été interceptées par les Libyens et ramenées sur la rive sud de la Méditerranée, et deux sur dix ont disparu.
      « Politiques de dissuasion »

      « La chose la plus importante est qu’autant le risque de mourir que les décès avérés ont considérablement augmenté si vous comparez deux périodes : celle allant de juillet 2017 à mai 2018, soit avant l’arrivée du gouvernement actuel et le durcissement des politiques de dissuasion contre les ONG, et celle allant de juin à septembre 2018, soit après le changement de gouvernement italien et le début des politiques de dissuasion », explique Matteo Villa à Libération.

      Selon le chercheur, l’effet du durcissement de la politique migratoire du gouvernement italien, en particulier, est tangible : « Avant les politiques menées par Minniti [l’ancien ministre de l’Intérieur italien, en poste entre décembre 2016 et juin 2018, ndlr] ne fassent effet, à peu près 12 migrants mouraient chaque jour. Pendant les politiques de Minniti, il y en avait 3 par jour. Depuis Salvini [le nouveau ministre de l’Intérieur italien d’extrême droite, ndlr], le chiffre est monté à 8 morts par jour », détaille encore le chercheur.
      « Navires sous-équipés »

      Peut-on pour autant faire le lien direct entre la fermeture des ports italiens, depuis cet été, aux ONG qui portent secours aux migrants en mer, ou les difficultés rencontrées notamment par l’Aquarius, que le Panama ne veut plus immatriculer, et la hausse de la mortalité ? « C’est difficile à dire, mais à mon avis, oui. Les données racontent une histoire spécifique : sans les ONG en mer, les seuls navires qui restent sont ceux des garde-côtes libyens, qui sont sous-équipés et sous-staffés, donc ils ne pourront pas éviter un grand nombre de décès en mer », explique Matteo Villa.

      Dans le même temps, les départs de Libye n’ont jamais été aussi peu nombreux, depuis 2012, signale-t-il : « C’est plus difficile de trouver une place dans un bateau aujourd’hui. » Pour autant, la politique de dissuasion menée envers les migrants ne peut être considérée comme satisfaisante, selon lui : « L’hypothèse était que, étant donné le risque de mourir, les gens ne tenteraient plus de traverser la mer depuis la Libye. Mais les gens essaient toujours, et cela débouche sur un nombre très haut de morts avérées. »


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/10/01/en-septembre-pres-d-un-migrant-sur-5-partant-de-libye-aurait-disparu-en-m
      #mortalité

    • Migrant Deaths in Western Mediterranean This Year Double Those Recorded in 2017: UN Migration Agency

      IOM’s Missing Migrants Project (MMP) team, based at IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) in Berlin, has confirmed that two migrant boats were lost in the Alboran Sea in late August and early September and at least 113 people lost their lives. Since the beginning of the year, 547 people are estimated to have died in these waters, more than double the 224 deaths documented in all of 2017.

      On 30 August, a boat carrying 52 migrants, including six women (one of whom was pregnant) disappeared, according to the NGO Alarm Phone. The boat left on 29 August from Nador, Morocco, and both Spanish and Algerian authorities were involved in the unsuccessful search for the lost boat.

      Days later, on 3 September, another boat, with 61 migrants on board, went missing in the Alboran Sea after it departed for mainland Spain. The bodies of 13 people were found on the shores of Morocco and Algeria in the following days.

      “What’s concerning is that we’ve seen a consistent increase in the number of migrant deaths recorded in the Western Mediterranean each year since IOM began keeping track,” said Frank Laczko, Director of IOM’s Data Analysis Centre. “These numbers, however, tell only a partial story of the tragedy unfolding in the Western Mediterranean. For each person lost at sea, families are left wondering if their loved one is dead or alive.”

      The families of the 113 people who disappeared in these two shipwrecks are forced to live in limbo, not knowing the fate of their loved ones. They will have no place to mourn and lay their loved ones to rest.

      Unfortunately, deaths in the waters between North Africa and the Spain are not a new phenomenon. The Andalusian Association for Human Rights has documented the deaths of over 6,000 people on this route since 1997.

      Laczko noted, “The increase in recorded deaths in 2018 is linked to the increase in attempted sea crossings from North Africa to Spain compared with the past five years, as well as the number of fatalities in each shipwreck.” Of the 547 deaths and disappearances recorded so far in 2018, more than half (289) occurred in seven shipwrecks in which more than 20 people died or were lost at sea. Between 2014 and 2017, two or fewer such incidents were recorded each year.

      There are also strong indications that many migrants have been lost without a trace in the Western Mediterranean this year. The remains of more than 60 people have been found on beaches in Spain, Morocco and Algeria in 2018 that are not associated with any known shipwreck.

      Furthermore, non-governmental organizations operating in Spain and Morocco have received numerous requests from family members reporting loved ones lost in the Alboran Sea in shipwrecks which cannot be confirmed.

      IOM’s Missing Migrants Project collects data on migrant deaths from various sources, including coast guards, non-governmental and civil society organizations, and media reports. However, reports on migrant deaths are scattered and incomplete, and there are no complete data on border deaths released by Spanish or Moroccan authorities.

      In general, Missing Migrants Project data on migrant deaths and disappearances are best understood as minimum estimates: the true number of fatalities during migration is likely much higher. This lack of data reinforces the marginality and invisibility of migrant deaths and leads to an environment in which deaths seem to be tolerated as an assumed risk of irregular migration.


      https://reliefweb.int/report/spain/migrant-deaths-western-mediterranean-year-double-those-recorded-2017-un-m
      #mortalité #Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #statistiques #chiffres #mourir_en_mer #2017 #morts #décès #2014 #2015 #2016 (et estimations #2018)

      Pour télécharger le pdf:
      https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Migrant%20Deaths%20in%20Western%20Mediterranean%20This%20Year%20Double%20

      ping @isskein @reka

    • #Méditerranée_occidentale : les décès de migrants ont doublé cette année par rapport à 2017 (OIM)

      Selon l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les migrations (OIM), la mer Méditerranée reste l’une des voies les plus meurtrières pour les migrants, malgré la baisse du trafic sur la partie centrale. D’après le Projet de l’OIM sur les migrants disparus (MMP), en date du 24 octobre, 1.969 migrants « irréguliers » sont morts en Méditerranée, dont plus des deux tiers dans les eaux entre l’Afrique du Nord et la Sicile.

      Mais la voie de la Méditerranée occidentale reste la plus meurtrière parmi les routes méditerranéennes menant en Europe.

      « Depuis le début de l’année, 547 personnes ont péri dans la Méditerranée occidentale. Ce chiffre s’élevait à 224 pour toute l’année 2017 », a déclaré le porte-parole de l’OIM, Joel Millman, lors d’un point de presse vendredi à Genève.

      Selon Joel Millman, l’illustration de cette tragédie est le naufrage de deux bateaux sur la mer d’Alboran qui ont fait au moins 113 morts entre fin août et début septembre.

      Le 30 août, un bateau transportant 52 migrants, dont six femmes (une enceinte), a disparu, selon l’ONG Alarm Phone. Le bateau est parti le 29 août de Nador (Maroc) et les autorités espagnoles et algériennes ont participé à la recherche infructueuse de l’embarcation portée disparue.

      Le 3 septembre, un autre bateau, avec 61 migrants à bord, a disparu à une centaine de kilomètres au sud de l’île espagnole d’Alboran. Les corps de 13 personnes ont été retrouvés par la suite sur les côtes marocaines et algériennes.

      L’OIM rappelle que les décès dans les eaux entre l’Afrique du Nord et l’Espagne ne sont pas « malheureusement un phénomène nouveau ». « L’Association andalouse des droits de l’homme a documenté le décès de plus de 6.000 personnes sur cette route depuis 1997 », a ajouté M. Millman.
      L’Espagne reste la porte d’entrée en Europe des migrants arrivées par la Méditerranée en 2018

      « L’augmentation des décès enregistrés en 2018 est liée à l’augmentation du nombre de tentatives de traversées par la mer entre l’Afrique du Nord et l’Espagne par rapport aux cinq dernières années, ainsi que par le nombre de morts dans chaque naufrage », a déclaré de son côté Franck Laczko, le Directeur du Centre mondial d’analyse des données sur la migration (CMADM) de l’OIM. Sur les 547 décès et disparitions enregistrés à ce jour en 2018, plus de la moitié (289) ont eu lieu lors de sept naufrages au cours desquels plus de 20 personnes sont mortes ou portées disparuesen mer. Entre 2014 et 2017, deux incidents de ce type ou moins ont été enregistrés chaque année.

      Il existe également de fortes indications selon lesquelles de nombreux migrants sont portés disparus cette année, sans laisser de traces dans la Méditerranée occidentale. Les restes de plus de 60 personnes ont été retrouvés sur des plages en Espagne, au Maroc et en Algérie en 2018, qui ne sont pas pourtant associés à des naufrages connus.

      Malgré une traversée périlleuse en Méditerranée, les migrants continuent d’emprunter cette voie pour tenter de rejoindre l’Espagne, l’Italie ou la Grèce. D’après l’OIM, 95.909 migrants et réfugiés sont arrivés en Europe cette année par la mer en date du 24 octobre, dont 45.976 rien qu’Espagne, la principale destination de débarquement cette année.

      En réalité, depuis les arrivées de fin septembre, l’Espagne a accueilli, en 2018, plus de migrants irréguliers qu’elle ne l’a fait pour toutes les années 2015, 2016 et 2017 combinées. En comparaison, ils étaient 147.170 à la même période dans la région l’an dernier et 324 267 au même moment en 2016.

      Recensant 46% de toutes les arrivées irrégulières cette année, l’Espagne (45.976 arrivées par la mer en plus de 5.202 par voie terrestre) continue de recevoir près de trois fois plus de migrants que la Grèce (26.340) et huit fois et demi de plus que l’Italie (21.935).

      https://news.un.org/fr/story/2018/10/1027622


    • Migranti:da inizio anno sbarcati 16.566,-79% rispetto a 2017

      Dall’inizio dell’anno ad oggi sono sbarcati in Italia 16.566 migranti, il 79,07% in meno rispetto allo stesso periodo dell’anno scorso, quando ne arrivarono 79.154. Dai dati del Viminale, aggiornati al 28 giugno, emerge dunque che per il dodicesimo mese consecutivo gli sbarchi nel nostro paese sono in calo: l’ultimo picco fu registrato proprio a giugno dell’anno scorso, quando sbarcarono 23.526 migranti (nel 2016 ne arrivarono 22.339 mentre quest’anno il numero è fermo a 3.136). Dal mese di luglio 2017, che ha coinciso con gli accordi siglati con la Libia dall’ex ministro dell’Interno Marco Minniti, si è sempre registrata una diminuzione. Dei 16.566 arrivati nei primi sei mesi del 2018 (la quasi totalità, 15.741, nei porti siciliani), 11.401 sono partiti dalla Libia: un calo nelle partenze dell’84,94% rispetto al 2017 e dell’83,18% rispetto al 2016. Quanto alle nazionalità di quelli che sono arrivati, la prima è la Tunisia, con 3.002 migranti, seguita da Eritrea (2.555), Sudan (1.488) e Nigeria (1.229).

      http://www.ansa.it/sito/notizie/cronaca/2018/06/30/migrantida-inizio-anno-sbarcati-16.566-79-rispetto-a-2017-_30327137-364e-44bf-8

    • En Méditerranée, les flux de migrants s’estompent et s’orientent vers l’ouest

      Pour la première fois depuis le début de la crise migratoire en 2014, l’Espagne est, avant l’Italie et la Grèce, le pays européen qui enregistre le plus d’arrivées de migrants par la mer et le plus de naufrages meurtriers au large de ses côtes.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/280618/en-mediterranee-les-flux-de-migrants-s-estompent-et-s-orientent-vers-l-oue
      #routes_migratoires

    • Migratory flows in April: Overall drop, but more detections in Greece and Spain

      Central Mediterranean
      The number of migrants arriving in Italy via the Central Mediterranean route in April fell to about 2 800, down 78% from April 2017. The total number of migrants detected on this route in the first four months of 2018 fell to roughly 9 400, down three-quarters from a year ago.
      So far this year, Tunisians and Eritreans were the two most represented nationalities on this route, together accounting for almost 40% of all the detected migrants.

      Eastern Mediterranean
      In April, the number of irregular migrants taking the Eastern Mediterranean route stood at some 6 700, two-thirds more than in the previous month. In the first four months of this year, more than 14 900 migrants entered the EU through the Eastern Mediterranean route, 92% more than in the same period of last year. The increase was mainly caused by the rise of irregular crossings on the land borders with Turkey. In April the number of migrants detected at the land borders on this route has exceeded the detections on the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea.
      The largest number of migrants on this route in the first four months of the year were nationals of Syria and Iraq.

      Western Mediterranean
      Last month, the number of irregular migrants reaching Spain stood at nearly 1100, a quarter more than in April 2017. In the first four months of 2018, there were some 4600 irregular border crossings on the Western Mediterranean route, 95 more than a year ago.
      Nationals of Morocco accounted for the highest number of arrivals in Spain this year, followed by those from Guinea and Mali.

      https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/migratory-flows-in-april-overall-drop-but-more-detections-in-greece-a
      #2018 #Espagne #Grèce

    • EU’s Frontex warns of new migrant route to Spain

      Frontex chief Fabrice Leggeri has warned that Spain could see a significant increase in migrant arrivals. The news comes ahead of the European Commission’s new proposal to strengthen EU external borders with more guards.

      Frontex chief Fabrice Leggeri said Friday that some 6,000 migrants had entered the European Union in June by crossing into Spain from Morocco, the so-called western Mediterranean route.

      https://m.dw.com/en/eus-frontex-warns-of-new-migrant-route-to-spain/a-44563058?xtref=http%253A%252F%252Fm.facebook.com

    • L’Espagne devient la principale voie d’accès des migrants à l’Europe

      La Commission a annoncé trois millions d’euros d’aide d’urgence pour les garde-frontières espagnols, confrontés à un triplement des arrivées de migrants, suite au verrouillage de la route italienne.

      –-> v. ici :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/683358

      L’aide supplémentaire que l’exécutif a décidé d’allouer à l’Espagne après l’augmentation des arrivées sur les côtes provient du Fonds pour la sécurité intérieure et a pour but de financer le déploiement de personnel supplémentaire le long des frontières méridionales espagnoles.

      Le mois dernier, la Commission a déjà attribué 24,8 millions d’euros au ministère de l’Emploi et de la Sécurité sociale et à la Croix-Rouge espagnole, afin de renforcer les capacités d’accueil, de prise en charge sanitaire, de nourriture et de logement des migrants arrivants par la route de l’ouest méditerranéen.

      Une enveloppe supplémentaire de 720 000 euros a été allouée à l’organisation des rapatriements et des transferts depuis l’enclave de Ceuta et Melilla.

      Cette aide financière s’ajoute aux 691,7 millions que reçoit Madrid dans le cadre du Fonds pour l’asile, l’immigration et l’intégration et du fonds pour la sécurité intérieure pour la période budgétaire 2014-2020.

      https://www.euractiv.fr/section/migrations/news/avramopoulos-in-spain-to-announce-further-eu-support-to-tackle-migration

    • En #Méditerranée, les flux de migrants s’orientent vers l’ouest

      Entre janvier et juillet, 62 177 migrants ont rejoint l’Europe par la Méditerranée, selon les données de l’Agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés. Un chiffre en baisse par rapport à 2017 (172 301 sur l’ensemble des douze mois) et sans commune mesure avec le « pic » de 2015, où 1 015 078 arrivées avaient été enregistrées.

      Les flux déclinent et se déplacent géographiquement : entre 2014 et 2017, près de 98 % des migrants étaient entrés via la Grèce et l’Italie, empruntant les voies dites « orientales » et « centrales » de la Méditerranée ; en 2018, c’est pour l’instant l’Espagne qui enregistre le plus d’arrivées (23 785), devant l’Italie (18 348), la Grèce (16 142) et, de manière anecdotique, Chypre (73).


      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/030818/en-mediterranee-les-flux-de-migrants-s-orientent-vers-l-ouest
      #statistiques #chiffres #Méditerranée_centrale #itinéraires_migratoires #parcours_migratoires #routes_migratoires #asile #migrations #réfugiés #2018 #Espagne #Italie #Grèce #2017 #2016 #2015 #2014 #arrivées

      Et des statistiques sur les #morts et #disparus :


      #mourir_en_mer #décès #naufrages

    • The most common Mediterranean migration paths into Europe have changed since 2009

      Until 2018, the Morocco-to-Spain route – also known as the western route – had been the least-traveled Mediterranean migration path, with a total of 89,000 migrants arriving along Spain’s coastline since 2009. But between January and August 2018, this route has seen over 28,000 arrivals, more than the central Africa-to-Italy central route (20,000 arrivals) and the Turkey-to-Greece eastern route (20,000 arrivals). One reason for this is that Spain recently allowed rescue ships carrying migrants to dock after other European Union countries had denied them entry.

      Toute la Méditerranée:

      #Méditerranée_occidentale:

      #Méditerranée_centrale:

      #Méditerranée_orientale:

      http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/09/18/the-most-common-mediterranean-migration-paths-into-europe-have-changed-

    • The “Shift” to the Western Mediterranean Migration Route: Myth or Reality?

      How Spain Became the Top Arrival Country of Irregular Migration to the EU

      This article looks at the increase in arrivals[1] of refugees and migrants in Spain, analysing the nationalities of those arriving to better understand whether there has been a shift from the Central Mediterranean migration route (Italy) towards the Western Mediterranean route (Spain). The article explores how the political dynamics between North African countries and the European Union (EU) have impacted the number of arrivals in Spain.

      The Western Mediterranean route has recently become the most active route of irregular migration to Europe. As of mid-August 2018, a total of 26,350 refugees and migrants arrived in Spain by sea, three times the number of arrivals in the first seven months of 2017. In July alone 8,800 refugees and migrants reached Spain, four times the number of arrivals in July of last year.

      But this migration trend did not begin this year. The number of refugees and migrants arriving by sea in Spain grew by 55 per cent between 2015 and 2016, and by 172 per cent between 2016 and 2017.

      At the same time, there has been a decrease in the number of refugees and migrants entering the EU via the Central Mediterranean route. Between January and July 2018, a total of 18,510 persons arrived in Italy by sea compared to 95,213 arrivals in the same period in 2017, an 81 per cent decrease.

      This decrease is a result of new measures to restrict irregular migration adopted by EU Member States, including increased cooperation with Libya, which has been the main embarkation country for the Central Mediterranean migration route. So far this year, the Libyan Coast Guards have intercepted 12,152 refugees and migrants who were on smuggling boats (more than double the total number of interceptions in 2017). In the last two weeks of July, 99.5 per cent of the refugees and migrants who departed on smuggling boats were caught and returned to Libya, according to a data analysis conducted at the Italian Institute for International Political Studies (ISPI). The number of people being detained by the Libyan Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration (DCIM) has continued growing (from 5,000 to 9,300 between May and July 2018), with thousands more held in unofficial detention facilities.

      So, was there a shift from the Central to the Western Mediterranean Migration route? In other words, has the decline of arrivals in Italy led to the increase of arrivals in Spain?

      First of all, while this article only analyses the changes in the use of these two sea routes and among those trying to go to Europe, for most West Africans, the intended destination is actually North Africa, including Libya and Algeria, where they hope to find jobs. A minority intends to move onwards to Europe and this is confirmed by MMC’s 4Mi data referred to below.

      The answer to the question on whether or not there has been a shift between the two routes can be found in the analysis of the origin countries of the refugees and migrants that were most commonly using the Central Mediterranean route before it became increasingly difficult to reach Europe. Only if a decrease of the main nationalities using the Central Mediterranean Route corresponds to an increase of the same group along the Western Mediterranean route we can speak of “a shift”.

      The two nationalities who were – by far – the most common origin countries of refugees and migrants arriving in Italy in 2015 and in 2016 were Nigeria and Eritrea. The total number of Nigerians and Eritreans arriving in Italy in 2015 was 50,018 and slightly lower (47,096) in the following year. Then, between 2016 and last year, the total number of Nigerian and Eritrean arrivals in Italy decreased by 66 per cent. The decrease has been even more significant in 2018; in the first half of this year only 2,812 Nigerians and Eritreans arrived in Italy.

      However, there has not been an increase in Nigerians and Eritreans arriving in Spain. Looking at the data, it is clear that refugees and migrants originating in these two countries have not shifted from the Central Mediterranean route to the Western route.

      The same is true for refugees and migrants from Bangladesh, Sudan and Somalia – who were also on the list of most common countries of origin amongst arrivals in Italy during 2015 and 2016. While the numbers of Bangladeshis, Sudanese and Somalis arriving in Italy have been declining since 2017, there has not been an increase in arrivals of these nationals in Spain. Amongst refugees and migrants from these three countries, as with Nigerians and Eritreans, there has clearly not been a shift to the Western route. In fact, data shows that zero refugees and migrants from Eritrea, Bangladesh and Somalia arrived in Spain by sea since 2013.

      However, the data tells a different story when it comes to West African refugees and migrants. Between 2015 and 2017, the West African countries of Guinea, Mali, Cote d’Ivoire, Gambia and Senegal were also on the list of most common origin countries amongst arrivals in Italy. During those years, about 91 per cent of all arrivals in the EU from these five countries used the Central Mediterranean route to Italy, while 9 per cent used the Western Mediterranean route to Spain.

      But in 2018 the data flipped: only 23 per cent of EU arrivals from these five West African countries used the Central Mediterranean route, while 76 per cent entered used the Western route. It appears that as the Central Mediterranean route is being restricted, a growing number of refugees and migrants from these countries are trying to reach the EU on the Western Mediterranean route.

      These finding are reinforced by 3,224 interviews conducted in Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso between July 2017 and June 2018 by the Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism initiative (4Mi), which found a rise in the share of West African refugees and migrants stating their final destination is Spain and a fall in the share of West African refugees and migrants who say they are heading to Italy.[2]

      A second group who according to the data shifted from the Central Mediterranean route to the Western route are the Moroccans. Between 2015 and 2017, at least 4,000 Moroccans per year entered the EU on the Central Mediterranean route. Then, in the first half of this year, only 319 Moroccan refugees and migrants arrived by sea to Italy. Meanwhile, an opposite process has happened in Spain, where the number of Moroccans arriving by sea spiked, increasing by 346 per cent between 2016 and last year. This increase has continued in the first six months of this year, in which 2,600 Moroccans reached Spain through the Western Mediterranean route.

      On-going Political Bargaining

      The fact that so many Moroccans are amongst the arrivals in Spain could be an indication that Morocco, the embarkation country for the Western Mediterranean route, has perhaps been relaxing its control on migration outflows, as recently suggested by several media outlets. A Euronews article questioned whether the Moroccan government is allowing refugees and migrants to make the dangerous sea journey towards Spain as part of its negotiations with the EU on the size of the support it will receive. Der Spiegel reported that Morocco is “trying to extort concessions from the EU by placing Spain under pressure” of increased migration.

      The dynamic in which a neighbouring country uses the threat of increased migration as a political bargaining tool is one the EU is quite familiar with, following its 2016 deal with Turkey and 2017 deal with Libya. In both occasions, whilst on a different scale, the response of the EU has been fundamentally the same: to offer its southern neighbours support and financial incentives to control migration.

      The EU had a similar response this time. On August 3, the European Commission committed 55 million euro for Morocco and Tunisia to help them improve their border management. Ten days later, the Moroccan Association for Human Rights reported that Moroccan authorities started removing would-be migrants away from departure points to Europe.

      Aside from Morocco and Libya, there is another North African country whose policies may be contributing to the increase of arrivals in Spain. Algeria, which has been a destination country for many African migrants during the past decade (and still is according to 4Mi interviews), is in the midst of a nationwide campaign to detain and deport migrants, asylum seekers and refugees.

      The Associated Press reported “Algeria’s mass expulsions have picked up since October 2017, as the European Union renewed pressure on North African countries to discourage migrants going north to Europe…” More than 28,000 Africans have been expelled since the campaign started in August of last year, according to News Deeply. While Algeria prides itself on not taking EU money – “We are handling the situation with our own means,” an Algerian interior ministry official told Reuters – its current crackdown appears to be yet another element of the EU’s wider approach to migration in the region.
      Bargaining Games

      This article has demonstrated that – contrary to popular reporting – there is no blanket shift from the Central Mediterranean route to the Western Mediterranean route. A detailed analysis on the nationalities of arrivals in Italy and Spain and changes over time, shows that only for certain nationalities from West Africa a shift may be happening, while for other nationalities there is no correlation between the decrease of arrivals in Italy and the increase of arrivals in Spain. The article has also shown that the recent policies implemented by North African governments – from Libya to Morocco to Algeria – can only be understood in the context of these countries’ dialogue with the EU on irregular migration.

      So, while the idea of a shift from the Central Mediterranean route to the Western route up until now is more myth than reality, it is clear that the changes of activity levels on these migration routes are both rooted in the same source: the on-going political bargaining on migration between the EU and North African governments. And these bargaining games are likely to continue as the EU intensifies its efforts to prevent refugees and migrants from arriving at its shores.

      http://www.mixedmigration.org/articles/shift-to-the-western-mediterranean-migration-route
      #Méditerranée_centrale #Méditerranée_occidentale

    • IOM, the UN Migration Agency, reports that 80,602 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2018 through 23 September, with 35,653 to Spain, the leading destination this year. In fact, with this week’s arrivals Spain in 2018 has now received via the Mediterranean more irregular migrants than it did throughout all the years 2015, 2016 and 2017 combined.

      The region’s total arrivals through the recent weekend compare with 133,465 arrivals across the region through the same period last year, and 302,175 at this point in 2016.

      Spain, with 44 per cent of all arrivals through the year, continues to receive seaborne migrants in September at a volume nearly twice that of Greece and more than six times that of Italy. Italy’s arrivals through late September are the lowest recorded at this point – the end of a normally busy summer sailing season – in almost five years. IOM Rome’s Flavio Di Giacomo on Monday reported that Italy’s 21,024 arrivals of irregular migrants by sea this year represent a decline of nearly 80 per cent from last year’s totals at this time. (see chart below).

      IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has documented the deaths of 1,730 people on the Mediterranean in 2018. Most recently, a woman drowned off the coast of Bodrum, Turkey on Sunday while attempting to reach Kos, Greece via the Eastern Mediterranean route. The Turkish Coast Guard reports that 16 migrants were rescued from this incident. On Saturday, a 5-year-old Syrian boy drowned off the coast of Lebanon’s Akkar province after a boat carrying 39 migrants to attempt to reach Cyprus capsized.

      IOM Spain’s Ana Dodevska reported Monday that total arrivals at sea in 2018 have reached 35,594 men, women and children who have been rescued in Western Mediterranean waters through 23 September (see chart below).

      IOM notes that over this year’s first five months, a total of 8,150 men, women and children were rescued in Spanish waters after leaving Africa – an average of 54 per day. In the 115 days since May 31, a total of 27,444 have arrived – or just under 240 migrants per day. The months of May-September this year have seen a total of 30,967 irregular migrants arriving by sea, the busiest four-month period for Spain since IOM began tallying arrival statistics, with just over one week left in September.

      With this week’s arrivals Spain in 2018 has now received via the Mediterranean more irregular migrants than it did throughout all the years 2015, 2016 and 2017 combined (see charts below).

      On Monday, IOM Athens’ Christine Nikolaidou reported that over four days (20-23 September) this week the Hellenic Coast Guard (HCG) units managed at least nine incidents requiring search and rescue operations off the islands of Lesvos, Chios, Samos and Farmakonisi.

      The HCG rescued a total 312 migrants and transferred them to the respective islands. Additional arrivals of some 248 individuals to Kos and some of the aforementioned islands over these past four days brings to 22,821 the total number of arrivals by sea to Greece through 23 September (see chart below).

      Sea arrivals to Greece this year by irregular migrants appeared to have peaked in daily volume in April, when they averaged at around 100 per day. That volume dipped through the following three months then picked up again in August and again in September, already this year’s busiest month – 3,536 through 23 days, over 150 per day – with about a quarter of the month remaining. Land border crossing also surged in April (to nearly 4,000 arrivals) but have since fallen back, with fewer than 2,000 crossings in each of the past four months (see charts below).

      IOM’s Missing Migrants Project has recorded 2,735 deaths and disappearances during migration so far in 2018 (see chart below).

      In the Americas, several migrant deaths were recorded since last week’s update. In Mexico, a 30-year-old Salvadoran man was killed in a hit-and-run on a highway in Tapachula, Mexico on Friday. Another death on Mexico’s freight rail network (nicknamed “La Bestia”) was added after reports of an unidentified man found dead on tracks near San Francisco Ixhuatan on 15 September.

      In the United States, on 16 September, an unidentified person drowned in the All-American Canal east of Calexico, California – the 55th drowning recorded on the US-Mexico border this year. A few days later a car crash south of Florence, Arizona resulted in the deaths of eight people, including four Guatemalan migrants, on Wednesday. Two others killed included one of the vehicles’ driver and his partner, who authorities say had been involved with migrant smuggling in the past.

      https://reliefweb.int/report/spain/mediterranean-migrant-arrivals-reach-80602-2018-deaths-reach-1730

    • Analyse de Matteo Villa sur twitter :

      Irregular sea arrivals to Italy have not been this low since 2012. But how do the two “deterrence policies” (#Minniti's and #Salvini's) compare over time?


      Why start from July 15th each year? That’s when the drop in sea arrivals in 2017 kicked in, and this allows us to do away with the need to control for seasonality. Findings do not change much if we started on July 1st this year.
      Zooming in, in relative terms the drop in sea arrivals during Salvini’s term is almost as stark as last year’s drop.

      In the period 15 July - 8 October:

      Drop during #Salvini: -73%.
      Drop during #Minniti: -79%.

      But looking at actual numbers, the difference is clear. In less than 3 months’ time, the drop in #migrants and #refugees disembarking in #Italy under #Minniti had already reached 51,000. Under #Salvini in 2018, the further drop is less than 10,000.


      To put it another way: deterrence policies under #Salvini can at best aim for a drop of about 42,000 irregular arrivals in 12 months. Most likely, the drop will amount to about 30.000. Under #Minniti, sea arrivals the drop amounted to 150.000. Five times larger.

      BOTTOM LINE: the opportunity-cost of deterrence policies is shrinking fast. Meanwhile, the number of dead and missing along the Central Mediterranean route has not declined in tandem (in fact, in June-September it shot up). Is more deterrence worth it?

      https://twitter.com/emmevilla/status/1049978070734659584

      Le papier qui explique tout cela :
      Sea Arrivals to Italy : The Cost of Deterrence Policies


      https://www.ispionline.it/en/publication/sea-arrivals-italy-cost-deterrence-policies-21367


  • For an open migration policy to end the deaths and crises in the Mediterranean

    The current crisis surrounding migration is not one of numbers – migrants’ crossings of the sea are at their lowest since 2013 – but of policies. The drive towards closure and the politicisation of migration are so strong after years of tension that the frail bodies of a few thousand migrants arriving on European shores are triggering a major political crisis throughout the EU.

    One epicentre of this crisis is in Italy, where Matteo Salvini, the country’s new far-right Interior Minister, is preventing NGOs from disembarking rescued migrants. Such was the case with the 629 people on board the Aquarius.

    Another is Germany, where the governing coalition led by Angela Merkel is at risk as the hardline Interior Minister Horst Seehofer has threatened to turn back refugees at the German borders. The European Council summit on 28 June 2018 promises to be rife with tensions. As EU member states will most probably continue to prove unable to offer a common response to migrants once they have arrived on European shores, they will reinforce the policy they have implemented since 2015: preventing migrants from crossing the sea by outsourcing border control to non-European countries.
    The consensus of closure

    This policy of closure has had horrendous consequences for migrants – such as the subjection to torture of those who are intercepted at sea by the Libyan coast guard, which has been equipped, trained and coordinated by Italy and the EU. Despite this, it has gathered growing consensus. Faced with the politicisation of migration which has fuelled the rise of far-right populist parties across Europe and threatens the EU itself with disintegration, even humanists of the centre left and right ask whether these inhumane policies are not a necessary evil.

    Would it not be better for migrants to “stay home” rather then reach a Europe which has turned its back on them and which they threaten in turn? Whispering or shouting, reluctantly or aggressively, European citizens increasingly wish migrants would simply disappear.

    Powerful forces driving migration, failed policies

    This consensus towards closure is delusional. Policies of closure that are completely at odds with the dynamics of migration systematically fail in their aim of ending the arrivals of illegalised migrants, as the record of the last 30 years demonstrates.

    Ever since the European states consolidated freedom of movement for European citizens in the 1990s all the while denying access to most non-European populations, the arrival of “undesirable” migrants has not stopped, but only been pushed underground. This is because as long as there are strong “push factors” – such as wars and economic crisis, and “pull factors” – such as work and welfare opportunities as well as respect for human rights, and that these continue to be connected by migrants’ transnational networks, state policies have little chance of succeeding in durably stemming the migration they aim to restrict.

    Over the last 30 years, for every route states have succeeded in closing, it has only been a matter of time before migrants opened several new ones. Forced to use precarious means of travel – often controlled by criminal networks, migrants’ lives were put at growing risk. More than 30,000 migrants are recorded to have died at sea since the beginning of the 1990s. A sea which has connected civilisations for millennia has become a mass grave.

    Fear breeds more fear: the vicious cycle

    These policies of closure, often implemented by centre governments allegedly in the aim of preventing the further rise of anti-immigrant sentiments, ultimately contributed to them. Despite the spectacular military means deployed by states to police borders, illegalised migration continued, giving European populations a sense that their states had “lost control” – a feeling that has only been heightened in the wake of the Arab uprisings.

    Migrants’ illegalisation has led to unjustifiable status inequality within European societies, allowing employers to pull salaries down in the sectors in which precaritized migrants are employed. This has lent to working classes the impression that migrants constitute an unfair competition.

    Policies of closure and discrimination thus only generate more fear and rejection of migrants. The parties which have mobilised voters on the basis of this fear have left unaddressed – and in fact diverted attention from – the rising unemployment, social insecurity, and inequality amongst Europe’s “losers of globalisation”, whose resentment has served as a fertile ground for anti-immigrant sentiments.

    In this way, we have become trapped in a vicious cycle that has fuelled the rise of the far-right.
    Towards an open migration policy, de-escalate the mobility conflict

    Over the years, the Mediterranean has become the main frontline of a mobility conflict, which has intensified in the wake of the 2011 Arab uprisings and European debt crisis. Since then, both the factors spurring migrants’ movement towards Europe and those leading to the drive to exclude them have been heightened.

    The lack of solidarity within the EU to respond to arrivals in so-called “frontline states” in southern and eastern Europe have further fuelled it. As long as the same policies continue to be applied, there is no end in sight to the political tensions and violence surrounding migration and the worrying political trends they are nurturing.

    A fundamental paradigm shift is necessary to end this vicious cycle. European citizens and policy makers alike must realise that the question is not whether migrants will exercise their freedom to cross borders, but at what human and political cost.

    State policies can only create a legal frame for human movement to unfold and thereby partly organise it, they cannot block it. Only a more open policy would allow migration to unfold in a way that threatens neither migrants themselves nor European citizens.

    With legal access to Europe, migrants would no longer need to resort to smugglers and risk their lives crossing the sea. No longer policed through military means, migration could appear as a normal process that does not generate fear. States could better detect individuals that might pause a threat among migrants as they would not be pushed underground. Migrants’ legal status would no longer allow employers to push working conditions down.

    Such a policy is however far from being on the European agenda. For its implementation to be even faintly imaginable in the medium term, the deep and entangled roots of the mobility conflict must addressed.
    Beyond the EU’s incoherent and one-sided “global approach”

    Today, the EU claims to address one side of the mobility conflict. Using development aid within its so-called “global approach to migration”, it claims to tackle the “root causes” that spur migration towards Europe. Researchers however have shown that development does not automatically lead to less migration. This policy will further have little effect as long as the EU’s unfair trade policies with the global south are perpetuated – for example concerning agriculture and fishing in Africa.

    In effect, the EU’s policy has mostly resulted in the use of development aid to impose policies of migration control on countries of the global south. In the process, the EU is lending support to authoritarian regimes – such as Turkey, Egypt, Sudan – which migrants are fleeing.

    Finally, when it has not worsened conflicts through its own military intervention as in Libya, the EU has proven unable of acting as a stabilizing force in the face of internationalised civil conflicts. These are bound to multiply in a time of intense competition for global hegemony. A true commitment to global justice and conflict resolution is necessary if Europe wishes to limit the factors forcing too many people onto the harsh paths of exile from their countries and regions, a small share of whom reach European shores.
    Tackling the drivers of migrant exclusion

    Beyond its lack of coherence, the EU’s so-called “global approach” suffers from one-sidedness, focused as it is on migration as “the problem”.

    As a result, it fails to see migration as a normal social process. Furthermore, it does not address the conditions that lead to the social and political drive to exclude them. The fact that today the arrival of a few thousand migrants is enough to put the EU into crisis clearly shows the limits of this approach.

    It is urgent for policy makers – at the national and local levels, but also researchers, cultural producers and social movements – to not only morally condemn racism and xenophobia, but to tackle the deep forces that shape them.

    What is needed is a more inclusive and fair economic system to decrease the resentment of European populations. In addition, a positive vision for living in common in diverse societies must be affirmed, so that the tensions that arise from the encounter between different people and cultures can be overcome.

    Crucially, we must emphasise the commonality of fate that binds European citizens to migrants. Greater equality and solidarity between migrants and European citizens is one of the conditions to defend all workers’ conditions.

    All in the same boat

    Addressing the entangled roots of the mobility conflict is a challenging agenda, one which emerges from the realisation that the tensions surrounding migration cannot be resolved through migration policies only – and by policy makers on their own for that matter.

    It charts a path worth following collectively as it points in the direction of a more open migration policy, but also a more just society. These are necessary to bring an end to the unbearable deaths of migrants at sea and end the vicious cycle of closure, violence, and politicisation of migration.

    Policies of closure have failed to end illegalised migration and only fuelled the rise of the far-right and the disintegration of Europe. If Europe is to stop sinking, it must end the policies that lead to migrants’ mass drowning in the Mediterranean. The NGOs being criminalised and prevented from disembarking migrants in Italy are not only saving migrants, but rescuing Europe against itself. Whether we like it or not, we are all in the same boat.

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/charles-heller/for-open-migration-policy-to-end-deaths-and-crises-in-mediterranea

    #tribune #Charles_Heller #solution #alternatives #migrations #asile #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #fermeture #ouverture_des_frontières #décès #morts #mourir_en_mer

    • Une politique migratoire plus ouverte pour moins de morts en Méditerranée

      La fermeture des frontières a coûté la vie à plus de 30 000 migrants qui tentaient de parvenir en Europe. Cette vision politique a favorisé la montée de l’extrême droite qu’elle prétendait combattre. Il est donc temps de changer de paradigme et d’adopter une nouvelle approche.

      Le sommet du Conseil européen du 28 juin n’aura que confirmé ce que tous savaient déjà. Face à la montée des partis d’extrême droite et à la menace de désintégration d’une Union européenne (UE) incapable d’offrir un accueil solidaire aux migrants arrivés sur le sol européen, la seule solution envisageable semble être de les empêcher à tout prix de pouvoir y mettre pied en externalisant le contrôle des migrations (1). Malgré la documentation de nombreux cas de tortures parmi les migrants interceptés par les gardes-côtes libyens financés, équipés, et coordonnés par l’Italie et l’Union européenne, ce soutien a été réitéré (2). Des ONG, qui ont courageusement déployé leurs bateaux pour combler le vide mortel laissé par le retrait des secours étatiques, sont sommées de laisser les Libyens faire le sale boulot, criminalisées, et interdites d’accès aux ports italiens. Chaque jour, la mer charrie son lot de corps sans vie.

      Il serait illusoire de penser que cette énième crise pourra être résolue par les mêmes politiques de fermetures qui échouent depuis plus de trente ans. Celles-ci n’ont pas mis un terme aux arrivées des migrants désignés comme indésirables, mais les ont seulement illégalisées. Tant qu’existeront des facteurs qui poussent les populations du Sud global sur les chemins de l’exil - guerres, crises économiques - et des facteurs d’attraction vers l’Europe - travail, Etat social, respect des droits humains - et que les réseaux transnationaux de migrants relient les continents, les politiques de fermetures ne parviendront pas à réduire durablement les migrations (3). Pour chaque route que les Etats ferment, plusieurs nouvelles voies seront bientôt ouvertes. La liste répertoriant plus de 30 000 migrants morts en mer depuis le début des années 90 ne cessera de s’allonger (4).

      Ces politiques de fermeture, souvent mises en œuvre par des gouvernements prétendant lutter contre la montée de sentiments anti-immigrants, n’ont fait que les renforcer. En dépit des moyens militaires spectaculaires déployés par les Etats pour contrôler les frontières, la migration illégale s’est poursuivie, confortant chez les populations européennes le sentiment que leurs gouvernements avaient « perdu le contrôle ». L’illégalisation des migrants permet aux employeurs de baisser les salaires dans les secteurs où sont employés des migrants précarisés, et des ouvriers en ont tiré la conclusion que les migrants sont une concurrence déloyale. Les partis, qui ont mobilisé les votants sur la base de sentiments anti-immigrés, n’ont offert aucune réponse à la hausse du chômage, de l’insécurité sociale et des inégalités qui ont généré un profond ressentiment parmi les « perdants de la globalisation » en Europe (5). Ceux-ci ont été d’autant plus réceptifs aux discours haineux. Nous sommes ainsi prisonniers d’un cercle vicieux qui a encouragé la montée de l’extrême droite et qui a perpétué les politiques de fermetures.

      Au fil des ans, la Méditerranée est devenue la principale ligne de front d’un conflit de mobilités qui s’est intensifié à la suite des « printemps arabes » de 2011 et de la crise de la dette européenne. Depuis, tant les facteurs qui amènent les migrants à venir vers l’Europe que ceux qui poussent à leur exclusion se sont intensifiés. Le manque de solidarité entre Etats européens a attisé le rejet des migrants. Tant qu’on appliquera les mêmes politiques de fermeture, il n’y aura pas d’issue aux tensions politiques et à la violence qui entourent les migrations, et aux inquiétantes tendances politiques qu’elles nourrissent. Le seul horizon de sortie de cette crise permanente est une politique migratoire ouverte (5).

      Citoyens et dirigeants européens doivent se rendre compte que la question n’est pas de savoir si les migrants vont exercer leur liberté de mouvement en franchissant les frontières, mais quel en sera le coût humain et politique. Les politiques des Etats ne peuvent que créer le cadre légal pour les mouvements humains, donc les organiser en partie, mais en aucun cas les bloquer. S’il existait des voies d’accès légales à l’Europe, les migrants n’auraient plus besoin de recourir aux passeurs et de risquer leur vie. En l’absence d’une gestion militarisée, la migration apparaîtrait pour ce qu’elle est : un processus normal qui n’engendre aucune peur. Les migrants disposant d’un statut légal, les employeurs n’auraient plus les mains libres pour dégrader les conditions de travail. Une telle politique est bien loin d’être à l’agenda européen, et suscite de nombreuses peurs. Pour qu’à moyen terme sa mise en place soit envisageable, il faut s’attaquer aux racines profondes et enchevêtrées du conflit de mobilité.

      Si l’Europe veut limiter les raisons qui poussent de trop nombreux êtres humains sur les chemins de l’exil, elle doit s’engager fermement en faveur d’une justice globale et de la résolution des conflits. C’est-à-dire réformer complètement la prétendue « approche globale de la migration » (6) de l’Union européenne qui, prétextant s’attaquer aux « causes profondes » des migrations, a surtout imposé aux pays du Sud l’externalisation des contrôles migratoires en leur faisant miroiter l’aide au développement. Bien plus, obsédée par la migration comme « problème », elle n’apporte aucune réponse aux conditions qui mènent à l’exclusion des migrants par l’Europe. Un système économique plus juste et inclusif permettrait de désamorcer le ressentiment des populations européennes. Une vision positive de la vie en commun dans des sociétés marquées par la diversité, de vaincre les tensions nées de la rencontre entre peuples et cultures. Il est vital d’insister sur la communauté de destin qui lie les citoyens européens aux migrants : plus d’égalité et de solidarité entre eux est l’une des conditions pour défendre les droits de tous les travailleurs.

      Une politique migratoire ouverte ne suffira ainsi pas à elle seule à surmonter les tensions entourant les migrations, elle devra être accompagnée d’une transformation profonde de notre monde. Mais pour se sauver du naufrage, l’Europe doit urgemment abandonner les politiques de fermeture qui sont la cause des dizaines de milliers de noyades en Méditerranée et ont attisé la montée de l’extrême droite. Les ONG aujourd’hui criminalisées font bien plus que sauver des migrants, elles sauvent l’Europe d’elle-même. Que nous le voulions ou non, nous sommes tous dans le même bateau.

      http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2018/07/03/une-politique-migratoire-plus-ouverte-pour-moins-de-morts-en-mediterranee
      #économie #illégalisation #extrême_droite #populisme #politique_migratoire #capitalisme #libéralisme #fermeture_des_frontières #ouverture_des_frontières #Charles_Heller


  • Sulle tracce del marmo della discordia

    Le montagne sventrate, le falde inquinate, il viavai di camion, i morti sul lavoro, le infiltrazioni criminali, la mancata distribuzione di una ricchezza collettiva. Carrara è schiacciata dai signori del marmo. Non sono cave: sono miniere. La roccia estratta qui non nisce in sculture e non alimenta più la liera artigianale locale. Parte per l’Asia oppure, in gran percentuale, finisce nei dentifrici, nella carta e in altre decine di prodotti. È il business del carbonato di calcio. Un’attività dominata dalla multinazionale svizzera #Omya che qui possiede un grosso stabilimento industriale.


    https://www.wereport.fr/articles/sulle-tracce-del-marmo-della-discordia-area
    #marbre #extractivisme #Carrara #Italie #pollution #carbonate_de_calcium #multinationales #Suisse #mondialisation #géographie_de_la_mondialisation #globalisation

    un article de Federico Franchini, de @wereport
    photo @albertocampiphoto

    • A Carrara, sulle tracce del marmo della discordia

      Le montagne sventrate, le falde inquinate, il via vai di camion, i morti sul lavoro, la mancata distribuzione di una ricchezza collettiva. Carrara è schiacciata dai signori del marmo. Non sono cave: sono miniere. La roccia estratta qui non finisce in sculture e non alimenta più la filiera artigianale locale. Parte per l’Asia oppure, in gran percentuale, finisce nei dentifrici, nella carta e in altre decine di prodotti. È il business del carbonato di calcio. Un’attività dominata dalla multinazionale svizzera Omya che qui possiede un grosso stabilimento industriale.

      Sembra un ghiacciaio ma è un bacino minerario. Tutto è bianco sporco. Le rocce, le strade, la polvere. Le montagne sono divorate dalle ruspe. Decine di camion, carichi di blocchi o di detriti, scendono a valle da stradine improvvisate. Persino la nostra Panda 4X4 fatica sul ripido pendio sterrato. Stiamo salendo alla cava Michelangelo, una delle più pregiate del bacino marmifero di Carrara, in Toscana. Qui viene estratto lo statuario, il marmo venduto anche a 4.600 franchi la tonnellata. In questa grossa cava lavorano circa una dozzina di persone.

      Riccardo, 52 anni di cui trenta passati a estrarre roccia, sta manovrando un blocco con il filo diamantato. Il sole che batte a picco sul marmo dà l’effetto di un forno. «D’estate è così mentre d’inverno è freddo e umido» ci racconta questo figlio e nipote di cavatori. Riccardo spiega con orgoglio il suo lavoro. Poi conclude: «Spero che mio figlio faccia qualcos’altro nella vita».

      Un lavoro rischioso

      La situazione nelle cave è sicuramente migliorata rispetto a qualche anno fa, ma il lavoro qui resta rischioso. L’ultimo decesso è dello scorso mese di luglio: Luca Savio, 37 anni, papà di un piccolo bambino, è stato travolto da un blocco in un deposito. Aveva un contratto di lavoro di sei giorni. A maggio, Luciano Pampana, un operaio di 58 anni, è invece morto schiacciato sotto una pala meccanica. «Qui i servi della gleba versano sangue» ha esclamato don Raffaello, il parroco di Carrara che nella sua omelia dopo questa morte si è scagliato contro il business del marmo: «Le Apuane sono sfregiate e pochi si arricchiscono!»

      «Le Apuane sono sfregiate e pochi si arricchiscono!».

      Don Raffaele, parroco di Carrara
      Fine della citazione

      I sindacati hanno indetto un giorno di sciopero e chiesto la chiusura delle cave non in regola. Negli ultimi dodici anni vi sono stati undici incidenti mortali, di cui sei tra il 2015 e il 2016. «È decisamente troppo se si calcola che in tutta la provincia i cavatori sono circa 600» esclama Roberto Venturini, segretario della Fillea Cgil di Massa Carrara che ci accompagna nella visita. Per il sindacalista vi è un solo modo per rendere compatibile questa attività con l’ambiente e con una cittadinanza che sempre meno tollera le cave: «Bisogna rallentare la produzione e aumentare il numero di dipendenti».
      «Monocoltura del marmo»

      Carrara e la vicina Massa sono un microcosmo rappresentativo delle attuali problematiche dell’economia: l’automatizzazione, la maledizione delle risorse, la concentrazione delle ricchezze, il conflitto tra ambiente e lavoro. Un conflitto, questo, che è emerso in queste zone già negli anni 80 attorno al polo chimico situato nella piana, verso il mare. Nel 1987 ci fu il primo referendum consultivo d’Europa con cui i cittadini si espressero a favore della chiusura dello stabilimento Farmoplant della Montedison. Ciò che avvenne, però, solo un anno dopo, a seguito dell’esplosione di un serbatoio di Rogor, pesticida cui già il nome dà inquietudine.

      In pochi anni, a catena, tutti gli stabilimenti cessarono le attività lasciando come eredità terreni inquinati e una schiera di disoccupati. Oggi la zona industriale si è trasferita dal mare alle montagne.

      L’unico settore che tira è quello estrattivo tanto che qui si parla di “monocultura del marmo”, in comparazione a quei paesi che hanno fatto di un prodotto destinato all’esportazione la sola attività economica. E così in pochi ci guadagnano mentre alla collettività rimangono le briciole e gli effetti nocivi.

      I ricavi crescono, gli impieghi no

      Nello scorso triennio il settore, dal punto di vista del ricavo, è cresciuto all’incirca del 5% all’anno. Difficile trovare un altro comparto in così rapida crescita. I profitti, però, sono sempre più concentrati.

      Gli addetti sono sempre meno e una crescente percentuale dell’attività di trasformazione è ormai svolta all’estero: dall’inizio degli anni duemila gli impieghi diretti sono diminuiti di oltre il 30%, passando da quasi 7’000 a circa 4’750 unità. Negli ultimi anni nelle cave sempre più meccanizzate sono stati persi più di 300 posti di lavoro; altri 300 sono scomparsi nelle attività di trasformazione e nella lavorazione.

      Ma anche attorno a queste cifre vi è scontro. Da un lato gli ambientalisti, dall’altro i rappresentanti del mondo imprenditoriale con i primi che tendono a sminuirne l’impatto economico e i secondi che mettono in valore l’effetto occupazionale del settore. La sola certezza, qui, è che quel marmo che ha plasmato l’identità ribelle dei carrarrini e fatto conoscere la città nel mondo intero è oggi sinonimo di conflitto.
      «Una comunità arrabbiata e ferita»

      «Dal marmo il territorio si aspetterebbe molto di più», ci spiega Paolo Gozzani, segretario della Cgil di Massa e Carrara. Il quale aggiunge: «Questa è una comunità arrabbiata e ferita che vede i signori del marmo come un potere arrogante, che si accaparra la ricchezza derivata da questa materia prima senza dare al territorio la possibilità di migliorarsi da un punto di vista sociale, dei servizi e senza fare in modo che, attorno al marmo, si sviluppi una vera e propria filiera».

      Un’opinione condivisa da Giulio Milani, uno scrittore che ha dedicato un libro alla devastazione territoriale di questa terra, dalla chimica al marmo: «L’industria del marmo c’è sempre stata in questa zona, ma negli ultimi anni è diventata una turboindustria che sta mettendo in crisi il territorio».

      Milani s’interroga sul presente e sul futuro dei suoi tre figli in un luogo che ha già sofferto per le conseguenze dell’inquinamento della chimica: «Tutte le volte in cui piove i fiumi diventano bianchi come latte a causa della marmittola, la polvere di marmo; a Carrara vi sono state quattro gravi alluvioni in nove anni legate al dissesto idrogeologico del territorio. Per questo parlo di costi sociali di questa attività. Dobbiamo ormai considerare che questo è diventato un distretto minerario vero e proprio e noi ci viviamo dentro».

      A supporto di questa situazione vi è la netta presa di posizione del procuratore capo di Massa, Aldo Giubilaro, che lo scorso mese di maggio ha illustrato l’entità di un’operazione effettuata presso diverse società attive nella lavorazione del marmo dalla quale è emerso uno spaccato di irregolarità ambientali diffuse: «Salvo rari casi, sicuramente encomiabili, sembra essere una regola per le aziende del lapideo al piano, quella di non rispettare le normative sull’impatto ambientale con conseguenze decisamente deleterie per chi vive in questa zona (…). Non si tratta solo di un problema ambientale, ma riguarda anche e soprattutto la salute dei cittadini che vivono in questa provincia, purtroppo maglia nera per il numero di tumori in tutta la Toscana» ha affermato questo magistrato noto per aver più volte criticato l’omertà del settore.
      Il carbonato svizzero

      Lasciata la cava, con la nostra Panda 4X4 ridiscendiamo a valle. Ai lati della strada diversi ravaneti, le vallate dove una volta si riversavano i detriti derivati dalla scavazione.

      Sotto numerosi camion sono in fila per scaricare le loro benne cariche di sassi. Il rumore degli scarichi e della frantumazione è incessante. Siamo di fronte a quello che è chiamato «il mulino»: i sassi qui vengono frantumati in scaglie.

      Una volta effettuata l’operazione, i camion imboccano la Strada dei marmi – sei chilometri di gallerie costati 138 milioni di franchi pubblici e destinati solo al trasporto del marmo – che sbuca verso il mare, a pochi passi da un grosso stabilimento industriale. È la fabbrica della Omya Spa dove le scaglie di marmo vengono lavorate fino a renderle carbonato di calcio, un prodotto sempre più richiesto.

      Questa farina di marmo la si trova dappertutto, nei dentifrici, nella carta e in altre decine di prodotti. La Omya Spa è una filiale della Omya Schweiz, che ha sede nel Canton Argovia. Pur essendo un’impresa familiare, poco nota al grande pubblico e non quotata in borsa, stiamo parlando di una vera e propria multinazionale: con 180 stabilimenti in 55 paesi Omya è il leader mondiale del carbonato di calcio. In Toscana ha campo libero. Nel 2014 il gruppo elvetico ha acquistato lo stabilimento del principale concorrente, la francese Imerys. Non solo: Omya ha preso importanti partecipazioni in quattro aziende attive nell’estrazione che la riforniscono di materia prima.

      Le polveri del boom

      A Carrara e dintorni si respirano le polveri di questo boom. Si stima che i blocchi di marmo rappresentino soltanto il 25% del materiale estratto: il restante 75% sono detriti. Una volta le scaglie erano considerate un rifiuto fastidioso, che impediva l’avanzata degli scavi e che veniva liberato nei ravaneti.

      Poi, nel 1987, arrivò Raul Gardini che con la sua Calcestruzzi Spa entrò nel business delle cave e ottenne un maxi contratto per la desolforazione delle centrali a carbone della Enel: un’attività in cui il carbonato di calcio era essenziale. L’industriale Raul Gardini morì suicida sulla scia di Tangentopoli, ma a Carrara rimase e si sviluppò questa nuova attività.

      Il business del carbonato di calcio ha dato un’accelerata all’attività estrattiva e ha permesso di tenere aperte cave che altrimenti sarebbero già state chiuse. Lo abbiamo visto alle pendici del Monte Sagro, all’interno del Parco delle Apuane, marchio Unesco: questa montagna, come ci ha mostrato Eros Tetti, dell’associazione Salviamo le Apuane, continua ad essere scarnificata per alimentare proprio il commercio del carbonato.

      La corsa alla polvere di marmo tocca anche il versante lucano. A Seravezza, un paesino a mezz’ora di auto da Carrara, abbiamo incontrato un gruppo di cittadini che si batte contro l’aumento incontrollato dell’attività di scavo: «Il comitato – ci spiegano i promotori – nasce proprio in risposta alla riapertura di tre cave di marmo sul Monte Costa. Siamo preoccupati per il nostro territorio e ci siamo interrogati sugli effetti che questi siti estrattivi avranno sulla nostra cittadinanza».
      Le parti nobili partono all’estero

      Se gran parte della roccia viene sbriciolata, la parte nobile – i blocchi di marmo – partono per il mondo. Così, interi e grezzi. Verranno poi lavorati direttamente all’estero, dove la manodopera costa meno.

      Se prima la regione di Massa e Carrara era un centro mondiale dell’arte e dell’artigianato legato al marmo, oggi la filiera legata all’estrazione è praticamente scomparsa. Ce lo racconta Boutros Romhein, un rinomato scultore siriano, da 35 anni a Carrara dove, oltre a realizzare enormi sculture, insegna agli studenti di tutto il mondo i segreti di questa nobile roccia: «Non ci sono ormai più artigiani sulla via Carriona, che parte dalle cave e va fino al mare. Una volta era un tutt’uno di piccole e grandi aziende che producevano sculture o materiale per l’architettura. Oggi possiamo dire che non c’è più nessuno».

      Una percezione confermata dai dati. Nel 2017 l’esportazione dei blocchi di marmo italiano è aumentata del 37%. È stata, in particolare, la provincia di Massa Carrara a realizzare il fatturato estero più alto con un export del valore di circa 212 milioni di euro. In calo, invece, i lavorati di marmo: per la provincia, nel 2017, la diminuzione è stata del 6,6%. I blocchi partono interi per gli Stati Uniti, la Cina, l’India e per i Paesi arabi.
      Il marmo dei Bin Laden

      Significativo di questa dinamica mondiale è lo sbarco a Carrara della famiglia saudita dei Bin Laden. Già grandi acquirenti di marmo per le loro attività edili, i Bin Laden sono ora entrati direttamente nell’attività estrattiva.

      Nel 2014 la famiglia saudita ha investito 45 milioni di euro per assicurarsi il controllo della società Erton che detiene il 50% della Marmi Carrara, il gruppo più importante del comprensorio del marmo, che attraverso la Società Apuana Marmi (Sam) controlla un terzo delle concessioni. Quattro famiglie carraresi si sono così riempite le tasche e messo parte delle cave nelle mani della CpC Holding, società controllata dalla Saudi Binladin Group.
      Un bacino minerario vero e proprio

      A Carrara siamo davanti non più a un’economia di cava, ma ad un bacino minerario vero e proprio. Così come nelle Ande e in Africa, nelle zone cioè dove l’estrazione di minerali è più selvaggia, il lato oscuro di questo business – mischiato alla pesante eredità lasciata dall’industria chimica e al fatto di non aver saputo sviluppare alternative economiche al marmo – hanno generato tutta una serie di effetti negativi: inquinamento, malattie, disoccupazione e disagio sociale.

      Nella graduatoria sulla qualità di vita 2017 curata dal dipartimento di statistiche dell’Università La Sapienza di Roma, la provincia di Massa-Carrara figura al 98esimo posto su 110. Se guardiamo i dettagli di questa classifica, la provincia è addirittura penultima per il fattore ambiente, 107esima per disagio sociale, 103esima per il superamento quotidiano della media di polveri sottili disperse nell’aria e 95esima per gli infortuni sul lavoro.

      Anche se non è possibile fare un legame diretto con il marmo, in questa terra vi è inoltre un’incidenza di malattie oncologiche fra le più elevate in Italia. In particolare vi un indice molto elevato nei mesoteliomi pleurici, la cui causa è quasi certamente dovuta alle tipologie di lavorazioni svolte in passato e all’eredità di prodotti tossici tuttora da smaltire. Per quanto riguarda il lavoro: nel 2017, Massa Carrara è stata la seconda provincia d’Italia con l’incremento più grande di disoccupazione (+36,7%). Il business del marmo e del suo derivato, il carbonato di calcio, sembra anch’esso continuare a crescere.


      https://www.tvsvizzera.it/tvs/cultura-e-dintorni/economia-mineraria_a-carrara--sulle-tracce-del-marmo-della-discordia/44377160
      #décès #risque #accident #morts #travail #Farmoplant #Montedison #Rogor #mécanisation #inondations #environnement #cancer #santé #Strad_dei_marmi #suisse #dentifrice #Argovie #Imerys #Calcestruzzi_Spa #Raul_Gardini #Monte_Sagro #Parco_delle_Apuane #résistance #Salviamo_le_Apuane #Seravezza #Monte_Costa #Bin_Laden #Arabie_Saoudite #Erton #Società_Apuana_Marmi (#Sam) #CpC_Holding #Saudi_Binladin_Group #chômage #pollution

    • “La terra bianca. Marmo, chimica e altri disastri” di #Giulio_Milani

      Mi balena in mente un quadro, come un’epifania, intercettato anni fa nel vivaio del d’Orsay, perché quelle opere respirano e non venitemi a dire che non assorbono luce e non emettono ossigeno. Sono creature folte e sempre assetate. Le spigolatrici di Jean-François Millet incastra tre donne su un lenzuolo di terra. Sono chinate, sono ingobbite, sono stanche e senza volto. La fatica rivendica il possesso feudale di quelle facce. Ma malgrado le loro schiene lontane da ogni verticale, malgrado tutte le ore inarcate e incallite, quelle lavoratrici sanno che il suolo non sputa. Che dal ventre di semi e raccolte dipende la loro vita. E anche quella che non conoscono. Non esiste(va) legame più forte. Perché il tempo presente fa pensare all’imperfetto.

      Il libro di Giulio Milani La terra bianca (Laterza, 2015) è l’ennesimo emblema della frattura, l’ulteriore dolente puntata di una serie d’inchieste sullo stupro più o meno inconsapevole subito dal nostro Paese.

      Siamo avvezzi ai fuochi campani, allo sfregio dell’agro aversano, all’idea che i rifiuti si sommergano, oppure che s-fumino altissimi a ingozzare le nuvole. Tutto già digerito. Il potere dei media gonfia il clamore e poi lo normalizza. Ci anestetizza. Ma la tragedia ambientale cambia dialetto. E in questo caso parla toscano. Nell’enclave assoluta del marmo.

      «Un’onda pietrificata, una sterminata scogliera di fossili» nella zona di confine tra la bassa Liguria e l’Emilia, che comprende la doppia provincia di Massa Carrara, le Alpi Apuane e una costola di Mar Tirreno.

      Giulio Milani, scrittore e direttore responsabile della casa editrice Transeuropa, ha sempre abitato qui, il bacino delle cave, un poligono colonizzato dalle industrie fin dagli anni Cinquanta. «Ex Farmoplant-Montedison. Ex Rumianca-Enichem. Ex Bario-Solvay. Ex Italiana Coke».

      Una sequela di sposalizi chimici e divorzi malconci che hanno divelto, macellato, svuotato un territorio rendendolo una tra le aree più inquinate d’Italia «anche per le polveri sottili prodotte dal traffico incessante dei mezzi pesanti, tra i quali i sempre più numerosi e caratteristici camion coi pianali per il trasporto di blocchi di marmo grandi alle volte come interi container e, in misura molto maggiore, i ribaltabili carichi fino al colmo di scaglie detritiche per i mille usi non ornamentali della pietra». «Fumi di latte», un impasto pestifero sbriciolato nell’aria, che la gente del luogo ingurgita ogni giorno, pensando non sia immaginabile un ipotetico altrimenti. Perché le cave sono lavoro e senza lavoro si muore. Ma a quanto pare anche a causa del lavoro.

      L’inchiesta di Milani parte da un episodio miliare: Il 17 luglio del 1988 il serbatoio di un pesticida (il Rogor), occultato malamente tra i Formulati liquidi per eludere la legge, scoppia come un attentato nello stabilimento Farmoplant- Montedison, partorendo una nube tossica diluita per 2000 kmq, soprattutto su Marina di Massa e Marina di Carrara. Nessun morto e chissà quante vittime. Perché il disastro più maligno è quello che s’incassa tardi, che s’incista nelle crepe, acquattato nelle vie respiratorie, nell’alcova dei polmoni, tra reni e vescica.

      Dopo proteste di ogni tipo la fabbrica fu chiusa, ma non la scia di condanne pronta a chiedere asilo dentro troppi cittadini. Il motivo? Le pratiche più diffuse da molte di quelle aziende riguardavano lo smaltimento “sportivo” dei rifiuti. Ovviamente tossico-nocivi, tramite la termodistruzione per opera dell’inceneritore Lurgi nel caso della Farmoplant, attraverso interramenti silenziosi e consenzienti in tutti gli altri. Abbuffare le zolle di veleni e poi coprirle di ulivi e ammalarsi d’olio e non capirlo mai per tempo.

      Ma il libro di Milani procede oltre, traccia una geometria spazio-temporale molto complessa, diagonali d’analisi che scavalcano il singolo episodio e pennellano il profilo di una provincia abusata attraverso la Storia, in prima istanza dalla fatica delle cave, dove i dispositivi di protezione sono stati per decenni fantasmi senza guanti. Operai falciati come insetti per un cumulo distratto, schiacciati da un peso sfuggito al controllo. Poi il vespaio furioso dell’industria estrattiva e dei suoi sversamenti. E la smania noncurante di usare la terra come un tappeto. Come un sepolcro ben ammobiliato.

      Milani ci racconta per salti, di uomini capaci di opporsi al male, dello stormo partigiano della Resistenza Apuana, negli echi di guerra nelle steppe di Russia (suo argomento di laurea). «Si erano battuti per tre giorni di seguito. Per tre giorni e due notti si erano sacrificati, a turno, ai piedi di una quota da riconquistare». Poi di altri uomini anni in anni più vicini, intenti a riagguantare la pulizia dei fatti, a denunciare gli illeciti, a spingere forze, a non tacere. Come Marcello Palagi, principale esponente del movimento per la chiusura della Farmoplant; come Alberto Grossi, regista del documentario Aut Out.«Se si altera la morfologia di un luogo non ne vengono modificati solo i caratteri distintivi, ma anche quelli invisibili, come l’alimentazione degli acquiferi e il clima. Sono a rischio le sorgenti, si perdono i fiori, e forse anche la poesia». E lo scempio continua.

      Chi pagherà per ogni verso bruciato, per lo sguardo rappreso in un cucchiaio d’orrore? Per la strage travestita da capitolo ordinario, senza nessun dittatore da offendere? Per le diagnosi neoplastiche di cui smettiamo di stupirci? Sempre noi, che se restiamo fermi avremo solo terre sane dipinte in un museo.

      http://www.flaneri.com/2016/05/25/la-terra-bianca-giulio-milani

      #livre

    • La malédiction du marbre de Carrare

      Le fameux marbre de Carrare n’est pas seulement symbole de luxe. Le site est surtout devenu un des hauts lieux de l’extraction du carbonate de calcium, utilisé notamment dans la fabrication des dentifrices. Une exploitation industrielle qui défigure le paysage et s’accompagne de morts sur les chantiers, de pollution et d’accaparement des ressources par une élite locale et par des acteurs internationaux, dont la famille Ben Laden et la multinationale suisse Omya.


      https://www.swissinfo.ch/fre/economie/pollution--maladies-et-gros-profits_la-mal%C3%A9diction-du-marbre-de-carrare/44416350