• Construire le féminisme et la sexualité libre au Mozambique

    Maira Domingos apporte des réflexions sur la maternité obligatoire, le conservatisme et les relations patriarcales dans le mariage.

    « La réalité des conflits armés renforce, dans la maternité,
    la fonction d’alimentation de la guerre elle-même. »

    La maternité et la sexualité sont des questions sur lesquelles les femmes mozambicaines trouvent peu d’espace pour partager et réfléchir collectivement. Au Mozambique, il est très courant que les femmes aient de nombreux enfants par obligation, même s’ils ne reflètent pas un désir et un sentiment agréable d’être mère. La réalité des conflits armés renforce dans la maternité la fonction de nourrir la guerre elle-même. Le grand problème de la malnutrition ravage le corps des femmes qui, même lorsqu’elles ont faim, doivent trouver la force de nourrir leur bébé. Ce ne sont là que quelques exemples qui montrent que la maternité est une question qui concerne l’ensemble de l’organisation sociale et économique, et pas seulement la vie privée de chaque femme.

    https://entreleslignesentrelesmots.blog/2021/05/19/construire-le-feminisme-et-la-sexualite-libre-au-mozamb

    #féminisme #afrique #mozambique

  • L’exposition « Refuser la guerre coloniale, une histoire portugaise »

    A la maison du Portugal de la Cité universitaire internationale de Paris a lieu une exposition sur l’engagement des années 1960 et 1970 contre les guerres coloniales menées par le Portugal en #Guinée-Bissau, #Angola et #Mozambique. Elle traite de l’exil parisien des 200’000 Portugais #déserteurs et insoumis à cette guerre.

    https://histoirecoloniale.net/L-exposition-Refuser-la-guerre-coloniale-une-histoire-portugaise-

    #résistance #désobéissance_civile #colonisation #guerre_coloniale #histoire #Portugal #exposition #France #exil

    ping @isskein

  • The strange case of Portugal’s returnees

    White settler returnees to Portugal in #1975, and the history of decolonization, can help us understand the complicated category of refugee.

    The year is 1975, and the footage comes from the Portuguese Red Cross. The ambivalence is there from the start. Who, or maybe what, are these people? The clip title calls them “returnees from Angola.” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wzd9_gh646U

    ) At Lisbon airport, they descend the gangway of a US-operated civil airplane called “Freedom.” Clothes, sunglasses, hairstyles, and sideburns: no doubt, these are the 1970s. The plane carries the inscription “holiday liner,” but these people are not on vacation. A man clings tight to his transistor radio, a prized possession brought from far away Luanda. Inside the terminal, hundreds of returnees stand in groups, sit on their luggage, or camp on the floor. White people, black people, brown people. Men, women, children, all ages. We see them filing paperwork, we see volunteers handing them sandwiches and donated clothes, we see a message board through which those who have lost track of their loved ones try to reunite. These people look like refugees (http://tracosdememoria.letras.ulisboa.pt/pt/arquivo/documentos-escritos/retornados-no-aeroporto-de-lisboa-1975). Or maybe they don’t?

    Returnees or retornados is the term commonly assigned to more than half-a-million people, the vast majority of them white settlers from Angola and Mozambique, most of whom arrived in Lisbon during the course of 1975, the year that these colonies acquired their independence from Portugal. The returnees often hastily fled the colonies they had called home because they disapproved of the one party, black majority state after independence, and resented the threat to their racial and social privilege; because they dreaded the generalized violence of civil war and the breakdown of basic infrastructures and services in the newly independent states; because they feared specific threats to their property, livelihood, and personal safety; or because their lifeworld was waning before their eyes as everyone else from their communities left in what often resembled a fit of collective panic.

    Challenged by this influx from the colonies at a time of extreme political instability and economic turmoil in Portugal, the authorities created the legal category of returnees for those migrants who held Portuguese citizenship and seemed unable to “integrate” by their own means into Portuguese society. Whoever qualified as a returnee before the law was entitled to the help of the newly created state agency, Institute for the Support of the Return of the Nationals (IARN). As the main character of an excellent 2011 novel by Dulce Maria Cardoso on the returnees states:

    In almost every answer there was one word we had never heard before, the I.A.R.N., the I.A.R.N., the I.A.R.N. The I.A.R.N. had paid our air fares, the I.A.R.N. would put us up in hotels, the I.A.R.N. would pay for the transport to the hotels, the I.A.R.N. would give us food, the I.A.R.N. would give us money, the I.A.R.N. would help us, the I.A.R.N. would advise us, the I.A.R.N. would give us further information. I had never heard a single word repeated so many times, the I.A.R.N. seemed to be more important and generous than God.

    The legal category “returnee” policed the access to this manna-from-welfare heaven, but the label also had a more symbolic dimension: calling those arriving from Angola and Mozambique “returnees” implied an orderly movement, and possibly a voluntary migration; it also suggested that they came back to a place where they naturally fit, to the core of a Portuguese nation that they had always been a part of. In this sense, the term was also meant to appeal to the solidarity of the resident population with the newcomers: in times of dire public finances, the government hoped to legitimize its considerable spending on behalf of these “brothers” from the nation’s (former) overseas territories.

    Many migrants, however, rebutted the label attached to them. While they were happy to receive the aid offered by state bureaucracies and NGOs like the Portuguese Red Cross, they insisted that they were refugees (refugiados), not returnees. One in three of them, as they pointed out, had been born in Africa. Far from returning to Portugal, they were coming for the first time, and often did not feel welcome there. Most felt that they had not freely decided to leave, that their departure had been chaotic, that they had had no choice but to give up their prosperous and happy lives in the tropics. (At the time, they never publicly reflected on the fact that theirs was the happiness of a settler minority, and that prosperity was premised on the exploitation of the colonized.) Many were convinced they would return to their homelands one day, and many of them proudly identified as “Angolans” or “Africans” rather than as Portuguese. All in all, they claimed that they had been forcibly uprooted, and that now they were discriminated against and living precariously in the receiving society—in short, that they shared the predicaments we typically associate with the condition of the refugee.

    Some of them wrote to the UNHCR, demanding the agency should help them as refugees. The UNHCR, however, declined. In 1976, High Commissioner Prince Aga Khan referred to the 1951 Refugee Convention, explaining that his mandate applied “only to persons outside the country of their nationality,” and that since “the repatriated individuals, in their majority, hold Portuguese nationality, [they] do not fall under my mandate.” The UNHCR thus supported the returnee label the Portuguese authorities had created, although high-ranking officials within the organization were in fact critical of this decision—in the transitory moment of decolonization, when the old imperial borders gave way to the new borders of African nation-states, it was not always easy to see who would count as a refugee even by the terms of the 1951 Convention.

    In short, the strange case of Portugal’s returnees—much like that of the pieds-noirs, French settlers “repatriated” from Algeria—points to the ambiguities of the “refugee.” In refugee studies and migration history, the term defines certain groups of people we study. In international law, the category bestows certain rights on specific individuals. As a claim-making concept, finally, “the refugee” is a tool that various actors—migrants, governments, international organizations, NGOs—use to voice demands and to mobilize, to justify their politics, or to interpret their experiences. What are we to make of this overlap? While practitioners of the refugee regime will have different priorities, I think that migration scholars should treat the “refugee” historically. We need to critically analyze who is using the term in which ways in any given situation. As an actor’s category, “refugee” is not an abstract concept detached from time and place, context, and motivations. Rather, it is historically specific, as its meanings change over time; it is relational, because it is defined against the backdrop of other terms and phenomena; and it is strategic, because it is supposed to do something for the people who use the term. The refugee concept is thus intrinsically political.

    Does analyzing “the refugee” as an actor’s category mean that we must abandon it as an analytical tool altogether? Certainly not. We should continue to research “refugees” as a historically contested category of people. While there will always be a tension between the normative and analytical dimensions, historicizing claims to being a “refugee” can actually strengthen the concept’s analytical purchase: it can complicate our understanding of forced migrations and open our eyes to the wide range of degrees of voluntariness or force involved in any migration decision. It can help us to think the state of being a refugee not as an absolute, but as a gradual, relational, and contextualized category. In the case of the returnees, and independently from what either the migrants or the Portuguese government or the UNHCR argued, such an approach will allow us to analyze the migrants as “privileged refugees.”

    Let me explain: For all the pressures that pushed some of them to leave their homes, for all the losses they endured, and for all the hardships that marked their integration into Portuguese society, the returnees, a privileged minority in a settler colony, also had a relatively privileged experience of (forced) migration and reintegration when colonialism ended. This becomes clear when comparing their experience to the roughly 20,000 Africans that, at the same time as the returnees, made it to Portugal but who, unlike them, were neither accepted as citizens nor entitled to comprehensive welfare—regardless of the fact that they had grown up being told that they were an integral part of a multi-continental Portuguese nation, and despite the fact that they were fleeing the same collapsing empire as the returnees were. Furthermore, we must bear in mind that in Angola and Mozambique, hundreds of thousands of Africans were forcibly displaced first by Portugal’s brutal colonial wars (1961-1974), then during the civil wars after independence (1975-2002 in Angola, 1977-1992 in Mozambique). Unlike the returnees, most of these forced migrants never had the opportunity to seek refuge in the safe haven of Portugal. Ultimately, the returnees’ experience can therefore only be fully understood when it is put into the broader context of these African refugee flows, induced as they were by the violent demise of settler colonialism in the process of decolonization.

    So, what were these people in the YouTube clip, then? Returnees? Or African refugees? I hope that by now you will agree that … well … it’s complicated.

    https://africasacountry.com/2020/12/the-strange-case-of-portugals-returnees

    #Portugal #colonialisme #catégorisation #réfugiés #asile #décolonisation #Angola #réfugiés_portugais #histoire #rapatriés #rapatriés_portugais #Mozambique #indépendance #nationalisme #retour_volontaire #discriminations #retour_forcé #retour #nationalité

    Et un nouveau mot pour la liste de @sinehebdo :
    #retornados
    #terminologie #vocabulaire #mots

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Mocimboa da Praia : Key Mozambique port ’seized by IS’ - BBC News
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-53756692

    C’est passé sous les radars apparemment, mais la situation au Mozambique se dégrade et devient très préoccupante

    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/1632/idt2/idt2/f0df8b16-d8df-480d-89d5-f23f1d740e73/image/816

    Militants linked to the Islamic State group have seized a heavily-defended port in Mozambique after days of fighting, according to reports.

    Local media say government forces that were in the far northern town of Mocimboa da Praia fled, many by boat, after Islamists stormed the port.

    The town is near the site of natural gas projects worth $60bn (£46bn).

    In recent months militants have taken a number of northern towns, displacing tens of thousands of people.

    –-----------

    Avec les décapitations de villages, l’État islamique intensifie les attaques au Mozambique - News 24

    https://news-24.fr/avec-les-decapitations-de-villages-letat-islamique-intensifie-les-attaques-a

    NAIROBI, Kenya – Les militants de l’État islamique, selon plusieurs témoignages, ont frappé la petite communauté agricole sur un plateau dans le nord du Mozambique lors d’un rite d’initiation pour amener les adolescents à devenir virils.

    Armés de machettes, les assaillants ont décapité jusqu’à 20 garçons et hommes dans le village de 24 de Marco, selon un rapport des médias locaux qui confirmé mercredi par ACLED, un groupe américain de surveillance de la crise qui cartographie l’explosion de l’insurrection au Mozambique.

    –-----------------

    Mozambique - Escalation of conflict and violence drive massive displacements and increased humanitarian needs in Cabo Delgado | Digital Situation Reports
    https://reports.unocha.org/en/country/mozambique/card/qXCEhl8yNX
    https://images.ctfassets.net/ejsx83ka8ylz/Z9ojahmui2MxmPMagjmfA/5c75e52ed09bf8c5724c3553183c05a3/WhatsApp_Image_2020-10-26_at_18.53.21.jpeg?w=1024

    Escalation of conflict and violence drive massive displacements and increased humanitarian needs in Cabo Delgado

    The humanitarian situation in Cabo Delgado Province, in northern Mozambique, significantly deteriorated over the last 10 months. The ongoing conflict in the region has escalated in 2020, compounding a fragile situation marked by chronic underdevelopment, consecutive climatic shocks and recurrent disease outbreaks. The increasing number of attacks by non-state armed groups, particularly impacting the northern and eastern districts of the Province, are driving massive and multiple displacements, disrupting people’s livelihoods and access to basic services.

    –-----------------------

    Cabo Ligado Weekly : 2-8 November 2020 | ACLED
    https://acleddata.com/2020/11/10/cabo-ligado-weekly-2-8-november-2020

    The battle for the road between Palma and Mueda continued last week, starting with a 2 November insurgent attack on Pundanhar, Palma district. Several houses were burned in the attack, and five civilians were kidnapped.

    At the same time, insurgents were in the midst of a four-day occupation of Muatide, Muidumbe district. According to a Pinnacle News report, insurgents used Muatide as a base from which they carried out attacks against young men involved in initiation rites. Fifteen boys and five adults from the 24 de Marco village were reported decapitated, and their bodies brought to the soccer field at Muatide. Pinnacle also reported that another 24 youths and six adults from other areas of the district were beheaded during the occupation, and their bodies similarly gathered at Muatide. Pinnacle later reported that many other civilians had been killed at Muatide. There is no confirmed final death toll, and sources can only confirm the targeting of male initiation rites and the initial report of 20 deaths at 24 de Marco.

    #mozambique #is #état_islamique #daesh #djihadisme_international

  • Au Cabo Delgado, brouillard de guerre, tambours d’internationalisation
    https://www.cetri.be/Au-Cabo-Delgado-brouillard-de

    Des djihadistes se sont emparés de la ville portuaire de Mocimboa da Praia, au nord du #Mozambique, mercredi 12 août. Sous tension depuis déjà plusieurs années, cette région du Cabo Delgado abrite d’importantes installations gazières mises en place par plusieurs compagnies étrangères dont le français Total. Alors que le gouvernement et les pays voisins plaident pour un renforcement des forces armées pour lutter contre les djihadistes, des associations condamnent une militarisation aveugle qui exacerbe (...) #Le_Sud_en_mouvement

    / #Le_Sud_en_mouvement, Mozambique, #Corruption, #Extractivisme, #Néocolonialisme, Les blogs du (...)

    #Les_blogs_du_Diplo

  • Les #circulations en #santé : des #produits, des #savoirs, des #personnes en mouvement

    Les circulations en santé sont constituées d’une multitude de formes de mouvements et impliquent aussi bien des savoirs, des #normes_médicales, des produits de santé, des patients et des thérapeutes. L’objectif de ce dossier consiste ainsi à mieux saisir la manière dont les #corps, les #connaissances_médicales, les produits se transforment pendant et à l’issue des circulations. Ouvert sans limite de temps, ce dossier thématique se veut un espace pour documenter ces circulations plus ordinaires dans le champ de la santé.

    Sommaire :

    BLOUIN GENEST Gabriel, SHERROD Rebecca : Géographie virale et risques globaux : la circulation des risques sanitaires dans le contexte de la gouvernance globale de la santé.

    BROSSARD ANTONIELLI Alila : La production locale de #médicaments_génériques au #Mozambique à la croisée des circulations de #savoirs_pharmaceutiques.

    PETIT Véronique : Circulations et quêtes thérapeutiques en #santé_mentale au #Sénégal.

    TAREAU Marc-Alexandre, DEJOUHANET Lucie, PALISSE Marianne, ODONNE Guillaume : Circulations et échanges de plantes et de savoirs phyto-médicinaux sur la frontière franco-brésilienne.

    TISSERAND Chloé : Médecine à la frontière : le recours aux professionnels de santé afghans en contexte d’urgence humanitaire.

    #Calais #réfugiés_afghans #humanitaire #PASS #soins #accès_aux_soins

    https://rfst.hypotheses.org/les-circulations-en-sante-des-produits-des-savoirs-des-personnes-en
    #Brésil #humanitaire #Brésil #Guyane

    ping @fil

  • farmlandgrab.org | Is nationalisation and state custodianship of land a solution? The case of Mozambique
    https://www.farmlandgrab.org/post/view/29116

    FIRST, WE HAVE TO UNDERSTAND THE formation of a national capitalist class.
    In order to have access to Mozambican resources and markets, international capital needed a compliant domestic capitalist class. No such class existed, so there was a need to create it. “Privatisation” of the state was a necessary condition for the process of capital accumulation and the creation of local oligarchies. From generals to top politicians and lobbyists, a small number of individuals reaped benefits from the privatisation of state enterprises, banks and services. This was also true in the natural resources sector. Fertile farmlands and mines were appropriated, in most cases from the peasantry.

    In the whole economy more broadly, this has led to a kind of porousness. According to the economist Nuno Castel-Branco, there has been an inability, deliberate or not, to retain the uncommitted surplus that could be used for the reproduction of the economy as a whole. In other words, elites capture the state in order to generate surpluses. These surpluses are then financialised, either in domestic capital markets, or, more often, in international capital markets. Of course this also results in capital flight.

    #Mozambique #foncier #terres #privatisation #prolétarisation #capitalisme #agriculture

  • U.N. to probe sex-for-food aid allegations after ...
    http://news.trust.org/item/20190426133548-oe3xz

    The United Nations said on Friday it will investigate allegations that survivors of a deadly cyclone in Mozambique are being forced to have sex with community leaders for food.

    More than 1,000 people died and tens of thousands were forced from their homes when Cyclone Idai hammered Mozambique before moving inland to Malawi and Zimbabwe, in one of the worst climate-related disasters to hit the southern hemisphere.

    The U.N. pledge came a day after Human Rights Watch (HRW) published accounts of female survivors who said they were abused by local leaders and as a second powerful storm, Cyclone Kenneth, pounded the impoverished southeast African nation.

    “As with any report on sexual exploitation and abuse, we are acting swiftly to follow-up on these allegations, including with the relevant authorities,” the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) said in a statement.

    “The U.N. has a zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse. It is not, and never will be, acceptable for any person in a position of power to abuse the most vulnerable, let alone in their time of greatest need.”

    #abus_de_pouvoir #viols #abus_sexuels #Mozambique #catastrophe

    • et ce n’est pas tout #femmes #discrimination

      A local community leader in the town of Tica, Nhamatanda district, told Human Rights Watch that in some cases, where access by road is impossible, local community leaders are responsible for storing the food and distributing it to families on a weekly basis. She said that, “Because the food is not enough for everyone,” some local leaders have exploited the situation by charging people to include their names on the distribution lists.

      One aid worker said that the distribution list often contains only the names of male heads of households, and excludes families headed by women. “In some of the villages, women and their children have not seen any food for weeks,” she said. “They would do anything for food, including sleeping with men in charge of the food distribution.”

      Another aid worker said that her international organization had received reports of sexual abuse of women not only in their villages, but also in camps for internally displaced people. She said they were monitoring the situation and training people to raise awareness among women and to report any cases of sexual exploitation or abuse.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/04/25/mozambique-cyclone-victims-forced-trade-sex-food

  • Le #Mozambique. Promesses de prospérité et instabilité – GeoStrategia
    https://www.geostrategia.fr/le-mozambique-promesses-de-prosperite-et-instabilite

    Cet article s’intéresse aux enjeux auxquels le Mozambique est confronté. La récente découverte de gisements d’hydrocarbures permet à ce pays d’envisager un développement économique rapide en devenant un champion énergétique du continent africain. Toutefois l’auteure nuance ce propos et rappelle que depuis 2013 une crise politico-militaire subsiste, marquée notamment par la déstabilisation islamiste au nord du pays.

  • #Pro-savana

    Vision

    Improve the livelihood of inhabitants of #Nacala_Corridor through inclusive and sustainable agricultural and regional development.

    Missions

    1. Improve and modernise agriculture to increase productivity and production, and diversify agricultural production.

    2. Create employment through agricultural investment and establishment of a supply chain.

    Objective

    Create new agricultural development models, taking into account the natural environment and socio-economic aspects, and seeking market-orientated agricultural/rural/regional development with a competitive edge.

    Principles of ProSAVANA

    1. ProSAVANA will be aligned with the vision and objectives of the national agricultural development strategy of Mozambique, the “Strategy Plan for the Agricultural Sector Development – 2011 – 2020 (PEDSA)”,

    2. ProSAVANA supports Mozambican farmers in order to contribute to poverty-reduction, food security and nutrition,

    3. Activities of ProSAVANA, in particular those involving the private sector, will be designed and implemented in accordance with Principles of Responsible Agricultural Investment (PRAI) and Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests,

    4. Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security of Mozambique (MASA) and Local Government, in collaboration with Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC), will strengthen dialogue and involvement of civil society and other appropriate parties,

    5. Appropriate consideration will be given for mitigation of the environmental and social impacts, which might be provided through the activities under ProSAVANA.

    Approaches of ProSAVANA

    1. Incorporate the results of relevant studies on the natural conditions and socio-economic situations, to support the establishment of appropriate agricultural development models,

    2. Increase agricultural productivity and production through appropriate measures, including improvement of farming systems, access to agricultural extension services including techniques and quality/quantity of inputs, value chain system and expansion of farmland,

    3. Promote diversification of agricultural production, based on research results to increase profitability,

    4. Provide opportunities to change from subsistence agriculture into a sustainable agriculture, with respect given to the farmers´ sovereignty,

    5. Strengthen the capacity and the competitiveness of farmers and farmers’ organisations,

    6. Enhance the enabling environment to promote responsible investments and activities, aiming to establish a win-win relationship between small-scale farmers and agribusiness firms,

    7. Promote and strengthen local leading farmers to disseminate and scale-up development impacts,

    8. Establish regional agricultural clusters and develop value chain systems,

    9. Promote public and private partnership as one of the driving forces for inclusive and sustainable agricultural development.

    http://www.prosavana.gov.mz
    #Pro_savana #land_grabbing #terres #Mozambique #accaparement_de_terres

    ping @odilon

    Apparemment, le programme a été arrêté avant d’être implémenté.
    Programme qui avait été promu par #Lula

    • What Happened to the Biggest Land Grab in Africa? Searching for #ProSavana in Mozambique

      What if you threw a lavish party for foreign investors, and no one came? By all accounts, that is what’s happening in Mozambique’s Nacala Corridor, the intended site for Africa’s largest agricultural development scheme – or land grab, depending on your perspective.

      The ProSavana project, a Brazilian-and-Japanese-led development project, was supposed to be turning Mozambique’s fertile savannah lands in the north into an export zone, replicating Brazil’s success taming its own savannah – the cerrado – and transforming it into industrial mega-farms of soybeans. The vision, hatched in 2009, but only revealed to Mozambicans in 2013, called for 35 million hectares (nearly 100 million acres) of “underutilized” land to be converted by Brazilian agribusiness into soybean plantations for cheaper export to China and Japan.

      In my two weeks in Mozambique, including one week in the Nacala Corridor, I had a hard time finding evidence of any such transformation. It was easy, though, to find outrage at a plan seen by many in the region as a secret land grab. That resistance, which has evolved into a tri-national campaign in Japan, Brazil, and Mozambique to stop ProSavana, is one of the reasons the project is a currently a dud.

      The new face of South-South investment?

      I came to look at ProSavana because, out of all the large-scale projects I studied over the course of the last year, this one sounded almost plausible. It wasn’t started by some fly-by-night venture capitalist, growing a biofuel crop he’d never produced commercially for a market that barely existed. That’s what I saw in Tanzania, and such failed land grabs litter the African landscape.

      ProSavana at least knew its investors: Brazil’s agribusiness giants. The planners also knew their technology: Brazil’s soybeans, which had adapted to the harsh tropical conditions of Brazil’s cerrado. And they knew their market: Japan’s and China’s hog farms and their insatiable appetite for feed, generally made with soybeans. That was already more than a lot of these grand schemes had going for them.

      I was also compelled by the sheer scale of the project. When first announced, ProSavana was to encompass 35 million hectares of land, an area the size of North Carolina. That would have made it the largest land acquisition in Africa.

      ProSavana also interested me because it was not the usual neo-colonial megaproject promoted by the Global North. It was a projection of Brazil’s agro-export prowess. This was South-South investment, the new wave of development in a multipolar world. Wouldn’t Brazil do this differently, I wondered, with the kind of strong developmental focus that had characterized the country’s ascendance under the leadership of the left-leaning Workers’ Party?

      ProSavana’s premise was that the soil and climate in the Nacala Corridor of Mozambique were similar to those found in the cerrado, so technology could be easily adapted to tame a region inhospitable to agriculture.

      Someone should have gone there before they issued the press releases.

      It turns out that the two regions differ dramatically. The cerrado had poor soils, which technology was able to address. That’s also why it had few farmers, and those that were there could be moved by Brazil’s then-military dictatorship. The Nacala Corridor, by contrast, has good soils, which is precisely why it is the most densely-populated part of rural Mozambique. (If there are good lands, you can bet civilization has discovered them and is farming them.)

      Mozambique also has a democratic government, forged in an independence movement rooted in peasant farmers’ struggle for land rights. So the country has one of the stronger land laws in Africa, which grants use rights to farmers who have been farming land for ten years or more.

      The disconnect between the claims ProSavana was making to its investors and the reality of the situation reached almost laughable proportions. Agriculture Minister Jose Pacheco led sales visits to Mozambique, organized by Brazil’s Getulio Vargas Foundation, which had put together the agribusiness-friendly draft “Master Plan” that was leaked to Mozambican civil society organizations in March 2013. Brazil’s biggest farmers came looking for thousands of hectares of land, only to find three disappointments: they couldn’t own land in Mozambique; what land they could lease was by no means empty; and it was far from the ports, with no decent roads to transport their soybeans. Brazil’s soybean mega-farmers packed up their giant combines and went back to the cerrado, where there are still millions of hectares of undeveloped land.

      A kinder, gentler ProSavana

      There are a few large soybean farms in Gurue, producing for the domestic poultry industry; but nothing like the export boom promised by ProSavana. According to Americo Uaciquete of ProSavana’s Nampula office, Brazilian farmers came expecting 40,000 hectares free and clear. He told me no investor could expect that in the Nacala Corridor. The only foreign investors who will farm there, he said, are those willing to take 2,000 hectares and involve local farmers.

      To me, that sounded like a very quick surrender on the ProSavana battlefield. Couldn’t the Mozambican government open larger swaths of land?

      “Not without a gun,” Uaciquete said, clearly rejecting that path. “We are not going to impose the Brazilian model here.” He went on to describe ProSavana as a support program for small-scale farmers, based on its two non-investment components: research into improved locally adapted seeds, and extension services to improve productivity.

      In Maputo, the ProSavana Directorate did its best to polish up the new, development-friendly ProSavana. Jusimere Mourao, of Japan’s cooperation agency, had it down best. She lamented that ProSavana was “poorly timed” because its “announcement” (a leak) “coincided” with international concerns about land grabbing. Hmmm….

      After taking civil society concerns into account, she said, the program had issued a new “concept note” and the Master Plan is under revision. “Small and medium producers are the main beneficiaries of ProSavana,” she said. “We have no intention of promoting the taking of their land. It would be a crime.” It’s not about promoting foreign investment, she assured me; that is up to the Mozambican government.

      The turnaround was stunning, and welcome, if not quite believable. It certainly had not quieted the coalition calling for an end to ProSavana until farmers and civil society groups are consulted on the agricultural development plan for the Nacala Corridor.

      Luis Sitoe, Economic Adviser to the Minister of Agriculture, smirked when I told him I’d been in the region researching ProSavana. “Did you find anything?” For him, ProSavana had failed.

      But lest I think anything profound had been learned from that experience, he reassured me that the Mozambican government remains firmly committed to relying on large-scale foreign investment to address its agricultural underdevelopment.

      He pulled out a two-inch-thick binder to show me he was serious. It was the project proposal for the Lurio River Valley Development Project, a 200,000-hectare irrigation scheme right there in the northern Nacala Corridor. Was it part of ProSavana? Absolutely not. Had the communities been consulted on this ambitious project along the heavily populated river valley?

      “Absolutely not,” said Vicente Adriano, research director at UNAC, Mozambique’s national farmers’ union, which had just presented its own agricultural development plan, based on the country’s three million family farmers.

      The ProSavana directorate is still promising a new Master Plan for the project in early 2015. So it would be a mistake to think that ProSavana is dead. Large-scale land deals certainly aren’t, however they are branded. Investors may just be waiting for the Mozambican government to bring more to the table than just promotional brochures. Things like land, which turns out to be rather important for a successful land grab. In the Nacala Corridor, that land is anything but unoccupied.

      https://foodtank.com/news/2014/12/what-happened-to-the-biggest-land-grab-in-africa-searching-for-prosavana-i

  • The victory of Mozambican farmers against the soya empire

    In 2011 the Mozambican government launched Africa’s largest agro-industrial development plan. The so-called #ProSavana aimed to turn 14 million hectares of land in the #Nacala corridor, in the north of the country, into a huge #monoculture, mainly soybean for the Chinese market. The development of the area would have been entrusted to Brazilian entrepreneurs coming directly from Mato Grosso.

    When they realized they would have lost their ancestral lands, local farmers put up a great mobilisation, which proved very successful.

    https://www.internazionale.it/video/2018/05/16/mozambican-farmers-soya
    #résistance #Mozambique #agriculture #soja #Chinafrique #Chine #Brésil #terres #accaparement_de_terres #vidéo

    • #Soyalism

      I n a world struck by climate change and overpopulation, food production control is increasingly becoming a huge business for a handful of giant corporations. Following the industrial production chain of pork, from China to Brazil through the United States and Mozambique, the documentary describes the enormous concentration of power in the hands of these Western and Chinese companies. This movement is putting out of business hundreds of thousands of small producers and transforming permanently entire landscapes. Launched in United States at the end of the Seventies, the system has been exported across the world, especially in large-populated countries such as China. From waste-lagoons in North Carolina to soybeans monoculture developed in the Amazon rainforest to feed animals, the movie describes how the expansion of this process is jeopardizing the social and environmental balance of the planet.

      https://www.soyalism.com

      #film #documentaire

      Trailer :
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwwAqllgwYg

      #Stefano_Liberti

    • La vittoria dei contadini del Mozambico contro l’impero della soia

      “In Mozambico non c’è abbastanza terra, abbiamo già conflitti tra di noi. Se verranno gli investitori stranieri, i conflitti peggioreranno. La terra appartiene ai mozambicani”, dice Costa Estevão, presidente dell’unione contadina di Nampula.

      Nel 2011 il governo mozambicano ha lanciato il più grande piano di sviluppo agroindustriale dell’Africa. Il ProSavana mirava a trasformare 14 milioni di ettari di terreno in monocolture da esportazione. L’area interessata era il corridoio di Nacala, nel nord del paese.

      Il suo sviluppo sarebbe stato affidato a imprenditori brasiliani venuti dal Mato Grosso, lo stato del Brasile trasformato negli anni ottanta nel principale produttore di soia al mondo. I contadini mozambicani, informati che avrebbero perso le proprie terre, hanno messo in piedi una grande mobilitazione e hanno vinto.

      Questo video, disponibile anche in inglese, è stato realizzato con il sostegno del Pulitzer center on crisis reporting. È uno spin-off di Soyalism, un documentario di Stefano Liberti ed Enrico Parenti sull’industria globale della carne e le monocolture correlate in giro per il pianeta.

      https://www.internazionale.it/video/2018/05/16/contadini-mozambico-soia
      #vidéo

  • #Accaparement_de_terres : le groupe #Bolloré accepte de négocier avec les communautés locales
    –-> un article qui date de 2014, et qui peut intéresser notamment @odilon, mais aussi d’actualité vue la plainte de Balloré contre le journal pour diffamation. Et c’est le journal qui a gagné en Cour de cassation : https://www.bastamag.net/Bollore-perd-definitivement-son-premier-proces-en-diffamation-intente-a

    Des paysans et villageois du Sierra-Leone, de #Côte_d’Ivoire, du #Cameroun et du #Cambodge sont venus spécialement jusqu’à Paris. Pour la première fois, le groupe Bolloré et sa filiale luxembourgeoise #Socfin, qui gère des #plantations industrielles de #palmiers_à_huile et d’#hévéas (pour le #caoutchouc) en Afrique et en Asie, ont accepté de participer à des négociations avec les communautés locales fédérées en « alliance des riverains des plantations Bolloré-Socfin ». Sous la houlette d’une association grenobloise, Réseaux pour l’action collective transnationale (ReAct), une réunion s’est déroulée le 24 octobre, à Paris, avec des représentants du groupe Bolloré et des communautés touchées par ces plantations.

    Ces derniers dénoncent les conséquences de l’acquisition controversée des terres agricoles, en Afrique et en Asie. Ils pointent notamment du doigt des acquisitions foncières de la #Socfin qu’ils considèrent comme « un accaparement aveugle des terres ne laissant aux riverains aucun espace vital », en particulier pour leurs cultures vivrières. Ils dénoncent également la faiblesse des compensations accordées aux communautés et le mauvais traitement qui serait réservé aux populations. Les représentants africains et cambodgiens sont venus demander au groupe Bolloré et à la Socfin de garantir leur #espace_vital en rétrocédant les terres dans le voisinage immédiat des villages, et de stopper les expansions foncières qui auraient été lancées sans l’accord des communautés.

    https://www.bastamag.net/Accaparement-de-terres-le-groupe-Bollore-accepte-de-negocier-avec-les
    #terres #Sierra_Leone #huile_de_palme

    • Bolloré, #Crédit_agricole, #Louis_Dreyfus : ces groupes français, champions de l’accaparement de terres
      –-> encore un article de 2012

      Alors que 868 millions de personnes souffrent de sous-alimentation, selon l’Onu, l’accaparement de terres agricoles par des multinationales de l’#agrobusiness ou des fonds spéculatifs se poursuit. L’équivalent de trois fois l’Allemagne a ainsi été extorqué aux paysans africains, sud-américains ou asiatiques. Les plantations destinées à l’industrie remplacent l’agriculture locale. Plusieurs grandes entreprises françaises participent à cet accaparement, avec la bénédiction des institutions financières. Enquête.

      Au Brésil, le groupe français Louis Dreyfus, spécialisé dans le négoce des matières premières, a pris possession de près de 400 000 hectares de terres : l’équivalent de la moitié de l’Alsace, la région qui a vu naître l’empire Dreyfus, avec le commerce du blé au 19ème siècle. Ces terres sont destinées aux cultures de canne à sucre et de soja. Outre le Brésil, le discret empire commercial s’est accaparé, via ses filiales Calyx Agro ou LDC Bioenergia [1], des terres en Uruguay, en Argentine ou au Paraguay. Si Robert Louis Dreyfus, décédé en 2009, n’avait gagné quasiment aucun titre avec l’Olympique de Marseille, club dont il était propriétaire, il a fait de son groupe le champion français toute catégorie dans l’accaparement des terres.

      Le Groupe Louis-Dreyfus – 56 milliards d’euros de chiffre d’affaires [2] – achète, achemine et revend tout ce que la terre peut produire : blé, soja, café, sucre, huiles, jus d’orange, riz ou coton, dont il est le « leader » mondial via sa branche de négoce, Louis-Dreyfus Commodities. Son jus d’orange provient d’une propriété de 30 000 ha au Brésil. L’équivalent de 550 exploitations agricoles françaises de taille moyenne ! Il a ouvert en 2007 la plus grande usine au monde de biodiesel à base de soja, à Claypool, au Etats-Unis (Indiana). Il possède des forêts utilisées « pour la production d’énergie issue de la biomasse, l’énergie solaire, la géothermie et l’éolien ». Sans oublier le commerce des métaux, le gaz naturel, les produits pétroliers, le charbon et la finance.

      Course effrénée à l’accaparement de terres

      En ces périodes de tensions alimentaires et de dérèglements climatiques, c’est bien l’agriculture qui semble être l’investissement le plus prometteur. « En 5 ans, nous sommes passés de 800 millions à 6,3 milliards de dollars d’actifs industriels liés à l’agriculture », se réjouissait le directeur du conglomérat, Serge Schoen [3]. Le groupe Louis Dreyfus illustre la course effrénée à l’accaparement de terres agricoles dans laquelle se sont lancées de puissantes multinationales. Sa holding figure parmi les cinq premiers gros traders de matières premières alimentaires, avec Archer Daniels Midland (États-Unis), Bunge (basé aux Bermudes), Cargill (États-Unis) et le suisse Glencore. Ces cinq multinationales, à l’acronyme ABCD, font la pluie et le beau temps sur les cours mondiaux des céréales [4].

      L’exemple de Louis Dreyfus n’est pas isolé. États, entreprises publiques ou privées, fonds souverains ou d’investissements privés multiplient les acquisitions – ou les locations – de terres dans les pays du Sud ou en Europe de l’Est. Objectif : se lancer dans le commerce des agrocarburants, exploiter les ressources du sous-sol, assurer les approvisionnements alimentaires pour les États, voire bénéficier des mécanismes de financements mis en œuvre avec les marchés carbone. Ou simplement spéculer sur l’augmentation du prix du foncier. Souvent les agricultures paysannes locales sont remplacées par des cultures industrielles intensives. Avec, à la clé, expropriation des paysans, destruction de la biodiversité, pollution par les produits chimiques agricoles, développement des cultures OGM... Sans que les créations d’emplois ne soient au rendez-vous.

      Trois fois la surface agricole de la France

      Le phénomène d’accaparement est difficile à quantifier. De nombreuses transactions se déroulent dans le plus grand secret. Difficile également de connaître l’origine des capitaux. Une équipe de la Banque mondiale a tenté de mesurer le phénomène. En vain ! « Devant les difficultés opposées au recueil des informations nécessaires (par les États comme les acteurs privés), et malgré plus d’un an de travail, ces chercheurs ont dû pour l’évaluer globalement s’en remettre aux articles de presse », explique Mathieu Perdriault de l’association Agter.

      Selon la base de données Matrice foncière, l’accaparement de terres représenterait 83 millions d’hectares dans les pays en développement. L’équivalent de près de trois fois la surface agricole française (1,7% de la surface agricole mondiale) ! Selon l’ONG Oxfam, qui vient de publier un rapport à ce sujet, « une superficie équivalant à celle de Paris est vendue à des investisseurs étrangers toutes les 10 heures », dans les pays pauvres [5].

      L’Afrique, cible d’un néocolonialisme agricole ?

      L’Afrique, en particulier l’Afrique de l’Est et la République démocratique du Congo, est la région la plus convoitée, avec 56,2 millions d’hectares. Viennent ensuite l’Asie (17,7 millions d’ha), puis l’Amérique latine (7 millions d’ha). Pourquoi certains pays se laissent-il ainsi « accaparer » ? Sous prétexte d’attirer investissements et entreprises, les réglementations fiscales, sociales et environnementales des pays les plus pauvres sont souvent plus propices. Les investisseurs se tournent également vers des pays qui leur assurent la sécurité de leurs placements. Souvent imposées par les institutions financières internationales, des clauses garantissent à l’investisseur une compensation de la part de l’État « hôte » en cas d’expropriation. Des clauses qui peuvent s’appliquer même en cas de grèves ou de manifestations.

      Les acteurs de l’accaparement des terres, privés comme publics, sont persuadés – ou feignent de l’être – que seul l’agrobusiness pourra nourrir le monde en 2050. Leurs investissements visent donc à « valoriser » des zones qui ne seraient pas encore exploitées. Mais la réalité est tout autre, comme le montre une étude de la Matrice Foncière : 45% des terres faisant l’objet d’une transaction sont des terres déjà cultivées. Et un tiers des acquisitions sont des zones boisées, très rentables lorsqu’on y organise des coupes de bois à grande échelle. Des terres sont déclarées inexploitées ou abandonnées sur la foi d’imageries satellites qui ne prennent pas en compte les usages locaux des terres.

      40% des forêts du Liberia sont ainsi gérés par des permis à usage privés [6] (lire aussi notre reportage au Liberia). Ces permis, qui permettent de contourner les lois du pays, concernent désormais 20 000 km2. Un quart de la surface du pays ! Selon Oxfam, 60% des transactions ont eu lieu dans des régions « gravement touchées par le problème de la faim » et « plus des deux tiers étaient destinées à des cultures pouvant servir à la production d’agrocarburants comme le soja, la canne à sucre, l’huile de palme ou le jatropha ». Toujours ça que les populations locales n’auront pas...

      Quand AXA et la Société générale se font propriétaires terriens

      « La participation, largement médiatisée, des États au mouvement d’acquisition massive de terre ne doit pas masquer le fait que ce sont surtout les opérateurs privés, à la poursuite d’objectifs purement économiques et financiers, qui forment le gros bataillon des investisseurs », souligne Laurent Delcourt, chercheur au Cetri. Les entreprises publiques, liées à un État, auraient acheté 11,5 millions d’hectares. Presque trois fois moins que les investisseurs étrangers privés, propriétaires de 30,3 millions d’hectares. Soit la surface de l’Italie ! Si les entreprises états-uniennes sont en pointe, les Européens figurent également en bonne place.

      Banques et assurances françaises se sont jointes à cette course à la propriété terrienne mondiale. L’assureur AXA a investi 1,2 milliard de dollars dans la société minière britannique Vedanta Resources PLC, dont les filiales ont été accusées d’accaparement des terres [7]. AXA a également investi au moins 44,6 millions de dollars dans le fond d’investissement Landkom (enregistré dans l’île de Man, un paradis fiscal), qui loue des terres agricoles en Ukraine. Quant au Crédit Agricole, il a créé – avec la Société générale – le fonds « Amundi Funds Global Agriculture ». Ses 122 millions de dollars d’actifs sont investis dans des sociétés telles que Archer Daniels Midland ou Bunge, impliquées comme le groupe Louis Dreyfus dans l’acquisition de terres à grande échelle. Les deux banques ont également lancé le « Baring Global Agriculture Fund » (133,3 millions d’euros d’actifs) qui cible les sociétés agro-industrielles. Les deux établissement incitent activement à l’acquisition de terres, comme opportunité d’investissement. Une démarche socialement responsable ?

      Vincent Bolloré, gentleman farmer

      Après le groupe Louis Dreyfus, le deuxième plus gros investisseur français dans les terres agricoles se nomme Vincent Bolloré. Son groupe, via l’entreprise Socfin et ses filiales Socfinaf et Socfinasia, est présent dans 92 pays dont 43 en Afrique. Il y contrôle des plantations, ainsi que des secteurs stratégiques : logistique, infrastructures de transport, et pas moins de 13 ports, dont celui d’Abidjan. L’empire Bolloré s’est développée de façon spectaculaire au cours des deux dernières décennies « en achetant des anciennes entreprises coloniales, et [en] profitant de la vague de privatisations issue des "ajustements structurels" imposés par le Fonds monétaire international », constate le Think tank états-unien Oakland Institute.

      Selon le site du groupe, 150 000 hectares plantations d’huile de palme et d’hévéas, pour le caoutchouc, ont été acquis en Afrique et en Asie. L’équivalent de 2700 exploitations agricoles françaises ! Selon l’association Survie, ces chiffres seraient en deçà de la réalité. Le groupe assure ainsi posséder 9 000 ha de palmiers à huile et d’hévéas au Cameroun, là où l’association Survie en comptabilise 33 500.

      Expropriations et intimidations des populations

      Quelles sont les conséquences pour les populations locales ? Au Sierra Leone,
      Bolloré a obtenu un bail de 50 ans sur 20 000 hectares de palmier à huile et 10 000 hectares d’hévéas. « Bien que directement affectés, les habitants de la zone concernée semblent n’avoir été ni informés ni consultés correctement avant le lancement du projet : l’étude d’impact social et environnemental n’a été rendue publique que deux mois après la signature du contrat », raconte Yanis Thomas de l’association Survie. En 2011, les villageois tentent de bloquer les travaux sur la plantation. Quinze personnes « ont été inculpées de tapage, conspiration, menaces et libérées sous caution après une âpre bataille judiciaire. » Bolloré menace de poursuivre en justice pour diffamation The Oakland Institute, qui a publié un rapport en 2012 sur le sujet pour alerter l’opinion publique internationale.

      Au Libéria, le groupe Bolloré possède la plus grande plantation d’hévéas du pays, via une filiale, la Liberia Agricultural Company (LAC). En mai 2006, la mission des Nations Unies au Libéria (Minul) publiait un rapport décrivant les conditions catastrophiques des droits humains sur la plantation : travail d’enfants de moins de 14 ans, utilisation de produits cancérigènes, interdiction des syndicats, licenciements arbitraires, maintien de l’ordre par des milices privées, expulsion de 75 villages…. La LAC a qualifié les conclusions de la Minul « de fabrications pures et simples » et « d’exagérations excessives ». Ambiance... Plusieurs années après le rapport des Nations Unies, aucune mesure n’a été prise par l’entreprise ou le gouvernement pour répondre aux accusations.

      Une coopératives agricole qui méprise ses salariés

      Autre continent, mêmes critiques. Au Cambodge, la Socfinasia, société de droit luxembourgeois détenue notamment par le groupe Bolloré a conclu en 2007 un joint-venture qui gère deux concessions de plus de 7 000 hectares dans la région de Mondulkiri. La Fédération internationale des Droits de l’homme (FIDH) a publié en 2010 un rapport dénonçant les pratiques de la société Socfin-KCD. « Le gouvernement a adopté un décret spécial permettant l’établissement d’une concession dans une zone anciennement protégée, accuse la FIDH. Cette situation, en plus d’autres violations documentées du droit national et des contrats d’investissement, met en cause la légalité des concessions et témoigne de l’absence de transparence entourant le processus d’approbation de celles-ci. » Suite à la publication de ce rapport, la Socfin a menacé l’ONG de poursuites pour calomnie et diffamation.

      Du côté des industries du sucre, la situation n’est pas meilleure. Depuis 2007, le géant français du sucre et d’éthanol, la coopérative agricole Tereos, contrôle une société mozambicaine [8]. Tereos exploite la sucrerie de Sena et possède un bail de 50 ans (renouvelable) sur 98 000 hectares au Mozambique. Le contrat passé avec le gouvernement prévoit une réduction de 80% de l’impôt sur le revenu et l’exemption de toute taxe sur la distribution des dividendes. Résultat : Tereos International réalise un profit net de 194 millions d’euros en 2010, dont 27,5 millions d’euros ont été rapatriés en France sous forme de dividendes. « De quoi mettre du beurre dans les épinards des 12 000 coopérateurs français de Tereos », ironise le journaliste Fabrice Nicolino. Soit un dividende de 2 600 euros par agriculteur français membre de la coopérative. Pendant ce temps, au Mozambique, grèves et manifestations se sont succédé dans la sucrerie de Sena : bas salaires (48,4 euros/mois), absence d’équipements de protection pour les saisonniers, nappe phréatique polluée aux pesticides... Ce doit être l’esprit coopératif [9].

      Fermes et fazendas, nouvelles cibles de la spéculation

      Connues ou non, on ne compte plus les entreprises et les fonds d’investissement français qui misent sur les terres agricoles. Bonduelle, leader des légumes en conserve et congelés, possède deux fermes de 3 000 hectares en Russie où il cultive haricots, maïs et pois. La célèbre marque cherche à acquérir une nouvelle exploitation de 6 000 ha dans le pays. Fondée en 2007 par Jean-Claude Sabin, ancien président de la pieuvre Sofiproteol (aujourd’hui dirigée par Xavier Beulin président de la FNSEA), Agro-énergie Développement (AgroEd) investit dans la production d’agrocarburants et d’aliments dans les pays en développement. La société appartient à 51% au groupe d’investissement LMBO, dont l’ancien ministre de la Défense, Charles Millon, fut l’un des directeurs. Les acquisitions de terres agricoles d’AgroEd en Afrique de l’Ouest sont principalement destinées à la culture du jatropha, transformé ensuite en agrocarburants ou en huiles pour produits industriels. Mais impossible d’obtenir plus de précisions. Les sites internet de LMBO et AgroED sont plus que discrets sur le sujet. Selon une note de l’OCDE, AgroEd aurait signé un accord avec le gouvernement burkinabé concernant 200 000 hectares de Jatropha, en 2007, et négocient avec les gouvernements du Bénin, de Guinée et du Mali.

      « Compte tenu de l’endettement massif des États et des politiques monétaires très accommodantes, dans une optique de protection contre l’inflation, nous recommandons à nos clients d’investir dans des actifs réels et notamment dans les terres agricoles de pays sûrs, disposant de bonnes infrastructures, comme l’Argentine », confie au Figaro Franck Noël-Vandenberghe, le fondateur de Massena Partners. Ce gestionnaire de fortune français a crée le fond luxembourgeois Terra Magna Capital, qui a investi en 2011 dans quinze fermes en Argentine, au Brésil, au Paraguay et en Uruguay. Superficie totale : 70 500 hectares, trois fois le Val-de-Marne ! [10]

      Le maïs aussi rentable que l’or

      Conséquence de ce vaste accaparement : le remplacement de l’agriculture vivrière par la culture d’agrocarburants, et la spéculation financière sur les terres agricoles. Le maïs a offert, à égalité avec l’or, le meilleur rendement des actifs financiers sur ces cinq dernières années, pointe une étude de la Deutsche Bank. En juin et juillet 2012, les prix des céréales se sont envolés : +50 % pour le blé, +45% pour le maïs, +30 % pour le soja, qui a augmenté de 60 % depuis fin 2011 ! Les prix alimentaires devraient « rester élevés et volatils sur le long terme », prévoit la Banque mondiale. Pendant ce temps, plus d’un milliard d’individus souffrent de la faim. Non pas à cause d’une pénurie d’aliments mais faute d’argent pour les acheter.

      Qu’importe ! Au nom du développement, l’accaparement des terres continuent à être encouragé – et financé ! – par les institutions internationales. Suite aux famines et aux émeutes de la faim en 2008, la Banque mondiale a créé un « Programme d’intervention en réponse à la crise alimentaire mondiale » (GFRP). Avec plus de 9 milliards de dollars en 2012, son fonds de « soutien » au secteur agricole a plus que doublé en quatre ans. Via sa Société financière internationale (SFI), l’argent est distribué aux acteurs privés dans le cadre de programme aux noms prometteurs : « Access to land » (accès à la terre) ou « Land market for investment » (marché foncier pour l’investissement).

      Des placements financiers garantis par la Banque mondiale

      Les deux organismes de la Banque mondiale, SFI et FIAS (Service Conseil pour l’Investissement Étranger) facilitent également les acquisitions en contribuant aux grandes réformes législatives permettant aux investisseurs privés de s’installer au Sierra Leone, au Rwanda, au Liberia ou au Burkina Faso… Quels que soient les continents, « la Banque mondiale garantit nos actifs par rapport au risque politique », explique ainsi l’homme d’affaire états-unien Neil Crowder à la BBC en mars 2012, qui rachète des petites fermes en Bulgarie pour constituer une grosse exploitation. « Notre assurance contre les risques politiques nous protège contre les troubles civils ou une impossibilité d’utiliser nos actifs pour une quelconque raison ou en cas d’expropriation. »

      Participation au capital des fonds qui accaparent des terres, conseils et assistances techniques aux multinationales pour améliorer le climat d’investissement des marchés étrangers, négociations d’accords bilatéraux qui créent un environnement favorable aux transactions foncières : la Banque mondiale et d’autres institutions publiques – y compris l’Agence française du développement – favorisent de fait « la concentration du pouvoir des grandes firmes au sein du système agroalimentaire, (...) la marchandisation de la terre et du travail et la suppression des interventions publiques telles que le contrôle des prix ou les subventions aux petits exploitants », analyse Elisa Da Via, sociologue du développement [11].

      Oxfam réclame de la Banque mondiale « un gel pour six mois de ses investissements dans des terres agricoles » des pays en développement, le temps d’adopter « des mesures d’encadrement plus rigoureuses pour prévenir l’accaparement des terres ». Que pense en France le ministère de l’Agriculture de ces pratiques ? Il a présenté en septembre un plan d’action face à la hausse du prix des céréales. Ses axes prioritaires : l’arrêt provisoire du développement des agrocarburants et la mobilisation du G20 pour « assurer une bonne coordination des politiques des grands acteurs des marchés agricoles » Des annonces bien vagues face à l’ampleur des enjeux : qui sont ces « grands acteurs des marchés agricoles » ? S’agit-il d’aider les populations rurales des pays pauvres à produire leurs propres moyens de subsistance ou de favoriser les investissements de l’agrobusiness et des fonds spéculatifs sous couvert de politique de développement et de lutte contre la malnutrition ? Les dirigeants français préfèrent regarder ailleurs, et stigmatiser l’immigration.

      Nadia Djabali, avec Agnès Rousseaux et Ivan du Roy

      Photos : © Eric Garault
      P.-S.

      – L’ONG Grain a publié en mars 2012 un tableau des investisseurs

      – La rapport d’Oxfam, « Notre terre, notre vie » - Halte à la ruée mondiale sur les terres, octobre 2012

      – Le rapport des Amis de la Terre Europe (en anglais), janvier 2012 : How European banks, pension funds and insurance companies are increasing global hunger and poverty by speculating on food prices and financing land grabs in poorer countries.

      – Un observatoire de l’accaparement des terres

      – A lire : Emprise et empreinte de l’agrobusiness, aux Editions Syllepse.
      Notes

      [1] « En octobre 2009, LDC Bioenergia de Louis Dreyfus Commodities a fusionné avec Santelisa Vale, un important producteur de canne à sucre brésilien, pour former LDC-SEV, dont Louis Dreyfus détient 60% », indique l’ONG Grain.

      [2] Le groupe Louis Dreyfus ne publie pas de résultats détaillés. Il aurait réalisé en 2010 un chiffre d’affaires de 56 milliards d’euros, selon L’Agefi, pour un bénéfice net de 590 millions d’euros. La fortune de Margarita Louis Dreyfus, présidente de la holding, et de ses trois enfants, a été évaluée par le journal Challenges à 6,6 milliards d’euros.

      [3] Dans Le Nouvel Observateur.

      [4] L’ONG Oxfam a publié en août 2012 un rapport (en anglais) décrivant le rôle des ABCD.

      [5] Selon Oxfam, au cours des dix dernières années, une surface équivalente à huit fois la superficie du Royaume-Uni a été vendue à l’échelle mondiale. Ces terres pourraient permettre de subvenir aux besoins alimentaires d’un milliard de personnes.

      [6] D’après les ONG Global Witness, Save My Future Foundation (SAMFU) et Sustainable Development Institute (SDI).

      [7] Source : Rapport des Amis de la Terre Europe.

      [8] Sena Holdings Ltd, via sa filiale brésilienne Açúcar Guaraní.

      [9] Une autre coopérative agricole, Vivescia (Ex-Champagne Céréales), spécialisée dans les céréales, investit en Ukraine aux côtés Charles Beigbeder, fondateur de Poweo (via un fonds commun, AgroGeneration). Ils y disposent de 50 000 hectares de terres agricoles en location.

      [10] La liste des entreprises françaises dans l’accaparement des terres n’est pas exhaustive : Sucres & Denrée (Sucden) dans les régions russes de Krasnodar, Campos Orientales en Argentine et en Uruguay, Sosucam au Cameroun, la Compagnie Fruitière qui cultive bananes et ananas au Ghana…

      [11] Emprise et empreinte de l’agrobusiness, aux Editions Syllepse.


      https://www.bastamag.net/Bollore-Credit-agricole-Louis
      #Françafrique #France #spéculation #finance #économie #Brésil #Louis-Dreyfus #Calyx_Agro #LDC_Bioenergia #Uruguay #Argentine #Paraguay #biodiesel #Louis-Dreyfus_Commodities #soja #USA #Etats-Unis #Claypool #agriculture #ABCD #Liberia #AXA #Société_générale #banques #assurances #Landkom #Ukraine #Amundi_Funds_Global_Agriculture #Archer_Daniels_Midland #Bunge #Baring_Global_Agriculture_Fund #Socfinaf #Socfinasia #Liberia_Agricultural_Company #Mondulkiri #éthanol #sucre #Tereos #Sena #Mozambique #Bonduelle #Russie #haricots #maïs #pois #Agro-énergie_Développement #AgroEd # LMBO #Charles_Millon #jatropha #Bénin #Guinée #Mali #Massena_Partners #Terra_Magna_Capital #Franck_Noël-Vandenberghe #agriculture_vivrière #prix_alimentaires #Société_financière_internationale #Access_to_land #Land_market_for_investment #Banque_mondiale #SFI #FIAS #Sierra_Leone #Rwanda #Burkina_Faso #Bulgarie

    • Crime environnemental : sur la piste de l’huile de palme

      L’huile de palme est massivement importée en Europe. Elle sert à la composition d’aliments comme aux agrocarburants. Avec le soutien de la région Languedoc-Roussillon, une nouvelle raffinerie devrait voir le jour à Port-la-Nouvelle, dans l’Aude. À l’autre bout de la filière, en Afrique de l’Ouest, l’accaparement de terres par des multinationales, avec l’expropriation des populations, bat son plein. Basta ! a remonté la piste du business de l’huile de palme jusqu’au #Liberia. Enquête.

      Quel est le point commun entre un résident de Port-la-Nouvelle, petite ville méditerranéenne à proximité de Narbonne (Aude), et un villageois du comté de Grand Cape Mount, au Liberia ? Réponse : une matière première très controversée, l’huile de palme, et une multinationale malaisienne, #Sime_Darby. D’un côté, des habitants de Port-la-Nouvelle voient d’un mauvais œil la création d’« une usine clés en main de fabrication d’huile de palme » par Sime Darby, en partie financée par le conseil régional du Languedoc-Roussillon. À 6 000 km de là, les paysans libériens s’inquiètent d’une immense opération d’accaparement des terres orchestrée par le conglomérat malaisien, en vue d’exploiter l’huile de palme et de l’exporter vers l’Europe, jusqu’à Port-la-Nouvelle en l’occurrence. Un accaparement de terres qui pourrait déboucher sur des déplacements forcés de population et mettre en danger leur agriculture de subsistance.

      Le petit port de l’Aude devrait donc accueillir une raffinerie d’huile de palme. Deux compagnies, la néerlandaise #Vopak et le malaisien #Unimills – filiale du groupe Sime Darby – sont sur les rangs, prêtes à investir 120 millions d’euros, venant s’ajouter aux 170 millions d’euros du conseil régional. La Région promet la création de 200 emplois, quand Sime Darby en annonce 50 pour cette usine qui prévoit d’importer 2 millions de tonnes d’huile de palme par an [1].

      Du Languedoc-Roussillon au Liberia

      Une perspective loin de réjouir plusieurs habitants réunis au sein du collectif No Palme [2]. Ces riverains d’une zone Seveso ont toujours en tête l’importante explosion de juillet 2010 dans la zone portuaire, après qu’un camion transportant du GPL se soit renversé. « La population n’a jamais été consultée ni informée de ce projet de raffinerie, relève Pascal Pavie, de la fédération Nature et Progrès. Ces installations présentent pourtant un risque industriel surajouté. » Le mélange du nitrate d’ammonium – 1 500 tonnes acheminées chaque mois à Port-la-Nouvelle – avec de l’huile végétale constituerait un explosif cocktail. Avec les allers et venues de 350 camions supplémentaires par jour. Cerise sur le gâteau, l’extension du port empièterait sur une zone côtière riche en biodiversité. « Notre collectif s’est immédiatement intéressé au versant international et européen de ce projet », explique Pascal.

      L’opérateur du projet, Sime Darby, est un immense conglomérat malaisien, se présentant comme « le plus grand producteur mondial d’huile de palme ». Présent dans 21 pays, il compte plus de 740 000 hectares de plantations, dont plus d’un tiers au Liberia. Et c’est là que remonte la piste de l’huile que l’usine devra raffiner.

      De Monrovia, la capitale, elle mène à Medina, une ville de Grand Cape Mount. D’immenses panneaux de Sime Darby promettent « un avenir durable ». Scrupuleusement gardés par des forces de sécurité privées recrutées par la compagnie, quelques bâtiments en béton émergent au milieu des pépinières d’huile de palme. C’est là que les futurs employés pourront venir vivre avec leurs familles. 57 « villages de travail » seront construits d’ici à 2025, promet la firme. Mais quid des habitants qui ne travailleront pas dans les plantations ? L’ombre d’un déplacement forcé de populations plane. « Quand Sime Darby a commencé à s’installer, ils ont dit qu’ils nous fourniraient des centres médicaux, des écoles, du logement… Mais nous n’avons rien vu, se désole Radisson, un jeune habitant de Medina qui a travaillé pour l’entreprise. Comment pourraient-ils nous déplacer alors qu’aucune infrastructure n’est prévue pour nous accueillir ? »

      Agriculture familiale menacée

      Le village de Kon Town est désormais entouré par les plantations. Seuls 150 mètres séparent les maisons des pépinières d’huile de palme. « Le gouvernement a accordé des zones de concession à la compagnie sans se rendre sur le terrain pour faire la démarcation », déplore Jonathan Yiah, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Un accaparement qui priverait les habitants des terres cultivables nécessaires à leur subsistance. Les taux d’indemnisation pour la perte de terres et de cultures sont également sous-évalués. « Comment vais-je payer les frais scolaires de mes enfants maintenant ? », s’insurge une habitante qui ne reçoit qu’un seul sac de riz pour une terre qui, auparavant, donnait du manioc, de l’ananas et du gombo à foison.

      La compagnie Sime Darby se défend de vouloir déplacer les communautés. Pourtant, un extrait de l’étude d’impact environnemental, financée par la compagnie elle-même, mentionne clairement la possibilité de réinstallation de communautés, si ces dernières « entravent le développement de la plantation » [3]. Du côté des autorités, on dément. Cecil T.O. Brandy, de la Commission foncière du Liberia, assure que le gouvernement fait tout pour « minimiser et décourager tout déplacement. Si la compagnie peut réhabiliter ou restaurer certaines zones, ce sera préférable ». Faux, rétorque les Amis de la Terre Liberia. « En laissant une ville au milieu d’une zone de plantations, et seulement 150 mètres autour pour cultiver, plutôt que de leur dire de quitter cette terre, on sait que les habitants finiront par le faire volontairement », dénonce James Otto, de l’ONG. Pour les 10 000 hectares déjà défrichés, l’association estime que 15 000 personnes sont d’ores et déjà affectées.

      Des emplois pas vraiment durables

      L’emploi créé sera-t-il en mesure de compenser le désastre environnemental généré par l’expansion des monocultures ? C’est ce qu’espère une partie de la population du comté de Grand Cape Mount, fortement touchée par le chômage. Sime Darby déclare avoir déjà embauché plus de 2 600 travailleurs permanents, auxquels s’ajouteraient 500 travailleurs journaliers. Quand l’ensemble des plantations seront opérationnelles, « Sime Darby aura créé au moins 35 000 emplois », promet la firme. Augustine, un jeune de Kon Town, y travaille depuis deux ans. D’abord sous-traitant, il a fini par être embauché par la compagnie et a vu son salaire grimper de 3 à 5 dollars US pour huit heures de travail par jour. Tout le monde ne semble pas avoir cette « chance » : 90 % du personnel de l’entreprise disposent de contrats à durée déterminée – trois mois en général – et sous-payés ! Les chiffres varient selon les témoignages, de 50 cents à 3 dollars US par jour, en fonction de la récolte réalisée. « Dans quelle mesure ces emplois sont-ils durables ?, interroge Jonathan, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Une fois que les arbres seront plantés et qu’ils commenceront à pousser, combien d’emplois l’entreprise pourra-t-elle maintenir ? »

      L’opacité entourant le contrat liant le gouvernement à Sime Darby renforce les tensions [4]. Malgré l’adoption d’une loi sur les droits des communautés, les communautés locales n’ont pas été informées, encore moins consultées. « Sime Darby s’est entretenu uniquement avec les chefs des communautés, raconte Jonathan Yiah. Or, la communauté est une unité diversifiée qui rassemble aussi des femmes, des jeunes, qui ont été écartés du processus de consultation. »

      Contrat totalement opaque

      Même de nombreux représentants d’agences gouvernementales ou de ministères ignorent tout du contenu du contrat, certains nous demandant même de leur procurer une copie. C’est ainsi que notre interlocuteur au ministère des Affaires intérieures a découvert qu’une partie du contrat portait sur le marché des crédits carbone. Des subventions qui iront directement dans la poche de la multinationale, comme le mentionne cet extrait en page 52 du contrat : « Le gouvernement inconditionnellement et irrévocablement (...) renonce, en faveur de l’investisseur, à tout droit ou revendication sur les droits du carbone. »

      « C’est à se demander si les investisseurs son vraiment intéressés par l’huile de palme ou par les crédits carbone », ironise Alfred Brownell, de l’ONG Green Advocates. « Nous disons aux communautés que ce n’est pas seulement leurs terres qui leur sont enlevées, ce sont aussi les bénéfices qui en sont issus », explique Jonathan Yiah.

      La forêt primaire remplacée par l’huile de palme ?

      Les convoitises de la multinationale s’étendent bien au-delà. Le militant écologiste organise depuis des mois des réunions publiques avec les habitants du comté de Gbarpolu, plus au nord. Cette région abrite une grande partie de la forêt primaire de Haute-Guinée. Sime Darby y a obtenu une concession de 159 827 hectares… Du contrat, les habitants ne savaient rien, jusqu’à ce que les Amis de la Terre Liberia viennent le leur présenter. La question de la propriété foncière revient sans cesse. « Comment le gouvernement peut-il céder nos terres à une compagnie alors même que nous détenons des titres de propriété ? », interrogent-ils. La crainte relative à la perte de leurs forêts, de leurs terres agricoles, d’un sol riche en or et en diamants s’installe.

      Lors d’une réunion, au moment où James énonce la durée du contrat, 63 ans – reconductible 30 ans ! –, c’est la colère qui prend le pas. « Que deviendront mes enfants au terme de ces 63 années de contrat avec Sime Darby ? », se désespère Kollie, qui a toujours vécu de l’agriculture, comme 70 % de la population active du pays. Parmi les personnes présentes, certaines, au contraire, voient dans la venue de Sime Darby la promesse d’investissements dans des hôpitaux, des écoles, des routes, mais aussi dans de nouveaux systèmes d’assainissement en eau potable. Et, déjà, la peur de nouveaux conflits germent. « Nous ne voulons de personne ici qui ramène du conflit parmi nous », lance Frederick. Les plaies des deux guerres civiles successives (1989-1996, puis 2001-2003) sont encore ouvertes. Près d’un million de personnes, soit un Libérien sur trois, avaient alors fui vers les pays voisins.

      Mea culpa gouvernemental

      « En signant une série de contrats à long terme accordant des centaines de milliers d’hectares à des conglomérats étrangers, le gouvernement voulait relancer l’économie et l’emploi, analyse James, des Amis de la Terre Liberia. Mais il n’a pas vu toutes les implications ». D’après un rapport de janvier 2012 réalisé par le Centre international de résolution des conflits, près de 40 % de la population libérienne vivraient à l’intérieur de concessions privées ! Aux côtés de Sime Darby, deux autres compagnies, la britannique Equatorial Palm Oil et l’indonésienne Golden Veroleum, ont acquis respectivement 169 000 et 240 000 hectares pour planter de l’huile de palme.

      Dans le comté de Grand Cape Mount, en décembre 2011, des habitants se sont saisis des clés des bulldozers de Sime Darby afin d’empêcher la poursuite de l’expansion des plantations et d’exiger des négociations. Une équipe interministérielle a depuis été mise en place, où siègent des citoyens du comté. « Oui, il y a eu des erreurs dans l’accord », reconnait-on à la Commission foncière. « Nous essayons de trouver des solutions pour que chacun en sorte gagnant », renchérit-on au ministère des Affaires intérieures. Difficile à croire pour les habitants du comté, qui n’ont rien vu, jusque-là, des grandes promesses philanthropes de Sime Darby.

      De l’huile de palme dans les agrocarburants

      Et si le changement venait des pays où l’on consomme de l’huile de palme ? Retour dans l’Aude, au pied du massif des Corbières. En décembre 2011, Sime Darby a annoncé geler pour un an son projet d’implantation de raffinerie à Port-la-Nouvelle. Les prévisions de commandes d’huile de palme sont en baisse, alors que le coût de l’usine grimpe. L’huile de palme commence à souffrir de sa mauvaise réputation, alimentaire et environnementale. De nombreuses marques l’ont retirée de la composition de leurs produits. L’huile de palme contribuerait à la malbouffe. Une fois solidifiée par injection d’hydrogène, elle regorge d’acides gras qui s’attaquent aux artères : un cauchemar pour les nutritionnistes. Dans les enseignes bios, elle commence également à être pointée du doigt comme l’une des causes de la déforestation, en Indonésie, en Afrique ou en Amérique latine. Pourtant, bien que la grande distribution réduise son besoin en huile de palme, cette dernière demeure aujourd’hui, et de loin, la première huile végétale importée en Europe. Merci les agrocarburants…

      « La consommation moyenne d’un Européen est d’environ 12 litres/an d’huile de palme, ce qui représente un accaparement d’environ 25 m2 de plantation de palmiers à huile dans un autre pays », souligne Sylvain Angerand, des Amis de la Terre France. « Relocaliser l’économie, développer les transports en commun, lutter contre l’étalement urbain seraient autant de mesures structurelles permettant de réduire notre consommation de carburant », propose l’écologiste. Réduire nos besoins ici, en Europe, pourrait diminuer partiellement l’accaparement des terres dans le Sud. À Port-la-Nouvelle, le collectif No Palme planche déjà sur des plans de développement alternatif pour le port. Avec en tête, les témoignages de leurs compères libériens.

      https://www.bastamag.net/Crime-environnemental-sur-la-piste

  • Kruger’s contested borderlands. Are #eco-cocoons the solution to poaching ?

    #Buffer_zones along the border of #Kruger_National_Park target wildlife poaching. Displaced communities say it’s a land grab by rich foreigners aided by corrupt politicians. Estacio Valoi investigates.

    About 2,000 families have been resettled in eight villages in the Eduardo Mondlane neighbourhood of Massingir, according to Anastácio Matável, executive director of the Forum of Non-governmental Organisations of Gaza (FONGA). Five communities, comprising 13,300 families, are still living inside the park and are awaiting resettlement.

    Matável described the resettlement as “a failed process. First 18 houses were built, then 50 houses. Then the local government tried to finance the project through the National Disaster Management Institute, but it failed.

    “There was no more money and the buildings were rejected by the communities. They also failed to take into consideration cultural aspects such as who should live together. Numbers of women and children all live one small hut.”


    https://pulitzercenter.storylab.africa/dominion
    #Mozambique #Afrique_du_sud #parc_national #frontières #rhinos #rhinocéros #zones_tampons #terres #accaparement_de_terres #écologie (les dérives de l’écologie) #géographie_culturelle (notamment pour ce qui est en lien avec la #représentation de la #nature, par exemple) #corruption #Cubo #Adolof_Bila #néo-colonialisme #Limpopo_National_Park #expulsion #tourisme #business #conservation_de_la_nature #braconnage #murs #barrières_frontalières #Nkanhine #riches #richesse #inégalités #écotourisme #twin_city #Twin_City_Development #Massingir #African_Wildlife_Foundation #Balule_Lodge #Zimbabwe #Gonarezhou_National_Park #canne_à_sucre #ProCana #industrie_du_sucre #éthanol #énergie #Bioenergy #Sable_Mining #Massingir_Agro_Industrial #eau #irrigation #Xonghile_Game_Park #Karangani_Game_Reserve #Singita #Luke_Bailes
    #Bedari_Foundation #Mangondzo_reserve #réserve_naturelle #Masintonto_Eco-Turismo #Sabie_Game_Park
    signalé par @fil sur twitter

  • Les activités minières irresponsables d’une entreprise chinoise menacent d’anéantir un village côtier

    À cause des activités minières irresponsables d’une entreprise chinoise au Mozambique, tout un village côtier de plus de 1000 habitants risque d’être englouti par l’océan Indien.

    https://www.amnesty.ch/fr/pays/afrique/mozambique/docs/2018/les-activites-minieres-irresponsables-d-une-entreprise-chinoise-menacent-d-a
    #Chinafrique #Mozambique #mines #extractivisme #Chine #Nagonha

    cc @albertocampiphoto @daphne

  • Mozambique: Another Norfund Fiasco as Matanuska Goes Bust - allAfrica.com
    http://allafrica.com/stories/201803260872.html

    The banana plantation in Monapo, Nampula, that was supposed to be a model for foreign farm investment and was promoted by Norfund, has finally gone bankrupt (@ Verdade, 16 March), at huge cost to Mozambique. Norfund is Norway’s government owned development finance institution which is funded from the aid budget, and has had a string of failures in Mozambique.

    Matanuska was one-third Norfund ($27 mn invested) and two-thirds Rift Valley, It started in 2008, and at the peak had 2500 workers and was exporting 1400 tonnes of bananas a day. However, in 2013 the plantation was found to have Panama disease, which had never been seen in Africa before and devastates the bananas. Panama disease is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum which lives in soil and enters the plant through the root, blocking the flow of water and nutrients. The fungus lasts in soil for decades and cannot be managed with chemical fungicides. It is easily transmitted in dirt on shoes and car tyres, and is probably impossible to control. Over the next few years it will probably spread across #Mozambique.

    #plantation #banane #maladie #agroindustrie

  • The Emergence of Violent Extremism in Northern #Mozambique

    The emergence of a new militant Islamist group in northern Mozambique raises a host of concerns over the influence of international jihadist ideology, social and economic marginalization of local Muslim communities, and a heavy-handed security response.

    https://africacenter.org/spotlight/the-emergence-of-violent-extremism-in-northern-mozambique
    #djihadisme #ISIS #EI #islamisme

    @reka : faut mettre à jour la carte ?

  • Who Is Responsible for the Avalanche of Garbage That Killed 16 in #Mozambique? · Global Voices

    https://globalvoices.org/2018/02/27/who-is-responsible-for-the-avalanche-of-garbage-that-killed-16-in-moza

    Mozambique’s government is set to speed up closure of the country’s largest waste disposal site, following the collapse of a mound of rubbish that led to the deaths of 16 people on 19 February. The tragedy exposed the poor waste management in the capital Maputo, as well as the precarious situation of the hundreds of garbage collectors living near the site.

    #avalanche_de_déchets #environnement #pollution #waste

  • Je viens de mettre sur seenthis un rapport sur les passeurs dans la #Corne_de_l'Afrique, c’est ici :
    http://seen.li/e71e

    Je remets ici un tableau que j’ai trouvé dans le rapport. Il concerne le nombre de #morts / #décès de migrants dans cette région d’Afrique (en fait, ce tableau considère une région plus large que la Corne de l’Afrique). Je peux me tromper, mais je n’ai jamais vu passer cette info avant.
    Voici le tableau :


    #mourir_aux_frontières #statistiques #chiffres #Soudan #Libye #Egypte #Yémen #Somalie #Ethiopie #Tanzanie #Erythrée #Mozambique #Kenya #Afrique_de_l'Est #Zimbabwe #Djibouti #Malawi

    Les trois tableaux sont construits un peu bizarrement, car tout le rapport est basé sur des questionnaires, et je n’ai pas le temps de trop regarder la méthodo, mais je mets ici dans le cas où de bonnes âmes de seenthis ont envie de voir un peu plus clair... Le rapport c’est par ici : http://regionalmms.org/images/briefing/RMMS%20BriefingPaper6%20-%20Unpacking%20the%20Myths.pdf

    cc @reka @simplicissimus

  • Impunité des multinationales : les victimes de ProSavana au Mozambique (...) - CCFD-Terre Solidaire
    https://ccfd-terresolidaire.org/infos/rse/traite-onu/impunite-des-5949

    Erika Mendes, est chargée de plaidoyer à Justiça Ambiental au Mozambique, organisation partenaire du CCFD-Terre Solidaire. Elle sera présente à Genève du 23 au 27 octobre 2017 pour défendre un #traité onusien contre l’impunité des #multinationales. Elle suit de près le projet #ProSavana et nous livre son témoignage en avant-première.

    Le projet ProSavana a été lancé en 2009 par les gouvernements du #Mozambique, du Brésil et du Japon. Il a été présenté comme un moyen de moderniser l’#agriculture au #Mozambique. Pourtant, quelques années plus tard, les violations des droits humains sont nombreuses.

    #Expropriations et #pollution

    Financé par le Brésil et le Japon, ce projet doit se déployer le long du « Corridor de #Nacala » dans le centre et le nord du pays. Dans cette région vivent de nombreuses communautés de paysans, soit 4 millions de familles, qui pratiquent l’agriculture familiale. L’arrivée d’investisseurs souhaitant développer l’agriculture industrielle suscite de nombreuses craintes. Les paysans ont peur d’être expropriés au profit de la mise en culture de parcelles dédiées à la #monoculture. Pour la plupart d’entre eux, une expropriation les priverait de moyens d’existence.

    Le processus a déjà commencé dans la province de Nampula. L’usage intensif des #pesticides et #fertilisants_chimiques a parallèlement entraîné la pollution des ressources en #eau et une dégradation des #sols.

    #terres

  • Gouverner l’#agriculture grâce aux modèles ? Le cas du #CAADP au #Mozambique

    Les politiques agricoles africaines alignées sur le Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) sont coproduites avec des modèles économiques. Les modèles sont devenus hégémoniques dans un contexte de dépendance à l’Aide au Développement et de socialisation des élites par la modélisation économique. À partir de la littérature grise et d’observations au Mozambique, nous analysons le rôle de la modélisation dans la fabrique de ces politiques. À contrepied des objectifs d’appropriation, d’efficience et d’allocation raisonnée des fonds, on observe un dédoublement des objectifs affichés et de ceux mis en œuvre. Le CAADP et la modélisation apparaissent alors comme un dispositif instrumentalisé par des élites politiques et agroindustrielles. Ce dispositif contribue ainsi à la reproduction de stratégies économiques et politiques qu’il annonçait dépasser. Nos observations appellent à réinterroger les appropriations multiples de la modélisation et les effets des politiques agricoles promues.

    http://cybergeo.revues.org/28477
    #modélisation