• Opinion | When Your Money Is So Tainted Museums Don’t Want It - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/16/opinion/sunday/met-sackler.html

    “Gifts that are not in the public interest.” It is a pregnant, important phrase. Coming on the heels of similar decisions by the Tate Modern in London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, the spurning of Oxy-cash seems to reflect a growing awareness that gifts to the arts and other good causes are not only a way for ultra-wealthy people to scrub their consciences and reputations. Philanthropy can also be central to purchasing the immunity needed to profiteer at the expense of the common welfare.

    Perhaps accepting tainted money in such cases isn’t just giving people a pass. Perhaps it is enabling misconduct against the public.

    This was the startling assertion made by New York State in its civil complaint, filed in March, against members of the Sackler family and others involved in the opioid crisis. It accused defendants of seeking to “profiteer from the plague they knew would be unleashed.” And the lawsuit explicitly linked Sackler do-gooding with Sackler harm-doing: “Ultimately, the Sacklers used their ill-gotten wealth to cover up their misconduct with a philanthropic campaign intending to whitewash their decades-long success in profiting at New Yorkers’ expense.”

    “No amount of charity in spending such fortunes can compensate in any way for the misconduct in acquiring them,” Theodore Roosevelt said after John D. Rockefeller proposed starting a foundation in 1909. It was not a lonely thought at the time.

    But in the decades since, not least because of the amount of philanthropic coin that has been spent (can it still be called bribing when millions are the recipients?), touching all corners of our cultural life, attitudes have changed. And, as I found in spending the last few years reporting on nonprofits and foundations, a deeply complicit silence took hold: It was understood that you don’t challenge people on how they make their money, how they pay their taxes (or don’t), what continuing deeds they may be engaged in — so long as they “give back.”

    #Opioides #Sackler #Musées #Philanthropie


  • The Met Will Turn Down Sackler Money Amid Fury Over the Opioid Crisis - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/15/arts/design/met-museum-sackler-opioids.html

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art said on Wednesday that it would stop accepting gifts from members of the Sackler family linked to the maker of OxyContin, severing ties between one of the world’s most prestigious museums and one of its most prolific philanthropic dynasties.

    The decision was months in the making, and followed steps by other museums, including the Tate Modern in London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, to distance themselves from the family behind Purdue Pharma. On Wednesday, the American Museum of Natural History said that it, too, had ceased taking Sackler donations.

    The moves reflect the growing outrage over the role the Sacklers may have played in the opioid crisis, as well as an energized activist movement that is starting to force museums to reckon with where some of their money comes from.

    “The museum takes a position of gratitude and respect to those who support us, but on occasion, we feel it’s necessary to step away from gifts that are not in the public interest, or in our institution’s interest,” said Daniel H. Weiss, the president of the Met. “That is what we’re doing here.”

    “There really aren’t that many people who are giving to art and giving to museums, in fact it’s a very small club,” said Tom Eccles, the executive director of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. “So we have to be a little careful what we wish for here.”

    There is also the difficult question of where to draw a line. What sort of behavior is inexcusable?

    “We are not a partisan organization, we are not a political organization, so we don’t have a litmus test for whom we take gifts from based on policies or politics,” said Mr. Weiss of the Met. “If there are people who want to support us, for the most part we are delighted.”

    “We would only not accept gifts from people if it in some way challenges or is counter to the core mission of the institution, in exceptional cases,” he added. “The OxyContin crisis in this country is a legitimate and full-blown crisis.”

    Three brothers, Arthur, Mortimer and Raymond Sackler, bought a small company called Purdue Frederick in 1952 and transformed it into the pharmaceutical giant it is today. In 1996, Purdue Pharma put the opioid painkiller OxyContin on the market, fundamentally altering the company’s fortunes.

    The family’s role in the marketing of OxyContin, and in the opioid crisis, has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. Documents submitted this year as part of litigation by the attorney general of Massachusetts allege that members of the Sackler family directed the company’s efforts to mislead the public about the dangers of the highly addictive drug. The company has denied the allegations and said it “neither created nor caused the opioid epidemic.”

    Nan Goldin, a photographer who overcame an OxyContin addiction, has led demonstrations at institutions that receive Sackler money; in March 2018, she and her supporters dumped empty pill bottles in the Sackler Wing’s reflecting pool.

    “We commend the Met for making the ethical, moral decision to refuse future funding from the Sacklers,” a group started by Ms. Goldin, Prescription Addiction Intervention Now, or PAIN, said in a statement. “Fourteen months after staging our first protest there, we’re gratified to know that our voices have been heard.”

    The group also called for the removal of the Sackler name from buildings the family has bankrolled. Mr. Weiss said that the museum would not take the more drastic step of taking the family’s name off the wing, saying that it was not in a position to make permanent changes while litigation against the family was pending and information was still coming to light.

    The Met also said that its board had voted to codify how the museum accepts named gifts, formalizing a longstanding practice of circulating those proposals through a chain of departments. The decision on the Sacklers, Mr. Weiss said, was made by the Met leadership in consultation with the board.

    #Opioides #Sackler #Musées


  • Tate Galleries Will Refuse Sackler Money Because of Opioid Links - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/21/arts/design/tate-modern-sackler-britain-opioid-art.html

    “The Sackler family has given generously to Tate in the past, as they have to a large number of U.K. arts institutions,” a Tate statement said.

    "We do not intend to remove references to this historic philanthropy. However, in the present circumstances we do not think it right to seek or accept further donations from the Sacklers.”

    Si je comprends bien, cela veut dire qu’ils ne retireront pas le nom des Sackler des lieux déjà sponsorisés... futilités.

    Tate’s statement came two days after Britain’s National Portrait Gallery said it would not accept a long-discussed $1.3 million donation from the London-based Sackler Trust, one of the family’s charitable foundations. It said the decision was taken jointly by the gallery and Trust.

    But the Thursday announcement, affecting Tate Modern and Tate Britain in London, as well as Tate Liverpool and Tate St. Ives in Cornwall, could have a bigger impact in the art world. All these galleries are major tourist attractions as well as home to large, high-profile exhibitions.

    In an email, a spokesman for the Mortimer and Raymond Sackler family said, “We deeply sympathise with all the communities, families and individuals affected by the addiction crisis in America. The allegations made against family members in relation to this are strongly denied and will be vigorously defended in court.” He did not comment on Tate’s decision.

    Ne parlons pas du Valium, qui fut la première cause des richesse de la famille Sackler. Surtout pas. Une drogue à la fois, isn’t it ? Quinze ans plus tôt.

    “The Sackler family has been connected with the Met for more than a half century,” Mr. Weiss’s statement said. “The family is a large extended group and their support of The Met began decades before the opioid crisis.”

    #Opioides #Sackler #Philanthropie #Musées


  • Museums Cut Ties With Sacklers as Outrage Over Opioid Crisis Grows - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/25/arts/design/sackler-museums-donations-oxycontin.html

    In Paris, at the Louvre, lovers of Persian art knew there was only one place to go: the Sackler Wing of Oriental Antiquities. Want to find the long line for the Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art? Head for the soaring, glass-walled Sackler Wing.

    For decades, the Sackler family has generously supported museums worldwide, not to mention numerous medical and educational institutions including Columbia University, where there is a Sackler Institute, and Oxford, where there is a Sackler Library.

    But now some favorite Sackler charities are reconsidering whether they want the money at all, and several have already rejected any future gifts, concluding that some family members’ ties to the opioid crisis outweighed the benefits of their six- and sometimes seven-figure checks.

    In a remarkable rebuke to one of the world’s most prominent philanthropic dynasties, the prestigious Tate museums in London and the Solomon R. Guggenheim in New York, where a Sackler sat on the board for many years, decided in the last week that they would no longer accept gifts from their longtime Sackler benefactors. Britain’s National Portrait Gallery announced it had jointly decided with the Sackler Trust to cancel a planned $1.3 million donation, and an article in The Art Newspaper disclosed that a museum in South London had returned a family donation last year.

    On Monday, as the embarrassment grew with every new announcement, a Sackler trust and a family foundation in Britain issued statements saying they would suspend further philanthropy for the moment.

    “The current press attention that these legal cases in the United States is generating has created immense pressure on the scientific, medical, educational and arts institutions here in the U.K., large and small, that I am so proud to support,” Theresa Sackler, the chair of the Sackler Trust, said in a statement. “This attention is distracting them from the important work that they do.”

    The Guggenheim’s move was perhaps the most surprising, and not just because it was the first American institution known to cut ties with its Sackler supporters.

    Mortimer D.A. Sackler, a son of Mortimer Sackler, sat on the Guggenheim’s board for nearly 20 years and the family gave the museum $9 million between 1995 and 2015, including $7 million to establish and support the Sackler Center for Arts Education.

    The Guggenheim and the Metropolitan Museum had been the scene of protests related to the Sacklers. One last month, led by the photographer Nan Goldin, who overcame an OxyContin addiction, involved dropping thousands of slips of white paper from the iconic gallery spiral into its rotunda, a reference to a court document that quoted Richard Sackler, who ran Purdue Pharma, heralding a “blizzard of prescriptions that will bury the competition.”

    Last Thursday, the Guggenheim, like other American museums, stated simply that “no contributions from the Sackler family have been received since 2015 and no additional gifts are planned.”

    But a day later, amid more articles about British museums rejecting Sackler money, the Guggenheim amended its statement: “The Guggenheim does not plan to accept any gifts.”

    #Opioides #Sackler #Philanthropie #Musées


  • Spatialités des mémoires

    Ce numéro de Géographie et cultures consacré aux spatialités des mémoires propose de poursuivre les voies ouvertes par de nombreux chercheurs appartenant à différentes disciplines des sciences sociales, et d’examiner comment la géographie contemporaine se situe dans le champ des #Memory_Studies.
    Si la mémoire, abordée dans ses dimensions individuelles et collectives, exprime d’emblée un rapport au passé, elle articule et produit conjointement de nombreuses interactions, entre soi et les autres, entre le temps et l’espace. La mémoire, plus ou moins visible et lisible, d’un passé réactivé, remodelé, nié ou instrumentalisé n’est pas sans lien avec des stratégies d’acteurs diversifiés. Qu’il s’agisse de mémoires institutionnalisées dans des #sites, #musées ou #mémoriaux, ou d’espaces dans lesquels les mémoires sont échafaudées à partir de traces, la (re)production d’#espaces_mémoriels s’organise autour d’une subtile articulation #identités/#mémoires/#territoires, laquelle rend compte d’une dialectique de l’#ancrage et de la #mobilité, fût-elle éphémère.
    Les articles de ce numéro thématique explorent différentes formes de productions (ou d’empêchement de productions) spatiales mémorielles liées aux diverses recompositions politiques, sociales et économiques qui affectent les sociétés.


    https://journals.openedition.org/gc/6318
    #mémoire #géographie

    Les articles :

    Dominique Chevalier et Anne Hertzog
    Introduction [Texte intégral]

    Laurent Aucher
    Devant le mémorial, derrière le paradoxe [Texte intégral]
    Réflexions sur les pratiques de visite au monument berlinois de la #Shoah
    In front of the memorial, behind the paradox:
    thoughts about practices of visiting the Berliner memorial of Shoah

    Thomas Zanetti
    #Matérialité et spatialité d’une mémoire meurtrie [Texte intégral]
    La reconnaissance mémorielle des #maladies_professionnelles des anciens verriers de #Givors
    Materiality and spatiality of a bruised memory: the memorial recognition of the occupational diseases of the former glassmakers of Givors

    Cécile Tardy
    Les infra-espaces des mémoires du Nord [Texte intégral]
    The infra-spacies of memories of the “Nord” region of #France

    Noémie Beltramo
    Le #territoire_minier [Texte intégral]
    Vecteur ou support de la mémoire de l’#immigration_polonaise ?
    The territory: vector or support of the Polish immigration’s memory?
    #migrants_polonais #extractivisme #mines

    André-Marie Dendievel et Dominique Chevalier
    Topos et mémoires des deux rives de La Loire amont (XVIIIe–XXe siècles) [Texte intégral]
    L’exemple de Chassenard (Allier) et Digoin (Saône-et-Loire)
    Topos and memories on both sides of the upstream section of the Loire River (XVIIIth‑XXth centuries AD): the example of #Chassenard (Allier) and Digoin (Saône-et-Loire)

    Patrick Naef
    L’escombrera de #Medellin [Texte intégral]
    Une #fosse_commune entre #reconnaissance et #oubli

    Sophie Didier
    #Droit_de_mémoire, Droit à la Ville [Texte intégral]
    Essai sur le cas sud-africain
    Right to memory, Right to the City: an essay on the South African case
    #afrique_du_sud

    Florabelle Spielmann
    Combats de bâtons de #Trinidad [Texte intégral]
    Fabrique géographique, sociale et culturelle de la mémoire
    Trinidad stick-fight: shaping memorial places through geographic, social and cultural spaces

    ping @reka @albertocampiphoto


  • Sackler family money is now unwelcome at three major museums. Will others follow? - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/museums/two-major-museums-are-turning-down-sackler-donations-will-others-follow/2019/03/22/20aa6368-4cb9-11e9-9663-00ac73f49662_story.html

    By Philip Kennicott
    Art and architecture critic
    March 23

    When the National Portrait Gallery in London announced Tuesday that it was forgoing a grant from the Sackler family, observers could be forgiven for a certain degree of skepticism about the decision’s impact on the art world. The Sacklers, owners of the pharmaceutical behemoth Purdue Pharma, which makes OxyContin, had promised $1.3 million to support a public-engagement project. The money, no doubt, was welcome, but the amount involved was a relative pittance.

    Now another British institution and a major U.S. museum, the Guggenheim, have said no to Sackler money, which has become synonymous with a deadly and addictive drug that boosted the family fortune by billions of dollars and caused immeasurable suffering. The Tate art galleries, which include the Tate Modern and the Tate Britain in London as well as outposts in Liverpool and Cornwall, announced Thursday that it will also not accept money from the family.

    The Sacklers are mired in legal action, investigations and looming congressional inquiries about their role in marketing a drug blamed for a significant early role in an epidemic of overdose deaths that has claimed the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans since 1997.

    Is this a trend? These moves may affect immediate plans but won’t put much of a dent in the museums’ budgets. The impact on the Sackler family’s reputation, however, will force American arts institutions to pay attention.

    The Sackler family, which includes branches with differing levels of culpability and involvement with the issue, has a long history of donating to cultural organizations. Arthur M. Sackler, who gave millions of dollars’ worth of art and $4 million for the opening of the Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery in 1987, died long before the OxyContin scandal began. Members of the family involved with OxyContin vigorously contest the claims that Perdue Pharma was unscrupulous in the promotion of a drug, though company executives pleaded guilty to violations involving OxyContin in 2007 and the company paid more than $600 million in fines.

    A million here or there is one thing. Having a whole building named for a family with blood on its hands is another, and seeking yet more money for new projects will become even more problematic. And every institution that bears the Sackler family name, including New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (which has a Sackler wing) and the University Art Museum at Princeton (which has a Sackler gallery) is now faced with the distasteful proposition of forever advertising the wealth of a family that is deeply implicated in suffering, death and social anomie.

    Will any major U.S. institution that has benefited from Sackler largesse remove the family’s name?

    The National Portrait Gallery in London. (Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images)
    The usual arguments against this are stretched to the breaking point. Like arguments about Koch family money, which has benefited cultural institutions but is, to many, inextricably linked to global warming and the impending collapse of the Anthropocene, the issues at stake seem, at first, to be consistency and pragmatism. The pragmatic argument is this: Cultural organizations need the money, and if they don’t take it, that money will go somewhere else. And this leads quickly to the argument from consistency. Almost all of our major cultural organizations were built up with money derived from family fortunes that are tainted — by the exploitation of workers, slavery and the lasting impacts of slavery, the depredations of colonialism and the destruction of the environment. So why should contemporary arts and cultural groups be required to set themselves a higher, or more puritanical, standard when it comes to corrupt money? And if consistency matters, should we now be parsing the morality of every dollar that built every opera house and museum a century ago?

    Both arguments are cynical. Arts organizations that engage in moral money laundering cannot make a straight-faced claim to a higher moral purpose when they seek other kinds of funding, including donations and membership dollars from the general public and support from government and foundations. But the consistency argument — that the whole system is historically wrapped up in hypocrisy about money — needs particular reconsideration in the age of rapid information flows, which create sudden, digital moral crises and epiphanies.

    [The Sacklers have donated millions to museums. But their connection to the opioid crisis is threatening that legacy.]

    Moral (or social) hazard is a funny thing. For as long as cultural institutions are in the money-laundering business, companies such as Perdue Pharma will have an incentive to take greater risks. If the taint of public health disaster can be washed away, then other companies may choose to put profits over public safety. But this kind of hazard isn’t a finely calibrated tool. It involves a lot of chance and inconsistency in how it works. That has only increased in the age of viral Twitter campaigns and rapid conflagrations of public anger fueled by new social media tools.

    Why is it that the Sackler family is in the crosshairs and not any of the other myriad wealthy people whose money was made through products that are killing us? Because it is. And that seeming randomness is built into the way we now police our billionaires. It seems haphazard, and sometimes unfair, and inefficient. Are there worse malefactors scrubbing their toxic reputations with a new hospital wing or kids literacy program? Surely. Maybe they will find their money unwelcome at some point in the future, and maybe not. The thing that matters is that the risk is there.

    [Now would be a good time for museums to think about our gun plague]

    The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art in Washington. (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)
    Much of the Sackler family money was made off a drug that deadens the mind and reduces the human capacity for thought and feeling. There is a nice alignment between that fact and what may now, finally, be the beginnings of a new distaste about using Sackler money to promote art and cultural endeavors, which must always increase our capacities for engagement with the world. It is immensely satisfying that the artist Nan Goldin, whose work has explored the misery of drug culture, is playing a leading role in the emerging resistance to Sackler family money. (Goldin, who was considering a retrospective of her work at the National Portrait Gallery, said to the Observer: “I have told them I would not do it if they take the Sackler money.”)

    More artists should take a lead role in these conversations, to the point of usurping the usual prerogatives of boards and executive committees and ethical advisory groups to make decisions about corrupt money.

    [‘Shame on Sackler’: Anti-opioid activists call out late Smithsonian donor at his namesake museum]

    Ultimately, it is unlikely that any arts organization will manage to find a consistent policy or somehow finesse the challenge of saying all that money we accepted from gilded-age plutocrats a century ago is now clean. But we may think twice about taking money from people who are killing our planet and our people today. What matters is that sometimes lightning strikes, and there is hell to pay, and suddenly a name is blackened forever. That kind of justice may be terrifying and swift and inconsistent, but it sends a blunt message: When the world finally learns that what you have done is loathsome, it may not be possible to undo the damage through the miraculous scrubbing power of cultural detergent.

    #Opioides #Sackler #Musées #Shame


  • Gifts Tied to Opioid Sales Invite a Question : Should Museums Vet Donors ? - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/01/arts/design/sackler-museum-donations-oxycontin-purdue-pharma.html

    The New York Times surveyed 21 cultural organizations listed on tax forms as having received significant sums from foundations run by two Sackler brothers who led Purdue. Several, including the Guggenheim, declined to comment; others, like the Brooklyn Museum, ignored questions. None indicated that they would return donations or refuse them in the future.

    “We regularly assess our funding activities to ensure best practice,” wrote Zoë Franklin, a spokeswoman for the Victoria and Albert Museum, which was listed as receiving about $13.1 million from the Dr. Mortimer and Theresa Sackler Foundation in 2012. “The Sackler family continue to be an important and valuable donor to the V & A and we are grateful for their ongoing support.”

    De l’usage de la philanthropie comme écran de fumée

    Robert Josephson, a spokesman for the company, pointed to its efforts to stem the opioid epidemic — distributing prescription guidelines, developing abuse-deterrent painkillers and ensuring access to overdose-reversal medication — and noted that OxyContin has never had a large share of total opioid prescriptions. In an email, he added, “Many leading medical, scientific, cultural and educational institutions throughout the world have been beneficiaries of Sackler family philanthropy.”

    #Sackler #Philanthropie #Opioides #Musées


  • Vincent Van Gogh à portée de vue
    https://aris.papatheodorou.net/vincent-van-gogh-a-portee-de-vue

    Le musée Van Gogh d’Amsterdam abrite dit-on la plus grande collection d’œuvres du peintre et est, à ce titre, un rendez-vous incontournable de la cité hollandaise. Il est désormais aussi possible de découvrir, sur le site Web du musée, une collection numérique de près de 1500 des créations de Van Gogh (tableaux, dessins, esquisses) en libre accès et en libre téléchargement pour un usage non-commercial.

    #art #musées #communs #open_culture #potlatch #Van_Gogh



  • Aidé par Beyoncé et Jay-Z, le Louvre enregistre un nouveau record de fréquentation
    https://www.france24.com/fr/20190103-louvre-enregistre-frequentation-record-10-millions-visiteurs-2018

    Le nombre de visiteurs du musée du Louvre a dépassé la barre des dix millions en 2018. Parmi les raisons de cette fréquentation record, la reprise du tourisme à Paris, l’exposition Delacroix ainsi qu’un clip de Beyoncé et Jay-Z.

    Des chiffres inédits. Le musée du Louvre a battu son record de fréquentation en 2018, en accueillant quelque 10,2 millions de visiteurs, un chiffre inégalé pour un musée, a annoncé jeudi 3 janvier l’institution.

    La fréquentation du plus célèbre musée de France a ainsi augmenté de 25 % par rapport à 2017. Son précédent record date de 2012, année d’inauguration du département des arts de l’islam et des expositions autour de Léonard de Vinci et de Raphaël, avec quelque 9,7 millions de visiteurs, peut-on lire dans un communiqué.

    https://youtu.be/kbMqWXnpXcA

    #marchandisation #musées


  • #Faux #tableaux : quand les #musées d’#art et les# experts se font avoir
    https://www.franceculture.fr/peinture/faux-tableaux-quand-les-musees-dart-et-les-experts-se-font-avoir

    Enquête | Les faux tableaux prolifèrent, présents partout en France, dans les collections particulières mais aussi dans les musées. S’il est difficile aujourd’hui de copier des Picasso ou des Chagall, les faussaires en profitent pour s’attaquer à des peintres moins connus.


  • Eric Fassin : « L’#appropriation_culturelle, c’est lorsqu’un emprunt entre les cultures s’inscrit dans un contexte de #domination »

    Dans un entretien au « Monde », le sociologue Eric Fassin revient sur ce concept né dans les années 1990, au cœur de nombre de polémiques récentes.

    Des internautes se sont empoignés sur ces deux mots tout l’été : « appropriation culturelle ». Le concept, né bien avant Twitter, connaît un regain de popularité. Dernièrement, il a été utilisé pour décrire aussi bien le look berbère de Madonna lors des MTV Video Music Awards, la dernière recette de riz jamaïcain du très médiatique chef anglais #Jamie_Oliver, ou l’absence de comédien autochtone dans la dernière pièce du dramaturge québécois #Robert_Lepage, #Kanata, portant justement sur « l’histoire du Canada à travers le prisme des rapports entre Blancs et Autochtones ».

    Qu’ont en commun ces trois exemples ? Retour sur la définition et sur l’histoire de l’« appropriation culturelle » avec Eric Fassin, sociologue au laboratoire d’études de genre et de sexualité de l’université Paris-VIII et coauteur de l’ouvrage De la question sociale à la question raciale ? (La Découverte).
    la suite après cette publicité

    D’où vient le concept d’« appropriation culturelle » ?

    Eric Fassin : L’expression apparaît d’abord en anglais, à la fin du XXe siècle, dans le domaine artistique, pour parler de « #colonialisme_culturel ». Au début des années 1990, la critique #bell_hooks, figure importante du #Black_feminism, développe par exemple ce concept, qu’elle résume d’une métaphore : « manger l’Autre. » C’est une approche intersectionnelle, qui articule les dimensions raciale et sexuelle interprétées dans le cadre d’une exploitation capitaliste.

    Un regard « exotisant »

    Cette notion est aussi au cœur de la controverse autour de #Paris_Is_Burning, un film #documentaire de 1990 sur la culture des bals travestis à New York. Une autre critique noire, Coco Fusco, reprochait à la réalisatrice #Jennie_Livingston, une lesbienne blanche, son regard « exotisant » sur ces minorités sexuelles et raciales. Pour elle, il s’agissait d’une forme d’#appropriation_symbolique mais aussi matérielle, puisque les sujets du film se sont sentis floués, dépossédés de leur image.

    Comment définir ce concept ?

    E. F. : Ce qui définit l’appropriation culturelle, comme le montre cet exemple, ce n’est pas seulement la circulation. Après tout, l’emprunt est la règle de l’art, qui ne connaît pas de frontières. Il s’agit de #récupération quand la #circulation s’inscrit dans un contexte de #domination auquel on s’aveugle. L’enjeu n’est certes pas nouveau : l’appropriation culturelle, au sens le plus littéral, remplit nos #musées occidentaux d’objets « empruntés », et souvent pillés, en Grèce, en Afrique et ailleurs. La dimension symbolique est aujourd’hui très importante : on relit le #primitivisme_artistique d’un Picasso à la lumière de ce concept.

    Ce concept a-t-il été intégré dans le corpus intellectuel de certaines sphères militantes ?

    E. F. : Ces références théoriques ne doivent pas le faire oublier : si l’appropriation culturelle est souvent au cœur de polémiques, c’est que l’outil conceptuel est inséparablement une arme militante. Ces batailles peuvent donc se livrer sur les réseaux sociaux : l’enjeu a beau être symbolique, il n’est pas réservé aux figures intellectuelles. Beaucoup se transforment en critiques culturels en reprenant à leur compte l’expression « appropriation culturelle ».

    En quoi les polémiques nées ces derniers jours relèvent-elles de l’appropriation culturelle ?

    E. F. : Ce n’est pas la première fois que Madonna est au cœur d’une telle polémique. En 1990, avec sa chanson Vogue, elle était déjà taxée de récupération : le #voguing, musique et danse, participe en effet d’une subculture noire et hispanique de femmes trans et de gays. Non seulement l’artiste en retirait les bénéfices, mais les paroles prétendaient s’abstraire de tout contexte (« peu importe que tu sois blanc ou noir, fille ou garçon »). Aujourd’hui, son look de « #reine_berbère » est d’autant plus mal passé qu’elle est accusée d’avoir « récupéré » l’hommage à la « reine » noire Aretha Franklin pour parler… de Madonna : il s’agit bien d’appropriation.

    La controverse autour de la pièce Kanata, de Robert Lepage, n’est pas la première non plus — et ces répétitions éclairent l’intensité des réactions : son spectacle sur les chants d’esclaves avait également été accusé d’appropriation culturelle, car il faisait la part belle aux interprètes blancs. Aujourd’hui, c’est le même enjeu : alors qu’il propose une « relecture de l’histoire du Canada à travers le prisme des rapports entre Blancs et Autochtones », la distribution oublie les « autochtones » — même quand ils se rappellent au bon souvenir du metteur en scène. C’est encore un choix revendiqué : la culture artistique transcenderait les cultures « ethniques ».

    Par comparaison, l’affaire du « #riz_jamaïcain » commercialisé par Jamie Oliver, chef britannique médiatique, peut paraître mineure ; elle rappelle toutefois comment l’ethnicité peut être utilisée pour « épicer » la consommation. Bien sûr, la #nourriture aussi voyage. Reste qu’aujourd’hui cette #mondialisation marchande du symbolique devient un enjeu.

    Pourquoi ce concept fait-il autant polémique ?

    E. F. : En France, on dénonce volontiers le #communautarisme… des « autres » : le terme est curieusement réservé aux minorités, comme si le repli sur soi ne pouvait pas concerner la majorité ! C’est nier l’importance des rapports de domination qui sont à l’origine de ce clivage : on parle de culture, en oubliant qu’il s’agit aussi de pouvoir. Et c’est particulièrement vrai, justement, dans le domaine culturel.

    Songeons aux polémiques sur l’incarnation des minorités au théâtre : faut-il être arabe ou noir pour jouer les Noirs et les Arabes, comme l’exigeait déjà #Bernard-Marie_Koltès, en opposition à #Patrice_Chéreau ? Un artiste blanc peut-il donner en spectacle les corps noirs victimes de racisme, comme dans l’affaire « #Exhibit_B » ? La réponse même est un enjeu de pouvoir.

    En tout cas, l’#esthétique n’est pas extérieure à la #politique. La création artistique doit revendiquer sa liberté ; mais elle ne saurait s’autoriser d’une exception culturelle transcendant les #rapports_de_pouvoir pour s’aveugler à la sous-représentation des #femmes et des #minorités raciales. L’illusion redouble quand l’artiste, fort de ses bonnes intentions, veut parler pour (en faveur de) au risque de parler pour (à la place de).

    Le monde universitaire n’est pas épargné par ces dilemmes : comment parler des questions minoritaires, quand on occupe (comme moi) une position « majoritaire », sans parler à la place des minorités ? Avec Marta Segarra, nous avons essayé d’y faire face dans un numéro de la revue Sociétés & Représentations sur la (non-)représentation des Roms : comment ne pas redoubler l’exclusion qu’on dénonce ? Dans notre dossier, la juriste rom Anina Ciuciu l’affirme avec force : être parlé, représenté par d’autres ne suffit pas ; il est temps, proclame cette militante, de « nous représenter ». Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas si difficile à comprendre : que dirait-on si les seules représentations de la société française nous venaient d’Hollywood ?


    https://mobile.lemonde.fr/immigration-et-diversite/article/2018/08/24/eric-fassin-l-appropriation-culturelle-c-est-lorsqu-un-emprunt-entre-
    #géographie_culturelle #pouvoir #culture #Madonna #exotisme #peuples_autochtones #film #musique #cuisine #intersectionnalité #Eric_Fassin

    • Cité dans l’article, ce numéro spécial d’une #revue :
      #Représentation et #non-représentation des #Roms en #Espagne et en #France

      Les populations roms ou gitanes, en France comme en Espagne, sont l’objet à la fois d’un excès et d’un défaut de représentation. D’une part, elles sont surreprésentées : si la vision romantique des Bohémiens semble passée de mode, les clichés les plus éculés de l’antitsiganisme sont abondamment recyclés par le racisme contemporain. D’autre part, les Roms sont sous-représentés en un double sens. Le sort qui leur est réservé est invisibilisé et leur parole est inaudible : ils sont parlés plus qu’ils ne parlent.

      Ce dossier porte sur la (non-) représentation, autant politique qu’artistique et médiatique, des Roms en France et en Espagne des Gitanxs (ou Gitan·e·s) ; et cela non seulement dans le contenu des articles, mais aussi dans la forme de leur écriture, souvent à la première personne, qu’il s’agisse de sociologie, d’anthropologie ou d’études littéraires, de photographie ou de littérature, ou de discours militants. Ce dossier veut donner à voir ce qui est exhibé ou masqué, affiché ou effacé, et surtout contribuer à faire entendre la voix de celles et ceux dont on parle. L’enjeu, c’est de parler de, pour et parfois avec les Gitan·e·s et les Roms, mais aussi de leur laisser la parole.

      https://www.cairn.info/revue-societes-et-representations-2018-1.htm

    • Au #Canada, la notion d’« appropriation culturelle » déchire le monde littéraire

      Tout est parti d’un éditorial dans Write, revue trimestrielle de la Writers’ Union of Canada (l’association nationale des écrivains professionnels) consacrée pour l’occasion aux auteurs autochtones du Canada, sous-représentés dans le panthéon littéraire national. Parmi les textes, l’éditorial d’un rédacteur en chef de la revue, Hal Niedzviecki, qui disait ne pas croire au concept d’« appropriation culturelle » dans les textes littéraires. Cette affirmation a suscité une polémique et une vague de fureur en ligne.

      On parle d’appropriation culturelle lorsqu’un membre d’une communauté « dominante » utilise un élément d’une culture « dominée » pour en tirer un profit, artistique ou commercial. C’est ici le cas pour les autochtones du Canada, appellation sous laquelle on regroupe les Premières Nations, les Inuits et les Métis, peuples ayant subi une conquête coloniale.
      la suite après cette publicité

      Des polémiques, plus ou moins importantes, liées à l’appropriation culturelle ont eu lieu ces derniers mois de manière récurrente, par exemple sur l’usage par la marque Urban Outfitters de savoir-faire traditionnels des Indiens Navajos ou la commercialisation par Chanel d’un boomerang de luxe, considéré comme une insulte par certains aborigènes d’Australie.
      Le « prix de l’appropriation »

      La notion est moins usitée pour la création littéraire, où l’on parle plus volontiers « d’orientalisme » pour l’appropriation par un auteur occidental de motifs issus d’une autre culture. Mais c’est bien cette expression qu’a choisie Hal Niedzviecki dans son plaidoyer intitulé « Gagner le prix de l’appropriation ». L’éditorial n’est pas disponible en ligne mais des photos de la page imprimée circulent :

      « A mon avis, n’importe qui, n’importe où, devrait être encouragé à imaginer d’autres peuples, d’autres cultures, d’autres identités. J’irais même jusqu’à dire qu’il devrait y avoir un prix pour récompenser cela – le prix de l’appropriation, pour le meilleur livre d’un auteur qui écrit au sujet de gens qui n’ont aucun point commun, même lointain, avec lui ».

      Il y voit surtout une chance pour débarrasser la littérature canadienne de sa dominante « blanche et classes moyennes », dénonçant la crainte de « l’appropriation culturelle » comme un frein qui « décourage les écrivains de relever ce défi ».

      Le fait que cette prise de position ait été publiée dans un numéro précisément consacré aux auteurs autochtones a été perçu comme un manque de respect pour les participants. L’un des membres du comité éditorial, Nikki Reimer, s’en est pris sur son blog à un article « au mieux, irréfléchi et idiot, au pire (…) insultant pour tous les auteurs qui ont signé dans les pages de la revue ».

      « Il détruit toutes les tentatives pour donner un espace et célébrer les auteurs présents, et montre que la revue “Write” n’est pas un endroit où l’on doit se sentir accueilli en tant qu’auteur indigène ou racisé. »

      La Writers’ Union a rapidement présenté des excuses dans un communiqué. Hal Niedzviecki a lui aussi fini par s’excuser et a démissionné de son poste, qu’il occupait depuis cinq ans.
      Un débat sur la diversité dans les médias

      Son argumentaire a cependant dépassé les colonnes du magazine lorsque plusieurs journalistes ont offert de l’argent pour doter le fameux « prix ». Ken Whyte, ancien rédacteur en chef de plusieurs publications nationales, a lancé sur Twitter :

      « Je donnerai 500 dollars pour doter le prix de l’appropriation, si quelqu’un veut l’organiser. »

      la suite après cette publicité

      D’autres figures de la presse canadienne, comme Anne Marie Owens (rédactrice en chef du National Post), Alison Uncles (rédactrice en chef de Maclean’s Magazine), deux éditorialistes du Maclean’s et du National Post, entre autres, se sont dits prêts à faire de même. Quelques heures plus tard, une poignée d’entre eux se sont excusés, dont Anne-Marie Owens, qui a déclaré qu’elle voulait simplement défendre « la liberté d’expression ».

      Comme le débat a débordé sur les réseaux sociaux, des lecteurs anonymes s’y sont invités pour dénoncer l’attitude de ces pontes du journalisme. « Imaginez, vous êtes une personne de couleur qui étudie le journalisme, et vous voyez les trois quarts de vos potentiels futurs chefs tweeter au sujet d’un prix de l’appropriation culturelle », grince une internaute.

      Pour les journalistes issus des minorités, l’affaire a également rappelé à quel point les médias manquent de diversité. Sur Buzzfeed, Scaachi Koul écrit : « Je n’en reviens pas d’avoir à dire ça, mais personne, dans l’histoire de l’écriture littéraire, n’a jamais laissé entendre que les Blancs n’avaient pas le droit de faire le portrait d’autochtones ou de gens de couleurs, en particulier dans la fiction. Franchement, on l’encourage plutôt. » Elle poursuit :

      « S’abstenir de pratiquer l’appropriation culturelle ne vous empêche pas d’écrire de manière réfléchie sur les non blancs. Mais cela vous empêche, en revanche, de déposséder les gens de couleur, ou de prétendre que vous connaissez leurs histoires intimement. Cela vous empêche de prendre une culture qui n’a jamais été à vous – une culture qui rend la vie plus difficile pour ceux qui sont nés avec dans le Canada d’aujourd’hui à majorité blanche – et d’en tirer profit. »

      sur le même sujet Les coiffes amérindiennes dans les défilés font-elles du tort à une culture menacée ?
      « Faire son numéro »

      Helen Knott, l’une des auteurs d’origine indigène dont le travail était publié dans la revue Write a raconté sur Facebook, quelques jours après, une étrange histoire. Contactée par la radio CBC pour une interview à ce sujet, elle est transférée vers quelqu’un qui doit lui poser quelques questions avant l’antenne. Elle entend alors les journalistes se passer le téléphone en disant, selon elle :

      « Helen Knott, c’est l’une de ceux qui sont super énervés par cette histoire. »

      « Précisément, la veille, dans une autre interview, raconte Helen Knott, j’ai rigolé avec le journaliste en lui disant que, contrairement à une idée largement répandue, les autochtones ne sont pas “super énervés” en permanence. »

      Au cours de cette pré-interview, elle dit avoir eu a le sentiment grandissant qu’on lui demandait de « faire son numéro » pour alimenter un « débat-divertissement-scandale ». « Je suis quelqu’un d’heureux et mon droit à être en colère quand la situation mérite de l’être ne me définit pas en tant qu’individu », explique-t-elle.

      « C’est tout le problème de l’appropriation culturelle. Les gens utilisent notre culture pour leur propre profit mais peuvent se désintéresser ensuite de nos difficultés à faire partie de la communauté autochtone, de la politisation continuelle de nos vies, des événements et des institutions qui viennent tirer sur la corde de notre intégrité et de notre sens moral, et qui exigent que nous répondions. Aujourd’hui, j’ai refusé de faire mon numéro. »

      En 2011, les autochtones du Canada représentaient 4,3 % de la population. Ils concentrent le taux de pauvreté le plus élevé du Canada et sont les premières victimes des violences, addictions et incarcérations. En 2016, une série de suicides dans des communautés autochtones de l’Ontario et du Manitoba avaient forcé le premier ministre, Justin Trudeau, à réagir. Sa volonté affichée d’instaurer une « nouvelle relation » avec la population autochtone est critiquée par certains comme n’ayant pas été suivie d’effet.

      https://mobile.lemonde.fr/big-browser/article/2017/05/16/au-canada-la-notion-d-appropriation-culturelle-suscite-la-polemique-d


  • Ethereal underworld: exploring Helsinki’s colossal new art bunker | Art and design | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/aug/27/helsinki-amos-rex-art-museum

    In a vast expanse beneath the Finnish capital lies a soaring circus-top culture hub. Will the €50m Amos Rex art museum put the city at the forefront of Europe’s art scene?
    Oliver Wainwright

    Oliver Wainwright in Helsinki

    Mon 27 Aug 2018 08.00 BST

    Bulging white mounds rear up out of the ground in the middle of Helsinki, tapering to circular windows that point like cyclopean eyes around the square. Children scramble up the steep slopes while a skateboarder attempts to glide down one, past a couple posing for a selfie at the summit.

    This curious landscape of humps and funnels signals the arrival of Amos Rex, a €50m (£45m) art museum for the Finnish capital, which opens this week in a vast subterranean space that was once a bus station parking lot.

    “It is as if the museum didn’t quite agree to go underground,” says Asmo Jaaksi of local architecture firm JKMM, which masterminded the project, “and it’s somehow bubbling up into the square.”

    #art #musées #helsinki #finlande


  • The #Baltimore Museum Sold Art to Acquire Work by Underrepresented Artists. Here’s What It Bought—and Why It’s Only the Beginning | artnet News
    https://news.artnet.com/art-world/baltimore-deaccessioning-proceeds-1309481

    The Baltimore Museum Sold Art to Acquire Work by Underrepresented Artists. Here’s What It Bought—and Why It’s Only the Beginning

    The museum sold works by Warhol and other white male artists to fund major acquisitions by Jack Whitten, Isaac Julien, and Amy Sherald.

    Julia Halperin, June 26, 2018

    #art #peinture #musées




  • Exploring museum collections online: Some background reading
    https://lab.sciencemuseum.org.uk/exploring-museum-collections-online-some-background-reading-da
    https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1200/0*lSMymVAifKTVawvD%2E

    John Stack
    Digital Director of the Science Museum Group
    Jan 23
    Exploring museum collections online: Some background reading

    In 2017 the Science Museum Group relaunched its online collection website. The website consolidated a number of existing websites publishing digitised collection material — organised by subject or area of collection — into a single presence.

    Over 282,000 objects and archival records were published and over 27,000 of these were illustrated with at least one image.

    This represents about 6% of the object collection (estimated to total 406,000 objects) and only a tiny fraction of the archival collection (estimated to be around 7 million items).

    #musées #collections_en_ligne #open_sources #archives_en_ligne


  • BBC - Culture - The rise of the post-industrial art gallery
    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20171121-the-rise-of-the-post-industrial-art-gallery

    Here in Berlin, Germany’s Bauhaus Archiv is throwing a farewell party. Next year this museum will close for renovation, and until then it’s presenting a display of ‘greatest hits’ from the world’s biggest Bauhaus collection. From furniture and posters to crockery and cutlery, these exquisite objects show how the Bauhaus school shaped our idea of good design.

    For most of us, the word Bauhaus conjures up a certain type of modern architecture – that stark aesthetic that spawned a million tower blocks. But the Bauhaus was much more than an architectural style – it was a new way of thinking, and a century since it was born, at the end of World War One, its ideas still set the pattern for the way we live today.

    #art #galeries #sites_industriels #musées


  • Un photographe passe une éternité à attendre que les visiteurs d’un musée soient assortis aux oeuvres et le résultat vaut l’attente | ipnoze
    https://www.ipnoze.com/2017/10/19/visiteurs-musee-assortis-oeuvres-stefan-draschan

    e photographe Stefan Draschan établi en France a créé un projet intitulé « People matching artworks » (personnes assorties aux oeuvres). Tandis que les images de Draschan semblent parfaitement orchestrées à première vue, leur secret est réellement la patience.

    Le photographe adore visiter différents musées principalement à Paris, Vienne et Berlin, où il attend patiemment que les visiteurs soient assortis à une oeuvre d’art d’une façon amusante. Les résultats sont des photos humoristiques et uniques qui présentent une harmonie inattendue entre des personnes et des oeuvres.

    C’est tellement fun qu’on n’ose pas imaginer que c’est réel, mais arrangé. Va savoir avec les images...

    #Images #Musées


  • The Secretive Family Making Billions From the Opioid Crisis
    http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a12775932/sackler-family-oxycontin

    You’re aware America is under siege, fighting an opioid crisis that has exploded into a public-health emergency. You’ve heard of OxyContin, the pain medication to which countless patients have become addicted. But do you know that the company that makes Oxy and reaps the billions of dollars in profits it generates is owned by one family?

    les frères Sackler, la #pharma #drogue et le #profit qui provoque l’actuelle crise d’overdoses, et le #whitewashing à travers les donations aux #musées


  • Metropolitan Museum Initiative Provides Free Access to 400,000 Digital Images | The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    http://metmuseum.org/press/news/2014/oasc-access

    (New York, May 16, 2014)—Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, announced today that more than 400,000 high-resolution digital images of public domain works in the Museum’s world-renowned collection may be downloaded directly from the Museum’s website for non-commercial use—including in scholarly publications in any media—without permission from the Museum and without a fee. The number of available images will increase as new digital files are added on a regular basis.

    In making the announcement, Mr. Campbell said: “Through this new, open-access policy, we join a growing number of museums that provide free access to images of art in the public domain. I am delighted that digital technology can open the doors to this trove of images from our encyclopedic collection.”

    The Metropolitan Museum’s initiative—called Open Access for Scholarly Content (OASC)—provides access to images of art in its collection that the Museum believes to be in the public domain and free of other known restrictions; these images are now available for scholarly use in any media. Works that are covered by the new policy are identified on the Museum’s website (http://www.metmuseum.org/collections) with the acronym OASC.

    #domaine_public #musées


  • #GÉOGRAPHIE DU #SOUVENIR. Ancrages spatiaux des mémoires de la #Shoah

    La #mondialisation des mémoires de la Shoah, telles que représentées dans des #musées et des #mémoriaux nationaux, constitue une caractéristique majeure des dimensions contemporaines de ce phénomène. Ce livre présente tout d’abord ces nombreux lieux du souvenir, leur géographie mais aussi leur insertion dans leur environnement urbain. C’est donc à la fois à un panorama des musées et mémoriaux de la Shoah dans le monde que ce livre convie le lecteur, mais aussi à une analyse sensible de la manière dont ils sont pratiqués et insérés dans la ville.


    http://www.editions-harmattan.fr/index.asp?navig=catalogue&obj=livre&no=53968
    #mémoire #espace #lieux #globalisation
    via @ville_en


  • Rapport « Musées Du XXIe siècle » : la culture toujours sans ouverture – SavoirsCom1
    https://www.savoirscom1.info/2017/03/rapport-musees-du-xxieme-siecle-la-culture-toujours-sans-ouverture

    Mais au-delà de cette accumulation de buzzwords, on cherche en vain dans les pages de ce rapport des propositions concrètes en faveur de l’Open Data, de l’Open Content ou de l’Open Source dans les musées. La question de l’ouverture des données culturelles et de la réutilisation des images diffusées par les sites des établissements est complètement escamotée, tout comme celle des pratiques de photographie personnelle lors des visites.

    Par malheur pour ce rapport (et pour le public), l’actualité montre pourtant que ces sujets sont de première importance pour les musées français, s’ils veulent entrer pleinement dans le XXIe siècle.
    Il y a quinze jours, le Metropolitan Museum of Art de New York créait l’événement en annonçant la libération de plus de 375 000 reproductions HD d’œuvres du domaine public numérisées, mises en ligne et entièrement réutilisables – y compris à des fins commerciales – à l’occasion d’une opération menée en partenariat avec Creative Commons et la fondation Wikimedia. Ce genre de démarche, également adopté par le passé par le Rijksmuseum d’Amsterdam, permet aux musées de contribuer à enrichir les Communs de la connaissance. Elles n’ont pourtant pas droit de cité dans le rapport de Jacqueline Eidelman.

    Sur l’autorisation de prendre des photographies pendant les visites, le rapport marque même une régression. En 2013-2014, le Ministère de la Culture, rappelons-le, avait organisé une concertation entre différents acteurs qui avait abouti à la publication de la charte « Tous Photographes » incitant les musées à faire évoluer leurs règlements. Le Collectif SavoirsCom1 avait logiquement salué cette initiative. Ce document reste hélas largement ignoré et il n’en est pas une seule fois fait mention dans le rapport.

    #musées #communs_connaissance #photographie #domaine_public


  • Disputed Memory. Emotions and Memory Politics in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe

    The world wars, genocides and extremist ideologies of the 20th century are remembered very differently across Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe, resulting sometimes in fierce memory disputes. This book investigates the complexity and contention of the layers of memory of the troubled 20th century in the region. Written by an international group of scholars from a diversity of disciplines, the chapters approach memory disputes in methodologically innovative ways, studying representations and negotiations of disputed pasts in different media, including monuments, museum exhibitions, individual and political discourse and electronic social media. Analyzing memory disputes in various local, national and transnational contexts, the chapters demonstrate the political power and social impact of painful and disputed memories. The book brings new insights into current memory disputes in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. It contributes to the understanding of processes of memory transmission and negotiation across borders and cultures in Europe, emphasizing the interconnectedness of memory with emotions, mediation and politics.


    https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/457298
    #livre #mémoire #génocides #musées #monuments #Europe_centrale #Europe_de_l'Est #Arménie #Russie #Finlande #guerre #WWII #seconde_guerre_mondiale #deuxième_guerre_mondiale #Srebrenica #Bosnie-Herzégovine #Berlin #Holcauste #Juifs #Roms #Pologne #Ukraine #Estonie #Croatie #Albanie
    cc @reka