naturalfeature:lesbos

  • The Vulnerability Contest

    Traumatized Afghan child soldiers who were forced to fight in Syria struggle to find protection in Europe’s asylum lottery.

    Mosa did not choose to come forward. Word had spread among the thousands of asylum seekers huddled inside Moria that social workers were looking for lone children among the general population. High up on the hillside, in the Afghan area of the chaotic refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos, some residents knew someone they suspected was still a minor. They led the aid workers to Mosa.

    The boy, whose broad and beardless face mark him out as a member of the Hazara ethnic group, had little reason to trust strangers. It was hard to persuade him just to sit with them and listen. Like many lone children, Mosa had slipped through the age assessment carried out on first arrival at Moria: He was registered as 27 years old. With the help of a translator, the social worker explained that there was still time to challenge his classification as an adult. But Mosa did not seem to be able to engage with what he was being told. It would take weeks to establish trust and reveal his real age and background.

    Most new arrivals experience shock when their hopes of a new life in Europe collide with Moria, the refugee camp most synonymous with the miserable consequences of Europe’s efforts to contain the flow of refugees and migrants across the Aegean. When it was built, the camp was meant to provide temporary shelter for fewer than 2,000 people. Since the European Union struck a deal in March 2016 with Turkey under which new arrivals are confined to Greece’s islands, Moria’s population has swollen to 9,000. It has become notorious for overcrowding, snowbound tents, freezing winter deaths, violent protests and suicides by adults and children alike.

    While all asylum systems are subjective, he said that the situation on Greece’s islands has turned the search for protection into a “lottery.”

    Stathis Poularakis is a lawyer who previously served for two years on an appeal committee dealing with asylum cases in Greece and has worked extensively on Lesbos. While all asylum systems are subjective, he said that the situation on Greece’s islands has turned the search for protection into a “lottery.”

    Asylum claims on Lesbos can take anywhere between six months and more than two years to be resolved. In the second quarter of 2018, Greece faced nearly four times as many asylum claims per capita as Germany. The E.U. has responded by increasing the presence of the European Asylum Support Office (EASO) and broadening its remit so that EASO officials can conduct asylum interviews. But the promises that EASO will bring Dutch-style efficiency conceal the fact that the vast majority of its hires are not seconded from other member states but drawn from the same pool of Greeks as the national asylum service.

    Asylum caseworkers at Moria face an overwhelming backlog and plummeting morale. A serving EASO official describes extraordinary “pressure to go faster” and said there was “so much subjectivity in the system.” The official also said that it was human nature to reject more claims “when you see every other country is closing its borders.”

    Meanwhile, the only way to escape Moria while your claim is being processed is to be recognized as a “vulnerable” case. Vulnerables get permission to move to the mainland or to more humane accommodation elsewhere on the island. The term is elastic and can apply to lone children and women, families or severely physically or mentally ill people. In all cases the onus is on the asylum seeker ultimately to persuade the asylum service, Greek doctors or the United Nations Refugee Agency that they are especially vulnerable.

    The ensuing scramble to get out of Moria has turned the camp into a vast “vulnerability contest,” said Poularakis. It is a ruthless competition that the most heavily traumatized are often in no condition to understand, let alone win.

    Twice a Refugee

    Mosa arrived at Moria in October 2017 and spent his first night in Europe sleeping rough outside the arrivals tent. While he slept someone stole his phone. When he awoke he was more worried about the lost phone than disputing the decision of the Frontex officer who registered him as an adult. Poularakis said age assessors are on the lookout for adults claiming to be children, but “if you say you’re an adult, no one is going to object.”

    Being a child has never afforded Mosa any protection in the past: He did not understand that his entire future could be at stake. Smugglers often warn refugee children not to reveal their real age, telling them that they will be prevented from traveling further if they do not pretend to be over 18 years old.

    Like many other Hazara of his generation, Mosa was born in Iran, the child of refugees who fled Afghanistan. Sometimes called “the cursed people,” the Hazara are followers of Shia Islam and an ethnic and religious minority in Afghanistan, a country whose wars are usually won by larger ethnic groups and followers of Sunni Islam. Their ancestry, traced by some historians to Genghis Khan, also means they are highly visible and have been targets for persecution by Afghan warlords from 19th-century Pashtun kings to today’s Taliban.

    In recent decades, millions of Hazara have fled Afghanistan, many of them to Iran, where their language, Dari, is a dialect of Persian Farsi, the country’s main language.

    “We had a life where we went from work to home, which were both underground in a basement,” he said. “There was nothing (for us) like strolling the streets. I was trying not to be seen by anyone. I ran from the police like I would from a street dog.”

    Iran hosts 950,000 Afghan refugees who are registered with the U.N. and another 1.5 million undocumented Afghans. There are no official refugee camps, making displaced Afghans one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world. For those without the money to pay bribes, there is no route to permanent residency or citizenship. Most refugees survive without papers on the outskirts of cities such as the capital, Tehran. Those who received permits, before Iran stopped issuing them altogether in 2007, must renew them annually. The charges are unpredictable and high. Mostly, the Afghan Hazara survive as an underclass, providing cheap labor in workshops and constructions sites. This was how Mosa grew up.

    “We had a life where we went from work to home, which were both underground in a basement,” he said. “There was nothing (for us) like strolling the streets. I was trying not to be seen by anyone. I ran from the police like I would from a street dog.”

    But he could not remain invisible forever and one day in October 2016, on his way home from work, he was detained by police for not having papers.

    Sitting in one of the cantinas opposite the entrance to Moria, Mosa haltingly explained what happened next. How he was threatened with prison in Iran or deportation to Afghanistan, a country in which he has never set foot. How he was told that that the only way out was to agree to fight in Syria – for which they would pay him and reward him with legal residence in Iran.

    “In Iran, you have to pay for papers,” said Mosa. “If you don’t pay, you don’t have papers. I do not know Afghanistan. I did not have a choice.”

    As he talked, Mosa spread out a sheaf of papers from a battered plastic wallet. Along with asylum documents was a small notepad decorated with pink and mauve elephants where he keeps the phone numbers of friends and family. It also contains a passport-sized green booklet with the crest of the Islamic Republic of Iran. It is a temporary residence permit. Inside its shiny cover is the photograph of a scared-looking boy, whom the document claims was born 27 years ago. It is the only I.D. he has ever owned and the date of birth has been faked to hide the fact that the country that issues it has been sending children to war.

    Mosa is not alone among the Hazara boys who have arrived in Greece seeking protection, carrying identification papers with inflated ages. Refugees Deeply has documented the cases of three Hazara child soldiers and corroborated their accounts with testimony from two other underage survivors. Their stories are of childhoods twice denied: once in Syria, where they were forced to fight, and then again after fleeing to Europe, where they are caught up in a system more focused on hard borders than on identifying the most damaged and vulnerable refugees.

    From Teenage Kicks to Adult Nightmares

    Karim’s descent into hell began with a prank. Together with a couple of friends, he recorded an angsty song riffing on growing up as a Hazara teenager in Tehran. Made when he was 16 years old, the song was meant to be funny. His band did not even have a name. The boys uploaded the track on a local file-sharing platform in 2014 and were as surprised as anyone when it was downloaded thousands of times. But after the surprise came a creeping sense of fear. Undocumented Afghan refugee families living in Tehran usually try to avoid drawing attention to themselves. Karim tried to have the song deleted, but after two months there was a knock on the door. It was the police.

    “I asked them how they found me,” he said. “I had no documents but they knew where I lived.”

    Already estranged from his family, the teenager was transported from his life of working in a pharmacy and staying with friends to life in a prison outside the capital. After two weeks inside, he was given three choices: to serve a five-year sentence; to be deported to Afghanistan; or to redeem himself by joining the Fatemiyoun.

    According to Iranian propaganda, the Fatemiyoun are Afghan volunteers deployed to Syria to protect the tomb of Zainab, the granddaughter of the Prophet Mohammad. In reality, the Fatemiyoun Brigade is a unit of Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard, drawn overwhelmingly from Hazara communities, and it has fought in Iraq and Yemen, as well as Syria. Some estimates put its full strength at 15,000, which would make it the second-largest foreign force in support of the Assad regime, behind the Lebanese militia group Hezbollah.

    Karim was told he would be paid and given a one-year residence permit during leave back in Iran. Conscripts are promised that if they are “martyred,” their family will receive a pension and permanent status. “I wasn’t going to Afghanistan and I wasn’t going to prison,” said Karim. So he found himself forced to serve in the #Fatemiyoun.

    His first taste of the new life came when he was transferred to a training base outside Tehran, where the recruits, including other children, were given basic weapons training and religious indoctrination. They marched, crawled and prayed under the brigade’s yellow flag with a green arch, crossed by assault rifles and a Koranic phrase: “With the Help of God.”

    “Imagine me at 16,” said Karim. “I have no idea how to kill a bird. They got us to slaughter animals to get us ready. First, they prepare your brain to kill.”

    The 16-year-old’s first deployment was to Mosul in Iraq, where he served four months. When he was given leave back in Iran, Karim was told that to qualify for his residence permit he would need to serve a second term, this time in Syria. They were first sent into the fight against the so-called Islamic State in Raqqa. Because of his age and physique, Karim and some of the other underage soldiers were moved to the medical corps. He said that there were boys as young as 14 and he remembers a 15-year-old who fought using a rocket-propelled grenade launcher.

    “One prisoner was killed by being hung by his hair from a tree. They cut off his fingers one by one and cauterized the wounds with gunpowder.”

    “I knew nothing about Syria. I was just trying to survive. They were making us hate ISIS, dehumanizing them. Telling us not to leave one of them alive.” Since media reports revealed the existence of the Fatemiyoun, the brigade has set up a page on Facebook. Among pictures of “proud volunteers,” it shows stories of captured ISIS prisoners being fed and cared for. Karim recalls a different story.

    “One prisoner was killed by being hung by his hair from a tree. They cut off his fingers one by one and cauterized the wounds with gunpowder.”

    The casualties on both sides were overwhelming. At the al-Razi hospital in Aleppo, the young medic saw the morgue overwhelmed with bodies being stored two or three to a compartment. Despite promises to reward the families of martyrs, Karim said many of the bodies were not sent back to Iran.

    Mosa’s basic training passed in a blur. A shy boy whose parents had divorced when he was young and whose father became an opium addict, he had always shrunk from violence. He never wanted to touch the toy guns that other boys played with. Now he was being taught to break down, clean and fire an assault rifle.

    The trainees were taken three times a day to the imam, who preached to them about their holy duty and the iniquities of ISIS, often referred to as Daesh.

    “They told us that Daesh was the same but worse than the Taliban,” said Mosa. “I didn’t listen to them. I didn’t go to Syria by choice. They forced me to. I just needed the paper.”

    Mosa was born in 2001. Before being deployed to Syria, the recruits were given I.D. tags and papers that deliberately overstated their age: In 2017, Human Rights Watch released photographs of the tombstones of eight Afghan children who had died in Syria and whose families identified them as having been under 18 years old. The clerk who filled out Mosa’s forms did not trouble himself with complex math: He just changed 2001 to 1991. Mosa was one of four underage soldiers in his group. The boys were scared – their hands shook so hard they kept dropping their weapons. Two of them were dead within days of reaching the front lines.

    “I didn’t even know where we were exactly, somewhere in the mountains in a foreign country. I was scared all the time. Every time I saw a friend dying in front of my eyes I was thinking I would be next,” said Mosa.

    He has flashbacks of a friend who died next to him after being shot in the face by a sniper. After the incident, he could not sleep for four nights. The worst, he said, were the sudden raids by ISIS when they would capture Fatemiyoun fighters: “God knows what happened to them.”

    Iran does not release figures on the number of Fatemiyoun casualties. In a rare interview earlier this year, a senior officer in the Iranian Revolutionary Guard suggested as many as 1,500 Fatemiyoun had been killed in Syria. In Mashhad, an Iranian city near the border with Afghanistan where the brigade was first recruited, video footage has emerged of families demanding the bodies of their young men believed to have died in Syria. Mosa recalls patrols in Syria where 150 men and boys would go out and only 120 would return.

    Escaping Syria

    Abbas had two weeks left in Syria before going back to Iran on leave. After 10 weeks in what he describes as a “living hell,” he had begun to believe he might make it out alive. It was his second stint in Syria and, still only 17 years old, he had been chosen to be a paramedic, riding in the back of a 2008 Chevrolet truck converted into a makeshift ambulance.

    He remembers thinking that the ambulance and the hospital would have to be better than the bitter cold of the front line. His abiding memory from then was the sound of incoming 120mm shells. “They had a special voice,” Abbas said. “And when you hear it, you must lie down.”

    Following 15 days of nursing training, during which he was taught how to find a vein and administer injections, he was now an ambulance man, collecting the dead and wounded from the battlefields on which the Fatemiyoun were fighting ISIS.

    Abbas grew up in Ghazni in Afghanistan, but his childhood ended when his father died from cancer in 2013. Now the provider for the family, he traveled with smugglers across the border into Iran, to work for a tailor in Tehran who had known his father. He worked without documents and faced the same threats as the undocumented Hazara children born in Iran. Even more dangerous were the few attempts he made to return to Ghazni. The third time he attempted to hop the border he was captured by Iranian police.

    Abbas was packed onto a transport, along with 23 other children, and sent to Ordugah-i Muhaceran, a camplike detention center outside Mashhad. When they got there the Shia Hazara boys were separated from Sunni Pashtuns, Afghanistan’s largest ethnic group, who were pushed back across the border. Abbas was given the same choice as Karim and Mosa before him: Afghanistan or Syria. Many of the other forced recruits Abbas met in training, and later fought alongside in Syria, were addicts with a history of substance abuse.

    Testimony from three Fatemiyoun child soldiers confirmed that Tramadol was routinely used by recruits to deaden their senses, leaving them “feeling nothing” even in combat situations but, nonetheless, able to stay awake for days at a time.

    The Fatemiyoun officers dealt with withdrawal symptoms by handing out Tramadol, an opioid painkiller that is used to treat back pain but sometimes abused as a cheap alternative to methadone. The drug is a slow-release analgesic. Testimony from three Fatemiyoun child soldiers confirmed that it was routinely used by recruits to deaden their senses, leaving them “feeling nothing” even in combat situations but, nonetheless, able to stay awake for days at a time. One of the children reiterated that the painkiller meant he felt nothing. Users describe feeling intensely thirsty but say they avoid drinking water because it triggers serious nausea and vomiting. Tramadol is addictive and prolonged use can lead to insomnia and seizures.

    Life in the ambulance had not met Abbas’ expectations. He was still sent to the front line, only now it was to collect the dead and mutilated. Some soldiers shot themselves in the feet to escape the conflict.

    “We picked up people with no feet and no hands. Some of them were my friends,” Abbas said. “One man was in small, small pieces. We collected body parts I could not recognize and I didn’t know if they were Syrian or Iranian or Afghan. We just put them in bags.”

    Abbas did not make it to the 12th week. One morning, driving along a rubble-strewn road, his ambulance collided with an anti-tank mine. Abbas’ last memory of Syria is seeing the back doors of the vehicle blasted outward as he was thrown onto the road.

    When he awoke he was in a hospital bed in Iran. He would later learn that the Syrian ambulance driver had been killed and that the other Afghan medic in the vehicle had lost both his legs. At the time, his only thought was to escape.

    The Toll on Child Soldiers

    Alice Roorda first came into contact with child soldiers in 2001 in the refugee camps of Sierra Leone in West Africa. A child psychologist, she was sent there by the United Kingdom-based charity War Child. She was one of three psychologists for a camp of more than 5,000 heavily traumatized survivors of one of West Africa’s more brutal conflicts.

    “There was almost nothing we could do,” she admitted.

    The experience, together with later work in Uganda, has given her a deep grounding in the effects of war and post-conflict trauma on children. She said prolonged exposure to conflict zones has physical as well as psychological effects.

    “If you are chronically stressed, as in a war zone, you have consistently high levels of the two basic stress hormones: adrenaline and cortisol.”

    Even after reaching a calmer situation, the “stress baseline” remains high, she said. This impacts everything from the immune system to bowel movements. Veterans often suffer from complications related to the continual engagement of the psoas, or “fear muscle” – the deepest muscles in the body’s core, which connect the spine, through the pelvis, to the femurs.

    “With prolonged stress you start to see the world around you as more dangerous.” The medial prefrontal cortex, the section of the brain that interprets threat levels, is also affected, said Roorda. This part of the brain is sometimes called the “watchtower.”

    “When your watchtower isn’t functioning well you see everything as more dangerous. You are on high alert. This is not a conscious response; it is because the stress is already so close to the surface.”

    Psychological conditions that can be expected to develop include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Left untreated, these stress levels can lead to physical symptoms ranging from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS or ME) to high blood pressure or irritable bowel syndrome. Also common are heightened sensitivity to noise and insomnia.

    The trauma of war can also leave children frozen at the point when they were traumatized. “Their life is organized as if the trauma is still ongoing,” said Roorda. “It is difficult for them to take care of themselves, to make rational well informed choices, and to trust people.”

    The starting point for any treatment of child soldiers, said Roorda, is a calm environment. They need to release the tension with support groups and physical therapy, she said, and “a normal bedtime.”

    The Dutch psychologist, who is now based in Athens, acknowledged that what she is describing is the exact opposite of the conditions at #Moria.

    Endgame

    Karim is convinced that his facility for English has saved his life. While most Hazara boys arrive in Europe speaking only Farsi, Karim had taught himself some basic English before reaching Greece. As a boy in Tehran he had spent hours every day trying to pick up words and phrases from movies that he watched with subtitles on his phone. His favorite was The Godfather, which he said he must have seen 25 times. He now calls English his “safe zone” and said he prefers it to Farsi.

    When Karim reached Greece in March 2016, new arrivals were not yet confined to the islands. No one asked him if he was a child or an adult. He paid smugglers to help him escape Iran while on leave from Syria and after crossing through Turkey landed on Chios. Within a day and a half, he had passed through the port of Piraeus and reached Greece’s northern border with Macedonia, at Idomeni.

    When he realized the border was closed, he talked to some of the international aid workers who had come to help at the makeshift encampment where tens of thousands of refugees and migrants waited for a border that would not reopen. They ended up hiring him as a translator. Two years on, his English is now much improved and Karim has worked for a string of international NGOs and a branch of the Greek armed forces, where he was helped to successfully apply for asylum.

    The same job has also brought him to Moria. He earns an above-average salary for Greece and at first he said that his work on Lesbos is positive: “I’m not the only one who has a shitty background. It balances my mind to know that I’m not the only one.”

    But then he admits that it is difficult hearing and interpreting versions of his own life story from Afghan asylum seekers every day at work. He has had problems with depression and suffered flashbacks, “even though I’m in a safe country now.”

    Abbas got the help he needed to win the vulnerability contest. After he was initially registered as an adult, his age assessment was overturned and he was transferred from Moria to a shelter for children on Lesbos. He has since been moved again to a shelter in mainland Greece. While he waits to hear the decision on his protection status, Abbas – like other asylum seekers in Greece – receives 150 euros ($170) a month. This amount needs to cover all his expenses, from food and clothing to phone credit. The money is not enough to cover a regular course of the antidepressant Prozac and the sleeping pills he was prescribed by the psychiatrist he was able to see on Lesbos.

    “I save them for when it gets really bad,” he said.

    Since moving to the mainland he has been hospitalized once with convulsions, but his main worry is the pain in his groin. Abbas underwent a hernia operation in Iran, the result of injuries sustained as a child lifting adult bodies into the ambulance. He has been told that he will need to wait for four months to see a doctor in Greece who can tell him if he needs another operation.

    “I would like to go back to school,” he said. But in reality, Abbas knows that he will need to work and there is little future for an Afghan boy who can no longer lift heavy weights.

    Walking into an Afghan restaurant in downtown Athens – near Victoria Square, where the people smugglers do business – Abbas is thrilled to see Farsi singers performing on the television above the door. “I haven’t been in an Afghan restaurant for maybe three years,” he said to explain his excitement. His face brightens again when he catches sight of Ghormeh sabzi, a herb stew popular in Afghanistan and Iran that reminds him of his mother. “I miss being with them,” he said, “being among my family.”

    When the dish arrives he pauses before eating, taking out his phone and carefully photographing the plate from every angle.

    Mosa is about to mark the end of a full year in Moria. He remains in the same drab tent that reminds him every day of Syria. Serious weight loss has made his long limbs – the ones that made it easier for adults to pretend he was not a child – almost comically thin. His skin is laced with scars, but he refuses to go into detail about how he got them. Mosa has now turned 18 and seems to realize that his best chance of getting help may have gone.

    “Those people who don’t have problems, they give them vulnerability (status),” he said with evident anger. “If you tell them the truth, they don’t help you.”

    Then he apologises for the flash of temper. “I get upset and angry and my body shakes,” he said.

    Mosa explained that now when he gets angry he has learned to remove himself: “Sometimes I stuff my ears with toilet paper to make it quiet.”

    It is 10 months since Mosa had his asylum interview. The questions he expected about his time in the Fatemiyoun never came up. Instead, the interviewers asked him why he had not stayed in Turkey after reaching that country, having run away while on leave in Iran.

    The questions they did ask him point to his likely rejection and deportation. Why, he was asked, was his fear of being persecuted in Afghanistan credible? He told them that he has heard from other Afghan boys that police and security services in the capital, Kabul, were arresting ex-combatants from Syria.

    Like teenagers everywhere, many of the younger Fatemiyoun conscripts took selfies in Syria and posted them on Facebook or shared them on WhatsApp. The images, which include uniforms and insignia, can make him a target for Sunni reprisals. These pictures now haunt him as much as the faces of his dead comrades.

    Meanwhile, the fate he suffered two tours in Syria to avoid now seems to be the most that Europe can offer him. Without any of his earlier anger, he said, “I prefer to kill myself here than go to Afghanistan.”

    #enfants-soldats #syrie #réfugiés #asile #migrations #guerre #conflit #réfugiés_afghans #Afghanistan #ISIS #EI #Etat_islamique #trauma #traumatisme #vulnérabilité

    ping @isskein


  • Grèce : soupçons de détournement des fonds européens d’aide aux réfugiés
    https://www.bastamag.net/Grece-soupcons-de-detournement-des-fonds-europeens-d-aide-aux-refugies

    Le ministre de la Défense grec a-t-il détourné des fonds européens destinés à l’accueil des réfugiés au profit de ses proches ? C’est ce que suggère une enquête de trois journalistes du journal chypriote Fileleftheros, qui affirment que des contrats de restauration ou de plomberie pour le camp de réfugiés de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, auraient été accordés sans appel d’offre régulier et à des prix gonflés au profit d’entreprises liées au ministre souverainiste Panos Kammenos, membre du gouvernement dirigé par (...)

    En bref

    / #Conservateurs, #Europe, #Migrations, #Droits_fondamentaux


  • Grèce : à Lesbos, le camp réservé aux migrants « est un monstre qui ne cesse de s’étendre » - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/09/20/grece-a-lesbos-le-camp-reserve-aux-migrants-est-un-monstre-qui-ne-cesse-d

    Alors que les dirigeants européens sont réunis à Salzbourg pour évoquer notamment les questions migratoires et la création de « centres fermés », les hotspots surpeuplés des îles grecques se trouvent dans une situation explosive.

    L’annonce n’aurait pu mieux tomber : mardi, le gouvernement grec s’est enfin engagé à transférer 2 000 migrants de l’île de Lesbos vers la Grèce continentale d’ici la fin du mois. Une décision censée décongestionner quelque peu le camp surpeuplé de Moria qui abrite près de 9 000 personnes, dont un tiers d’enfants. Or, depuis plusieurs jours, les ONG installés sur place ne cessent d’alerter sur les conditions de vie abjectes dans ce camp, aux allures de caserne, prévu au départ pour 3 000 personnes.

    Car #Moria est censé accueillir l’immense majorité de réfugiés et migrants qui accostent sur l’île (ils sont aujourd’hui plus de 11 000 au total à Lesbos), en provenance des côtes turques qu’on distingue à l’œil nu au large. Généraliser les #hotspots, ou centres fermés, en Europe : c’est justement l’une des options envisagées par les dirigeants européens réunis jeudi et vendredi à Salzbourg en Autriche. En Grèce, les hotspots créés il y a plus de deux ans, ont pourtant abouti à une situation explosive.

    Moria, comme les autres hotspots des îles grecques, n’est certes pas un centre fermé : ses occupants ont le droit de circuler sur l’île, mais pas de la quitter. En mars 2016, un accord inédit entre l’Union européenne et la Turquie devait tarir le flot des arrivées sur cette façade maritime. Comme Ankara avait conditionné le rapatriement éventuel en Turquie de ces naufragés à leur maintien sur les hotspots d’arrivée, les îles grecques qui lui font face se sont rapidement transformées en prison. Condamnant les demandeurs d’asile à attendre de longs mois le résultat de leurs démarches auprès des services concernés. Certains attendent même une réponse depuis déjà deux ans. Et plus le temps passe, plus les candidats sont nombreux.

    Silence

    Si le deal UE-Turquie a fait baisser le nombre des arrivées, elles n’ont jamais cessé. Rien que pour l’année 2018, ce sont près de 20 000 nouveaux arrivants qui ont échoué sur les îles grecques, où l’afflux des barques venues de Turquie reste quasi quotidien. Selon le quotidien grec Kathimerini, 615 personnes sont arrivées rien que le week-end dernier. Pour le seul mois d’août, Lesbos a accueilli plus de 1 800 nouveaux arrivants. Des arrivées désormais peu médiatisées alors que les dirigeants européens se sont écharpés cet été sur l’accueil de bateaux en provenance de Libye. Et pendant ce temps à Lesbos, la situation vire au cauchemar dans un silence assourdissant.

    Il y a une semaine, 19 ONG, dont Oxfam, ont pourtant tiré la sonnette d’alarme dans une déclaration commune, dénonçant des conditions de vie scandaleuses, et appelant les dirigeants européens à abandonner l’idée de créer d’autres centres fermés à travers l’Europe.

    « Moria, c’est un monstre qui n’a cessé de s’étendre. Faute de place on installe désormais des tentes dans les champs d’oliviers voisins, des enfants y dorment au milieu des serpents, des scorpions et de torrents d’eau pestilentiels qui servent d’égouts. A l’intérieur même du camp, il y a une toilette pour 72 résidents, une douche pour 80 personnes. Et encore, ce sont les chiffres du mois de juin, c’est pire aujourd’hui », dénonce Marion Bouchetel, chargée sur place du plaidoyer d’Oxfam, et jointe par téléphone. « Ce sont des gens vulnérables, qui ont vécu des situations traumatisantes, ont été parfois torturés. Quand ils arrivent ici, ils sont piégés pour une durée indéterminée. Ils n’ont souvent aucune information, vivent dans une incertitude totale », ajoute-t-elle.

    Avec un seul médecin pour tout le camp de Moria, les premiers examens psychologiques sont forcément sommaires et de nombreuses personnes vulnérables restent livrées à elles-mêmes. Dans la promiscuité insupportable du camp, les agressions sont devenues fréquentes, les tentatives de suicide et d’automutilations aussi. Elles concernent désormais souvent des adolescents, voire de très jeunes enfants.

    « Enfer »

    « J’ai travaillé quatorze ans dans une clinique psychiatrique de santé mentale à Trieste en Italie », explique dans une lettre ouverte publiée lundi, le docteur Alessandro Barberio, employé par Médecins sans frontières (MSF), à Lesbos. « Pendant toutes ces années de pratique médicale, jamais je n’ai vu un nombre aussi phénoménal qu’à Lesbos de gens en souffrance psychique », poursuit le médecin, qui dénonce la tension extrême dans laquelle vivent les réfugiés mais aussi les personnels soignants. Sans compter le cas particulier des enfants « qui viennent de pays en guerre, ont fait l’expérience de la violence et des traumatismes. Et qui, au lieu de recevoir soins et protection en Europe, sont soumis à la peur, au stress et à la violence », renchérit dans une vidéo récemment postée sur les réseaux sociaux le coordinateur de MSF en Grèce Declan Barry.

    « Comment voulez vous aider quelqu’un qui a subi des violences sexuelles ou a fait une tentative de suicide, si vous le renvoyez chaque soir dans l’enfer du camp de Moria ? Tout en lui annonçant qu’il aura son premier entretien pour sa demande d’asile en avril 2019 ? Actuellement, il n’y a même plus d’avocat sur place pour les seconder dans la procédure d’appel », s’indigne Marion Bouchetel d’Oxfam.

    Il y a une dizaine de jours, la gouverneure pour les îles d’Egée du Nord avait menacé de fermer Moria pour cause d’insalubrité. Est-ce cette annonce, malgré tout difficile à appliquer, qui a poussé le gouvernement grec a annoncé le transfert de 2 000 personnes en Grèce continentale ? Le porte-parole du gouvernement grec a admis mardi que la situation à Moria était « borderline ». Mais de toute façon, ce transfert éventuel ne réglera pas le problème de fond.

    « Il a déjà eu d’autres transferts, au coup par coup, sur le continent. Le problème, c’est que ceux qui partent sont rapidement remplacés par de nouveaux arrivants », soupire Marion Bouchetel. Longtemps, les ONG sur place ont soupçonné les autorités grecques et européennes de laisser la situation se dégrader afin d’envoyer un message négatif aux candidats au départ. Lesquels ne se sont visiblement pas découragés.
    Maria Malagardis

    Cette photo me déglingue ! Cette gamine plantée là les bras collés contre le buste, jambes et pieds serrés, comme au garde à vous. Et ce regard, cette expression, je sais pas mais je n’arrive pas à m’en détacher ! Et forcément le T-shirt ! Et le contexte du camp avec l’article, ça me flingue.

    #immigration #grèce #Lesbos #camps #MSF #europe


  • EU steps up planning for refugee exodus if Assad attacks #Idlib

    Thousands to be moved from Greek island camps to make space in case of mass arrivals.

    Children walk past the remains of burned-out tents after an outbreak of violence at the Moria migrant centre on Lesbos. Aid groups say conditions at the camps on Greek islands are ’shameful’ © Reuters

    Michael Peel in Brussels September 14, 2018

    Thousands of migrants will be moved from Greek island camps within weeks to ease chronic overcrowding and make space if Syrians flee from an assault on rebel-held Idlib province, under plans being discussed by Brussels and Athens.

    Dimitris Avramopoulos, the EU’s migration commissioner, is due to meet senior Greek officials next week including Alexis Tsipras, prime minister, to hammer out a plan to move an initial 3,000 people.

    The proposal is primarily aimed at dealing with what 19 non-governmental groups on Thursday branded “shameful” conditions at the island migrant centres. The strategy also dovetails with contingency planning in case Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s Russian-backed regime launches a full-scale offensive to retake Idlib and triggers an exodus of refugees to Greece via Turkey.

    The numbers in the planned first Greek migrant transfer would go only partway to easing the island overcrowding — and they are just a small fraction of the several million people estimated to be gathered in the Syrian opposition enclave on the Turkish border.

    “It’s important to get those numbers down,” said one EU diplomat of the Greek island camps. “If we have mass arrivals in Greece, it’s going to be very tough. There is no spare capacity.”

    Syria’s Idlib awaits major assault The UN Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs said this week that 30,000 people had been displaced from their homes by air and ground attacks by the Syrian regime and its allies in the Idlib area, while a full assault could drive out 800,000.

    Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission president, this week warned that the “impending humanitarian disaster” in Idlib must be a “deep and direct concern to us all”.

    17,000 Number of migrants crammed into camps designed for 6,000 The European Commission wants to help Athens accelerate an existing programme to send migrants to the Greek mainland and provide accommodation there to ease the island overcrowding, EU diplomats say.

    The commission said it was working with the Greeks to move 3,000 “vulnerable” people whom Athens has made eligible for transfer, in many cases because they have already applied for asylum and are awaiting the results of their claims.

    Migrant numbers in the island camps have climbed this year, in part because of the time taken to process asylum cases. More than 17,000 are crammed into facilities with capacity of barely 6,000, the NGOs said on Thursday, adding that Moria camp on the island of Lesbos was awash with raw sewage and reports of sexual violence and abuse.

    “It is nothing short of shameful that people are expected to endure such horrific conditions on European soil,” the NGOs said in a statement.

    Mr Avramopoulos, the EU migration commissioner, told reporters on Thursday he knew there were “problems right now, especially in the camp of Moria”. The commission was doing “everything in our power” to support the Greek authorities operationally and financially, he added.

    Recommended The FT View The editorial board The high price of Syria’s next disaster “Money is not an issue,” he said. “Greece has had and will continue having all the financial support to address the migration challenges.

    ” The Greek government has already transferred some asylum seekers to the mainland. It has urged the EU to give it more funds and support.

    EU diplomats say the effect of the Idlib conflict on the Greek situation is hard to judge. One uncertainty is whether Ankara would open its frontier to allow people to escape. Even if civilians do cross the border, it is not certain that they would try to move on to the EU: Turkey already hosts more than 3.5m Syrian refugees.

    The EU secured a 2016 deal with Turkey under which Brussels agreed to pay €6bn in exchange for Ankara taking back migrants who cross from its territory to the Greek islands. The agreement has helped drive a sharp fall in Mediterranean migrant arrival numbers to a fraction of their 2015-16 highs.

    https://www.ft.com/content/0aada630-b77a-11e8-bbc3-ccd7de085ffe
    #Syrie #réfugiés_syriens #asile #migrations #Grèce #guerre #réfugiés_syriens #Moria #vide #plein #géographie_du_vide #géographie_du_plein (on vide le camp pour être prêt à le remplir au cas où...) #politique_migratoire
    cc @reka


  • InfoMigrants | MSF : des enfants tentent de se suicider dans le camp de Moria en Grèce
    https://asile.ch/2018/09/14/infomigrants-msf-des-enfants-tentent-de-se-suicider-dans-le-camp-de-moria-en-g

    Médecins sans frontières (MSF) lance un énième cri d’alarme concernant les conditions de vie catastrophiques dans le camp de réfugiés de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce. Article de Wesley Dockery et Naser Ahmadi publié par InfoMigrants, le 7 septembre 2018. Cliquez ici pour lire l’article sur leur site internet. 


  • http://www.migreurop.org/article2893.html

    « Au terme d’un procès bouclé en une semaine à Chios, 32 personnes ont été condamnées, le 27 avril 2018, à 26 mois de prison avec sursis pour coups et blessures sur policiers. Elles avaient été arrêtées un an plus tôt à l’issue d’une manifestation de protestation dans le hotspot de Moria (île de Lesbos) où sont confiné·e·s les migrant·e·s arrivé·e·s par mer.
    (...)
    Le procès : une justice d’exception
    Un système de prison à ciel ouvert organisé à l’échelle européenne
    Instrumentalisation et nouveau système de dissuasion
    Dans quelle mesure ces poursuites ne servent-elles pas un autre dessein ? En interpellant des demandeurs d’asile pour des motifs de type délictuel, instrumentalisant par là même la justice, il est alors possible de les sortir du parcours d’asile et d’organiser leur renvoi vers le(s) pays qu’ils ont fui.

    Cette nouvelle stratégie semble couronner des politiques migratoires de plus en plus dures à l’égard des exilé·e·s, qui s’inscrivent plus que jamais dans une logique de criminalisation. En outre, poussant le cynisme à son paroxysme, les États ont trouvé là une autre manière de décongestionner les hotspots : si le renvoi forcé de la Grèce vers la Turquie n’est pas possible en application de l’arrangement UE/Turquie, si les personnes migrantes ne peuvent être admises sur le territoire européen, il restera toujours l’instrumentalisation de la justice, alternative supplémentaire pour dissuader, punir et éloigner collectivement toute une population ciblée. »

    #grèce-moria #migration #criminalisation


  • https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Une-ONG-accusee-d-aide-a-l-entree-irreguliere-de-migrants

    "L’ONG grecque Emergency response centre international (ERCY) était présente sur l’île de Lesbos depuis 2015 pour venir en aide aux réfugiés. Depuis mardi 28 août, ses 30 membres sont poursuivis pour avoir « facilité l’entrée illégale d’étrangers sur le territoire grec » en vue de gains financiers, selon le communiqué de la police grecque.

    L’enquête a commencé en février 2018, rapporte le site d’information protagon.gr, lorsqu’une Jeep portant une fausse plaque d’immatriculation de l’armée grecque a été découverte par la police sur une plage, attendant l’arrivée d’une barque pleine de réfugiés en provenance de Turquie. Les membres de l’ONG, six Grecs et 24 ressortissants étrangers, sont accusés d’avoir été informés à l’avance par des personnes présentes du côté turc des heures et des lieux d’arrivée des barques de migrants, d’avoir organisé l’accueil de ces réfugiés sans en informer les autorités locales et d’avoir surveillé illégalement les communications radio entre les autorités grecques et étrangères, dont Frontex, l’agence européenne des gardes-cotes et gardes-frontières. Les crimes pour lesquels ils sont inculpés – participation à une organisation criminelle, violation de secrets d’État et recel – sont passibles de la réclusion à perpétuité.

    Parmi les membres de l’ONG grecque arrêtés se trouve Yusra et Sarah Mardini, deux sœurs nageuses et réfugiées syrienne qui avaient sauvé 18 personnes de la noyade lors de leur traversée de la mer Égée en août 2015. Depuis Yusra a participé aux Jeux Olympiques de Rio, est devenue ambassadrice de l’ONU et a écrit un livre, Butterfly. Sarah avait quant à elle décidé d’aider à son tour les réfugiés qui traversaient dangereusement la mer Égée sur des bateaux de fortune et s’était engagée comme bénévole dans l’ONG ERCI durant l’été 2016.

    Sarah a été arrêtée le 21 août à l’aéroport de Lesbos alors qu’elle devait rejoindre Berlin où elle vit avec sa famille. Le 3 septembre, elle devait commencer son année universitaire au collège Bard en sciences sociales. La jeune Syrienne de 23 ans a été transférée à la prison de Korydallos, à Athènes, dans l’attente de son procès. Son avocat a demandé mercredi sa remise en liberté.

    Ce n’est pas la première fois que des ONG basées à Lesbos ont des soucis avec la justice grecque. Des membres de l’ONG espagnole Proem-Aid avaient aussi été accusés d’avoir participé à l’entrée illégale de réfugiés sur l’île. Ils ont été relaxés en mai dernier. D’après le ministère de la Marine, 114 ONG ont été enregistrées sur l’île, dont les activités souvent difficilement contrôlables inquiètent le gouvernement grec et ses partenaires européens."

    #grèce #migration #criminalisation #frontex #mobilisation #courrier-des-balkans


  • Vu sur Twitter :

    M.Potte-Bonneville @pottebonneville a retweeté Catherine Boitard

    Vous vous souvenez ? Elle avait sauvé ses compagnons en tirant l’embarcation à la nage pendant trois heures : Sarah Mardini, nageuse olympique et réfugiée syrienne, est arrêtée pour aide à l’immigration irrégulière.

    Les olympiades de la honte 2018 promettent de beaux records

    M.Potte-Bonneville @pottebonneville a retweeté Catherine Boitard @catboitard :

    Avec sa soeur Yusra, nageuse olympique et distinguée par l’ONU, elle avait sauvé 18 réfugiés de la noyade à leur arrivée en Grèce. La réfugiée syrienne Sarah Mardini, boursière à Berlin et volontaire de l’ONG ERCI, a été arrêtée à Lesbos pour aide à immigration irrégulière

    #migration #asile #syrie #grèce #solidarité #humanité

    • GRÈCE : LA POLICE ARRÊTE 30 MEMBRES D’UNE ONG D’AIDE AUX RÉFUGIÉS

      La police a arrêté, mardi 28 août, 30 membres de l’ONG grecque #ERCI, dont les soeurs syriennes Yusra et Sarah Mardini, qui avaient sauvé la vie à 18 personnes en 2015. Les militant.e.s sont accusés d’avoir aidé des migrants à entrer illégalement sur le territoire grec via l’île de Lesbos. Ils déclarent avoir agi dans le cadre de l’assistance à personnes en danger.

      Par Marina Rafenberg

      L’ONG grecque Emergency response centre international (ERCY) était présente sur l’île de Lesbos depuis 2015 pour venir en aide aux réfugiés. Depuis mardi 28 août, ses 30 membres sont poursuivis pour avoir « facilité l’entrée illégale d’étrangers sur le territoire grec » en vue de gains financiers, selon le communiqué de la police grecque.

      L’enquête a commencé en février 2018, rapporte le site d’information protagon.gr, lorsqu’une Jeep portant une fausse plaque d’immatriculation de l’armée grecque a été découverte par la police sur une plage, attendant l’arrivée d’une barque pleine de réfugiés en provenance de Turquie. Les membres de l’ONG, six Grecs et 24 ressortissants étrangers, sont accusés d’avoir été informés à l’avance par des personnes présentes du côté turc des heures et des lieux d’arrivée des barques de migrants, d’avoir organisé l’accueil de ces réfugiés sans en informer les autorités locales et d’avoir surveillé illégalement les communications radio entre les autorités grecques et étrangères, dont Frontex, l’agence européenne des gardes-cotes et gardes-frontières. Les crimes pour lesquels ils sont inculpés – participation à une organisation criminelle, violation de secrets d’État et recel – sont passibles de la réclusion à perpétuité.

      Parmi les membres de l’ONG grecque arrêtés se trouve Yusra et Sarah Mardini, deux sœurs nageuses et réfugiées syrienne qui avaient sauvé 18 personnes de la noyade lors de leur traversée de la mer Égée en août 2015. Depuis Yusra a participé aux Jeux Olympiques de Rio, est devenue ambassadrice de l’ONU et a écrit un livre, Butterfly. Sarah avait quant à elle décidé d’aider à son tour les réfugiés qui traversaient dangereusement la mer Égée sur des bateaux de fortune et s’était engagée comme bénévole dans l’ONG ERCI durant l’été 2016.

      Sarah a été arrêtée le 21 août à l’aéroport de Lesbos alors qu’elle devait rejoindre Berlin où elle vit avec sa famille. Le 3 septembre, elle devait commencer son année universitaire au collège Bard en sciences sociales. La jeune Syrienne de 23 ans a été transférée à la prison de Korydallos, à Athènes, dans l’attente de son procès. Son avocat a demandé mercredi sa remise en liberté.

      Ce n’est pas la première fois que des ONG basées à Lesbos ont des soucis avec la justice grecque. Des membres de l’ONG espagnole Proem-Aid avaient aussi été accusés d’avoir participé à l’entrée illégale de réfugiés sur l’île. Ils ont été relaxés en mai dernier. D’après le ministère de la Marine, 114 ONG ont été enregistrées sur l’île, dont les activités souvent difficilement contrôlables inquiètent le gouvernement grec et ses partenaires européens.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Une-ONG-accusee-d-aide-a-l-entree-irreguliere-de-migrants

      #grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #délit_de_solidarité

    • Arrest of Syrian ’hero swimmer’ puts Lesbos refugees back in spotlight

      Sara Mardini’s case adds to fears that rescue work is being criminalised and raises questions about NGO.

      Greece’s high-security #Korydallos prison acknowledges that #Sara_Mardini is one of its rarer inmates. For a week, the Syrian refugee, a hero among human rights defenders, has been detained in its women’s wing on charges so serious they have elicited baffled dismay.

      The 23-year-old, who saved 18 refugees in 2015 by swimming their waterlogged dingy to the shores of Lesbos with her Olympian sister, is accused of people smuggling, espionage and membership of a criminal organisation – crimes allegedly committed since returning to work with an NGO on the island. Under Greek law, Mardini can be held in custody pending trial for up to 18 months.

      “She is in a state of disbelief,” said her lawyer, Haris Petsalnikos, who has petitioned for her release. “The accusations are more about criminalising humanitarian action. Sara wasn’t even here when these alleged crimes took place but as charges they are serious, perhaps the most serious any aid worker has ever faced.”

      Mardini’s arrival to Europe might have gone unnoticed had it not been for the extraordinary courage she and younger sister, Yusra, exhibited guiding their boat to safety after the engine failed during the treacherous crossing from Turkey. Both were elite swimmers, with Yusra going on to compete in the 2016 Rio Olympics.

      The sisters, whose story is the basis of a forthcoming film by the British director Stephen Daldry, were credited with saving the lives of their fellow passengers. In Germany, their adopted homeland, the pair has since been accorded star status.

      It was because of her inspiring story that Mardini was approached by Emergency Response Centre International, ERCI, on Lesbos. “After risking her own life to save 18 people … not only has she come back to ground zero, but she is here to ensure that no more lives get lost on this perilous journey,” it said after Mardini agreed to join its ranks in 2016.

      After her first stint with ERCI, she again returned to Lesbos last December to volunteer with the aid group. And until 21 August there was nothing to suggest her second spell had not gone well. But as Mardini waited at Mytilini airport to head back to Germany, and a scholarship at Bard College in Berlin, she was arrested. Soon after that, police also arrested ERCI’s field director, Nassos Karakitsos, a former Greek naval force officer, and Sean Binder, a German volunteer who lives in Ireland. All three have protested their innocence.

      The arrests come as signs of a global clampdown on solidarity networks mount. From Russia to Spain, European human rights workers have been targeted in what campaigners call an increasingly sinister attempt to silence civil society in the name of security.

      “There is the concern that this is another example of civil society being closed down by the state,” said Jonathan Cooper, an international human rights lawyer in London. “What we are really seeing is Greek authorities using Sara to send a very worrying message that if you volunteer for refugee work you do so at your peril.”

      But amid concerns about heavy-handed tactics humanitarians face, Greek police say there are others who see a murky side to the story, one ofpeople trafficking and young volunteers being duped into participating in a criminal network unwittingly. In that scenario,the Mardini sisters would make prime targets.

      Greek authorities spent six months investigating the affair. Agents were flown into Lesbos from Athens and Thessaloniki. In an unusually long and detailed statement, last week, Mytilini police said that while posing as a non-profit organisation, ERCI had acted with the sole purpose of profiteering by bringing people illegally into Greece via the north-eastern Aegean islands.

      Members had intercepted Greek and European coastguard radio transmissions to gain advance notification of the location of smugglers’ boats, police said, and that 30, mostly foreign nationals, were lined up to be questioned in connection with the alleged activities. Other “similar organisations” had also collaborated in what was described as “an informal plan to confront emergency situations”, they added.

      Suspicions were first raised, police said, when Mardini and Binder were stopped in February driving a former military 4X4 with false number plates. ERCI remained unnamed until the release of the charge sheets for the pair and that of Karakitsos.

      Lesbos has long been on the frontline of the refugee crisis, attracting idealists and charity workers. Until a dramatic decline in migration numbers via the eastern Mediterranean in March 2016, when a landmark deal was signed between the EU and Turkey, the island was the main entry point to Europe.

      An estimated 114 NGOs and 7,356 volunteers are based on Lesbos, according to Greek authorities. Local officials talk of “an industry”, and with more than 10,000 refugees there and the mood at boiling point, accusations of NGOs acting as a “pull factor” are rife.

      “Sara’s motive for going back this year was purely humanitarian,” said Oceanne Fry, a fellow student who in June worked alongside her at a day clinic in the refugee reception centre.

      “At no point was there any indication of illegal activity by the group … but I can attest to the fact that, other than our intake meeting, none of the volunteers ever met, or interacted, with its leadership.”

      The mayor of Lesbos, Spyros Galinos, said he has seen “good and bad” in the humanitarian movement since the start of the refugee crisis.

      “Everything is possible,. There is no doubt that some NGOs have exploited the situation. The police announcement was uncommonly harsh. For a long time I have been saying that we just don’t need all these NGOs. When the crisis erupted, yes, the state was woefully unprepared but now that isn’t the case.”

      Attempts to contact ERCI were unsuccessful. Neither a telephone number nor an office address – in a scruffy downtown building listed by the aid group on social media – appeared to have any relation to it.

      In a statement released more than a week after Mardini’s arrest, ERCI denied the allegations, saying it had fallen victim to “unfounded claims, accusations and charges”. But it failed to make any mention of Mardini.

      “It makes no sense at all,” said Amed Khan, a New York financier turned philanthropist who has donated boats for ERCI’s search and rescue operations. To accuse any of them of human trafficking is crazy.

      “In today’s fortress Europe you have to wonder whether Brussels isn’t behind it, whether this isn’t a concerted effort to put a chill on civil society volunteers who are just trying to help. After all, we’re talking about grassroots organisations with global values that stepped up into the space left by authorities failing to do their bit.”


      https://amp.theguardian.com/world/2018/sep/06/arrest-of-syrian-hero-swimmer-lesbos-refugees-sara-mardini?CMP=shar

      #Sarah_Mardini

    • The volunteers facing jail for rescuing migrants in the Mediterranean

      The risk of refugees and migrants drowning in the Mediterranean has increased dramatically over the past few years.

      As the European Union pursued a policy of externalisation, voluntary groups stepped in to save the thousands of people making the dangerous crossing. One by one, they are now criminalised.

      The arrest of Sarah Mardini, one of two Syrian sisters who saved a number of refugees in 2015 by pulling their sinking dinghy to Greece, has brought the issue to international attention.

      The Trial

      There aren’t chairs enough for the people gathered in Mytilíni Court. Salam Aldeen sits front row to the right. He has a nervous smile on his face, mouth half open, the tongue playing over his lips.

      Noise emanates from the queue forming in the hallway as spectators struggle for a peak through the door’s windows. The morning heat is already thick and moist – not helped by the two unplugged fans hovering motionless in dead air.

      Police officers with uneasy looks, 15 of them, lean up against the cooling walls of the court. From over the judge, a golden Jesus icon looks down on the assembly. For the sunny holiday town on Lesbos, Greece, this is not a normal court proceeding.

      Outside the court, international media has unpacked their cameras and unloaded their equipment. They’ve come from the New York Times, Deutsche Welle, Danish, Greek and Spanish media along with two separate documentary teams.

      There is no way of knowing when the trial will end. Maybe in a couple of days, some of the journalists say, others point to the unpredictability of the Greek judicial system. If the authorities decide to make a principle out of the case, this could take months.

      Salam Aldeen, in a dark blue jacket, white shirt and tie, knows this. He is charged with human smuggling and faces life in jail.

      More than 16,000 people have drowned in less than five years trying to cross the Mediterranean. That’s an average of ten people dying every day outside Europe’s southern border – more than the Russia-Ukraine conflict over the same period.

      In 2015, when more than one million refugees crossed the Mediterranean, the official death toll was around 3,700. A year later, the number of migrants dropped by two thirds – but the death toll increased to more than 5,000. With still fewer migrants crossing during 2017 and the first half of 2018, one would expect the rate of surviving to pick up.

      The numbers, however, tell a different story. For a refugee setting out to cross the Mediterranean today, the risk of drowning has significantly increased.

      The deaths of thousands of people don’t happen in a vacuum. And it would be impossible to explain the increased risks of crossing without considering recent changes in EU-policies towards migration in the Mediterranean.

      The criminalisation of a Danish NGO-worker on the tiny Greek island of Lesbos might help us understand the deeper layers of EU immigration policy.

      The deterrence effect

      On 27 March 2011, 72 migrants flee Tripoli and squeeze into a 12m long rubber dinghy with a max capacity of 25 people. They start the outboard engine and set out in the Mediterranean night, bound for the Italian island of Lampedusa. In the morning, they are registered by a French aircraft flying over. The migrants stay on course. But 18 hours into their voyage, they send out a distress-call from a satellite phone. The signal is picked up by the rescue centre in Rome who alerts other vessels in the area.

      Two hours later, a military helicopter flies over the boat. At this point, the migrants accidentally drop their satellite phone in the sea. In the hours to follow, the migrants encounter several fishing boats – but their call of distress is ignored. As day turns into night, a second helicopter appears and drops rations of water and biscuits before leaving.

      And then, the following morning on 28 March – the migrants run out of fuel. Left at the mercy of wind and oceanic currents, the migrants embark on a hopeless journey. They drift south; exactly where they came from.

      They don’t see any ships the following day. Nor the next; a whole week goes by without contact to the outside world. But then, somewhere between 3 and 5 April, a military vessel appears on the horizon. It moves in on the migrants and circle their boat.

      The migrants, exhausted and on the brink of despair, wave and signal distress. But as suddenly as it arrived, the military vessel turns around and disappears. And all hope with it.

      On April 10, almost a week later, the migrant vessel lands on a beach south of Tripoli. Of the 72 passengers who left 2 weeks ago, only 11 make it back alive. Two die shortly hereafter.

      Lorenzo Pezzani, lecturer at Forensic Architecture at Goldsmiths University of London, was stunned when he read about the case. In 2011, he was still a PhD student developing new spatial and aesthetic visual tools to document human rights violations. Concerned with the rising number of migrant deaths in the Mediterranean, Lorenzo Pezzani and his colleague Charles Heller founded Forensic Oceanography, an affiliated group to Forensic Architecture. Their first project was to uncover the events and policies leading to a vessel left adrift in full knowledge by international rescue operations.

      It was the public outrage fuelled by the 2013 Lampedusa shipwreck which eventually led to the deployment of Operation Mare Nostrum. At this point, the largest migration of people since the Second World War, the Syrian exodus, could no longer be contained within Syria’s neighbouring countries. At the same time, a relative stability in Libya after the fall of Gaddafi in 2011 descended into civil war; waves of migrants started to cross the Mediterranean.

      From October 2013, Mare Nostrum broke with the reigning EU-policy of non-interference and deployed Italian naval vessels, planes and helicopters at a monthly cost of €9.5 million. The scale was unprecedented; saving lives became the political priority over policing and border control. In terms of lives saved, the operation was an undisputed success. Its own life, however, would be short.

      A critical narrative formed on the political right and was amplified by sections of the media: Mare Nostrum was accused of emboldening Libyan smugglers who – knowing rescue ships were waiting – would send out more migrants. In this understanding, Mare Nostrum constituted a so-called “pull factor” on migrants from North African countries. A year after its inception, Mare Nostrum was terminated.

      In late 2014, Mare Nostrum was replaced by Operation Triton led by Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, with an initial budget of €2.4 million per month. Triton refocused on border control instead of sea rescues in an area much closer to Italian shores. This was a return to the pre-Mare Nostrum policy of non-assistance to deter migrants from crossing. But not only did the change of policy fail to act as a deterrence against the thousands of migrants still crossing the Mediterranean, it also left a huge gap between the amount of boats in distress and operational rescue vessels. A gap increasingly filled by merchant vessels.

      Merchant vessels, however, do not have the equipment or training to handle rescues of this volume. On 31 March 2015, the shipping community made a call to EU-politicians warning of a “terrible risk of further catastrophic loss of life as ever-more desperate people attempt this deadly sea crossing”. Between 1 January and 20 May 2015, merchant ships rescued 12.000 people – 30 per cent of the total number rescued in the Mediterranean.

      As the shipping community had already foreseen, the new policy of non-assistance as deterrence led to several horrific incidents. These culminated in two catastrophic shipwrecks on 12 and 18 April 2015 and the death of 1,200 people. In both cases, merchant vessels were right next to the overcrowded migrant boats when chaotic rescue attempts caused the migrant boats to take in water and eventually sink. The crew of the merchant vessels could only watch as hundreds of people disappeared in the ocean.

      Back in 1990, the Dublin Convention declared that the first EU-country an asylum seeker enters is responsible for accepting or rejecting the claim. No one in 1990 had expected the Syrian exodus of 2015 – nor the gigantic pressure it would put on just a handful of member states. No other EU-member felt the ineptitudes and total unpreparedness of the immigration system than a country already knee-deep in a harrowing economic crisis. That country was Greece.

      In September 2015, when the world saw the picture of a three-year old Syrian boy, Alan Kurdi, washed up on a beach in Turkey, Europe was already months into what was readily called a “refugee crisis”. Greece was overwhelmed by the hundreds of thousands of people fleeing the Syrian war. During the following month alone, a staggering 200.000 migrants crossed the Aegean Sea from Turkey to reach Europe. With a minimum of institutional support, it was volunteers like Salam Aldeen who helped reduce the overall number of casualties.

      The peak of migrants entered Greece that autumn but huge numbers kept arriving throughout the winter – in worsening sea conditions. Salam Aldeen recalls one December morning on Lesbos.

      The EU-Turkey deal

      And then, from one day to the next, the EU-Turkey deal changed everything. There was a virtual stop of people crossing from Turkey to Greece. From a perspective of deterrence, the agreement was an instant success. In all its simplicity, Turkey had agreed to contain and prevent refugees from reaching the EU – by land or by sea. For this, Turkey would be given a monetary compensation.

      But opponents of the deal included major human rights organisations. Simply paying Turkey a formidable sum of money (€6 billion to this date) to prevent migrants from reaching EU-borders was feared to be a symptom of an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ attitude pervasive among EU decision makers. Moreover, just like Libya in 2015 threatened to flood Europe with migrants, the Turkish President Erdogan would suddenly have a powerful geopolitical card on his hands. A concern that would later be confirmed by EU’s vague response to Erdogan’s crackdown on Turkish opposition.

      As immigration dwindled in Greece, the flow of migrants and refugees continued and increased in the Central Mediterranean during the summer of 2016. At the same time, disorganised Libyan militias were now running the smuggling business and exploited people more ruthlessly than ever before. Migrant boats without satellite phones or enough provision or fuel became increasingly common. Due to safety concerns, merchant vessels were more reluctant to assist in rescue operations. The death toll increased.
      A Conspiracy?

      Frustrated with the perceived apathy of EU states, Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) responded to the situation. At its peak, 12 search and rescue NGO vessels were operating in the Mediterranean and while the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) paused many of its operations during the fall and winter of 2016, the remaining NGO vessels did the bulk of the work. Under increasingly dangerous weather conditions, 47 per cent of all November rescues were carried out by NGOs.

      Around this time, the first accusations were launched against rescue NGOs from ‘alt-right’ groups. Accusations, it should be noted, conspicuously like the ones sounded against Mare Nostrum. Just like in 2014, Frontex and EU-politicians followed up and accused NGOs of posing a “pull factor”. The now Italian vice-prime minister, Luigi Di Maio, went even further and denounced NGOs as “taxis for migrants”. Just like in 2014, no consideration was given to the conditions in Libya.

      Moreover, NGOs were falsely accused of collusion with Libyan smugglers. Meanwhile Italian agents had infiltrated the crew of a Save the Children rescue vessel to uncover alleged secret evidence of collusion. The German Jugendrettet NGO-vessel, Iuventa, was impounded and – echoing Salam Aldeen’s case in Greece – the captain accused of collusion with smugglers by Italian authorities.

      The attacks to delegitimise NGOs’ rescue efforts have had a clear effect: many of the NGOs have now effectively stopped their operations in the Mediterranean. Lorenzo Pezzani and Charles Heller, in their report, Mare Clausum, argued that the wave of delegitimisation of humanitarian work was just one part of a two-legged strategy – designed by the EU – to regain control over the Mediterranean.
      Migrants’ rights aren’t human rights

      Libya long ago descended into a precarious state of lawlessness. In the maelstrom of poverty, war and despair, migrants and refugees have become an exploitable resource for rivalling militias in a country where two separate governments compete for power.

      In November 2017, a CNN investigation exposed an entire industry involving slave auctions, rape and people being worked to death.

      Chief spokesman of the UN Migration Agency, Leonard Doyle, describes Libya as a “torture archipelago” where migrants transiting have no idea that they are turned into commodities to be bought, sold and discarded when they have no more value.

      Migrants intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) are routinely brought back to the hellish detention centres for indefinite captivity. Despite EU-leaders’ moral outcry following the exposure of the conditions in Libya, the EU continues to be instrumental in the capacity building of the LCG.

      Libya hadn’t had a functioning coast guard since the fall of Gaddafi in 2011. But starting in late 2016, the LCG received increasing funding from Italy and the EU in the form of patrol boats, training and financial support.

      Seeing the effect of the EU-Turkey deal in deterring refugees crossing the Aegean Sea, Italy and the EU have done all in their power to create a similar approach in Libya.
      The EU Summit

      Forty-two thousand undocumented migrants have so far arrived at Europe’s shores this year. That’s a fraction of the more than one million who arrived in 2015. But when EU leaders met at an “emergency summit” in Brussels in late June, the issue of migration was described by Chancellor Merkel as a “make or break” for the Union. How does this align with the dwindling numbers of refugees and migrants?

      Data released in June 2018 showed that Europeans are more concerned about immigration than any other social challenge. More than half want a ban on migration from Muslim countries. Europe, it seems, lives in two different, incompatible realities as summit after summit tries to untie the Gordian knot of the migration issue.

      Inside the courthouse in Mytilini, Salam Aldeen is questioned by the district prosecutor. The tropical temperature induces an echoing silence from the crowded spectators. The district prosecutor looks at him, open mouth, chin resting on her fist.

      She seems impatient with the translator and the process of going from Greek to English and back. Her eyes search the room. She questions him in detail about the night of arrest. He answers patiently. She wants Salam Aldeen and the four crew members to be found guilty of human smuggling.

      Salam Aldeen’s lawyer, Mr Fragkiskos Ragkousis, an elderly white-haired man, rises before the court for his final statement. An ancient statuette with his glasses in one hand. Salam’s parents sit with scared faces, they haven’t slept for two days; the father’s comforting arm covers the mother’s shoulder. Then, like a once dormant volcano, the lawyer erupts in a torrent of pathos and logos.

      “Political interests changed the truth and created this wicked situation, playing with the defendant’s freedom and honour.”

      He talks to the judge as well as the public. A tragedy, a drama unfolds. The prosecutor looks remorseful, like a small child in her large chair, almost apologetic. Defeated. He’s singing now, Ragkousis. Index finger hits the air much like thunder breaks the night sounding the roar of something eternal. He then sits and the room quiets.

      It was “without a doubt” that the judge acquitted Salam Aldeen and his four colleagues on all charges. The prosecutor both had to determine the defendants’ intention to commit the crime – and that the criminal action had been initialised. She failed at both. The case, as the Italian case against the Iuventa, was baseless.

      But EU’s policy of externalisation continues. On 17 March 2018, the ProActiva rescue vessel, Open Arms, was seized by Italian authorities after it had brought back 217 people to safety.

      Then again in June, the decline by Malta and Italy’s new right-wing government to let the Aquarious rescue-vessel dock with 629 rescued people on board sparked a fierce debate in international media.

      In July, Sea Watch’s Moonbird, a small aircraft used to search for migrant boats, was prevented from flying any more operations by Maltese authorities; the vessel Sea Watch III was blocked from leaving harbour and the captain of a vessel from the NGO Mission Lifeline was taken to court over “registration irregularities“.

      Regardless of Europe’s future political currents, geopolitical developments are only likely to continue to produce refugees worldwide. Will the EU alter its course as the crisis mutates and persists? Or are the deaths of thousands the only possible outcome?

      https://theferret.scot/volunteers-facing-jail-rescuing-migrants-mediterranean


  • #Grèce : Des enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’école

    À cause de sa politique migratoire appuyée par l’Union européenne qui bloque des milliers d’enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles de la mer Égée, la Grèce prive ces enfants de leur droit à l’éducation, a déclaré Human Rights Watch aujourd’hui.
    Le rapport de 51 pages, intitulé « ‘Without Education They Lose Their Future’ : Denial of Education to Child Asylum Seekers on the Greek Islands » (« ‘Déscolarisés, c’est leur avenir qui leur échappe’ : Les enfants demandeurs d’asile privés d’éducation sur les îles grecques », résumé et recommandations disponibles en français), a constaté que moins de 15 % des enfants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, soit plus de 3 000, étaient inscrits dans des établissements publics à la fin de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, et que dans les camps que gère l’État dans les îles, seuls une centaine, tous des élèves de maternelle, avaient accès à l’enseignement officiel. Les enfants demandeurs d’asile vivant dans les îles grecques sont exclus des opportunités d’instruction qu’ils auraient dans la partie continentale du pays. La plupart de ceux qui ont pu aller en classe l’ont fait parce qu’ils ont pu quitter les camps gérés par l’État grâce à l’aide des autorités locales ou de volontaires.

    « La Grèce devrait abandonner sa politique consistant à confiner aux îles les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles, puisque depuis deux ans, l’État s’est avéré incapable d’y scolariser les enfants », a déclaré Bill Van Esveld, chercheur senior de la division Droits des enfants à Human Rights Watch. « Abandonner ces enfants sur des îles où ils ne peuvent pas aller en classe leur fait du tort et viole les propres lois de la Grèce. »

    Human Rights Watch s’est entretenue avec 107 enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés vivant dans les îles, ainsi qu’avec des responsables du ministère de l’Éducation, de l’ONU et de groupes humanitaires locaux. Elle a également examiné la législation en vigueur.

    L’État grec applique une politique appuyée par l’UE qui consiste à maintenir dans les îles les demandeurs d’asile qui arrivent de Turquie par la mer jusqu’à ce que leurs dossiers de demande d’asile soient traités. Le gouvernement soutient que ceci est nécessaire au regard de l’accord migratoire que l’EU et la Turquie ont signé en mars 2016. Le processus de traitement est censé être rapide et les personnes appartenant aux groupes vulnérables sont censées en être exemptées. Mais Human Rights Watch a parlé à des familles qui avaient été bloquées jusqu’à 11 mois dans les camps, souvent à cause des longs délais d’attente pour être convoqué aux entretiens relatifs à leur demande d’asile, ou parce qu’elles ont fait appel du rejet de leur demande.

    Même si l’État grec a transféré plus de 10 000 demandeurs d’asile vers la Grèce continentale depuis novembre, il refuse de mettre fin à sa politique de confinement. En avril 2018, la Cour suprême grecque a invalidé cette politique pour les nouveaux arrivants. Au lieu d’appliquer ce jugement, le gouvernement a émis une décision administrative et promulgué une loi afin de rétablir la politique.

    D’après la loi grecque, la scolarité est gratuite et obligatoire pour tous les enfants de 5 à 15 ans, y compris ceux qui demandent l’asile. Le droit international garantit à tous les enfants le même droit de recevoir un enseignement primaire et secondaire, sans discrimination. Les enfants vivant en Grèce continentale, non soumis à la politique de confinement, ont pu s’inscrire dans l’enseignement officiel.

    Selon l’office humanitaire de la Commission européenne, ECHO, « l’éducation est cruciale » pour les filles et garçons touchés par des crises. Cette institution ajoute que l’éducation permet aux enfants de « retrouver un certain sens de normalité et de sécurité », d’acquérir des compétences importantes pour leur vie, et que c’est « un des meilleurs outils pour investir dans leur avenir, ainsi que dans la paix, la stabilité et la croissance économique de leur pays ».

    Une fille afghane de 12 ans, qui avait séjourné pendant six mois dans un camp géré par l’État grec dans les îles, a déclaré qu’avant de fuir la guerre, elle était allée à l’école pendant sept ans, et qu’elle voulait y retourner. « Si nous n’étudions pas, nous n’aurons pas d’avenir et nous ne pourrons pas réussir, puisque nous [ne serons pas] instruits, nous ne saurons parler aucune langue étrangère », a-t-elle déclaré.

    Plusieurs groupes non gouvernementaux prodiguent un enseignement informel aux enfants demandeurs d’asile dans les îles, mais d’après les personnes qui y travaillent, rien ne peut remplacer l’enseignement officiel. Par exemple il existe une école de ce type dans le camp de Moria géré par l’État sur l’île de Lesbos, mais elle ne dispose qu’à temps partiel d’une salle dans un préfabriqué, ce qui signifie que les enfants ne peuvent recevoir qu’une heure et demie d’enseignement par jour. « Ils font de leur mieux et nous leur en sommes reconnaissants, mais ce n’est pas une véritable école », a fait remarquer un père.

    D’autres assurent le transport vers des écoles situées à l’extérieur des camps, mais ne peuvent pas emmener les enfants qui sont trop jeunes pour s’y rendre tout seuls. Certains élèves vivant à l’extérieur des camps de l’État suivent un enseignement informel et ont également reçu l’aide de volontaires ou de groupes non gouvernementaux afin de s’inscrire dans l’enseignement public. Ainsi des volontaires ont aidé un garçon kurde de 13 ans vivant à Pipka, un site situé à l’extérieur des camps de l’île de Lesbos, désormais menacé de fermeture, à s’inscrire dans un établissement public, où il est déjà capable de suivre la classe en grec

    Des parents et des enseignants estimaient que la routine scolaire pourrait aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile à se remettre des expériences traumatisantes qu’ils ont vécues dans leurs pays d’origine et lors de leur fuite. À l’inverse, le manque d’accès à l’enseignement, combiné aux insuffisances du soutien psychologique, exacerbe le stress et l’anxiété qui découlent du fait d’être coincé pendant des mois dans des camps peu sûrs et surpeuplés. Évoquant les conditions du camp de Samos, une fille de 17 ans qui a été violée au Maroc a déclaré : « [ça] me rappelle ce que j’ai traversé. Moi, j’espérais être en sécurité. »

    Le ministère grec de la Politique d’immigration, qui est responsable de la politique de confinement et des camps des îles, n’a pas répondu aux questions que Human Rights Watch lui avait adressées au sujet de la scolarisation des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants vivant dans ces îles. Plusieurs professionnels de l’éducation ont déclaré qu’il existait un manque de transparence autour de l’autorité que le ministère de l’Immigration exerçait sur l’enseignement dans les îles. Une commission du ministère de l’Éducation sur la scolarisation des réfugiés a rapporté en 2017 que le ministère de l’Immigration avait fait obstacle à certains projets visant à améliorer l’enseignement dans les îles.

    Le ministère de l’Éducation a mis en place deux programmes clés pour aider les enfants demandeurs d’asile de toute la Grèce qui ne parlent pas grec et ont souvent été déscolarisés pendant des années, à intégrer l’enseignement public et à y réussir, mais l’un comme l’autre excluaient la plupart des enfants vivant dans les camps des îles gérés par l’État.

    En 2018, le ministère a ouvert des écoles maternelles dans certains camps des îles, et en mai, environ 32 enfants d’un camp géré par une municipalité de Lesbos ont pu s’inscrire dans des écoles primaires – même si l’année scolaire se terminait en juin. Le ministère a déclaré que plus de 1 100 enfants demandeurs d’asile avaient fréquenté des écoles des îles à un moment ou un autre de l’année scolaire 2017-2018, mais apparemment ils étaient nombreux à avoir quitté les îles avant la fin de l’année.

    Une loi adoptée en juin a permis de clarifier le droit à l’éducation des demandeurs d’asile et, le 9 juillet, le ministère de l’Éducation a déclaré qu’il prévoyait d’ouvrir 15 classes supplémentaires destinées aux enfants demandeurs d’asile des îles pour l’année scolaire 2018-2019. Ce serait une mesure très positive, à condition qu’elle soit appliquée à temps, contrairement aux programmes annoncés les années précédentes. Même dans ce cas, elle laisserait sur le carreau la majorité des enfants demandeurs d’asile et migrants en âge d’être scolarisés, à moins que le nombre d’enfants vivant dans les îles ne diminue.

    « La Grèce a moins de deux mois devant elle pour veiller à ce que les enfants qui ont risqué leur vie pour atteindre ses rivages puissent aller en classe lorsque l’année scolaire débutera, une échéance qu’elle n’a jamais réussi à respecter auparavant », a conclu Bill Van Esveld. « L’Union européenne devrait encourager le pays à respecter le droit de ces enfants à l’éducation en renonçant à sa politique de confinement et en autorisant les enfants demandeurs d’asile et leurs familles à quitter les îles pour qu’ils puissent accéder à l’enseignement et aux services dont ils ont besoin. »

    https://www.hrw.org/fr/news/2018/07/18/grece-des-enfants-demandeurs-dasile-prives-decole
    #enfance #enfants #éducation #îles #mer_Egée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #école #éducation #rapport #Lesbos #Samos #Chios

    Lien vers le rapport :
    https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/07/18/without-education-they-lose-their-future/denial-education-child-asylum-seekers


  • Nuit de violences à #Lesbos : des centaines de militants d’#extrême_droite attaquent des migrants

    23 avril 2018 – 11h30 La police a évacué à l’aube ce lundi matin plusieurs dizaines de migrants qui campaient depuis le 18 avril sur la place principale de Mytilène. Ces hommes, femmes et enfants, pour la plupart originaires d’Afghanistan, ont été transportés en bus vers le camp de #Moria. Cette opération a été mise en œuvre après une nuit de violences.

    Dans la soirée de dimanche, environ 200 hommes ont attaqué les migrants en scandant « Brûlez-les vivants » et d’autres slogans racistes. Ils ont jeté des fumigènes, des pétards, des pavés et tout ce qui leur tombait sous la main en direction du campement de fortune. Des militants pro-migrants sont venus en renfort pour protéger la place, tandis que les rangs des assaillants grossissaient.

    Vers 1h du matin, les #affrontements ont atteint la mairie de #Mytilène. Les militants d’extrême-droite ont mis le feu à des poubelles et attaqué la police. Les affrontements n’ont pris in qu’avec l’#évacuation des migrants, dont plusieurs ont été blessés. La situation reste tendue, avec toujours un important dispositif policier déployé.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/les-dernieres-infos-nuit-violences-lesbos
    #asile #migrations #anti-migrants #attaques_racistes #anti-réfugiés #réfugiés #Grèce #it_has_begun #hotspot #violence

    • Non, Mouvement patriotique de Mytilène II. Le gouvernement avait autorisé une manifestation des fascistes à proximité de la place qu’occupaient les réfugiés depuis 5 jours…

      Πόσους φασίστες είπαμε συλλάβατε στη Μυτιλήνη ; | Γνώμες | News 24/7
      http://www.news247.gr/gnomes/leyterhs-arvaniths/posoys-fasistes-eipame-syllavate-sti-mytilini.6605215.html

      Πάμε όμως να δούμε πως λειτουργεί το βαθύ κράτος. Η διαδικτυακή ομάδα « Πατριωτική Κίνηση Μυτιλήνης ΙΙ » αναρτά στο διαδίκτυο μια ανακοίνωση που ζητούσε από τον κόσμο να προσέλθει μαζικά στην υποστολή σημαίας στις 19:00 το απόγευμα της Κυριακής, με την υποσημείωση όμως « Φτάνει πια ». Εφημερίδες του νησιού και μεγάλα αθηναϊκά sites αναπαράγουν το κάλεσμα, τονίζοντας πως πρόκειται για συγκέντρωση υποστήριξης των δύο Ελλήνων αξιωματικών που κρατούνται στην Ανδριανούπολη. Οι δε αστυνομικές αρχές, όχι μόνο δεν ανησυχούν, αλλά επιτρέπουν στους φασίστες να εξαπολύουν επί ώρες επιθέσεις στους πρόσφυγες, δίχως να συλλάβουν ούτε έναν από την ομάδα των ακροδεξιών.

    • Far-right hooligans attack migrants on Lesvos, turn town into battleground

      Police forced dozens of migrants, most Afghan asylum-seekers, who had been camped out on the main square of Lesvos island’s capital since last week, onto buses and transported them to the Moria camp in the early hours of Monday after downtown Mytilini turned into a battleground on Sunday.

      The operation was intended to end clashes that raged all night in the center of the eastern Aegean island’s capital after a group of some 200 men chanting far-right slogans attacked the migrants who had been squatting on the square since last Wednesday in protest at their detention in Moria camp and delays in asylum processing.

      The attack started at around 8 p.m. in the wake of a gathering of several hundred people at a flag ceremony in support of two Greek soldiers who have been in a prison in Turkey since early March, when some 200 men from that group tried to break through a police cordon guarding the protesting migrants on Sapphous Square.


      http://www.ekathimerini.com/227956/article/ekathimerini/news/far-right-hooligans-attack-migrants-on-lesvos-turn-town-into-battlegro

    • Lesbo, il racconto minuto per minuto dell’aggressione ai profughi afghani

      VIta.it ha raggiunto Walesa Porcellato, operatore umanitario sull’isola greca da quasi tre anni che era presente durante le 10 drammatiche ore almeno 200 estremisti di destra hanno attaccato altrettante persone scappate dall’Afghanistan che con un sit in di piazza protestavano contro le condizioni disastrose dell’hotspot di Moria in cui sono trattenute da mesi


      http://www.vita.it/it/article/2018/04/24/lesbo-il-racconto-minuto-per-minuto-dellaggressione-ai-profughi-afghan/146651

    • League for Human Rights expresses “dismay” over the racists attacks on Lesvos”

      The Hellenic League for Human Rights condemns the racist violent attacks against refugees and migrants on the island of Lesvos on Sunday. Expressing its particular concern, the HLHR said in a statement issued on Monday, the attacks ’cause dismay’, the ‘no arrests of perpetrators pose serious questions and requite further investigation.” The HLHR urges the Greek state to

      http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2018/04/23/hlhr-lesvos-statement

    • Συνέλαβαν... τους πρόσφυγες στη Μόρια

      Στη σκιά των επιθέσεων ακροδεξιών η αστυνομία συνέλαβε 120 πρόσφυγες και δύο Έλληνες υπήκοους για τα Κυριακάτικα γεγονότα στη Μυτιλήνη.

      Η αστυνομική επιχείρηση ξεκίνησε στις 05:30 τα ξημερώματα και διήρκεσε μόλις λίγα λεπτά, με τις αστυνομικές δυνάμεις να απομακρύνουν τους διαμαρτυρόμενους από την κεντρική πλατεία Σαπφούς.

      Πρόσφυγες και μετανάστες, που αρνούνταν να εγκαταλείψουν την πλατεία σχηματίζοντας μια σφιχτή ανθρώπινη αλυσίδα, αποσπάστηκαν με τη βία από το σημείο.


      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/astynomiki-epiheirisi-meta-ta-epeisodia-akrodexion

    • Le procès des « #Moria_35 » sur l’île grecque de Chios : entre iniquité et instrumentalisation de la justice sur le dos des exilés

      Le 28 avril 2018, 32 des 35 personnes migrantes poursuivies pour incendie volontaire, rébellion, dégradation des biens, tentative de violences ou de trouble à l’ordre public ont été condamnées à 26 mois de prison avec sursis par le tribunal de Chios (Grèce) après quatre jours d’une audience entachée de nombreuses irrégularités. Elles ont finalement été reconnues coupables d’avoir blessé des fonctionnaires de police, et ont été acquittées de toutes les autres charges.

      Avant cette sentence, les 32 condamnés ont subi neuf longs mois de détention provisoire sur une base très contestable, voire sur des actes non prouvés. En effet, les 35 personnes incriminées avaient été arrêtées en juillet 2017 à la suite d’une manifestation pacifique par laquelle plusieurs centaines d’exilés bloqués dans le hotspot de Moria, sur l’île de Lesbos, dénonçaient leurs conditions de vie indignes et inhumaines. Toutes ont nié avoir commis les délits qu’on leur reprochait. Certaines ont même démontré qu’elles n’avaient pas participé à la manifestation.

      Les membres de la délégation d’observateurs internationaux présents au procès ont pu y mesurer les graves entorses au droit à un procès équitable : interprétariat lacunaire, manque d’impartialité des juges, temps limité accordé à la défense, mais surtout absence de preuves des faits reprochés. En condamnant injustement les exilés de Moria, le tribunal de Chios a pris le relais du gouvernement grec – qui confine depuis plus de deux ans des milliers de personnes dans les hotspots de la mer Égée – et de l’Union européenne (UE) qui finance la Grèce pour son rôle de garde-frontière de l’Europe.

      Sorties de détention, elles n’ont cependant pas retrouvé la liberté. Les « 35 de Moria », assignés à nouveau dans le hotspot de l’île de Lesbos, ont été interdits de quitter l’île jusqu’au traitement de leur demande d’asile. Pourtant, le Conseil d’État grec avait décidé, le 17 avril 2018, de lever ces restrictions géographiques à la liberté d’aller et venir jugées illégales et discriminatoires. C’était sans compter la réplique du gouvernement grec qui a immédiatement pris un décret rétablissant les restrictions, privant ainsi d’effets la décision du Conseil d’État grec.

      La demande d’asile de la plupart de ces 35 personnes est encore en cours d’examen, ou en appel contre la décision de refus d’octroi du statut de réfugié. Au mépris des normes élémentaires, certains n’ont pas pu bénéficier d’assistance juridique pour faire appel de cette décision. Deux d’entre elles ont finalement été expulsées en juin 2018 vers la Turquie (considéré comme « pays sûr » par la Grèce), en vertu de l’accord UE-Turquie conclu le 16 mars 2016.

      Le 17 juillet prochain, à 19h30, au « Consulat » , à Paris, sera présenté le film documentaire « Moria 35 », de Fridoon Joinda, qui revient sur ces événements et donne la parole aux 35 personnes concernées. Cette projection sera suivie de la présentation, par les membres de la délégation d’observateurs, du rapport réalisé à la suite de ce procès qui démontre, une fois de plus, la grave violation des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes en Grèce, et en Europe.

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2892.html

    • Ouverture du procès des « #Moria_35 » le 20 avril prochain sur l’île grecque de Chios

      Le 18 juillet 2017, 35 résidents du hotspot de Moria sur l’île de Lesbos en Grèce ont été arrêtés à la suite d’une manifestation organisée quelques heures plus tôt dans le camp et à laquelle plusieurs centaines d’exilés avaient participé pour protester contre leurs conditions de vie indignes et inhumaines.

      Quelques jours plus tard, Amnesty International appelait, dans une déclaration publique, les autorités grecques à enquêter immédiatement sur les allégations de recours excessif à la force et de mauvais traitements qui auraient été infligés par la police aux personnes arrêtées. Ces violences policières ont été filmées et les images diffusées dans les médias dans les jours qui ont suivi la manifestation.

      Ce sont pourtant aujourd’hui ces mêmes personnes qui se retrouvent sur le banc des accusés.

      Le procès des « Moria 35 », s’ouvre le 20 avril prochain sur l’île de Chios en Grèce.

      Poursuivis pour incendie volontaire, rébellion, dégradation de biens, tentative de violences ou encore trouble à l’ordre public, ils encourent des peines de prison pouvant aller jusqu’à 10 ans, leur exclusion du droit d’asile et leur renvoi vers les pays qu’ils ont fui. Trente d’entre eux sont en détention provisoire depuis juillet 2017.

      Il a semblé essentiel aux organisations signataires de ce texte de ne pas laisser ce procès se dérouler sans témoins. C’est pourquoi chacune de nos organisations sera présente, tour à tour, sur toute la durée du procès afin d’observer les conditions dans lesquelles il se déroulera au regard notamment des principes d’indépendance et d’impartialité des tribunaux et du respect des règles relatives au procès équitable.

      https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article5897

    • Reporter’s Diary: Back to Lesvos

      I first visited the Greek island of Lesvos in 2016. It was the tail end of the great migration that saw over a million people cross from Turkey to Greece in the span of a year. Even then, Moria, the camp set up to house the refugees streaming across the sea, was overcrowded and squalid.

      I recently returned to discover that conditions have only become worse and the people forced to spend time inside its barbed wire fences have only grown more desperate. The regional government is now threatening to close Moria if the national government doesn’t clean up the camp.

      Parts of Lesvos look like an island paradise. Its sandy beaches end abruptly at the turquoise waters of the Aegean Sea, houses with red tile roofs are clustered together in small towns, and olive trees blanket its rocky hills. When I visited last month, the summer sun had bleached the grass yellow, wooden fishing boats bobbed in the harbor, and people on holiday splashed in the surf. But in Moria sewage was flowing into tents, reports of sexual abuse were on the rise, and overcrowding was so severe the UN described the situation at Greece’s most populous refugee camp as “reaching boiling point”.

      More than one million people fleeing war and violence in places like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan crossed from Turkey to the Greek islands between January 2015 and early 2016. Over half of them first set foot in Greece, and on European soil, in Lesvos. But in March 2016, the European Union and Turkey signed an agreement that led to a dramatic reduction in the number of people arriving to Greece. So far this year, just over 17,000 people have landed on the islands. At times in 2015, more than 10,000 people would arrive on Lesvos in a single day.

      Despite the drop in numbers, the saga isn’t over, and visiting Lesvos today is a stark reminder of that. Thousands of people are still stranded on the island and, shortly after I left, the regional governor threatened to close Moria, citing “uncontrollable amounts of waste”, broken sewage pipes, and overflowing rubbish bins. Public health inspectors deemed the camp “unsuitable and dangerous for public health and the environment”. Soon after, a group of 19 NGOs said in a statement that “it is nothing short of shameful that people are expected to endure such horrific conditions on European soil.”

      The Greek government is under increasing pressure to house refugees on the mainland – where conditions for refugees are also poor – but right now no one really knows what would happen to those on Lesvos should Moria be closed down.
      Razor wire and hunger strikes

      In some places in the north and the east, Lesvos is separated from Turkey by a strait no wider than 10 or 15 kilometres. This narrow distance is what makes the island such an appealing destination for those desperate to reach Europe. From the Turkish seaside town of Ayvalik, the ferry to Lesvos takes less than an hour. I sat on the upper deck as it churned across the sea in April 2016, a month after Macedonia shut its border to refugees crossing from Greece, effectively closing the route that more than a million people had taken to reach Western Europe the previous year.

      The Greek government had been slow to respond when large numbers of refugees started landing on its shores. Volunteers and NGOs stepped in to provide the services that people needed. On Lesvos there were volunteer-run camps providing shelter, food, and medical assistance to new arrivals. But the EU-Turkey deal required that people be kept in official camps like Moria so they could be processed and potentially deported.

      By the time I got there, the volunteer-run camps were being dismantled and the people staying in them were being corralled into Moria, a former military base. Once inside, people weren’t allowed to leave, a policy enforced by multiple layers of fences topped in spools of razor wire.

      Moria had space for around 2,500 people, but even in 2016 it was already over capacity. While walking along the perimeter I scrawled my phone number on a piece of paper, wrapped it around a rock, and threw it over the fence to an Iranian refugee named Mohamed.

      For months afterwards he sent me pictures and videos of women and children sleeping on the ground, bathrooms flooded with water and dirt, and people staging hunger strikes inside the camp to protest the squalid conditions.
      “The image of Europe is a lie”

      Two and a half years later, refugees now have more freedom of movement on Lesvos – they can move about the island but not leave it.

      I arrived in Mytilene, the main city on the island, in August. At first glance it was easy to forget that these were people who had fled wars and risked their lives to cross the sea. People were queuing at cash points to withdraw their monthly 90 euro ($104) stipends from UNHCR, the UN’s refugee agency. Some sat at restaurants that served Greek kebabs, enjoyed ice cream cones in the afternoon heat, or walked along the sidewalks pushing babies in strollers next to tourists and locals.

      The conditions on Lesvos break people down.

      The illusion of normalcy melted away at the bus stop where people waited to catch a ride back to Moria. There were no Greeks or tourists standing in line, and the bus that arrived advertised its destination in Arabic and English. Buildings along the winding road inland were spray-painted with graffiti saying “stop deportations” and “no human is illegal”.

      Moria is located in a shallow valley between olive groves. It looked more or less the same as it had two and a half years ago. Fences topped with razor wire stilled ringed the prefabricated buildings and tents inside. A collection of cafes outside the fences had expanded, and people calling out in Arabic hawked fruits and vegetables from carts as people filtered in and out of the main gate.

      Médecins Sans Frontières estimates that more than 8,000 people now live in Moria; an annex has sprung up outside the fences. People shuffled along a narrow path separating the annex from the main camp or sat in the shade smoking cigarettes, women washed dishes and clothing at outdoor faucets, and streams of foul-smelling liquid leaked out from under latrines.

      I met a group of young Palestinian men at a cafe. “The image of Europe is a lie,” one of them told me. They described how the food in the camp was terrible, how criminals had slipped in, and how violence regularly broke out because of the stress and anger caused by the overcrowding and poor conditions.

      A doctor who volunteers in Moria later told me that self-harm and suicide attempts are common and sexual violence is pervasive. It takes at least six months, and sometimes up to a year and a half, for people to have their asylum claims processed. If accepted, they are given a document that allows them to travel to mainland Greece. If denied, they are sent to Turkey. In the meantime, the conditions on Lesvos break people down.

      “Ninety-nine percent of refugees... [are] vulnerable because of what happened to them in their home country [and] what happened to them during the crossing of borders,” Jalal Barekzai, an Afghan refugee who volunteers with NGOs in Lesvos, told me. “When they are arriving here they have to stay in Moria in this bad condition. They get more and more vulnerable.”

      Many of the problems that existed in April 2016 when people were first rounded up into Moria, and when I first visited Lesvos, still exist today. They have only been amplified by time and neglect.

      Jalal said the international community has abandoned those stuck on the island. “They want Moria,” he said. “Moria is a good thing for them to keep people away.”


      https://www.irinnews.org/feature/2018/09/18/reporter-s-diary-back-lesvos
      #graffitis

    • Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 11.09.2018, envoyé par Vicky Skoumbi:

      En effet le camp de Moria est plus que surpeuplé, avec 8.750 résidents actuellement pour à peine 3.000 places, chiffre assez large car selon d’autres estimations la capacité d’accueil du camp ne dépasse pas les 2.100 places. Selon le Journal de Rédacteurs,(Efimerida ton Syntakton)
      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/30-meres-prothesmia
      Il y a déjà une liste de 1.500 personnes qui auraient dû être transférés au continent, à titre de vulnérabilité ou comme ayant droit à l’asile,mais ils restent coincés là faute de place aux structures d’accueil sur la Grèce continentale. Les trois derniers jours 500 nouveaux arrivants se sont ajoutés à la population du camp. La plan de décongestionn du camp du Ministère de l’immigration est rendu caduc par les arrivées massives pendant l’été.
      La situation sanitaire y est effrayante avec des eaux usées qui coulent à ciel ouvert au milieu du camp, avant de rejoindre un torrent qui débouche à la mer. Le dernier rapport du service sanitaire, qui juge le lieu impropre et constituant un danger pour la santé publique et l ’ environnement, constate non seulement le surpeuplement, mais aussi la présence des eaux stagnantes, des véritables viviers pour toute sorte d’insectes et de rongeurs et bien sûr l’absence d’un nombre proportionnel à la population de structures sanitaires. En s’appuyant sur ce rapport, la présidente de la région menace de fermer le camp si des mesures nécessaires pour la reconstruction du réseau d’eaux usées ne sont pas prises d’ici 30 jours. Le geste de la présidente de la Région est tout sauf humanitaire, et il s’inscrit très probablement dans une agenda xénophobe, d’autant plus qu’elle ne propose aucune solution alternative pour l’hébergement de 9,000 personnes actuellement à Moria. N’empêche les problèmes sanitaires sont énormes et bien réels, le surpeuplement aussi, et les conditions de vie si effrayantes qu’on dirait qu’elles ont une fonction punitive. Rendons- leur la vie impossible pour qu’ils ne pensent plus venir en Europe...


  • Poursuites-bâillons contre 35 réfugiés de Lesbos, le camp insalubre qui déshonore la Grèce et l’Europe
    https://www.bastamag.net/Poursuites-baillons-contre-35-refugies-de-Lesbos-le-camp-insalubre-qui

    Ils viennent d’Afrique ou du Moyen-Orient. Ils fuient la guerre, la terreur djihadiste ou les persécutions de régimes totalitaires. Ils ont osé protesté contre leurs conditions d’internement indignes au sein du camp, surpeuplé, de l’île grecque de Lesbos. En guise de réponse, ils ont été la cible de violences policières et de punitions collectives. Le procès de 35 de ces demandeurs d’asile s’ouvre aujourd’hui en Grèce. Des associations françaises sont présentes pour surveiller l’impartialité des juges. Le (...)

    #Résister

    / A la une, #Luttes_sociales, #Europe, #Discriminations, #Migrations, #Droits_fondamentaux


  • #Grèce : les migrants arrivent toujours à Lesbos, sans pouvoir en partir

    4 décembre 2017 Par Elisa Perrigueur

    Plus de 8 500 demandeurs d’asile sont actuellement bloqués sur l’île de #Lesbos, avec interdiction de se rendre sur le continent grec. Alors que le principal camp de l’île, #Moria, est largement surpeuplé, des migrants arrivent chaque jour depuis la Turquie, située à une dizaine de kilomètres.

    Lesbos (Grèce), envoyée spéciale.– Lorsqu’il a voulu traverser la dizaine de kilomètres de la mer Égée qui séparent la Turquie de l’île grecque de Lesbos, l’Irakien Muhammad n’a eu aucun mal à trouver un passeur. Aux frontières de l’Europe, ce business obscur est enraciné. Concurrentiel, selon l’étudiant de 26 ans. « Dans le quartier d’Aksaray à Istanbul, il y en a plein… »

    Muhammad, veste de cuir marron et l’air sûr de lui, a pu choisir son tarif en négociant avec « des Syriens, des Irakiens, de [son] âge, qui travaillent sous pseudo ». Avec toujours la même stratégie commerciale. « Au début, ils étaient sympas avec moi pour me vendre leur trajet, ils m’emmenaient boire du thé, plaisantaient. » Mais une fois l’argent déposé auprès d’une épicerie d’Istanbul, la relation a changé. « Ils ne répondaient plus au téléphone, ils m’ont abandonné près de la plage de Dikili [à l’ouest de la Turquie – ndlr] avec des migrants syriens. » Après avoir dormi plusieurs jours dans une forêt de la côte turque égéenne, le 20 novembre, Muhammad a finalement gagné les rives de Lesbos sur un bateau pneumatique, pour 500 euros.

    En 2015, lorsque près d’un million de migrants avaient franchi cette frontière maritime, la traversée coûtait de 1 500 à 2 000 euros. Juste après la signature de l’accord controversé entre l’Union européenne (UE) et la Turquie, en mars 2016, le nombre des passages avait chuté. Mais ces derniers mois, il repart à la hausse : 26 167 personnes sont arrivées dans le pays en 2017, par la mer pour une majorité d’entre elles, selon l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations. « On enregistre une hausse des venues cet automne, précise Astrid Castelein, responsable au Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR). Cela peut s’expliquer par la météo, la mer est très calme. »
    Désormais, chaque jour, comme Muhammad, en moyenne 120 migrants arrivent sur les îles grecques situées en face de la Turquie, notamment Lesbos, Samos ou Chios, indique Georges Christianos, commandant de la garde côtière hellénique et directeur du bureau de surveillance maritime.

    Et les trafiquants prospèrent toujours sur la misère. « Les passeurs sont nombreux. Nous en avons arrêté 800 depuis 2015 dans les eaux territoriales grecques, dont 210 cette année », affirme-t-il. Condamnés sur la base de témoignages de migrants et de flagrants délits, ils écopent de peines allant jusqu’à dix ans de prison et d’une amende de 1 000 euros par migrant transporté. « Ces trafiquants sont souvent des hommes entre 25 et 30 ans. Sur les 800 arrestations, 20 femmes ont été interpellées. Un quart de toutes ces personnes arrêtées sont d’origine turque. » Pour beaucoup, des pêcheurs familiers des rivages montagneux près d’Izmir, Ayvalik, Bodrum, qui connaissent les eaux et maîtrisent leurs courants. Mais les passeurs sont aussi syriens, irakiens, pakistanais et ces deux dernières années, issus d’ex-pays soviétiques comme l’Ukraine.
    Leurs « clients », des Syriens, Afghans, Soudanais, Congolais… payent 300 euros pour une place dans un canot pneumatique surchargé, 1 000 euros pour un passage dans un hors-bord et 2 000 euros pour une traversée sur un voilier de luxe. Certains passeurs restent à terre. D’autres accompagnent les embarcations sur des canots annexes, selon le ministère grec de la marine, pour pouvoir récupérer les moteurs et bateaux après la traversée. Avec la distance pour avantage. « La Grèce et la Turquie sont parfois si proches qu’un passeur peut rejoindre les deux rives en une dizaine de minutes », explique Georges Christianos. Mais une traversée peut aussi durer plus de deux heures, en fonction du point de départ en Turquie.

    Aujourd’hui, ces trafiquants d’hommes doivent être plus stratégiques pour rester invisibles. Car depuis mars 2016, la frontière maritime a été barricadée. Vers 18 heures, le 24 novembre, un voile noir enveloppe les hauteurs de Lesbos. La patrouille portugaise de l’agence Frontex, chargée de surveiller les frontières extérieures de l’Union européenne, largue les amarres du petit port de Molivos, dans le Nord. Les trois agents ainsi qu’un officier de liaison grec longent les montagnes obscures de Turquie, dans les eaux territoriales grecques. Comme cette patrouille, 42 autres, en bateau, avion et hélicoptère, dont 17 de Frontex, arpentent la mer Égée, précise le ministère grec de la marine. Depuis mars 2016, ces équipages arrêtent les passeurs et récupèrent les embarcations de migrants. Mais ces interceptions sont presque indécelables : aucun bateau n’arrive directement sur les plages de galets, comme en 2015. Les opérations de secours ont lieu en mer Égée, le plus souvent au cœur de la nuit.

    Ce soir de novembre, le navire battant pavillon portugais croise, phares éteints. « Sans lumières, nous détectons mieux les embarcations au loin », précise Paulo, le jeune commandant. Alors, dans leur étroite cabine, les agents scrutent durant des heures un radar et un écran où défilent les images des eaux alentour, filmées en caméra infrarouge. Seule une chanson de Marilyn Manson en fond sonore trahit leur présence dans la pénombre. L’étendue d’eau calme paraît déserte, mais deux faibles lumières rouges clignotent : les gardes-côtes turcs. « Dès que Frontex ou les gardes-côtes grecs détectent au loin des embarcations de migrants dans les eaux territoriales turques, nous les prévenons pour qu’ils les ramènent en sécurité en Turquie », indique le responsable grec Georges Christianos. Car si 120 personnes parviennent chaque jour à gagner la rive grecque, dans le même temps, 120 autres sont rapatriées en Turquie par les gardes-côtes turcs. La hantise des candidats à l’Europe.

    Au même moment, un canot d’une capacité de 15 places quitte le rivage turc. Soixante-six personnes à bord. Durant la traversée, un mouvement de panique s’empare du bateau surchargé. Un enfant afghan de 10 ans ne survivra pas. « D’après le témoignage du père, il est mort peu après avoir quitté la Turquie. Le bateau était trop plein, l’enfant était au centre, il a été piétiné », rapporte Georges Christianos. Le bateau a ensuite été récupéré par une patrouille bulgare de Frontex. D’après l’agence de presse grecque ANA, l’arrivée du navire européen a suscité l’affolement. Les passagers ont cru que le navire appartenait aux gardes-côtes turcs. Et imaginé un retour forcé vers la Turquie.

    « On a toujours un doute, on ne sait jamais si ce sont des Grecs ou des Turcs lorsqu’ils arrivent vers nous. » Eddy, pasteur congolais de 40 ans, arrivé à Lesbos en juin, se souvient de la peur qui l’a tétanisé lors de son sauvetage. Parti de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC), celui qui se décrit comme « opposant politique, évadé de la prison de Makala [prison de Kinshasa – ndlr] », a pris la mer de nuit avec 50 personnes. « Il y a eu des mouvements de panique à cause des vagues. Deux hommes sont tombés à l’eau mais ont réussi à remonter. » Après deux heures et demie à dériver seuls, un hélicoptère a survolé leur embarcation. « Un navire a commencé à s’approcher. J’avais tellement peur que ce soit des Turcs. En anglais, des hommes disaient : “Restez calmes, nous sommes là pour vous sauver.” » Peu à peu, le drapeau grec du bateau est apparu à l’horizon. Les passagers ont poussé des cris de joie. « Vous êtes maintenant en sécurité, nous allons à Lesbos », ont répété les gardes-côtes aux exilés. Mais Eddy ne s’attendait pas à une escale interminable. Même s’il avait entendu parler du « piège » du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque.

    Moria, 2 000 places, 6 700 personnes, « Welcome to prison »

    L’étudiant Muhammad, lui, s’était « mentalement préparé » à Moria. Avant de quitter l’Irak, il s’était inscrit dans un groupe Facebook privé « où discutent des passeurs et des Syriens et des Irakiens voulant venir en Grèce ». Et ce nom revenait régulièrement dans les messages. « Je savais qu’ici, certains deviennent fous. Je voyais des vidéos des bagarres, fréquentes à cause de l’alcool, du shit, de la tension. Et je savais que je passerais au moins l’hiver ici », dit-il. Comme une condamnation. Lorsqu’il est arrivé devant les grilles du camp, le 23 novembre, il a lu ce tag le long du mur de béton : « Welcome to prison. »

    Ce lieu illustre l’éternel contraste de Lesbos. Une tragédie humaine au cœur d’un paysage idyllique de mer azur et de collines arborées. Nichée au milieu de cette nature, cette forteresse de barbelés, dans le village de 1 000 âmes de Moria, « loge » désormais 6 700 migrants. De plus en plus confinés, bien au-delà des 2 000 places prévues. Soixante-quinze nationalités rapprochées de force par leur quête d’Europe : des Syriens, Afghans, Irakiens, Érythréens, Éthiopiens, Congolais, Camerounais, Ivoiriens… Hommes, femmes et enfants, répartis par origines.

    L’Irakien Muhammad montre sa petite tente de deux places dans un champ d’oliviers. « Nous dormons à cinq dedans. Les autres sont aussi des Irakiens que je ne connaissais pas avant de venir. » Plusieurs centaines de tentes ont été plantées dans l’urgence autour des containers, hors de l’enceinte de Moria, pour accueillir les migrants qui arrivent régulièrement sur l’île. 67 par jour en octobre, selon un calcul du HCR. Le linge qui pend sur ses grillages ne sèche pas. L’hiver s’approche, l’air est frais. L’odeur de poubelle et d’urine a supplanté celle des oliviers. Au bout d’un sentier d’herbes folles, jonché de préservatifs usagés, de canettes vides et d’excréments humains, coule un filet d’eau sorti d’un tuyau percé. C’est « la douche » pour des milliers de migrants qui n’accèdent pas aux centaines d’installations sanitaires du camp.
    Depuis l’accord UE-Turquie, les migrants restent bloqués dans ce camp avec interdiction de quitter Lesbos dans l’attente du traitement de leur demande d’asile. Mamoudou, 27 ans, espère une réponse depuis sept mois. Cet Ivoirien exhibe sa carte de demandeur, renouvelée chaque mois par le Bureau européen en charge des demandes. Avec toujours cette même inscription en rouge : « Droit de circuler à Lesbos. » Mais nulle part ailleurs. Ce petit papier reste précieux : il lui permet de toucher 90 euros par mois. De fausses cartes circulent parfois dans le camp, d’après une source anonyme interne à Moria… L’Ivoirien a atterri en Turquie avec de faux papiers, avant de gagner les côtes grecques.

    Comme lui, quelques milliers d’Africains désormais bloqués ont pris la route de la Grèce pour rejoindre l’Europe, voulant « éviter la Libye où les Noirs sont réduits à l’esclavage. […] Je l’ai vu sur le Net », explique Mamoudou. Mais pour Sami, autre résident du camp venu de RDC, la Turquie est aussi un « calvaire », raconte-t-il en serrant sa Bible. « Au départ, je voulais rester à Istanbul. Mais à l’aéroport, des policiers turcs m’ont arrêté plusieurs jours et ne m’ont pas laissé prier. Je suis chrétien, et ils étaient musulmans… Puis certaines personnes, dans la rue, se bouchaient le nez sur mon passage », assure le jeune homme de 20 ans.

    À plusieurs reprises, des ONG, comme Amnesty International, ont alerté sur les risques qu’encourent les migrants en Turquie. Assis sur un banc face à Sami, trois visiteurs venus de France, « de passage quelques jours », écoutent son récit avec un air compassionnel. « Nous sommes venus pour apporter notre soutien et la parole de Dieu à ces gens », prêchent ces religieux anonymes, qui disent être venus à titre « personnel ». À quelques mètres, derrière les rangées de barbelés, des policiers épient l’étranger du regard. Un policier contrôle les images d’une journaliste vidéo. L’inscription « No photo » est placardée sur les clôtures.

    L’Europe pourrait oublier Moria et ses âmes égarées, isolées en ses confins. Mais les autorités de Lesbos élèvent la voix. Le 20 novembre, à l’appel de la mairie, des centaines d’habitants grecs ont défilé sur le port aux façades pastel du chef-lieu de l’île, Mytilène. « Il y a au total 8 500 candidats à l’asile bloqués sur l’île. C’est une mauvaise gestion de la crise de l’UE et du gouvernement, dénonce Marios Andriotis, porte-parole de la municipalité. La frustration monte. Des Afghans ont fait une grève de la faim sur la petite place de la ville pendant deux semaines. »

    Lesbos, impuissante et explosive, réclame « le transport des migrants vers le continent [grec] ». En mars 2016, Marios Andriotis se disait pourtant satisfait de l’accord UE-Turquie. « Jamais nous n’aurions imaginé la situation actuelle, nous pensions que les déboutés de l’asile seraient renvoyés en Turquie. » Le politicien ne s’attendait pas à ce que « seules » plusieurs centaines de personnes soient déportées de l’autre côté. « Nous pensions aussi que les demandes d’asile seraient traitées rapidement. » La réponse concernant le droit d’asile s’éternise. Inquiet, Marios Andriotis estime que « les migrants pourront désormais attendre jusqu’à un an pour savoir ce qu’ils deviendront ». Certains ne tiendront pas. Régulièrement, des migrants tentent de rejoindre Athènes en montant illégalement à bord des ferries qui partent chaque jour de Lesbos.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/041217/grece-les-migrants-arrivent-toujours-lesbos-sans-pouvoir-en-partir?onglet=
    #statistiques #chiffres de personnes bloquées sur l’île :

    Ce lieu illustre l’éternel contraste de Lesbos. Une tragédie humaine au cœur d’un paysage idyllique de mer azur et de collines arborées. Nichée au milieu de cette nature, cette forteresse de barbelés, dans le village de 1 000 âmes de Moria, « loge » désormais 6 700 migrants.

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations



  • Greece: Protest and fire break out at Lesbos migrant camp

    Police said no injuries were reported from Monday’s protest and that the fire believed to have been set deliberately at the Moria camp is still burning.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/newswires/news/world/greece-protest-fire-break-lesbos-migrant-camp-article-1.3314802?cid=bit

    #Lesbos #Lesvos #protestations #feu #Moria #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camp_de_réfugiés #Grèce #hotspots #résistance

    • Μόρια : « σκούπα » για πρόσφυγες που έχουν δύο « όχι » από την Υπηρεσία Ασύλου
      http://www.efsyn.gr/arthro/moria-skoypa-gia-prosfyges-poy-ehoyn-dyo-ohi-apo-tin-ypiresia-asyloy

      Commentaire reçu via la mailing-list de Migreurop :

      Une #opération_policière d’une grande envergure s’est déroulé hier matin à Moria, le hot-spot de Lesbos. Au moins 200 policiers ont passé au peigne fin le camp avec des contrôles d’identité systématiques afin de repérer les demandeurs d’asile déboutés dont les appels à la Commission de Recours ont été rejetés. L’opération a duré six heures et s’est conclu par l’interpellation d’une cinquantaine de personnes qui ont été amenés au commissariat de Lesbos pour contrôle d’identité. Ceux qui ont vu leur deuxième appel rejeté, seront conduits à un centre spécial pour les personnes en instance d’expulsion- une sorte de prison qui fonctionne au sein du camp de Moria-, pour être ensuite expulsés vers la Turquie.

      #police

    • Reçu via la mailing-list de Migreurop :

      Déchaînements de violences policières contre les réfugiés à Moria (Lesbos, Grèce) (English below)

      Plusieurs plaintes contre la police ont été déposées pour des mauvais traitements, des coups et des blessures sur des hommes déjà immobilisé voire menottés et pour des tortures pratiqués dans les commissariats. Au moins 11 parmi les 35 hommes arrêtés lors de la répression de la révolte à Moria la semaine dernière, ont déjà déposé ou sont sur le point de déposer de plaintes contre des policiers pour coups et blessures pouvant entraîner des lésions corporelles graves. Parmi eux, un Sénégalais âgé de 37 ans qui n’avait pas participé aux incidents avait reçu de coups de pied à la tête par un groupe de 4 policiers jusqu’à perdre connaissance et a dû être hospitalisé dans un état préoccupant.

      14 organisations humanitaires et défense de droit de l’homme ont faire part de leur très vive inquiétude et ont lancé un appel à la justice grecque pour qu’une enquête soit immédiatement ouverte afin de déterminer les responsables de cette violation flagrante des droits les plus élémentaires de migrants et de toute notion d’Etat de Droit.

      Au Parlement,19 députés de Syriza ont déposé une question adressée au Ministre de l’Immigration et à celui de l’Intérieur, en exigeant des explications sur cet « flagrant abus de pouvoir et sur les tortures pratiqués sur des hommes déjà arrêtés et menottés ». Ils veulent savoir qui a donné l’ordre pour ce type d’interventions policières et comment se fait-il que des hommes en civile ont été autorisés à participer à la répression brutale de la révolte.

      Un autre élément extrêmement préoccupant est le fait que les charges qui pèsent sur les 35 hommes arrêtés sont absolument identiques pour tous sans qu’aucune distinction personnalisée soit faite entre les supposés responsables de la révolte.

      Voir la vidéo qui montre des groupes de policiers et des civils qui s’acharnent contre des hommes immobilisés par terre où quiconque qui a le malheur de croiser le chemin de la police est violement brutalisé.

      Ci-dessous le communiqué de presse des 14 organisations (in English)
      http://www.solidaritynow.org/en/joint-press-release-violent-incidents-moria-lesvos

    • Greece: Authorities must investigate allegations of excessive use of force and ill-treatment of asylum-seekers in Lesvos

      Amnesty International calls on the Greek authorities to urgently investigate allegations that police used excessive force against asylum-seekers in the Moria camp near Mytilene during a protest on 18 July 2017 and ill-treated some of those who were arrested and detained in the Mytilene police station following the clashes that ensued. Testimonies the organisation collected from victims and witnesses about excessive use of force in the Moria camp are also supported by audio-visual material that was made public in the media in the days after the protest.

      https://www.amnesty.org/en/documents/eur25/6845/2017/en

    • Report on Rights Violations and Resistance in Lesvos

      In the months since our last update on rights violations and resistance in Lesvos, our advocacy and campaigning resources were almost exclusively focused on the two trials for the Moria 35 and Moria 10 that took place in Chios in late April and early May 2018.

      The situation has predictably worsened in Lesvos. On the 17 April 2018, the Greek Council of State (the highest administrative court in Greece) ruled that geographic restrictions imposed by the Asylum Service for asylum seekers arriving to the Greek islands was illegal. However, within a week, new legislation was proposed, which further limits the rights of asylum seekers and continues the practice of containing asylum seekers to the Greek islands. Moria Camp is now at three times its capacity, holding approximately 7000 individuals. Between 500 and 1000 Kurdish asylum seekers are still living outside Moria in temporary shelter provided by Lesvos Solidarity – Pikpa, and Humans 4 Humanity, as they fear for their safety in Moria. Procedures are now so delayed that even individuals who are recognized as vulnerable, and whose cases should be prioritized under Article 51 of Greek Law 4375, are being scheduled for their interviews nearly a year after their arrival. This means that they are prohibited from leaving the island of Lesvos, and are denied freedom of movement during this entire time.

      In one case we are following, an eleven year old child has a serious, undiagnosed digestive condition that causes her constant pain and seizures. Because they have been unable to diagnose her illness, the hospital in Mytilene has referred her for testing and treatment in Athens. Even the Mytilene police department has recommended that geographic restrictions be temporarily lifted so that she can travel to Athens for further tests and treatment, but the Regional Asylum Office has denied this request without an appointment in the Athens hospital. Her family is now in a constant state of fear that given her critical condition, their daughter will be unable to receive emergency medical care when needed, given the lack of testing and treatment for her on the island. Already once, when she had seizures and attempted to get treatment at the hospital in Lesvos, she was not admitted because they do not have means to treat her.

      The Green Party published a report on 6 June 2018 exposing the inhumane conditions that systematically violate refugee rights in the Greek hotspots. On the 1 June 2018 the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) also published preliminary observations of its visit to detention facilities in Greece from 10 to 19 April 2018, with damning findings.
      Treatment of Moria35 defendants highlights lack of procedural safeguards for detained asylum seekers in Lesvos

      In the last month and a half since the conclusion of the Moria 35 trial, we have been closely following the administrative process related to the detention and processing of the asylum claims of these individuals. It has become a near full time job of our Greek attorney based in Mytilene to ensure that Greek authorities comply by their own laws and respect the rights of these asylum seekers. Despite the fact that the UNHCR, the Ombudsman’s Office, and the Legal Centre have been closely monitoring their cases, there have been rampant violation of their rights at every step of their procedures. Unfortunately despite this close monitoring, two individuals were deported to Turkey on the morning of 13 June 2018. The violations we have observed in the individual cases of these 35 men highlight the lack of procedural safeguards to protect the rights of asylum seekers, particularly those who are being detained.

      Below we outline some of the observed violations of Moria 35 defendants’ rights as asylum seekers:

      Two individuals whose cases were rejected were denied the representation of a lawyer on appeal. The appeal of a rejected asylum claim is the one stage in the asylum procedure where asylum seekers have the right to a lawyer, under Article 44(3) of Law 4375. Although both requested the representation of a lawyer, the examination of their case on appeal occurred without them having been assigned an attorney.

      Another individual signed for voluntary departure, but then changed his mind and decided to continue his claim for international protection. He requested that his case be reopened. While that request was being processed, he was placed by police on the list to be deported on the 1 June 2018. It was only after advocacy from the Legal Centre that he was removed from the deportation list. He remains in detention, despite the lack of legal grounds to hold him there.

      Another individual was held for over a month in detention, after transfer to Lesvos following the trial in Chios. There was no recommendation for his continued detention either from the Regional Asylum Office, as required by Article 46(3) of Law 4375. After daily follow up from the Legal Centre, eventually the police admitted that they were holding him by mistake and he was released.

      Two additional individuals had their asylum cases rejected, but were unable to appeal because they were detained. With advocacy from UNHCR and Legal Centre lawyers, one of the individuals was able to lodge his appeal. However, he remains in detention, and it is not clear if the Appeals Committee will review his case on the merits or deny the appeal as untimely filed.

      The second individual was deported on the morning of 13 June 2018. This was despite the fact that for days he had been expressing to the police his desire to appeal the rejection of his asylum claim. Lawyers from HIAS and the Legal Centre also spoke with the Mytilene police department the day before he was deported and informed the police that they would be filing an appeal on his behalf. On the morning of 13 June 2018, he was deported to Turkey. This individual, a Guinean national, claims that he was a victim of torture, and will be subject to persecution if returned to his country. Regardless of whether his claim is credible, he has the right to appeal the rejection of his claim. Even though untimely, it is not the police who have the authority to accept or reject his appeal, but the Asylum Service. His right to appeal was clearly denied, and his deportation was illegal as police were aware that he would be appealing the denial of his claim and they proceeded with the deportation in any case.

      A second Moria 35 defendant was also deported on the 13 June 2018. His case had been rejected in the second instance. In 2017 this Ghanean national had been rejected and scheduled for deportation, but he lodged a subsequent application. It was the denial of this subsequent application that led to his deportation. While the Regional Asylum Service again scheduled for him to file a subsequent application on 14 June 2018, on 11 June 2018, we were informed that they would not accept a second subsequent application, since he had already submitted a subsequent application in 2017. However, he still had the option of appealing the denial of his claim in administrative court. Less than two days after being informed that he could not file a subsequent application, he was deported to Turkey. This individual has recently received original documents from Ghana that were not previously submitted to the Asylum Office. These documents corroborate his claim that he will be imprisoned 10-15 years if returned to Ghana. Prison conditions in Ghana according to human rights reports are “generally harsh and sometimes life threatening due to physical abuse, food shortages, overcrowding, and inadequate sanitary conditions and medical care” meaning he should be eligible for subsidiary protection, if not refugee status. Both individuals that were deported on the 13 June 2018 are also eligible for humanitarian protection as important witnesses to a serious crime that is still being investigated in Greece (the brutal police attack against the 35 arrestees on 18 July 2017). The swift move of the police to deport these individuals show that while procedures to grant protection and ensure that refugee rights are respected are constantly delayed, the State is able to mobilize and act swiftly to deny these same rights.

      The trampling of the rights of these individuals by the police has followed their brutally violent arrest, their unjust prosecution, and lengthy imprisonment in the case of the Moria 35. It is not clear if the police have targeted these individuals precisely because they were part of the Moria35 case, or if the violation of detained asylum seekers rights is systematic. What is clear is that there is a lack of sufficient transparency, oversight, and monitoring of detention and deportation practices.
      Legal Centre Successes

      Despite this hostile environment, we continue providing legal aid and individual consultation to all foreign nationals who seek our counsel. We conduct approximately 10 individual consultations daily, and through the assistance of our volunteer lawyers and interpreters, hundreds of individuals have been granted international protection in Greece, or have successfully had geographic restrictions lifted so they can legally travel to mainland Europe.

      We also continue to have success in assisting individuals in reuniting with family members in second European States under the Dublin III Regulation. In one case, a single young man from Haiti who is seriously ill was approved to be reunited with his family in France. While in Haiti, he had attempted to apply for a visa to join his parents and younger siblings in France, but was denied because he was over 18. France finally admitted, through our advocacy, that he was dependent on the care of his family, and that he should be able to join them in France. The fact that this individual was forced to take a lengthy, expensive, and dangerous journey to Europe through Turkey and the use of smugglers, only to be later admitted as an asylum seeker in France, shows that European immigration policies are broken.

      We will continue our work to assist and help navigate individuals through this broken system, and to monitor and expose the violations of these individuals’ rights when they occur.

      http://www.legalcentrelesbos.org/2018/06/14/report-on-rights-violations-and-resistance


  • Clingendael report : EU external migration policies misaligned with reality

    On the February 1, Dutch think tank #Clingendael released a report on the relationship between irregular migration and conflict and stability in Mali, Niger and Libya. The report’s main finding is that current EU policies are misaligned with the reality of trans-Saharan migration.

    The report argues that European external migration policies fail to take into account the diverse socio-political dynamics of intra-African migration. EU policies focus on stemming migration flows through securitised measures as a means to stop human smuggling. However, it disregards local actors such as transportation companies facilitating irregular movements, local security forces gaining income by bribery and road taxes, political elites facilitating irregular migration in exchange for money and local population offering to sell food and lodging to earn a living. Ignoring such essential local dynamics prevents the establishment of effective migration management policies. A worrying mistake given the EU’s increased focus on the external dimension of migration in the context of the Partnership Framework.

    The report encourages the EU to focus on peace building processes and invest in both conflict- and politically sensitive state building as well as regional cooperation.

    http://www.ecre.org/clingendael-report-eu-external-migration-policies-misaligned-with-reality
    #rapport #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Libye #Sahel #Gao #Agadez #Niger #routes_migratoires #Mali #Tamanrasset #Niamey #Sebba #Arlit #Séguédine #Algérie #Murzuq #Ghadames #Ghat #Tripoli #EU #UE #Union_européenne #détention_administrative #rétention #passeurs #trafiquants #trafic_d'êtres_humains #gardes-côtes

    Lien vers le rapport :


    https://www.clingendael.nl/sites/default/files/turning_the_tide.pdf

    cc @isskein @reka

    • Our analyses from January: externalisation of migration control

      We pay but others do it. This first and foremost has been the response of the European Union
      to the so
      –called “refugee crisis”. Under the title of the
      European Agenda on Migration
      , in May
      2015 the European Commission proposed a series of measures to stop what
      it called “the
      human misery created by those who exploit migrants.” This document established as a priority
      cooperation with third countries to jointly address the causes of emigration. In practice, this
      cooperation has been limited to promoti
      ng the readmission of irregular migrants, border control
      and the reception of asylum
      –seekers and refugees in third countries. The EU’s agreements
      with Turkey (March 2016) and more recently with Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Mali and Ethiopia
      (June 2016) represent the implementation of this approach.

      http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-305-viewpoint-migration-more-externalisation.pdf

    • Ecco l’accordo con la Libia sui migranti…

      Praticamente si chiede di far soffrire, di far subire violazioni, magari anche di uccidere, o di estorcere soldi ai migranti lontano dai nostri confini. Lontano dalle macchine fotografiche dei giornalisti, lontano da chi può raccontare cosa succede.


      http://www.africarivista.it/ecco-laccordo-con-la-libia-sui-migranti/111726

    • Profughi: un piano studiato per tenerli lontano, ad ogni costo

      Ora è operativo. Dal pomeriggio del 2 febbraio, con la firma congiunta del premier Gentiloni e del presidente del Governo di Alleanza di Tripoli, Fayez Serraj, è entrato in vigore a tutti gli effetti il piano sull’immigrazione concordato tra Italia e Libia dal ministro Minniti all’inizio di gennaio. Lo hanno chiamato memorandum sui migranti. Gentiloni lo ha presentato come “una svolta nella lotta al traffico degli esseri umani”, sollecitando il sostegno politico e finanziario dell’Unione Europea. In realtà è un piano di respingimento e deportazione, da attuare in più fasi e in modi diversi, a seconda delle condizioni e delle circostanze: l’ultima di tutta una serie di barriere messe su da Roma e da Bruxelles, negli ultimi dieci anni, per esternalizzare le frontiere della Fortezza Europa, spostandole il più a sud possibile e affidandone la sorveglianza a Stati “terzi” come, appunto, la Libia. Sorveglianza remunerata con milioni di euro, ben inteso: milioni per affidare ad altri il lavoro sporco di bloccare i profughi, non importa come, prima che raggiungano il Mediterraneo e, ancora, di “riprendersi” quelli respinti dall’Europa, con l’obiettivo, poi, di convincerli in qualche modo a ritornare “volontariamente” nel paese d’origine. A prescindere se il “paese d’origine” è sconvolto da guerre, terrorismo, dittature e persecuzioni, miseria e fame endemiche, carestia.

      http://habeshia.blogspot.ch/2017/02/profughi-un-piano-studiato-per-tenerli.html

    • La « forteresse » Europe commence en #Afrique_du_nord

      Le 3 février 2017, les représentants de l’Union européenne réunis à Malte se sont séparés après avoir entériné un plan d’action destiné à freiner – et éventuellement arrêter - les arrivées de réfugiés en provenance de #Libye principalement. Face à une situation incontrôlable dans ce pays, les dirigeants européens se tournent de plus en plus vers les pays voisins, la #Tunisie, l’#Egypte et l’#Algérie afin de les pousser à respecter ou intégrer les dispositifs de gestion des flux migratoires qu’ils ont mis en place. La chancelière allemande Angela Merkel a fait personnellement le déplacement pour convaincre les responsables de ces Etats à coopérer moyennant de substantielles aides matérielles et financières. Si les rencontres n’ont pas abouti aux résultats escomptés, force est de constater que les pratiques de contrôle et de répression de ces pays se professionnalisent et s’adaptent progressivement aux exigences de leurs partenaires du Nord.

      http://www.algeria-watch.org/fr/article/analyse/mellah_forteresse.htm

    • L’Afrique du Nord, dernier recours de l’Europe ?

      Depuis que l’accord controversé, conclu entre la Turquie et l’Union européenne (UE) en mars 2016, a largement réussi à empêcher les demandeurs d’asile d’atteindre l’Europe par la Méditerranée orientale, les dirigeants européens se sont tournés vers la partie centrale de cette mer. Avec les élections qui approchent dans plusieurs États de l’Union et les craintes suscitées par la perspective de voir de nouvelles vagues de migrants entrer en Europe au printemps, les responsables politiques tentent de trouver des solutions rapides pour montrer qu’ils sont capables de gérer la crise.

      Au-delà de ce contexte électorale, l’UE dans son ensemble est pressée de formuler, et pas seulement des solutions d’urgence, une vision stratégique de long à même de relever le défi que présente la question migratoire. Et pour trouver de telles solutions, elle est contrainte de se tourner vers les pays nord-africains.

      http://www.alternatives-economiques.fr/lafrique-nord-dernier-recours-de-leurope/00077792

      En anglais : carnegieendowment.org/sada/68097

    • Migration monitoring in the Mediterranean region – Libyan military to be linked up to European surveillance systems

      The Mediterranean countries of the EU are establishing a network to facilitate communication between armed forces and the border police. Libya, Egypt, Algeria and Tunisia are also set to take part. This would make them, through the back door, part of the surveillance system #EUROSUR. Refugees could then be seized on the open seas before being returned to Libya.

      https://digit.site36.net/2017/04/25/migration-monitoring-in-the-mediterranean-region-libyan-military-to-be

    • Security and migration amongst EU priorities for cooperation with “modern, democratic” Egypt

      Joint priorities adopted today by the EU and Egypt for 2017 to 2020 include a commitment from the EU to “support the Egyptian government’s efforts to strengthen its migration governance framework, including elements of legislative reform and strategies for migration management,” and to “support Egypt’s efforts to prevent and combat irregular migration, trafficking and smuggling of human beings, including identifying and assisting victims of trafficking.”

      http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/jul/eu-egypt-priorities.htm

    • Niger : #ingérence et #néocolonialisme, au nom du #Développement

      Le 10 octobre 2016, la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel était reçue en grande pompe à Niamey. Elle ne faisait pas mystère que ses deux préoccupations étaient la « #sécurité » et « l’#immigration ». Il s’agissait de mettre en œuvre des « recommandations » répétées à l’envie : le Niger, « pays de transit », devait être accompagné afin de jouer le rôle de filtre migratoire. Des programmes de « renforcement des institutions locales » feraient advenir cette grande césure entre les « réfugiés » à protéger sur place et les « migrants » à « reconduire » vers leurs « pays d’origine ». Autrement dit, comme l’a récemment exprimé le président français, le Niger et ses voisins (Libye, Tchad…) devaient accepter de se couvrir de camps et de jouer le rôle de #hotspot (voir Note #4). Le #néo-colonialisme d’une telle vision des rapports euro-africains a poussé les très conciliantes autorités nigériennes à rappeler que les intérêts de leurs ressortissants et la souveraineté nationale devaient être l’objet de plus d’égards. Ces négociations inter-gouvernementales sont toujours en cours alors qu’en Libye elles ont été directement menées avec des chefs de milices, prêts à jouer les geôliers à condition de pouvoir capter les fonds qui se déversent sur les gardes-frontières de l’Union européenne (UE).

      http://www.migreurop.org/article2840.html

    • Niger : #Niamey, capitale cernée par les crises

      Exode de migrants, conflits ethniques exacerbés par une guerre contre le jihad et une montée de l’islam politique… Dans la ville, devenue réceptacle des problèmes actuels du Sahel, la tension est omniprésente.

      Ce sont des victimes invisibles. Emportées par un cycle sans fin de représailles dans un coin reculé du monde. La scène de la tuerie est pourtant terrifiante : « Les assaillants sont arrivés vers 17 heures et se sont rendus directement à la mosquée où ils ont tué à coup de mitraillettes automatiques une dizaine de personnes. Puis ils se sont dirigés à l’intérieur du campement nomade où ils ont tiré sur des personnes qu’ils ont croisées », affirme un communiqué officiel relayé par la presse au Niger. Bilan ? 17 morts, vendredi à Inates, un bled perdu dans le sud de ce pays sahélien et proche de la frontière avec le Mali. A part les autorités du pays, aucun témoin extérieur, journaliste ou humanitaire, n’a pu se rendre seul sur place. Car Inates se trouve dans cette nouvelle zone de tous les périls, située au nord de Niamey, la capitale. Le 11 avril, Joerg Lang, un humanitaire allemand, pensait pouvoir s’y rendre incognito en dissimulant son visage sous un keffieh, foulard traditionnel, et en circulant à bord d’une voiture banalisée. Il a été enlevé sur la route du retour, non loin d’Inates.

      L’attaque du 19 mai n’est que la dernière d’une longue série, qui oppose depuis peu des nomades, touaregs et peuls, de chaque côté de la frontière qui sépare le Niger et le Mali. « Il y a trois semaines, de jeunes Peuls, venus du Niger, ont exécuté 18 Touaregs de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Mali. Cette fois-ci, les assaillants voulaient en tuer autant chez les Peuls, en représailles. Sauf que l’une des victimes a finalement survécu », indique Mohamed Bazoum, ministre de l’Intérieur du Niger. Les forces de sécurité sont pourtant loin d’être absentes dans ce pays, qui est même devenu le nouveau hub militaire régional d’une coalition internationale en lutte contre les forces jihadistes au Sahel. A Niamey, la capitale, située à seulement 250 kilomètres d’Inates, des gaillards musclés aux cheveux très courts ont remplacé les touristes dans les hôtels, qui ne désemplissent pas. On y croise des Français, des Américains, et même désormais des Allemands.
      Théories complotistes

      C’est au Mali, pays gangrené depuis plusieurs années par les mouvements jihadistes, et désormais aussi au Burkina Faso voisin, que se joue l’essentiel de cette guerre asymétrique. Mais c’est bien au Niger que s’implantent de plus en plus les bases arrières étrangères engagées dans cette bataille du Sahel. Pourtant le Niger n’a jamais connu de mouvement jihadiste autochtone. Son point faible, ce sont justement ses frontières. Et notamment celles avec le Mali et le Burkina Faso, dans ce petit triangle où se trouve aussi Niamey. Une capitale en apparence assoupie, particulièrement en ce mois de mai où la température frôle souvent les 45 °C. Mais le calme de la ville est trompeur. Tous les accès extérieurs sont verrouillés par des barrages, les fameuses « ficelles ». Et les entrées et les sorties sont fortement contrôlées. Les dunes orange qu’on aperçoit parfois au loin évoquent ainsi un monde potentiellement hostile, qui donne à la capitale nigérienne un air de forteresse isolée guettant l’ennemi, comme dans le roman de l’Italien Dino Buzzati, le Désert des Tartares. Mais qui est exactement l’ennemi ?

      A Niamey, nombreux sont ceux qui s’interrogent : « Les Américains ont construit une immense base à Agadez [à 950 kilomètres au nord-est de Niamey, ndlr]. Les Français et les Allemands renforcent leurs installations près de l’aéroport. Visiblement, ils sont là pour rester longtemps. Mais dans quel but ? Est-ce seulement pour notre sécurité ? » s’inquiète Abdoulaye, un jeune entrepreneur de la capitale. Les intentions « réelles » des Occidentaux au Niger font l’objet de nombreuses conversations et les théories complotistes ne manquent pas. Pourtant, même dans ce cas de la tuerie d’Inates, c’est bien l’influence des jihadistes qui est aussi en jeu. « Les Peuls se sont fait piéger. Depuis quelques années, la pression démographique et la raréfaction des terres pastorales les ont poussés vers le nord du Mali. Mais en s’y implantant, ils ont dû choisir leur camp dans un conflit purement malien. Et se sont laissé instrumentaliser par les forces jihadistes de l’Etat islamique en Afrique de l’Ouest alors qu’une partie des Touaregs soutient désormais la coalition internationale », affirme le général Abou Tarka qui dirige la Haute Autorité pour la consolidation de la paix, un organisme né lors des rébellions touaregs des années 90 et qui tente aujourd’hui de désamorcer cette bombe communautariste parée des oripeaux jihadistes. « C’est une guerre de pauvres, de populations qui se sentent souvent abandonnées », confie le général.

      Le conflit dans le sud-ouest est récent. Mais dans le sud-est du pays, une autre zone dessine depuis plus longtemps un front sensible avec la présence de la secte Boko Haram qui a infiltré la région de Diffa, en provenance du Nigeria voisin. Il existe d’autres frontières sensibles dans ce vaste « pays de sable, en apparence immobile », comme le décrit le père Mauro, un prêtre italien très investi aux côtés des migrants. Les Nigériens immigrent peu, et encore moins vers l’Europe. Mais depuis longtemps, le pays est une zone de passage pour tous ceux qui veulent tenter la traversée de la Méditerranée à partir des côtes libyennes. Depuis 2016, les Européens ont fait pression sur le pouvoir en place pour restreindre ces mouvements. En criminalisant les passeurs, mais aussi en faisant de Niamey et d’Agadez des « hot spots » censés dissuader les traversées clandestines, grâce à l’espoir d’un passage légal vers l’Europe, du moins pour ceux qui peuvent prétendre au statut de réfugié. Ces derniers mois, des charters ont même ramené au Niger des candidats à l’asile en Europe, jusqu’alors détenus dans les geôles libyennes. « Mais aujourd’hui ces rotations sont quasiment à l’arrêt car les autorités se sont rendu compte que les Européens, et notamment les Français, n’acceptaient les réfugiés qu’au compte-gouttes, malgré leurs promesses », explique un responsable du Haut Commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR) à Niamey.

      Cette nouvelle stratégie impose aussi un tri entre « bons » et « mauvais » migrants. Dans une rue ombragée du centre de la capitale, des hommes prennent l’air, assis devant une maison gardée par des vigiles. Les visages sont maussades, les regards fuyants, et les gardiens ont vite fait d’éconduire les visiteurs étrangers qui tentent de parler à ces migrants rapatriés de Libye et qui ont, eux, accepté de rentrer dans leur pays. Ceux qui refusent ce retour « volontaire » se dispersent dans la ville, formant une cohorte invisible qui échappe aux radars. « En réalité, les passages de migrants ne se sont pas arrêtés. Il y a de nouvelles routes, plus dangereuses », confie un officiel nigérien. En revanche, la création des hot spots attire désormais d’autres candidats à l’exil. Début mai, des centaines de Soudanais ont ainsi envahi les rues d’Agadez dans l’espoir d’obtenir le sésame miraculeux de l’asile en Europe. Mais, excédées par ces arrivées massives, les autorités de la ville ont envoyé de force, le 12 mai, 145 d’entre eux à la frontière libyenne, en plein désert. Depuis, leur sort est inconnu.
      Arrestations

      En privé, les responsables nigériens se moquent parfois de l’autosatisfaction des Européens sur les mirages de cette nouvelle politique migratoire. Et fustigent les faux-semblants de l’aide, en principe massive, accordée au pays : « On nous dit que le Niger est désormais le pays d’Afrique le plus aidé par l’Europe. Mais ce sont les ONG étrangères qui captent toute cette aide », peste un haut responsable. Ce n’est pas le seul mirage financier dans l’un des pays les plus pauvres de la planète. En décembre, un grand raout organisé à Paris avait permis en principe au Niger d’engranger 23 milliards de dollars (19 milliards d’euros) de promesses d’investissements. Six mois plus tard, les promesses sont restées… des promesses : « La concrétisation des projets est effectivement assez lente », reconnaît, un peu gênée, la responsable d’une agence onusienne. Reste qu’en raison des enjeux sécuritaires et migratoires, le Niger est bien devenu « le chouchou de la communauté internationale », comme le rappelle Issa Garba, porte-parole local de l’association Tournons la page.

      Au début de l’année, la société civile avait organisé des manifestations dans les rues de Niamey pour protester contre une loi de finances qui instaure de nouvelles taxes et augmente les prix de l’électricité et de l’eau. Mais à partir du 25 mars, le mouvement a été brutalement décapité avec l’arrestation d’une vingtaine de leaders de la société civile. « Ils ne représentent rien, ils veulent juste créer le chaos et susciter un coup d’Etat militaire », balaye Mohamed Bazoum, le ministre de l’Intérieur. « Tout ce que nous demandons, c’est une bonne gouvernance et l’abandon de lois qui frappent les plus pauvres », rétorque Issa Garba. Reste que face aux arrestations, la communauté internationale se tait. Et la rue, elle, a compris le message : une journée ville morte décrétée par la société civile le 14 mai a été un échec et les manifestations n’ont pas repris. « Je soutiens ces leaders, mais je n’ai aucune envie de me retrouver moi aussi en prison », résume Mokhtar, un jeune homme très pieux. Dans la base arrière des Occidentaux en guerre contre le jihadisme au Sahel, d’autres influences s’imposent pourtant silencieusement. « Au Niger, l’islam gagne du terrain », souligne un professeur d’université, citant le nombre exponentiel de femmes voilées et de salles de prières dans les facs. « Le jour où les imams nous demanderont de sortir dans la rue, là, j’obéirais. Car l’islam est dans nos cœurs », constate de son côté Mokhtar.


      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/05/23/niger-niamey-capitale-cernee-par-les-crises_1652220

      Signalé par Alizée Dauchy sur la liste Migreurop, avec ce commentaire :

      un article rédigé par Maria Malagardis publié dans Libération le 23 mai :
      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/05/23/niger-niamey-capitale-cernee-par-les-crises_1652220

      et à écouter sur France Culture un podcast avec Maria Malagardis en première partie :
      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/culturesmonde-du-vendredi-25-mai-2018

      sur la question migratoire :
      Elle revient (min’9) notamment sur ’l’hypocrisie des #hotspot", avec très peu de #réinstallation en Europe, malgré les engagements pris (la France s’est engagée à 3000 #réinstallations jusqu’en 2019).

      Procédure d’asile : Idée admise de trier sur la base de la nationalité à la place des demandes individuelles. Autrement : rapatriement volontaire dans les pays d’origine / les migrants se fondent dans la nature.
      Effet pervers : de nouvelles populations se rendent au Niger pour demander l’asile, exemple des soudanais à #Agadez (Cf. http://www.rfi.fr/afrique/20180526-niger-refugies-soudanais-darfour-agadez-statut-migrants).
      Elle qualifie le Niger de « passoire de mouvements », en « rotation perpétuelle ».

      sur la loi de finance :
      Augmentation des taxes sur l’électricité et l’eau, loi typique d’austérité. Manifestations dans la rue dès la promulgation.
      Interdiction des manifestations par les autorités nigériennes, arrestations d’activistes dès le 25 mars, 26 personnes de la société civile ont été arrêtées.
      Silence de la part de la communauté internationale, elle parle de dérive autoritaire car chèque en blanc de la communauté internationale.

      Loi de finance élaborée avec le parrainage des européens, notamment des français avec des conseillers techniques français du ministère de l’économie.
      « Accord tacite » davantage que « silence tacite ». Communauté internationale a besoin d’un Niger calme et silencieux.

      sur la question jihadiste :
      Pas de mouvement nigérien jihadiste autochtone contrairement au Mali et au Burkina Faso.
      Niger était un exemple de stabilité, où l’on louait le règlement de la question touareg, il est aujourd’hui le pays le plus menacé.

      #hotspots #tri #catégorisation #djihadisme #EI #Etat_islamique

    • « Pour le HCR, l’essentiel est d’aider les pays qui hébergent vraiment les réfugiés, en Afrique ou en Asie »

      Filippo Grandi : « L’essentiel est qu’on nous donne les moyens d’aider les pays qui hébergent vraiment les réfugiés »

      Le haut-commissaire des Nations unies pour les réfugiés revient sur les difficultés de l’UE à apporter une solution commune à la crise migratoire et s’inquiète de la diminution de la solidarité en Europe.

      LE MONDE | 09.11.2018
      Propos recueillis par Jean-Baptiste Chastand

      A la tête de l’Agence des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) depuis 2016, Filippo Grandi appelle l’Union européenne (UE) à préserver le droit d’asile et considère que le retour des réfugiés syriens dans leur pays se fera au compte-gouttes.

      La crise migratoire déchirait l’Union européenne depuis 2015. Elle semble être passée au second plan des pré­occupations. Le problème est-il réglé ?

      Il y a eu des manipulations excessives de la part de ceux qui ont parlé d’invasion, de la fin de l’identité européenne ou de menaces sécuritaires. Maintenant que l’intérêt politique se décale, le risque consiste à ne pas faire ce qu’il faudrait pour mieux gérer ces mouvements de populations. L’Europe n’a pas encore donné toutes les réponses. Or, un report ne peut qu’aggraver la situation en cas de nouvelle crise.

      Les « centres contrôlés » et les « plates-formes de débarquement » destinés à centraliser le traitement des demandeurs d’asile paraissent dans l’impasse…

      La convention de Dublin, destinée à éviter le « tourisme de l’asile » en prévoyant que le premier pays d’accueil doit gérer les de­mandes d’asile, est mise à l’épreuve par les arrivées nombreuses dans quelques pays, qui se sont retrouvés pénalisés par rapport aux autres. Il faut passer à autre chose. On a longuement évoqué une répartition entre les 28 Etats, mais ça ne fonctionne pas, car seuls quelques pays y sont prêts. Moins de 100 000 personnes arrivées en Europe en 2018, c’est gérable.

      La prise en charge par des Etats d’une partie des passagers de l’Aquarius, par exemple, ressemble à une forme de partage, sauf que chaque nouveau bateau s’est transformé en crise. Un tel système devrait être décidé au préalable. Le problème est l’absence de consensus sur le lieu où ce partage doit se faire. Ce n’est pas au HCR de déterminer où ces centres d’accueil et de réception doivent se trouver, mais à l’Europe. Le rôle du HCR est de donner tous les instruments pour les gérer de manière correcte.

      Et qu’en est-il de l’idée de « centres ­d’accueil » hors Europe, comme au Maghreb ?

      Le HCR travaille dans tous les pays du monde pour gérer l’asile. Le gérer avec efficacité aide à stabiliser ces flux. Par ailleurs, nous n’accepterons jamais que les demandes d’asile en Europe soient gérées hors de son territoire. L’Europe doit garder ses portes ouvertes. Il faut qu’il y soit toujours possible de demander l’asile, sans être renvoyé vers des pays tiers. Cela dit, si l’Europe est prête à prendre des réfugiés dès le Niger, par exemple, dans le cadre de la « réinstallation » [transfert au sein de l’UE, par des voies sûres et légales, de personnes déplacées ayant besoin d’une protection], ce processus peut être renforcé.

      Vous êtes donc opposé à des plates-formes pour débarquer, en Afrique, des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée ?

      Si quelqu’un est sauvé dans les eaux territoriales tunisiennes, puis renvoyé en Tunisie, c’est légitime. C’est le droit. En Libye, les garde-côtes ont été renforcés par l’Europe de manière plus ou moins transparente. C’est une bonne idée, à condition de renforcer aussi les institutions qui gèrent les migrants, et pas seulement celles qui les empêchent de partir.

      L’Autriche, qui assure ce semestre la présidence tournante de l’UE, cherche à instaurer un accord avec l’Egypte. Y êtes-vous ­favorable ?

      Nous travaillons depuis longtemps en Egypte, qui héberge plus de 250 000 réfugiés. Si les Etats veulent nous aider à y renforcer les structures, c’est une bonne chose, mais cela ne doit pas être un moyen d’empêcher les gens de partir vers l’Europe.

      Pourquoi le HCR participe-t-il à cette politique d’externalisation des frontières européennes ?

      La Turquie héberge 4 millions de réfugiés. Vous voudriez qu’on ne les aide pas ? Au moment de l’accord UE-Turquie, auquel le HCR n’a pas été associé, on nous a demandé de vérifier que son contenu n’allait pas à l’encontre des normes internationales. Le HCR a travaillé avec la Grèce pour s’assurer qu’il n’y ait pas d’expulsion vers la Turquie de personnes qui pourraient y courir des risques.

      En 2015, l’Europe a lancé l’initiative d’un fonds pour l’Afrique. Il est sous-financé, et la plupart des ressources sont utilisées pour le contrôle des frontières et non pour traiter les causes des départs. Je le regrette.

      La situation de surpopulation et ­d’insalubrité du camp de Moria, sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, est catastrophique. Le HCR y participe…

      C’est difficile en effet, d’autant que le nombre d’arrivées continue à augmenter J’en ai parlé au premier ministre grec, Alexis ­Tsipras, et au ministre de l’immigration, qui vont faire un effort pour transférer des personnes sur le continent. J’ai reçu des assurances. Si on arrive à réguler la population dans les îles, on arrivera à mieux gérer la situation.

      Accordez-vous foi aux perspectives démographiques alarmistes du journaliste et chercheur Stephen Smith, qui prévoit une explosion migratoire venue d’Afrique ?

      L’invasion est un peu une légende : 70 % des mouvements de population en Afrique restent à l’intérieur du continent et ne vont pas vers l’Europe. Cela dit, il y aura toujours des migrations : les gens se déplacent toujours vers la prospérité. Quand il n’y a pas de possibilité d’émigrer de manière légale, ne reste que l’asile. Ce n’est pas bien, car ces demandes encombrent les systèmes d’asile et les délégitimisent, en créant dans l’opinion publique une confusion entre immigration et asile.

      Aujourd’hui, 80 % des demandeurs d’asile en Europe sont venus pour des raisons économiques, comment faire ?

      L’un des problèmes est l’impossibilité pour les déboutés du droit d’asile de retourner chez eux. Il faut trouver des accords de réadmission avec les pays d’origine, mais c’est coûteux et politiquement difficile pour ces derniers. En Libye, un accord avec l’Union africaine autorisant le HCR et l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations d’y travailler, a permis le retour de 30 000 migrants chez eux [depuis début 2017]. Ils ont été réadmis parce que les images terribles des gens exploités dans les prisons libyennes ont eu un impact. Ce processus doit s’élargir.

      Pensez-vous que les réfugiés syriens retourneront dans leur pays ?

      Il y a une petite augmentation des demandes de retour de Syriens vivant en Jordanie et au Liban, mais il ne s’agit que de quelques milliers de personnes sur plusieurs millions. Le droit au retour existe, mais il doit être le résultat d’un choix personnel. Il reste des obstacles sécuritaires et matériels. Les réfugiés ont peur d’être enrôlés pour le service militaire, ils redoutent des représailles ou de ne pas retrouver leurs biens. La situation dans la province d’Idlib [minée par les affrontements inter-rebelles et l’insécurité galopan­te] n’encourage pas non plus les gens à rentrer. La reconstruction de la Syrie est un sujet politiquement sensible, mais j’appelle les pays donateurs à au moins aider les gens qui font le choix du retour.

      Comment jugez-vous la politique migratoire d’Emmanuel Macron ?

      En France, il faut améliorer la mise à l’abri, l’accueil, certains aspects de la procédure, mais la loi asile et immigration [définitivement adoptée à l’Assemblée le 1er août] a permis des progrès. A l’échelle européenne, le discours solidaire du président est très positif [il s’était engagé, en automne 2017, à offrir en deux ans 10 000 places de réinstallation aux réfugiés liés au HCR, notamment au Niger et au Tchad]. L’augmentation relative des places de réinstallation pour les réfugiés et l’action rapide de l’Ofpra [Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides] au Niger ont été exemplaires.

      Comprenez-vous que l’afflux massif d’une population culturellement musulmane dans une région majoritairement judéo-chrétienne puisse créer des tensions ?

      Toute absorption de personnes issues d’une culture minoritaire est complexe, mais elle est possible et souhaitable ! Je crois à la diversité, même si je sais que ce n’est pas populaire de le dire. Lors de réunions européennes, en particulier dans l’est de l’Europe, j’ai entendu certains pays parler d’homogénéité. Mais ce n’est pas dans la tradition de l’Europe. Les valeurs chrétiennes sont précisément des valeurs de solidarité et de partage. L’homogénéité est une utopie négative qu’il faut contrer à tout prix. La diversité est un élément d’enrichissement. Les villes vivantes dans le monde sont des villes diverses ; ce sont elles qui sont à l’avant-garde ! Les Européens ont suffisamment d’outils économiques, sociaux et culturels pour gérer cette diversité.

      Etes-vous inquiet de la montée de l’extrême droite en Italie ?

      [Le ministre de l’intérieur italien] Matteo Salvini mène plusieurs batailles. Sur la question de la répartition des migrants en Europe, je suis d’accord avec lui : l’Italie ne peut pas recevoir tout le monde. Mais son discours très agressif, même s’il n’est pas forcément raciste, est susceptible de créer une atmosphère où le racisme peut prospérer. Cela m’inquiète beaucoup. Son langage ouvre la porte à des tendances extrêmes au sein des sociétés.

      La montée du populisme dans le monde pose-t-elle des problèmes pour une organisation multilatérale comme le HCR ?

      Pour l’instant, personne ne nous dit d’arrêter notre travail, qui, il faut le rappeler, est effectué à 90 % hors de l’Europe. Pour nous, l’essentiel est d’obtenir les ressources pour aider les pays qui hébergent vraiment les réfugiés, c’est-à-dire souvent des pays pauvres en Afrique ou en Asie. Je crains que la diminution de la solidarité en Europe et la stigmatisation du droit d’asile aux Etats-Unis donnent un mauvais exemple. Les pays pauvres me demandent de plus en plus pourquoi ils devraient prendre des réfugiés alors que l’Europe n’en veut pas. Or, pour des Etats voisins de pays en guerre, cela signifierait renvoyer des gens dans ces zones de conflit. C’est cela qui m’inquiète le plus.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2018/11/09/filippo-grandi-l-essentiel-est-qu-on-nous-donne-les-moyens-d-aider-les-pays-

      Avec ce commentaire de Emmanuel Blanchard via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      Une interview inquiétante à plus d’un titre : #Filippo_Grandi suggère que le HCR pourrait être plus impliqué encore en Lybie et dans tout pays d’Afrique du Nord prêt à s’impliquer dans des programmes de retours de boat-people et autres projets de gestion de « centres d’accueil et de réception ». Il ouvre même grand la porte pour une collaboration poussée avec l’UE en Egypte, même s’il prévient que le rôle du HCR ne peut pas être de contribuer à « des moyens d’empêcher les gens de partir vers l’Europe ». Il critique en effet à mots couverts certaines dimensions des politiques européennes de contrôle des frontières extérieures (voir passages soulignés en gras).
      A noter que sous couvert « d’équilibre », le journaliste du Monde - qui s’est autorisé une critique de la « politique d’externalisation des frontières européennes » - reprend certains des argumentaires « anti-migrants » les plus éculés.


  • Long Read: Shipwreck Survivors Stranded by a Faltering Deal

    As an E.U.–Turkey agreement on refugees nears collapse, Preethi Nallu and Iason Athanasiadis report from the Greek island of Lesbos on how the deal never fully stopped the deadly voyages and has left survivors of such tragedies in agonizing limbo.


    https://www.newsdeeply.com/refugees/articles/2016/11/02/long-read-shipwreck-survivors-stranded-by-a-faltering-deal
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce #limbe #attente #anti-chambre #antichambre #îles


  • 4.1 Miles

    When I returned home to Greece last fall to make a film about the refugee crisis, I discovered a situation I had never imagined possible. The turquoise sea that surrounds the beautiful Greek island of Lesbos, just 4.1 miles from the Turkish coast, is these days a deadly gantlet, choked with terrified adults and small children on flimsy, dangerous boats. I had never seen people escaping war before, and neither had the island’s residents. I couldn’t believe there was no support for these families to safely escape whatever conflict had caused them to flee. The scene was haunting.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/28/opinion/4-1-miles.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0

    #film #vidéo #asile #migrations #réfugiés #îles #Grèce #sauvetage #Lesbos #témoignage #Mourir_en_mer #Mer_Egée



  • Greece : Refugee “Hotspots” Unsafe, Unsanitary

    (Athens) – Police are failing to protect people during frequent incidents of violence in closed centers on the Greek islands known as “hotspots,” Human Rights Watch said today. The centers were established for the reception, identification, and processing of asylum seekers and migrants. None of the three centers Human Rights Watch visited on Samos, Lesbos, and Chios in mid-May 2016, separate single women from unrelated adult men, and all three are unsanitary and severely overcrowded.


    https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/05/19/greece-refugee-hotspots-unsafe-unsanitary
    #hotspots #Grèce #réfugiés #asile #migrations



  • Greece: Asylum Seekers Locked Up

    Greek authorities, in coordination with the European Union, are automatically detaining all asylum seekers and migrants who arrive on the islands of Lesbos and Chios in deplorable conditions, Human Rights Watch said today. The detention of about 4,000 people creates particular hardships for vulnerable people who are held, such as children, pregnant women, and people with disabilities. The blanket detention of all asylum seekers and migrants in closed facilities is unjustified, given the possibility of less restrictive options, and amounts to arbitrary detention. The two closed facilities should be converted into open camps with appropriate services and safety for people needing protection from war, persecution, and human rights abuses.


    https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/04/14/greece-asylum-seekers-locked
    #Grèce #détention_administrative #rétention #asile #migrations #réfugiés


  • Amnesty | Grèce. Des réfugiés détenus dans des conditions déplorables, sur fond de course à la mise en œuvre de l’accord UE-Turquie
    http://asile.ch/2016/04/09/amnesty-grece-des-refugies-detenus-dans-des-conditions-deplorables-sur-fond-de

    Des milliers de réfugié-e-s et de migrant-e-s sont maintenus en détention arbitraire dans des conditions déplorables tandis qu’incertitude, peur et désespoir montent parmi eux quant au sort que leur réserve le nouvel accord conclu par l’Union européenne (UE) et la Turquie sur les réfugiés, a déclaré Amnesty International après que des délégués de l’organisation ont […]



  • Why don’t EU leaders realise that this refugee deal with Turkey is exactly what the people traffickers want?

    The Turkish mafia, assorted jihadi groups in Libya, and networked crime networks linking Europe to the Sahel are already strengthening their grip on people smuggling routes, eroding the already porous borders between people-smuggling, drugs-trafficking, gun-running and money-laundering


    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/david-cameron-dont-you-realise-that-this-eu-turkey-refugee-deal-is-ex
    #Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés #UE #Europe #externalisation #push-back #refoulement #politique_migratoire #accord

    #passeurs #trafiquants


  • “The Lesbos hotspot”: A visit to Lesbos and Lampedusa

    Red roofs on yellow houses glitter between the green hills like colorful splashes of paint in the landscape. The nearby Mediterranean’s white-topped waves glisten in the midday sun, and a few boats go about their business. Lesbos sparkles in all the colors of the rainbow; it has the scent of cold pressed olive oil, of Cyprus wood and sun cream.


    http://espminetwork.com/2016/02/23/a-drop-in-the-ocean-a-visit-to-lesbos-and-lampedusa

    #hotspot #Lesbos #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #tri

    • Hot-spots: Welcome to EU-Land

      It is only too easy to be caught into the hustle and bustle of updates on the unfolding crisis: to be dragged into closely following minute-by-minute trackers from one “crucial summit” after another, in reading into a country’s swagging around, into demands raised and dropped, interim agreements reached and breached: heck, to even be caught into trying to understand what the lunch menu of attendants might have to do with this all. It is only too easy, in other words, to read this crisis and its management as an endlessly consecutive, theatre-like play of political actors entering the spotlight to decide the fate of those people dismissed as “flows”. Yet while this is all unfolding, and keeping well away from the spotlight for now, a crucial process plays out: the process of establishing and rendering operative the so-called ‘hot spots’ – including in the Greek island of Lesbos, which is where this brief video was filmed.

      http://www.transcapes.net/hot-spots-welcome-to-eu-land
      https://vimeo.com/158463296


      #vidéo #film