• Nigerians returned from Europe face stigma and growing hardship

    ‘There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids.’

    The EU is doubling down on reducing migration from Africa, funding both voluntary return programmes for those stranded along migration routes before they reach Europe while also doing its best to increase the number of rejected asylum seekers it is deporting.

    The two approaches serve the same purpose for Brussels, but the amount of support provided by the EU and international aid groups for people to get back on their feet is radically different depending on whether they are voluntary returnees or deportees.

    For now, the coronavirus pandemic has slowed voluntary return programmes and significantly reduced the number of people being deported from EU countries, such as Germany. Once travel restrictions are lifted, however, the EU will likely resume its focus on both policies.

    The EU has made Nigeria one of five priority countries in Africa in its efforts to reduce the flow of migrants and asylum seekers. This has involved pouring hundreds of millions of euros into projects in Nigeria to address the “root causes” of migration and funding a “voluntary return” programme run by the UN’s migration agency, IOM.

    Since its launch in 2017, more than 80,000 people, including 16,800 Nigerians, have been repatriated to 23 African countries after getting stuck or having a change of heart while travelling along often-dangerous migration routes connecting sub-Saharan Africa to North Africa.

    Many of the Nigerians who have opted for IOM-facilitated repatriation were stuck in detention centres or exploitative labour situations in Libya. Over the same time period, around 8,400 Nigerians have been deported from Europe, according to official figures.

    Back in their home country, little distinction is made between voluntary returnees and deportees. Both are often socially stigmatised and rejected by their communities. Having a family member reach Europe and be able to send remittances back home is often a vital lifeline for people living in impoverished communities. Returning – regardless of how it happens – is seen as failure.

    In addition to stigmatisation, returnees face daily economic struggles, a situation that has only become worse with the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on Nigeria’s already struggling economy.

    Despite facing common challenges, deportees are largely left to their own devices, while voluntary returnees have access to an EU-funded support system that includes a small three-months salary, training opportunities, controversial “empowerment” and personal development sessions, and funds to help them start businesses – even if these programmes often don’t necessarily end up being effective.
    ‘It’s a well-oiled mechanism’

    Many of the voluntary returnee and deportation flights land in Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest city and main hub for international travel. On a hot and humid day in February, before countries imposed curfews and sealed their borders due to coronavirus, two of these flights arrived within several hours of each other at the city’s hulking airport.

    First, a group of about 45 people in winter clothes walked through the back gate of the cargo airport looking out of place and disoriented. Deportees told TNH they had been taken into immigration custody by German police the day before and forced onto a flight in Frankfurt. Officials from the Nigerian Immigration Service, the country’s border police, said they are usually told to prepare to receive deportees after the planes have already left from Europe.

    Out in the parking lot, a woman fainted under the hot sun. When she recovered, she said she was pregnant and didn’t know where she would sleep that night. A man began shouting angrily about how he had been treated in Europe, where he had lived for 16 years. Police officers soon arrived to disperse the deportees. Without money or phones, many didn’t know where to go or what to do.

    Several hours later, a plane carrying 116 voluntary returnees from Libya touched down at the airport’s commercial terminal. In a huge hangar, dozens of officials guided the returnees through an efficient, well-organised process.

    The voluntary returnees queued patiently to be screened by police, state health officials, and IOM personnel who diligently filled out forms. Officials from Nigeria’s anti-people trafficking agency also screened the female returnees to determine if they had fallen victim to an illegal network that has entrapped tens of thousands of Nigerian women in situations of forced sex work in Europe and in transit countries such as Libya and Niger.

    “It’s a well-oiled mechanism. Each agency knows its role,” Alexander Oturu, a programme manager at Nigeria’s National Commission for Refugees, Migrants & Internally Displaced Persons, which oversees the reception of returnees, told The New Humanitarian.

    Voluntary returnees are put up in a hotel for one night and then helped to travel back to their home regions or temporarily hosted in government shelters, and later they have access to IOM’s reintegration programming.

    Initially, there wasn’t enough funding for the programmes. But now almost 10,000 of the around 16,600 returnees have been able to access this support, out of which about 4,500 have set up small businesses – mostly shops and repair services – according to IOM programme coordinator Abrham Tamrat Desta.

    The main goal is to “address the push factors, so that upon returning, these people don’t face the same situation they fled from”, Desta said. “This is crucial, as our data show that 97 percent of returnees left for economic reasons.”
    COVID-19 making things worse

    Six hours drive south of Lagos is Benin City, the capital of Edo State.

    An overwhelming number of the people who set out for Europe come from this region. It is also where the majority of European migration-related funding ends up materialising, in the form of job creation programmes, awareness raising campaigns about the risks of irregular migration, and efforts to dismantle powerful trafficking networks.

    Progress* is one of the beneficiaries. When TNH met her she was full of smiles, but at 26 years old, she has already been through a lot. After being trafficked at 17 and forced into sex work in Libya, she had a child whose father later died in a shipwreck trying to reach Europe. Progress returned to Nigeria, but couldn’t escape the debt her traffickers expected her to pay. Seeing little choice, she left her child with her sister and returned to Libya.

    Multiple attempts to escape spiralling violence in the country ended in failure. Once, she was pulled out of the water by Libyan fishermen after nearly drowning. Almost 200 other people died in that wreck. On two other occasions, the boat she was in was intercepted and she was dragged back to shore by the EU-supported Libyan Coast Guard.

    After the second attempt, she registered for the IOM voluntary return programme. “I was hoping to get back home immediately, but Libyans put me in prison and obliged me to pay to be released and take the flight,” she said.

    Back in Benin City, she took part in a business training programme run by IOM. She couldn’t provide the paperwork needed to launch her business and finally found support from Pathfinders Justice Initiative – one of the many local NGOs that has benefited from EU funding in recent years.

    She eventually opened a hairdressing boutique, but coronavirus containment measures forced her to close up just as she was starting to build a regular clientele. Unable to provide for her son, now seven years old, she has been forced to send him back to live with her sister.

    Progress isn’t the only returnee struggling due to the impact of the pandemic. Mobility restrictions and the shuttering of non-essential activities – due to remain until early August at least – have “exacerbated returnees’ existing psychosocial vulnerabilities”, an IOM spokesperson said.

    The Edo State Task Force to Combat Human Trafficking, set up by the local government to coordinate prosecutions and welfare initiatives, is trying to ease the difficulties people are facing by distributing food items. As of early June, the task force said it had reached 1,000 of the more than 5,000 people who have returned to the state since 2017.
    ‘Sent here to die’

    Jennifer, 39, lives in an unfinished two-storey building also in Benin City. When TNH visited, her three-year-old son, Prince, stood paralysed and crying, and her six-year-old son, Emmanuel, ran and hid on the appartment’s small balcony. “It’s the German police,” Jennifer said. “The kids are afraid of white men now.”

    Jennifer, who preferred that only her first name is published, left Edo State in 1999. Like many others, she was lied to by traffickers, who tell young Nigerian women they will send them to Europe to get an education or find employment but who end up forcing them into sex work and debt bondage.

    It took a decade of being moved around Europe by trafficking rings before Jennifer was able to pay off her debt. She got a residency permit and settled down in Italy for a period of time. In 2016, jobless and looking to get away from an unstable relationship, she moved to Germany and applied for asylum.

    Her application was not accepted, but deportation proceedings against her were put on hold. That is until June 2019, when 15 policemen showed up at her apartment. “They told me I had five minutes to check on my things and took away my phone,” Jennifer said.

    The next day she was on a flight to Nigeria with Prince and Emmanuel. When they landed, “the Nigerian Immigration Service threw us out of the gate of the airport in Lagos, 20 years after my departure”. she said.

    Nine months after being deported, Jennifer is surviving on small donations coming from volunteers in Germany. It’s the only aid she has received. “There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids,” she said.

    Jennifer, like other deportees TNH spoke to, was aware of the support system in place for people who return through IOM, but felt completely excluded from it. The deportation and lack of support has taken a heavy psychological toll, and Jennifer said she has contemplated suicide. “I was sent here to die,” she said.
    ‘The vicious circle of trafficking’

    Without a solid economic foundation, there’s always a risk that people will once again fall victim to traffickers or see no other choice but to leave on their own again in search of opportunity.

    “When support is absent or slow to materialise – and this has happened also for Libyan returnees – women have been pushed again in the hands of traffickers,” said Ruth Evon Odahosa, from the Pathfinders Justice Initiative.

    IOM said its mandate does not include deportees, and various Nigerian government agencies expressed frustration to TNH about the lack of European interest in the topic. “These deportations are implemented inhumanely,” said Margaret Ngozi Ukegbu, a zonal director for the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons.

    The German development agency, GIZ, which runs several migration-related programmes in Nigeria, said their programming does not distinguish between returnees and deportees, but the agency would not disclose figures on how many deportees had benefited from its services.

    Despite the amount of money being spent by the EU, voluntary returnees often struggle to get back on their feet. They have psychological needs stemming from their journeys that go unmet, and the businesses started with IOM seed money frequently aren’t sustainable in the long term.

    “It’s crucial that, upon returning home, migrants can get access to skills acquisition programmes, regardless of the way they returned, so that they can make a new start and avoid falling back in the vicious circle of trafficking,” Maria Grazie Giammarinaro, the former UN’s special rapporteur on trafficking in persons, told TNH.

    * Name changed at request of interviewee.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/07/28/Nigeria-migrants-return-Europe

    #stigmatisation #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #réfugiés_nigérians #réintegration #retour_volontaire #IOM #OIM #chiffres #statistiques #trafic_d'êtres_humains

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour @isskein @karine4

  • IOM, Government of Greece Assist 134 Iraqi Migrants with Voluntary Return | International Organization for Migration
    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-government-greece-assist-134-iraqi-migrants-voluntary-return

    The International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Greece and the Hellenic authorities, in coordination with IOM Iraq and the diplomatic corps, organized the voluntary return of 134 Iraqi nationals who wished to return home. They left Athens Thursday (6/8) on a flight to Baghdad International Airport, where the first group of passengers disembarked. The flight then continued to Erbil International Airport.

    This is the first large group of migrants to voluntarily return from Greece since the COVID-19 movement restrictions were imposed. Among them were 80 men, 16 women and 38 children.

    #Covid_19#migration#migrant#oim#irak#grece#retour

  • To stop the spread of COVID-19 and associated stigma in Somalia, communities need the facts | The Storyteller
    https://storyteller.iom.int/stories/stop-spread-covid-19-and-associated-stigma-somalia-communities-need

    The lack of accurate, factual information about public health emergencies presents a very real and present risk for people in Somalia, especially among the estimated 2.6 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and the thousands of migrants that transit through the country every year. Health messages broadcasted through media outlets do not reach everyone. Rumours and hearsay spread faster than any virus, putting people’s lives in danger and bringing stigma and shame to those who contract COVID-19.
    These are features of the COVID-19 pandemic response which has produced 3,212 positive cases in Somalia and claimed the lives of 93 people since March. While COVID-19 awareness is generally high here, recent findings from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) show that four months after the first confirmed case, there are still many vulnerable populations who have not received this information, particularly those living in displacement sites. Worse still, misconceptions about how the disease spreads remain pervasive across the country. Many young migrants crossing into Somalia, mainly from Ethiopia, told IOM that they were unaware of the COVID-19 pandemic. When surveyed in March, IOM found that only 19 per cent had heard about the disease. This number has increased to 46 per cent since the exercise started.

    #COvid-19#migrant#migration#somaliie#ethiopie#OIM#stigmatisation#information#pandemie#vulnerabilite#refugie#sante

  • Migrants, the Backbone of Ukrainian Economy, Require Support in Times of COVID-19 – IOM Report | International Organization for Migration
    https://www.iom.int/news/migrants-backbone-ukrainian-economy-require-support-times-covid-19-iom-report

    “Migrants are the backbone of the Ukrainian economy,” affirms Anh Nguyen, Chief of Mission at IOM Ukraine. He explains: “Private remittances sent to Ukraine equal to more than 10 per cent of GDP, and a large share of this money comes from migrant workers, allowing their families to cover their basic needs including food, rent, education and health care.”
    Today IOM is concerned about conditions impacting an estimated 350,000–400,000 Ukrainian migrant workers who came home following announcements of quarantine or lockdowns in their countries of destination as well as in Ukraine itself.
    As IOM Ukraine forecasts in a newly published analysis, implications of COVID-19 travel restrictions will remain extremely challenging not only at the individual, but at the local and national level as well.

    #Covid19#migrant#migration#oim#ukraine#travailleurmigrant#envoidefonds

  • Internal Displacement in Yemen Exceeds 100,000 in 2020 with COVID-19 an Emerging New Cause | International Organization for Migration
    https://www.iom.int/news/internal-displacement-yemen-exceeds-100000-2020-covid-19-emerging-new-cause

    Nearly six years have passed, but the conflict in Yemen continues to rage on. So far in 2020, more than 100,000 people have been forced to flee – mostly due to fighting and insecurity. However, COVID-19 is beginning to emerge as a new cause of internal displacement across the country.

    #Covid19#migrant#migration#oim#yemen#deplaceinterne

  • Eau salubre, hygiène et assainissement : une nécessité pour contenir la COVID-19 chez les déplacés internes du nord-est du Nigéria | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/eau-salubre-hygiene-et-assainissement-une-necessite-pour-contenir-la-covid-19-c

    La COVID-19 continue de perturber la santé, la vie publique et les moyens de subsistance dans le pays le plus peuplé d’Afrique. Alors que la maladie continue de se propager dans le nord-est du Nigéria, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) étend ses opérations d’eau, d’assainissement et d’hygiène (WASH) pour réduire la propagation du virus. Un nouveau projet de l’OIM aidera à prévenir et à contrôler les infections à la COVID-19 dans trois zones de l’État de Borno où se trouvent de fortes concentrations de déplacés internes, zones également considérées comme étant à haut risque de propagation de la maladie. Dans l’État de Borno, le plus grand de la région, environ 80 % des quelque 840 000 déplacés internes vivent dans des abris temporaires de fortune, dans des conditions de surpeuplement où la distanciation physique est difficile, voire impossible. En outre, malgré la pandémie, les attaques par des groupes armés non étatiques dans le nord-est sont en cours, y compris dans les zones proches des opérations humanitaires. Plus tôt cette semaine (14/07), le Centre de contrôle des maladies du Nigéria a enregistré 591 cas confirmés et 35 décès à Borno, où une crise humanitaire de dix ans a provoqué le déplacement de 1,8 millions de personnes et laissé 10,6 millions d’autres dans le besoin. L’impact d’une épidémie au sein des populations déplacées dans cette région pourrait être dévastateur. « Sans installations sanitaires et matériel d’hygiène à disposition, les déplacés internes sont extrêmement vulnérables à la transmission de maladies », a déclaré Teshager Tefera, responsable du programme WASH de l’OIM au Nigéria. Les services aideront environ 420 000 déplacés internes dans 120 camps et communautés voisines dans les municipalités de Maiduguri, Konduga et Damasak, dans l’État de Borno. Le projet visera à acheminer de l’eau salubre, ainsi que 22 000 kits d’hygiène comprenant du savon, des seaux et d’autres articles, aux populations à risque.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#nigeria#borno#sante#camp#deplaceinterne#materielsanitaire#violence#OIM

  • #IOM using #Facebook #advertisment to reach potential #return_migrants

    Mail received by a friend with Pakistani citizenship:

    “I am adding a screenshot of advertising on Facebook by German government which suggest me to ’ If I would like to return my home country and don’t know how then I can contact there’ Advertising is in Urdu which means they already know who they are showing this advertisement. This is interesting that they use my personal data and target me as a refugee I guess. [...]
    Screenshot is attached and the link where the advertisement leads is below.”

    https://www.online-antragsmodul.de/OAM/MIRA/Default.aspx

    #Germany #migration #return_migration #explusion #social_media #social_networks #data_privacy

    ping @cdb_77 @rhoumour @deka

    • Menschenrechtsverletzungen bei Rückkehrprogrammen

      Immer wieder gibt es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen bei den Rückkehrprogrammen der IOM. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international belegt die Vorwürfe.

      Die EU lagert seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setzt innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, damit Migrantinnen und Migranten erst gar nicht Europas Außengrenzen erreichen. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international weist nach, dass die EU dabei Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in den Transitländern Libyen, Niger und Algerien in Kauf nimmt.

      Die EU-Kommission hatte 2015 den Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika aufgelegt. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM), ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm für Migrantinnen und Migranten durchzuführen.Tatsächlich aber gibt es immer wieder Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen.In ihrer Studie kann die Autorin Jill Alpes nun belegen, dass die Teilnahme an den Rückkehrprogrammen oftmals unfreiwillig erfolgt und teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie der Rückführung zustimmen.

      Zusammenfassung der Studie

      Eine neue von Brot für die Welt und medico international herausgegebene Studie untersuchtbestehende Rückkehrprogramme für Migrantinnen und Migranten in Libyen und Niger entlang der Frage: Sind die Programme tatsächlich geeignete Instrumente zum Schutz der Menschen? Oder werden sie nach ihrer Rückkehr neuen Gefahren ausgesetzt?

      Im November 2017 alarmierte ein Beitrag des Nachrichtensenders CNN die Öffentlichkeit. Die Reporter berichteten über sklavenähnliche und zutiefst menschenunwürdige Verhältnisse in libyschen Internierungslagern. Europäische und afrikanische Regierungen, die zur gleichen Zeit ihr Gipfeltreffen in Abidjan abhielten, sahen sich daraufhin gezwungen, geeignete Schritte zum Schutz und zur Rettung der internierten Migranten und Flüchtlinge zu präsentieren.

      Doch statt eine Evakuierung der Menschen in sichere europäische Länder zu organisieren oder in Erwägung zu ziehen, die Unterstützung der für Menschenrechtsverletzungen verantwortlichen libyschen Küstenwache zu beenden, wurde die Rückführung von Flüchtlingen und Migranten aus Libyen in ihre Herkunftsländer beschlossen. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM) damit, ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm aus Libyen durchzuführen.

      Doch in ihrer Studie kann nun die Autorin Jill Alpes belegen, dass es bei der Umsetzung der Rückkehrprogramme teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien kommt. So legen Berichte von Betroffenen nahe, dass die Beteiligung an den Rückkehrprogrammen keineswegs immer freiwillig erfolgt, wie von IOM behauptet, sondern teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie ihrer eigenen Rückführung zustimmen. Vielfach erscheint ihnen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland angesichts in Libyen drohender Folter und Gewalt als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als eine geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. In Niger akzeptierten interviewte Migrantinnen und Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch die algerischen Behörden. Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert, bzw. genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten.

      Auch die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen, für die u.a. über den EU Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) erhebliche finanzielle Mittel aufgewendet werden, bewertet die Autorin kritisch. Libyen allein hat seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen. Offizielle Zahlen bestätigen, dass nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhält. Viele scheitern bereits daran, die Kosten für den Transport zum Büro der IOM aufzubringen, um dort Unterstützung zu beantragen. Empfängerinnen und Empfänger von Reintegrationshilfen kritisieren, dass die angebotenen Hilfsmaßnahmen, bspw. Seminare zur Unternehmensgründung, häufig an ihrem eigentlichen Bedarf vorbeigingen und dem formulierten Ziel, nämlich nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln, nicht ausreichend gerecht werden würden.

      Um tatsächlich zum Schutz von Migrantinnen und Migranten in Nord- und Westafrika beizutragen, zeigt die Autorin politische Handlungsempfehlungen auf. Eine Neuausrichtung der Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik müsse sich orientieren an Schadensvermeidung und -verhinderung, Befähigung der Menschen, ihre Rechte einzufordern, Unterstützung der Entwicklung von Selbstschutzkapazitäten und bedarfsgerechter Hilfe.

      Konkret:

      Die Europäische Union und die EU-Mitgliedstaaten müssen die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen. Stattdessen sollten sie für proaktive Such- und Rettungsaktionen im zentralen Mittelmeer sorgen, Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren schaffen, die Rechte von Migrantinnen, Migranten und Flüchtlingen in der migrations-politischen Zusammenarbeit mit Libyen schützen und sich zu einer globalen Teilung der Verantwortung und zur Förderung regulärer Migrationswege verpflichten.
      Die derzeitige Abschiebepraxis von Staatsangehörigen aus Subsahara-Ländern von Algerien nach Niger stellt eine eklatante Verletzung des Völkerrechts dar und macht Migrantinnen und Migranten extrem verwundbar. Internationale Organisationen, die Europäische Union und die Regierung von Niger müssen eine entschlossene und öffentliche Haltung gegen diese Praktiken einnehmen und die potentiell negativen Auswirkungen der in Niger verfügbaren Rückkehrprogramme auf die Abschiebepraxis aus Algerien kritisch untersuchen.
      Rückkehrprogramme müssen den Rechten von Menschen, die vor oder während ihrer Migration intern vertrieben, gefoltert oder Opfer von Menschenhandel geworden sind, mehr Aufmerksamkeit schenken. Opfer von Menschenhandel und Folter sollten Zugang zu einem Asylverfahren oder einem Umsiedlungsmechanismus in ein Drittland als Alternative zur Rückkehr in die Herkunftsländer haben.
      Humanitäre Akteure (und ihre Geldgeber) sollten die Begünstigten von Programmen ausschließlich auf der Grundlage humanitärer Bedürfnisse definieren und sich nicht von Logiken des Migrationsmanagements beeinflussen lassen. Nur ein kleiner Teil der afrikanischen Migrationsbewegungen hat Europa zum Ziel. Der Entwicklungsbeitrag von Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrern ist dann am stärksten, wenn sich die Migrantinnen und Migranten freiwillig zu einer Rückkehr entschlossen haben.
      Gelder der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten nur dann für Rückkehr- und Reintegrationsprogramme verwendet werden, wenn eine positive Verbindung zu Entwicklung hergestellt werden kann. Die entwicklungspolitischen Auswirkungen der Reintegrationshilfe müssen untersucht und mit dem Nutzen und den Auswirkungen der Rücküberweisungen von Migrantinnen und Migranten verglichen werden.

      https://www.medico.de/menschenrechtsverletzungen-bei-rueckkehrprogrammen-17805

    • Paying for migrants to go back home: how the EU’s Voluntary Return scheme is failing the desperate

      By the time James boarded a flight from Libya to Nigeria at the end of 2018, he had survived a Mediterranean shipwreck, travelled through a half dozen African states, been shot and spent two years being abused and tortured in Libya’s brutal detention centres.

      In 2020, back home in Benin City, Edo State, James has been evicted from his house after failing to cover his rent and sleeps on the floor of his barbershop.

      He has been shunned by his family and friends for his failure to reach Europe.

      “There’s no happiness that you are back. No one seems to care about you [...]. You came back empty-handed,” he told Euronews.

      James was one of around 81,000 African migrants returned to their home nation with the aid of the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM) and paid for by the European Union, as part of the €357 million Joint Initiative. As well as a seat on a flight out of Libya and a number of other transit nations, migrants are also promised cash, support and counselling to allow them to reintegrate in their home countries once they return.

      But a Euronews investigation across seven African nations has revealed massive failings in the programme, considered to be the EU’s flagship response to stopping migrants trying to get to Europe.

      Dozens of migrants that have been through the programme told Euronews that once they returned, no support was forthcoming. Even those who did receive financial support - like James - said it was insufficient.

      Many are considering making a new break for Europe as soon as the chance arises.

      “I feel I don’t belong here,” James said. “If the opportunity comes, I’m taking it. I’m leaving the country.”

      Of the 81,000 migrants returned since 2017, almost 33,000 were flown back from Libya, many of whom have suffered detention, abuse and violence at the hands of people smugglers, militias and criminal gangs. Conditions are so bad in the north African country that the programme is called Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR), rather than the Assisted Voluntary Return (AVR) programme elsewhere in Africa.

      Mohi, 24, who spent three years in Libya, accepted the offer of a flight back home in 2019. But, once there, his reintegration package never materialised. “Nothing has been provided to us, they keep telling us tomorrow,” he told Euronews from north Darfur, Sudan.

      Mohi is not alone. IOM’s own statistics on returnees to Sudan reveal that only 766 out of over 2,600 have received economic support. It blames high rates of inflation and a shortage of both goods and cash in the market.

      But Kwaku Arhin-Sam, who evaluates development projects as director of the Friedensau Institute for Evaluation, estimates that half of the IOM reintegration programmes fail.

      “Most people are lost after a few days”, he said.
      Two-thirds of migrants don’t complete the reintegration programmes

      The IOM itself lowers this estimate even further: the UN agency told Euronews that so far only one-third of the migrants who have started reintegration assistance have completed the process. A spokesperson said that as the joint initiative is a voluntary process, “migrants can decide to pull out at any time, or not to join at all”.

      He said that reintegrating migrants once they return home goes far beyond the organisation’s mandate, and “requires strong leadership from national authorities”, as well as “active contributions at all levels of society”.

      Between May 2017 and February 2019, IOM had helped over 12,000 people return to Nigeria. Of them, 9,000 were “reachable” when they returned home, 5,000 received business training and 4,300 received “reintegration aid”. If access to counselling or health services is included, IOM Nigeria says, a total of 7,000 out of 12,000 returnees - or 58% - received reintegration support.

      But the number of people classified as having completed the reintegration assistance programme was just 1,289, and research by Jill Alpes, a migration expert and research associate at the Nijmegen Centre for Border Research, found that surveys to check the effectiveness of these packages were conducted with only 136 returnees.

      Meanwhile, a Harvard study on Nigerian returnees from Libya estimates that 61.3% of the respondents were not working after their return, and an additional 16.8% only worked for a short period of time, not long enough to generate a stable source of income. Upon return, the vast majority of returnees, 98.3%, were not in any form of regular education.

      The European Commissioner for home affairs, Ylva Johansson, admitted to Euronews that “this is one area where we need improvements.” Johansson said it was too early to say what those improvements might be but maintained the EU have a good relationship with the IOM.

      Sandrine, Rachel and Berline, from Cameroon, agreed to board an IOM flight from Misrata, Libya, to Yaounde, Cameroon’s capital in September 2018.

      In Libya, they say they suffered violence and sexual abuse and had already risked their lives in the attempt at crossing the Mediterranean. On that occasion, they were intercepted by the Libyan coastguard and sent back to Libya.

      Once back home, Berline and Rachel say they received no money or support from IOM. Sandrine was given around 900,000 cfa francs (€1,373.20) to pay for her children’s education and start a small business - but it didn’t last long.

      “I was selling chicken by the roadside in Yaounde, but the project didn’t go well and I left it,” she said.

      Sandrine, from Cameroon, recalled giving birth in a Tripoli detention centre to the sound of gunfire.

      All three said that they had no idea where they would sleep when they returned to Cameroon, and they had no money to even call their families to inform them of their journey.

      “We left the country, and when we came back we found the same situation, sometimes even worse. That’s why people decide to leave again,” Berline says.

      In November 2019, fewer than half of the 3,514 Cameroonian migrants who received some form of counselling from IOM were reported as “effectively integrated”.

      Seydou, a Malian returnee, received money from IOM to pay his rent for three months and the medical bills for his sick wife. He was also provided with business training and given a motorbike taxi.

      But in Mali he takes home around €15 per day, compared to the more than €1,300 he was able to send home when he was working illegally in Algeria, which financed the construction of a house for his brother in the village.

      He is currently trying to arrange a visa that would enable him to join another of his brothers in France.

      Seydou is one of the few lucky Malians, though. .Alpes’ forthcoming research, published by Brot für die Welt (the relief agency of the Protestant Churches in Germany) and Medico International, found that only 10% of migrants returned to Mali up to January 2019 had received any kind of support from IOM.

      IOM, meanwhile, claims that 14,879 Malians have begun the reintegration process - but the figure does not reveal how many people completed it.
      The stigma of return

      In some cases the money migrants receive is used to fund another attempt to reach Europe.

      In one case, a dozen people who had reached Europe and been sent home were discovered among the survivors of a 2019 shipwreck of a boat headed to the Canary Islands. “They had returned and they had decided to take the route again,” said Laura Lungarotti, IOM chief mission in Mauritania.

      Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the IOM, told Euronews that it could not prevent individuals from attempting to reach Europe again once they had been returned.

      “It is however in the hands of people to decide whether or not they migrate and in its different programme IOM doesn’t plan to prevent people from re-migrating”, she said.

      What is the IOM?

      From 2016, the IOM rebranded itself as the UN Migration Agency, and its budget has ballooned from US$242.2 million (€213 million) in 1998 to exceed US$2 billion (€1.7 billion) for the first time in the autumn of 2019 - an eightfold increase. Though not part of the UN, the IOM is now a “related organisation”, with a relationship similar to that of a private contractor.

      The EU and its member states collectively are the largest contributors to IOM’s budget, accounting for nearly half of its operational funding.

      IOM has been keen to highlight cases of when its voluntary return programme has been successful on its website, including that of Khadeejah Shaeban, a Sudanese returnee from Libya who was able to set up a tailoring shop.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/19/paying-for-migrants-to-go-back-home-how-the-eu-s-voluntary-return-scheme-i

    • Abschottung statt Entwicklung

      Brot für die Welt und medico international kritisieren das EU-Programm zur Rückführung von Flüchtlingen in ihre Heimatländer und fordern eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik.

      Fünf Jahre nachdem die EU den EU-Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds (EUTF) in Afrika ins Leben rief, ziehen Brot für die Welt und medico international in einer aktuellen Studie eine kritische Zwischenbilanz. Im Zentrum der Untersuchung steht die 2016 mit Mitteln des EUTF ins Leben gerufene Gemeinsame Initiative der EU und der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) für den Schutz und die Wiedereingliederung von Migranten. Ziel des Programms war es insbesondere in Libyen gestrandeten Flüchtlingen eine Rückkehr in ihre Heimatländer zu ermöglichen.
      Insgesamt erfolgreich

      Das zuständige Auswärtige Amt bewertet die EU-IOM Initiative gegenüber dem SWR insgesamt als erfolgreich. Brot für die Welt und medico international kommen in ihrer aktuellen Studie aber zu einem anderen Ergebnis. Demnach ginge es bei der „freiwilligen Rückkehr“ vor allem darum, dass weniger Flüchtlinge und Migranten aus Afrika nach Europa kommen: „Migrationswege zu schließen und Menschen in ihre Herkunftsländer zurückzuschicken, lindert jedoch keine Not und hat daher nichts mit Entwicklungszusammenarbeit zu tun. Häufig werden hierdurch sogar neue und größere Probleme für die betroffenen Menschen und Gesellschaften geschaffen, wie die Studie von Jill Alpes zeigt“, erklärt medico international gegenüber dem SWR.

      Drei Monate lang suchte die Migrations-Expertin Jill Alpes im Niger, Nigeria und Mali nach Rückkehrern. Sie sprach auch mit den Vertretern der Hilfsorganisationen und den Verantwortlichen der IOM. Sie traf viele Zurückgekehrte, die bereits mehrfach einen Fluchtversuch unternommen hatten. „Von den Männern wollen die meisten eigentlich wieder raus,“ beschrieb Alpes gegenüber dem SWR die Situation vor Ort. Ihre Perspektive im Heimatland habe sich meist nicht verbessert, sondern verschlimmert, denn viele hätten Schulden aufgenommen, um die gefährliche Flucht anzutreten oder würden nach der Rückkehr stigmatisiert.

      „Während der Feldforschung war es so, dass auch die IOM Schwierigkeiten hatte, mit den Menschen, die sie bei der Rückkehr unterstützt hatte, wieder Kontakt aufzunehmen – kann sein, dass viele von ihnen wieder losgezogen sind.“ Für die meisten von Alpes befragten Betroffenen stelle sich die Notfallrückführung de facto als Abschiebung dar.

      Im Falle der „Rückkehr“ aus Algerien hatten einige Betroffene offenbar sogar bereits einen Flüchtlingsstatus oder hätten aufgrund ihrer Staatsangehörigkeit nicht aus Algerien ausgewiesen werden dürften.
      Ergebnisse der Studie

      Brot für die Welt kommentiert die Ergebnisse der Studie: „Die EU nimmt Menschenrechtsverletzungen in Kauf, insbesondere an den Außengrenzen Europas und den Transitländern wie Libyen, Niger und Algerien sind die Zustände eklatant.“

      Medico international kritisiert zudem, dass mit dem Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika „Mittel der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit eingeflossen sind, um so genannte irreguläre Migration zu unterbinden“.

      SWR Recherchen zeigen: Über den EU-Haushalt fließen Entwicklungsmittelgelder in die umstrittene Mission. Von den insgesamt 5 Milliarden Euro des Treuhandfond kommt mit 4.4 Milliarden der größte Anteil aus der Europäischen Entwicklungshilfe (EDF). Aus den Protokollen der Board Meetings des EUTF geht hervor, dass Deutschland darauf drängt, die Gelder vor allem im Bereich „Migrationsmanagement“ einzusetzen. „Hierbei geht es eher darum, innenpolitisch Handlungsfähigkeit zu beweisen – auf Kosten der Betroffenen. Eine Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, der es um Menschenrechte und die Bekämpfung von Armut geht, darf sich dafür nicht vereinnahmen lassen,“ kritisiert medico international.

      Brot für die Welt fordert darum einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik: „Im Vordergrund müssen die Rechte der Migrant*innen und deren Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen. Um tatsächlich zum Schutz beizutragen, müssen die Europäischen Mitgliedstaaten die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen und für eine proaktive Such – und Rettungsaktion, vorhersehbare Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren sorgen.“

      Die Bundesregierung setzt sich dagegen für eine Fortführung der Gemeinsamen Initiative ein, heißt es aus dem Auswärtigen Amt. Die Finanzierung ist aktuell Gegenstand der noch laufenden Verhandlungen zum mehrjährigen EU-Finanzrahmen.

      Die Studie liegt bisher dem SWR exklusiv vor.

      https://www.swr.de/report/swr-recherche-unit/studie-zur-eu-fluechtlingspolitik/-/id=24766532/did=25311586/nid=24766532/1rbvj1t/index.html

    • Studie: Rückkehrprogramme für Migranten verstoßen oft gegen Menschenrechte

      Die Teilnahme sei oft unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher Druck ausgeübt, kritisieren „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Die EU, die auf solche Programme setze, nehme das in Kauf.

      Bei Rückkehrprogrammen für Migranten nimmt die EU schwere Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in Transitländern in Kauf. Zu diesem Fazit kommt eine Studie von „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Immer wieder gebe es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen, erklärten die beiden Organisationen. Die neue Studie belege diese Vorwürfe: Die Teilnahme an solchen Programmen erfolge oftmals unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt.

      Die EU lagere seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setze innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, erklärten die Entwicklungsorganisationen. Bei der Umsetzung von Rückkehrprogrammen komme es jedoch teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien. So sei etwa die Beteiligung keineswegs immer freiwillig - anders als von der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) behauptet, die von der EU für ein humanitäres Rückführprogramm aus Libyen beauftragt worden sei.

      Für die Studie befragte Autorin Jill Alpes den Angaben zufolge Rückkehrer aus Libyen sowie Migranten in Niger und Mali, weiter sprach sie mit Vertretern von IOM, Nichtregierungsorganisationen, nationalen staatlichen Institutionen, EU, UNHCR und europäischen Entwicklungsagenturen.

      Vielfach erscheine den Menschen angesichts drohender Folter und Gewalt in Libyen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland letztlich als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. Im Niger hätten interviewte Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch algerische Behörden akzeptiert. „Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert beziehungsweise genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten“, betonen die Entwicklungsorganisationen.

      Die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen bewertet Studienautorin Alpes ebenfalls kritisch: Libyen allein habe seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen, nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer habe aber überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhalten. Von den Empfängern hätten viele bemängelt, dass die Hilfen am Bedarf vorbeigingen und nicht das Ziel erfüllten, nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln.

      „Wir fordern einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik“, erklärte Katherine Braun, Referentin für Migration und Entwicklung bei „Brot für die Welt“. Im Vordergrund müssten die Rechte der Migrantinnen und Migranten und der Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen.

      https://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/fluechtlinge-rueckkehr-studie-1.4961909

  • Les Rohingyas sont reconnaissants du soutien local, mais l’inquiétude grandit pour les bateaux encore en mer | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/les-rohingyas-sont-reconnaissants-du-soutien-local-mais-linquietude-grandit-pou

    L’OIM en Indonésie continue de fournir des soins 24 heures sur 24 au 99 Rohingyas secourus et autorisés à débarquer dans le nord d’Aceh la semaine dernière, tandis qu’un autre bateau actuellement en mer avec environ 500 Rohingyas à bord soulève des inquiétudes, selon les autorités de Jakarta.

    Les autorités malaisiennes ont également signalé qu’au moins 300 personnes se trouvaient sur un bateau au large des côtes de l’île de Koh Adang en Thaïlande.
    Aucune autre information n’est connue mais environ 1 400 Rohingyas se sont retrouvés bloqués en mer pendant la saison de navigation 2020, qui se termine généralement avec l’arrivée de la mousson, fin mai. Selon diverses estimations, au moins 130 d’entre eux ont péri.
    Au centre de Lhoksemauwe, à Aceh, où les Rohingyas sont hébergés, l’équipe de l’OIM - une infirmière, un interprète et du personnel psychosocial et opérationnel - travaille aux côtés d’autres partenaires pour apporter un soutien indispensable au groupe qui a exprimé sa gratitude pour l’aide reçue de la communauté locale après plus de 120 jours passés en mer.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#oim#indonesie#rohingya

  • Reintegration Handbook - Practical guidance on the design, implementation and monitoring of reintegration assistance

    Overview:
    This Handbook aims to provide practical guidance on the design, implementation and monitoring of reintegration assistance for returnees. While reintegration is a process taking place in different return contexts (for example following spontaneous, forced or assisted voluntary returns, or internal displacement), the Handbook focuses on assistance provided to migrants unable or unwilling to remain in the host country.

    The Handbook has been conceived as a hands-on tool, targeting the various stakeholders involved in the provision of reintegration-related support at different levels and at different stages: project developers, project managers and case managers but also policy makers and other reintegration practitioners. The Handbook is written on the basis that the goal of reintegration assistance is to foster sustainable reintegration, defined in the next section, for returnees and that this requires a whole-of-government approach, through the adoption of coordinated measures, policies, and practices between relevant stakeholders at the international, regional, national and local levels. Each module will specify which target audience it is aimed at.

    Module 1: An integrated approach to reintegration – describes the basic concepts of return and reintegration and explains IOM’s integrated approach to reintegration. It also lays out the general considerations when developing a comprehensive reintegration programme, including assessments, staffing and budgeting.
    Module 2: Reintegration assistance at the individual level – outlines suggested steps for assisting returnees, taking into account the economic, social and psychosocial dimensions of reintegration.
    Module 3: Reintegration assistance at the community level – provides guidance on assessing community needs and engaging the community in reintegration activities. It also provides examples of community-level reintegration initiatives in the economic, social and psychosocial dimensions.
    Module 4: Reintegration assistance at the structural level – proposes ways to strengthen capacities of all actors and to promote stakeholder engagement and ownership in reintegration programming. It suggests approaches for mainstreaming reintegration into existing policies and strategies.
    Module 5: Monitoring and evaluation of reintegration assistance – provides guidance and tools to design programmes, monitor interventions and carry out evaluations to maximize effectiveness and learning
    Annexes provide additional useful tools and further guidance on specific reintegration interventions.

    https://publications.iom.int/fr/books/reintegration-handbook-practical-guidance-design-implementation-an
    #réintégration #IOM #OIM #manuel #handbook #guide #renvois #expulsions

    ping @isskein @rhoumour @_kg_ @karine4 @i_s_

  • Bloqués depuis trois mois, 338 Maliens rentrent chez eux via un couloir humanitaire | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/bloques-depuis-trois-mois-338-maliens-rentrent-chez-eux-un-couloir-humanitaire

    Mardi (23/06), 159 Maliens sont rentrés chez eux à bord d’un un vol affrété grâce à un couloir humanitaire ouvert par les gouvernements du Niger et du Mali. Le groupe attendait depuis mars dans les centres de transit de Niamey, la capitale du Niger, en raison des fermetures de frontières décrétées par les gouvernements pour éviter la propagation de la COVID-19.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#oim#mali#niger#retour

  • IOM Organizing Transport Home for Hundreds of Stranded Tajik Migrants | International Organization for Migration
    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-organizing-transport-home-hundreds-stranded-tajik-migrants

    The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is today supporting the voluntary return home of hundreds of Tajik migrants stranded at the Kazakhstan/Uzbekistan border due to restrictions imposed in the wake of COVID-19.
    The group of 650 people are mainly migrant workers, and includes women, children and students. On Friday afternoon they were preparing to board buses funded by IOM to make the journey from the border crossing at Zhibek Zholi, through Uzbekistan, to Khojand in Tajikistan.
    They are just some of the tens of thousands of migrant workers in Central Asia who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic. Many have come from the Russian Federation, Kazakhstan and even further afield. They are typically working in low-paid jobs with little or no job security. Over a quarter of the returning migrants are between 15 and 24 years of age including 100 Tajik students from Kazakh universities. Fifteen percent of the group are women and girls.
    While most of the migrants have only been waiting a few days to get across the border, some have been there for weeks, with little or no shelter and sanitation.

    #COvid-19#migrant#migration#oim#tadjikistan#kazakhstan#retour

  • HCR - Déclaration conjointe : Le Haut Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, Filippo Grandi, et le Directeur général de l’OIM, António Vitorino, annoncent la reprise des voyages pour la réinstallation des réfugiés
    https://www.unhcr.org/fr-fr/news/press/2020/6/5eeba6f7a/declaration-conjointe-haut-commissaire-nations-unies-refugies-filippo-grandi.

    Le HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, et l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) ont annoncé aujourd’hui la reprise des départs en réinstallation pour les réfugiés.

    La suspension temporaire des départs en réinstallation avait été rendue nécessaire du fait des perturbations et des restrictions du transport aérien international causées par la pandémie de Covid-19. Elle a retardé le départ de quelque 10 000 réfugiés vers des pays de réinstallation. Durant cette période, le HCR, l’OIM et ses partenaires ont continué d’examiner les dossiers de candidature pour la réinstallation, de conseiller les réfugiés et de procéder à la réinstallation d’urgence pour des dizaines de cas urgents et justifiés.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#hcr#oim#refugie#reinstallation

  • L’OIM et Quizrr lancent une application de formation en ligne pour les migrants en Thaïlande | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/loim-et-quizrr-lancent-une-application-de-formation-en-ligne-pour-les-migrants-

    « En ces temps incertains, l’information sur les droits du travail et les pratiques éthiques est plus importante que jamais. Tout le monde doit savoir comment rester en sécurité et en bonne santé, et comment éviter la propagation de la COVID-19. En collaborant avec l’OIM, nous pouvons ajouter des informations sur la COVID-19 dans l’application, non seulement pour les travailleurs migrants des pays voisins en Thaïlande, mais aussi en Chine et au Bangladesh. »

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#sante#droit#information#thailande#chine#cambodge#bangladesh#oim

  • Des centaines de familles de migrants éthiopiens touchés par la COVID-19 reçoivent de la nourriture et de l’aide au Kenya | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/des-centaines-de-familles-de-migrants-ethiopiens-touches-par-la-covid-19-recoiv

    Plus de 300 migrants éthiopiens et leurs familles reçoivent aujourd’hui de la nourriture et d’autres articles essentiels de l’OIM, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations, à Nairobi, au Kenya, un petit effort pour atténuer l’impact plus large de la COVID-19 dans la région.
    Les migrants, dont beaucoup vivent et travaillent au Kenya depuis des années, ont perdu leur emploi et leurs revenus en raison des restrictions de déplacement et des couvre-feux, ainsi que du ralentissement économique général, tous provoqués par la pandémie.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#oim#ethiopie#kenya#ethiopie#nourriture

  • Des cyclistes rohingyas partagent des informations clés sur la COVID19 dans les camps de réfugiés de Cox’s Bazar | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/des-cyclistes-rohingyas-partagent-des-informations-cles-sur-la-covid19-dans-les

    Cox’s Bazar - La distanciation physique est un aspect crucial dans la lutte contre la pandémie de COVID-19. Mais cela pose des problèmes pour la circulation des informations clés à un moment où il est essentiel d’être bien informé pour préserver la santé publique. À Cox’s Bazar, le plus grand camp de réfugiés du monde, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) continue d’explorer de nouvelles façons de transmettre des messages clés aux Rohingyas et aux membres des communautés d’accueil dans tout le district. Des initiatives telles que la diffusion de messages à bord de rickshaws et le système de serveur vocal interactif de l’OIM font d’énormes progrès pour garantir que le public soit tenu informé.Cependant, des lacunes subsistent là où l’accès au téléphone et au réseau routier est limité. Pour amplifier les messages clés et s’assurer que personne ne reste sans accès à des informations vitales, l’unité de santé mentale et de soutien psychosocial (SMSPS) de l’OIM à Cox’s Bazar a commencé à diffuser des informations à vélo dans les établissements de Rohingyas. l’OIM aide les participants rohingyas à utiliser des vélos achetés et peints localement pour se déplacer dans des parties du camp préalablement identifiées. Les cyclistes utilisent des mégaphones pour diffuser des messages préenregistrés dans chaque zone. L’initiative est menée par des réfugiés rohingyas, pour des réfugiés rohingyas, et a déjà atteint environ 67 000 bénéficiaires à travers le camp. La diffusion de messages à grande échelle se poursuivra à mesure que le nombre de cas de COVID-19 augmentera. Au 10 juin 2020, 37 réfugiés rohingyas avaient été testés positifs au virus. Le contenu des messages va d’informations clés sur la COVID-19 à des informations générales sur la santé mentale et le soutien psychosocial, et est enregistré en anglais, en rohingya et en bengali avec le soutien de Bengal Creative Media et de Traducteurs sans frontières. Les messages sont stockés sur des clés USB, de sorte que les informations puissent être facilement adaptées aux conditions variables où les restrictions limitent la circulation des véhicules dans le camp.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#refugie#bangladesh#coxsbazar#sante#rohingyas#information#santementale#soutienpsychosocial#OIM

  • IOM Turkey Calls for Greater Assistance for Migrants and Refugees as COVID-19 Restrictions Ease - IOM UN migration

    Turkey has the 10th highest number of COVID-19 cases globally, but strict measures implemented by the government have allowed it to flatten the curve, with new cases down to under 1,000 per day.

    As lock-down restrictions ease in the world’s largest refugee-hosting country, hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants continue face elevated levels of risk. Many are trying to return to work but can’t afford basic personal protective equipment (PPE) or pay for medical services should they fall ill.

    Given this reality, further support to ensure greater protection of migrants is urgently needed.

    “The COVID-19 epidemic hit migrant and refugee communities in the larger cities such as Istanbul, Izmir and Gaziantep particularly hard,” explaiend IOM Turkey’s Emergency Coordinator Mazen Aboulhosn. “Hundreds of thousands of migrants were among the first to lose their jobs, causing an immediate financial burden for them and their families. Many are still not able to afford food, medicine and healthcare.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#OIM#Turquie#déconfinement

    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-turkey-calls-greater-assistance-migrants-and-refugees-covid-19-restrictions

  • L’OIM publie un guide sur le recrutement international et la protection des travailleurs migrants | ONU Info
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#monde#OIM#travail#protection

    https://news.un.org/fr/story/2020/06/1070422

    L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) a publié lundi de nouvelles directives à l’intention des États membres sur la réglementation du recrutement international et de la protection des travailleurs migrants.

  • L’OIM en Ethiopie aide des centaines de migrants de retour touchés par la COVID-19 | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/loim-en-ethiopie-aide-des-centaines-de-migrants-de-retour-touches-par-la-covid-

    Les migrants ont subi un dépistage des symptômes de la maladie et ont reçu des équipements de protection individuelle (EPI) de la part de l’Institut de santé publique d’Éthiopie. La majorité d’entre eux sont des jeunes femmes qui travaillaient au Moyen-Orient et qui se trouvent maintenant dans des centres de quarantaine gérés par le gouvernement. L’OIM fournit également des allocations de voyage aux migrants pour qu’ils puissent retourner dans leurs villes et villages à travers le pays, après avoir terminé la quarantaine. « Le centre de quarantaine est la phase la plus critique du périple pour les migrants de retour dans le cadre de la pandémie COVID-19 », a déclaré Milun Jovanovic, responsable des opérations de l’OIM en Éthiopie. « Nous faisons de notre mieux pour fournir tous les articles nécessaires aux centres de quarantaine en collaboration avec le gouvernement, et uniformisons les efforts des autres agences des Nations Unies et des organisations non gouvernementales ». L’OIM distribue également aux centres de quarantaine des articles essentiels tels que des EPI, du linge de lit, des produits sanitaires et des tentes, donnés par l’UNICEF, le HCR, le Conseil norvégien pour les réfugiés, Concern Worldwide, Action Aid, Samaritan’s Purse et TT Shoe Factory. On s’attend toutefois à ce que d’autres migrants rentrent au pays dans les jours et semaines à venir, alors que le taux d’infection par la COVID-19 en Éthiopie continue d’augmenter.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#retour#ethiopie#moyenorient#sante#centrequarantaine#oim#hcr#unicef

  • IOM, Partners Offer “Filter Hotel” to Migrants Needing Quarantine in Northern Mexico - Mexico | ReliefWeb
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#OIM#Mexique#hotel#confinement

    https://reliefweb.int/report/mexico/iom-partners-offer-filter-hotel-migrants-needing-quarantine-northern-mexi

    Ciudad Juárez – In this Mexican city on the border with the United States, many migrant shelters have closed their doors in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. For this reason, recently arrived migrants to the city, or those who can no longer afford to pay for lodging, wonder if they would have somewhere to go during the quarantine ordered by authorities.

  • The COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity to reimagine human mobility - World | ReliefWeb
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#OIM#Monde#politique_migratoire#gouvernance

    https://reliefweb.int/report/world/covid-19-pandemic-opportunity-reimagine-human-mobility

    Geneva- Today, the Secretary-General has urged that global efforts to manage the COVID-19 crisis will depend upon public health responses and a comprehensive recovery that include all people. The United Nations Network on Migration welcomes the Secretary-General’s policy guidance on COVID-19 and People on the Move, which provides key lessons from the pandemic that can guide us in advancing safe and inclusive mobility. No one will be safe from the pandemic until everybody is safe.

  • L’OIM et l’UE renforcent leur réponse à l’impact de la COVID-19 sur les migrants de retour à travers l’Afrique de l’Ouest et l’Afrique centrale | Organisation internationale pour les migrations
    https://www.iom.int/fr/news/loim-et-lue-renforcent-leur-reponse-limpact-de-la-covid-19-sur-les-migrants-de-

    L’OIM fait face à la pandémie de COVID-19 en Afrique de l’Ouest et en Afrique centrale et aide les migrants les plus touchés par les difficultés socioéconomiques. Grâce au soutien de l’UE, un fonds d’urgence pour la COVID-19 de plus d’un million d’euros a été mis à disposition dans le cadre de l’Initiative conjointe UE-OIM pour aider au retour volontaire des migrants lorsque des couloirs humanitaires sont accordés par les pays d’origine.
    Afin d’améliorer la disponibilité des fournitures médicales de base dans toute la région, l’OIM intègre les activités liées à la COVID-19 dans les initiatives existantes. Dans le cadre de leur aide à la réintégration, les migrants de retour produisent des milliers d’articles d’équipement de protection pour les fonctionnaires de l’immigration et des frontières en première ligne. L’OIM développe également des programmes d’assistance alternatifs. Dans certains pays, elle prévoit par exemple d’utiliser l’aide à la réintégration pour fournir des subventions aux migrants de retour pendant trois mois

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#migrant-retour#réintégration#OIM2quipement-médical#santé#couloirs-humanitaires#vulnérabilité