organization:interpol

  • The New York Times and its Uyghur “activist” - World Socialist Web Site
    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/05/09/uygh-m09.html

    9 May 2019 - The New York Times has furnished a case study of the way in which it functions as the conduit for the utterly hypocritical “human rights” campaigns fashioned by the CIA and the State Department to prosecute the predatory interests of US imperialism.

    While turning a blind eye to the gross abuses of democratic rights by allies such as Saudi Arabia, the US has brazenly used “human rights” for decades as the pretext for wars, diplomatic intrigues and regime-change. The media is completely integrated into these operations.

    Another “human rights” campaign is now underway. The New York Times is part of the mounting chorus of condemnation of China over its treatment of the Turkic-speaking, Muslim Uyghur minority in the western Chinese province of Xinjiang.

    In an article on May 4 entitled “In push for trade deal, Trump administration shelves sanctions over China’s crackdown on Uyghurs,” the New York Times joined in criticism of the White House, particularly by the Democrats, for failing to impose punitive measures on Beijing.

    The strident denunciations of China involve unsubstantiated allegations that it is detaining millions of Uyghurs without charge or trial in what Beijing terms vocational training camps.

    The New York Times reported, without qualification, the lurid claims of US officials, such as Assistant Secretary of Defence Randall Schriver, who last Friday condemned “the mass imprisonment of Chinese Muslims in concentration camps” and boosted the commonly cited figure of up to a million to “up to three million” in detention. No evidence has been presented for either claim.

    The repression of the Uyghurs is completely bound up with the far broader oppression of the working class by the Chinese capitalist elites and the Chinese Communist Party regime that defends their interests. The US campaign on the Uyghurs, however, has nothing to do with securing the democratic rights of workers, but is aimed at stirring up reactionary separatist sentiment.

    The US has longstanding ties to right-wing separatist organisations based on Chinese minorities—Tibetans as well as the Uyghurs—that it helped create, fund and in some cases arm. As the US, first under President Obama and now Trump, has escalated its diplomatic, economic and military confrontation with China, the “human rights” of Uyghurs has been increasingly brought to the fore.

    Washington’s aim, at the very least, is to foment separatist opposition in Xinjiang, which is a crucial source of Chinese energy and raw materials as well as being pivotal to its key Belt and Road Initiative to integrate China more closely with Eurasia. Such unrest would not only weaken China but could lead to a bloody war and the fracturing of the country. Uyghur separatists, who trained in the US network of Islamist terrorist groups in Syria, openly told Radio Free Asia last year of their intention to return to China to wage an armed insurgency.

    The New York Times is completely in tune with the aims behind these intrigues—a fact that is confirmed by its promotion of Uyghur “activist” Rushan Abbas.

    Last weekend’s article highlighted Abbas as the organiser of a tiny demonstration in Washington to “pressure Treasury Department officials to take action against Chinese officials involved in the Xinjiang abuses.” She told the newspaper that the Uyghur issue should be included as part of the current US-China trade talks, and declared: “They are facing indoctrination, brainwashing and the elimination of their values as Muslims.”

    An article “Uyghur Americans speak against China’s internment camps” on October 18 last year cited her remarks at the right-wing think tank, the Hudson Institute, where she “spoke out” about the detention of her aunt and sister. As reported in the article: “I hope the Chinese ambassador here reads this,” she said, wiping away tears. “I will not stop. I will be everywhere and speak on this at every event from now on.”

    Presented with a tearful woman speaking about her family members, very few readers would have the slightest inkling of Abbas’s background, about which the New York Times quite deliberately says nothing. Abbas is a highly connected political operator with long standing ties to the Pentagon, the State Department and US intelligence agencies at the highest level as well as top Republican Party politicians. She is a key figure in the Uyghur organisations that the US has supported and funded.

    Currently, Abbas is Director of Business Development in ISI Consultants, which offers to assist “US companies to grow their businesses in Middle East and African markets.” Her credentials, according to the company website, include “over 15 years of experience in global business development, strategic business analysis, business consultancy and government affairs throughout the Middle East, Africa, CIS regions, Europe, Asia, Australia, North America and Latin America.”

    The website also notes: “She also has extensive experience working with US government agencies, including Homeland Security, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Justice, and various US intelligence agencies.” As “an active campaigner for human rights,” she “works closely with members of the US Senate, Congressional Committees, the Congressional Human Rights Caucus, the US Department of State and several other US government departments and agencies.”

    This brief summary makes clear that Abbas is well connected in the highest levels of the state apparatus and in political circles. It also underscores the very close ties between the Uyghur organisations, in which she and her family members are prominent, and the US intelligence and security agencies.

    A more extensive article and interview with Abbas appeared in the May 2019 edition of the magazine Bitter Winter, which is published by the Italian-based Center for Studies on New Religions. The magazine focuses on “religious liberty and human rights in China” and is part of a conservative, right-wing network in Europe and the United States. The journalist who interviewed Abbas, Marco Respinti, is a senior fellow at the Russell Kirk Centre for Cultural Renewal, and a board member of the Centre for European Renewal—both conservative think tanks.

    The article explains that Abbas was a student activist at Xinjiang University during the 1989 protests by students and workers against the oppressive Beijing regime, but left China prior to the brutal June 4 military crackdown that killed thousands in the capital and throughout the country. At the university, she collaborated with Dolkun Isa and “has worked closely with him ever since.”

    Dolkun Isa is currently president of the World Uyghur Congress, established in 2004 as an umbrella group for a plethora of Uyghur organisations. It receives funding from the National Endowment for Democracy—which is one of the fronts used by the CIA and the US State Department for fomenting opposition to Washington’s rivals, including so-called colour revolutions, around the world.

    Isa was the subject of an Interpol red notice after China accused him of having connections to the armed separatist group, the East Turkestan Liberation Organisation, a claim he denied. East Turkestan is the name given to Xinjiang by Uyghur separatists to denote its historic connections to Turkey. None of the Western countries in which he traveled moved to detain him and the red notice was subsequently removed, no doubt under pressure from Washington.

    Bitter Winter explained that after moving to the US, Abbas cofounded the first Uyghur organisation in the United States in 1993—the California-based Tengritagh Overseas Students and Scholars Association. She also played a key role in the formation of the Uyghur American Association in 1998, which receives funding from the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). Last year its Uyghur Human Rights Project was awarded two NED grants totaling $320,000. Her brother Rishat Abbas was the association’s first vice-chairman and is currently the honorary chairman of the Uyghur Academy based in Turkey.

    When the US Congress funded a Uyghur language service for the Washington-based Radio Free Asia, Abbas became its first reporter and news anchor, broadcasting daily to China. Radio Free Asia, like its counterpart Radio Free Europe, began its existence in the 1950s as a CIA conduit for anti-communist propaganda. It was later transferred to the US Information Agency, then the US State Department and before being incorporated as an “independent,” government-funded body. Its essential purpose as a vehicle for US disinformation and lies has not changed, however.

    In a particularly revealing passage, Bitter Winter explained: “From 2002–2003, Ms. Abbas supported Operation Enduring Freedom as a language specialist at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.” In the course of the interview with the magazine, Abbas attempted to explain away her involvement with the notorious prison camp by saying that she was simply acting on behalf of 22 Uyghurs who were wrongfully detained and ultimately released—after being imprisoned for between four to 11 years!

    Given the denunciations of Chinese detention camps, one might expect that Abbas would have something critical to say about Guantanamo Bay, where inmates are held indefinitely without charge or trial and in many cases tortured. However, she makes no criticism of the prison or its procedures, nor for that matter of Operation Enduring Freedom—the illegal US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq that resulted in the deaths of a million civilians.

    It is clear why. Abbas is plugged into to the very top levels of the US state apparatus and political establishment in Washington. Her stints with Radio Free Asia and at Guantanamo Bay are undoubtedly not the only times that she has been directly on the payroll.

    As Bitter Winter continued: “She has frequently briefed members of the US Congress and officials at the State Department on the human rights situation of the Uyghur people, and their history and culture, and arranged testimonies before Congressional committees and Human Rights Commissions.

    “She provided her expertise to other federal and military agencies as well, and in 2007 she assisted during a meeting between then-President George W. Bush and Rebiya Kadeer, the world-famous moral leader of the Uyghurs, in Prague. Later that year she also briefed then First Lady Laura Bush in the White House on the Human Rights situation in Xinjiang.”

    It should be noted, Rebiya Kadeer is the “the world-famous moral leader of the Uyghurs,” only in the eyes of the CIA and the US State Department who have assiduously promoted her, and of the US-funded Uyghur organisations. She was one of the wealthiest businesswomen in China who attended the National People’s Congress before her husband left for the US and began broadcasting for Radio Free Asia and Voice of America. She subsequently fled China to the US and has served as president both of the World Uyghur Congress and the American Uyghur Association.

    The fact that Russan Abbas is repeatedly being featured in the New York Times is an indication that she is also being groomed to play a leading role in the mounting US propaganda offensive against China over the persecution of the Uyghurs. It is also a telling indictment of the New York Times which opens its pages to her without informing its readers of her background. Like Abbas, the paper of record is also plugged into the state apparatus and its intelligence agencies.

    #Chine #Xinjiang_Weiwuer_zizhiqu #USA #impérialisme #services_secretes

    新疆維吾爾自治區 / 新疆维吾尔自治区, Xīnjiāng Wéiwú’ěr zìzhìqū, englisch Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

  • Cyberprostitution : « Enfants et jeunes majeurs sont désormais les premières victimes »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2019/06/11/cyberprostitution-enfants-et-jeunes-majeurs-sont-desormais-les-premieres-vic

    La bataille idéologique opposant ces dernières années les partisans de la règlementarisation et ceux qui réaffirment que « la prostitution n’est ni un travail ni du sexe » est au cœur de profondes transformations de sociétés qui se numérisent à grande vitesse. Si ce débat fondamental a permis à une partie des associations de défense des « travailleurs du sexe » et aux acteurs de l’industrie pornographique de faire voir la réalité de leurs conditions d’exercice, l’internationale des proxénètes « autoentrepreneurs », elle, y a vu une aubaine sans précédent.
    Fondation Scelles

    Pour aboutir au paradoxe que les Etats comme l’Allemagne, l’Espagne ou la Nouvelle-Zélande, qui ont décidé d’encadrer légalement la prostitution, ont connu une explosion du phénomène et précipité l’extrême fragilisation des personnes prostituées. Les chiffres sont sans appel : à l’heure de #metoo, 99 % des personnes prostituées dans le monde sont des femmes, 48 % en Europe sont des enfants, 90 % de cette population réduite en esclavage sexuel souhaitent en sortir et le taux de mortalité est 10 à 40 fois supérieur dans les pays « libéraux » que dans les abolitionnistes. Dans le monde, la prostitution individuelle « choisie » ne s’élève à même pas 10 %.

    Partout très exposés aux réseaux sociaux, les mineurs et les jeunes majeurs sont désormais les premières victimes des systèmes d’exploitation 2.0. Mais leurs clients et proxénètes ont aussi rajeuni : les personnes vulnérables ou parfois seulement en quête d’identité sont pistées sur les communautés d’amis. Personne n’est à l’abri. Ni la jeune Nigériane sans papiers qui se retrouve happée par une « Authentic Sister » à smartphone et jetée sur les départementales françaises, ni la lycéenne de Paris ou Marseille amadouée par un « loverboy » au profil de gendre idéal qui la réduit en esclavage sexuel en quelques semaines dans une chambre louée en deux clics. Cette « invisibilisation » et la plasticité des systèmes de « recrutement » compliquent les réponses judiciaires et pénales des Etats.

    Partenaire des grands organismes de lutte contre la traite humaine, la Fondation française Scelles, résolument abolitionniste, s’attache tous les deux ans à radiographier tous les « systèmes prostitutionnels ». Son rapport 2019 fait l’effort d’un décryptage pointu de la bataille idéologique et de communication qui continue de diviser jusqu’aux féministes. Son président Yves Charpenel, ancien magistrat et membre du Comité consultatif national d’éthique, est aussi un fin connaisseur du continent africain. Il a répondu aux questions du Monde Afrique avant de s’envoler pour le Bénin.
    La prostitution organisée a toujours existé. Qu’est-ce qui a changé ?

    Yves Charpenel Les réseaux sociaux lui donnent une ampleur sans précédent. En dix ans, le défi est devenu planétaire. Aucun continent n’est épargné et aucun des 54 pays africains, les jeunes étant très connectés, n’échappent au phénomène. La prostitution prolifère au gré des crises : migrations trans et intracontinentales, terrorisme islamiste, tourisme sexuel, conflits, corruption policière, catastrophes naturelles fragilisent des populations forcées de se déplacer et paupérisées. La crise migratoire en Méditerranée, la plus importante depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, et la fermeture de l’Europe ont bloqué nombre de migrants en Algérie, au Niger, au Maroc, en Libye dans les conditions terribles que l’on sait. Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) les estimait à 70 millions en 2017. C’est l’équivalent de la population française !
    Article réservé à nos abonnés Lire aussi Des « mamas maquerelles » nigérianes jugées à Paris

    Les enquêtes d’Europol et d’Interpol ont établi le lien entre les parcours de migrants et les filières de traite en Afrique, en Europe, au Moyen-Orient et en Asie. Les Africaines subsahariennes, dont les Nigérianes, sont au cœur d’un trafic qui se noue dès le village, que les filles quittent pleines d’espoir pour un voyage en bateau payé par toute une communauté dont elles deviennent redevables. Dans les pays du Nord, les chiffres de racolage de rue sont en chute libre. L’immense majorité de la prostitution se fait via Internet et échappe aujourd’hui à la vue.

    Par ailleurs, les enfants échoués en Europe à la suite des bouleversements des « printemps arabes », de la crise au Mali qui gagne aujourd’hui le Burkina Faso et le Bénin, de Boko Haram au Nigeria, des Chabab en Somalie, le régime autoritaire érythréen, les conflits aux Soudans, et, évidemment, la guerre en Syrie, ont jeté sur les bateaux des dizaines de milliers de mineurs arrivés seuls par la Méditerranée. Beaucoup ont été directement absorbés par les réseaux de prostitution et, selon Europol, environ 10 000 d’entre eux ont carrément disparu de la circulation entre 2016 et 2018. Il n’y a pas si longtemps en France, des fillettes de 8 ans étaient mises en vente par l’Etat islamique sur Twitter pour être réduites en esclavage sexuel.

    Comment expliquez-vous le rajeunissement des clients et des proxénètes ?

    En Europe, le marché de la drogue est saturé et coûte trop cher pour un jeune qui veut « se lancer » dans un trafic lucratif. Il faut investir beaucoup d’argent pour accéder à la matière première et avoir des connexions avec des réseaux criminels très puissants et très dangereux. Les délinquants juste majeurs comprennent très vite que, malgré un arsenal judiciaire sévère, comme en France qui va jusqu’à quinze ans de prison et 1,5 million d’euros d’amende, ils ne seront condamnés en première instance qu’à dix-huit mois et à 8 000 euros pour de premiers faits de proxénétisme. Ils ne font même pas appel et paient en trois semaines de recette. Certains mineurs, garçons ou filles, sont aussi passés de victimes de la traite sexuelle en Libye à proxénètes dans les rues des grandes capitales européennes pour survivre.

    Tout est « géré » via de faux comptes Facebook, Instagram, Snapshat ou Twitter, sur des sites de rencontres « entre adultes », véritables cache-sexes de réseaux de prostitution enfantine, dont les proxénètes contournent sans arrêt les filtres en euphémisant le vocabulaire employé pour proposer des services sexuels à une clientèle de plus en plus avertie. Le Web est devenu l’outil gratuit et discret du recrutement et de la gestion de la prostitution.
    Après le Sénégal et le Niger en 2018, vous partez au Bénin pour aider à former des administrateurs à la lutte contre la traite humaine. Pourquoi ?

    L’Europe, débordée par la crise de l’accueil, tente d’aider les pays d’origine de migration à traiter le mal à la racine. Ma mission a été initiée par l’Ecole de la magistrature et est soutenue par l’Agence française de développement [AFD, partenaire du Monde Afrique de 2015 à 2018]. Les gouvernements d’Afrique de l’Ouest et du centre sont confrontés au développement d’une traite transnationale et nationale. Depuis 2009, selon le HCR, la secte islamiste nigériane Boko Haram a poussé sur les routes de l’exil plus de 2,4 millions de personnes dans le bassin du lac Tchad, carrefour du Cameroun, du Tchad, du Nigeria et du Niger.

    Ces groupes djihadistes volent, violent et revendent femmes et enfants transformés en monnaie d’échange. Le Bénin commence à être touché par ces rapts. L’Agence nationale nigériane de lutte contre l’exploitation sexuelle (Naptip) a vu le pourcentage de trafic augmenté de 204 % en 2016. Dans le même temps, beaucoup de pays africains ont légalisé la prostitution, et l’on assiste à un véritable exode des jeunes filles de villages vers les grands centres urbains du continent.
    Face à la gravité de la situation, quelles réponses d’envergure peuvent-elles être apportées ?

    Quels que soient le pays et le continent, la réponse ne peut plus être seulement nationale, elle doit être transnationale. Les lois extraterritoriales permettent par exemple aux Etats comme la France, qui criminalisent le client prostitueur et non plus la victime prostituée, de poursuivre leurs ressortissants pour des faits d’exploitation sexuelle de mineurs commis à l’étranger. En 2016, un directeur de maison de retraite catholique a été condamné par la cour d’assises de Versailles à seize ans de prison pour avoir violé ou agressé 66 enfants au Sri Lanka, en Tunisie et en Egypte. C’est loin d’être un cas isolé. C’est une avancée notable dans la lutte contre le tourisme sexuel, dont beaucoup d’enfants africains sont victimes au Maroc, au Sénégal, en Gambie, pour ne citer que quelques pays.

    L’application de ces lois dépend cependant de la qualité de la collaboration entre les pays. L’augmentation vertigineuse des réseaux nigérians dans les pays européens par exemple est rendue possible par le manque de coopération d’Abuja sur le plan international. Mais il faut aller beaucoup plus long en rendant imprescriptible, assimilée à un crime contre l’humanité, l’exploitation sexuelle des mineurs. Cela permettrait de saisir des cours relevant du droit international.
    Quelles doivent être les exigences des Etats face aux grands hébergeurs de contenus Internet ?

    Les réflexions et les lois vont dans le sens d’engager la responsabilité civile et pénale des puissants Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon et Microsoft (Gafam). Malgré leur attitude de défi vis-à-vis des Etats et la rapide adaptation des sites spécialisés qui se jouent des failles juridiques nationales, les Gafam ne peuvent se permettre un dégât d’image aussi considérable que d’être associés à la traite humaine.

    Les choses bougent donc et des victoires ont été remportées avec la fermeture, fin mai 2018, de la rubrique « Rencontres » du premier site français d’annonces Vivastreet, présent dans treize pays, ou l’arrêt par le FBI en avril 2018 pour « contribution au trafic sexuel » du géant américain Blackpage, spécialisé dans les services sexuels tarifés. Une course aux algorithmes pour filtrer les contenus est engagée. Sans l’émergence d’une gouvernance mondialisée d’Internet et une profonde prise de conscience de nos sociétés, on aura beau mettre face à face tous les clients condamnés face à des « survivantes » de la traite, on n’empêchera pas des Guinéennes de 15 ans d’être conduites en Uber dans un Airbnb de banlieue pour un viol tarifé « consenti » et « alternatif ».

  • Fraude à la TVA : « Carrousel », la crasse du siècle
    Par Emmanuel Fansten et Jacques Pezet — 7 mai 2019 — Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2019/05/07/fraude-a-la-tva-carrousel-la-crasse-du-siecle_1725371

    Cinquante milliards d’euros : voilà au bas mot la somme engloutie chaque année en Europe par la fraude à la TVA dite « carrousel », probablement la plus juteuse de l’histoire. En faisant circuler des biens et des services au sein de l’UE sans reverser la taxe finale aux Etats, ses artisans ont réussi le casse du siècle. Bien que son principe soit connu des autorités depuis plus de vingt-cinq ans, la fraude carrousel continue à provoquer des dégâts considérables, les Etats s’avérant incapables de mettre en place des outils permettant d’y mettre fin. En bout de chaîne, les profits générés alimentent le crime organisé et les réseaux terroristes, déformant l’économie légale et pénalisant les entreprises saines. A la veille des élections européennes, Libé s’est associé à 34 médias dans le cadre du projet « Grand Theft Europe », en collaboration avec le média d’investigation à but non lucratif allemand Correctiv, pour mettre en commun de nombreux documents confidentiels et mener des dizaines d’entretiens, afin d’évaluer la portée de cette gigantesque escroquerie.
    (...)
    En France, le pic a été atteint en 2009 avec la gigantesque fraude au CO2, des quotas carbone que les escrocs pouvaient s’échanger via une bourse détenue à 40 % par la Caisse des dépôts et consignations. Il suffisait alors de quelques clics pour acheter les quotas hors taxe à l’étranger et les revendre TTC en France sans reverser au fisc la TVA facturée. Puis de renouveler l’opération des dizaines de fois, en empochant à chaque tour 19,6 % de la somme investie. Au total, en à peine huit mois, l’escroquerie a fait perdre au moins 1,6 milliard d’euros à l’Etat français. Depuis, plusieurs procès retentissants ont mené à des sanctions exemplaires. L’an dernier, la 32e chambre du tribunal correctionnel de Paris a condamné 36 personnes à des peines allant jusqu’à dix ans de prison et 20 millions d’euros d’amende dans le volet dit « marseillais » de la fraude au CO2 (385 millions d’euros de préjudice). Mais plus d’une décennie après les premiers signalements, seule une infime partie des sommes envolées ont été récupérées et un grand nombre de fraudeurs courent toujours.
    (...)
    En France, plusieurs fraudes carrousel ont impliqué des escrocs proches du milieu franco-israélien au cours des dernières années. Ils seraient plusieurs dizaines identifiés par les services de police, réfugiés en Israël, à Dubaï ou dans des paradis fiscaux plus exotiques. L’un d’eux, Stéphane Alzraa, vient d’être extradé d’Israël pour son implication dans une escroquerie ayant permis de détourner environ 51 millions d’euros. Un autre, Arnaud Mimran, considéré comme un des princes du CO2, et condamné à huit ans de prison dans une affaire portant sur plus de 280 millions d’euros, devait comparaître lundi devant la cour d’assises spéciale de Paris pour séquestration et extorsion en bande organisée. Mais le procès a été renvoyé pour des raisons procédurales. Il est soupçonné d’avoir commandité l’enlèvement d’un richissime trader suisse en janvier 2015 afin de lui soutirer ses fonds, ce qu’il conteste. (...)

    #carrousel #mafia_du_co2 #taxe_carbone #France #Israël #Arnaud_Mimran

    • Entre la France et Israël, les escrocs ont toujours réseaux
      Par Marie Semelin, Intérim à Tel-Aviv — 7 mai 2019
      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2019/05/07/entre-la-france-et-israel-les-escrocs-ont-toujours-reseaux_1725376

      (...)
      Ce jour de 2016, Stéphane Alzraa, ses yeux clairs, sa gouaille et son goût pour la flambe, roulent en Israël dans une Ferrari rouge au côté d’un ami, Michael Aknin. Dans l’univers des grands escrocs, les deux acolytes sont des petits, qui se sont tout de même largement gavés sur l’arnaque au CO2. Stéphane Alzraa, alias David Bloomberg comme il se fait désormais appeler, a deux mandats d’arrêt sur le dos. Il est en cavale, et c’est un simple contrôle routier qui l’envoie en geôle israélienne.

      Un an plus tôt, il était emprisonné à Corbas, près de Lyon, pour abus de biens sociaux. Le Franco-Israélien profite d’une permission de sortie en novembre 2015 pour se planquer au bord de la Méditerranée, bénéficiant sans doute du délai de transmission de son mandat Interpol, un peu plus lent qu’un avion pour Tel-Aviv. Egalement connu comme l’un des corrupteurs du commissaire Neyret, il a été condamné en son absence pour avoir un peu trop gâté l’ex-star lyonnaise de l’antigang. La France vient d’obtenir son extradition de l’Etat hébreu pour son implication dans une fraude au CO2 portant sur 51 millions d’euros. Après un feu vert du parquet israélien, Alzraa est arrivé dans l’Hexagone le mois dernier.

      Lui n’y croyait pas. « Israël n’extrade pas ses citoyens », confiait-il au téléphone, dans des écoutes publiées par la presse israélienne. Voyant cette perspective se rapprocher, il jure à des magistrats israéliens dubitatifs que « sa vie est en danger en France, où ses codétenus antisémites le menacent parce qu’il est juif », raconte une source proche du dossier : « Il a pris les Français pour des cons, pas de raison qu’il ne fasse pas pareil avec les Israéliens. » En Israël, certains laissent entendre que ce côté flambeur, couplé à du fricotage avec la pègre locale, n’est pas étranger à son extradition.

      #mafia_du_co2 #taxe_carbone

  • Anas, le héros masqué du journalisme africain
    https://www.lemonde.fr/m-le-mag/article/2019/04/19/anas-le-heros-masque-du-journalisme-africain_5452593_4500055.html

    Sa popularité dépasse le Ghana, pourtant personne ne connaît le visage du journaliste Anas Aremeyaw Anas. Cet anonymat lui permet de protéger sa vie et d’enquêter en caméra cachée sur les affaires de corruption.

    Le chauffeur connaît manifestement le chemin. Sur les avenues fluides, les immeubles de bureaux défilent, comme les enfants des rues qui, aux carrefours, mendient une pièce ou un morceau de pain. Accra, capitale du Ghana, fait sa pause dominicale. Même le marché central, le plus grand d’Afrique de l’Ouest, qui perturbe le centre-ville les jours de semaine, en provoquant des embouteillages monstres, est presque calme avec ses femmes en tenue de fête négociant le kilo de légumes.
    La ville retient son souffle, chargée des derniers échos des cantiques évangéliques, véritable tempo du dimanche matin. Sur les murs, quelques graffs accrochent le regard au passage, comme ce visage en noir et blanc, masqué par un drôle de rideau de perle.
    On le retrouve, en faisant route vers l’aéroport, sur une immense fresque signée Nicholas Tettey Wayo, un des street-artistes les plus en vogue du pays, accompagnée de cette devise en gros caractères : « Anas te surveille. Agis bien. »

    Un superhéros

    Anas ? C’est Anas Aremeyaw Anas, une vedette sans visage, mais à double face. Côté pile, c’est le journaliste le plus connu du continent africain ; côté face, un véritable James Bond, qui met sa vie en jeu pour tourner les images de ses documentaires chocs : des films pour la BBC, CNN ou la chaîne qatarie Al-Jazira.
    Peu connu en France, il apparaît comme un superhéros en Afrique et dans le monde anglo-saxon. Un journaliste espion, bardé d’une cinquantaine de prix, qui travaille caméra cachée sous la chemise, déguisé pour infiltrer les milieux les plus opaques.

    Son dernier reportage, Number 12, est sorti mi-2018. Il raconte la face obscure du football africain, où « le 12e joueur, c’est la corruption ». Le documentaire, fruit de deux ans d’enquête, dénonce cette gangrène.
    Trois jours après sa diffusion par la BBC, le 9 juin 2018, lors d’une séance publique dans la ville d’Accra, le patron ghanéen de ce sport hyperpopulaire a été forcé de démissionner. Puis, pendant plusieurs semaines, toute la planète du ballon rond africain a vécu à l’heure des évictions prononcées par la Fédération internationale (FIFA). Jusqu’à celle d’un arbitre kényan pourtant prêt à officier durant la Coupe du monde en Russie, à l’été 2018. Anas et son équipe ont piégé 97 des 100 leaders du championnat ghanéen ou des grands championnats du continent, leur proposant de l’argent pour influer sur la sélection d’arbitres ou pour truquer des matchs.

    L’anonymat, une assurance-vie

    Aucun milieu ne fait peur à Anas Aremeyaw Anas. En 2015, il a fait tomber sept des douze juges des plus hautes juridictions de son pays. Au total, une trentaine de magistrats et 170 huissiers de justice s’étaient laissés acheter par des journalistes infiltrés, acceptant des liasses de billets en échange d’une décision de justice, comme l’a montré Ghana in the Eyes of God (« le Ghana vu par Dieu »).
    Ce film a été construit à partir de 500 heures de tournage ; il a été vu par 6 500 personnes en quatre projections seulement, au Centre international de conférences d’Accra. Car dans ce petit Etat anglophone d’Afrique de l’Ouest, entre Burkina Faso et Côte d’Ivoire, les sorties des enquêtes du journaliste sont de véritables événements nationaux, aussi courus que le concert d’une rock star.

    « Si je décide d’arrêter, quelqu’un d’autre peut devenir le nouvel Anas. » Anas

    Anas Aremeyaw Anas est une célébrité sans visage car l’anonymat est son assurance-vie. Si de très rares personnes ont déjà vu ses traits, la plupart ne connaissent de lui que le rideau de perles qui tombe de son bob noir, assorti, dans une coquetterie inattendue, à la couleur de sa tunique. Il a choisi de longue date ce masque « produit de l’artisanat local », d’abord parce qu’il « est représentatif du continent africain », mais aussi parce que d’autres que lui peuvent le porter facilement.
    « Si je décide d’arrêter, quelqu’un d’autre peut devenir le nouvel Anas », répète-t-il volontiers. Aujourd’hui, ils sont parfois trois à l’arborer en même temps dans les grands rendez-vous internationaux où Anas est invité. Si, officiellement, il s’agit de tromper ceux qui voudraient l’agresser ou le tuer, c’est aussi par souci de mise en scène. Anas est conscient de la force symbolique du personnage qu’il s’est créé et en joue désormais, écrivant chaque jour un chapitre supplémentaire de cette histoire.

    Pour nous recevoir, le rendez-vous a été donné sans adresse. A l’heure dite, ce 17 février, le pick-up annoncé s’est arrêté devant un hôtel international d’Accra. Prénoms échangés en guise de code et le voilà reparti, stoppant une demi-heure plus tard devant un immeuble à l’air inhabité, dans une banlieue sans charme. Entre une épicerie fermée et une de ces mini-pharmacies où, hormis la gamme d’antipaludéens, les étagères font plus de place aux sodas qu’aux médicaments, un responsable de la sécurité entrebâille un portillon et joue les guides vers le troisième étage, où attend une clé, sésame pour accéder au toit-terrasse, puis à un studio aveugle, camouflé derrière de lourds volets de bois. L’air de la pièce poussiéreuse est encore irrespirable quand le garde du corps y installe trois chaises. Sorti de nulle part, Anas se glisse en silence sur l’une d’elles.

    « Dénoncer, faire honte, emprisonner »

    Après des salutations rapides, ses premiers mots sont pour demander la climatisation. On imagine la chaleur sous son bob enfoncé, derrière ses perles dont le jaune doré répond à sa tunique aux plis parfaits, sur laquelle il porte un petit gilet écossais où le jaune se marie à l’ocre roux. L’homme est théâtral sur sa chaise. Une voix douce très assurée qui s’emballe de temps à autre quand on pointe des contradictions. Des mains qui parlent seules, gesticulant sans cesse. On les fixe d’instinct, gêné face à cet interlocuteur sans visage. Ces mains aux longs doigts fins, graciles, ne trahissent rien de son âge, une quarantaine d’années.

    Anas n’a jamais cessé d’infiltrer des milieux fermés « au nom de l’intérêt général et des droits de l’homme ».

    Né dans le nord du pays, élevé par un père militaire et une mère infirmière, Anas a grandi dans une caserne d’Accra, ville où il étudie le droit à l’université et le journalisme au Ghana Institute of Journalism. Lors de son stage de fin de cursus au tabloïd Crusading Guide, il passe son temps avec les petits vendeurs de rue, ceux qui alpaguent les automobilistes pour quelques cacahuètes ou une bouteille d’eau, et prouve, images à l’appui, que les policiers prélèvent leur obole pour fermer les yeux sur ce commerce illicite.
    Depuis cette première, en 1998, Anas n’a jamais cessé d’infiltrer des milieux fermés « au nom de l’intérêt général et des droits de l’homme », explique celui qui change d’apparence et de personnage pour prélever les preuves de ce qu’il dénonce.

    Pour lutter contre la prostitution enfantine, il devient concierge et homme de ménage dans une maison close en 2007 ; pour démanteler un réseau de proxénètes chinois, il joue les garçons d’étage dans un hôtel chic. Pour raconter le scandale des hôpitaux psychiatriques, il se fait interner, en 2009, sous le nom de Musa Akolgo, une caméra cachée dans sa chemise, essayant de conserver toute sa lucidité en dépit des drogues avalées. En Tanzanie, il dénonce les assassinats d’albinos, dont on broie les os pour en faire des potions, et livre les criminels aux policiers.

    Si Anas Aremeyaw Anas est le cerveau de ces enquêtes, il ne travaille plus seul. Il est le patron emblématique d’une équipe de journalistes d’investigation qui dénoncent la corruption et défendent les droits de l’homme au Ghana et ailleurs sur le continent. Il est copropriétaire du journal de ses débuts, devenu le New Crusading Guide, et a ouvert son agence vidéo. A l’écrit comme à l’écran, sa méthode tient dans le triptyque : Naming, Shaming, Jailing (« dénoncer, faire honte, emprisonner »).

    « Nous voyons cet esprit dans des journalistes courageux comme Anas Aremeyaw Anas, qui risque sa vie pour la vérité. » Barack Obama, lors d’un voyage au Ghana

    Parce qu’il n’hésite pas à s’attaquer aux puissants, Anas est devenu celui qui protège le peuple contre des pouvoirs corrompus. Une sorte de Robin des bois moderne, qui dit choisir ses enquêtes « en fonction de l’intérêt général », ce qui explique son immense popularité.
    Au Ghana, se présenter comme journaliste, c’est immédiatement s’entendre répondre « comme Anas ! », que ce soit dans les taxis ou à la réception de l’Hôtel Golden Tulip, où Linda, la vingtaine, étudiante en tourisme, a cette réaction spontanée, avant d’expliquer avoir vu « le film sur le football et celui sur les juges ».

    #jesuisanas

    La population connaît d’autant mieux Anas qu’il offre des projections gratuites en plein air de tous ses documentaires, estimant que « les gens doivent savoir », que « les informations doivent circuler en Afrique » pour faire naître une société civile plus exigeante et afin que la presse passe enfin du rôle de faire-valoir à celui de quatrième pouvoir. Anas a aussi choisi ce mode de diffusion en parallèle à la BBC, CNN ou Al-Jazira pour protéger les télévisions de son pays qui pourraient être poursuivies si elles diffusaient ses documentaires.
    Le journaliste estime sa popularité « symptomatique d’une société où les gens sont désenchantés ». « Tout à coup, quelqu’un leur redonne espoir en poussant la démocratie plus loin, réveillant leurs aspirations. C’est un phénomène naturel, qui est la conséquence de notre travail – si vous faisiez la même chose, vous seriez aussi populaire », minimise celui qui reste modeste en dépit des fresques sur les murs, des tee-shirts à son effigie, de sa présence dans le dessin animé Tales of Nazir (« les contes de Nazir »), un symbole de la production ghanéenne dont les saisons successives sont diffusées depuis 2014.

    Cette popularité dépasse même largement les frontières nationales, comme le prouvent ses invitations multiples dans les grands festivals, mais aussi ses 276 000 abonnés sur Facebook et ses 212 000 followers sur Twitter, où le mouvement #jesuisanas se répand.
    En plus des trois conférences TED qu’il a faites (à visage caché, bien sûr), Anas s’est vu consacrer un film de 78 minutes, Chameleon (« caméléon »), réalisé par le Québécois Ryan Mullins, et a été cité dans le grand discours de Barack Obama au Ghana, en 2009. Le président américain avait alors rappelé qu’une « presse indépendante » est l’une des choses qui « donne vie à la démocratie » et ajouté : « Nous voyons cet esprit dans des journalistes courageux comme Anas Aremeyaw Anas, qui risque sa vie pour la vérité. »

    Campagne de dénigrement

    Malgré cette célébrité sans frontière, le journaliste est aussi une cible. Un de ses plus proches collaborateurs, Ahmed Hussein-Suale, qui avait travaillé avec lui sur le football et sur les juges, a été abattu le 16 janvier aux abords de son domicile d’Accra par deux hommes à moto. Depuis cet assassinat, Anas a dispersé son équipe et chacun travaille dans son coin.
    Deux jours avant la sortie du film Number 12, Anas a été publiquement accusé de ne pas payer ses impôts par un député du parti au pouvoir, Kennedy Agyapong. L’élu estimait qu’il faisait du mal au peuple ghanéen, ce à quoi Anas a répondu : « Fake news », ajoutant, serein : « Plus vous vous attaquez aux gros poissons, plus vous êtes attaqué. » C’est le même homme politique qui avait appelé à la télévision à « frapper » Ahmed Hussein-Suale, diffusant sa photo (alors que lui aussi jouait l’anonymat) et proposant de « payer » pour corriger cet enquêteur dont il dénonçait les méthodes.

    Cet assassinat a créé l’émoi dans le pays et au-delà. « Lorsque des dirigeants politiques qualifient les journalistes de “diaboliques” ou de “dangereux”, ils incitent à l’hostilité à leur égard et dénigrent leur travail aux yeux du public. De telles déclarations ont un impact direct sur la sécurité des journalistes et créent un environnement de travail dangereux pour eux », a déclaré David Kaye, le rapporteur spécial de l’ONU sur la liberté d’opinion et d’expression.
    « On travaille depuis vingt ans et personne n’avait encore été tué jusque-là, parce que personne n’avait été “outé”, observe simplement aujourd’hui Anas. Si le visage d’Ahmed Hussein-Suale n’avait pas été montré, il ne serait peut-être pas mort. Il y a les gens qui parlent et ceux qui agissent et tuent. Mais quand vous êtes à cette position, vous créez une opportunité en montrant cette photo. »

    « Etre infiltré permet d’apporter des preuves tangibles, que les puissants ne peuvent pas contester devant les tribunaux. Mon objectif est l’efficacité. » Anas

    Interrogé sur ce sujet le 15 février, pour l’émission « Internationales » de TV5Monde, le chef de l’Etat, Nana Akufo-Addo, qui avait officiellement dénoncé le crime sur Twitter, avouait en marge de l’entretien qu’il aimerait « connaître les raisons de cet assassinat », laissant entendre que la victime n’était peut-être pas tout à fait irréprochable. La rumeur court en effet qu’Ahmed Hussein-Suale aurait lui-même touché de l’argent – rumeur que l’entourage d’Anas balaie d’un revers de main, expliquant que la campagne de dénigrement fait partie de la riposte de ceux qui protègent leurs intérêts en refusant de voir le pays changer.

    « A la limite de l’éthique »

    L’ONU comme le Comité pour la protection des journalistes ont demandé qu’une enquête soit sérieusement menée sur cette mort. Le député a reconnu, le 16 mars, dans la presse ghanéenne, avoir été mandaté par le parti au pouvoir pour mener une croisade anti-Anas et jeudi 11 avril, un suspect a été arrêté.
    Reste que la méthode d’Anas interroge et interrogeait bien avant le meurtre d’Ahmed Hussein-Suale. Un journaliste peut-il verser de l’argent pour piéger son interlocuteur ? Peut-il travailler sans révéler son identité professionnelle ? « Mon journalisme est adapté à la société dans laquelle je vis, explique l’intéressé. Au Ghana, et plus largement en Afrique, on ne peut pas se contenter de raconter une histoire pour faire bouger les choses. Etre infiltré permet d’apporter des preuves tangibles, que les puissants ne peuvent pas contester devant les tribunaux. Mon objectif est l’efficacité », poursuit celui qui collabore avec la police. Dépasse-t-il les limites de la déontologie journalistique ? « Je vends bon nombre de sujets à Al-Jazira, CNN et surtout à la BBC. Or, les standards de la BBC sont les meilleurs au monde », rétorque-t-il.

    Pour avoir passé un an auprès de lui et l’avoir vu fonctionner, Ryan Mullins, le réalisateur de Chameleon, journaliste lui-même, reconnaissait, dans un entretien au site Voir, à la sortie du film, en 2015, que les méthodes d’Anas sont « à la limite de l’éthique pour un journaliste occidental » mais qu’elles « sont issues du contexte de travail ghanéen, où les institutions et le système juridique fonctionnent souvent au ralenti et sont aussi très corrompus ».
    Plus important, il ajoute croire que « les motivations d’Anas sont sincères ». « Il veut vraiment que la justice dans son pays soit meilleure et plus développée. Après plus d’une dizaine de séjours en compagnie d’Anas et de son équipe, j’ai pu constater son intégrité. Il a une véritable foi en sa mission », conclut le réalisateur.

    Entreprise privée d’investigation

    Une intégrité qui n’empêche pas le sens des affaires, même si cela contribue à brouiller encore un peu son image… En effet, le savoir-faire développé par les enquêteurs qui entourent Anas Aremeyaw Anas, à mi-chemin entre le journalisme d’infiltration à la Günter Wallraff, le travail de détective et celui d’espion, a fait affluer les commandes. Et le journaliste a monté une entreprise privée d’investigation, Tiger Eye, qui se consacre aussi à des enquêtes ne relevant pas du journalisme. Interpol, la troisième société minière au monde (AngloGold Ashanti), l’une des plus grosses entreprises britanniques de sécurité (Securicor) sont ses clients, au même titre que le gouvernement ghanéen.
    L’entreprise propose tout type d’enquête, de la filature à l’infiltration, la surveillance fine, l’analyse de données. Pour cela, Tiger Eye met à disposition « des agents de haut niveau » qui peuvent avoir été « formés par les services de renseignement israéliens, maîtrisent les sciences de la sécurité et de la surveillance », rappelle le site commercial, qui propose des tarifs variant entre 300 et 500 dollars (jusqu’à 450 euros) la journée – le revenu national moyen au Ghana est d’à peine 2 000 euros annuels.
    Là encore, la pratique pose des questions déontologiques et fait surgir le risque de conflits d’intérêts, qu’Anas met de côté, pragmatique. « La BBC fonctionne avec de l’argent public ! Ici, ce n’est pas possible. Je suis réaliste. Je collabore avec de nombreuses institutions et je le mentionne dans les enquêtes. Et la postérité ne nous pardonnerait pas si nous décidions de simplement se croiser les bras et de laisser place à la criminalité », ajoute celui qui rêve que le journalisme réveille la société africaine.

    « D’autres très bons journalistes d’investigation font leur métier au Ghana et dans la région avec une tout autre approche. » Will Fitzgibbon, ICIJ
    « Nous avons reçu une aide pour reproduire ce nouveau type de journalisme à travers le continent africain. Nous travaillons actuellement sur un projet baptisé “Investigations nigérianes”, qui suscite beaucoup d’intérêt et d’enthousiasme chez les journalistes nigérians. Je suis censé aller au Malawi, en Tanzanie, en Afrique du Sud pour bâtir une nouvelle génération d’“Anas”, capables de repousser les limites de notre démocratie. On n’est plus dans l’histoire d’un individu mais dans un mouvement », insiste-t-il.

    Optimiste

    Un mouvement qui n’est pas le seul sur le continent. Will Fitzgibbon, du Consortium international de journalistes d’investigation (ICIJ), qui reste réservé sur les méthodes d’Anas Aremeyaw Anas, rappelle que « d’autres très bons journalistes d’investigation font leur métier au Ghana et dans la région avec une tout autre approche ». M. Fitzgibbon a notamment travaillé avec la Cellule Norbert Zongo (du nom d’un reporter burkinabé assassiné en 1998) pour le journalisme d’investigation en Afrique de l’Ouest (Cenozo) sur les « West AfricaLeaks », qui ont permis de dénoncer quelques scandales financiers.

    Anas ne prétend d’ailleurs pas que sa démarche est la seule valable et se veut plutôt optimiste : « Je vois la société ghanéenne bouger, avancer. Une société civile est en train de naître dans ce pays et le journalisme d’investigation y est pour quelque chose, observe-t-il. Le monde a toujours été en lutte, nous ne sommes pas arrivés ici sans nous battre. Nos ancêtres, que ce soit en Amérique ou ailleurs, ont lutté pour que nous arrivions où nous en sommes aujourd’hui. Dans dix ans, la société sera plus ouverte, il y aura beaucoup moins de corruption. On ne volera plus impunément. Des gens ne demanderont plus qu’on frappe des journalistes parce qu’ils ont de l’argent. On aura davantage conscience que l’argent n’achète pas tout. »
    En attendant, le Ghana occupait, en 2018, la 78e place sur les 180 pays qu’observe l’association de lutte contre la corruption Transparency International. Et l’Afrique est le continent le plus mal classé.

  • Un projet de #fichage géant des citoyens non membres de l’#UE prend forme en #Europe

    Un accord provisoire a été signé le 5 février entre la présidence du Conseil européen et le Parlement européen pour renforcer les contrôles aux frontières de l’Union. Il va consolider la mise en commun de fichiers de données personnelles. Les défenseurs des libertés individuelles s’alarment.

    Des appareils portables équipés de lecteurs d’#empreintes_digitales et d’#images_faciales, pour permettre aux policiers de traquer des terroristes : ce n’est plus de la science-fiction, mais un projet européen en train de devenir réalité. Le 5 février 2019, un accord préliminaire sur l’#interopérabilité des #systèmes_d'information au niveau du continent a ainsi été signé.

    Il doit permettre l’unification de six #registres avec des données d’#identification_alphanumériques et biométriques (empreintes digitales et images faciales) de citoyens non membres de l’UE. En dépit des nombreuses réserves émises par les Cnil européennes.

    Giovanni Buttarelli, contrôleur européen de la protection des données, a qualifié cette proposition de « point de non-retour » dans le système de base de données européen. En substance, les registres des demandeurs d’asile (#Eurodac), des demandeurs de visa pour l’Union européenne (#Visa) et des demandeurs (système d’information #Schengen) seront joints à trois nouvelles bases de données mises en place ces derniers mois, toutes concernant des citoyens non membres de l’UE.

    Pourront ainsi accéder à la nouvelle base de données les forces de police des États membres, mais aussi les responsables d’#Interpol, d’#Europol et, dans de nombreux cas, même les #gardes-frontières de l’agence européenne #Frontex. Ils pourront rechercher des personnes par nom, mais également par empreinte digitale ou faciale, et croiser les informations de plusieurs bases de données sur une personne.

    « L’interopérabilité peut consister en un seul registre avec des données isolées les unes des autres ou dans une base de données centralisée. Cette dernière hypothèse peut comporter des risques graves de perte d’informations sensibles, explique Buttarelli. Le choix entre les deux options est un détail fondamental qui sera clarifié au moment de la mise en œuvre. »

    Le Parlement européen et le Conseil doivent encore approuver officiellement l’accord, avant qu’il ne devienne législation.

    Les #risques de la méga base de données

    « J’ai voté contre l’interopérabilité parce que c’est une usine à gaz qui n’est pas conforme aux principes de proportionnalité, de nécessité et de finalité que l’on met en avant dès lors qu’il peut être question d’atteintes aux droits fondamentaux et aux libertés publiques, assure Marie-Christine Vergiat, députée européenne, membre de la commission des libertés civiles. On mélange tout : les autorités de contrôle aux #frontières et les autorités répressives par exemple, alors que ce ne sont pas les mêmes finalités. »

    La proposition de règlement, élaborée par un groupe d’experts de haut niveau d’institutions européennes et d’États membres, dont les noms n’ont pas été révélés, avait été présentée par la Commission en décembre 2017, dans le but de prévenir les attaques terroristes et de promouvoir le contrôle aux frontières.

    Les institutions de l’UE sont pourtant divisées quant à son impact sur la sécurité des citoyens : d’un côté, Krum Garkov, directeur de #Eu-Lisa – l’agence européenne chargée de la gestion de l’immense registre de données –, estime qu’elle va aider à prévenir les attaques et les terroristes en identifiant des criminels sous de fausses identités. De l’autre côté, Giovanni Buttarelli met en garde contre une base de données centralisée, qui risque davantage d’être visée par des cyberattaques. « Nous ne devons pas penser aux simples pirates, a-t-il déclaré. Il y a des puissances étrangères très intéressées par la vulnérabilité de ces systèmes. »

    L’utilité pour l’antiterrorisme : les doutes des experts

    L’idée de l’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information est née après le 11-Septembre. Elle s’est développée en Europe dans le contexte de la crise migratoire et des attentats de 2015, et a été élaborée dans le cadre d’une relation de collaboration étroite entre les institutions européennes chargées du contrôle des frontières et l’industrie qui développe les technologies pour le mettre en œuvre.

    « L’objectif de lutte contre le terrorisme a disparu : on parle maintenant de “#fraude_à_l'identité”, et l’on mélange de plus en plus lutte contre la #criminalité et lutte contre l’immigration dite irrégulière, ajoute Vergiat. J’ai participé à la commission spéciale du Parlement européen sur la #lutte_contre_le_terrorisme ; je sais donc que le lien entre #terrorisme et #immigration dite irrégulière est infinitésimal. On compte les cas de ressortissants de pays tiers arrêtés pour faits de terrorisme sur les doigts d’une main. »

    Dans la future base de données, « un référentiel d’identité unique collectera les données personnelles des systèmes d’information des différents pays, tandis qu’un détecteur d’identités multiples reliera les différentes identités d’un même individu », a déclaré le directeur d’Eu-Lisa, lors de la conférence annuelle de l’#Association_européenne_de_biométrie (#European_Association_for_Biometrics#EAB) qui réunit des représentants des fabricants des technologies de #reconnaissance_numérique nécessaires à la mise en œuvre du système.

    « Lors de l’attaque de Berlin, perpétrée par le terroriste Anis Amri, nous avons constaté que cet individu avait 14 identités dans l’Union européenne, a-t-il expliqué. Il est possible que, s’il y avait eu une base de données interopérable, il aurait été arrêté auparavant. »

    Cependant, Reinhard Kreissl, directeur du Vienna Centre for Societal Security (Vicesse) et expert en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme, souligne que, dans les attentats terroristes perpétrés en Europe ces dix dernières années, « les auteurs étaient souvent des citoyens européens, et ne figuraient donc pas dans des bases de données qui devaient être unifiées. Et tous étaient déjà dans les radars des forces de police ».

    « Tout agent des services de renseignement sérieux admettra qu’il dispose d’une liste de 1 000 à 1 500 individus dangereux, mais qu’il ne peut pas les suivre tous, ajoute Kreissl. Un trop-plein de données n’aide pas la police. »

    « L’interopérabilité coûte des milliards de dollars et l’intégration de différents systèmes n’est pas aussi facile qu’il y paraît », déclare Sandro Gaycken, directeur du Digital Society Institute à l’Esmt de Berlin. « Il est préférable d’investir dans l’intelligence des gens, dit l’expert en cyberintelligence, afin d’assurer plus de #sécurité de manière moins intrusive pour la vie privée. »

    Le #budget frontière de l’UE augmente de 197 %

    La course aux marchés publics pour la mise en place de la nouvelle base de données est sur le point de commencer : dans le chapitre consacré aux dépenses « Migration et contrôle des frontières » du budget proposé par la Commission pour la période 2021-2027, le fonds de gestion des frontières a connu une augmentation de 197 %, tandis que la part consacrée aux politiques de migration et d’asile n’a augmenté, en comparaison, que de 36 %.

    En 2020, le système #Entry_Exit (#Ees, ou #SEE, l’une des trois nouvelles bases de données centralisées avec interopérabilité) entrera en vigueur. Il oblige chaque État membre à collecter les empreintes digitales et les images de visages de tous les citoyens non européens entrant et sortant de l’Union, et d’alerter lorsque les permis de résidence expirent.

    Cela signifie que chaque frontière, aéroportuaire, portuaire ou terrestre, doit être équipée de lecteurs d’empreintes digitales et d’images faciales. La Commission a estimé que ce SEE coûterait 480 millions d’euros pour les quatre premières années. Malgré l’énorme investissement de l’Union, de nombreuses dépenses resteront à la charge des États membres.

    Ce sera ensuite au tour d’#Etias (#Système_européen_d’information_de_voyage_et_d’autorisation), le nouveau registre qui établit un examen préventif des demandes d’entrée, même pour les citoyens de pays étrangers qui n’ont pas besoin de visa pour entrer dans l’UE. Cette dernière a estimé son coût à 212,1 millions d’euros, mais le règlement, en plus de prévoir des coûts supplémentaires pour les États, mentionne des « ressources supplémentaires » à garantir aux agences de l’UE responsables de son fonctionnement, en particulier pour les gardes-côtes et les gardes-frontières de Frontex.

    C’est probablement la raison pour laquelle le #budget proposé pour Frontex a plus que triplé pour les sept prochaines années, pour atteindre 12 milliards d’euros. Le tout dans une ambiance de conflits d’intérêts entre l’agence européenne et l’industrie de la biométrie.

    Un membre de l’unité recherche et innovation de Frontex siège ainsi au conseil d’administration de l’#Association_européenne_de_biométrie (#EAB), qui regroupe les principales organisations de recherche et industrielles du secteur de l’identification numérique, et fait aussi du lobbying. La conférence annuelle de l’association a été parrainée par le géant biométrique français #Idemia et la #Security_Identity_Alliance.

    L’agente de recherche de Frontex et membre du conseil d’EAB Rasa Karbauskaite a ainsi suggéré à l’auditoire de représentants de l’industrie de participer à la conférence organisée par Frontex avec les États membres : « L’occasion de montrer les dernières technologies développées. » Un représentant de l’industrie a également demandé à Karbauskaite d’utiliser son rôle institutionnel pour faire pression sur l’Icao, l’agence des Nations unies chargée de la législation des passeports, afin de rendre les technologies de sécurité des données biométriques obligatoires pour le monde entier.

    La justification est toujours de « protéger les citoyens européens du terrorisme international », mais il n’existe toujours aucune donnée ou étude sur la manière dont les nouveaux registres de données biométriques et leur interconnexion peuvent contribuer à cet objectif.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/250219/un-projet-de-fichage-geant-de-citoyens-prend-forme-en-europe
    #surveillance_de_masse #surveillance #étrangers #EU #anti-terrorisme #big-data #biométrie #complexe_militaro-industriel #business

    • Règlement (UE) 2019/817 du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 20 mai 2019 portant établissement d’un cadre pour l’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information de l’UE dans le domaine des frontières et des visas

      Point 9 du préambule du règlement UE 2019/817

      "Dans le but d’améliorer l’efficacité et l’efficience des vérifications aux frontières extérieures, de contribuer à prévenir et combattre l’immigration illégale et de favoriser un niveau élevé de sécurité au sein de l’espace de liberté, de sécurité et de justice de l’Union, y compris la préservation de la sécurité publique et de l’ordre public et la sauvegarde de la sécurité sur les territoires des États membres, d’améliorer la mise en œuvre de la politique commune des visas, d’aider dans l’examen des demandes de protection internationale, de contribuer à la prévention et à la détection des infractions terroristes et d’autres infractions pénales graves et aux enquêtes en la matière, de faciliter l’identification de personnes inconnues qui ne sont pas en mesure de s’identifier elles-mêmes ou des restes humains non identifiés en cas de catastrophe naturelle, d’accident ou d’attaque terroriste, afin de préserver la confiance des citoyens à l’égard du régime d’asile et de migration de l’Union, des mesures de sécurité de l’Union et de la capacité de l’Union à gérer les frontières extérieures, il convient d’établir l’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information de l’UE, à savoir le système d’entrée/de sortie (EES), le système d’information sur les visas (VIS), le système européen d’information et d’autorisation concernant les voyages (ETIAS), Eurodac, le système d’information Schengen (SIS) et le système européen d’information sur les casiers judiciaires pour les ressortissants de pays tiers (ECRIS-TCN), afin que lesdits systèmes d’information de l’UE et leurs données se complètent mutuellement, tout en respectant les droits fondamentaux des personnes, en particulier le droit à la protection des données à caractère personnel. À cet effet, il convient de créer un portail de recherche européen (ESP), un service partagé d’établissement de correspondances biométriques (#BMS partagé), un répertoire commun de données d’identité (#CIR) et un détecteur d’identités multiples (#MID) en tant qu’éléments d’interopérabilité.

      http://www.europeanmigrationlaw.eu/fr/articles/actualites/bases-de-donnees-interoperabilite-reglement-ue-2019817-frontier

  • The Mystery of the Exiled Billionaire Whistle-Blower - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/10/magazine/the-mystery-of-the-exiled-billionaire-whistleblower.html

    From a penthouse on Central Park, Guo Wengui has exposed a phenomenal web of corruption in China’s ruling elite — if, that is, he’s telling the truth.

    By Lauren Hilgers, Jan. 10, 2018

    阅读简体中文版閱讀繁體中文版

    On a recent Saturday afternoon, an exiled Chinese billionaire named Guo Wengui was holding forth in his New York apartment, sipping tea while an assistant lingered quietly just outside the door, slipping in occasionally to keep Guo’s glass cup perfectly full. The tycoon’s Twitter account had been suspended again — it was the fifth or sixth time, by Guo’s count — and he blamed the Communist Party of China. “It’s not normal!” he said, about this cycle of blocking and reinstating. “But it doesn’t matter. I don’t need anyone.”

    Guo’s New York apartment is a 9,000-square-foot residence along Central Park that he bought for $67.5 million in 2015. He sat in a Victorian-style chair, his back to a pair of west-facing windows, the sunset casting craggy shadows. A black-and-white painting of an angry-looking monkey hung on the wall to Guo’s right, a hat bearing a star-and-wreath Soviet insignia on its head and a cigarette hanging from its lips. Guo had arrived dressed entirely in black, except for two silver stripes on each lapel. “I have the best houses,” he told me. Guo had picked his apartment for its location, its three sprawling balconies and the meticulously tiled floor in the entryway. He has the best apartment in London, he said; the biggest apartment in Hong Kong. His yacht is docked along the Hudson River. He is comfortable and, anyway, Guo likes to say that as a Buddhist, he wants for nothing. If it were down to his own needs alone, he would have kept his profile low. But he has a higher purpose. He is going to save China.

    Guo pitches himself as a former insider, a man who knows the secrets of a government that tightly controls the flow of information. A man who, in 2017, did the unthinkable — tearing open the veil of secrecy that has long surrounded China’s political elite, lobbing accusations about corruption, extramarital affairs and murder plots over Facebook and Twitter. His YouTube videos and tweets have drawn in farmers and shopkeepers, democracy activists, writers and businesspeople. In China, people have been arrested for chatting about Guo online and distributing T-shirts with one of his slogans printed on the front (“This is only the beginning!”). In New York, Guo has split a community of dissidents and democracy activists down the middle. Some support him. Others believe that Guo himself is a government spy.

    Nothing in Guo’s story is as straightforward as he would like it to seem. Guo is 47 years old, or 48, or 49. Although he has captured the attention of publications like The Guardian, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, the articles that have run about him have offered only hazy details about his life. This is because his biography varies so widely from one source to the next. Maybe his name isn’t even Guo Wengui. It could be Guo Wugui. There are reports that in Hong Kong, Guo occasionally goes by the name Guo Haoyun.

    When pressed, Guo claims a record of unblemished integrity in his business dealings, both in real estate and in finance (when it comes to his personal life, he strikes a more careful balance between virility and dedication to his family). “I never took a square of land from the government,” he said. “I didn’t take a penny of investment from the banks.” If you accept favors, he said, people will try to exploit your weaknesses. So, Guo claims, he opted to take no money and have no weaknesses.

    Yet when Guo left China in 2014, he fled in anticipation of corruption charges. A former business partner had been detained just days before, and his political patron would be detained a few days afterward. In 2015, articles about corruption in Guo’s business dealings — stories that he claims are largely fabrications — started appearing in the media. He was accused of defrauding business partners and colluding with corrupt officials. To hear Guo tell it, his political and business opponents used a national corruption campaign as a cover for a personal vendetta.

    Whatever prompted Guo to take action, his campaign came during an important year for China’s president, Xi Jinping. In October, the Communist Party of China (C.P.C.) convened its 19th National Congress, a twice-a-decade event that sets the contours of political power for the next five years. The country is in the throes of a far-reaching anti-corruption campaign, and Xi has overseen a crackdown on dissidents and human rights activists while increasing investment in censorship and surveillance. Guo has become a thorn in China’s side at the precise moment the country is working to expand its influence, and its censorship program, overseas.

    In November 2017, the Tiananmen Square activist Wang Dan warned of the growing influence of the C.P.C. on university campuses in the United States. His own attempts to hold “China salons” on college campuses had largely been blocked by the Chinese Students and Scholars Association — a group with ties to China’s government. Around the same time, the academic publisher Springer Nature agreed to block access to hundreds of articles on its Chinese site, cutting off access to articles on Tibet, Taiwan and China’s political elite. Reports emerged last year that China is spending hundreds of thousands of dollars quarterly to purchase ads on Facebook (a service that is blocked within China’s borders). In Australia, concerns about China’s growing influence led to a ban on foreign political donations.

    “That’s why I’m telling the United States they should really be careful,” Guo said. China’s influence is spreading, he says, and he believes his own efforts to change China will have global consequences. “Like in an American movie,” he told me with unflinching self-confidence. “In the last minutes, we will save the world.”

    Propaganda, censorship and rewritten histories have long been specialties of authoritarian nations. The aim, as famously explained by the political philosopher Hannah Arendt, is to confuse: to breed a combination of cynicism and gullibility. Propaganda can leave people in doubt of all news sources, suspicious of their neighbors, picking and choosing at random what pieces of information to believe. Without a political reality grounded in facts, people are left unmoored, building their world on whatever foundation — imaginary or otherwise — they might choose.

    The tight grip that the C.P.C. keeps on information may be nothing new, but China’s leadership has been working hard to update the way it censors and broadcasts. People in China distrusted print and television media long before U.S. politicians started throwing around accusations of “fake news.” In 2016, President Xi Jinping was explicit about the arrangement, informing the country’s media that it should be “surnamed Party.” Likewise, while the West has only recently begun to grapple with government-sponsored commenters on social media, China’s government has been manipulating online conversations for over a decade.

    “They create all kinds of confusion,” said Ha Jin, the National Book Award-winning American novelist born in China’s Liaoning Province, and a vocal supporter of Guo. “You don’t know what information you have and whether it’s right. You don’t know who are the informers, who are the agents.”

    Online, the C.P.C. controls information by blocking websites, monitoring content and employing an army of commenters widely known as the 50-cent party. The name was used as early as 2004, when a municipal government in Hunan Province hired a number of online commenters, offering a stipend of 600 yuan, or about $72. Since then, the 50-cent party has spread. In 2016, researchers from Harvard, Stanford and the University of California-San Diego estimated that these paid commenters generated 448 million social-media comments annually. The posts, researchers found, were conflict averse, cheerleading for the party rather than defending it. Their aim seemed not to be engaging in argument but rather distracting the public and redirecting attention from sensitive issues.

    In early 2017, Guo issued his first salvos against China’s ruling elite through more traditional channels. He contacted a handful of Chinese-language media outlets based in the United States. He gave interviews to the Long Island-based publication Mingjing News and to Voice of America — a live event that was cut short by producers, leading to speculation that V.O.A. had caved to Chinese government pressure. He called The New York Times and spoke with reporters at The Wall Street Journal. It did not take long, however, before the billionaire turned to direct appeals through social media. The accusations he made were explosive — he attacked Wang Qishan, Xi Jinping’s corruption czar, and Meng Jianzhu, the secretary of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, another prominent player in Xi’s anti-corruption campaign. He talked about Wang’s mistresses, his business interests and conflicts within the party.

    In one YouTube video, released on Aug. 4, Guo addressed the tension between Wang and another anti-corruption official named Zhang Huawei. He recounted having dinner with Zhang when “he called Wang Qishan’s secretary and gave him orders,” Guo said. “Think about what Wang had to suffer in silence back then. They slept with the same women, and Zhang knew everything about Wang.” In addition, Guo said, Zhang knew about Wang’s corrupt business dealings. When Zhang Huawei was placed under official investigation in April, Guo claimed, it was a result of a grudge.

    “Everyone in China is a slave,” Guo said in the video. “With the exception of the nobility.”

    To those who believe Guo’s claims, they expose a depth of corruption that would surprise even the most jaded opponent of the C.P.C. “The corruption is on such a scale,” Ha Jin said. “Who could imagine that the czar of anti-corruption would himself be corrupt? It is extraordinary.”

    Retaliation came quickly. A barrage of counteraccusations began pouring out against Guo, most published in the pages of the state-run Chinese media. Warrants for his arrest were issued on charges of corruption, bribery and even rape. China asked Interpol to issue a red notice calling for Guo’s arrest and extradition. He was running out of money, it was reported. In September, Guo recorded a video during which he received what he said was a phone call from his fifth brother: Two of Guo’s former employees had been detained, and their family members were threatening suicide. “My Twitter followers are so important they are like heaven to me,” Guo said. But, he declared, he could not ignore the well-being of his family and his employees. “I cannot finish the show as I had planned,” he said. Later, Guo told his followers in a video that he was planning to divorce his wife, in order to shield her from the backlash against him.

    Guo quickly resumed posting videos and encouraging his followers. His accusations continued to accumulate throughout 2017, and he recently started his own YouTube channel (and has yet to divorce his wife). His YouTube videos are released according to no particular schedule, sometimes several days in a row, some weeks not at all. He has developed a casual, talkative style. In some, Guo is running on a treadmill or still sweating after a workout. He has demonstrated cooking techniques and played with a tiny, fluffy dog, a gift from his daughter. He invites his viewers into a world of luxury and offers them a mix of secrets, gossip and insider knowledge.

    Wang Qishan, Guo has claimed, is hiding the money he secretly earned in the Hainan-based conglomerate HNA Group, a company with an estimated $35 billion worth of investments in the United States. (HNA Group denies any ties to Wang and is suing Guo.) He accused Wang of carrying on an affair with the actress Fan Bingbing. (Fan is reportedly suing Guo for defamation.) He told stories of petty arguments among officials and claimed that Chinese officials sabotaged Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared in 2014 en route to Beijing, in order to cover up an organ-harvesting scheme. Most of Guo’s accusations have proved nearly impossible to verify.

    “This guy is just covered in question marks,” said Minxin Pei, a professor at Claremont McKenna who specializes in Chinese governance.

    The questions that cover Guo have posed a problem for both the United States government and the Western journalists who, in trying to write about him, have found themselves buffeted by the currents of propaganda, misinformation and the tight-lipped code of the C.P.C. elite. His claims have also divided a group of exiled dissidents and democracy activists — people who might seem like Guo’s natural allies. For the most part, the democracy activists who flee China have been chased from their country for protesting the government or promoting human rights, not because of corruption charges. They tell stories of personal persecution, not insider tales of bribery, sex and money. And perhaps as a consequence, few exiled activists command as large an audience as Guo. “I will believe him,” Ha Jin said, “until one of his serious accusations is proved to be false.”

    Pei, the professor, warns not to take any of Guo’s accusations at face value. The reaction from the C.P.C. has been so extreme, however, that Pei believes Guo must know something. “He must mean something to the government,” he said. “They must be really bothered by this billionaire.” In May, Chinese officials visited Guo on visas that did not allow them to conduct official business, causing a confrontation with the F.B.I. A few weeks later, according to The Washington Times, China’s calls for Guo’s extradition led to a White House showdown, during which Jeff Sessions threatened to resign if Guo was sent back to China.

    Guo has a history of cultivating relationships with the politically influential, and the trend has continued in New York. He famously bought 5,000 copies of a book by Cherie Blair, Tony Blair’s wife. (“It was to give to my employees,” Guo told me. “I often gave my employees books to read.”) Guo has also cultivated a special relationship with Steve Bannon, whom he says he has met with a handful of times, although the two have no financial relationship. Not long after one of their meetings, Bannon appeared on Breitbart Radio and called China “an enemy of incalculable power.”

    Despite Guo’s high-powered supporters and his army of online followers, one important mark of believability has continued to elude him. Western news organizations have struggled to find evidence that would corroborate Guo’s claims. When his claims appear in print, they are carefully hedged — delivered with none of his signature charm and bombast. “Why do you need more evidence?” Guo complained in his apartment. “I can give them evidence, no problem. But while they’re out spending time investigating, I’m waiting around to get killed!”

    The details of Guo’s life may be impossible to verify, but the broad strokes confirm a picture of a man whose fortunes have risen and fallen with the political climate in China. To hear Guo tell it, he was born in Jilin Province, in a mining town where his parents were sent during the Cultural Revolution. “There were foreigners there,” Guo says in a video recorded on what he claims is his birthday. (Guo was born on Feb. 2, or May 10, or sometime in June.) “They had the most advanced machinery. People wore popular clothing.” Guo, as a result, was not ignorant of the world. He was, however, extremely poor. “Sometimes we didn’t even have firewood,” he says. “So we burned the wet twigs from the mountains — the smoke was so thick.” Guo emphasizes this history: He came from hardship. He pulled himself up.

    The story continues into Guo’s pre-teenage years, when he moved back to his hometown in Shandong Province. He met his wife and married her when he was only 15, she 14. They moved to Heilongjiang, where they started a small manufacturing operation, taking advantage of the early days of China’s economic rise, and then to Henan. Guo got his start in real estate in a city called Zhengzhou, where he founded the Zhengzhou Yuda Property Company and built the tallest building the city had seen so far, the Yuda International Trade Center. According to Guo, he was only 25 when he made this first deal.

    The string of businesses and properties that Guo developed provide some of the confirmable scaffolding of his life. No one disputes that Guo went on to start both the Beijing Morgan Investment Company and Beijing Zenith Holdings. Morgan Investment was responsible for building a cluster of office towers called the Pangu Plaza, the tallest of which has a wavy top that loosely resembles a dragon, or perhaps a precarious cone of soft-serve ice cream. Guo is in agreement with the Chinese media that in buying the property for Pangu Plaza, he clashed with the deputy mayor of Beijing. The dispute ended when Guo turned in a lengthy sex tape capturing the deputy mayor in bed with his mistress.

    There are other details in Guo’s biography, however, that vary from one source to the next. Guo says that he never took government loans; Caixin, a Beijing-based publication, quoted “sources close to the matter” in a 2015 article claiming that Guo took out 28 loans totaling 588 million yuan, or about $89 million. Guo, according to Caixin, eventually defaulted. At some point in this story — the timeline varies — Guo became friends with the vice minister of China’s Ministry of State Security, Ma Jian. The M.S.S. is China’s answer to the C.I.A. and the F.B.I. combined. It spies on civilians and foreigners alike, conducting operations domestically and internationally, amassing information on diplomats, businessmen and even the members of the C.P.C. Describing Ma, Guo leans back in his chair and mimes smoking a cigarette. “Ma Jian! He was fat and his skin was tan.” According to Guo, Ma sat like this during their first meeting, listening to Guo’s side of a dispute. Then Ma told him to trust the country. “Trust the law,” he told Guo. “We will treat you fairly.” The older master of spycraft and the young businessman struck up a friendship that would become a cornerstone in Guo’s claims of insider knowledge, and also possibly the reason for the businessman’s downfall in China.

    Following the construction of Pangu Plaza in Beijing, Guo’s life story becomes increasingly hard to parse. He started a securities business with a man named Li You. After a falling-out, Li was detained by the authorities. Guo’s company accused Li and his company of insider trading. According to the 2015 article in Caixin, Li then penned a letter to the authorities accusing Guo of “wrongdoing.”

    As this dispute was going on, China’s anti-​corruption operation was building a case against Ma Jian. In Guo’s telling, Ma had long been rumored to be collecting intelligence on China’s leaders. As the anti-corruption campaign gained speed and officials like Wang Qishan gained power, Ma’s well of intelligence started to look like a threat. It was Guo’s relationship with Ma, the tycoon maintains, that made officials nervous. Ma was detained by the authorities in January 2015, shortly after Guo fled the country. Soon after Ma’s detention, accounts began appearing in China’s state-run media claiming that Ma had six Beijing villas, six mistresses and at least two illegitimate sons. In a 2015 article that ran in the party-run newspaper The China Daily, the writer added another detail: “The investigation also found that Ma had acted as an umbrella for the business ventures of Guo Wengui, a tycoon from Henan Province.”

    In the mix of spies, corrupt business dealings, mistresses and sex scandals, Guo has one more unbelievable story to tell about his past. It is one reason, he says, that he was mentally prepared to confront the leaders of the Communist Party. It happened nearly 29 years ago, in the aftermath of the crackdown on Tiananmen Square. According to Guo, he had donated money to the students protesting in the square, and so a group of local police officers came to find him at his home. An overzealous officer fired off a shot at Guo’s wife — at which point Guo’s younger brother jumped in front of the bullet, suffering a fatal wound. “That was when I started my plan,” he said. “If your brother had been killed in front of your eyes, would you just forget it?” Never mind the fact that it would take 28 years for him to take any public stand against the party that caused his brother’s death. Never mind that the leadership had changed. “I’m not saying everyone in the Communist Party is bad,” he said. “The system is bad. So what I need to oppose is the system.”

    On an unusually warm Saturday afternoon in Flushing, Queens, a group of around 30 of Guo’s supporters gathered for a barbecue in Kissena Park. They laid out a spread of vegetables and skewers of shrimp and squid. Some children toddled through the crowd, chewing on hot dogs and rolling around an unopened can of Coke. The adults fussed with a loudspeaker and a banner that featured the name that Guo goes by in English, Miles Kwok. “Miles Kwok, NY loves U,” it said, a heart standing in for the word “loves.” “Democracy, Justice, Liberty for China.” Someone else had carried in a life-size cutout of the billionaire.

    The revelers decided to hold the event in the park partly for the available grills but also partly because the square in front of Guo’s penthouse had turned dangerous. A few weeks earlier, some older women had been out supporting Guo when a group of Chinese men holding flags and banners showed up. At one point, the men wrapped the women in a protest banner and hit them. The park was a safer option. And the protesters had learned from Guo — it wasn’t a live audience they were hoping for. The group would be filming the protest and posting it on social media. Halfway through, Guo would call in on someone’s cellphone, and the crowd would cheer.

    Despite this show of support, Guo’s claims have divided China’s exiled dissidents to such an extent that on a single day near the end of September, two dueling meetings of pro-democracy activists were held in New York, one supporting Guo, the other casting doubt on his motivations. (“They are jealous of me,” Guo said of his detractors. “They think: Why is he so handsome? Why are so many people listening to him?”) Some of Guo’s claims are verifiably untrue — he claimed in an interview with Vice that he paid $82 million for his apartment — and others seem comically aggrandized. (Guo says he never wears the same pair of underwear twice.) But the repercussions he is facing are real.

    In December, Guo’s brother was sentenced to three years and six months in prison for destroying accounting records. The lawsuits filed against Guo for defamation are piling up, and Guo has claimed to be amassing a “war chest” of $150 million to cover his legal expenses. In September, a new set of claims against Guo were made in a 49-page document circulated by a former business rival. For Ha Jin, Guo’s significance runs deeper than his soap-opera tales of scandal and corruption. “The grand propaganda scheme is to suppress and control all the voices,” Jin said. “Now everybody knows that you can create your own voice. You can have your own show. That fact alone is historical.” In the future, Jin predicts, there will be more rebels like Guo. “There is something very primitive about this, realizing that this is a man, a regular citizen who can confront state power.”

    Ho Pin, the founder of Long Island’s Mingjing News, echoed Jin. Mingjing’s reporters felt that covering Guo was imperative, no matter the haziness of the information. “In China, the political elite that Guo was attacking had platforms of their own,” Ho said. “They have the opportunity, the power and the ability to use all the government’s apparatus to refute and oppose Guo Wengui. So our most important job is to allow Guo Wengui’s insider knowledge reach the fair, open-minded people in China.” Still, people like Pei urge caution when dealing with Guo’s claims. Even Guo’s escape raises questions. Few others have slipped through the net of China’s anti-corruption drive. “How could he get so lucky?” Pei asked. “He must have been tipped off long before.”

    At the barbecue, a supporter named Ye Rong tucked one of his children under his arm and acknowledged that Guo’s past life is riddled with holes. There was always the possibility that Guo used to be a thug, but Ye didn’t think it mattered. The rules of the conflict had been set by the Communist Party. “You need all kinds of people to oppose the Chinese government,” Ye said. “We need intellectuals; we also need thugs.”

    Guo, of course, has his own opinions about his legacy. He warned of dark times for Americans and for the world, if he doesn’t succeed in his mission to change China. “I am trying to help,” he told me. “I am not joking with you.” He continued: “I will change China within the next three years. If I don’t change it, I won’t be able to survive.”
    Correction: Jan. 12, 2018

    An earlier version of this article misidentified the name of the province where the Chinese government hired online commenters in 2004. It is Hunan Province, not Henan.

    #Chine #politique #corruption #tireurs_d_alarme

  • Au #Niger, l’UE mise sur la #police_locale pour traquer les migrants

    Au Niger, l’Union européenne finance le contrôle biométrique des frontières. Avec pour objectif la lutte contre l’immigration, et dans une opacité parfois très grande sur les méthodes utilisées.

    Niger, envoyé spécial.– Deux semaines après une attaque meurtrière attribuée aux groupes armés djihadistes, un silence épais règne autour du poste de la gendarmerie de Makalondi, à la frontière entre le Niger et le Burkina Faso. Ce jour de novembre 2018, un militaire nettoie son fusil avec un torchon, des cartouches scintillantes éparpillées à ses pieds. Des traces de balles sur le mur blanc du petit bâtiment signalent la direction de l’attaque. Sur le pas de la porte, un jeune gendarme montre son bras bandé, pendant que ses collègues creusent une tranchée et empilent des sacs de sable.
    L’assaut, à 100 kilomètres au sud de la capitale Niamey, a convaincu le gouvernement du Niger d’étendre les mesures d’état d’urgence, déjà adoptées dans sept départements frontaliers avec le Mali, à toute la frontière avec le Burkina Faso. La sécurité a également été renforcée sur le poste de police, à moins d’un kilomètre de distance de celui de la gendarmerie, où les agents s’affairent à une autre mission : gérer les flux migratoires.
    « On est les pionniers, au Niger », explique le commissaire Ismaël Soumana, montrant les équipements installés dans un bâtiment en préfabriqué. Des capteurs d’empreintes sont alignés sur un comptoir, accompagnés d’un scanneur de documents, d’une microcaméra et d’un ordinateur. « Ici, on enregistre les données biométriques de tous les passagers qui entrent et sortent du pays, on ajoute des informations personnelles et puis on envoie tout à Niamey, où les données sont centralisées. »
    Makalondi est le premier poste au Niger à avoir installé le Midas, système d’information et d’analyse de données sur la migration, en septembre 2018. C’est la première étape d’un projet de biométrisation des frontières terrestres du pays, financé par l’UE et le #Japon, et réalisé conjointement par l’#OIM, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations – créatrice et propriétaire du système #Midas –, et #Eucap_Sahel_Niger, la mission de sécurité civile de Bruxelles.


    Au cœur de ce projet, il y a la Direction pour la surveillance du territoire (DST), la police aux frontières nigérienne, dont le rôle s’est accru au même rythme que l’intérêt européen à réduire la migration via le Niger. Dans un quartier central de Niamey, le bureau du directeur Abdourahamane Alpha est un oasis de tranquillité au milieu de la tempête. Tout autour, les agents tourbillonnent, en se mêlant aux travailleurs chinois qui renouvellent leur visa et aux migrants ouest-africains sans papiers, en attente d’expulsion.
    Dessinant une carte sur un morceau de papier, le commissaire Alpha trace la stratégie du Niger « pour contrôler 5 000 kilomètres de frontière avec sept pays ». Il évoque ainsi les opérations antiterrorisme de la force G5 Sahel et le soutien de l’UE à une nouvelle compagnie mobile de gardes-frontières, à lancer au printemps 2019.
    Concernant le Midas, adopté depuis 2009 par 23 pays du monde, « le premier défi est d’équiper tous les postes de frontière terrestre », souligne Alpha. Selon l’OIM, six nouveaux postes devraient être équipés d’ici à mi-2020.

    Un rapport interne réalisé à l’été 2018 et financé par l’UE, obtenu par Mediapart, estime que seulement un poste sur les douze visités, celui de Sabon Birni sur la frontière avec le Nigeria, est apte à une installation rapide du système Midas. Des raisons de sécurité, un flux trop bas et composé surtout de travailleurs frontaliers, ou encore la nécessité de rénover les structures (pour la plupart bâties par la GIZ, la coopération allemande, entre 2015 et 2016), expliquent l’évaluation prudente sur l’adoption du Midas.
    Bien que l’installation de ce système soit balbutiante, Abdourahamane Alpha entrevoit déjà le jour où leurs « bases de données seront connectées avec celles de l’UE ». Pour l’instant, du siège de Niamey, les agents de police peuvent consulter en temps quasi réel les empreintes d’un Ghanéen entrant par le Burkina Faso, sur un bus de ligne.
    À partir de mars 2019, ils pourront aussi les confronter avec les fichiers du Pisces, le système biométrique du département d’État des États-Unis, installé à l’aéroport international de Niamey. Puis aux bases de données d’Interpol et du Wapis, le système d’information pour la police de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, un fichier biométrique financé par le Fonds européen de développement dans seize pays de la région.
    Mais si le raccordement avec des bases de données de Bruxelles, envisagé par le commissaire Alpha, semble une hypothèse encore lointaine, l’UE exerce déjà un droit de regard indirect sur les écrans de la police nigérienne, à travers Frontex, l’agence pour le contrôle des frontières externes.

    Frontex a en effet choisi le Niger comme partenaire privilégié pour le contrôle migratoire sur la route dite de la Méditerranée centrale. En août 2017, l’agence y a déployé son unique officier de liaison en Afrique et a lancé, en novembre 2018, la première cellule d’analyse de risques dans le continent. Un projet financé par la coopération au développement de l’UE : 4 millions d’euros destinés à ouvrir des cellules similaires dans huit pays subsahariens.
    L’agence n’a dévoilé à Mediapart que six documents sur onze relatifs à ses liens avec le Niger, en rappelant la nécessité de « protéger l’intérêt public concernant les relations internationales ». Un des documents envoyés concerne les cellules d’analyse de risques, présentées comme des bureaux équipés et financés par Frontex à l’intérieur des autorités de contrôle des frontières du pays, où des analystes formés par l’agence – mais dépendants de l’administration nationale – auront accès aux bases de données.
    Dans la version intégrale du document, que Mediapart a finalement pu se procurer, et qui avait été expurgée par Frontex, on apprend que « les bases de données du MIDAS, PISCES et Securiport [compagnie privée de Washington qui opère dans le Mali voisin, mais pas au Niger – ndlr] seront prises en considération comme sources dans le plan de collecte de données ».
    En dépit de l’indépendance officielle des cellules par rapport à Frontex, revendiquée par l’agence, on peut y lire aussi que chaque cellule aura une adresse mail sur le serveur de Frontex et que les informations seront échangées sur une plateforme digitale de l’UE. Un graphique, également invisible dans la version expurgée, montre que les données collectées sont destinées à Frontex et aux autres cellules, plutôt qu’aux autorités nationales.
    Selon un fonctionnaire local, la France aurait par ailleurs fait pression pour obtenir les fichiers biométriques des demandeurs d’asile en attente d’être réinstallés à Paris, dans le cadre d’un programme de réinstallation géré par le UNHCR.
    La nouvelle Haute Autorité pour la protection des données personnelles, opérationnelle depuis octobre 2018, ne devrait pas manquer de travail. Outre le Midas, le Pisces et le Wapis, le Haut Commissariat pour les réfugiés a enregistré dans son système Bims les données de presque 250 000 réfugiés et déplacés internes, tandis que la plus grande base biométrique du pays – le fichier électoral – sera bientôt réalisée.
    Pendant ce temps, au poste de frontière de Makalondi, un dimanche de décembre 2018, les préoccupations communes de Niamey et Bruxelles se matérialisent quand les minibus Toyota laissent la place aux bus longue distance, reliant les capitales d’Afrique occidentale à Agadez, au centre du pays, avec escale à Niamey. Des agents fouillent les bagages, tandis que les passagers attendent de se faire enregistrer.
    « Depuis l’intensification des contrôles, en 2016, le passage a chuté brusquement, explique le commissaire Ismaël Soumana. En parallèle, les voies de contournement se sont multipliées : si on ferme ici, les passeurs changent de route, et cela peut continuer à l’infini. »
    Les contrôles terminés, les policiers se préparent à monter la garde. « Car les terroristes, eux, frappent à la nuit, et nous ne sommes pas encore bien équipés », conclut le commissaire, inquiet.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/280219/au-niger-l-ue-mise-sur-la-police-locale-pour-traquer-les-migrants
    #migrations #réfugiés #asile #traque #externalisation #contrôles_frontaliers #EU #UE #Eucap #biométrie #organisation_internationale_contre_les_migrations #IOM

    J’ajoute à la métaliste :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

    • Biometrics: The new frontier of EU migration policy in Niger

      The EU’s strategy for controlling irregular West African migration is not just about asking partner countries to help stop the flow of people crossing the Mediterranean – it also includes sharing data on who is trying to make the trip and identifying to which countries they can be returned.

      Take Niger, a key transit country for migrants arriving in Europe via Libya.

      European money and technical assistance have flowed into Niger for several years, funding beefed-up border security and supporting controversial legislation that criminalises “migrant trafficking” and has led to a sharp fall in the registered number of people travelling through the country to reach Libya – down from 298,000 in 2016 to 50,000 in 2018.

      Such cooperation is justified by the “moral duty to tackle the loss of lives in the desert and in the Mediterranean”, according to the EU’s head of foreign policy, Federica Mogherini. It was also a response to the surge in arrivals of asylum seekers and migrants to European shores in 2015-16, encouraging the outsourcing of control to African governments in return for development aid.

      In April, as a further deterrent to fresh arrivals, the European Parliament passed a tougher “Regulation” for #Frontex – the EU border guard agency – authorising stepped-up returns of migrants without proper documentation to their countries of origin.

      The regulation is expected to come into force by early December after its formal adoption by the European Council.

      The proposed tougher mandate will rely in part on biometric information stored on linked databases in Africa and Europe. It is a step rights campaigners say not only jeopardises the civil liberties of asylum seekers and others in need of protection, but one that may also fall foul of EU data privacy legislation.

      In reply to a request for comment, Frontex told The New Humanitarian it was “not in the position to discuss details of the draft regulation as it is an ongoing process.”

      Niger on the frontline

      Niger is a key country for Europe’s twin strategic goals of migration control and counter-terrorism – with better data increasingly playing a part in both objectives.

      The #Makalondi police station-cum-immigration post on Niger’s southern border with Burkina Faso is on the front line of this approach – one link in the ever-expanding chain that is the EU’s information-driven response to border management and security.

      When TNH visited in December 2018, the hot Sunday afternoon torpor evaporated when three international buses pulled up and disgorged dozens of travellers into the parking area.

      “In Niger, we are the pioneers.”

      They were mostly Burkinabès and Nigeriens who travelled abroad for work and, as thousands of their fellow citizens do every week, took the 12-hour drive from the Burkina Faso capital, Ouagadougou, to the Niger capital, Niamey.

      As policemen searched their bags, the passengers waited to be registered with the new biometric #Migration_Information_and_Data_Analysis_System, or #MIDAS, which captures fingerprints and facial images for transmission to a central #database in Niamey.

      MIDAS has been developed by the International Organisation for Migration (#IOM) as a rugged, low-cost solution to monitor migration flows.

      “In Niger, we are the pioneers,” said Ismael Soumana, the police commissioner of Makalondi. A thin, smiling man, Soumana proudly showed off the eight new machines installed since September at the entry and exit desks of a one-storey prefabricated building. Each workstation was equipped with fingerprint and documents scanners, a small camera, and a PC.
      Data sharing

      The data from Makalondi is stored on the servers of the Directorate for Territorial Surveillance (DTS), Niger’s border police. After Makalondi and #Gaya, on the Benin-Niger border, IOM has ambitious plans to instal MIDAS in at least eight more border posts by mid-2020 – although deteriorating security conditions due to jihadist-linked attacks could interrupt the rollout.

      IOM provides MIDAS free of charge to at least 20 countries, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa. Its introduction in Niger was funded by Japan, while the EU paid for an initial assessment study and the electrical units that support the system. In addition to the border posts, two mobile MIDAS-equipped trucks, financed by #Canada, will be deployed along the desert trails to Libya or Algeria in the remote north.

      MIDAS is owned by the Nigerien government, which will be “the only one able to access the data,” IOM told TNH. But it is up to Niamey with whom they share that information.

      MIDAS is already linked to #PISCES (#Personal_Identification_Secure_Comparison_and_Evaluation_System), a biometric registration arm of the US Department of State installed at Niamey international airport and connected to #INTERPOL’s alert lists.

      Niger hosts the first of eight planned “#Risk_Analysis_Cells” in Africa set up by Frontex and based inside its border police directorate. The unit collects data on cross-border crime and security threats and, as such, will rely on systems such as #PISCES and MIDAS – although Frontex insists no “personal data” is collected and used in generating its crime statistics.

      A new office is being built for the Niger border police directorate by the United States to house both systems.

      The #West_African_Police_Information_System, a huge criminal database covering 16 West African countries, funded by the EU and implemented by INTERPOL, could be another digital library of fingerprints linking to MIDAS.

      Frontex programmes intersect with other data initiatives, such as the #Free_Movement_of_Persons_and_Migration_in_West_Africa, an EU-funded project run by the IOM in all 15-member Economic Community of West African States. One of the aims of the scheme is to introduce biometric identity cards for West African citizens.

      Frontex’s potential interest is clear. “If a European country has a migrant suspected to be Ivorian, they can ask the local government to match in their system the biometric data they have. In this way, they should be able to identify people,” IOM programme coordinator Frantz Celestine told TNH.

      The push for returns

      Only 37 percent of non-EU citizens ordered to leave the bloc in 2017 actually did so. In his 2018 State of the Union address, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker urged a “stronger and more effective European return policy” – although some migration analysts argue what is needed are more channels for legal migration.

      Part of the problem has been that implementing a returns policy is notoriously hard – due in part to the costs of deportation and the lack of cooperation by countries of origin to identify their citizens. Europe has had difficulty in finalising formal accords with so-called third countries unwilling to lose remittances from those abroad.

      The Commission is shifting to “informal arrangements [that] keep readmission deals largely out of sight” – serving to ease the domestic pressure on governments who cooperate on returns, according to European law researcher, Jonathan Slagter.

      The new Frontex regulation provides a much broader mandate for border surveillance, returns, and cooperation with third countries.

      It contains provisions to “significantly step up the effective and sustainable return of irregular migrants”. Among the mechanisms is the “operation and maintenance of a platform for the exchange of data”, as a tool to reinforce the return system “in cooperation with the authorities of the relevant third countries”. That includes access to MIDAS and PISCES.

      Under the new Frontex policy, in order to better identify those to be deported, the agency will be able “to restrict certain rights of data subjects”, specifically related to the protection and access to personal data granted by EU legislation.

      That, for example, will allow the “transfer of personal data of returnees to third countries” - even in cases where readmission agreements for deportees do not exist.

      Not enough data protection

      The concern is that the expanded mandate on returns is not accompanied by appropriate safeguards on data protection. The #European_Data_Protection_Supervisor – the EU’s independent data protection authority – has faulted the new regulation for not conducting an initial impact study, and has called for its provisions to be reassessed “to ensure consistency with the currently applicable EU legislation”.

      “Given the extent of data sharing, the regulation does not put in place the necessary human rights safeguards."

      Mariana Gkliati, a researcher at the University of Leiden working on Frontex human rights accountability, argues that data on the proposed centralised return management platform – shared with third countries – could prove detrimental for the safety of people seeking protection.

      “Given the extent of data sharing, the regulation does not put in place the necessary human rights safeguards and could be perceived as giving a green light for a blanket sharing with the third country of all information that may be considered relevant for returns,” she told TNH.

      “Frontex is turning into an #information_hub,” Gkliati added. “Its new powers on data processing and sharing can have a major impact on the rights of persons, beyond the protection of personal data.”

      For prospective migrants at the Makalondi border post, their data is likely to travel a lot more freely than they can.

      https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2019/06/06/biometrics-new-frontier-eu-migration-policy-niger
      #empreintes_digitales #OIM #identification #renvois #expulsions #échange_de_données

      ping @albertocampiphoto @karine4 @daphne @marty @isskein

  • Un projet de fichage géant de citoyens prend forme en Europe

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/250219/un-projet-de-fichage-geant-de-citoyens-prend-forme-en-europe

    Des appareils portables équipés de lecteurs d’empreintes digitales et d’images faciales, pour permettre aux policiers de traquer des terroristes : ce n’est plus de la science-fiction, mais un projet européen en train de devenir réalité. Le 5 février 2019, un accord préliminaire sur l’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information au niveau du continent a ainsi été signé.

    Il doit permettre l’unification de six registres avec des données d’identification alphanumériques et biométriques (empreintes digitales et images faciales) de citoyens non membres de l’UE. En dépit des nombreuses réserves émises par les Cnil européennes.

    Giovanni Buttarelli, contrôleur européen de la protection des données, a qualifié cette proposition de « point de non-retour » dans le système de base de données européen. En substance, les registres des demandeurs d’asile (Eurodac), des demandeurs de visa pour l’Union européenne (Visa) et des demandeurs (système d’information Schengen) seront joints à trois nouvelles bases de données mises en place ces derniers mois, toutes concernant des citoyens non membres de l’UE.

    Pourront ainsi accéder à la nouvelle base de données les forces de police des États membres, mais aussi les responsables d’Interpol, d’Europol et, dans de nombreux cas, même les gardes-frontières de l’agence européenne Frontex. Ils pourront rechercher des personnes par nom, mais également par empreinte digitale ou faciale, et croiser les informations de plusieurs bases de données sur une personne.

    L’infographie diffusée par le Conseil pour défendre son projet. L’infographie diffusée par le Conseil pour défendre son projet.

    « L’interopérabilité peut consister en un seul registre avec des données isolées les unes des autres ou dans une base de données centralisée. Cette dernière hypothèse peut comporter des risques graves de perte d’informations sensibles, explique Buttarelli. Le choix entre les deux options est un détail fondamental qui sera clarifié au moment de la mise en œuvre. »

    Le Parlement européen et le Conseil doivent encore approuver officiellement l’accord, avant qu’il ne devienne législation.

    Les risques de la méga base de données

    « J’ai voté contre l’interopérabilité parce que c’est une usine à gaz qui n’est pas conforme aux principes de proportionnalité, de nécessité et de finalité que l’on met en avant dès lors qu’il peut être question d’atteintes aux droits fondamentaux et aux libertés publiques, assure Marie-Christine Vergiat, députée européenne, membre de la commission des libertés civiles. On mélange tout : les autorités de contrôle aux frontières et les autorités répressives par exemple, alors que ce ne sont pas les mêmes finalités. »

    La proposition de règlement, élaborée par un groupe d’experts de haut niveau d’institutions européennes et d’États membres, dont les noms n’ont pas été révélés, avait été présentée par la Commission en décembre 2017, dans le but de prévenir les attaques terroristes et de promouvoir le contrôle aux frontières.

    Les institutions de l’UE sont pourtant divisées quant à son impact sur la sécurité des citoyens : d’un côté, Krum Garkov, directeur de Eu-Lisa – l’agence européenne chargée de la gestion de l’immense registre de données –, estime qu’elle va aider à prévenir les attaques et les terroristes en identifiant des criminels sous de fausses identités. De l’autre côté, Giovanni Buttarelli met en garde contre une base de données centralisée, qui risque davantage d’être visée par des cyberattaques. « Nous ne devons pas penser aux simples pirates, a-t-il déclaré. Il y a des puissances étrangères très intéressées par la vulnérabilité de ces systèmes. »

    L’utilité pour l’antiterrorisme : les doutes des experts

    L’idée de l’interopérabilité des systèmes d’information est née après le 11-Septembre. Elle s’est développée en Europe dans le contexte de la crise migratoire et des attentats de 2015, et a été élaborée dans le cadre d’une relation de collaboration étroite entre les institutions européennes chargées du contrôle des frontières et l’industrie qui développe les technologies pour le mettre en œuvre.

    « L’objectif de lutte contre le terrorisme a disparu : on parle maintenant de “fraude à l’identité”, et l’on mélange de plus en plus lutte contre la criminalité et lutte contre l’immigration dite irrégulière, ajoute Vergiat. J’ai participé à la commission spéciale du Parlement européen sur la lutte contre le terrorisme ; je sais donc que le lien entre terrorisme et immigration dite irrégulière est infinitésimal. On compte les cas de ressortissants de pays tiers arrêtés pour faits de terrorisme sur les doigts d’une main. »

    Dans la future base de données, « un référentiel d’identité unique collectera les données personnelles des systèmes d’information des différents pays, tandis qu’un détecteur d’identités multiples reliera les différentes identités d’un même individu », a déclaré le directeur d’Eu-Lisa, lors de la conférence annuelle de l’Association européenne de biométrie (European Association for Biometrics – EAB) qui réunit des représentants des fabricants des technologies de reconnaissance numérique nécessaires à la mise en œuvre du système.

    « Lors de l’attaque de Berlin, perpétrée par le terroriste Anis Amri, nous avons constaté que cet individu avait 14 identités dans l’Union européenne, a-t-il expliqué. Il est possible que, s’il y avait eu une base de données interopérable, il aurait été arrêté auparavant. »

    Cependant, Reinhard Kreissl, directeur du Vienna Centre for Societal Security (Vicesse) et expert en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme, souligne que, dans les attentats terroristes perpétrés en Europe ces dix dernières années, « les auteurs étaient souvent des citoyens européens, et ne figuraient donc pas dans des bases de données qui devaient être unifiées. Et tous étaient déjà dans les radars des forces de police ».

    « Tout agent des services de renseignement sérieux admettra qu’il dispose d’une liste de 1 000 à 1 500 individus dangereux, mais qu’il ne peut pas les suivre tous, ajoute Kreissl. Un trop-plein de données n’aide pas la police. »

    « L’interopérabilité coûte des milliards de dollars et l’intégration de différents systèmes n’est pas aussi facile qu’il y paraît », déclare Sandro Gaycken, directeur du Digital Society Institute à l’Esmt de Berlin. « Il est préférable d’investir dans l’intelligence des gens, dit l’expert en cyberintelligence, afin d’assurer plus de sécurité de manière moins intrusive pour la vie privée. »

    Le budget frontière de l’UE augmente de 197 %

    La course aux marchés publics pour la mise en place de la nouvelle base de données est sur le point de commencer : dans le chapitre consacré aux dépenses « Migration et contrôle des frontières » du budget proposé par la Commission pour la période 2021-2027, le fonds de gestion des frontières a connu une augmentation de 197 %, tandis que la part consacrée aux politiques de migration et d’asile n’a augmenté, en comparaison, que de 36 %.

    En 2020, le système Entry Exit (Ees, ou SEE, l’une des trois nouvelles bases de données centralisées avec interopérabilité) entrera en vigueur. Il oblige chaque État membre à collecter les empreintes digitales et les images de visages de tous les citoyens non européens entrant et sortant de l’Union, et d’alerter lorsque les permis de résidence expirent.

    Cela signifie que chaque frontière, aéroportuaire, portuaire ou terrestre, doit être équipée de lecteurs d’empreintes digitales et d’images faciales. La Commission a estimé que ce SEE coûterait 480 millions d’euros pour les quatre premières années. Malgré l’énorme investissement de l’Union, de nombreuses dépenses resteront à la charge des États membres.

    Ce sera ensuite au tour d’Etias (Système européen d’information de voyage et d’autorisation), le nouveau registre qui établit un examen préventif des demandes d’entrée, même pour les citoyens de pays étrangers qui n’ont pas besoin de visa pour entrer dans l’UE. Cette dernière a estimé son coût à 212,1 millions d’euros, mais le règlement, en plus de prévoir des coûts supplémentaires pour les États, mentionne des « ressources supplémentaires » à garantir aux agences de l’UE responsables de son fonctionnement, en particulier pour les gardes-côtes et les gardes-frontières de Frontex.

    C’est probablement la raison pour laquelle le budget proposé pour Frontex a plus que triplé pour les sept prochaines années, pour atteindre 12 milliards d’euros. Le tout dans une ambiance de conflits d’intérêts entre l’agence européenne et l’industrie de la biométrie.

    Un membre de l’unité recherche et innovation de Frontex siège ainsi au conseil d’administration de l’Association européenne de biométrie (EAB), qui regroupe les principales organisations de recherche et industrielles du secteur de l’identification numérique, et fait aussi du lobbying. La conférence annuelle de l’association a été parrainée par le géant biométrique français Idemia et la Security Identity Alliance.

    L’agente de recherche de Frontex et membre du conseil d’EAB Rasa Karbauskaite a ainsi suggéré à l’auditoire de représentants de l’industrie de participer à la conférence organisée par Frontex avec les États membres : « L’occasion de montrer les dernières technologies développées. » Un représentant de l’industrie a également demandé à Karbauskaite d’utiliser son rôle institutionnel pour faire pression sur l’Icao, l’agence des Nations unies chargée de la législation des passeports, afin de rendre les technologies de sécurité des données biométriques obligatoires pour le monde entier.

    La justification est toujours de « protéger les citoyens européens du terrorisme international », mais il n’existe toujours aucune donnée ou étude sur la manière dont les nouveaux registres de données biométriques et leur interconnexion peuvent contribuer à cet objectif.

  • Mort d’Aline Kiner, auteure de « la Nuit des béguines » - Culture / Next
    https://next.liberation.fr/livres/2019/01/07/mort-d-aline-kiner-auteure-de-la-nuit-des-beguines_1701491

    A peine les éditions Stock venaient-elles de démentir le décès de J.M.G. Le Clézio, annoncé par un plaisantin sur Twitter, que les éditions Liana Levi adressaient un communiqué attristé, au contenu malheureusement bien réel : Aline Kiner est morte « ce lundi 7 janvier 2019 après des années de lutte contre la maladie ».

    Aline Kiner est l’auteure de la Nuit des béguines, beau roman sur une communauté de femmes, vers 1310 à Paris. L’organisation intérieure, le rôle de chacune, guérisseuse ou intendante, les relations avec le clergé qui ne voyait pas d’un bon œil la liberté de pensée et l’indépendance des béguines : une solide documentation historique, servant de soubassement à l’intrigue, permettait à l’écrivain de faire jouer librement son imagination et d’inventer des personnages attachants. Ces femmes n’étaient pas mariées, elles n’étaient pas non plus cloîtrées : leur piété n’était pas tributaire d’un quelconque pouvoir masculin.

    La Nuit des béguines, dès sa sortie en août 2017, a été un très grand succès, salué dans Libération par Aurélie Filippetti dans une « librairie éphémère ». Auparavant, Aline Kiner a écrit l’excellent Jeu du pendu (2011 chez Liana Levi), lauréat des prix Interpol’Art et Georges Sadler, et inspiré, note l’éditeur, du « petit village de Moselle, près des forêts du plateau lorrain » où l’auteure a grandi, fille de mineur née en 1959. Puis en 2014, elle a publié la Vie sur le fil, après de nombreux reportages en Egypte, notamment sur le site archéologique d’Abydos. La contribution d’Aline Kiner au Libé des écrivains de 2018 portait d’ailleurs sur Khéops. Elle « travaillait à un nouveau projet autour de la figure du bouc émissaire dans la France du XIVe siècle », indiquent les éditions Liana Levi. Romancière mais aussi journaliste, passionnée d’histoire avec une prédilection pour le Moyen Age, Aline Kiner a été rédactrice en chef de Sciences et Avenir, mensuel où elle était, depuis 2008, responsable des hors-série.

  • The Scourge of the #Red_Notice – Foreign Policy
    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/12/03/the-scourge-of-the-red-notice-interpol-uae-russia-china

    notez l’appel de une de la newsletter, très explicite :
    It’s not just Russia and China that have been accused of misusing Interpol Red Notices

    How some countries use Interpol to go after dissidents and debtors.
    […]
    Red Notices issued by Interpol’s 194 member states are usually reserved for people suspected of committing serious crimes. But under the UAE’s sharia-influenced legal system, some foreigners who did business there have found themselves on Interpol’s wanted list for business disputes, bounced checks, or even credit card debt—things that in many countries do not carry criminal penalties.

    There is no public information about how many Red Notices are issued by the UAE for these relatively minor matters. But one British-based group that helps people in this predicament says it is now seeing at least two cases a month.

    Under the UAE’s credit system, customers are often asked to write a check for the value of any bank loan they take, which is then held as a security. If the loan is defaulted on, the bank can then cash the check to recover its money. But because the sum is often high, it’s not unusual for the check to bounce. The Gulf state of Qatar, which has a similar credit system, sentenced British businessman Jonathan Nash to 37 years imprisonment last year for a check that could not be covered. 

    In the UAE, all you have to do is get sick and not be able to pay your mortgage bill,” Estlund said. “What grabs people’s attention about #Interpol Red Notice cases is that it could be you, it could be me.

    #notice_rouge
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notice_rouge

  • How Borders Are Constructed in West Africa

    The E.U. has led an expensive and often contradictory effort to modernize African borders. Author #Philippe_Frowd looks at the gap between policy and outcomes.

    Over the past 15 years there has been a surge in E.U. spending on borders outside Europe. The impact of this funding on West Africa has received little attention until recently.

    A new book by Philippe M. Frowd, an expert on the politics of borders, migration and security intervention, seeks to correct this. In “Security at the Borders: Transnational Practices and Technologies in West Africa,” Frowd details both the high politics and everyday culture clashes that have shaped European interventions and the way they have been received in countries like Senegal.

    An assistant professor in the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa, Frowd coins the term “border work” to denote how everything from training to technology to migration deals work in combination with each other. Here in conversation with Refugees Deeply, he shares some of his main observations.

    Refugees Deeply: You talk about tracing the “who” of border work in West Africa. Can you explain your findings?

    Philippe Frowd: One of my book’s points is to use the term “border work” to identify how seemingly disparate practices such as negotiating migrant readmission agreements, deploying citizen identification technologies, funding border management projects and routine police cooperation actually combine. To try and make sense of what seems to be a bewildering but also often opaque set of actors operating at the intersection of these fields in West Africa specifically.

    One of the most striking developments of the past 10-15 years has been the phenomenal growth of E.U. border security-related spending, much of it in “third countries,” mainly in Africa. This has gone hand in hand with a growing salience of “border security” on the part of many African states as a way of understanding flows at borders.

    One of my main findings was the sheer diversity of actors involved in determining policies, experiences and practices of borders in the region. The African Union is the successor to the Organisation of African Unity which accepted Africa’s inherited borders in 1964, and the A.U. continues to provide assistance for demarcation of borders and dispute resolution. The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) is one of the guarantors of free movement in the region and generally pursues an ambitious agenda of greater harmonization (e.g., of visa policy).

    Yet other actors, such as the E.U. and U.N. specialized agencies (such as the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime), tend to have agendas driven by primarily Western security concerns. Then there are the more immediately visible police and gendarmeries who directly enact border controls. More recently, the G5 Sahel force consistently invokes border security and transnational crime.

    Beyond simply tracing who does what, there is tracing the interconnections and tensions between these different institutions. Looking sociologically at the diverse range of actors, we can see how knowledge is a crucial part of the equation: What is the vision of borders, security and migration each actor puts forward? On one hand, institutions like ECOWAS are focused on legal mobility rights while those such as Interpol envision mobility as a regulated, digitally legible practice. The range of actors who contribute to this border work is often a patchwork in which uneasy bedfellows co-exist. E.U. funding, for instance, goes to supporting free movement projects at the ECOWAS level but also to train and equip the security forces of states like Niger to crack down on irregular migration routes. West African borders are the product of the balance of forces between this range of competing visions.

    Refugees Deeply: Can you talk us through the way in which border practices move between different regions. Is there a model for the process of emulation?

    Frowd: Border security is made up of everyday routines but also of various digital and other technologies, both of which are potentially mobile. I point to a couple of ways that these tools of doing border security can travel: One of these is emulation of existing (often Western) methods and standards, but this also goes alongside what I describe as “pedagogy” and the role of exemplars.

    “West African borders are the product of the balance of forces between this range of competing visions.”

    All of these interact in some way. As an example, a border management project led by the IOM [International Organization for Migration] might include training sessions during which members of the local police and gendarmerie learn about key principles of border management illustrated by best practices from elsewhere. Emulation is the desired outcome of many of these trainings, which are the backbone of international border security assistance. The EUCAP Sahel missions, for example, put a heavy emphasis on training rather than equipping so there is a strong faith that mentalities matter more than equipment.

    Equipment also matters and plays its part in shaping how border security works. Biometrics, which aim to verify identification using some kind of body measurement, require ways of reading the body and storing data about it. Senegal adopted, in one decade, a range of biometric technologies for national I.D. cards and controls at borders. There is a very obvious mobility of technology here (a Malaysian company providing e-Passport infrastructure, a Belgian company providing visa systems) but movement of border practices is also about ideas. The vision of biometrics as effective in the first place is one that I found, from interviews with Senegalese police commanders, was strongly tied to emulating ideals of modern and selective borders found elsewhere.

    Refugees Deeply: In your work you identify some of the gaps between policy goals and to actual outcomes and practices. Can you talk us through the greatest discrepancies?

    Frowd: Some of the discrepancies I found showed some interesting underlying factors. One of these was the shifting role of global private sector companies in frustrating public policy goals. Not through deliberate sabotage or state capture, but rather through the diverging incentives around doing border work. In the case of Senegal’s biometric systems, the state has been keen to make as coherent an infrastructure as possible, with connections between various elements such as biometric passport issuance, automated airport arrivals for holders of this passport and systems such as the national I.D. card. Given the need for private companies to compete based on technological advantage, rival systems made by rival companies could not interconnect and share data without sharing of valuable corporate information.

    Another underlying factor for the discrepancies I point to is that, once again, the sociological dynamics of the people doing the border work come into play. Many border management projects bring together a diverse range of actors who can have competing visions of how security is to be performed and achieved. For instance the ways police and gendarmerie competed over border post data in Mauritania leading to separate databases. It can also happen at a larger scale through the lack of integration across the donor community, which leads to a huge amount of duplication.

    Refugees Deeply: You spent a section of your book on Spanish-African police cooperation to show the limits of European knowledge and technology. You mention a clash of cultures, can you elaborate?

    Frowd: This is a particularly salient point today for two reasons. First because we are hearing more elite (e.g., Frontex) discourse about the “reopening” of a migration route to Spain. Second because Spain itself is increasingly active in E.U. projects across the Sahel. My book tells some of the story of Spanish security ambitions in Africa. But these ambitions, and those of other Western partners, have hard limits. Some of these limits are quite straightforward: Climate is often a barrier to the functioning of surveillance technologies and some countries (like Mauritania) are harder to recruit international experts for if they cannot or do not bring their families along.

    In terms of Spanish-African cooperation, much of the narrative about clashes of cultures comes down to perceptions. One of the elements of the clash is a temporal one, with Spanish security officials often considering local partners as existing at a completely different stage of progress.

    More broadly in terms of the limits of knowledge itself, the ambitions of experts to implicitly recreate aspects of European best practice are flawed. Part of this form of border security knowledge involves supporting technological solutions to make African mobility more legible to states. This comes up against the reality that movement in West Africa is already quite free but highly informalized. European experts are well aware of this reality but seek to formalize these flows. A police expert I spoke to recently suggested co-located border posts, and many international funders are supportive of specific I.D. cards for residents of border regions. This is not to impede movement, but rather to rationalize it – in much the same way that common I.D. standards and databases underpin free movement within Europe.

    https://www.newsdeeply.com/refugees/community/2018/07/18/how-borders-are-constructed-in-west-africa
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Mauritanie #Sénégal

  • Maroc-Israël: Hassan II, la grande imposture, par René Naba – Salimsellami’s Blog
    https://salimsellami.wordpress.com/2018/11/22/maroc-israel-hassan-ii-la-grande-imposture-par-rene-naba

    Le Roi Hassan II du Maroc, Président du Comité Al Qods » (Jérusalem), hôte du premier sommet islamique de l’époque contemporaine (Rabat 1969), apparaît rétrospectivement comme l‘un des grands traîtres à la cause arabe et son long règne de 38 ans (Mars 1961-Juillet 1999) une vaste supercherie, si toutefois sont avérées les révélations contenues dans le livre du journaliste israélien Ronen Bergman « Rise and Kill First : The secret History of Israel’s targeted assassinations », ED. Penguin Random House.

    LES DIRIGEANTS ARABES PLACÉS SUR ÉCOUTE SUR ORDRE DE RABAT
    Réputé pour son sérieux, chroniqueur militaire de Yedioth Aharonoth et du New York Times, l’auteur soutient que les dirigeants arabes ont été placés sur écoute des services israéliens grâce à la connivence marocaine lors du Sommet arabe de Casablanca de septembre 1965. Du jamais vu même dans les fictions les plus satiriques, cette trahison dénote la désinvolture du monarque chérifien à l’égard de ses pairs et de son mépris pour la cause palestinienne.

    Version arabe de ce récit selon la recension de l’ouvrage établi par le site en ligne Ar Rai Al Yom à l’intention du locuteur arabophone.
    https://www.raialyoum.com/?p=821705

    La date n’est pas anodine. Scellé par la signature d’un pacte de solidarité et de coexistence pacifique entre régimes arabes, ce sommet s’est tenu en septembre 1965, au terme d’un été particulièrement brûlant au Maroc, marqué par la terrible répression de la révolte étudiante de Casablanca (23 mars 1965) qui fit officiellement 7 morts et 168 blessés. En fait 400 morts selon l’ambassade de France à Rabat.

    Sentant le vent du boulet, le jeune monarque a eu la lumineuse idée de se tourner alors vers les Israéliens, comme garde fou aux débordements de son opposition interne et externe. Autrement dit, contre la volonté de son peuple, il s’allia aux ennemis du Monde arabe pour la survie de son trône, dans la pure tradition de la servitude coloniale. Un schéma identique sera observé 70 ans plus tard par le trône wahhabite, bradant la Palestine, par une alliance ouverte avec Israël.

    Dans une sorte d’échange de bons procédés, Hassan II percevra le prix de sa forfaiture au plan arabe, un mois plus tard, par l’élimination d’un des espoirs de la renaissance arabe, Mehdi Ben Barka.

    Figure mythique de l’opposition démocratique marocaine, l’ancien professeur de mathématiques d’Hassan II sera enlevé en octobre 1965 à Paris avec la complicité du Mossad, et carbonisé par des sbires marocains, un mois après la tenue du sommet de Casablanca.

    Principal opposant socialiste au roi Hassan II et leader du mouvement tiers-mondiste et panafricaniste, Mehdi Ben Barka a été enlevé le 29 octobre 1965 à Paris alors qu’il tentait, en sa qualité de « commis-voyageur de la révolution », de fédérer les mouvements révolutionnaires du tiers-monde en vue de la Conférence Tri-continentale devant se tenir en janvier 1966 à la Havane en vue de faire converger « les deux courants de la révolution mondiale : le courant surgi avec la révolution d’Octobre et celui de la révolution nationale libératrice ». Pour l’historien René Galissot, « c’est dans cet élan révolutionnaire de la Tri-continentale que se trouve la cause profonde de l’enlèvement et de l’assassinat de Ben Barka ».

    Sur ce lien, Le rôle de Mehdi Ben Barka et de la tri-continentale dans le réveil des peuples colonisés

    https://www.madaniya.info/2015/12/20/non-alignes-tricontinentale-60-eme-anniversaire-1-2
    https://www.madaniya.info/2015/12/26/non-alignes-tri-continentale-60-eme-anniversaire-2-2
    La mise sur écoute des dirigeants arabes a permis aux Israéliens de prendre note de la stratégie de reconquête de la Palestine, comme des divergences inter arabes. La décision marocaine aura constitué « Le plus grand trésor stratégique d’Israël ». Le journaliste israélien a estimé que cette information était « la raison principale qui a poussé Israël à prendre la décision de faire la guerre aux États arabes en Juin 1967 », deux ans après le sommet de Casablanca, et qui a infligé une terrible défaite à l’Égypte, à la Syrie et à la Jordanie.

    L’incendie de la Mosquée Al Aqsa par un illuminé israélien, en 1969, donne l’occasion au souverain chérifien de se refaire une virginité politique à l’occasion du sommet Islamique de Rabat, en 1969. Deux ans après la défaite de juin 1967, dont il en a été indirectement responsable, le « Commandeur des Croyants » va cumuler cette fonction spirituelle avec celle plus politique de président du « Comité Al Qods ».

    Le sommet islamique de Rabat a marqué, sur le plan idéologique, le début de l’instrumentalisation de l’Islam comme arme politique contre l’athéisme soviétique et le nationalisme arabe, et, sur le plan stratégique, le détournement du combat pour la libération de la Palestine, vers des contrées périphériques, à des milliers de km du champ de bataille de la Palestine, avec Al Qaida en Afghanistan et les djihadistes arabo afghans au Caucase et en Bosnie au Kosovo, avant d’être dirigé contre les pays arabes à structure républicaine (Libye, Syrie) à l’occasion du déclenchement de la séquence dite du « printemps arabe » et le surgissement de groupements terroristes islamistes Daech, Jabat An Nosra, Jaych al Islam, opérant, dans le sud de la Syrie, en coopération avec Israël.

    Le Maroc figurera lors de cette séquence comme l’un des plus gros exportateurs du terrorisme islamique vers l’Europe occidentale (Attentat de Madrid 2004 qui a fait 200 morts, l’assassinat de Théo Van Gogh, les attentats de Bruxelles en 2015 et les attentats de Barcelone en 2017).

    Pour aller plus loin sur ce thème

    http://www.renenaba.com/de-l-instrumentalisation-de-l-islam-comme-arme-de-combat-politique

    Nonobstant la coopération sécuritaire entre le Maroc et Israël, Hassan II, fait rarissime dans les annales, devra faire face à deux séditions militaires, à son palais de Skhirat, le 10 juillet 1971, jour de son anniversaire, puis l’année suivante contre son propre Boeing par un groupe d’aviateurs ; indice d’un fort ressentiment à son égard, deux ans après son sacre de Rabat.

    Au delà du rôle du Mossad dans l’enlèvement de Mehdi Ben Barka, la vassalité du trône alaouite à l’égard de l’État Hébreu s’est concrétisée sous le règne de son successeur Mohammad VI avec le scandale du « Collier de la Reine » dans sa version tropicale ; un scandale qui titre son nom du bijou offert par l’épouse du Roi à Tzipi Livni, ancien ministre israélien des Affaires étrangères, dans la foulée de la destruction de la bande de Gaza (2007-2008), dont l’ancienne agent du Mossad en Europe en a été la coordonnatrice.

    Pour aller plus loin sur l’affaire du collier de la reine
    http://www.renenaba.com/le-collier-de-la-reine

    LE MAROC, PIVOT CENTRAL DU DISPOSITIF OCCIDENTAL EN AFRIQUE VIA LE SAFARI CLUB
    Pivot central du dispositif occidental en Afrique, le Royaume fondera, en 1976, avec la France, l’Egypte, l’Iran et l’Arabie saoudite, le « Safari Club », se donnant ainsi l’illusion de « jouer dans la cour des grands ». En pleine négociation de paix égypto-israélienne, il assumera le rôle de gendarme, non sur le champ de la confrontation israélo-arabe, mais à des milliers de kilomètres de là, non pour la récupération des Lieux Saints de l’Islam, mais pour le maintien au pouvoir d’un des dictateurs les plus corrompus de la planète le Zaïrois Mobutu, agent attitré des Américains dans la zone centrale de l’Afrique, l’assassin de Patrice Lumumba, le chef charismatique de l’Indépendance du Congo ex belge.

    En soutien à Jonas Savimbi, l’agent de la CIA en Angola ; ou encore l’ivoirien Félix Houphouet Boigny, le principal pourvoyeur des djembés et des mallettes à une caste politico médiatique française vénale.

    Le Maroc était représenté au sein de cette structure par le général Ahmad Dlimi, un des artisans de la liquidation de Mehdi Ben Barka, l’ancien lieutenant du général Mohamad Oufkir, l’homme des basses oeuvres de la dynastie alaouite, tous les deux liquidés sans autre forme de procès sur ordre du Palais royal.

    À propos du safari Club

    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safari_Club

    La dynastie chérifienne a constamment justifié sa relation privilégiée avec Israël par la spécificité du judaïsme marocain.

    Cf sur ce point, l’analyse d’Abraham Sarfati, l’un des plus célèbres opposants marocain à Hassan II.
    http://www.renenaba.com/jordanie-et-maroc-additif

    Il n’en demeure pas moins que le règne d’Hassan II, malgré les prosternations d’une presse française vénale, sera néanmoins qualifié de « Règne du Bagne et de la Terreur », dont le cas le plus illustre aura été le bagne de Tazmamart et l’arbitraire qui frappa notamment les Frères Bourequat.

    Pour aller plus loin sur cette affaire, cf le lien suivant
    http://www.renenaba.com/maroc-les-trois-freres-bourequat-40-ans-apres-le-retour-des-fantomes-vivan

    LE MAROC, POURVOYEUR DE PROSTITUÉES POUR LES PÉTROMONARCHIES ET REFUGE DE LA MAFIA ISRAÉLIENNE
    Un des principaux pourvoyeurs de la prostitution à destination du Golfe pétro monarchique, où près de vingt mille marocaines y font l’objet d’exploitations sexuelles, le Maroc passe de surcroît pour être un refuge pour la mafia israélienne. Le royaume aurait accueilli plusieurs anciens membres de la mafia israélienne, selon le quotidien israélien Haaretz, en date du vendredi 14 septembre 2012.

    Gabriel Ben-Harush et Shalom Domrani, deux figures puissantes de la mafia israélienne, recherchées depuis des années par l’Interpol, figuraient parmi les noms cités par le journal. Cf à ce propos : http://www.yabiladi.com/articles/details/12903/maroc-refuge-pour-mafia-israelienne.html

    Pour aller plus loin sur ce sujet cf :
    http://www.renenaba.com/yves-mamou-et-le-phenomene-de-serendipite

    Ronen Bergman mentionne 2700 assassinats ciblés orchestrés par Israël ; soit en moyenne 40 opérations par an. Les Israéliens n’auront fait que reprendre les méthodes en vigueur en Palestine par les britanniques, notamment le général Orde Wingate, qui avait créé dans la décennie 1930 les « Special Night Squads », les « Escadrons Nocturnes Spéciaux » composés de combattants juifs chargés des raids contre les villages arabes en procédant à l’élimination des meneurs.

    La France en a fait usage pendant la guerre d’Algérie et François Hollande a même admis que Paris y avait eu recours dans le cadre de la lutte contre le terrorisme. Les deux derniers présidents américains ont eu également recours aux « assassinats extrajudiciaires », George W. Bush jr, après les attentats terroristes du 11 Septembre 2001, et Barack Obama a ordonné plusieurs centaines d’exécutions ciblées par drones.

    YASSER ARAFAT, CHEIKH AHMAD YASSINE, ABDEL AZIZ RANTISSI
    La connivence israélo-marocaine s’est poursuivie en dépit de la décapitation du leadership palestinien, par les Israéliens, et le recours aux assassinats « extra judiciaires » des deux principaux dirigeants du Hamas, Cheikh Ahmad Yassine et son successeur Abdel Aziz Rantissi. Une collision qui acte une forme de forfaiture de la part du pouvoir chérifien.

    Le livre suggère aussi clairement qu’Israël a utilisé un poison radioactif pour tuer Yasser Arafat, le chef historique palestinien, ce que les dirigeants israéliens ont toujours nié. Bergman écrit que la mort d’Arafat en 2004 correspondait à un modèle et avait des partisans. Mais il évite d’affirmer clairement ce qui s’est passé, expliquant que la censure militaire israélienne l’empêche de révéler ce qu’il pourrait savoir.

    Deux monuments ont été édifiés au Maroc pour immortaliser l’oeuvre d’Hassan II : son mausolée à Rabat et la Mosquée de Casablanca, l’une des plus grandes du monde, qui porte son nom. Mais celui que la presse occidentale, particulièrement la presse française engourdie par la diplomatie de la Mamouniya, encensait comme un « Machiavel arabe doté de la baraka », se révélera être, à la lecture des révélations du livre de Ronen Bergman, un mauvais génie, une imposture.

    Et les deux monuments édifiés à la gloire posthume du Commandeur des Croyants et Président du comité Al Qods, -mais néanmoins un des principaux artisans du bradage de la Palestine, au même titre que l’Arabie saoudite-, se perçoivent, rétrospectivement, comme les stigmates du règne hideux d’un parfait sous traitant de l’impérium israélo-occidental. D’un être maléfique. D’un souverain vil et servile.

    Source : Madaniya, René Naba, 17-11-2018                                           https://www.les-crises.fr/maroc-israel-hassan-ii-la-grande-imposture-par-rene-naba

  • ELN y disidencia de las FARC controlan minas de coltán y oro en Venezuela
    http://www.el-nacional.com/noticias/latinoamerica/eln-disidencia-las-farc-controlan-minas-coltan-oro-venezuela_259336

    Desde hace aproximadamente dos años, la presencia de guerrilleros del Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN) y disidentes de las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) que no se unieron al proceso de paz se ha notado y denunciado en Venezuela, especialmente en los estados Bolívar, Apure, Amazonas, estos dos últimos fronterizos con Colombia.

    Allí han replicado sus asentamientos en zonas selváticas así como el control de rutas de transporte y poblaciones, pero se han involucrado especialmente en la explotación de los recursos minerales del suelo venezolano, específicamente el oro, diamante y coltán.

    Se trata de la reinvención de estos grupos a la sombra del gobierno del presidente fallecido Hugo Chávez que tuvieron luz verde para entrar y descansar en Venezuela, pero bajo el régimen de Nicolás Maduro tienen un «trabajo formal en las minas»: organizar a los mineros para explotar el recurso, luego transportarlo y entregarlo al gobierno venezolano, que desde hace poco tiempo recurre a la explotación minera como nueva fuente de riqueza ante el declive de su producción petrolera. 

    Funciona como una especie de alianza laboral en la que la Fuerza Armada Nacional de Venezuela (FANV) tiene un rol pasivo, con apenas presencia en algunos puntos de control y haciéndose la vista gorda ante la actividad de la zona. Así lo explican el diputado por el estado Bolívar, Américo De Grazia, y el ex candidato a gobernador y también ex diputado de esa región Andrés Velásquez, recientemente amenazados por el presidente Maduro por denunciar lo que ocurre al sur del país.

    «Estas actividades de explotación y entrega de oro y coltán al gobierno venezolano solían estar a cargo de los ’pranes’ (criminales o ex convictos pertenecientes al crimen organizado que controlan la explotación de los recursos), pero poco a poco los disidentes de las FARC y guerrilleros del ELN que han entrado a Venezuela han ido asumiendo estos roles», explicó Velásquez a El Tiempo de Colombia. 

    «Los guerrilleros están haciendo el mismo trabajo de los pranes, pero al gobierno les ha resultado mejor la cosa con ellos porque se supone que son más organizados, tienen mejor control de la zona y hay menos problemas entre clanes», agregó.

    El diputado De Grazia, oriundo de la zona, discernió que son tres los puntos donde los guerrilleros colombianos han logrado establecerse. En Parguaza, una zona conocida como el cuadrante entre los estados Bolívar, Apure, Amazonas y que pellizca la frontera con Colombia, donde se explota el coltán. «Esta zona es custodiada y operada por el ELN», aseguró. 

    La segunda zona es en San Vicente de Paúl, en el municipio Cedeño también en el estado Bolívar, donde hay explotación de diamante y el tercer punto es la zona de Bochinche, en la zona limítrofe entre Venezuela y el Esequibo, al extremo oriental del estado Bolívar. 

    En este último punto la explotación es de oro, lo mismo que en el municipio Sifontes, donde se encuentra la zona de Tumeremo, fuente prácticamente inagotable del metal precioso y por eso también de mafias por controlarlo. Allí han ocurrido al menos tres masacres de mineros en los últimos dos años.

    • Reprend l’article d’il y a 5 jours d’un journal local de l’état Bolívar, El Correo del Caroní

      Correo del Caroní - ELN explora suelo venezolano desde hace cinco años y se expande para controlar minas y pasos fronterizos
      http://www.correodelcaroni.com/index.php/ciudad/ciudad-bolivar/305-eln-explora-suelo-venezolano-desde-hace-cinco-anos-y-se-expande

      Sus motivaciones son principalmente económicas, asegura la organización colombiana Fundación Ideas para la Paz, que ha mapeado en el país la presencia del ELN y disidentes de las FARC que buscan controlar minas y paso de combustible y alimentos.

      La presencia de guerrilleros colombianos del Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN) y disidentes de las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) se ha hecho fuerte y crece desde 2013 al sur de Venezuela, cuando el primer grupo hizo incursiones tímidas desde el estado Apure hacia Amazonas, fronterizo con Colombia.

      Un informe de 2017 de la organización colombiana Fundación Ideas para la Paz (FIP) indica que el ELN así como disidencias de las FARC, específicamente del Frente 16 y Acacio Medina, se ha movido a zonas de alto valor estratégico para su financiamiento. En el caso de Colombia, hacia los departamentos de Guainía, Vichada y Arauca y, en Venezuela, a Apure, Bolívar y Amazonas, en donde el domingo emboscaron a militares y asesinaron a tres de ellos, tras la captura de Luis Felipe Ortega Bernal, alias Garganta, comandante del Frente de Guerra Oriental del ELN.

      El Gobierno venezolano ha insistido en negar la presencia del ELN y disidencias de las FARC en Venezuela, pese a que la misma Cancillería de Colombia nombró a Ortega Bernal como “un reconocido cabecilla del ELN, cuyo prontuario delictivo le mereció circular azul por parte de Interpol, por múltiples delitos cometidos en nuestro país”.

      Un mapa de la presencia de los irregulares, trazado por la FIP, dibuja la presencia del ELN en Amazonas desde Puerto Páez en el municipio Pedro Camejo del estado Apure hasta San Fernando de Atabapo en el municipio Atabapo del estado Amazonas, mientras que los disidentes de las FARC se despliegan en el sur de Amazonas en las cercanías del Parque Nacional Yapacana, al suroeste de la confluencia del río Ventuari en el río Orinoco, y en el norte a pocos kilómetros de la capital de Amazonas.

    • Carte interactive de situation aux frontières colombiennes, par la Fundación Ideas para la Paz
      ESPECIAL FRONTERAS –Inseguridad, Violencia y Economías Ilegales: los Desafíos del Nuevo Gobierno
      http://www.ideaspaz.org/especiales/mapa-fronteras

      et le rapport


      http://ideaspaz.org/media/website/fip_seguridad_fronteras.pdf

      01. Frontera con Venezuela
      02. Frontera con Venezuela y Brasil
      03. Frontera con Ecuador y Perú
      04. Frontera con Brasil y Perú
      05. Frontera con Panamá

    • InSight Crime, une autre ONG, basée en Colombie, établit le constat

      El ELN opera en 12 estados de Venezuela
      https://es.insightcrime.org/noticias/analisis/eln-opera-12-estados-venezuela

      Pero contrario a los comentarios de Padrino, InSight Crime logró identificar la presencia del ELN en 12 estados de Venezuela (la mitad del país), mediante un monitoreo de las denuncias publicadas en prensa en 2018 sobre la actividad de esta guerrilla en territorio venezolano, los informes de algunas ONG y las informaciones suministradas por fuentes oficiales en las zonas fronterizas.

      Según estos registros el ELN tendría presencia en Táchira, Zulia, Apure, Trujillo, Anzoátegui, Lara, Falcón, Amazonas, Barinas, Portuguesa, Guárico y Bolívar. Allí estaría desarrollando actividades como contrabando de ganado, contrabando de gasolina, cobro de extorsiones, distribución de comida, emisoras de radio, reclutamiento de menores, ataques a funcionarios de cuerpos de seguridad, narcotráfico y minería ilegal, entre otras.

      La última incursión en Bolívar, el 14 de octubre, dejó como resultado seis personas ejecutadas en el municipio de Domingo Sifontes, la más importante zona minera del país, donde el gobierno Venezolano desarrolla el proyecto Arco Minero. Este hecho no solo mostró el poder que la guerrilla colombiana tiene en territorio venezolano, sino que puso de manifiesto el largo recorrido que han hecho, para tener presencia en la mitad del país.

  • lorsque NS 55, l’agent infiltré de la DNRED partait à Bogota
    https://ns55dnred.wordpress.com/2018/10/21/france-douane-francaise-lorsque-ns-55-lagent-infiltre-de-la-dnr

    Marc Fievet sera arrêté le 23 septembre 1994 à Fuengirola en Espagne par Interpol et découvrira que la DEA qui finalisait l’opération DINERO n’avait pas informé l’agent NS 55 de la DNRED ! Marc Fievet attendra 33 mois pour arriver au Canada via Madrid et Londres, bénéficiant alors des meilleurs attentions carcérales.


    Contraint par la Douane française à plaider coupable, sans avocat, Marc Fievet sera condamné par la Cour provinciale de Bathurst au Nouveau-Brunswick le 5 août 1997 à… perpétuité !

    Le DG François Auvigne, malgré les demandes réitérées de Jean Puons, le directeur de la DNRED pour le faire libérer, refusera d’intervenir, n’ayant pas, d’après lui, à assumer les actions de ses prédécesseurs.

    Avec Christophe Pech de Laclause, son avocat français, Marc Fievet dépose plainte pour complicité de trafic de drogue et subornation de témoins contre X.

    Pour Maitre Pech de Laclause : « Puisque Fiévet travaillait pour les douanes, son supérieur hiérarchique, et pourquoi pas le ministre du Budget, n’auraient-ils pas dû comparaître à ses côtés devant le tribunal canadien ?

    La juge d’instruction Sophie Clément rendra un non-lieu en 2006…

    Dans ses conclusions, la magistrate reconnaît que Marc Fiévet ne s’est pas livré à un quelconque trafic de stupéfiants, puisqu’il était chargé d’infiltrer un réseau et donc… qu’il n’est pas un narcotrafiquant.

    Pourtant Marc Fievet subira 3 888 jours d’enfermement dans 23 prisons d’Espagne, d’Angleterre, du Canada et de France !

  • Evasion fiscale : l’exploit de Kylian M’Bape
    Football : ouverture à Paris du procès de la banque suisse UBS.

    Brésil : le géant des mers pour la première fois devant la justice
    Pollution : le candidat de l’extrême droite largement en tête de la présidentielle

    Climat : le dernier bilan du séisme s’élève à 1944 morts
    Indonésie : il y a un espoir de limiter le réchauffement climatique mais au prix d’un sursaut international

    La Chine accuse Marine Le Pen de corruption
    Le président d’Interpol disparu depuis dix jours voyage à Rome pour afficher sa proximité avec Matteo Salvini

    Apprendre à renoncer à ses privilèges est obligatoire depuis le XVIIème siècle
    Décoloniser les arts : les Blancs doivent apprendre à porter secours à des personnes en danger en mer

    #de_la_dyslexie_creative

  • Dans les paradis fiscaux, « l’ampleur des flux financiers liés à la destruction environnementale est effarante » - Libération
    http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/08/22/dans-les-paradis-fiscaux-l-ampleur-des-flux-financiers-lies-a-la-destruct

    Dans quelle mesure les paradis fiscaux participent-ils à la destruction d’espaces naturels ? Plusieurs chercheurs du Centre sur la résilience de Stockholm, de l’Académie royale des sciences de Suède et de l’université d’Amsterdam, sous la direction de Victor Galaz, ont creusé le sujet pendant trois ans. Leurs résultats viennent d’être publiés dans la revue Nature Ecology and Evolution. Le biologiste français Jean-Baptiste Jouffray est un des coauteurs de l’étude.

    Comment les paradis fiscaux sont-ils liés aux activités destructrices pour l’environnement ?
    Nous nous sommes concentrés sur deux cas emblématiques que sont la déforestation de l’Amazonie brésilienne et la pêche illégale. En moyenne, 68 % des capitaux étrangers étudiés, qui ont été investis entre 2001 et 2011 dans des secteurs liés à la déforestation de l’Amazonie, industrie du soja et du bœuf, ont été transférés par le biais de paradis fiscaux. En ce qui concerne la pêche, 70 % des navires reconnus comme ayant été impliqués dans la pêche illicite, non déclarée et non réglementée sont, ou ont été, enregistrés dans des paradis fiscaux. En revanche, notre étude n’a pas réussi à établir de preuves directes de causalité entre une entreprise utilisant des paradis fiscaux et un cas précis de dégradation environnementale. Cela, à cause de l’opacité maintenue par les autorités ces lieux sur les montants, l’origine et la destination des flux financiers qu’ils gèrent.

    Avez-vous été étonné par les résultats de vos recherches ?
    Rien que dans ces deux cas, l’ampleur des flux financiers liés à la destruction environnementale est effarante. Elle prouve qu’il est nécessaire d’ajouter la dimension environnementale au débat sur les paradis fiscaux.

    • CR de la même étude par Le Monde (derrière #paywall)

      Une étude montre les liens entre paradis fiscaux et dégradation environnementale
      https://www.lemonde.fr/biodiversite/article/2018/08/13/une-etude-montre-les-liens-entre-paradis-fiscaux-et-degradation-environnemen

      Les « Panama Papers » et autres « Paradise Papers » – ces fuites de documents confidentiels qui, passés au crible par le Consortium international des journalistes d’investigation, ont, en 2016 et 2017, braqué les projecteurs sur le système tentaculaire des sociétés offshore et des paradis fiscaux – ont surtout été analysés sous l’angle économique, politique ou social. Mais leurs possibles implications environnementales sont restées dans l’ombre. C’est sur ce volet qu’une étude, publiée lundi 13 août dans la revue Nature Ecology & Evolution, apporte un éclairage inédit.

      Ce travail a été mené par des chercheurs de l’université de Stockholm (Suède), de l’Académie royale des sciences de Suède et de l’université d’Amsterdam (Pays-Bas), sous la direction de Victor Galaz, directeur adjoint du Stockholm Resilience Centre. Ils se sont intéressés à des activités économiques prédatrices de ressources naturelles. D’une part, la pêche industrielle qui, à l’échelle mondiale, épuise les stocks de poissons - dont ils ont ciblé le volet illégal -. D’autre part, les filières du soja et de la viande de bœuf qui, au Brésil, contribuent massivement à la déforestation de l’Amazonie.

      En consultant les données les plus récentes, datant de septembre 2017, de l’Organisation internationale de police criminelle (Interpol), ainsi que les registres d’organismes régionaux, ils ont établi que sur 209 navires impliqués dans des activités de pêche illicite, non déclarée et non réglementée (« illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing »), 70 % étaient enregistrés, ou l’avaient été, dans un pays répertorié comme un paradis fiscal. En tête de liste arrivent le Belize et la République du Panama, suivis de Saint-Vincent-et-les-Grenadines, du Costa Rica, des Seychelles et de la Dominique.

    • L’étude, dont seul le résumé est accessible
      Tax havens and global environmental degradation | Nature Ecology & Evolution
      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-018-0497-3


      Fig. 1 Fishing vessels and tax havens

      Abstract
      The release of classified documents in the past years have offered a rare glimpse into the opaque world of tax havens and their role in the global economy. Although the political, economic and social implications related to these financial secrecy jurisdictions are known, their role in supporting economic activities with potentially detrimental environmental consequences have until now been largely ignored. Here, we combine quantitative analysis with case descriptions to elaborate and quantify the connections between tax havens and the environment, both in global fisheries and the Brazilian Amazon. We show that while only 4% of all registered fishing vessels are currently flagged in a tax haven, 70% of the known vessels implicated in illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing are, or have been, flagged under a tax haven jurisdiction. We also find that between October 2000 and August 2011, 68% of all investigated foreign capital to nine focal companies in the soy and beef sectors in the Brazilian Amazon was transferred through one, or several, known tax havens. This represents as much as 90–100% of foreign capital for some companies investigated. We highlight key research challenges for the academic community that emerge from our findings and present a set of proposed actions for policy that would put tax havens on the global sustainability agenda.


      Fig. 2: Foreign capital and tax havens in the Amazon.

    • Une étude montre les liens entre paradis fiscaux et dégradation environnementale, Le Monde, suite

      Le nombre de bateaux concernés – 146 – peut paraître faible. Mais il reste vraisemblable que le gros de la pêche illégale échappe à la surveillance d’Interpol et que le chiffre réel se révèle donc très supérieur. En outre, les chercheurs soulignent que, parmi les près de 258 000 navires de pêche en situation régulière recensés, sur tous les océans du globe par la base de données de l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO), un peu plus de 4 % seulement sont sous pavillon d’un paradis fiscal. C’est donc la forte propension des armateurs de bateaux aux pratiques illicites à se faire enregistrer dans un Etat à la fiscalité opaque qui, à leurs yeux, pose question.

      S’agissant cette fois de la filière agro-industrielle brésilienne, les chercheurs ont épluché les données publiques de la Banque centrale du Brésil, sur la période d’octobre 2000 à août 2011, date à laquelle elles n’ont plus été accessibles. Ils se sont focalisés sur les neuf plus grandes multinationales intervenant dans le secteur du soja (cultivé dans ce pays sur 35 millions d’hectares) et de la viande bovine (dont le Brésil est le premier exportateur mondial, avec 23 millions de têtes abattues en 2017). Ces deux activités qui parfois gagnent des terrains au prix de brutalité et de destruction d’espaces forestiers, sont en partie liées, les tourteaux de soja servant à nourrir le cheptel.

      Lire aussi : La déforestation de l’Amérique du Sud nourrit les élevages européens

      Il apparaît que 68 % des capitaux étrangers investis dans ces sociétés entre 2000 et 2011, soit 18,4 milliards de dollars (16 milliards d’euros), ont été transférés par le biais d’un ou plusieurs paradis fiscaux, principalement les îles Caïman (Royaume-Uni), les Bahamas et les Antilles néerlandaises. L’article ne cite pas les entreprises concernées, les auteurs voulant pointer l’absence de transparence des réseaux de financement plutôt que montrer du doigt tel ou tel groupe agroalimentaire.

      Quelles conclusions tirer de cette étude ? « Il est impossible d’établir une relation de causalité directe entre paradis fiscaux et dégradation environnementale, conduisant dans un cas à plus de surpêche, dans l’autre à davantage de déforestation, commente Jean-Baptiste Jouffray, doctorant au Stockholm Resilience Centre et cosignataire de la publication. Nous mettons simplement en évidence, pour la première fois dans un article scientifique, un lien entre des pays où les pratiques fiscales sont frappées du sceau du secret et des activités économiques préjudiciables aux écosystèmes. »

      Ce travail, ajoute-t-il, est « un appel à une prise de conscience politique de la nécessité d’ajouter la dimension environnementale aux débats sur les paradis fiscaux ». Les capitaux transitant par ces pays favorisent-ils le prélèvement de ressources naturelles ? Aident-ils à contourner les législations environnementales ? Les pertes de recettes publiques dues à l’évasion fiscale amputent-elles la capacité des Etats à agir pour protéger la nature ? Ces mêmes pertes ne constituent-elles pas des subventions indirectes à des activités nocives pour l’environnement ?

      Autant de questions qui, pour les auteurs de l’étude, doivent être traitées « si l’on veut atteindre les objectifs de développement durables des Nations unies ». Paradis fiscal, enfer écologique ?

  • Interpol lance une base de données d’identification vocale internationale
    https://www.huffpostmaghreb.com/entry/interpol-lance-une-base-de-donnees-didentification-vocale-internati

    La plateforme SiiP offre également la possibilité de filtrer les échantillons de voix par sexe, âge, langue et accent. L’Organisation internationale de police criminelle, Interpol, “a procédé à un dernier examen de son système d’identification des locuteurs”, le SiiP, en utilisant “des échantillons provenant de 192 organismes d’application de la loi à travers le monde ». C’est ce que révèle The Intercept, le magazine en ligne créé par Glenn Greenwald, Jeremy Scahill et Laura Poitras, les révélateurs de (...)

    #Interpol #algorithme #biométrie #voix #profiling #SiiP #écoutes #surveillance

  • How #blockchain Can Help Artists’ Resale Rights
    https://hackernoon.com/how-blockchain-can-help-artists-resale-rights-8178f4e058e1?source=rss---

    By Jacqueline O’Neill, Executive Director at Blockchain #art Collective. Originally published on Quora.Resale rights already exist in a number of creative industries.To use a song in a commercial, a company has to license it and pay royalties to the musician. Every time a book is purchased, the author gets a small percentage of the sales.But for many visual artists, once they’ve created and sold a work of art, that’s the last they ever hear about it. Their resale rights are essentially non-existent. If the piece is sold for a few thousand dollars, and then goes for several hundred thousand a decade later, the artist is out of luck.Fortunately, that’s starting to change. The blockchain is making waves in the art world, and artist resale rights is one area where those waves may end up having an (...)

    #blockchain-artist #artists-resale-rights #quora-partnership

    • How and Why We Invented the CryptoSeal

      “We can now put a tiny computer chip with cryptographic identity into a slim adhesive seal strip form factor to secure a package,” said one of our software engineers, Maksym Petkus, “enabling mathematically- and cryptographically-closed loop integration with the blockchain and secure high-value assets with this tamper-evident technology.”

      Today, at the ID Tech Expo in Santa Clara, we announced the release of our CryptoSeal prototype, representing a major step forward in immutable supply chain provenance and the secure movement of physical assets.
      What is a CryptoSeal?

      The first in what will be a line of blockchain-registered and tamper-evident hardware products, CryptoSeals each contain a Near Field Communication (NFC) chip embedded with unique identity information. This identity data is then immutably registered and verified on a blockchain (we currently offer support for Ethereum and plan to expand to other blockchains, including Bitcoin, Zcash, Hyperledger, and Symbiont).

      The tamper-evident form factor, developed in collaboration with Cellotape Smart Products, registers not only the identity of an object onto the blockchain, but also records the identity of its registrant and packaging or asset metadata. And, with their customizable size allowing application to a variety of packages, from envelopes to shipping containers, CryptoSeals have the ability to securely verify sender identity and timestamp shipment deliveries, and provide a secure chain of custody in the supply chain.
      Why do you need a blockchain?

      Our CEO, Ryan Orr, likes to compare the CryptoSeal to the King’s Signet Ring: “you can think of it like the old system of the Signet Ring stamping a wax seal on a letter. The signet holder is analogous to the registrant of the CryptoSeal, the wax to the chip inside of the seal, and the stamping of the signet is like the signing of the CryptoSeal to the Blockchain. On its own each component, from the cryptographic chips to the tamper evident seals and blockchain registration, is necessary but insufficient to solve the problem. Together the three technologies create a strong solution.”
      Who can benefit from using CryptoSeals?

      Our CryptoSeals can be affixed to any physical item, guaranteeing its identity and authenticity in an unforgeable way. There are more than a handful of business use cases for our new product, which combines the best of blockchain technology and Internet of Things (or Everything, as we like to call it): medical equipment, fine art, electronics, cold chain, and forensic evidence tracking, to name a few. Individual consumers also benefit in being able to verify and protect their artistic creations, secure luggage, ship high-value items internationally, as well as prove authenticity of items they buy and sell on secondary markets.

      One of the most exciting use cases of the CryptoSeal for us at Chronicled is pharmaceutical tracking, where a secure chain of custody and immutable provenance are needed but often lacking. The high monetary value, along with the human suffering, associated with fraudulent pharmaceuticals necessitates new solutions for tracking authenticity. According to Interpol, Operation Pangea, their pharmaceutical investigation, seized 2.4M fraudulent pills in 2011; four years later, in 2015, that skyrocketed to 20.7M.

      The estimated monetary value? $81M USD.

      We can directly address this problem. Chronicled’s CryptoSeals can be customized to fit and seal shipments of pharmaceuticals, including individual cartons and containers. If the antenna in the adhesive seal is broken at any time, it will be impossible to verify the chip inside the CryptoSeal, ensuring that patients have confidence when they receive legitimate, untampered-with pharmaceuticals.
      When will CryptoSeals be available?

      Our CryptoSeals will begin entering the market late this year with standard offerings and unique solutions, with customizable sizing and adhesives, for clients.

      You can learn more on our website or contact us! And, to stay up to date with our work, sign up for our mailing list below.

      https://blog.chronicled.com/how-and-why-we-invented-the-cryptoseal-6577d8633a2

  • The $300 system in the fight against illegal images - BBC News
    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-44525358?ocid=socialflow_twitter

    Mr Haschek used three Raspberry PIs, powering two Intel Movidius sticks, which can be trained to classify images. He also used an open source algorithm for identifying explicit material called NSFW (Not Safe For Work), available free of charge from Yahoo.
    Image copyright Christian Haschek
    Image caption Christian Haschek said the system took a couple of hours to assemble.

    He set it to find images which the system could say with 30% or more certainty was likely to contain pornography - he said he set the possibility low so as to be sure not to miss anything.

    He has since discovered 16 further illegal images featuring children on his platform, all of which he reported to Interpol and deleted.

    He then contacted a larger image hosting service, which he declined to name, and found thousands more by running images uploaded to their platform through his system as well.

    #Images #Protection_mineurs #Intelligence_artificielle

  • En Malaisie, la traductrice qui en savait trop

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2018/05/28/en-malaisie-la-traductrice-qui-en-savait-trop_5305535_3210.html

    Une jeune Mongole assassinée, des commissions occultes, un ex-premier ministre sur la sellette : après l’arrivée d’un nouveau gouvernement, la justice va-t-elle rouvrir le dossier ?

    La Mongole était jolie et résidait en Malaisie, où elle avait été la maîtresse d’un conseiller du ministre de la défense d’alors, et peut-être même celle du ministre lui-même. Elle avait 28 ans, elle était traductrice. Elle parlait, outre le mongol, le russe, le chinois, l’anglais et un peu le français. Elle s’appelait Altantuya Shaariibuu. Et elle en savait trop.

    Altantuya s’était retrouvée, notamment en raison de ses contacts sur l’oreiller, indirectement associée – ou impliquée – dans l’affaire de la vente de trois sous-marins à la Malaisie par la France en 2002, un scandale d’Etat dont l’onde de choc continue aujourd’hui de se propager dans l’Hexagone : en juillet 2017, un ancien président de la Direction des constructions navales et un ex-directeur général délégué du groupe français Thales (ex-Thomson), ont été mis en examen pour « corruption active ». Récipiendaires probables de commissions illégales versées en Malaisie : des responsables au plus haut niveau du gouvernement. Les Français avaient de bonnes raisons de mettre la main au portefeuille pour graisser la patte aux bonnes personnes : le contrat s’élevait à près d’un milliard d’euros…

    Le corps pulvérisé

    Altantuya Shaariibuu a payé au prix fort, de la manière la plus terrible et la plus spectaculaire qui soit, le fait d’en savoir trop : le 18 octobre 2006, elle est enlevée en plein Kuala Lumpur par deux policiers d’un corps d’élite de gardes du corps rattaché au bureau du premier ministre. Traînée de force dans un véhicule banalisé, elle est emmenée dans le faubourg de Shah Alam, à la sortie de Kuala Lumpur. Là, elle est abattue d’une balle dans la tête avant que des explosifs de type C-4 soient placés sur son corps. Le cadavre d’Altantuya est pulvérisée au point que l’on ne retrouvera presque rien d’elle.

    La raison de cet assassinat s’explique très probablement par le fait que la jeune Mongole était en train de faire chanter son ancien amant, Abdul Razak Baginda, à l’époque directeur d’un cercle de réflexion mais aussi proche de Najib Razak, alors ministre de la défense. Ce dernier allait ensuite devenir premier ministre, jusqu’à la spectaculaire défaite de son parti aux élections du 8 mai dernier…

    Altantuya Shaariibuu avait en effet été arrêtée alors qu’elle faisait un scandale devant la résidence d’Abdul Razak Baginda, vociférante et menaçante. Elle avait auparavant exigé de son « ex » qu’il lui verse une commission de 500 000 dollars, promise mais non versée. Faute de quoi elle révélerait les secrets des troubles combines autour de la vente des sous-marins. Après son meurtre, des photos ont circulé, la montrant en train de festoyer en des temps plus heureux, dans un restaurant parisien avec Baginda et… Najib Razak. Peut-être était-elle aussi l’amante de ce dernier, ont laissé entendre certaines rumeurs.

    Réouverture du dossier

    L’échec électoral de « Najib » et de son parti a des chances de provoquer la réouverture d’un dossier (scandale des sous-marins et donc, du même coup, l’assassinat d’Altantuya) mis sous le tapis depuis des années. Et Najib Razak, déjà empêtré dans un scandale d’Etat où il est soupçonné d’avoir siphonné l’équivalent de plus de 600 millions d’euros de fonds publics sur son compte en banque, pourrait se retrouver, si les langues se délient un peu trop, impliqué cette fois, non seulement dans une affaire de corruption mais aussi, fut-ce indirectement, dans un assassinat…

    « Il faut que le nouveau gouvernement relance l’enquête sur l’affaire de la vente des sous-marins [français] », vient de déclarer l’ancien juge de la haute cour, Gopal Sri Ram. Le 16 mai, le président de Mongolie, Khaltmaagiyn Battulga, a adressé un message de félicitations au nouveau premier ministre de Malaisie, Mahathir Mohamad, qui avait déjà été auparavant premier ministre et l’était encore quand le contrat des sous-marins fut signé entre la France de Jacques Chirac et la Malaisie : « L’assassinat d’Altantuya Shaariibuu a créé une atmosphère défavorable entre nos deux pays et j’espère sincèrement que votre Excellence accordera toute son attention [à ce cas] afin que justice soit rendue », écrit notamment le chef d’Etat mongol.

    L’ONG malaisienne Suaram, qui a demandé que des poursuites judiciaires soient diligentées à propos du scandale des sous-marins, a engagé à Paris l’avocat William Bourdon. Ce dernier vient de dire aux journalistes du site en ligne Malaysiakini qu’il était prêt à se rendre cet été à Kuala Lumpur, pour « briefer » le nouveau gouvernement sur l’affaire.

    Des ordres venus de très haut

    Une voix lointaine pourrait s’avérer cruciale dans le « dossier » Altantuya Shaariibuu : l’un de ses deux agresseurs, Sirul Azhar Umar, condamné à mort en 2009 par une cour malaisienne, mais sans qu’aucun mobile de son meurtre n’ait alors été invoqué, est en prison en Australie. Il s’y était enfui en 2014 alors que sa condamnation était jugée en appel en Malaisie et qu’il avait été libéré sous caution.

    De sa prison, il a donné plusieurs interviews, dans lesquelles il a assuré avoir servi de « bouc émissaire ». Il a parfois laissé entendre que les ordres d’assassiner la jeune Mongole venaient de très haut. Le jour précédant son incarcération en Australie, en 2015, conséquence d’une demande faite par Interpol, Sirul avait envoyé un mystérieux SMS à un contact, resté anonyme, mais qui aurait été proche des services de renseignements malaisiens.

    « Salut patron. Je suis en difficulté. Je veux deux millions de dollars australiens avant que vous veniez me rendre visite. Je ne reviendrai pas en Malaisie. Je ne veux pas faire tomber le premier ministre. »
    Lire aussi : Mahathir et Anwar, un improbable tandem à la tête de la Malaisie

    Plus tard, Sirul se rétracta, comme s’il réalisait qu’il lui fallait ménager ses arrières : des émissaires du parti de Najib Razak étaient venus le voir dans sa cellule. Il jura par la suite au site Malaysiankini « qu’au Nom de Dieu, l’honorable premier ministre Najib Razak n’a jamais été impliqué dans [le meurtre d’Altantuya] et n’a jamais eu de liens avec cette affaire ».

    Mais l’« honorable » premier ministre, qui n’a jamais été très « honorable », n’est plus premier ministre. Le 1er juin, l’ancien flic et ci-devant assassin devrait à nouveau comparaître devant la justice australienne. Osera-t-il révéler tout ce qu’il sait ?

  • Le député #Dassault, cité dans les « #Paradise_Papers », rejoint la Fondation #Interpol

    Le député de l’Oise #Olivier_Dassault, ex-président du conseil de surveillance du #Groupe_Dassault, vient d’être nommé membre de la #Fondation_Interpol. L’entreprise française est pourtant citée dans les « Paradise Papers » comme possible complice de #fraude à la TVA.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/240418/le-depute-dassault-cite-dans-les-paradise-papers-rejoint-la-fondation-inte

    Article de @marty (@wereport)

  • #Interpol’s controversial funding by #Qatar and the IOC (Mediapart)
    https://www.wereport.fr/articles/interpols-controversial-funding-by-qatar-and-the-ioc-mediapart

    The international #police body Interpol severed all links with football’s governing organisation #FIFA after the latter’s corruption scandal erupted in 2015. But it has maintained partnerships with both the committee organising the 2022 football World Cup in Qatar and the International Olympic Committee (IOC), who are at the centre of corruption investigations. This is [...]

    #Enquêtes_et_reportages #CIO

  • Après la #FIFA, #Interpol se fait financer par le #Qatar et le #CIO (Mediapart)
    https://www.wereport.fr/articles/apres-la-fifa-interpol-se-fait-financer-par-le-qatar-et-le-cio-mediapart

    Interpol, la mythique organisation mondiale de #police, a coupé les ponts avec la Fifa après le scandale de 2015. Mais elle conserve deux partenaires, le Comité Qatar 2022 et le Comité international olympique (CIO), qui sont au cœur d’enquêtes judiciaires pour corruption. De grands flics de toute l’Europe ont alerté sur ces liaisons dangereuses. En [...]

    #Enquêtes_et_reportages

  • Après la #FIFA, #Interpol se fait financer par le #Qatar et le #CIO
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/190318/apres-la-fifa-interpol-se-fait-financer-par-le-qatar-et-le-cio

    Interpol, la mythique organisation mondiale de police, a coupé les ponts avec la Fifa après le scandale de 2015. Mais elle conserve deux partenaires, le Comité Qatar 2022 et le Comité #International olympique (CIO), qui sont au cœur d’enquêtes judiciaires pour corruption. De grands flics de toute l’Europe ont alerté sur ces liaisons dangereuses. En vain.