• Saul Alinsky - Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saul_Alinsky

    Influence on the Tea Party movement[edit]
    In the 2000s, Rules for Radicals did develop as a primer for middle-class moblization, but it was of a kind and in a direction—the return to “vanished verities”—that Alinsky had feared. As did William F. Buckley in the 1960s, a new generation of libertarian, right-wing populist, and conservative activists seemed willing to admire Alinsky’s disruptive organizing talents while rejecting his social-justice politics. Rules for Radicals, and adaptations of the book, began circulating among Republican Tea Party activists.

    #organizing

  • Labor organizer Jane McAlevey on how the left builds power all wrong - The Ezra Klein Show - Vox
    https://www.vox.com/podcasts/2020/3/17/21182149/jane-mcalevey-the-ezra-klein-show-labor-organizing

    By Ezra Klein@ezraklein Mar 17, 2020, The organizer, scholar, and writer gives a master class in political organizing on The Ezra Klein Show.

    The Bernie Sanders campaign is an organizing tour de force relative to the Joe Biden campaign, yet the latter has won primary after primary — with even higher turnouts than 2016. So does organizing even work? And, if so, what went wrong?

    To get a sense of how to answer these questions, I sat down with the scholar, writer, and organizer Jane McAlevey on The Ezra Klein Show. McAlevey has organized hundreds of thousands of workers on the front lines of America’s labor movement. She is also a senior policy fellow at UC Berkeley’s Labor Center and the author of three books on organizing, including, most recently, A Collective Bargain: Unions, Organizing, and the Fight for Democracy.

    McAlevey doesn’t pull her punches. She thinks the left builds political power all wrong. She thinks people are constantly mistaking “mobilizing” for “organizing,” and that social media has taught a generation of young activists the worst possible lessons. She thinks organized labor’s push for “card check” was a mistake but that there really is a viable path back to a strong labor movement. And since McAlevey is, above all, a teacher and an organizer, she offers what amounts to a master class in organizing, one relevant not just to building political power but to building anything.

    To McAlevey, organizing, at its core, is about something very simple and very close to the heart of this show: How do you talk to people who may not agree with you such that you can truly hear them, and they can truly hear you? This conversation ran long, but it ran long because it was damn good.

    Here’s a lightly edited transcript of part of our conversation, which we released this week on The Ezra Klein Show.

    Ezra Klein

    What is the difference between advocacy, mobilizing, and organizing?
    Jane McAlevey

    In the advocacy model, people aren’t really central to the solution. Instead, you have lawyers, public opinion researchers, and a full-time staff in Washington, DC. Greenpeace is an example. If you’re concerned about the planet, you write a check to Greenpeace and they’re going to take care of the problem for you. That’s advocacy.

    Then you move to the difference between mobilizing and organizing. It’s the difference between these two that I think most of the progressive movement is deeply confused about. Mobilizing is essentially doing a very good job at getting people off the couch who largely already agree with you. In the mobilizing model, you may be involving people in very large numbers, but the limitation of the mobilizing approach is that you’re only talking to people who agree with you already.

    Organizing, which I put the highest value on, is the process by which people come to change their opinions and change their views. Organizing is what I call “base expansion,” meaning it’s expanding either the political or the societal basis from which you can then later mobilize. What makes organizing different than all other kinds of activism is it puts you in direct contact every day with people who have no shared political values whatsoever. When you’re a union organizer, you get a list of let’s say a thousand employees and you’ve got to figure out how to build to 90 percent or greater unity with unbreakable solidarity and a tight, effective structure. So, essentially every single trade union unionization campaign I’ve negotiated is an experiment in how you build political unity in a time of intense polarization.
    Ezra Klein

    I’m interested in your thoughts on the 2020 Democratic primary. My observation is a lot of people in the Sanders campaign thought they were doing organizing when they were doing mobilizing. This is not to say anything good about the Biden campaign, which I think just skated by. But there seems to me to be a real distinction between the personality type and the temperament and the strategies of a mobilizer versus an organizer. And it seems to me that not only in the Sanders campaign but all over politics — and especially on social media — I see people acting in ways that wouldn’t be conducive to organizing.
    Jane McAlevey

    Mobilizers tend to be activists. They’re better engaging a self-selected crowd of people who exist in some bubble. When I’m looking for organizers, I’m looking for people who genuinely believe that ordinary people have high intelligence and who really deeply respect ordinary people. I start out every day genuinely believing that people can make radical changes in how they think about and see the world. And that means you have to be willing to work with them, even if their views are fairly different than your own.

    Almost every worker in a campaign I’ve worked on starts out with values that seem pretty different than mine. But you have to respect where they’re coming from, what shaped them, how they got there, and then have a theory of how to help them shift from maybe having the wrong idea of who’s to blame for the pain in their lives. They might be blaming Mexican immigrants for stealing their jobs instead of the CEOs of corporations that directly facilitated the departure of their job. And if you can’t look at them and imagine where they might be based on the fact that most people want to have clean water, a safe planet, a decent job, nice neighbors, and fairness, then you’re not going to be a good organizer.
    Ezra Klein

    One of the things that strikes me about your mobilizing-organizing distinction has to do with the fact that for each one there are different incentives around disagreement. When faced with disagreement, do you escalate or do you somehow find a way to synthesize or get around it? So, walk me through a typical interaction with a worker, specifically one who may disagree with you.
    Jane McAlevey

    When I start a conversation with a worker, I’m going to start by telling them exactly why I’m there. There’s no bullshitting: I’m here because coworkers of yours called up and they’re in and figuring out how you can make things better in the workplace. That’s it. I’m being very honest about why I’m on your door. The very next thing I’m going to do is ask them a question: If you could change three things at work tomorrow, what would they be?

    This question is going to give me immediate insight into your human priorities. So, when I later find out that we may have very different political views, it doesn’t really matter to me. If I know the three things that matter most to you about the workplace that you want to change, I’m sticking with that conversation the whole way through it. And I’m gonna help you understand who is in the way of fixing that problem and how only you and your coworkers can actually fix it.

    Let’s say a nurse says to me “I’m exhausted every day. I love my job in the ICU so much. But I’m so frustrated I can’t get my job done. We need more staff on the floors.” I don’t know if she’s Republican, a libertarian Democrat, Green Party, or has never voted in her life, but when she tells me that I’m off and running. The thing I’m gonna ask her is, “Given how much profit your employer had last year, why do you think you’re working so short on the floors in the hospital?” The whole point of organizing is I’m never going to tell her what the answer is. I’m going to just start framing a series of questions that are going help that nurse begin to understand why it is she works for a filthy rich employer and why it is she can’t get her job done. And it’s gonna be pretty crystal clear.

    #syndicalisme #organizing #USA

  • Jane McAlevey | janemcalevey.com
    https://janemcalevey.com

    Organizing for Power: Coronovirus and Everything After - A Free Global Online Training Webinar with Jane McAlevey

    A free, four-part on-line organizing course led by Jane McAlevey and co-hosted by the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, taking place online between March 30th and April 16th. McAlevey will build on her experiences, connecting them to the current world health crisis, the surrounding political climate, and the organizing that will be necessary to prevent a further collapse into disaster capitalism and right-wing authoritarianism

    #syndicalisme #USA #formation #organizing

  • Ein Generalstab für den Green New Deal | Jacobin Magazin
    https://jacobin.de/artikel/generalstab-fuer-den-green-new-deal

    6.4.2020, von Jane McAlevey, Übersetzung von Linus Westheuser - Im Kampf für einen Green New Deal und gegen den Klimawandel muss die Gewerkschaftsbewegung eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Erfolgreiche Arbeitskämpfe zeigen, wie das möglich ist – in kurzer Zeit und von der Basis her organisiert.

    Die derzeitige Welle von Schülerinnen-Protesten und -Streiks verschafft der Forderung nach echter Klimagerechtigkeit willkommenen Auftrieb. Die Mainstream-Medien und sozialen Netzwerke sind voll von Bildern junger Leute wie der Schwedin Greta Thunberg, die auf die Plätze der Welt drängen, Bremser in der Politik zur Rede stellen und sich offensiv mit den Mächtigen anlegen. Schon immer brachte die Jugend zwei essenzielle Dinge in soziale Bewegungen ein: ihren klaren moralischen Kompass und eine einzigartige, aufwühlende Energie. Ihre Vision ist mutig, ihr Vorgehen kompromisslos. Doch die kohlenstoffbasierte Wirtschaft zurückzudrängen und schließlich zu beseitigen, den Planeten zu retten und zugleich eine Zukunft zu ermöglichen, die jungen Menschen die Art von Arbeit verschafft, die sie gerne machen – all das erfordert mehr Macht und eine ernsthafte Strategie.

    In den USA dreht sich die Debatte zur Klimakrise hauptsächlich um das Gesetzesvorhaben zu einem Green New Deal, das die Abgeordneten Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez und Ed Markey im Februar 2019 vorlegten. Die Kommentare dazu changierten zwischen faszinierten Beschreibungen eines großen Wurfs und skeptischen bis ablehnenden Stimmen – auch vonseiten potenzieller Unterstützerinnen und Unterstützer: »Weder umsetzbar noch realistisch« lautete das Urteil des größten Gewerkschaftsverbands der USA, der AFL-CIO vergleichbar mit dem deutschen DGB. Im Hintergrund der Debatten tobte eine nicht enden wollende Serie von extremen Stürmen, wie sie die Klimaforscherinnen seit den 80er-Jahren vorhergesagt hatten. Sogenannte Bomben-Zyklone verwüsteten den Mittleren Westen, massive Regenfälle trafen Kalifornien nach einer verheerenden Waldbrandsaison und der Süden hatte mit Tornados zu kämpfen, die die Ernte zerstörten. Die mangelnde Vorbereitung auf diese Krise kostet Menschenleben.

    Angesichts dessen ist es natürlich ärgerlich, wenn die AFL-CIO sich weigert, das Ausmaß der Krise einzusehen. Doch wollen wir im Kampf für einen Green New Deal unsere ganze Kraft in die Waagschale werfen, brauchen wir mehr als mutige Visionen. Es reicht nicht aus, dass die Linke sich der Alternative zwischen Jobs und der Umwelt widersetzt. Wir müssen erst noch beweisen, dass bei unseren rhetorischen Bekenntnissen am Ende auch wirklich grüne Jobs herausspringen.

    Wenn wir gewinnen wollen, sollten wir auf Nato Green zu hören – einen Organizer der Dienstleistungsgewerkschaft SEIU. Er erklärte kürzlich in einem Artikel, wie lokale Gewerkschaftssektionen Verhandlungen über Klimagerechtigkeit führen können und sollen: »Jede erfahrene Gewerkschafterin liebt es, während Vertragsverhandlungen zu mobilisieren: Die harte Deadline dieser Kämpfe, die Androhung von Streiks nach Ablauf der Friedenspflicht – all das fokussiert die Aufmerksamkeit der Leute. Die Klimaforschung hat uns eine neue Deadline gegeben, und damit eine neue Gelegenheit, zu zeigen, dass wir der Herausforderung gewachsen sind. Wir haben zwölf Jahre.«

    Green hat recht: Gewerkschafts-Organizerinnen lieben Kämpfe mit klaren Fristen. Betrachten wir also die zwölf Jahre, die der Weltklimarat IPCC in seinem letzten Report skizziert hat, als Fristende: Was ist ein glaubwürdiger Plan, bis 2030 zu gewinnen?

    Leute, die es ernst damit meinen, aus schwierigen Kämpfen siegreich hervorzugehen – und womöglich ist keiner schwieriger, als der gegen die fossile Energiewirtschaft – beginnen das Planen mit einer umfassenden Analyse der Machtstruktur sowie mit dem Aufbau eines Generalstabs. Der martialische Begriff ist bewusst gewählt, denn tatsächlich befinden wir uns in einem Krieg; einem, den bislang die Öl-Milliardäre und ihre Lobby gewinnen. Unsere Seite sollte sich an kriegerische Metaphern gewöhnen, denn die höflichen, ordnungsgemäßen Demonstrationen, mit denen wir es bisher versucht haben, haben uns der Rettung des Planeten und einer gerechten Wirtschaftsform nicht näher gebracht – auch wenn wir das nicht gerne hören. Ein Generalstab ist ein physischer Ort, an dem Leute mit der notwendigen Erfahrung und inneren Festigkeit gemeinsam brainstormen, planen und diskutieren, welche nächsten Schritte nötig sind, um zu gewinnen. Die Planung beginnt beim Zustand der Welt, wie sie jetzt ist – also bei der Herausforderung, einen völlig wüsten Haufen von Leuten und Organisationen zusammenzubringen, die nur allzu oft durch Methoden des ›Teile und Herrsche‹ gegeneinander ausgespielt werden und sich nur allzu selten auf das Gemeinsame konzentrieren, das weit über das nackte Überleben hinausgeht.

    In den USA muss sich der Klima-Generalstab zunächst damit auseinandersetzen, dass wir jetzt mit Gerichten gestraft sind, die für weitere dreißig bis vierzig Jahre gegen den Planeten und die Arbeiterinnen entscheiden werden. Wir sind uns noch gar nicht der Tragweite der Urteile bewusst, die die gestärkte rechte Mehrheit im Supreme Court in den nächsten Jahren fällen und kippen wird.

    Der Verlust des Gleichgewichts im obersten Gericht macht eine veränderte Strategie nötig. In den letzten vierzig Jahren haben Umweltorganisationen hauptsächlich auf Lobbyarbeit, punktuelle Mobilisierung und juristische Strategien gesetzt, statt sich der schwierigeren Arbeit zu widmen, eine Massenbewegung aufzubauen. Das Ergebnis ist eine grüne Bewegung, die kaum eine populäre Basis hat, leicht als elitär diffamiert werden kann und der so die nötige Macht fehlt um zu gewinnen.

    Glücklicherweise gibt es eine Strategie, die auch in Zeiten feindseliger Gerichte Erfolge vorweisen kann: Organizing. Echtes Organizing. Es mag erstmal zu langwierig wirken, für eine Auseinandersetzung, die wir in der allernächsten Zukunft für uns werden entscheiden müssen. Doch tatsächlich zeigen jüngste Erfolge, dass es möglich ist, in kürzerer als der für den Green New Deal anvisierten Zeit ernstzunehmende Macht von unten zu organisieren.

    Beispiele waren die bahnbrechenden Arbeitskämpfe von Lehrerinnen in Chicago, West Virginia und Los Angeles. In allen drei Fällen verwandelten kluge, progressive und motivierte Arbeiterinnen ihre totgesagten, kraftlosen Organisationen in wahre Gewerkschaften, die imstande waren, lange und harte Auseinandersetzungen mit starken Gegnern zu führen – und zu gewinnen.

    In West Virginia brauchte es weniger als ein Jahr, um eine republikanische, ultra-rechte und tief mit der Öl- und Kohle-Lobby verbundene Landesregierung zu bezwingen, obwohl diese über die Kontrolle in beiden legislativen Kammern verfügte. Kompromisslose und umfassende Streiks können das erreichen. Viele Lehrerinnen waren Töchter und Söhne von Minenarbeiterinnen, die sich auf die Tradition der großen Minenstreiks beriefen.

    In Chicago und Los Angeles waren die Lehrerinnen mit der anderen Machtstruktur konfrontiert, die anzugehen in Klimafragen unerlässlich ist: dem Wall Street-Flügel innerhalb der Demokratischen Partei. Es brauchte vier Jahre, um nutzlose und untätige, von oben organisierte Organisationen zu übernehmen und in produktive Basis-Organisationen zu verwandeln. Die sich organisierenden Arbeiterinnen hatten Fristen vor Augen und hielten sie ein. Generalstabsmäßige Planung und eine Rückkehr zu den Grundlagen des Organizing waren der Schlüssel.

    Machtstrukturanalysen und Planungsdiskussionen im Generalstabsformat sollen herausstellen, was nicht funktioniert (Kämpfe vor Gericht und große Demos) und was sehr wohl funktioniert (kraftvolle Streiks mit hundertprozentiger Beteiligung der Belegschaften und aktiver Unterstützung lokaler Communities). Gibt es Beispiele aus der Welt der Klimapolitik, die zeigen, wie es aussieht, erfolgreich zu sein? Ein wichtiges Beispiel ist ein jüngeres Vorhaben in New York, das 2014 seinen Anfang nahm, als eine Reihe von Gewerkschaften sich zusammensetzten, um die Klimakrise mit der gebotenen Ernsthaftigkeit anzugehen.

    Vincent Alvarez, Präsident der landesweit größten Lokalsektion der AFL-CIO in New York, erinnert sich: »Wir waren frustriert von dem Gerede und der Untätigkeit in Washington und beschlossen, vor Ort etwas auf die Beine zu stellen, um der Doppelkrise von Klima und Ungleichheit entgegenzutreten. Es ging uns darum, ein Programm zu entwickeln, das es erlauben würde, messbare Schritte in Richtung eines nachhaltigeren Klimas zu machen und zugleich die Krise der Ungleichheit anzugehen.«

    Alvarez erklärt, dass es Sinn ergibt, die 10 Prozent konflikthaften Themen (wie das Fracking oder den Pipeline-Bau) zunächst beiseite zu lassen und sich auf die 90 Prozent zu konzentrieren, in denen sich Umweltbewegte und Gewerkschafterinnen völlig einig sind: Infrastruktur, öffentlicher Nahverkehr, Energiewende – um nur drei zu nennen. Bevor sich Umweltaktivistinnen den ersteren 10 Prozent zuwenden – was sie früher oder später natürlich sollten – müssen sie durch konkretes Handeln bewiesen haben, dass sie dabei helfen können, in diesen drei Sektoren gute, gewerkschaftlich organisierte Arbeitsplätze zu schaffen. Wenn es uns nicht gelingt, ›schlüsselfertige‹ Alternativen zur Arbeit im Pipelinebau aufzuzeigen, geben wir der Lobby für fossile Brennstoffe eine astreine Gelegenheit, Zwietracht zu säen.

    Lara Skinner, Leiterin des Worker Institute an der Cornell-Universität, das die New Yorker Klima-Jobinitative begleitete, berichtet, dass die Einrichtung einer rein gewerkschaftlichen Arbeitsgruppe zum Thema Klima ein zentraler Fortschritt war. Wie viele Gewerkschafterinnen, denen Klimafragen am Herzen liegen, verbrachte Skinner Jahre damit, sich den Kopf darüber zu zerbrechen, wie man Öko-Aktivistinnen und Gewerkschafterinnen zusammenbringen könnte. Der Kampf gegen den Bau der Keystone XL Pipeline in den späten Obama-Jahren machte große Schlagzeilen, zerstörte aber zugleich die Ansätze von Organisierungsarbeit des behutsam wachsenden Bündnisses von Grünen und Blaumännern.

    Die Kraftstoff-Lobby stürzte sich dankbar auf die Keystone Proteste und trieb das Thema wie einen Keil zwischen Arbeiterinnen und Umweltaktivistinnen, die ihnen vermeintlich ihre Jobs wegnehmen wollten. Die Umweltschützerinnen tappten voll in die Falle, indem sie sich auf Auseinandersetzungen darüber einließen, wie viele Jobs tatsächlich abzubauen seien: nämlich weniger als von der Industrie behauptet. Doch das war überhaupt nicht der Punkt.

    Nach einer massiven Rezession, die die Ersparnisse, Rücklagen und Rentenversicherungen der Arbeiterinnenklasse gebeutelt hinterlassen, ihre Häuser entwertet den Neubau zum Erliegen gebracht hatte, waren hochwertige, gewerkschaftlich geschützte Jobs eine Seltenheit. Darüber zu diskutieren, wie viele Arbeiterinnen genau diese eben geschaffenen Jobs wieder verlieren sollten, spielte den Bossen in die Karten: Für die Aktivistinnen schienen Arbeitsplätze ein akzeptabler Kollateralschaden zu sein. Statt die Schicksale krisengeschüttelter Arbeiterinnen in Erbsenzählerei zu verwandeln, hätte die Umweltbewegung auf konkrete Infrastrukturprojekte in der Region des Pipeline-Baus verweisen und so ›schlüsselfertige‹ Arbeitsplätze als echte Alternative präsentieren sollen.

    Doch während sich hier Fenster schlossen, öffneten sich andere. Nur Monate nach dem Keystone-Zerwürfnis erreichte der schwere Hurrikan Sandy den Bundesstaat New York. Lara Skinner erinnert sich: »Sandy hat den Gewerkschaftsmitgliedern in New York bewusst gemacht, wie ernst die Lage wirklich ist. Der Sturm Irene hatte gerade zuvor erst den Norden des Staates getroffen – und wir bemerkten alle, wie planlos und unvorbereitet wir waren.« Der Sturm eröffnete die Gelegenheit für eine Wiederaufnahme der Diskussion, die von Skinner und ihrem Team nun als gewerkschaftsinterner Runder Tisch zur Klimakrise organisiert wurde.

    Umweltaktivistinnen bekennen sich zwar rhetorisch zu grünen Jobs, doch in der Praxis fehlt ihnen die Einsicht, dass sie sich aktiv für die Schaffung guter, gewerkschaftlich organisierter Arbeitsplätze einsetzen müssen, um wirksam mit Gewerkschaften zusammenarbeiten zu können. Im Zuge des Sandy-Schocks formierte sich 2014 eine Runde aus Mitgliedern der New Yorker Gewerkschaften, die die Diskussion und Selbstbildung rund um den Klimawandel zum Gegenstand hatte. Arbeitsgruppen wurden mit Mitgliedern von Gewerkschaften zentraler betroffener Sektoren besetzt: Energie, Transportwesen, Infrastruktur und Bau sowie öffentlicher Dienst. Sie luden Klimawissenschaftlerinnen zu regelmäßigen Treffen ein, um sich einen besseren Einblick zu verschaffen.

    Teil des Selbstbildungsprogramms war auch der Besuch einer New Yorker Delegation bei dänischen Gewerkschaften im Sommer 2018. Alvarez berichtet: »Es war wirklich wichtig, über die bloße Diskussion hinauszukommen, gewerkschaftlich organisierte dänische Arbeiterinnen in ihren Produktionsstätten zu treffen und aus erster Hand zu erfahren, wie sie den Übergang zur Windenergie erlebt und mitgetragen haben.«

    In nur drei Jahren produzierte die Arbeitsgruppe unter Ko-Autorschaft von Skinner einen wegweisenden Abschlussbericht: »Reversing Inequality, Combatting Climate Change: A Climate Jobs Program for New York State«. Der Bericht – umfassend, klug und getragen von allen maßgeblichen Gewerkschaften – sollte als Inspiration und Ansatzpunkt für andere Bundesstaaten wie auch für die Bundesebene dienen. Schnell gelang den Gewerkschaften auch die Umsetzung in die Praxis: In Antwort auf die machtvolle Forderung der Gewerkschaften wurde beschlossen, dass New York bis 2035 die Hälfte seines gesamten Energiebedarfs von nachhaltigen Offshore-Windprojekten beziehen werde.

    Der ausgehandelte Vertrag im Wert von 50 Milliarden Dollar enthält außerdem eine gewerkschaftliche Jobgarantie bekannt als Project Labor Agreement oder PLA. Und das ist erst der Anfang für das Bündnis von Arbeit und Ökologie. Kein anderer Bundesstaat hat ein vergleichbares Programm zur Halbierung seiner Abhängigkeit von fossilen Energien in so kurzer Zeit. Der Grund war, so Skinner, »dass die Gewerkschaften sich informiert und den riesigen Maßstab erkannt haben, in dem wir bei grünen Jobs denken müssen.« Die Pläne für diese grünen Jobs müssen von denen gemacht werden, die auch die Arbeit machen.

    Der Generalstab, den wir für den Green New Deal brauchen, muss es den New Yorker Gewerkschaften gleichtun: selbständig die Initiative ergreifen, das Thema mit größtem Ernst behandeln, sich bilden. Und Wissen und Macht dazu verwenden, einen glaubwürdigen Plan zu entwickeln, mit dem man gewinnen kann. Was sie nicht getan hatten, war herumzusitzen und sich zu beschweren oder auf die Einladung zu irgendeinem halbherzigen Policy-Dialog zu warten, bei dem alle nur aneinander vorbeireden und nichts zustande bringen, während der Gegner Keile in unsere Allianzen treibt. Der New Yorker Deal gelang, weil Gewerkschaften die Macht hatten, Subventionen (also Steuergelder) so zu kanalisieren, dass ihr Gebrauch zugleich den Ansprüchen der Klimaforschung bei der Emissionsreduktion und den Arbeits- und Lohnstandards der Gewerkschaften genügen würde, für die ihre Mitglieder zu kämpfen bereit und in der Lage sind. Beide sind unerlässlich, um die Wirtschaft in dem Tempo und in dem Ausmaß umzubauen, das der Lage angemessen ist.

    Wie bezahlen wir das ganze? Christian Parenti bemerkte neulich, dass US-Konzerne derzeit 4,8 Billionen Dollar Cash horten – ein Fünftel der 22,1 Billiarden ihres Finanzvermögens. Dieses Geld könnte genutzt werden, um eine robuste grüne Wirtschaft nach gewerkschaftlichen Standards aufzubauen; eine, die es den Arbeiterinnen der Zukunft erlaubt, ein würdevolles Lebensniveau aufrechtzuerhalten und die ein für alle Mal die Frontstellung von Jobs gegen Umwelt beendet.

    Doch um an dieses Geld heranzukommen, bedarf es echter Macht und echten Know-Hows, wie es die New Yorker Gewerkschaften und die einiger anderer Staaten haben. Um diese gewerkschaftliche Macht wiederaufzurichten, müssen Umweltaktivistinnen an der Seite der Gewerkschafterinnen kämpfen. Wirklich kämpfen vor allem, statt bloß über grüne Jobs zu reden. Das bedeutet, sich aktiv in Kämpfe um das Streikrecht einzumischen und die Arbeiterinnen mit den eigenen Ressourcen zu unterstützen.

    Diese Art von Organizing und die politische Macht, die von ihr ausgeht, wird notwendig sein, um die höhere Besteuerung von Reichen wirklich durchsetzen zu können und auf Bundesebene weg von der fossilen Energie und hin zu einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft für Mensch und Natur zu kommen. Ebenso wird es notwendig sein, die Umweltbewegung neu auszurichten, indem wir uns von der gescheiterten Strategie verabschieden, die sich nur auf Gerichtsverfahren stütze. Wir müssen uns stattdessen darauf konzentrieren, eine Massenbewegung und damit Macht aufzubauen.

    Ein ernstgemeinter Green New Deal benötigt auch den Wiederaufbau eines robusten öffentlichen Sektors. So ein öffentlicher Sektor verspricht eine Zukunft voll guter Jobs für Frauen und People of Color. Doch die Angriffe der Rechten auf die Gewerkschaften und die Reste öffentlicher Errungenschaften werden nicht aufhören. Es ist noch nicht zu spät für umweltbewegte Menschen, zu Verbündeten der Arbeiterinnen und ihrer Gewerkschaften zu werden – aber die Zeit läuft. Gute Gewerkschaften sind ideale Organisationen, um unter schwierigen Bedingungen und mit strengen Fristen zu kämpfen. Es ist Zeit für den Generalstab 2030!

    #écologie #organizing #auf_deutsch

  • Why Detroit Residents Pushed Back Against Tree-Planting
    https://www.citylab.com/environment/2019/01/detroit-tree-planting-programs-white-environmentalism-research/579937

    Detroiters were refusing city-sponsored “free trees.” A researcher found out the problem: She was the first person to ask them if they wanted them.
    ...


    “This shows sidewalk damage and a large limb that has fallen from a street tree planted, likely by the city, many years ago,” said study author Christine Carmichael. “Residents who were resistant to tree planting also often noted that they felt existing, large trees on city property were not adequately cared for and affected the appearance of the neighborhood, and presented a safety concern.” (Christine E. Carmichael)
    ...
    After all, who would turn down a free tree on their property, given all of the health and economic benefits that service affords? Perhaps these people just don’t get it. As one staff member told Carmichael in the study:

    You’re dealing with a generation that has not been used to having trees, the people who remember the elms are getting older and older. Now we’ve got generations of people that have grown up without trees on their street, they don’t even know what they’re missing.

    However, environmental justice is not just about the distribution of bad stuff, like pollution, or good stuff, like forestry projects across disadvantaged communities. It’s also about the distribution of power among communities that have historically only been the subjects and experiments of power structures.
    ...
    A couple of African-American women Carmichael talked to linked the tree-planting program to a painful racist moment in Detroit’s history, right after the 1967 race rebellion, when the city suddenly began cutting down elm trees in bulk in their neighborhoods. The city did this, as the women understood it, so that law enforcement and intelligence agents could better surveil their neighborhoods from helicopters and other high places after the urban uprising.

    #USA #racisme #organizing #communautarisme

  • „GO GET ORGANIZED!“ by THE REDSKINS
    https://www.flashlyrics.com/lyrics/the-redskins/go-get-organized-83
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBquv9EcVWk


    I got a job just shifting beer
    Straight out of school, straight into here
    I got a job pays none too well
    But every Friday I can tell them go to hell
    This place is noisy and full of dust & s***
    This jobs dead lousy but I can’t get out of it
    Come every Friday I see an old man
    Sat back from the bar in the smoke room
    He’s been through battles
    He’s seen some hard ones
    I fought and lost he said
    But let me tell you this son

    Your only weapon
    Is those you work with
    Your strength is their strength
    Can’t beat the rank and file

    Go get organized!

    I joined the union & started signing up
    I found a man ten years a member
    And all this time he’s been holin’ up, hiding quiet
    We pressed the govnor for improved conditions
    And found ourselves on strike for union recognition
    I seen the old man in the smoke room
    He’s been through battles
    He’s seen some hard ones
    I fought and lost he said
    But let me tell you this son

    Your only weapon
    Is those you work with
    Your strength is their strength
    Can’t beat the rank and file
    Go get organized!

    Come every Friday I see an old man
    Sat back from the bar in the smoke room
    He’s been through battles
    He’s seen some hard ones
    I fought and lost he said
    But let me tell you this son

    Your only weapon
    Is those you work with
    Your strength is their strength
    Can’t beat the rank and file

    Go get organized!

    #Gewerkschaft #Organizing #Musik

  • #Etats-Unis : les succès mitigés des nouvelles formes syndicales
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/economie/100916/etats-unis-les-succes-mitiges-des-nouvelles-formes-syndicales

    À travers le combat des salariés américains de #walmart et celui des travailleurs des fast-foods pour un meilleur salaire, le chercheur Mathieu Hocquelet décrypte les mutations du #syndicalisme à l’américaine, tenté par l’organizing, pour rattraper les bastions de travailleurs pauvres du pays.

    #Economie #Amérique_du_nord #anti-syndicalisme #fast-food #grande_distribution #mouvement_social #organizing #social