• Sponsoriser la guerre, soutenir la dictature, « et en même temps » célébrer la paix | L’Humanité

    https://www.humanite.fr/sponsoriser-la-guerre-soutenir-la-dictature-et-en-meme-temps-celebrer-la-pa

    Sponsoriser la guerre, soutenir la dictature, « et en même temps » célébrer la paix
    Vendredi, 9 Novembre, 2018
    Pauline Tétillon

    Par Pauline Tétillon, co-présidente de l’association Survie.

    Lorsqu’Emmanuel Macron affirmait, il y a un an lors de son déplacement à Ouagadougou, qu’« il n’y [avait] plus de politique africaine de la France », sans doute fallait-il comprendre que les critères de respect des droits humains et de démocratie n’avaient désormais pas plus d’importance en Afrique qu’ailleurs : il ne serait finalement même plus question de faire semblant. Mais c’est oublier que le soutien de la France à des régimes criminels en Afrique comporte des modalités pratiques qui contredisent dans les faits de telles déclarations, et qui concourent à la guerre et la terreur que prétendent occulter les célébrations du premier « forum de Paris sur la paix » organisé à l’occasion du centenaire de l’armistice de 1918.

    #guerre #paix #macron #imposture #crapulerie #arabie_saoudite



  • Those closest to #Nagorno-Karabakh conflict ‘most supportive of peace’

    Those who have experienced the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict first-hand and are most affected by the hostilities are more supportive of peaceful reconciliation, a report from UK-based peacebuilding group International Alert suggests.

    ‘Envisioning Peace’ is the first large-scale study of attitudes towards the conflict since renewed hostilities during the April 2016 Four-Day War.

    The study examined ‘grassroot’ views on Nagorno-Karabakh by those living there and among communities in Azerbaijan and Armenia. Respondents included internally displaced persons (IDPs) and those living near the frontline.

    The study suggested that those most affected by the armed confrontations — living in border communities or near the ceasefire line, and those who had personally faced consequences of the war — were more supportive of peaceful reconciliation with the ‘other’ side.

    ‘These individuals understand the importance of resolving this conflict and can take practical steps to promote peacebuilding initiatives’, said Carey Cavanaugh, the Chairman of the Board of International Alert, who is a former co-chair of the OSCE Minsk Group.

    The OSCE Minsk Group, led by Russia, France, and the United States, has been mediating the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh since 1992.

    ‘The further people live from the frontline, the more strongly they speak about patriotism’, the report said.
    Powerlessness to resolve conflict

    The report noted the effects of long-lasting hostilities on the communities they had to adapt to, making the conflict a constant part of their lives. ‘I haven’t even thought about what my life would be like without the conflict’, one interviewee says in the study.

    This sort of coping and a ‘learned helplessness’ — less faith in having a control over one’s surroundings, life, and future — among respondents could have a negative influence on peacebuilding initiatives aimed at conflict transformation, the report suggests.

    Respondents in all three societies expressed a sense of powerlessness in resolving the conflict. This, the study suggests, together with a low trust in external peacebuilding actors like the Minsk Group, the US, and Russia, pose additional challenges to policymakers and peace negotiators.

    Protracted conflict, according to the study, was being accompanied by enemy image propaganda, especially by the Azerbaijani state and media.

    The study reflected contrasting attitudes of Azerbaijanis and Armenians on transforming the years-old ‘no peace no war’ stalemate. According to the report, respondents in Nagorno-Karabakh and Armenia identified the status quo with ‘stability’, while for Azerbaijanis, it evoked the concept of ‘justice’, which they associate with the ‘return of territories’.

    International Alert called for more support for initiatives that would help all three societies to overcome a trend of devaluing human life, and to explore more about the lives of individuals in the border areas.

    The peacebuilding group also underlined the continued exclusion of refugees in all three societies from the conflict discourse.

    ‘It is important to put the focus back on the individual who has shouldered the heavy burden of war, their feelings, thoughts, fears and hopes. Personal history must be clearly seen and valued. Only then will it become possible to appreciate a person’s worth and activity’, the report reads.

    The group suggests ‘open media projects’ as one of the tools to highlight personal stories.

    [Read on OC Media: ‘I would never return home again’ — the Azerbaijani IDPs as old as the conflict]

    The group advocated for raising awareness of members of the communities about the personal cost of conflict both in humanitarian and economic terms.

    ‘If people realise that every individual and every family is paying for the conflict and not for peace, this could help to alter the dynamics of the conflict’, the report reads.

    The group recommends highlighting how conflict reinforces social justice grievances, a problem seen as important among respondents from all communities.
    ‘Status quo no longer in Armenia’s favour’

    On Monday, outgoing US Ambassador to Armenia Richard Mills identified the unresolved conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh and resulting economic blockade from Azerbaijan and Turkey as contributing to corruption in Armenia.

    ‘The status quo is no longer in Armenia’s favour […] Corruption didn’t grow because there are evil people here. The ground was pretty fertile for it because you have closed borders and a very small economy, so it’s very easy to control markets’, Mills said in an interview with EVN Report.

    In the same interview, Mills said he had been ‘struck’ by a lack of discussion in Armenia on what could be ‘acceptable solutions and compromise’ for Armenians, and said that settlement of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict would require Armenia to ‘return some occupied territories’ to Azerbaijan.

    [Read on OC Media: ‘Enhanced security’: Armenian settlers in Nagorno-Karabakh]

    On Wednesday, acting Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan shortly commented the statement, saying that Armenia’s position was known to the public and ‘has not changed’.

    Russia, another Minsk Group co-chairing country, recently angered Azerbaijani authorities when on 7 October, Svetlana Zhurova, deputy chair of the Russian Duma’s International Affairs Committee, visited Nagorno-Karabakh without their prior permission.

    Her trip was part of the ‘Women for Peace’ initiative under Pashinyan’s wife, Anna Hakobyan.

    Zhurova ended up being blacklisted by the Azerbaijani government for ‘illegally’ entering Nagorno-Karabakh.
    Renewal of talks

    The OSCE Minsk Group, created in 1992, remains the only format for peace negotiations. It has yielded no major breakthroughs in recent years.

    Azerbaijan’s leadership continues to insist on respecting the country’s territorial integrity and on Armenia withdrawing their armed forces from Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding regions.

    Since a change of power in Armenia in May, new Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan has insisted on including the Nagorno-Karabakh authorities in the negotiation process as a party directly involved in the conflict.

    Azerbaijan has rejected the proposal.

    Nevertheless, at a Minsk Group–mediated meeting on 27 September on the margins of the 73rd Session of the UN General Assembly, top Armenian and Azerbaijani diplomats agreed to continue negotiations.

    Talks between the two are expected to resume during the co-chairs’ ‘upcoming’ visit to the region.

    Hopes for progress were reignited after informal talks between Pashinyan and Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev in Dushanbe on 28 September. The meeting was the first public interaction between the two countries’ leaders following the change in power in Armenia.

    After the meeting, both leaders confirmed that they had agreed to open a direct line of communication between each other through their defence ministries, in order to prevent incidents along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact.


    http://oc-media.org/those-closest-to-nagorno-karabakh-conflict-most-supportive-of-peace
    #paix #Arménie #conflit
    ping @reka
    En italien:
    https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Nagorno-Karabakh/Nagorno-Karabakh-piu-vicini-al-fronte-piu-a-favore-della-pace-190742


  • Pour accroître l’efficacité de ses missions de #paix, l’#ONU recrute davantage de #femmes officiers de #police | ONU Info
    https://news.un.org/fr/story/2018/11/1028551

    Pour être plus efficaces, les missions de #maintien_de_la_paix des Nations Unies ont besoin de recruter davantage de femmes au sein de leurs effectifs de police, a insisté mardi devant le Conseil de sécurité un haut responsable de l’ONU.


  • Tous ceux qui veulent que la guerre au #Yémen continue
    https://www.cetri.be/Tous-ceux-qui-veulent-que-la

    « Il est plus que temps que cette guerre cesse et il est important aussi, c’est même la priorité de la France (...), que l’aide humanitaire puisse passer », a déclaré Françoise Parly, ministre française des armées, le 30 octobre. Pourtant, jusqu’à aujourd’hui, aucune des puissances étrangères engagée au Yémen n’a vraiment agi en ce sens. Ce qui complique l’objectif d’un accord auquel les différentes parties yéménites semblent réticentes. n août 2O18, deux ans après l’échec des négociations de #Paix au Koweït, (...)

    #Le_Sud_en_mouvement

    / #Le_Sud_en_mouvement, Yémen, Paix, #Orient_XXI


  • Faire la #paix avec la #guerre

    Quatre frères d’armes. Une guerre, celle de #Bosnie-Herzégovine. Et une #mission_de_paix, une vraie celle-là, toute personnelle, qui commence pour les Gatinois Dominique Brière, Érick Moyneur, Luc Laframboise et Frédérick Lavergne. Vingt-cinq ans après y avoir été déployés, les quatre anciens réservistes du #Régiment_de_Hull se préparent à retourner en Bosnie, dans l’espoir d’en revenir une fois pour toutes.


    https://ici.tou.tv/faire-la-paix-avec-la-guerre/S01E01
    #Bosnie #ex-Yougoslavie #ONU #film #documentaire
    ping @albertocampiphoto @wizo


  • La stratégie mondiale de l’#ONU en matière de #drogues est un « #échec spectaculaire », selon 174 ONG
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/detail_la-strategie-mondiale-de-l-onu-en-matiere-de-drogues-est-un-echec-specta

    Les politiques punitives mises en œuvre cette dernière décennie ont mené à de nombreuses #violations des droits humains et à des #menaces pour la #santé et l’ordre public, juge l’IDPC dans son rapport intitulé « Bilan : 10 ans de politiques des drogues - un rapport parallèle de la société civile ».

    Parallèlement, « la culture, la consommation et le trafic de drogues ont atteint des niveaux record » depuis les années ’90, pointe Helen Clark, ex-Premier ministre néo-zélandaise et membre de la Commission globale sur les #politiques des drogues. Ainsi, entre 2009 et 2018, la culture du pavot à opium a augmenté de 130% et celle de la coca de 34%, selon l’organisme, qui se base pour son rapport sur des données onusiennes, académiques et de la société civile.

    Pour l’IDPC, les politiques mises en place contreviennent aux priorités plus larges des #Nations_Unies, que sont la protection des #droits humains, la promotion de la #paix, de la #sécurité et du #développement.


  • Le #monument aux morts de #Gentioux-Pigerolles : « Maudite soit la #guerre »
    J’ai entendu parler pour la première fois du monument aux morts de #Gentioux pendant mon service militaire. Un camarade, ayant séjourné au camp de la Courtine, m’avait affirmé que l’armée française refusait de défiler devant pour les célébrations du 11 novembre.

    Sans avoir jamais pu vérifier cette anecdote mais assez intrigué par l’histoire, j’ai eu depuis à plusieurs reprise l’occasion de m’arrêter sur la place du village pour saluer un des plus célèbres #monuments_aux_morts de #France, connu, paraît-il, des pacifistes du monde entier.

    Elevé en 1922 à l’initiative d’un maire ancien combattant, blessé de guerre, et fidèle à la tradition socialiste de ces terres rudes, le monument représente un écolier, en sabots et sarreau, dénonçant de son point fermé la légende « #maudite_soit_la_guerre ». Ce simple sujet a fait plonger ce souvenir dans l’enfer des orgueils militaires, et explique que l’Etat -aucun préfet ou sous-préfet n’a jamais daigné l’inaugurer- et l’état-major de la Courtine aient maudit cet extraordinaire édifice !

    Loin de la vague patriotique et nationaliste qui a pardonné aux généraux le sacrifice de plus d’un million de nos compatriotes, ce coin de Limousin, proche du lac de Vassivières, a été un des rares endroits où le #pacifisme et l’#humanisme ont su louer les valeurs de la #Paix.

    Le cimetière du village contiendrait les cendres d’un fusillé pour l’exemple, mais je n’ai pas eu le temps d’aller me renseigner sur place.

    Le petit écolier change parfois de couleur. Vert anglais il y a un quart de siècle, crème au cours de l’été 2011.


    http://histoire.et.cartes.postales.over-blog.com/article-le-monument-aux-morts-de-gentioux-pig
    #mémoire #nationalisme #géographie_culturelle

    ping @reka via @albertocampiphoto


  • Le #Prix_Nobel de la #paix 2018 a été décerné à #Denis_Mukwege et #Nadia_Murad, pour dénoncer les victimes de #violences_sexuelles.

    J’étais surpris que l’on récompense un homme pour son action en faveur des femmes, et une femme comme simple victime, mais comme beaucoup se sont réjoui ici de la récompense de Denis Mukwege, je n’ai rien dit.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/726904
    https://seenthis.net/messages/726918

    Et puis on apprend que Nadia Murad ne cesse de prendre Israël comme exemple et comme soutien.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/727264
    https://seenthis.net/messages/727820

    Alors on se rappelle des calculs géopolitiques du comité Nobel et on réalise que pour dénoncer les victimes de violences sexuelles, on ne prend que des cas de violences perpétrées par des Noirs et des Arabes, ce qui permet d’invisibiliser les violences faites aux femmes par de riches hommes blancs comme Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, Roman Polanski, Donald Trump, Bertrand Cantat, Dominique Strauss Kahn, Luc Besson, Brett Kavanaugh...

    #racisme

    • on ne prend que des cas de violences perpétrées par des Noirs et des Arabes, ce qui permet d’invisibiliser les violences faites aux femmes par de riches hommes blancs comme Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, Roman Polanski, Donald Trump, Bertrand Cantat, Dominique Strauss Kahn, Luc Besson, Brett Kavanaugh...

      @sinehebdo Depuis l’affaire Weinstein il n’y a pas une semaine sans que les médias occidentaux ne parlent des violences sexuelles perpétrés dans ces même pays occidentaux par des hommes blancs (l’affaire Polanski reprise aussi très régulièrement et actions contre Cantat ) alors que par ailleurs, absolument rien dans les médias sur les viols en RDC (juste quelques travaux universitaires sur le viol comme arme de guerre) et tu parles d’invisibiliser les violences faites aux femmes par de riches hommes blancs ?

    • Depuis un an, ces violences-là, perpétrées par des mecs (ajoutons Claude Lanzmann, tiens) qui jouissent d’un statut social élevé et maltraitent les femmes qui leur sont plus ou moins proches, a donné un autre visage aux violences alors que le patriarcat s’acharnait à dire que le viol, c’est dans de sombres allées par des inconnus ou les violences conjugales, des ouvriers alcooliques. Ça nous change et c’est important, de dire que les femmes sont plus en danger chez elles que dans un parking mal éclairé ! Je pense que c’est un moment, qu’il est utile mais qu’en effet il faudra remettre le projecteur sur tous les autres types de violences. Un papier récent signale la prévalence du suicide pour les femmes indiennes, @odilon tu nous rappelles le viol comme arme de guerre (y’a pas qu’en Bosnie). Essayons de n’oublier personne ! Et ma pensée du jour va aux femmes, en Amérique latine ou du Nord, qui sont privées de la liberté d’avorter et qui subissent plus que les autres le backlash conservateur, voire fasciste, du continent.

      Et le Alain, on est quelques-unes à l’avoir bloqué parce qu’il ne prend pas tes pincettes, @sinehebdo, pour donner son avis. Il a gentiment éclairé de son ignorance les questions que les féministes d’ici ont bien documentées et discutées, avec l’intelligence dont vous pouvez admirer un exemple ici et sans jamais bouger sa couille d’un millimètre devant les arguments de meufs féministes. L’exemple du macho de merde qui prolifère sur Twitter (mais qui, je l’espère, trouve ici contradiction et portes closes, et pas que des femmes qu’il prend de haut).

    • @odilon , désolé, je ne parlais pas (et je ne voulais pas) d’invisibiliser les victimes racisées (Nafissatou Diallo en sait quelque chose, mais aussi les enfants violés par les soldats de l’armée française en Centrafrique), mais de la tentative d’invisibiliser les #grands_hommes prédateurs sexuels occidentaux, et de perpétuer l’idée qu’il n’y a que les Noirs et les Arabes qui sont violents et sexistes (là bas comme ici).

      En d’autres termes, je ne conteste pas à Denis Mukwege d’avoir mérité son prix, mais vu qu’il y avait une troisième place sur le podium, une organisation comme #metoo qui dénonce le sexisme aux Etats-Unis (par exemple) aurait peut-être pu partager ce prix...

    • Brave Alain, pourquoi as-tu besoin de corriger tout le monde, de ne jamais céder d’un pouce, de te présenter comme le super féministe qui apporte ses lumières et le spectacle de sa méritante position anti-sexiste chaque fois qu’il est question de féminisme alors que tu ne connais rien ou si peu sur le sujet et que tu n’accordes aucun crédit à une femme dans une conversation ? Pourquoi ce besoin de remettre ton ordre chaque fois qu’il te semble menacé ?

      Un début de réponse ici : http://blog.ecologie-politique.eu/post/Un-profeminisme-toxique.

      #misandrie et si ça te fait plaisir, d’imaginer que je n’ai aucun ami ou amant sur ce réseau (ah ah !), que je hais les hommes et que #misogynie s’écrit avec deux y...

    • Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, Roman Polanski, Donald Trump, Bertrand Cantat, Dominique Strauss Kahn, Luc Besson, Brett Kavanaugh

      Ce sont tous des hommes blancs en position de pouvoir (politique, économique, prestige) qui ont fait violence à des femmes et ont été défendus avec plus ou moins de mauvaise foi. Parmi ces violences, il y a des viols, des abus sur mineures, des violences conjugales... Mais toujours il y a eu le dénigrement des victimes, le déni des faits ou de leur gravité, etc.

      Marie Trintignant, elle avait mauvais caractère, ce n’est qu’un accident, il ne faut pas voir une intention de faire mal. Dans le refus de voir un grand type costaud se mettre sur la gueule avec une femme petite et nier la responsabilité de cette exploitation de sa vulnérabilité physique, il y a un air connu avec les autres cas de violences.

      Les Espagnol·es parlent de violence de genre pour ces violences que les hommes font aux femmes parce qu’elles sont femmes, parce qu’ils croient pouvoir les violer, les frapper, etc. Violences qu’ils ne feraient pas à d’autres hommes. Par exemple, les hommes sont plus menacés dans la rue par la violence d’inconnus alors que les femmes sont plus menacées par la violence de leurs proches. Cette violence a un caractère genré et c’était l’objet du post avant qu’Alain vienne expliquer la vie à tout le monde...

    • Question : qui auriez-vous récompensé comme personnalité ou organisation symbolique de la lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes en occident ?

      Harvey Weinstein, Woody Allen, Roman Polanski, Donald Trump, Bertrand Cantat, Dominique Strauss Kahn, Luc Besson, Claude Lanzmann, Brett Kavanaugh... et j’en oublie un : Jean-Claude Arnault !

      (...) la légitimité même de l’académie suédoise qui est en cause et sa gestion d’une crise historique, qui a débuté en novembre 2017, en plein mouvement #metoo. Dix-huit femmes accusaient le mari d’une des académiciennes de viols et d’agressions sexuelles. Un Français, Jean-Claude Arnault, 71 ans, directeur d’un lieu d’expositions culturelles dans la capitale du royaume. Un audit, mené par un cabinet d’avocats, a depuis révélé que l’académie lui versait de généreuses subventions. Le parquet financier a ouvert une enquête.

      Le prix Nobel de littérature en 2018 reporté d’un an
      Anne-Françoise Hivert, Le Monde, le 4 mai 2018
      https://abonnes.lemonde.fr/livres/article/2018/05/04/l-academie-suedoise-ne-decernera-pas-de-prix-nobel-de-litterature-en ?

      A la place, le prix nobel alternatif de littérature a été décerné à la Guadeloupéenne Maryse Condé :

      Maryse Condé remporte le Nobel « alternatif » de littérature
      La Libre Belgique, le 12 octobre 2018
      https://seenthis.net/messages/728549



  • Ethiopia-Eritrea Border Opens for First Time in 20 Years

    Astebeha Tesfaye went to visit friends in Eritrea, and had to stay 20 years.

    “I was going to take the bus the next day,” he said by phone on Tuesday, “but I heard that the roads were blocked, and that no one was going to move either to Eritrea or Ethiopia.”

    Mr. Tesfaye was traveling as war broke out between Ethiopia and Eritrea, locking the two countries in hostilities that eventually left tens of thousands dead. Cross-border phone calls were banned, embassies were closed and flights were canceled. Travel between the countries became impossible.

    But on Tuesday, the leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea reopened crossing points on their shared border, clearing the way for trade between the two nations. The development was part of a series of reconciliation moves that began in July, when Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed of Ethiopia and President Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea signed a formal declaration of peace.

    Fitsum Arega, Mr. Abiy’s chief of staff, said on Twitter that the reopening of border crossings had created “a frontier of peace & friendship.”

    Mr. Abiy and Mr. Isaias visited the Debay Sima-Burre border crossing with members of their countries’ armed forces to observe the Ethiopian new year. They then did the same at the #Serha - #Zalambesa crossing, the Eritrean information minister, Yemane Meskel, said on Twitter.

    Photographs posted online by Mr. Arega and Mr. Meskel showed the two leaders walking side by side, passing soldiers and civilians who waved the countries’ flags. In a ceremony broadcast live on Ethiopian television, long-separated families held tearful reunions. People from both sides ran toward one another as the border crossings opened, hugging, kissing and crying as if in a coordinated act.

    “This must be how the people during World War I or World War II felt when they met their families after years of separation and uncertainty,” said Mr. Tesfaye, who is from a border town but was caught on the wrong side of the frontier during the war.

    Eritrea gained its independence from Ethiopia in the early 1990s, and war broke out later that decade, locking the two nations in unyielding hostilities that left more than 80,000 people dead. The turning point came in June, when Mr. Abiy announced that Ethiopia would “fully accept and implement” a peace agreement that was signed in 2000 but never honored. The formal deal was signed weeks later.

    Few people expected such a quick turn of events. Embassies have reopened, telephone lines have been restored and commercial flights between the capitals have resumed. An Ethiopian commercial ship docked in an Eritrean port last Wednesday — the first to do so in more than two decades.

    Ethiopia has a strategic interest in a critical Eritrean port, Assab, as a gateway to international trade via the Red Sea. Landlocked since Eritrea gained independence, Ethiopia sends 90 percent of its foreign trade through Djibouti.

    Bus routes through Zalambesa are expected to start soon, helping residents to move freely for the first time in decades.

    Mr. Tesfaye, for one, is thrilled.

    “There wasn’t any day that went by that I didn’t think of my mother,” he said, choking up. “I never thought this day would come.”


    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/world/africa/ethiopia-eritrea-border-opens.html

    #frontières #Erythrée #Ethiopie #paix

    • #Ouverture_des_frontières et fuite des Erythréens

      Le 11 septembre dernier, à l’occasion du nouvel an éthiopien, les deux dirigeants, Isayas Afewerki et Abiy Ahmed ont ouvert leurs frontières.

      Les civils et les soldats, habités d’une euphorie certaine, brandissaient les deux drapeaux.

      Bien que cette nouvelle peut sembler réjouissante, elle s’accompagne aussi d’un certain nombre de préoccupations et d’effets inattendus. Depuis une dizaine de jours, un nombre croissants de mères et d’enfants quittent l’Erythree.

      Au début de cette dizaine de jours, il était difficile de distinguer les individus qui quittaient l’Erythree, pour simplement revoir leurs familles se trouvant de l’autre côté de la frontière, de ceux qui quittaient le pays pour bel et bien en fuir.

      Il convient de rappeler que malgré le fait que le rapprochement avec l’Ethiopie peut être perçu comme un progrès à l’échelle régionale et internationale, il n’empêche que du côté érythréen ce progrès découle d’une décision unilatérale du Président Afewerki. Celle-ci motivée par les Etats-Unis et par des incitations de nature financière qui demeurent encore particulièrement opaques.

      Comme Monsieur Abrehe l’avait indiqué dans son message au Président : « les accords diplomatiques rapides et peu réfléchis que vous faites seul avec certaines nations du monde (…) risquent de compromettre les intérêts nationaux de l’Érythrée. ».

      Ce message ainsi que le départ important de mères érythréennes avec leurs enfants vers l’Ethiopie sont l’aveu de :

      – l’absence de confiance des érythréens vis-à-vis de leurs autorités ; et
      – de leur décision contraignante à devoir trouver une alternative de survie par leurs propres moyens.

      Il convient aussi de constater l’asymétrie non-négligeable dans la rapidité et l’efficacité dans les solutions trouvées et fournies par le gouvernement érythréen pour les demandes venant du côté éthiopien. Alors que dans l’intervalle, aucune solution tangible n’est apportée pour que sa propre population ait accès à son droit à un standard de vie suffisant (manger à sa faim, disposer de sa liberté de mouvement pour notamment subvenir à ses besoins, etc.).

      Le gouvernement est parfaitement conscient de ses départs vu qu’il a commencé à émettre lui-même des passeports à ceux qui le demandent. Il reste à savoir si les autorités érythréennes se complaisent dans ce schéma hémorragique ou si elles mettront en place des incitations pour assurer la survie de l’Etat de l’Erythrée.

      https://www.ife-ch.org/fr/news/ouverture-des-frontieres-et-fuite-des-erythreens

    • L’enregistrement d’Erythréens dans les camps de réfugiés en Ethiopie a quadruplé depuis l’ouverture des frontières avec l’Ethiopie, le 11 septembre 2018, selon UNHCR.

      Le 26 septembre 2018, la « European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations » a indiqué que l’absence de changements en Erythrée et l’ouverture des frontières en seraient les raisons. « L’assistance humanitaire va devoir augmenter les ressources pour répondre aux besoins et pour réduire les risques d’une migration qui se déplace ».

      Samedi dernier, le Ministre des Affaires Etrangères a prononcé un discours devant l’Assemblée Générale de l’ONU à New York dans lequel il :
      Rappelle le récent rapprochement avec l’Ethiopie et les nombreux fruits qu’il porte tant au niveau national qu’au niveau régional ;
      Demande à ce que les « déplorables » sanctions à l’encontre de l’Erythrée soient immédiatement levées et à cet égard, il dénonce les préconditions imposées par certains Etats ;
      Précise que « quand l’Etat de droit est supprimé et supplanté par la logique de force ; quand l’équilibre du pouvoir mondial est compromis, les conséquences inévitables sont des crises difficiles à résoudre et des guerres qui dégénèrent. »
      Dénonce les « principaux architectes » de ces sanctions, à savoir d’anciennes administrations étatsuniennes ;
      Insiste sur le fait que « le peuple d’Erythrée n’a commis aucun crime, ni aucune transgression qui le pousse à demander clémence. Ainsi, ils demandent non seulement la levée des sanctions, mais demandent aussi, et méritent, une compensation pour les dommages causés et les opportunités perdues. »
      Il convient de souligner que ces propos prononcés « au nom du peuple » n’ont fait l’objet d’aucune consultation représentative du peuple ou de sa volonté. Il s’agit à nouveau d’un discours construit par le parti unique qui ne dispose toujours pas de mandat pour gouverner.

      Par ailleurs, aucune mention n’a été faite sur l’entrée en vigueur de la Constitution, ni sur le changement de la pratique du service national/militaire. Deux points critiques qui étaient très attendus tant par les fonctionnaires de l’ONU que par les différentes délégations.

      Lors de cette session, l’Assemblée Générale votera sur :

      La levée ou non des sanctions ; et
      L’adhésion ou non de l’Erythrée au Conseil des Droits de l’Homme.

      Message reçu par email, de l’association ife : https://www.ife-ch.org

    • Nouvel afflux de migrants érythréens en Ethiopie

      Le Monde 30 octobre 2018

      L’ouverture de la frontière a créé un appel d’air pour les familles fuyant le régime répressif d’Asmara

      Teddy (le prénom a été modifié) est sur le départ. Ce jeune Erythréen à peine majeur n’a qu’une envie : rejoindre son père aux Etats-Unis. Originaire d’Asmara, la capitale, il a traversé la frontière « le plus vite possible »quand le premier ministre éthiopien, Abiy Ahmed, et le président érythréen, Isaias Afwerki, ont décidé de la démilitariser et de l’ouvrir, le 11 septembre.

      Cette mesure a donné le signal du départ pour sa famille, qui compte désormais sur la procédure de regroupement familial pour parvenir outre-Atlantique. Ce matin de fin octobre, sa mère et ses trois frères patientent à Zalambessa, ville frontière côté éthiopien, comme 700 autres Erythréens répartis dans 13 autobus en partance pour le centre de réception d’Endabaguna, à environ 200 km à l’ouest, la première étape avant les camps de réfugiés.

      L’ouverture de la frontière a permis aux deux peuples de renouer des relations commerciales. Mais elle a aussi créé un appel d’air, entraînant un afflux massif de migrants en Ethiopie. Selon des chiffres du Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), près de 15 000 Erythréens ont traversé la frontière les trois premières semaines.

      « Là-bas, il n’y a plus de jeunes »

      Certains d’entre eux sont simplement venus acheter des vivres et des marchandises ou retrouver des proches perdus de vue depuis la guerre. Mais la plupart ont l’intention de rester. « Je n’ai pas envie de rentrer à Asmara. Là-bas, il n’y a plus de jeunes : soit ils sont partis, soit ils sont morts en mer, soit ils sont ici »,poursuit Teddy.

      Chaque année, des milliers d’Erythréens fuient leur pays, depuis longtemps critiqué par les organisations de défense des droits humains pour le recours à la détention arbitraire, la disparition d’opposants et la restriction des libertés d’expression et de religion. La perspective d’être enrôlé à vie dans un service militaire obligatoire, jusque-là justifié par la menace du voisin éthiopien, a poussé une grande partie de la jeunesse sur la route de l’exil. Pour l’heure, l’accord de paix entre les deux pays n’a pas fait changer d’avis les candidats au départ, au contraire.

      Depuis plusieurs semaines, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) fait des allers-retours entre le centre d’Endabaguna et Zalambessa et Rama, les principaux points de passage grâce auxquels la grande majorité des nouveaux arrivants – surtout des femmes et des enfants – traversent la frontière. « L’affluence ne tarit pas », explique un humanitaire. Près de 320 personnes franchiraient la frontière quotidiennement, soit six fois plus qu’avant. Côté érythréen, les militaires tiennent un registre des départs, mais le contrôle s’arrête là.

      Après leur enregistrement au centre d’Endabaguna, les migrants seront répartis dans des camps. Plus de 14 000 nouveaux arrivants ont été recensés depuis l’ouverture de la frontière. « L’un des camps est saturé », confie le même humanitaire. Quant au HCR, il juge la situation « critique ». Cette nouvelle donne risque d’accentuer la pression sur l’Ethiopie, qui compte déjà près d’un million de réfugiés, dont plus de 175 000 Erythréens et voit augmenter le nombre de déplacés internes : ceux-ci sont environ 2,8 millions à travers le pays.

      Si la visite du premier ministre éthiopien à Paris, Berlin et Francfort, du lundi 29 au mercredi 31 octobre, se voulait à dominante économique, la lancinante question migratoire a forcément plané sur les discussions. Et l’Europe, qui cherche à éviter les sorties du continent africain, a trouvé en Abiy Ahmed un allié, puisque l’Ethiopie prévoit d’intégrer davantage les réfugiés en leur accordant bientôt des permis de travail et des licences commerciales. C’est l’un des objectifs du « cadre d’action globale pour les réfugiés » imaginé par les Nations unies. Addis-Abeba doit confier à cette population déracinée une partie des 100 000 emplois créés dans de nouveaux parcs industriels construits grâce à un prêt de la Banque européenne d’investissement et aux subventions du Royaume-Uni et de la Banque mondiale.

      En attendant, à Zalambessa, les nouveaux arrivants devront passer une ou plusieurs nuits dans un refuge de fortune en tôle, près de la gare routière. Ils sont des centaines à y dormir. Adiat et Feruz viennent de déposer leurs gros sacs. Autour d’elles, des migrants s’enregistrent pour ne pas rater les prochains bus. « Notre pays est en train de se vider. Dans mon village, il n’y a plus personne », lâche Feruz, qui rappelle que beaucoup d’Erythréens sont partis avant l’ouverture de la frontière, illégalement. Elle se dit prête à sacrifier une ou deux années dans un camp de réfugiés avant d’obtenir, peut-être, le droit d’aller vivre en Europe, son rêve.

      –-> Ahh ! J’adore évidemment l’expression « appel d’air » (arrghhhh)... Et l’afflux...

    • L’ONU lève les sanctions contre l’Érythrée.

      Après quasi une décennie d’isolement international du pays, le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies a décidé à l’unanimité de lever les sanctions contre l’Érythrée. Un embargo sur les armes, un gel des avoirs et une interdiction de voyager avaient été imposés en 2009, alors que l’Érythrée était accusée de soutenir les militants d’al-Shabab en Somalie, ce qu’Asmara a toujours nié, note la BBC (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-46193273). La chaîne britannique rappelle également que le pays, critiqué pour ses violations des droits de l’homme, a longtemps été considéré comme un paria sur la scène international. La résolution, rédigée par le Royaume-Uni, a été soutenue par les États-Unis et leurs alliés. La #levée_des_sanctions intervient dans un contexte de dégel des relations entre l’Érythrée et ses voisins après des années de conflit, notamment avec l’Ethiopie – Asmara et Addis-Abeba ont signé un accord de paix en juin –, mais aussi la Somalie et Djibouti. “La bromance [contraction des mots brother (frère) et romance (idylle)] entre le nouveau dirigeant réformiste éthiopien Abiy Ahmed et le président érythréen Isaias Aferweki semble avoir déteint sur les dirigeants voisins”, analyse le journaliste de la BBC à Addis-Abeba.


      https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/pendant-que-vous-dormiez-caravane-de-migrants-israel-erythree
      #sanctions #ONU

    • L’ONU lève les sanctions contre l’Erythrée après un accord de paix

      Le Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU a levé mercredi les sanctions contre l’Erythrée après un accord de paix historique avec l’Ethiopie et un réchauffement de ses relations avec Djibouti.

      Ces récents développements laissent augurer de changements positifs dans la Corne de l’Afrique.

      Le Conseil a adopté à l’unanimité cette résolution élaborée par la Grande-Bretagne. Il a levé l’embargo sur les armes, toutes les interdictions de voyage, les gels d’avoirs et autres sanctions visant l’Erythrée.

      Les relations entre Djibouti et l’Erythrée s’étaient tendues après une incursion en avril 2008 de troupes érythréennes vers Ras Doumeira, un promontoire stratégique surplombant l’entrée de la mer Rouge au nord de Djibouti-ville. Les deux pays s’étaient opposés à deux reprises en 1996 et 1999 pour cette zone.
      Accord signé en juillet

      L’Erythrée est depuis 2009 sous le coup de sanctions du Conseil de sécurité pour son soutien présumé aux djihadistes en Somalie, une accusation que le gouvernement érythréen a toujours niée.

      Asmara a signé en juillet avec l’Ethiopie un accord de paix qui a mis fin à deux décennies d’hostilités et conduit à un apaisement de ses relations avec Djibouti.


      https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/9995089-lonu-leve-les-sanctions-contre-lerythree-apres-un-accord-de-paix.html


  • #vietnamese_women's_museum in #Hanoi, #Vietnam

    Vietnamese Women’s Museum (VWM) is located in Ly Thuong Kiet Street, downtown Hanoi, just 500m from the central Hoan Kiem (Restored Sword) Lake and the old quarter. This is the most ancient street in the capital city, with many French-style buildings, foreign embassies, big hotels and government offices.
    Vietnamese Women’s Museum was established in 1987 and run by Vietnam Women’s Union. It is a gender museum with functions of research, preservation, and display of tangible and intangible historical and cultural heritages of Vietnamese women and Vietnam Women’s Union. It is also a centre for cultural exchange between Vietnamese and international women for the goal of equality, development and peace.


    http://www.baotangphunu.org.vn
    #femmes #musée

    @tchaala_la & @isskein :

    It is also a centre for cultural exchange between Vietnamese and international women for the goal of equality, development and peace.

    –-> peut-être intéressant de tisser des liens avec la Turquie ?
    #paix


  • Eritrea-Etiopia – Si tratta la pace ad Addis Abeba

    Una delegazione eritrea di alto livello è arrivata in Etiopia per il primo round di negoziati di pace in vent’anni. Il ministro degli Esteri eritreo Osman Sale è stato accolto in aeroporto dal neo premier etiopico Abiy Ahmed che, ai primi di giugno, ha sorpreso il Paese dichiarando di accettare l’Accordo di pace del 2000 che poneva fine alla guerra con l’Eritrea.

    L’Accordo, nonostante la fine dei combattimenti nel 2000, non è mai stato applicato e i rapporti tra i due Paesi sono rimasti tesi. Etiopia ed Eritrea non hanno relazioni diplomatiche e negli ultimi anni ci sono stati ripetute schermaglie militari al confine.


    https://www.africarivista.it/eritrea-etiopia-si-tratta-la-pace-ad-addis-abeba/125465
    #paix #Ethiopie #Erythrée #processus_de_paix

    • Peace Deal Alone Will Not Stem Flow of Eritrean Refugees

      The detente with Ethiopia has seen Eritrea slash indefinite military conscription. Researcher Cristiano D’Orsi argues that without a breakthrough on human rights, Eritreans will still flee.

      Ethiopia and Eritrea have signed a historic agreement to end the 20-year conflict between the two countries. The breakthrough has been widely welcomed given the devastating effects the conflict has had on both countries as well as the region.

      The tension between the two countries led to Eritrea taking steps that were to have a ripple effect across the region – and the world. One in particular, the conscription of young men, has had a particularly wide impact.

      Two years before formal cross-border conflict broke out in 1998, the Eritrean government took steps to maintain a large standing army to push back against Ethiopia’s occupation of Eritrean territories. Initially, troops were supposed to assemble and train for a period of 18 months as part of their national service. But, with the breakout of war, the service, which included both military personnel and civilians, was extended. All Eritrean men between the ages of 18–50 have to serve in the army for more than 20 years.

      This policy has been given as the reason for large numbers of Eritreans fleeing the country. The impact of the policy on individuals, and families, has been severe. For example, there have been cases of multiple family members being conscripted at the same time. This denied them the right to enjoy a stable family life. Children were the most heavily affected.

      It’s virtually impossible for Eritreans to return once they have left as refugees because the Eritrean government doesn’t look kindly on repatriated returnees. Those who are forced to return to the country face persecution and human rights abuses.

      In 2017, Eritreans represented the ninth-largest refugee population in the world with 486,200 people forcibly displaced. By May 2018, Eritreans represented 5 percent of the migrants who disembarked on the northern shores of the Mediterranean.

      Things look set to change, however. The latest batch of national service recruits have been told their enlistment will last no longer than 18 months. The announcement came in the midst of the dramatic thawing of relations between Ethiopia and Eritrea. It has raised hopes that the service could be terminated altogether.

      With that said, it remains to be seen whether the end of hostilities between the two countries will ultimately stem the flow of Eritrean refugees.

      It’s virtually impossible for Eritreans to return once they have left as refugees because the Eritrean government doesn’t look kindly on repatriated returnees. Those who are forced to return to the country face persecution and human rights abuses.

      The Eritrean government’s hardline position has led to changes in refugee policies in countries like the UK. For example, in October 2016, a U.K. appellate tribunal held that Eritreans of draft age who left the country illegally would face the risk of persecution and abuse if they were involuntarily returned to Eritrea.

      This, the tribunal said, was in direct violation of the European Convention on Human Rights. As a result, the U.K.’s Home Office amended its immigration policy to conform to the tribunal’s ruling.

      Eritrean asylum seekers haven’t been welcome everywhere. For a long time they were persona non grata in Israel on the grounds that absconding national service duty was not justification for asylum. But in September 2016, an Israeli appeals court held that Eritreans must be given the chance to explain their reasons for fleeing at individual hearings, overruling an interior ministry policy that denied asylum to deserters.

      The situation is particularly tense for Eritreans in Israel because they represent the majority of African asylum seekers in the country. In fact, in May 2018, Israel and the United Nations refugee agency began negotiating a deal to repatriate African asylum seekers in western countries, with Canada as a primary destination.

      An earlier deal had fallen through after public pressure reportedly caused Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to back out of it.

      Eritreans living as refugees in Ethiopia have been welcomed in Australia where they are one among eight nationalities that have access to a resettlement scheme known as the community support program. This empowers Australian individuals, community organizations and businesses to offer Eritrean refugees jobs if they have the skills, allowing them to settle permanently in the country.

      The government has always denied that conscription has anything to do with Eritreans fleeing the country. Two years ago it made it clear that it would not shorten the length of the mandatory national service.

      At the time officials said Eritreans were leaving the country because they were being enticed by certain “pull factors.” They argued, for example, that the need for low cost manpower in the West could easily be met by giving asylum to Eritreans who needed just to complain about the National Service to obtain asylum.

      But change is on the cards. After signing the peace deal with Ethiopia, Eritrea has promised to end the current conscription regime and announcing that national service duty will last no more than 18 months.

      Even so, the national service is likely to remain in place for the foreseeable future to fulfil other parts of its mandate which are reconstructing the country, strengthening the economy, and developing a joint Eritrean identity across ethnic and religious lines.

      Eritrea is still a country facing enormous human rights violations. According to the last Freedom House report, the Eritrean government has made no recent effort to address these. The report accuses the regime of continuing to perpetrate crimes against humanity.

      If Eritrea pays more attention to upholding human rights, fewer nationals will feel the need to flee. And if change comes within Eritrean borders as fast as it did with Ethiopia, a radical shift in human rights policy could be in the works.

      https://www.newsdeeply.com/refugees/community/2018/08/09/peace-deal-alone-will-not-stem-flow-of-eritrean-refugees

      #asile #réfugiés

    • Eritrea has slashed conscription. Will it stem the flow of refugees?

      Ethiopia and Eritrea have signed an historic agreement to end the 20-year conflict between the two countries. The breakthrough has been widely welcomed given the devastating effects the conflict has had on both countries as well as the region.

      The tension between the two countries led to Eritrea taking steps that were to have a ripple effect across the region – and the world. One in particular, the conscription of young men, has had a particularly wide impact.

      Two years before formal cross border conflict broke out in 1998, the Eritrean government took steps to maintain a large standing army to push back against Ethiopia’s occupation of Eritrean territories. Initially, troops were supposed to assemble and train for a period of 18 months as part of their national service. But, with the breakout of war, the service, which included both military personnel and civilians, was extended. All Eritrean men between the ages of 18 – 50 have to serve in the army for more than 20 years.

      This policy has been given as the reason for large numbers of Eritreans fleeing the country. The impact of the policy on individuals, and families, has been severe. For example, there have been cases of multiple family members being conscripted at the same time. This denied them the right to enjoy a stable family life. Children were the most heavily affected.

      In 2017, Eritreans represented the ninth-largest refugee population in the world with 486,200 people forcibly displaced. By May 2018 Eritreans represented 5% of the migrants who disembarked on the northern shores of the Mediterranean.

      Things look set to change, however. The latest batch of national service recruits have been told their enlistment will last no longer than 18 months. The announcement came in the midst of the dramatic thawing of relations between Ethiopia and Eritrea. It has raised hopes that the service could be terminated altogether.

      With that said, it remains to be seen whether the end of hostilities between the two countries will ultimately stem the flow of Eritrean refugees.
      The plight of Eritrean refugees

      It’s virtually impossible for Eritreans to return once they have left as refugees because the Eritrean government doesn’t look kindly on repatriated returnees. Those who are forced to return to the country face persecution and human rights abuses.

      The Eritrean government’s hard line position has led to changes in refugee policies in countries like the UK. For example, in October 2016 a UK appellate tribunal held that Eritreans of draft age who left the country illegally would face the risk of persecution and abuse if they were involuntarily returned to Eritrea.

      This, the tribunal said, was in direct violation of the European Convention on Human Rights. As a result, the UK’s Home Office amended its immigration policy to conform to the tribunal’s ruling.

      Eritrean asylum seekers haven’t been welcome everywhere. For a long time they were persona non grata in Israel on the grounds that absconding national service duty was not justification for asylum. But in September 2016 an Israeli appeals court held that Eritreans must be given the chance to explain their reasons for fleeing at individual hearings, overruling an interior ministry policy that denied asylum to deserters.

      The situation is particularly tense for Eritreans in Israel because they represent the majority of African asylum-seekers in the country. In fact, in May 2018, Israel and the United Nations refugee agency began negotiating a deal to repatriate African asylum-seekers in western countries, with Canada as a primary destination.

      An earlier deal had fallen through after public pressure reportedly caused Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to back out of it.

      Eritreans living as refugees in Ethiopia have been welcomed in Australia where they are one among eight nationalities that have access to a resettlement scheme known as the community support programme. This empowers Australian individuals, community organisations and businesses to offer Eritrean refugees jobs if they have the skills, allowing them to settle permanently in the country.
      The future

      The government has always denied that conscription has anything to do with Eritreans fleeing the country. Two years ago it made it clear that it would not shorten the length of the mandatory national service.

      At the time officials said Eritreans were leaving the country because they were being enticed by certain “pull factors”. They argued, for example, that the need for low cost manpower in the West could easily be met by giving asylum to Eritreans who needed just to complain about the National Service to obtain asylum.

      But change is on the cards. After signing the peace deal with Ethiopia, Eritrea has promised to end the current conscription regime and announcing that national service duty will last no more than 18 months.

      Even so, the national service is likely to remain in place for the foreseeable future to fulfil other parts of its mandate which are reconstructing the country, strengthening he economy, and developing a joint Eritrean identity across ethnic and religious lines.

      Eritrea is still a country facing enormous human rights violations. According to the last Freedom House report, the Eritrean government has made no recent effort to address these. The report accuses the regime of continuing to perpetrate crimes against humanity.

      If Eritrea pays more attention to upholding human rights, fewer nationals will feel the need to flee. And if change comes within Eritrean borders as fast as it did with Ethiopia, a radical shift in human rights policy could be in the works.

      https://theconversation.com/eritrea-has-slashed-conscription-will-it-stem-the-flow-of-refugees-

      #conscription #service_militaire #armée

    • Out of Eritrea: What happens after #Badme?

      On 6 June 2018, the government of Ethiopia announced that it would abide by the Algiers Agreement and 2002 Eritrea-Ethiopian Boundary Commission decision that defined the disputed border and granted the border town of Badme to Eritrea. Over the last 20 years, Badme has been central to the dispute between the two countries, following Ethiopia’s rejection of the ruling and continued occupation of the area. Ethiopia’s recently appointed Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed acknowledged that the dispute over Badme had resulted in 20 years of tension between the two countries. To defend the border areas with Ethiopia, in 1994 the Eritrean government introduced mandatory military service for all adults over 18. Eritrean migrants and asylum seekers often give their reason for flight as the need to escape this mandatory national service.

      Since 2015, Eritreans have been the third largest group of people entering Europe through the Mediterranean, and have the second highestnumber of arrivals through the Central Mediterranean route to Italy. According to UNHCR, by the end of 2016, 459,390 Eritreans were registered refugees in various countries worldwide. Various sources estimate Eritrea’s population at 5 million people, meaning that approximately 10% of Eritrea’s population has sought refuge abroad by 2016.
      Mandatory military service – a driver of migration and displacement

      As data collection from the Mixed Migration Centre’s Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism Initiative (4Mi) shows, 95% of Eritrean refugees and migrants surveyed gave fear of conscription into national service as their main reason for flight out of Eritrea. Men and women from 18 to 40 years old are required by law to undertake national service for 18 months — including six months of military training followed by 12 months’ deployment either in military service or in other government entities including farms, construction sites, mines and ministries.
      In reality, national service for most conscripts extends beyond the 18 months and often indefinite. There are also reported cases of children under 18 years old being forcefully recruited. Even upon completion of national service, Eritreans under the age of 50 years may been enrolled in the Reserve Army with the duty to provide reserve military service and defend the country from external attacks or invasions.

      According to Human Rights Watch, conscripts are subject to military discipline and are harshly treated and earn a salary that often ranges between USD 43 – 48 per month. The length of service is unpredictable, the type of abuse inflicted on conscripts is at the whim of military commanders and the UN Commission of inquiry on human rights in Eritrea reported on the frequent sexual abuse of female conscripts. Eritrea has no provision for conscientious objection to national service and draft evaders and deserters if arrested are subjected to heavy punishment according to Amnesty International, including lengthy periods of detention, torture and other forms of inhuman treatment including rape for women. For those who escape, relatives are forced to pay fines of 50,000 Nakfa (USD 3,350) for each family member. Failure to pay the fine may result in the arrest and detention of a family member until the money is paid which further fuels flight from Eritrea for families who are unable to pay the fine.

      The government of Eritrea asserts that compulsory and indefinite national service is necessitated by continued occupation of its sovereign territories citing Ethiopia as the main threat. In its response to the UN Human Rights Council Report that criticised Eritrea for human rights violations including indefinite conscription, Eritrea stated that one of its main constraints to the fulfilment of its international and national obligations in promoting and protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms is the continued occupation of its territory by Ethiopia.

      In 2016, Eritrea’s minister for Information confirmed that indefinite national service would remain without fundamental changes even in the wake of increased flight from the country by citizens unwilling to undertake the service. The Minister went on to state that Eritrea would contemplate demobilization upon the removal of the ‘main threat’, in this case Eritrea’s hostile relationship with Ethiopia. Eritrea and Ethiopia have both traded accusations of supporting opposition/militia groups to undermine each other both locally and abroad. If the relations between the countries turn peaceful, this could potentially have an impact on Eritrean migration, out of the country and out of the region.

      In the absence of hostilities and perceived security threats from its neighbour, it is possible that Eritrea will amend – or at least be open to start a dialogue about amending – its national service (and military) policies from the current mandatory and indefinite status, which has been one of the major root causes of the movement of Eritreans out of their country and onwards towards Europe. Related questions are whether an improvement in the relations with Ethiopia could also bring an immediate or longer term improvement in the socio-economic problems that Eritrea faces, for example through expanded trade relations between the two countries? Will this change usher in an era of political stability and an easing of military burdens on the Eritrean population?
      A possible game changer?

      The border deal, if it materialises, could at some time also have serious implications for Eritrean asylum seekers in Europe. Eritreans applying for asylum have relatively high approval rates. The high recognition rate for Eritrean asylum seekers is based on the widely accepted presumptionthat Eritreans who evade or avoid national service are at risk of persecution. In 2016 for example, 93% of Eritreans who sought asylum in EU countries received a positive decision. This recognition rate was second to Syrians and ahead of Iraqis and Somalis; all countries that are in active conflict unlike Eritrea. If the government of Eritrea enacts positive policy changes regarding conscription, the likely effect could be a much lower recognition rate for Eritrean asylum seekers. It is unclear how this would affect those asylum seekers already in the system.

      While Eritreans on the route to Europe and in particular those arriving in Italy, remain highly visible and receive most attention, many Eritreans who leave the country end up in refugee camps or Eritrean enclaves in neighbouring countries like Sudan and Ethiopia or further away in Egypt. After they flee, most Eritreans initially apply for refugee status in Ethiopia’s and Sudan’s refugee camps. As Human Rights Watch noted in 2016, the Eritrean camp population generally remains more or less stable. While many seek onward movements out of the camps, many refugees remain in the region. With these potentially new developments in Eritrea, will the Eritreans in Sudan, Ethiopia and other neighbouring countries feel encouraged or compelled to return at some, or will they perhaps be forced to return to Eritrea?
      What’s next?

      Conservative estimates in 2001 put the cost of the war between Eritrea and Ethiopia at USD 2.9 billion in just the first three years. This has had an adverse effect on the economies of the two countries as well as human rights conditions. In 2013, Eritrea expressed its willingness to engage in dialogue with Ethiopia should it withdraw its army from the disputed territory which it further noted is occupied by 300,000 soldiers from both countries. Ethiopia has previously stated its willingness to surrender Badme, without in the end acting upon this promise. Should this latest promise be implemented and ties between two countries normalized, this might herald positive developments for both the economy and the human rights situation in both countries, with a potential significant impact on one of the major drivers of movement out of Eritrea.

      However, with the news that Ethiopia would move to define its borders in accordance with international arbitration, the possibilities for political stability and economic growth in Eritrea remain uncertain. On 21 June 2018, the President of Eritrea Isaias Aferwerki issued a statement saying that Eritrea would send a delegation to Addis Ababa to ‘gauge current developments… chart out a plan for continuous future action’. The possibility of resulting peace and economic partnership between the two countries could, although a long-term process, also result in economic growth on both sides of the border and increased livelihood opportunities for their citizens who routinely engage in unsafe and irregular migration for political, humanitarian and economic reasons.

      http://www.mixedmigration.org/articles/out-of-eritrea

    • Despite the peace deal with Ethiopia, Eritrean refugees are still afraid to return home

      When Samuel Berhe thinks of Eritrea, he sees the sand-colored buildings and turquoise water of Asmara’s shoreline. He sees his sister’s bar under the family home in the capital’s center that sells sweet toast and beer. He sees his father who, at 80 years old, is losing his eyesight but is still a force to be reckoned with. He thinks of his home, a place that he cannot reach.

      Berhe, like many other Eritreans, fled the country some years ago to escape mandatory national service, which the government made indefinite following the 1998-2000 border war with Ethiopia. The war cost the countries an estimated 100,000 lives, while conscription created a generation of Eritrean refugees. The UNHCR said that in 2016 there were 459,000 Eritrean exiles out of an estimated population of 5.3 million.

      So, when the leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a sudden peace deal in July 2018, citizens of the Horn of Africa nations rejoiced. Many took to the streets bearing the two flags. Others chose social media to express their happiness, and some even dialed up strangers, as phone lines between the nations were once again reinstated. It felt like a new era of harmony and prosperity had begun.

      But for Berhe, the moment was bittersweet.

      “I was happy because it is good for our people but I was also sad, because it doesn’t make any change for me,” he said from his home in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa. “I will stay as a refugee.”

      Like many other Eritrean emigrants, Berhe fled the country illegally to escape national service. He fears that if he returns, he will wind up in jail, or worse. He does not have a passport and has not left Ethiopia since he arrived on the back of a cargo truck 13 years ago. His two daughters, Sarah, 9, and Ella, 11, for whom he is an only parent, have never seen their grandparents or their father’s homeland.

      Now that there is a direct flight, Berhe is planning on sending the girls to see their relatives. But before he considers returning, he will need some sort of guarantee from Eritrea’s President Isaias Afwerki, who leads the ruling People’s Front for Democracy and Justice, that he will pardon those who left.

      “The people that illegally escaped, the government thinks that we are traitors,” he said. “There are many, many like me, all over the world, too afraid to go back.”

      Still, hundreds fought to board the first flights between the two capitals throughout July and August. Asmara’s and Addis Ababa’s airports became symbols of the reunification as hordes of people awaited their relatives with bouquets daily, some whom they hadn’t seen for more than two decades.

      “When I see the people at the airport, smiling, laughing, reuniting with their family, I wish to be like them. To be free. They are lucky,” Berhe said.

      Related: Chronic insomnia plagues young migrants long after they reach their destination

      Zala Mekonnen, 38, an Eritrean Canadian, who was one of the many waiting at arrivals in Addis Ababa, said she had completely given up on the idea that the two nations — formerly one country — would ever rekindle relations.

      Mekonnen, who is half Ethiopian, found the 20-year feud especially difficult as her family was separated in half. In July, her mother saw her uncle for the first time in 25 years.

      “We’re happy but hopefully he’s [Afwerki] going to let those young kids free [from conscription],” she said. “I’m hoping God will hear, because so many of them died while trying to escape. One full generation lost.”

      Related: A life of statelessness derailed this Eritrean runner’s hopes to compete in the Olympics

      Mekonnen called the peace deal with Ethiopia a crucial step towards Eritrean democracy. But Afwerki, the 72-year-old ex-rebel leader, will also have to allow multiple political parties to exist, along with freedom of religion, freedom of speech and reopening Asmara’s public university while also giving young people opportunities outside of national service.

      “The greeting that Afwerki received here in Ethiopia [following the agreement to restore relations], he didn’t deserve it,” said Mekonnen. “He should have been hung.”

      Since the rapprochement, Ethiopia’s leader, Abiy Ahmed, has reached out to exiled opposition groups, including those in Eritrea, to open up a political dialogue. The Eritrean president has not made similar efforts. But in August, his office announced that he would visit Ethiopia for a second time to discuss the issue of rebels.

      Laura Hammond, a professor of developmental studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, said that it is likely Afwerki will push for Ethiopia to send Eritrean refugees seeking asylum back to Eritrea.

      “The difficulty is that, while the two countries are normalizing relations, the political situation inside Eritrea is not changing as rapidly,” Hammond said. “There are significant fears about what will happen to those who have left the country illegally, including in some cases escaping from prison or from their national service bases. They will need to be offered amnesty if they are to feel confident about returning.”

      To voice their frustrations, thousands of exiled Eritreans gathered in protest outside the UN headquarters in Geneva on Aug. 31. Amid chants of “enough is enough” and “down, down Isaias,” attendees held up placards calling for peace and democracy. The opposition website, Harnnet, wrote that while the rapprochement with Ethiopia was welcomed, regional and global politicians were showing “undeserved sympathy” to a power that continued to violate human rights.

      Sitting in front of the TV, Berhe’s two daughters sip black tea and watch a religious parade broadcast on Eritrea’s national channel. Berhe, who has temporary refugee status in Ethiopia, admits that one thing that the peace deal has changed is that the state’s broadcaster no longer airs perpetual scenes of war. For now, he is safe in Addis Ababa with his daughters, but he is eager to obtain a sponsor in the US, Europe or Australia, so that he can resettle and provide them with a secure future. He is afraid that landlocked Ethiopia might cave to pressures from the Eritrean government to return its refugees in exchange for access to the Red Sea port.

      “Meanwhile my girls say to me, ’Why don’t we go for summer holiday in Asmara?’” he laughs. “They don’t understand my problem.”


      https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-09-13/despite-peace-deal-ethiopia-eritrean-refugees-are-still-afraid-return-home

    • Etiopia: firmato ad Asmara accordo di pace fra governo e Fronte nazionale di liberazione dell’#Ogaden

      Asmara, 22 ott 09:51 - (Agenzia Nova) - Il governo dell’Etiopia e i ribelli del Fronte nazionale di liberazione dell’Ogaden (#Onlf) hanno firmato un accordo di pace nella capitale eritrea Asmara per porre fine ad una delle più antiche lotte armate in Etiopia. L’accordo, si legge in una nota del ministero degli Esteri di Addis Abeba ripresa dall’emittente “Fana”, è stato firmato da una delegazione del governo etiope guidata dal ministro degli Esteri Workneh Gebeyehu e dal presidente dell’Onlf, Mohamed Umer Usman, i quali hanno tenuto un colloquio definito “costruttivo” e hanno raggiunto un “accordo storico” che sancisce “l’inizio di un nuovo capitolo di pace e stabilità in Etiopia”. L’Onlf, gruppo separatista fondato nel 1984, è stato etichettato come organizzazione terrorista dal governo etiope fino al luglio scorso, quando il parlamento di Addis Abeba ha ratificato la decisione del governo di rimuovere i partiti in esilio – tra cui appunto l’Onlf – dalla lista delle organizzazioni terroristiche. La decisione rientra nella serie di provvedimenti annunciati dal premier Abiy Ahmed per avviare il percorso di riforme nel paese, iniziato con il rilascio di migliaia di prigionieri politici, la distensione delle relazioni con l’Eritrea e la parziale liberalizzazione dell’economia etiope.

      https://www.agenzianova.com/a/5bcd9c24083997.87051681/2142476/2018-10-22/etiopia-firmato-ad-asmara-accordo-di-pace-fra-governo-e-fronte-nazional


  • #Peacekeeping: servono più donne nelle operazioni #Onu per la pace

    Ancora poche donne partecipano alle operazioni di pace dell’Onu. Eppure le Nazioni Unite hanno promosso l’Agenda delle Donne, Pace e Sicurezza, otto risoluzioni che prevedono, tra l’altro, un ruolo maggiore nel peacekeeping, #peacemaking, #peacebulding e #peace_enforcement. Ecco perché è così importante che questo avvenga davvero


    https://www.osservatoriodiritti.it/2018/06/26/peacekeeping-onu-pace-donne
    #paix #femmes #casques_bleus


  • La paix est un cliché : lorsque l’Occident ne peut pas contrôler le monde sans opposition, cela signifie la guerre Andre Vltchek - Traduit de l’anglais par Diane Gilliard pour Investig’Action 6 Juin 2018
    https://www.investigaction.net/fr/la-paix-est-un-cliche-lorsque-loccident-ne-peut-pas-controler-le-mon

    L’Occident aime à se penser comme une « partie du monde qui aime la paix ». Mais est-ce le cas ? Vous l’entendez partout, de l’Europe à l’Amérique du Nord puis à l’Australie, avant de revenir en Europe : « Paix, paix, paix ! » . C’est devenu un cliché, un slogan, une recette pour obtenir des financements, de la sympathie et du soutien. Vous dites « la paix » et vous ne pouvez vraiment pas vous tromper. Cela veut dire que vous êtes un être humain compatissant et raisonnable.
     
    Dédié à mon ami, le philosophe John Cobb, Jr.


    Chaque année, des « conférences pour la paix » sont organisées partout où la paix est vénérée et même exigée. J’ai récemment assisté à l’une d’elles en tant qu’orateur principal, sur la côte ouest du Danemark.

    Si un poids lourd des correspondants de guerre comme moi y assiste, il sera choqué. Les thèmes de discussion habituels y sont superficiels et choisis pour qu’on se sente bien.

    Au mieux, « à quel point le capitalisme est mauvais » et comment « tout tient au pétrole ». Rien sur la culture génocidaire de l’Occident. Rien sur les pillages permanents et séculaires et les avantages que pratiquement tous les Occidentaux en retirent.

    Au pire, il s’agit de savoir combien le monde est mauvais – le cliché « les gens sont tous les mêmes ». Il y a aussi de plus en plus de sorties bizarres et mal informées contre la Chine et la Russie, souvent qualifiées par les néocons occidentaux de « menaces » et de « puissances rivales ».

    Les participants à ces rassemblements s’accordent pour dire que « la paix est bonne » et que « la guerre est mauvaise ». Ces déclarations sont suivies de grandes ovations et de petites tapes mutuelles dans le dos. Peu de larmes sincères sont versées.


    Les raisons de ces démonstrations sont cependant rarement interrogées. Après tout, qui demanderait la guerre ? Qui aurait envie de violence, de blessures horribles et de mort ? Qui voudrait voir des villes rasées et carbonisées et des bébés abandonnés en pleurs ? Tous cela semble très simple et très logique.

    Mais alors pourquoi entendons-nous si rarement ce « discours de paix » de la part des pays africains dévastés et toujours colonisés de fait ou du Moyen-Orient ? Ne sont-ce pas eux qui souffrent le plus ? Ne devraient-ils pas rêver de paix ? Ou, peut-être, sommes-nous tous en train de manquer l’élément essentiel ?

    Mon amie Arundhati Roy, une grande écrivaine et intellectuelle indienne, a écrit en 2001, en réaction à la « guerre contre le terrorisme » occidentale : « Lorsqu’il a annoncé les frappes aériennes, le président George Bush a dit : “Nos sommes une nation pacifique.” L’ambassadeur préféré de l’Amérique, Tony Blair (qui occupe également le poste de Premier ministre du Royaume-Uni) lui a fait écho : “Nous sommes un peuple pacifique.” Maintenant, nous savons. Les porcs sont des chevaux. Les filles sont des garçons. La guerre, c’est la paix. »

    Lorsqu’elle sort de la bouche des Occidentaux, la « paix » est-elle vraiment la paix, la « guerre » est-elle vraiment une guerre ?

    Les habitants de cet « Occident libre et démocratique » ont-ils encore le droit de poser ces questions ?

    Ou la guerre et la paix, et la perception de la paix, ne sont-elles qu’une partie du dogme qu’il n’est pas permis de contester et qui est « protégé » par la culture occidentale et ses lois ?

    Je ne vis pas en Occident et je ne veux pas y vivre. Par conséquent, je ne suis pas sûr de ce qu’ils sont autorisés à dire et à remettre en question là-bas. Mais nous, les chanceux qui sommes « à l’extérieur » et donc pas totalement conditionnés, contrôlés et endoctrinés, nous ne cesserons certainement pas de poser ces questions de sitôt ; ou, pour être précis, jamais !


    J’ai reçu récemment par le biais de Whatsapp une chaîne de messages de mes amis et camarades d’Afrique de l’Est – pour la plupart des jeunes de gauche, des leaders révolutionnaires, des intellectuels et des militants :

    « L’Afrique libre est une Afrique socialiste ! Nous sommes prêts pour la guerre ! Les jeunes Africains sont en feu ! Mort aux forces impérialistes ! Vive la Révolution bolivarienne ! Coopération Sud-Sud !

    Aujourd’hui, nous menons la bataille dans les rues ! L’Afrique doit s’unir ! »

    De telles déclarations pourraient paraître « violentes » et donc même être qualifiées d’« illégales » si elles étaient prononcées ouvertement en Occident. Quelqu’un pourrait finir à Guantanamo pour cela, ou dans une « prison secrète de la CIA ». Il y a quelques semaines, j’ai parlé directement à ces jeunes – des dirigeants de l’opposition de gauche en Afrique de l’Est – à l’ambassade du Venezuela à Nairobi, au Kenya. Oui, ils étaient en ébullition, ils étaient outragés, déterminés et prêts.

    Pour ceux qui ne connaissent pas bien le continent, le #Kenya a été pendant des années et des décennies, un avant-poste de l’impérialisme britannique, américain et même israélien en Afrique de l’Est. Il jouait le même rôle que l’Allemagne de l’Ouest pendant la guerre froide : un paradis du lèche-vitrine, rempli de biens et de services de luxe.


    Dans le passé, le Kenya était censé éclipser l’expérience socialiste de la Tanzanie dirigée par Nyerere.

    Aujourd’hui, environ 60% des Kenyans vivent dans des bidonvilles, dont certains sont parmi les plus durs d’Afrique. Certaines de ces « implantations », comme Mathare et Kibera, abritent au moins un million de personnes dans les conditions les plus abjectes et les plus terribles. Il y a quatre ans, lorsque je réalisais mon film documentaire dans ces bidonvilles, pour le réseau sud-américain TeleSur, j’ai écrit :

    « … Officiellement, il y a la paix au Kenya. Pendant des décennies, le Kenya a fonctionné comme un État client de l’Occident, mettant en place un régime de marché sauvage, accueillant des bases militaires étrangères. Des milliards de dollars y ont été faits. Mais presque nulle part sur la terre la misère n’est plus brutale qu’ici. »

    Deux ans plus tôt, en filmant mon « Tumaini » près de la ville de Kisumu et de la frontière ougandaise, j’ai vu des hameaux entiers, vides comme des fantômes. Les gens avaient disparu, était morts – du sida et de faim. Mais cela s’appelait encore la paix.

    La paix, c’était quand les médecins militaires américains opéraient à ciel ouvert des Haïtiens désespérément pauvres et malades, dans le célèbre bidonville de Cité Soleil. J’ai vu et j’ai photographié une femme, allongée sur une table de fortune, se faire retirer sa tumeur avec seulement des anesthésiques locaux. J’ai demandé aux médecins nord-américains pourquoi c’était comme ça. Je savais qu’il y avait une installation militaire de premier ordre à deux minutes de là.

    « C’est ce qui se rapproche le plus d’une situation de combat réelle », a répondu un médecin avec franchise. « Pour nous, c’est une excellente formation. »

    Une fois l’intervention chirurgicale terminée, la femme s’est levée, soutenue par son mari effrayé, et a marché vers l’arrêt de bus.

    Oui, tout ceci est, officiellement, la paix.


    À #Beyrouth, au #Liban, j’ai récemment participé à une discussion sur « Écologie de la guerre », un concept scientifique et philosophique créé par plusieurs médecins moyen-orientaux du Centre médical AUB. Le Dr Ghassan « Gus », le chef du département de chirurgie plastique de ce centre au Liban, a expliqué :

    « La #misère, c’est la guerre. La destruction d’un État fort mène au conflit. Un grand nombre de gens sur notre planète vivent en fait dans un conflit ou une guerre, sans même le réaliser : dans des bidonvilles, dans des camps de réfugiés, dans des États totalement faillis ou dans des camps de réfugiés. »

    Au cours de mon travail dans presque tous les coins dévastés du monde, j’ai vu des choses beaucoup plus horribles que ce que j’ai décrit ci-dessus. Peut-être en ai-je trop vu – toute cette « paix » qui a arraché les membres des victimes, toutes ces huttes en feu et toutes ces femmes hurlantes, ou ces enfants mourant de maladie et de faim avant d’atteindre l’adolescence.

    J’ai écrit longuement sur la guerre et la paix dans mon livre de 840 pages, Exposing Lies Of The Empire.

    Lorsque vous faites ce que je fais, vous devenez comme un médecin : vous ne pouvez qu’assister à toutes ces horreurs et ces souffrances, parce que vous êtes là pour aider, pour révéler la réalité et pour faire honte au monde. Vous n’avez pas le droit de vous décomposer, de vous effondrer, de tomber et de pleurer.

    Mais ce que vous ne pouvez pas supporter, c’est l’hypocrisie. L’hypocrisie est « à l’épreuve des balles ».

    Elle ne peut pas être éclairée par des arguments précis, la logique et par des exemples. L’hypocrisie en Occident est souvent ignorante, mais elle n’est qu’égoïste la plupart du temps.


    Alors qu’est-ce que la vraie paix pour les gens en Europe et en Amérique du Nord ? La réponse est simple : c’est un état des choses dans lequel aussi peu d’Occidentaux que possible sont tués ou blessés.

    Un état de choses dans lequel le flot des ressources des pays pauvres, pillés et colonisés s’écoule sans interruption, principalement vers l’Europe et l’Amérique du Nord.

    Le prix d’une telle paix ? Le nombre d’Africains, de Latino-Américains ou d’Asiatiques qui meurent à la suite de cette organisation du monde est totalement sans importance.

    La paix, c’est quand les intérêts commerciaux de l’Occident ne sont pas menacés, même si des dizaines de millions d’êtres humains non blancs disparaissent au cours du processus.

    La paix, c’est lorsque l’Occident peut contrôler le monde politiquement, économiquement, idéologiquement et « culturellement » sans rencontrer d’opposition.

    La « guerre », c’est quand il y a rébellion. La guerre, c’est lorsque le peuple des pays pillés disent « non ! ». La guerre, c’est lorsqu’ils refusent subitement d’être violés, volés, endoctrinés et assassinés.

    Lorsqu’un tel scénario se produit, la réaction immédiate de l’Occident « pour restaurer la paix » est de renverser le gouvernement du pays qui essaie de prendre soin de son peuple. De bombarder les écoles et les hôpitaux, de détruire l’approvisionnement en eau potable et en électricité et de jeter des millions de gens dans la misère et l’agonie.

    C’est ce que l’Occident pourrait bientôt faire à la Corée du Nord (RPDC), à Cuba, au Venezuela, à l’Iran – des pays qui, pour l’instant, ne sont tourmentés « que » par des sanctions et une « opposition » mortelle soutenue par l’étranger. Dans le vocabulaire occidental, « paix » est synonyme de « soumission ». Une soumission totale, sans condition. Toute autre chose est la guerre ou pourrait potentiellement y conduire.

    Pour les pays opprimés et dévastés, y compris les pays d’Afrique, appeler à la résistance serait, au moins dans le vocabulaire occidental, synonyme d’« appel à la violence », et par conséquent illégal. Aussi « illégal » que les appels à la résistance dans les pays occupés par les forces allemands nazies pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Il serait donc logique de qualifier l’approche et l’état d’esprit occidentaux de « fondamentalistes » et de profondément agressif.

     

    #Paix #guerre #géopolitique #geopolitics #dogme #Occident #conférences-pour-la-paix #Occident #Haïti #médecins #formation #Écologie #Écologie-de-la-guerre



  • Korea summit: When war ends but peace is out of reach - BBC News
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-43933745

    Ancient #Rome and #Carthage
    Going further back, in ancient times Rome and Carthage never agreed to peace after the Romans seized and destroyed Carthage at the end of the Punic wars in 146 BC.

    More than 2,100 years later in 1985, the mayors of modern Rome and Carthage municipality - a modern-day suburb of Tunis - signed a peace treaty and an accompanying pact of friendship.

    #guerres #paix #histoire


  • Two Koreas Discuss Official End to 68-Year War, Report Says - Bloomberg
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-17/two-koreas-discuss-announcing-end-to-military-conflict-munhwa-jg35w9vf

    No peace treaty has been signed to replace the 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War, and the U.S. and North Korea have been at loggerheads since formal hostilities ended. A successful summit between Moon and Kim could pave the way for a meeting between Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump — the first between a sitting American president and a North Korean leader.

    #Corée



  • Derrière les horaires, l’abandon des #services_publics marseillais
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/090418/derriere-les-horaires-labandon-des-services-publics-marseillais

    Musée Cantini, à Marseille © Marsactu Sous pression du préfet, la Ville de Marseille va augmenter le temps de travail de ses agents pour respecter la loi. Mais le problème est plus profond : les services publics sont minés par la #cogestion avec #FO et un abandon de l’équipe Gaudin qui les a laissés dépérir.

    #France #Jean-Claude_Gaudin #paix_sociale


  • Le rêve de Martin Luther King : émerger des vallées obscures - 7 Lames la Mer
    http://7lameslamer.net/joyeux-anniversaire-reverend.html

    Le 28 août 1963, devant plus de 250.000 personnes à #Washington, #MartinLutherKing prononce un discours parmi les plus célèbres de l’histoire contemporaine. #Militant #nonviolent pour les #droitsciviques des Afro-Américains, pour la #paix et contre la #pauvreté, #prixNobeldelaPaix en 1964, il est assassiné le #4avril 1968 à Memphis (Tennessee). « #Ihaveadream », texte intégral en français. Zordi mi mazine...

    #racisme #segregation



    • Situato a sud di Bogotà, in una regione strategica tra la cordigliera e la selva, l’#Alto_Ariari è stato a lungo considerato come una “zona rossa” per la massiccia presenza delle #FARC e la forte influenza del partito comunista su molti villaggi. Isolata e stigmatizzata, a partire dagli anni Ottanta la popolazione è stata vittima di una lunga serie di abusi, compiuti tanto dai guerriglieri quanto dalle forze paramilitari e dall’esercito. Intere comunità sono state costrette ad abbandonare le proprie terre, migliaia di persone hanno perso la vita (tra cui oltre 300 membri dell’Unione patriottica) e molte famiglie sono tuttora alla ricerca dei corpi dei propri cari.
      Ad oltre un anno dalla firma degli accordi di pace, nell’Alto Ariari si è tenuto un pellegrinaggio della memoria. Sei giorni di cammino ricordando le ferite della guerra, primo passo necessario per costruire un nuovo futuro.

      #Colombie #guerre #paramilitaires #pèlerinage #mémoire #paix



  • Seggae : Berger Agathe, mort sur le bitume, après Kaya... - 7 Lames la Mer
    http://7lameslamer.net/seggae-berger-agathe-mort-sur-le-2145.html

    Ce #22février 1999, au lendemain de la #mort suspecte de #Kaya en #prison, son ami, Berger Agathe — lui aussi #chanteur de #seggae — marche en direction du rond-point du Port Franc, en brandissant sa chemise blanche au milieu de scènes d’#émeutes. Un #policier au visage masqué met un genou à terre, vise et tire. #BergerAgathe s’effondre sur le macadam ; il ne se relèvera jamais...

    #Mauritius #ileMaurice #Paix #bloodySunday