• Friends of the Traffickers Italy’s Anti-Mafia Directorate and the “Dirty Campaign” to Criminalize Migration

    Afana Dieudonne often says that he is not a superhero. That’s Dieudonne’s way of saying he’s done things he’s not proud of — just like anyone in his situation would, he says, in order to survive. From his home in Cameroon to Tunisia by air, then by car and foot into the desert, across the border into Libya, and onto a rubber boat in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Dieudonne has done a lot of surviving.

    In Libya, Dieudonne remembers when the smugglers managing the safe house would ask him for favors. Dieudonne spoke a little English and didn’t want trouble. He said the smugglers were often high and always armed. Sometimes, when asked, Dieudonne would distribute food and water among the other migrants. Other times, he would inform on those who didn’t follow orders. He remembers the traffickers forcing him to inflict violence on his peers. It was either them or him, he reasoned.

    On September 30, 2014, the smugglers pushed Dieudonne and 91 others out to sea aboard a rubber boat. Buzzing through the pitch-black night, the group watched lights on the Libyan coast fade into darkness. After a day at sea, the overcrowded dinghy began taking on water. Its passengers were rescued by an NGO vessel and transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, where officers picked Dieudonne out of a crowd and led him into a room for questioning.

    At first, Dieudonne remembers the questioning to be quick, almost routine. His name, his age, his nationality. And then the questions turned: The officers said they wanted to know how the trafficking worked in Libya so they could arrest the people involved. They wanted to know who had driven the rubber boat and who had held the navigation compass.

    “So I explained everything to them, and I also showed who the ‘captain’ was — captain in quotes, because there is no captain,” said Dieudonne. The real traffickers stay in Libya, he added. “Even those who find themselves to be captains, they don’t do it by choice.”

    For the smugglers, Dieudonne explained, “we are the customers, and we are the goods.”

    For years, efforts by the Italian government and the European Union to address migration in the central Mediterranean have focused on the people in Libya — interchangeably called facilitators, smugglers, traffickers, or militia members, depending on which agency you’re speaking to — whose livelihoods come from helping others cross irregularly into Europe. People pay them a fare to organize a journey so dangerous it has taken tens of thousands of lives.

    The European effort to dismantle these smuggling networks has been driven by an unlikely actor: the Italian anti-mafia and anti-terrorism directorate, a niche police office in Rome that gained respect in the 1990s and early 2000s for dismantling large parts of the Mafia in Sicily and elsewhere in Italy. According to previously unpublished internal documents, the office — called the Direzione nazionale antimafia e antiterrorismo, or DNAA, in Italian — took a front-and-center role in the management of Europe’s southern sea borders, in direct coordination with the EU border agency Frontex and European military missions operating off the Libyan coast.

    In 2013, under the leadership of a longtime anti-mafia prosecutor named Franco Roberti, the directorate pioneered a strategy that was unique — or at least new for the border officers involved. They would start handling irregular migration to Europe like they had handled the mob. The approach would allow Italian and European police, coast guard agencies, and navies, obliged by international law to rescue stranded refugees at sea, to at least get some arrests and convictions along the way.

    The idea was to arrest low-level operators and use coercion and plea deals to get them to flip on their superiors. That way, the reasoning went, police investigators could work their way up the food chain and eventually dismantle the smuggling rings in Libya. With every boat that disembarked in Italy, police would make a handful of arrests. Anybody found to have played an active role during the crossing, from piloting to holding a compass to distributing water or bailing out a leak, could be arrested under a new legal directive written by Roberti’s anti-mafia directorate. Charges ranged from simple smuggling to transnational criminal conspiracy and — if people asphyxiated below deck or drowned when a boat capsized — even murder. Judicial sources estimate the number of people arrested since 2013 to be in the thousands.

    For the police, prosecutors, and politicians involved, the arrests were an important domestic political win. At the time, public opinion in Italy was turning against migration, and the mugshots of alleged smugglers regularly held space on front pages throughout the country.

    But according to the minutes of closed-door conversations among some of the very same actors directing these cases, which were obtained by The Intercept under Italy’s freedom of information law, most anti-mafia prosecutions only focused on low-level boat drivers, often migrants who had themselves paid for the trip across. Few, if any, smuggling bosses were ever convicted. Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions built on hasty investigations and coercive interrogations.

    In the years that followed, the anti-mafia directorate went to great lengths to keep the arrests coming. According to the internal documents, the office coordinated a series of criminal investigations into the civilian rescue NGOs working to save lives in the Mediterranean, accusing them of hampering police work. It also oversaw efforts to create and train a new coast guard in Libya, with full knowledge that some coast guard officers were colluding with the same smuggling networks that Italian and European leaders were supposed to be fighting.

    Since its inception, the anti-mafia directorate has wielded unparalleled investigative tools and served as a bridge between politicians and the courts. The documents reveal in meticulous detail how the agency, alongside Italian and European officials, capitalized on those powers to crack down on alleged smugglers, most of whom they knew to be desperate people fleeing poverty and violence with limited resources to defend themselves in court.

    Tragedy and Opportunity

    The anti-mafia directorate was born in the early 1990s after a decade of escalating Mafia violence. By then, hundreds of prosecutors, politicians, journalists, and police officers had been shot, blown up, or kidnapped, and many more extorted by organized crime families operating in Italy and beyond.

    In Palermo, the Sicilian capital, prosecutor Giovanni Falcone was a rising star in the Italian judiciary. Falcone had won unprecedented success with an approach to organized crime based on tracking financial flows, seizing assets, and centralizing evidence gathered by prosecutor’s offices across the island.

    But as the Mafia expanded its reach into the rest of Europe, Falcone’s work proved insufficient.

    In September 1990, a Mafia commando drove from Germany to Sicily to gun down a 37-year-old judge. Weeks later, at a police checkpoint in Naples, the Sicilian driver of a truck loaded with weapons, explosives, and drugs was found to be a resident of Germany. A month after the arrests, Falcone traveled to Germany to establish an information-sharing mechanism with authorities there. He brought along a younger colleague from Naples, Franco Roberti.

    “We faced a stone wall,” recalled Roberti, still bitter three decades later. He spoke to us outside a cafe in a plum neighborhood in Naples. Seventy-three years old and speaking with the rasp of a lifelong smoker, Roberti described Italy’s Mafia problem in blunt language. He bemoaned a lack of international cooperation that, he said, continues to this day. “They claimed that there was no need to investigate there,” Roberti said, “that it was up to us to investigate Italians in Germany who were occasional mafiosi.”

    As the prosecutors traveled back to Italy empty-handed, Roberti remembers Falcone telling him that they needed “a centralized national organ able to speak directly to foreign judicial authorities and coordinate investigations in Italy.”

    “That is how the idea of the anti-mafia directorate was born,” Roberti said. The two began building what would become Italy’s first national anti-mafia force.

    At the time, there was tough resistance to the project. Critics argued that Falcone and Roberti were creating “super-prosecutors” who would wield outsize powers over the courts, while also being subject to political pressures from the government in Rome. It was, they argued, a marriage of police and the judiciary, political interests and supposedly apolitical courts — convenient for getting Mafia convictions but dangerous for Italian democracy.

    Still, in January 1992, the project was approved in Parliament. But Falcone would never get to lead it: Months later, a bomb set by the Mafia killed him, his wife, and the three agents escorting them. The attack put to rest any remaining criticism of Falcone’s plan.

    The anti-mafia directorate went on to become one of Italy’s most important institutions, the national authority over all matters concerning organized crime and the agency responsible for partially freeing the country from its century-old crucible. In the decades after Falcone’s death, the directorate did what many in Italy thought impossible, dismantling large parts of the five main Italian crime families and almost halving the Mafia-related murder rate.

    And yet, by the time Roberti took control in 2013, it had been years since the last high-profile Mafia prosecution, and the organization’s influence was waning. At the same time, Italy was facing unprecedented numbers of migrants arriving by boat. Roberti had an idea: The anti-mafia directorate would start working on what he saw as a different kind of mafia. The organization set its sights on Libya.

    “We thought we had to do something more coordinated to combat this trafficking,” Roberti remembered, “so I put everyone around a table.”

    “The main objective was to save lives, seize ships, and capture smugglers,” Roberti said. “Which we did.”

    Our Sea

    Dieudonne made it to the Libyan port city of Zuwara in August 2014. One more step across the Mediterranean, and he’d be in Europe. The smugglers he paid to get him across the sea took all of his possessions and put him in an abandoned building that served as a safe house to wait for his turn.

    Dieudonne told his story from a small office in Bari, Italy, where he runs a cooperative that helps recent arrivals access local education. Dieudonne is fiery and charismatic. He is constantly moving: speaking, texting, calling, gesticulating. Every time he makes a point, he raps his knuckles on the table in a one-two pattern. Dieudonne insisted that we publish his real name. Others who made the journey more recently — still pending decisions on their residence permits or refugee status — were less willing to speak openly.

    Dieudonne remembers the safe house in Zuwara as a string of constant violence. The smugglers would come once a day to leave food. Every day, they would ask who hadn’t followed their orders. Those inside the abandoned building knew they were less likely to be discovered by police or rival smugglers, but at the same time, they were not free to leave.

    “They’ve put a guy in the refrigerator in front of all of us, to show how the next one who misbehaves will be treated,” Dieudonne remembered, indignant. He witnessed torture, shootings, rape. “The first time you see it, it hurts you. The second time it hurts you less. The third time,” he said with a shrug, “it becomes normal. Because that’s the only way to survive.”

    “That’s why arresting the person who pilots a boat and treating them like a trafficker makes me laugh,” Dieudonne said. Others who have made the journey to Italy report having been forced to drive at gunpoint. “You only do it to be sure you don’t die there,” he said.

    Two years after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi’s government, much of Libya’s northwest coast had become a staging ground for smugglers who organized sea crossings to Europe in large wooden fishing boats. When those ships — overcrowded, underpowered, and piloted by amateurs — inevitably capsized, the deaths were counted by the hundreds.

    In October 2013, two shipwrecks off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa took over 400 lives, sparking public outcry across Europe. In response, the Italian state mobilized two plans, one public and the other private.

    “There was a big shock when the Lampedusa tragedy happened,” remembered Italian Sen. Emma Bonino, then the country’s foreign minister. The prime minister “called an emergency meeting, and we decided to immediately launch this rescue program,” Bonino said. “Someone wanted to call the program ‘safe seas.’ I said no, not safe, because it’s sure we’ll have other tragedies. So let’s call it Mare Nostrum.”

    Mare Nostrum — “our sea” in Latin — was a rescue mission in international waters off the coast of Libya that ran for one year and rescued more than 150,000 people. The operation also brought Italian ships, airplanes, and submarines closer than ever to Libyan shores. Roberti, just two months into his job as head of the anti-mafia directorate, saw an opportunity to extend the country’s judicial reach and inflict a lethal blow to smuggling rings in Libya.

    Five days after the start of Mare Nostrum, Roberti launched the private plan: a series of coordination meetings among the highest echelons of the Italian police, navy, coast guard, and judiciary. Under Roberti, these meetings would run for four years and eventually involve representatives from Frontex, Europol, an EU military operation, and even Libya.

    The minutes of five of these meetings, which were presented by Roberti in a committee of the Italian Parliament and obtained by The Intercept, give an unprecedented behind-the-scenes look at the events on Europe’s southern borders since the Lampedusa shipwrecks.

    In the first meeting, held in October 2013, Roberti told participants that the anti-mafia offices in the Sicilian city of Catania had developed an innovative way to deal with migrant smuggling. By treating Libyan smugglers like they had treated the Italian Mafia, prosecutors could claim jurisdiction over international waters far beyond Italy’s borders. That, Roberti said, meant they could lawfully board and seize vessels on the high seas, conduct investigations there, and use the evidence in court.

    The Italian authorities have long recognized that, per international maritime law, they are obligated to rescue people fleeing Libya on overcrowded boats and transport them to a place of safety. As the number of people attempting the crossing increased, many Italian prosecutors and coast guard officials came to believe that smugglers were relying on these rescues to make their business model work; therefore, the anti-mafia reasoning went, anyone who acted as crew or made a distress call on a boat carrying migrants could be considered complicit in Libyan trafficking and subject to Italian jurisdiction. This new approach drew heavily from legal doctrines developed in the United States during the 1980s aimed at stopping drug smuggling.

    European leaders were scrambling to find a solution to what they saw as a looming migration crisis. Italian officials thought they had the answer and publicly justified their decisions as a way to prevent future drownings.

    But according to the minutes of the 2013 anti-mafia meeting, the new strategy predated the Lampedusa shipwrecks by at least a week. Sicilian prosecutors had already written the plan to crack down on migration across the Mediterranean but lacked both the tools and public will to put it into action. Following the Lampedusa tragedy and the creation of Mare Nostrum, they suddenly had both.

    State of Necessity

    In the international waters off the coast of Libya, Dieudonne and 91 others were rescued by a European NGO called Migrant Offshore Aid Station. They spent two days aboard MOAS’s ship before being transferred to an Italian coast guard ship, Nave Dattilo, to be taken to Europe.

    Aboard the Dattilo, coast guard officers asked Dieudonne why he had left his home in Cameroon. He remembers them showing him a photograph of the rubber boat taken from the air. “They asked me who was driving, the roles and everything,” he remembered. “Then they asked me if I could tell him how the trafficking in Libya works, and then, they said, they would give me residence documents.”

    Dieudonne said that he was reluctant to cooperate at first. He didn’t want to accuse any of his peers, but he was also concerned that he could become a suspect. After all, he had helped the driver at points throughout the voyage.

    “I thought that if I didn’t cooperate, they might hurt me,” Dieudonne said. “Not physically hurt, but they could consider me dishonest, like someone who was part of the trafficking.”

    To this day, Dieudonne says he can’t understand why Italy would punish people for fleeing poverty and political violence in West Africa. He rattled off a list of events from the last year alone: draught, famine, corruption, armed gunmen, attacks on schools. “And you try to convict someone for managing to escape that situation?”

    The coast guard ship disembarked in Vibo Valentia, a city in the Italian region of Calabria. During disembarkation, a local police officer explained to a journalist that they had arrested five people. The journalist asked how the police had identified the accused.

    “A lot has been done by the coast guard, who picked [the migrants] up two days ago and managed to spot [the alleged smugglers],” the officer explained. “Then we have witness statements and videos.”

    Cases like these, where arrests are made on the basis of photo or video evidence and statements by witnesses like Dieudonne, are common, said Gigi Modica, a judge in Sicily who has heard many immigration and asylum cases. “It’s usually the same story. They take three or four people, no more. They ask them two questions: who was driving the boat, and who was holding the compass,” Modica explained. “That’s it — they get the names and don’t care about the rest.”

    Modica was one of the first judges in Italy to acquit people charged for driving rubber boats — known as “scafisti,” or boat drivers, in Italian — on the grounds that they had been forced to do so. These “state of necessity” rulings have since become increasingly common. Modica rattled off a list of irregularities he’s seen in such cases: systemic racism, witness statements that migrants later say they didn’t make, interrogations with no translator or lawyer, and in some cases, people who report being encouraged by police to sign documents renouncing their right to apply for asylum.

    “So often these alleged smugglers — scafisti — are normal people who were compelled to pilot a boat by smugglers in Libya,” Modica said.

    Documents of over a dozen trials reviewed by The Intercept show prosecutions largely built on testimony from migrants who are promised a residence permit in exchange for their collaboration. At sea, witnesses are interviewed by the police hours after their rescue, often still in a state of shock after surviving a shipwreck.

    In many cases, identical statements, typos included, are attributed to several witnesses and copied and pasted across different police reports. Sometimes, these reports have been enough to secure decadeslong sentences. Other times, under cross-examination in court, witnesses have contradicted the statements recorded by police or denied giving any testimony at all.

    As early as 2015, attendees of the anti-mafia meetings were discussing problems with these prosecutions. In a meeting that February, Giovanni Salvi, then the prosecutor of Catania, acknowledged that smugglers often abandoned migrant boats in international waters. Still, Italian police were steaming ahead with the prosecutions of those left on board.

    These prosecutions were so important that in some cases, the Italian coast guard decided to delay rescue when boats were in distress in order to “allow for the arrival of institutional ships that can conduct arrests,” a coast guard commander explained at the meeting.

    When asked about the commander’s comments, the Italian coast guard said that “on no occasion” has the agency ever delayed a rescue operation. Delaying rescue for any reason goes against international and Italian law, and according to various human rights lawyers in Europe, could give rise to criminal liability.

    NGOs in the Crosshairs

    Italy canceled Mare Nostrum after one year, citing budget constraints and a lack of European collaboration. In its wake, the EU set up two new operations, one via Frontex and the other a military effort called Operation Sophia. These operations focused not on humanitarian rescue but on border security and people smuggling from Libya. Beginning in 2015, representatives from Frontex and Operation Sophia were included in the anti-mafia directorate meetings, where Italian prosecutors ensured that both abided by the new investigative strategy.

    Key to these investigations were photos from the rescues, like the aerial image that Dieudonne remembers the Italian coast guard showing him, which gave police another way to identify who piloted the boats and helped navigate.

    In the absence of government rescue ships, a fleet of civilian NGO vessels began taking on a large number of rescues in the international waters off the coast of Libya. These ships, while coordinated by the Italian coast guard rescue center in Rome, made evidence-gathering difficult for prosecutors and judicial police. According to the anti-mafia meeting minutes, some NGOs, including MOAS, routinely gave photos to Italian police and Frontex. Others refused, arguing that providing evidence for investigations into the people they saved would undermine their efficacy and neutrality.

    In the years following Mare Nostrum, the NGO fleet would come to account for more than one-third of all rescues in the central Mediterranean, according to estimates by Operation Sophia. A leaked status report from the operation noted that because NGOs did not collect information from rescued migrants for police, “information essential to enhance the understanding of the smuggling business model is not acquired.”

    In a subsequent anti-mafia meeting, six prosecutors echoed this concern. NGO rescues meant that police couldn’t interview migrants at sea, they said, and cases were getting thrown out for lack of evidence. A coast guard admiral explained the importance of conducting interviews just after a rescue, when “a moment of empathy has been established.”

    “It is not possible to carry out this task if the rescue intervention is carried out by ships of the NGOs,” the admiral told the group.

    The NGOs were causing problems for the DNAA strategy. At the meetings, Italian prosecutors and representatives from the coast guard, navy, and Interior Ministry discussed what they could do to rein in the humanitarian organizations. At the same time, various prosecutors were separately fixing their investigative sights on the NGOs themselves.

    In late 2016, an internal report from Frontex — later published in full by The Intercept — accused an NGO vessel of directly receiving migrants from Libyan smugglers, attributing the information to “Italian authorities.” The claim was contradicted by video evidence and the ship’s crew.

    Months later, Carmelo Zuccaro, the prosecutor of Catania, made public that he was investigating rescue NGOs. “Together with Frontex and the navy, we are trying to monitor all these NGOs that have shown that they have great financial resources,” Zuccaro told an Italian newspaper. The claim went viral in Italian and European media. “Friends of the traffickers” and “migrant taxi service” became common slurs used toward humanitarian NGOs by anti-immigration politicians and the Italian far right.

    Zuccaro would eventually walk back his claims, telling a parliamentary committee that he was working off a hypothesis at the time and had no evidence to back it up.

    In an interview with a German newspaper in February 2017, the director of Frontex, Fabrice Leggeri, refrained from explicitly criticizing the work of rescue NGOs but did say they were hampering police investigations in the Mediterranean. As aid organizations assumed a larger percentage of rescues, Leggeri said, “it is becoming more difficult for the European security authorities to find out more about the smuggling networks through interviews with migrants.”

    “That smear campaign was very, very deep,” remembered Bonino, the former foreign minister. Referring to Marco Minniti, Italy’s interior minister at the time, she added, “I was trying to push Minniti not to be so obsessed with people coming, but to make a policy of integration in Italy. But he only focused on Libya and smuggling and criminalizing NGOs with the help of prosecutors.”

    Bonino explained that the action against NGOs was part of a larger plan to change European policy in the central Mediterranean. The first step was the shift away from humanitarian rescue and toward border security and smuggling. The second step “was blaming the NGOs or arresting them, a sort of dirty campaign against them,” she said. “The results of which after so many years have been no convictions, no penalties, no trials.”

    Finally, the third step was to build a new coast guard in Libya to do what the Europeans couldn’t, per international law: intercept people at sea and bring them back to Libya, the country from which they had just fled.

    At first, leaders at Frontex were cautious. “From Frontex’s point of view, we look at Libya with concern; there is no stable state there,” Leggeri said in the 2017 interview. “We are now helping to train 60 officers for a possible future Libyan coast guard. But this is at best a beginning.”

    Bonino saw this effort differently. “They started providing support for their so-called coast guard,” she said, “which were the same traffickers changing coats.”
    Rescued migrants disembarking from a Libyan coast guard ship in the town of Khoms, a town 120 kilometres (75 miles) east of the capital on October 1, 2019.

    Same Uniforms, Same Ships

    Safe on land in Italy, Dieudonne was never called to testify in court. He hopes that none of his peers ended up in prison but said he would gladly testify against the traffickers if called. Aboard the coast guard ship, he remembers, “I gave the police contact information for the traffickers, I gave them names.”

    The smuggling operations in Libya happened out in the open, but Italian police could only go as far as international waters. Leaked documents from Operation Sophia describe years of efforts by European officials to get Libyan police to arrest smugglers. Behind closed doors, top Italian and EU officials admitted that these same smugglers were intertwined with the new Libyan coast guard that Europe was creating and that working with them would likely go against international law.

    As early as 2015, multiple officials at the anti-mafia meetings noted that some smugglers were uncomfortably close to members of the Libyan government. “Militias use the same uniforms and the same ships as the Libyan coast guard that the Italian navy itself is training,” Rear Adm. Enrico Credendino, then in charge of Operation Sophia, said in 2017. The head of the Libyan coast guard and the Libyan minister of defense, both allies of the Italian government, Credendino added, “have close relationships with some militia bosses.”

    One of the Libyan coast guard officers playing both sides was Abd al-Rahman Milad, also known as Bija. In 2019, the Italian newspaper Avvenire revealed that Bija participated in a May 2017 meeting in Sicily, alongside Italian border police and intelligence officials, that was aimed at stemming migration from Libya. A month later, he was condemned by the U.N. Security Council for his role as a top member of a powerful trafficking militia in the coastal town of Zawiya, and for, as the U.N. put it, “sinking migrant boats using firearms.”

    According to leaked documents from Operation Sophia, coast guard officers under Bija’s command were trained by the EU between 2016 and 2018.

    While the Italian government was prosecuting supposed smugglers in Italy, they were also working with people they knew to be smugglers in Libya. Minniti, Italy’s then-interior minister, justified the deals his government was making in Libya by saying that the prospect of mass migration from Africa made him “fear for the well-being of Italian democracy.”

    In one of the 2017 anti-mafia meetings, a representative of the Interior Ministry, Vittorio Pisani, outlined in clear terms a plan that provided for the direct coordination of the new Libyan coast guard. They would create “an operation room in Libya for the exchange of information with the Interior Ministry,” Pisani explained, “mainly on the position of NGO ships and their rescue operations, in order to employ the Libyan coast guard in its national waters.”

    And with that, the third step of the plan was set in motion. At the end of the meeting, Roberti suggested that the group invite representatives from the Libyan police to their next meeting. In an interview with The Intercept, Roberti confirmed that Libyan representatives attended at least two anti-mafia meetings and that he himself met Bija at a meeting in Libya, one month after the U.N. Security Council report was published. The following year, the Security Council committee on Libya sanctioned Bija, freezing his assets and banning him from international travel.

    “We needed to have the participation of Libyan institutions. But they did nothing, because they were taking money from the traffickers,” Roberti told us from the cafe in Naples. “They themselves were the traffickers.”
    A Place of Safety

    Roberti retired from the anti-mafia directorate in 2017. He said that under his leadership, the organization was able to create a basis for handling migration throughout Europe. Still, Roberti admits that his expansion of the DNAA into migration issues has had mixed results. Like his trip to Germany in the ’90s with Giovanni Falcone, Roberti said the anti-mafia strategy faltered because of a lack of collaboration: with the NGOs, with other European governments, and with Libya.

    “On a European level, the cooperation does not work,” Roberti said. Regarding Libya, he added, “We tried — I believe it was right, the agreements [the government] made. But it turned out to be a failure in the end.”

    The DNAA has since expanded its operations. Between 2017 and 2019, the Italian government passed two bills that put the anti-mafia directorate in charge of virtually all illegal immigration matters. Since 2017, five Sicilian prosecutors, all of whom attended at least one anti-mafia coordination meeting, have initiated 15 separate legal proceedings against humanitarian NGO workers. So far there have been no convictions: Three cases have been thrown out in court, and the rest are ongoing.

    Earlier this month, news broke that Sicilian prosecutors had wiretapped journalists and human rights lawyers as part of one of these investigations, listening in on legally protected conversations with sources and clients. The Italian justice ministry has opened an investigation into the incident, which could amount to criminal behavior, according to Italian legal experts. The prosecutor who approved the wiretaps attended at least one DNAA coordination meeting, where investigations against NGOs were discussed at length.

    As the DNAA has extended its reach, key actors from the anti-mafia coordination meetings have risen through the ranks of Italian and European institutions. One prosecutor, Federico Cafiero de Raho, now runs the anti-mafia directorate. Salvi, the former prosecutor of Catania, is the equivalent of Italy’s attorney general. Pisani, the former Interior Ministry representative, is deputy head of the Italian intelligence services. And Roberti is a member of the European Parliament.

    Cafiero de Raho stands by the investigations and arrests that the anti-mafia directorate has made over the years. He said the coordination meetings were an essential tool for prosecutors and police during difficult times.

    When asked about his specific comments during the meetings — particularly statements that humanitarian NGOs needed to be regulated and multiple admissions that members of the new Libyan coast guard were involved in smuggling activities — Cafiero de Raho said that his remarks should be placed in context, a time when Italy and the EU were working to build a coast guard in a part of Libya that was largely ruled by local militias. He said his ultimate goal was what, in the DNAA coordination meetings, he called the “extrajudicial solution”: attempts to prove the existence of crimes against humanity in Libya so that “the United Nation sends troops to Libya to dismantle migrants camps set up by traffickers … and retake control of that territory.”

    A spokesperson for the EU’s foreign policy arm, which ran Operation Sophia, refused to directly address evidence that leaders of the European military operation knew that parts of the new Libyan coast guard were also involved in smuggling activities, only noting that Bija himself wasn’t trained by the EU. A Frontex spokesperson stated that the agency “was not involved in the selection of officers to be trained.”

    In 2019, the European migration strategy changed again. Now, the vast majority of departures are intercepted by the Libyan coast guard and brought back to Libya. In March of that year, Operation Sophia removed all of its ships from the rescue area and has since focused on using aerial patrols to direct and coordinate the Libyan coast guard. Human rights lawyers in Europe have filed six legal actions against Italy and the EU as a result, calling the practice refoulement by proxy: facilitating the return of migrants to dangerous circumstances in violation of international law.

    Indeed, throughout four years of coordination meetings, Italy and the EU were admitting privately that returning people to Libya would be illegal. “Fundamental human rights violations in Libya make it impossible to push migrants back to the Libyan coast,” Pisani explained in 2015. Two years later, he outlined the beginnings of a plan that would do exactly that.

    The Result of Mere Chance

    Dieudonne knows he was lucky. The line that separates suspect and victim can be entirely up to police officers’ first impressions in the minutes or hours following a rescue. According to police reports used in prosecutions, physical attributes like having “a clearer skin tone” or behavior aboard the ship, including scrutinizing police movements “with strange interest,” were enough to rouse suspicion.

    In a 2019 ruling that acquitted seven alleged smugglers after three years of pretrial detention, judges wrote that “the selection of the suspects on one side, and the witnesses on the other, with the only exception of the driver, has almost been the result of mere chance.”

    Carrying out work for their Libyan captors has cost other migrants in Italy lengthy prison sentences. In September 2019, a 22-year-old Guinean nicknamed Suarez was arrested upon his arrival to Italy. Four witnesses told police he had collaborated with prison guards in Zawiya, at the immigrant detention center managed by the infamous Bija.

    “Suarez was also a prisoner, who then took on a job,” one of the witnesses told the court. Handing out meals or taking care of security is what those who can’t afford to pay their ransom often do in order to get out, explained another. “Unfortunately, you would have to be there to understand the situation,” the first witness said. Suarez was sentenced to 20 years in prison, recently reduced to 12 years on appeal.

    Dieudonne remembered his journey at sea vividly, but with surprising cool. When the boat began taking on water, he tried to help. “One must give help where it is needed.” At his office in Bari, Dieudonne bent over and moved his arms in a low scooping motion, like he was bailing water out of a boat.

    “Should they condemn me too?” he asked. He finds it ironic that it was the Libyans who eventually arrested Bija on human trafficking charges this past October. The Italians and Europeans, he said with a laugh, were too busy working with the corrupt coast guard commander. (In April, Bija was released from prison after a Libyan court absolved him of all charges. He was promoted within the coast guard and put back on the job.)

    Dieudonne thinks often about the people he identified aboard the coast guard ship in the middle of the sea. “I told the police the truth. But if that collaboration ends with the conviction of an innocent person, it’s not good,” he said. “Because I know that person did nothing. On the contrary, he saved our lives by driving that raft.”

    https://theintercept.com/2021/04/30/italy-anti-mafia-migrant-rescue-smuggling

    #Méditerranée #Italie #Libye #ONG #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #solidarité #secours #mer_Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violence #passeurs #Méditerranée_centrale #anti-mafia #anti-terrorisme #Direzione_nazionale_antimafia_e_antiterrorismo #DNAA #Frontex #Franco_Roberti #justice #politique #Zuwara #torture #viol #Mare_Nostrum #Europol #eaux_internationales #droit_de_la_mer #droit_maritime #juridiction_italienne #arrestations #Gigi_Modica #scafista #scafisti #état_de_nécessité #Giovanni_Salvi #NGO #Operation_Sophia #MOAS #DNA #Carmelo_Zuccaro #Zuccaro #Fabrice_Leggeri #Leggeri #Marco_Minniti #Minniti #campagne #gardes-côtes_libyens #milices #Enrico_Credendino #Abd_al-Rahman_Milad #Bija ##Abdurhaman_al-Milad #Al_Bija #Zawiya #Vittorio_Pisani #Federico_Cafiero_de_Raho #solution_extrajudiciaire #pull-back #refoulement_by_proxy #refoulement #push-back #Suarez

    ping @karine4 @isskein @rhoumour

  • The Death of Asylum and the Search for Alternatives

    March 2021 saw the announcement of the UK’s new post-Brexit asylum policy. This plan centres ‘criminal smuggling gangs’ who facilitate the cross border movement of people seeking asylum, particularly in this case, across the English Channel. It therefore distinguishes between two groups of people seeking asylum: those who travel themselves to places of potential sanctuary, and those who wait in a refugee camp near the place that they fled for the lottery ticket of UNHCR resettlement. Those who arrive ‘spontaneously’ will never be granted permanent leave to remain in the UK. Those in the privileged group of resettled refugees will gain indefinite leave to remain.

    Resettlement represents a tiny proportion of refugee reception globally. Of the 80 million displaced people globally at the end of 2019, 22,800 were resettled in 2020 and only 3,560 were resettled to the UK. Under the new plans, forms of resettlement are set to increase, which can only be welcomed. But of course, the expansion of resettlement will make no difference to people who are here, and arriving, every year. People who find themselves in a situation of persecution or displacement very rarely have knowledge of any particular national asylum system. Most learn the arbitrary details of access to work, welfare, and asylum itself upon arrival.

    In making smugglers the focus of asylum policy, the UK is inaugurating what Alison Mountz calls the death of asylum. There is of course little difference between people fleeing persecution who make the journey themselves to the UK, or those who wait in a camp with a small chance of resettlement. The two are often, in fact, connected, as men are more likely to go ahead in advance, making perilous journeys, in the hope that safe and legal options will then be opened up for vulnerable family members. And what makes these perilous journeys so dangerous? The lack of safe and legal routes.

    Britain, and other countries across Europe, North America and Australasia, have gone to huge efforts and massive expense in recent decades to close down access to the right to asylum. Examples of this include paying foreign powers to quarantine refugees outside of Europe, criminalising those who help refugees, and carrier sanctions. Carrier sanctions are fines for airlines or ferry companies if someone boards an aeroplane without appropriate travel documents. So you get the airlines to stop people boarding a plane to your country to claim asylum. In this way you don’t break international law, but you are certainly violating the spirit of it. If you’ve ever wondered why people pay 10 times the cost of a plane ticket to cross the Mediterranean or the Channel in a tiny boat, carrier sanctions are the reason.

    So government policy closes down safe and legal routes, forcing people to take more perilous journeys. These are not illegal journeys because under international law one cannot travel illegally if one is seeking asylum. Their only option becomes to pay smugglers for help in crossing borders. At this point criminalising smuggling becomes the focus of asylum policy. In this way, government policy creates the crisis which it then claims to solve. And this extends to people who are seeking asylum themselves.

    Arcane maritime laws have been deployed by the UK in order to criminalise irregular Channel crossers who breach sea defences, and therefore deny them sanctuary. Specifically, if one of the people aboard a given boat touches the tiller, oars, or steering device, they become liable to be arrested under anti-smuggling laws. In 2020, eight people were jailed on such grounds, facing sentences of up to two and a half years, as well as the subsequent threat of deportation. For these people, there are no safe and legal routes left.

    We know from extensive research on the subject, that poverty in a country does not lead to an increase in asylum applications elsewhere from that country. Things like wars, genocide and human rights abuses need to be present in order for nationals of a country to start seeking asylum abroad in any meaningful number. Why then, one might ask, is the UK so obsessed with preventing people who are fleeing wars, genocide and human rights abuses from gaining asylum here? On their own terms there is one central reason: their belief that most people seeking asylum today are not actually refugees, but economic migrants seeking to cheat the asylum system.

    This idea that people who seek asylum are largely ‘bogus’ began in the early 2000s. It came in response to a shift in the nationalities of people seeking asylum. During the Cold War there was little concern with the mix of motivations in relation to fleeing persecution or seeking a ‘better life’. But when people started to seek asylum from formerly colonised countries in the ‘Third World’ they began to be construed as ‘new asylum seekers’ and were assumed to be illegitimate. From David Blunkett’s time in the Home Office onwards, these ‘new asylum seekers’, primarily black and brown people fleeing countries in which refugee producing situations are occurring, asylum has been increasingly closed down.

    The UK government has tended to justify its highly restrictive asylum policies on the basis that it is open to abuse from bogus, cheating, young men. It then makes the lives of people who are awaiting a decision on their asylum application as difficult as possible on the basis that this will deter others. Forcing people who are here to live below the poverty line, then, is imagined to sever ‘pull factors’ for others who have not yet arrived. There is no evidence to support the idea that deterrence strategies work, they simply costs lives.

    Over the past two decades, as we have witnessed the slow death of asylum, it has become increasingly difficult to imagine alternatives. Organisations advocating for people seeking asylum have, with diminishing funds since 2010, tended to focus on challenging specific aspects of the system on legal grounds, such as how asylum support rates are calculated or whether indefinite detention is lawful.

    Scholars of migration studies, myself included, have written countless papers and books debunking the spurious claims made by the government to justify their policies, and criticising the underlying logics of the system. What we have failed to do is offer convincing alternatives. But with his new book, A Modern Migration Theory, Professor of Migration Studies Peo Hansen offers us an example of an alternative strategy. This is not a utopian proposal of open borders, this is the real experience of Sweden, a natural experiment with proven success.

    During 2015, large numbers of people were displaced as the Syrian civil war escalated. Most stayed within the region, with millions of people being hosted in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. A smaller proportion decided to travel onwards from these places to Europe. Because of the fortress like policies adopted by European countries, there were no safe and legal routes aboard aeroplanes or ferries. Horrified by the spontaneous arrival of people seeking sanctuary, most European countries refused to take part in burden sharing and so it fell to Germany and Sweden, the only countries that opened their doors in any meaningful way, to host the new arrivals.

    Hansen documents what happened next in Sweden. First, the Swedish state ended austerity in an emergency response to the challenge of hosting so many refugees. As part of this, and as a country that produces its own currency, the Swedish state distributed funds across the local authorities of the country to help them in receiving the refugees. And third, this money was spent not just on refugees, but on the infrastructure needed to support an increased population in a given area – on schools, hospitals, and housing. This is in the context of Sweden also having a welfare system which is extremely generous compared to Britain’s stripped back welfare regime.

    As in Britain, the Swedish government had up to this point spent some years fetishizing the ‘budget deficit’ and there was an assumption that spending so much money would worsen the fiscal position – that it would lead both to inflation, and a massive national deficit which must later be repaid. That this spending on refugees would cause deficits and hence necessitate borrowing, tax hikes and budget cuts was presented by politicians and the media in Sweden as a foregone conclusion. This foregone conclusion was then used as part of a narrative about refugees’ negative impact on the economy and welfare, and as the basis for closing Sweden’s doors to people seeking asylum in the future.

    And yet, the budget deficit never materialised: ‘Just as the finance minister had buried any hope of surpluses in the near future and repeated the mantra of the need to borrow to “finance” the refugees, a veritable tidal wave of tax revenue had already started to engulf Sweden’ (p.152). The economy grew and tax revenue surged in 2016 and 2017, so much that successive surpluses were created. In 2016 public consumption increased 3.6%, a figure not seen since the 1970s. Growth rates were 4% in 2016 and 2017. Refugees were filling labour shortages in understaffed sectors such as social care, where Sweden’s ageing population is in need of demographic renewal.

    Refugees disproportionately ended up in smaller, poorer, depopulating, rural municipalities who also received a disproportionately large cash injections from the central government. The arrival of refugees thus addressed the triple challenges of depopulation and population ageing; a continuous loss of local tax revenues, which forced cuts in services; and severe staff shortages and recruitment problems (e.g. in the care sector). Rather than responding with hostility, then, municipalities rightly saw the refugee influx as potentially solving these spiralling challenges.

    For two decades now we have been witnessing the slow death of asylum in the UK. Basing policy on prejudice rather than evidence, suspicion rather than generosity, burden rather than opportunity. Every change in the asylum system heralds new and innovative ways of circumventing human rights, detaining, deporting, impoverishing, and excluding. And none of this is cheap – it is not done for the economic benefit of the British population. It costs £15,000 to forcibly deport someone, it costs £95 per day to detain them, with £90 million spent each year on immigration detention. Vast sums of money are given to private companies every year to help in the work of denying people who are seeking sanctuary access to their right to asylum.

    The Swedish case offers a window into what happens when a different approach is taken. The benefit is not simply to refugees, but to the population as a whole. With an economy to rebuild after Covid and huge holes in the health and social care workforce, could we imagine an alternative in which Sweden offered inspiration to do things differently?

    https://discoversociety.org/2021/04/07/the-death-of-asylum-and-the-search-for-alternatives

    #asile #alternatives #migrations #alternative #réfugiés #catégorisation #tri #réinstallation #death_of_asylum #mort_de_l'asile #voies_légales #droit_d'asile #externalisation #passeurs #criminalisation_des_passeurs #UK #Angleterre #colonialisme #colonisation #pull-factors #pull_factors #push-pull_factors #facteurs_pull #dissuasion #Suède #déficit #économie #welfare_state #investissement #travail #impôts #Etat_providence #modèle_suédois

    ping @isskein @karine4

    –-

    ajouté au fil de discussion sur le lien entre économie et réfugiés/migrations :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705790

    • A Modern Migration Theory. An Alternative Economic Approach to Failed EU Policy

      The widely accepted narrative that refugees admitted to the European Union constitute a fiscal burden is based on a seemingly neutral accounting exercise, in which migrants contribute less in tax than they receive in welfare assistance. A “fact” that justifies increasingly restrictive asylum policies. In this book Peo Hansen shows that this consensual cost-perspective on migration is built on a flawed economic conception of the orthodox “sound finance” doctrine prevalent in migration research and policy. By shifting perspective to examine migration through the macroeconomic lens offered by modern monetary theory, Hansen is able to demonstrate sound finance’s detrimental impact on migration policy and research, including its role in stoking the toxic debate on migration in the EU. Most importantly, Hansen’s undertaking offers the tools with which both migration research and migration policy could be modernized and put on a realistic footing.

      In addition to a searing analysis of EU migration policy and politics, Hansen also investigates the case of Sweden, the country that has received the most refugees in the EU in proportion to population. Hansen demonstrates how Sweden’s increased refugee spending in 2015–17 proved to be fiscally risk-free and how the injection of funds to cash-strapped and depopulating municipalities, which received refugees, boosted economic growth and investment in welfare. Spending on refugees became a way of rediscovering the viability of welfare for all. Given that the Swedish approach to the 2015 refugee crisis has since been discarded and deemed fiscally unsustainable, Hansen’s aim is to reveal its positive effects and its applicability as a model for the EU as a whole.

      https://cup.columbia.edu/book/a-modern-migration-theory/9781788210553
      #livre #Peo_Hansen

  • Sur l’#OIM, en quelques mots, par #Raphaël_Krafft...

    "L’OIM est créé en 1951 pour faire contre-poids au #HCR, qui est soupçonné par les américains d’être à la solde des communistes. L’OIM a pour fonction d’organiser les #migrations. Elle a notamment eu pour premier rôle de ramener depuis l’Europe beaucoup de réfugiés suite à la seconde guerre mondiale vers les Etats-Unis, vers le Canada, l’Amérique latine, etc. Et elle a été affiliée à l’ONU depuis quelques années seulement et a un rôle particulier parce que surtout elle sert les intérêts de ses principaux bailleurs : les Etats-Unis pour ce qui concerne l’Amérique centrale et l’Europe pour ce qui concerne l’Afrique. L’OIM a plusieurs fonctions, à la fois de renforcer les capacités des #frontières intra-africaines, à la fois d’organiser les #retours_volontaires... les retours dits volontaires... Beaucoup de #vols sont organisés depuis le #Maroc, depuis la #Libye principalement pour les personnes qui ont été enfermées par les autorités libyennes pour les ramener au pays : ça peut être la Guinée, le Sénégal, la Côte d’Ivoire, beaucoup le Nigeria. Et l’OIM communique sur des retours volontaires, mais c’est pas toujours le cas, c’est-à-dire que ce sont des jeunes dont on rend visite dans des prisons, on leur dit « voilà, si tu rentres en Guinée, on te donnera 50 euro, et puis un téléphone portable avec une puce pour que tu puisses voir tes parents... beaucoup de promesses d’#emploi. L’OIM travaille beaucoup sur la création d’emploi dans les pays d’origine, avec un vocabulaire très libéral, très technique, mais les emplois c’est surtout pour conduire des moto-taxi. »

    (...)

    "Il y a tout un travail de #propagande qui est organisé par l’OIM et financé par l’Union européenne pour inciter cette jeunesse à rester chez elle. Ces #campagnes de propagande sont orchestrées notamment par la cooptation du monde des #arts et de la #culture, ainsi les rappeurs les plus célèbres de #Guinée se sont vus financer des #chansons qui prônent la #sédentarité, qui alertent sur les dangers de la route. Sauf que cette même organisation qui alerte sur les dangers de la route est la principale responsable des dangers de la route, puisque l’installation de postes-frontière, la #biométrie aux postes-frontière, le #lobbying auprès des parlementaires nigériens, nigérians, ivoiriens, guinéens pour durcir les lois... peut-être que les auditeurs de France Inter ont entendu qu’il y a eu une #criminalisation des #passeurs au Niger... c’est le fait d’un lobbying de l’OIM auprès des parlementaires pour rendre plus compliqué le passage de ces frontières, des frontières qui sont millénaires...

    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/l-humeur-vagabonde/l-humeur-vagabonde-27-fevrier-2021
    #IOM #réinsertion #art #campagne

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

    • Contrôle des frontières et des âmes : le #soft_power de l’OIM en Afrique

      Comment l’organisation internationale pour les migrations tente à travers toute l’Afrique d’éviter les départs en s’appuyant sur les artistes et les chanteurs. Un décryptage à retrouver dans la Revue du Crieur, dont le numéro 15 sort ce jeudi en librairies.

      Le terminal des vols domestiques de l’aéroport Gbessia de Conakry est le lieu idéal où débarquer discrètement d’un avion en Guinée. Situé à l’écart, il n’a plus de fonction commerciale depuis que la compagnie Air Guinée qui assurait les rares vols intérieurs a fait faillite en 1992. Et quand ce ne sont pas des VIP qui pénètrent dans son hall, ce sont les migrants « rapatriés volontaires » de Libye, à l’abri des regards, pour un retour au pays perçu comme honteux parce qu’il signe l’échec de leur projet migratoire. Ils sont cent onze ce soir-là à descendre de l’avion affrété par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations ( OIM ), en provenance de l’aéroport de Mitiga à Tripoli. En file indienne sur le tarmac, ils masquent leurs visages face à la caméra de la télévision d’État guinéenne, toujours présente depuis que l’OIM rapatrie des migrants guinéens de Libye, près de douze mille en trois ans.

      Les officiers « de protection » de l’OIM les attendent dans le hall du terminal, secondés par les bénévoles de l’Organisation guinéenne de lutte contre la migration irrégulière, créée de toutes pièces par l’Union européenne et l’OIM afin d’organiser des campagnes « de sensibilisation » à moindres frais qui visent à décourager les candidats à l’émigration. Leurs membres sont tous d’anciens migrants revenus au pays après avoir échoué dans leur aventure en Libye, en Algérie ou au Maroc. Ils sillonnent le pays, les plateaux de télévision ou les studios de radio dans le but d’alerter contre les dangers du voyage et les horreurs vécues en Libye.

      Elhadj Mohamed Diallo, le président de l’organisation, harangue les « rapatriés volontaires » dès leur arrivée dans le hall : « Votre retour n’est pas un échec ! La Guinée a besoin de vous ! Tous ensemble nous allons travailler ! Regardez-moi, je suis l’un de vous, j’ai vécu ce que vous avez vécu ! Et maintenant que vous êtes rentrés, vous allez nous aider parce qu’il faut raconter votre histoire à nos jeunes pour les empêcher de partir et qu’ils vivent la même chose que nous. »

      Tous se sont assis, hagards, dans l’attente des instructions des officiers « de protection » de l’OIM. Ils sont épuisés par des semaines voire des mois d’un voyage éprouvant qui s’est terminé dans les prisons de Libye où la plupart d’entre eux ont fait l’expérience de la torture, la malnutrition, le travail forcé et la peur de mourir noyé en mer Méditerranée lors de leurs tentatives parfois multiples de passage en Europe. Certains écoutent, voire répondent au discours du président de l’association. La plupart ont la tête ailleurs.

      Lorsque nous interrogeons l’un d’entre eux, il s’offusque du qualificatif de « volontaire » utilisé dans le programme d’aide au retour volontaire et à la réintégration ( AVRR ) de l’OIM : « Mais je n’étais pas volontaire ! Je ne voulais pas rentrer ! Ce sont les Libyens du DCIM [ Directorate for Combating Illegal Immigration ] qui m’ont forcé à signer le papier ! Je n’avais pas d’autre choix que de monter dans l’avion. Dès que j’aurai rassemblé un peu d’argent, je repartirai pour encore tenter ma chance. J’essayerai par le Maroc cette fois. »

      C’est toute l’ambiguïté de ce programme : le guide du Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés ( HCR ) qui encadre les retours dits volontaires précise que « si les droits des réfugiés ne sont pas reconnus, s’ils sont soumis à des pressions, des restrictions et confinés dans des camps, il se peut qu’ils veuillent rentrer chez eux, mais ce ne peut être considéré comme un acte de libre choix ». Ce qui est clairement le cas en Libye où les réfugiés sont approchés par les autorités consulaires de leur pays d’origine alors qu’ils se trouvent en détention dans des conditions sanitaires déplorables.

      Lorsqu’ils déclinent l’offre qui leur est faite, on les invite à réfléchir pour la fois où elles reviendront. À raison le plus souvent d’un repas par jour qui consiste en une assiette de macaronis, d’eau saumâtre pour se désaltérer et d’un accès aux soins dépendant de l’action limitée des organisations internationales, sujets aux brimades de leurs geôliers, les migrants finissent souvent par accepter un retour « volontaire » dans leur pays d’origine.

      L’OIM leur remet l’équivalent de cinquante euros en francs guinéens, parfois un téléphone avec ce qu’il faut de crédit pour appeler leur famille, et leur promet monts et merveilles quant à leur avenir au pays. C’est le volet réintégration du programme AVRR. Il entend « aider à la réintégration à court et/ou moyen terme, y compris création d’entreprise, formation professionnelle, études, assistance médicale et autre forme d’aide adaptée aux besoins particuliers des migrants de retour ».

      Plus que l’appât d’un modeste gain, ce sont l’épuisement et le désespoir qui ont poussé Maurice Koïba à se faire rapatrier de Libye. Intercepté par les gardes-côtes libyens alors qu’il tentait de gagner l’Europe dans un canot pneumatique bondé, Maurice a été vendu par ces mêmes gardes-côtes à un certain Mohammed basé à Sabratha, quatre-vingts kilomètres à l’ouest de la capitale Tripoli. Pendant un mois et demi, il est battu tous les matins avec ses parents au téléphone de façon à ce qu’ils entendent ses cris provoqués par les sévices qu’on lui inflige, afin de les convaincre de payer la rançon qui le libérera. Son père au chômage et sa mère ménagère parviendront à réunir la somme de mille euros pour le faire libérer, l’équivalent de près de dix mois du salaire minimum en Guinée. Une fois sorti de cette prison clandestine, Maurice tente de nouveau sa chance sur un bateau de fortune avant d’être une fois encore intercepté par les gardes-côtes libyens. Cette fois-ci, il est confié aux agents du DCIM qui l’incarcèrent dans un camp dont la rénovation a été financée par l’OIM via des fonds européens.

      Là, les conditions ne sont pas meilleures que dans sa prison clandestine de Sabratha : il ne mange qu’un maigre repas par jour, l’eau est toujours saumâtre et les rares soins prodigués le sont par des équipes de Médecins sans frontières qui ont un accès limité aux malades. C’est dans ces conditions que les autorités consulaires de son pays et les agents de l’OIM lui rendent visite ainsi qu’à ses compatriotes afin de les convaincre de « bénéficier » du programme de « retour volontaire » : « Lorsque les agents de l’OIM venaient dans le camp avec leurs gilets siglés, ils n’osaient jamais s’élever contre les violences et les tortures que les geôliers libyens nous faisaient subir », se souvient Maurice, et cela nonobstant le programme de formation aux droits de l’homme toujours financé par l’Union européenne et conduit par l’OIM auprès des gardiens des centres de détention pour migrants illégaux.

      « Nous avons éprouvé des sentiments mêlés et contradictoires, ajoute-t-il, lorsque les représentants consulaires de nos pays respectifs sont venus nous recenser et nous proposer de rentrer, à la fois heureux de pouvoir être extraits de cet enfer et infiniment tristes de devoir renoncer, si près du but, à nos rêves d’avenir meilleur. Sans compter la honte que nous allions devoir affronter une fois rentrés dans nos familles et dans les quartiers de nos villes. »

      Ce n’est que le jour de leur départ que Maurice et ses compatriotes d’infortune sortent du camp pour être remis à l’OIM. L’organisation prend soin de les rendre « présentables » en vue de leur retour au pays : « Pour la première fois depuis des semaines, j’ai pu me doucher, manger à ma faim et boire de l’eau potable. L’OIM nous a remis un kit d’hygiène et des vêtements propres avant de nous emmener à l’aéroport Mitiga de Tripoli », confie Maurice.

      Arrivé à Conakry, il prend la route de Nzérékoré, à l’autre bout du pays, où vit sa famille. Une fièvre typhoïde contractée en Libye se déclare le jour de son arrivée. Malgré ses multiples appels à l’aide et contrairement aux clauses du programme AVRR, l’OIM ne donne pas suite à sa demande de prise en charge de son hospitalisation, alors que la Guinée n’est pas dotée d’un système de sécurité sociale. Le voici doublement endetté : aux mille euros de sa rançon s’ajoutent maintenant les frais de l’hôpital et du traitement qu’il doit suivre s’il ne veut pas mourir.

      Comme la majorité des candidats guinéens à l’exil, Maurice est pourvu d’un diplôme universitaire et avait tenté d’émigrer dans le but de poursuivre ses études au Maroc, en Algérie ou en Europe. Il pensait que son retour en Guinée via le programme d’aide au retour volontaire aurait pu lui ouvrir la voie vers de nouvelles opportunités professionnelles ou de formation. Il voulait étudier l’anglais. En vain. Il retourne enseigner le français dans une école secondaire privée, contre un salaire de misère, avant de comprendre que l’OIM n’aide les retournés volontaires que s’ils donnent de leur temps afin de promouvoir le message selon lequel il est mal de voyager.

      Après avoir enfilé le tee-shirt siglé du slogan « Non à l’immigration clandestine, oui à une migration digne et légale » et participé ( ou avoir été « invité » à participer ) à des campagnes de sensibilisation, on lui a financé ses études d’anglais et même d’informatique. S’il n’est que bénévole, les per diem reçus lors de ses déplacements afin de porter la bonne parole de la sédentarité heureuse, ainsi que l’appartenance à un réseau, lui assurent une sécurité enviable dans un pays dont tous les indices de développement baissent inexorablement depuis plus d’une décennie.
      Le soft power de l’OIM

      Les maux de la Guinée, l’humoriste Sow Pedro les égrène dans la salle de spectacle du Centre culturel franco-guinéen ( CCFG ). Il fait se lever la salle et lui intime d’entonner un « N’y va pas ! » sonore à chaque fléau évoqué : « – Je veux aller en Europe !… – N’y va pas ! – Loyer cher je vais chez les Blancs… – N’y va pas ! – Là-bas au moins on nous met dans des camps… – N’y va pas ! – Politiciens vous mentent tous les jours – N’y va pas ! – C’est pour ça que j’irai là-bas ! » Ainsi conclut-il sur le refrain d’un des plus grands succès de Jean-Jacques Goldman, Là-bas, qu’il enchaîne, moqueur, face au tout Conakry qui s’est déplacé pour l’applaudir avant de se retrouver au bar du Centre culturel, lors de l’entracte, et d’y échanger sur ce fléau que constitue l’immigration illégale entre personnes pouvant, du moins la plupart d’entre elles, circuler librement autour de la planète.

      Le spectacle de Sow Pedro est sponsorisé par l’OIM. Afin de mener à bien l’écriture du show, l’humoriste a bénéficié de l’expertise du bureau guinéen de l’organisation internationale : « L’équipe de l’OIM m’a fourni une documentation et nous avons beaucoup échangé ensemble pour que mon spectacle colle au plus près de la réalité vécue par mes compatriotes sur les routes de l’exil. J’étais ignorant sur ce sujet et à mille lieues d’imaginer l’ampleur des horreurs que les migrants peuvent subir sur leur chemin. »

      « Ne t’en va pas », c’est encore le refrain de Fallé, le titre phare de Degg J Force 3, le groupe de rap le plus populaire de Guinée, qui clôt la soirée au Centre culturel franco-guinéen. « Ne pars pas. La mer te tuera, c’est la mort qui t’attend », exhorte la chanson. La qualité des images du clip jure avec la production habituelle d’un groupe de cette envergure en Afrique. Et pour cause, l’Union européenne l’a financé à hauteur de quinze mille dollars et a chargé l’OIM de la mise en œuvre de sa production.

      Moussa Mbaye, l’un des deux chanteurs du groupe explique la genèse de cette chanson : « Lorsqu’en 1999 Yaguine Koïta et Fodé Tounkara avaient été retrouvés morts dans le train d’atterrissage d’un avion de la [ compagnie aérienne belge ] Sabena, ça nous avait particulièrement marqués que deux jeunes puissent mourir parce qu’ils voulaient partir en Europe. C’est ce qui nous a poussés à écrire cette chanson qui n’était jamais sortie dans aucun de nos albums, elle n’avait jusqu’alors circulé que dans les “ ghettos ”. Ce n’est finalement que beaucoup plus tard, à force d’apprendre chaque semaine la mort d’un jeune de notre quartier en Libye, dans le Sahara ou au Maroc, qu’on s’est décidés à la réécrire. Comme on n’y connaissait rien sur les questions migratoires, on est allés voir l’OIM pour qu’ils nous fournissent des informations à ce sujet. »

      Moussa et les membres de son groupe sont reçus par Fatou Diallo N’Diaye, la cheffe de mission de l’OIM en Guinée, qui choisira de travailler avec eux « parce qu’ils sont connus et que nous savions que leur chanson serait écoutée par notre public cible ». Fatou Diallo N’Diaye porte la chanson Fallé dans son cœur pour avoir largement contribué à son écriture : « L’écriture du morceau Fallé a été un travail d’équipe, un véritable brainstorming. Il y a certaines paroles que j’ai écrites moi-même tandis que d’autres l’ont été par Lucas Chandellier, notre chargé de communication. Aujourd’hui, ce morceau appartient à l’Union européenne et à l’OIM. »

      Depuis le succès commercial de Fallé, Fatou Diallo N’Diaye confesse voir de plus en plus d’artistes venir frapper à sa porte pour écrire et composer des chansons sur le thème de la migration irrégulière. Les chanteurs et musiciens ne sont pas les seuls cooptés par l’institution : auteurs de bandes dessinées, humoristes, metteurs en scène de théâtre, griots, conteurs traditionnels, organisateurs de festivals, imams, radios locales, etc., sont également sollicités.

      La représentante d’un organisme de développement qui a souhaité garder l’anonymat nous a confié que l’OIM avait cependant refusé de contribuer au financement d’un film qu’elle produisait parce que l’on y voyait des migrants guinéens arrivés en Europe et que de telles images « pouvaient susciter un espoir chez les candidats au départ ». L’OIM organise aussi des formations de journalistes sur les « techniques de couverture des questions migratoires ». Depuis 2018, près de cinq cents d’entre eux, originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest et d’Afrique centrale, ont été formés selon la vision de l’OIM sur cette question.

      Fondée en 1951 par les États-Unis pour faire contrepoids au HCR que les diplomates américains soupçonnaient d’être sous influence communiste, l’OIM a d’abord eu la fonction logistique d’organiser le transit vers l’Amérique de dizaines de milliers de personnes déplacées par la Seconde Guerre mondiale en Europe. Selon les mots du site de l’organisation : « Simple agence logistique au départ, elle a constamment élargi son champ d’action pour devenir l’organisme international chef de file œuvrant aux côtés des gouvernements et de la société civile afin de favoriser la compréhension de la problématique migratoire, d’encourager le développement économique et social par le biais de la migration et de veiller au respect de la dignité humaine et au bien-être des migrants. »

      Ce que l’OIM met moins en valeur, en revanche, ce sont les campagnes de sensibilisation et de propagande qu’elle a mises en place au début des années 1990 dans les pays d’Europe centrale et d’Europe de l’Est afin de mettre en garde les jeunes femmes contre les réseaux de traite et de prostitution. Selon le sociologue Antoine Pécoud, Youssou N’Dour, archétype du chanteur mondialisé, serait le premier artiste africain à avoir mis sa voix et sa renommée au service de la lutte contre la migration illégale en Afrique.

      Ce n’est pas l’OIM, cette fois, qui en fut à l’origine, mais le gouvernement espagnol et l’Union européenne qui, en 2007, et alors que de nombreux Sénégalais tentaient de rallier l’archipel des Canaries en pirogue, décidaient de produire et diffuser un clip afin de les dissuader de prendre la mer. Cette vidéo met en scène une mère de famille prénommée Fatou, sans nouvelles de son fils parti depuis huit mois, et se termine par un message de Youssou N’Dour : « Vous savez déjà comment [ l’histoire de Fatou ] se termine, ce sont des milliers de familles détruites. Je suis Youssou N’Dour, s’il vous plaît, ne risquez pas votre vie en vain. Vous êtes le futur de l’Afrique. »

      Depuis lors, la liste des artistes cooptés par diverses institutions internationales et européennes ne cesse de s’allonger : Coumba Gawlo, Fatou Guewel et Adiouza au Sénégal, Bétika en Côte d’Ivoire, Ousmane Bangara et Degg J Force 3 en Guinée, Jalimadi Kanuteh en Gambie, Miss Espoir au Bénin, Will B Black au Burkina Faso, Ousmane Cissé au Mali, Zara Moussa au Niger, ou encore Ewlad Leblad en Mauritanie pour ne citer qu’eux. Lors de la campagne Aware migrants lancée en 2017 par l’OIM, l’artiste malienne Rokia Traoré a composé la chanson Be aware. Dans une interview à l’émission 28 Minutes diffusée sur Arte, elle expliquait que son but à travers cette chanson n’était pas de vouloir empêcher les jeunes Africains de partir mais « qu’il était inhumain de ne pas les informer sur les dangers de la route ». Ce qu’elle ne dit pas, c’est que sa chanson et son clip avaient été sponsorisés par le ministère italien de l’Intérieur.
      Dissuader les Africains ou rassurer les Européens ?

      Sur un continent comme l’Afrique où les frontières sont historiquement poreuses et où 80 % des migrations sont internes au continent, l’Union européenne, via l’OIM notamment, s’emploie à restreindre la liberté de circulation en modernisant les postes frontières et en formant les gardes-frontières, introduisant la technologie biométrique ou faisant pression sur les gouvernements et les parlementaires africains afin de rendre toujours plus restrictive leur législation en matière de migration, comme au Niger en 2015 avec le vote d’une loi sur la criminalisation des « passeurs ».

      C’est toute la contradiction de ces campagnes de propagande sur les dangers de la route dont les auteurs sont les principaux responsables, explique le sociologue Antoine Pécoud : « S’il est louable de renseigner les candidats à l’exil sur les dangers de la route, il y a une contradiction fondamentale dans la nature même de ce danger dont on prétend avertir les migrants. Parce que ce danger est corrélé au contrôle de l’immigration. Plus on contrôle l’immigration, plus il est difficile pour les migrants de circuler légalement, plus ils vont tenter de migrer par des chemins détournés, plus ils vont prendre de risques et plus il y aura de morts. »

      Affiliée à l’ONU depuis 2016, l’OIM demeure, à l’instar des autres agences gravitant dans la galaxie de l’organisation internationale, directement et principalement financée par les pays les plus riches de l’hémisphère occidental qui lui délèguent une gestion des migrations conforme à leurs intérêts : ceux de l’Australie en Asie et en Océanie, des États-Unis en Amérique centrale et de l’Europe en Afrique pour ne citer que ces exemples. Son budget en 2018 était de 1,8 milliard d’euros. Il provient principalement de fonds liés à des projets spécifiques qui rendent l’OIM très accommodante auprès de ses donateurs et la restreint dans le développement d’une politique qui leur serait défavorable. C’est un outil parfait de contrôle à distance de la mise en œuvre de la politique d’externalisation des frontières chère à l’Union européenne. D’autant qu’au contraire du HCR, elle n’a pas à s’embarrasser des conventions internationales et notamment de celle de 1951 relative à la protection des réfugiés.

      D’après Nauja Kleist, chercheuse au Danish Institute for International Studies, c’est précisément « le manque de crédibilité des diffuseurs de ces messages qui les rend peu efficaces auprès des populations ciblées » d’autant que « les jeunes Africains qui décident de migrer sont suffisamment informés des dangers de la route – via les réseaux sociaux notamment – et que pour un certain nombre d’entre eux, mourir socialement au pays ou physiquement en Méditerranée revient au même ». Selon elle, « ces campagnes sont surtout un moyen parmi d’autres de l’Union européenne d’adresser un message à son opinion publique afin de lui montrer qu’elle ne reste pas inactive dans la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière ».

      Selon Antoine Pécoud, « le développement de ces campagnes de propagande est d’une certaine manière le symbole de l’échec de la répression des flux migratoires. Malgré sa brutalité et les milliards investis dans les murs et les technologies de surveillance des frontières, il se trouve que de jeunes Africains continuent d’essayer de venir ».

      Promouvoir un message sédentariste et une « désirable immobilité », selon les mots d’Antoine Pécoud, c’est aussi encourager une forme de patriotisme dans le but d’inciter les jeunes à contribuer au développement de leur pays et de l’Afrique. Une fable qui ne résiste pas aux recherches en cours sur la mobilité internationale : c’est à partir d’un certain niveau de développement qu’un pays voit ses citoyens émigrer de façon significative vers des pays plus riches. Qu’importe, avec l’argent du contribuable européen, l’OIM finance aussi des artistes porteurs de ce message.

      Dans le clip de sa chanson No Place Like Home promu par l’OIM ( « On n’est nulle part aussi bien que chez soi » ), Kofi Kinaata, la star ghanéenne du fante rap, confronte le destin d’un migrant qui a échoué dans son aventure incertaine à celui d’un proche resté au pays, lequel, à force de labeur, a pu accéder aux standards de la classe moyenne européenne incarnés dans le clip par la fondation d’une famille et l’acquisition d’une voiture neuve.

      De son côté, le groupe guinéen Degg J Force 3 a composé #Guinealove qui met en scène une Guinée largement fantasmée aux rues vierges de détritus, aux infrastructures modernes, sans bidonvilles et où se succèdent des paysages majestueux et une nature vierge alors que ce pays occupe la cent quatre-vingt-deuxième place sur les cent quatre-vingt-sept que compte le classement de l’Indice de développement humain. Le groupe l’a notamment interprétée lors du lancement en grande pompe du programme Integra, le volet réintégration du programme de retours volontaires et de réintégration de l’OIM juste après le discours du Premier ministre guinéen :

      Ma Guinée ma mère ma fierté ma cité

      Ma Guinée ma belle mon soleil ma beauté

      Ma Guinée ma terre mon chez-moi

      Mon havre de paix

      Ouvrez les frontières de Tiken Jah Fakoly, sorti en 2007, est peut-être l’un des derniers tubes africains à avoir promu aussi frontalement la liberté de circulation. Douze ans plus tard, le message adressé par la star africaine du reggae est tout autre. Son dernier album, Le monde est chaud, fait la part belle aux messages prônés par l’Union européenne en Afrique : « Dans Ouvrez les frontières, je dénonçais cette injustice dont étaient et sont toujours victimes les Africains de ne pas pouvoir circuler librement. Aujourd’hui, je dis qu’effectivement cette injustice demeure, mais si on veut que nos enfants grandissent dans une autre Afrique, alors notre place n’est pas ailleurs. Donc aujourd’hui, je dis aux jeunes de rester au pays, je dis que l’Afrique a besoin de tous ses enfants. D’autant que notre race est rabaissée quand nos frères sont mis en esclavage en Libye, quand ils ont payé si cher pour se retrouver sous les ponts à Paris. Au lieu de donner leurs forces à l’Europe, pourquoi nos jeunes ne restent-ils pas ici ? » Tiken Jah Fakoly affirme n’avoir pas reçu de fonds européens pour la production de son dernier album.

      Ses compatriotes du Magic System, eux, ne s’en cachent pas et ont compris via leur fondation éponyme que le développement de l’emploi local et la lutte contre la migration irrégulière étaient des thèmes capteurs de fonds européens. Partenaire privilégiée de l’Union européenne en Côte d’Ivoire à travers une multitude de projets de développement, la fondation Magic System a signé en février dernier avec l’OIM un partenariat qui engage les deux structures « à travailler main dans la main pour promouvoir des migrations sûres et informées, et des alternatives durables à la migration irrégulière ».

      La migration sûre, c’est le parent pauvre du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence européen pour l’Afrique, créé le 11 novembre 2015 lors du sommet européen de La Valette sur la migration, et à partir duquel sont financées les campagnes dites de sensibilisation et de propagande en prévention de la migration irrégulière. L’un des points sur lequel les pays européens se sont pourtant entendus et qui consiste à « favoriser la migration et la mobilité légales » ne s’est, pour l’heure, toujours pas concrétisé sur le terrain et ne reçoit ni publicité ni propagande dans les pays de départ. Maurice Koïba, le rapatrié de Libye, désormais tout à ses études d’anglais et d’informatique et toujours en campagne « pour une migration digne et légale », a renoncé depuis belle lurette à demander un visa à l’ambassade de France : son prix est prohibitif pour un jeune de sa condition sociale et n’est pas remboursé en cas de refus, ce qui attend l’immense majorité des demandes.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/200220/controle-des-frontieres-et-des-ames-le-soft-power-de-l-oim-en-afrique?ongl

  • #Damien_Carême dans « à l’air libre » sur la #politique_migratoire européenne et française
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU1TpPLjRzI&feature=youtu.be

    –—

    Quelques citations :

    Damien Carême :

    « On est reparti [au parlement européen] sur les discussion sur le #pacte asile migration pour voir dans quelles conditions celui qui nous est proposé maintenant est pire que le précédent, parce qu’on nivelle par le bas les exigences. On l’appelait la directive #Dublin il y encore quelque temps, aujourd’hui moi je dis que c’est la #Directive_Budapest parce qu’on s’est aligné sur les désirs de #Orban vis-à-vis de la politique de migration, et c’est pas possible qu’on laisse faire cette politique-là. [Aujourd’hui] C’est laisser les camps en #Grèce, laisser les gens s’accumuler, laisser les pays de première entrée en Europe s’occuper de la demande d’asile et permettre maintenant aux Etats qui sont à l’extérieur (la Suède, la France, l’Allemagne ou ailleurs) organiser le retour, depuis la Grèce, depuis l’Italie, depuis l’Espagne en se lavant les mains. »

    –—

    Sur le manque chronique de #logement pour les exilés en France... et la demande de #réquisition de #logements_vacants de la part des associations...
    Question du journaliste : pourquoi les mairies, et notamment les mairies de gauche et écologistes ne le font pas ?

    Damien Carême :

    « C’est à eux qu’il faut poser la question, moi je ne le comprends pas, moi, je l’ai fait chez moi. Je ne souhaite pas faire des camps, c’est pas l’idée de faire des #camps partout, mais parce que j’avais pas d’école vide, j’avais pas d’ancien hôpital, d’ancienne caserne, de vieux bâtiments pour héberger ces personnes. Donc on peut accueillir ces personnes-là, je ne comprends pas pourquoi ils ne le font pas. Je milite en tant que président de l’association #ANVITA pour l’#accueil_inconditionnel »

    Journaliste : Qu’est-ce que vous diriez à #Anne_Hidalgo ?

    « On travaille ensemble... on ne peut pas laisser ces personnes là... il faut les rendre visibles. Il a raison #Yann_Manzi d’#Utopia_56 dans le reportage. Il ne faut surtout pas jouer la politique du gouvernement qui joue l’#invisibilité. Et le ras-le-bol des #bénévoles... moi je connais des bénévoles à Grande-Synthe, ça fait 20 ans qu’ils sont là pour aider des exilés qui arrivent sur le territoire... ils sont épuisés, et c’est l’#épuisement que joue le gouvernement. Il ne faut pas céder à cela et il faut en arriver de temps en temps à un #rapport_de_force pour faire en sorte qu’on ouvre [des bâtiments vides] pour que ces gens ne soient pas à la rue. »

    Journaliste : un mot pour qualifier la politique migratoire du gouvernement

    « C’est la #politique_du_refus. C’est une politique d’#extrême_droite. D’ailleurs l’extrême droite applaudit des 4 mains ce que fait aujourd’hui le gouvernement. »

    Sur la situation à #Briançon :
    Damien Carême :

    « C’est du #harcèlement organisé par l’Etat pour jouer l’épuisement sur les bénévoles mais aussi chez les exilés qui arrivent. Et on voit bien que ça ne sert à rien. Macron, à grand renfort de pub a annoncé qu’il doublait les forces de l’ordre à la frontière italienne pour éviter les entrées, y a jamais eu autant d’entrée à la #frontière franco-italienne... »

    Journaliste : "Il y a quasiment autant d’exilés que de policiers qui dorment dans les hôtels de la ville..."
    Damien Carême :

    « Mais bien sûr ! Le budget de #Frontex est passé de 50 millions à l’origine à 476 millions aujourd’hui, ça ne change rien. La seule chose que ça change, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, à Calais, pour passer de l’autre côté en Angleterre, il y a des gens qui prennent des #small_boats et il y a des gens qui meurent en traversant le détroit de la Manche. Et c’est ça qui est grave. Et c’est ça que font ces politiques ! Que le #trafic_d'êtres_humains est le troisième trafic international après les armes et la drogue, parce que le coût du passage a énormément augmenté. A Grande-Synthe en 2015, on me disait que c’était 800 euros le passage garanti, aujourd’hui c’est entre 10 et 14’000 euros. C’est toute l’#efficacité de cette politique-là. Donc changeons de politique : dépensons beaucoup moins d’argent à faire de la #répression [utilisons-le] en organisant l’accueil »

    Commentaire à partir de cette photo, prise à Grande-Synthe :


    Journaliste : Pourquoi ça se passe comment ça, sachant que c’est votre ancien adjoint, un socialiste, #Martial_Beyaert, qui est maire maintenant ?
    Damien Carême :

    "Il avait toujours été d’accord avec notre politique d’accueil. A partir du moment dans lequel il a assumé la responsabilité, il s’est réfugié derrière la volonté du préfet. Et aujourd’hui il dit qu’il est prêt à ouvrir le gymnase, « mais il faut que l’Etat soit d’accord pour le faire, et l’Etat n’est pas d’accord ». Mais l’Etat ne sera jamais d’accord, donc c’est du #cynisme de tenir ces propos aujourd’hui".

    Sur l’ANVITA :
    Damien Carême :

    « C’est un réseau de soutien, c’est un réseau de pression, il y a 44 communes, 3 régions et 2 départements. »

    Journaliste : c’est facile d’être solidaire en ce moment ?

    Damien Carême : « Oui c’est facile. En fait, tout repose sur l’#imaginaire, sur les #récits qu’on peut faire. Nous, ce qu’on a fait quand on était à Grande-Synthe, et c’est ce qui se passe dans plein de villes... quand on accueille réellement, quand on met en relation les populations accueillies et les populations accueillantes, tout se passe merveilleusement bien. »

    Carême parle de #Lyon comme prochaine ville qui intégrera le réseau... et il rapporte les mots de #Gérard_Collomb :
    Damien Carême :

    "Lyon c’est quand même symbolique, parce que Gérard Collomb... qui avait été, pour moi, le ministre de l’intérieur le plus cynique, lui aussi, puisqu’il m’avait dit quand je l’avais vu en entretien en septembre 2017, ouvert les guillemets : « On va leur faire passer l’envie de venir chez nous », fermées les guillemets. C’était les propos d’un ministre de l’intérieur sur la politique migratoire qui allait été mise en ville"

    L’ANVITA....

    « c’est mettre en réseau ces collectivités, c’est montrer qu’on peut faire, qu’on peut faire de l’accueil sans soulèvement de population... Et c’est bientôt créer un réseau européen, car il y a des réseaux comme ça en Allemagne, en Belgique, en Italie, et fédérer ces réseaux »

    Damien Carême :

    « Dans la #crise_écologique, dans la #crise_climatique qu’on vit, il y a la crise migratoire, enfin... c’est pas une #crise_migratoire, c’est structurel, c’est pas conjoncturel la migration : c’est depuis toujours et ça durera toujours. C’est quelque chose à intégrer. Et donc intégrons-le dans nos politiques publiques. C’est pas une calamité, c’est une #chance parfois d’avoir cet apport extérieur. Et toute l’histoire de l’humanité nous le raconte parfaitement »

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #interview #Calais #France #Grande-Synthe #camp_humanitaire #camps_de_réfugiés #accueil #rhétorique #appel_d'air #solidarité #mouvements_citoyens #associations #sauvetage #mer #secours_en_mer #Frontex #Fabrice_Leggeri #refus #harcèlement_policier #passeurs #militarisation_des_frontières #efficacité

    signalé par @olaf : https://seenthis.net/messages/898383

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Mort·e·s et disparu·e·s aux frontières européennes : les États irresponsables désignent de nouveaux coupables, les parents !

    Dans la nuit du 7 au 8 novembre 2020, un jeune père iranien assistait impuissant à la mort de son fils de 6 ans au cours de leur traversée en #mer pour rejoindre la #Grèce. Le lendemain, les autorités grecques décidaient de le poursuivre en justice pour « #mise_en danger_de_la_vie_d’autrui ». Il risque 10 ans de prison.

    Trois jours plus tard au #Sénégal, les autorités décidaient de poursuivre plusieurs personnes dont le père d’un jeune garçon de 14 ans décédé lors d’une traversée vers les #Canaries mi-octobre. En payant le passage de son fils, celui-ci serait coupable aux yeux des autorités « d’#homicide_involontaire et de #complicité_de_trafic_de_migrants ». Son procès s’ouvre mardi 1er décembre. Au Sénégal, deux autres pères sont également poursuivis pour « mise en danger de la vie d’autrui et #complicité_d’émigration_clandestine ».

    A la connaissance de nos organisations, c’est la première fois que des autorités publiques s’attaquent aux parents pour criminaliser l’aide à la migration « irrégulière », faisant ainsi sauter le verrou protecteur de la #famille. Il s’agit d’une forme de #répression supplémentaire dans la stratégie déployée depuis des années pour tenter d’empêcher toute arrivée sur le territoire européen, qui révèle jusqu’où peut aller le #cynisme quand il s’agit de stopper les migrations vers l’Union européenne (UE).

    Tandis que les routes migratoires deviennent toujours plus dangereuses en raison de la multiplicité des entraves et des mesures de contrôles le long des parcours, l’UE, ses États et les États coopérant avec elle ne cessent de se dérober de leur #responsabilité en invoquant celles des autres.

    Tout d’abord celle des « #passeurs », terme non-défini et utilisé pour désigner toute une série d’acteurs et d’actrices intervenant sur les routes migratoires jusqu’à s’appliquer à toute personne ayant un lien avec une personne en migration. Ainsi, le « passeur » peut prendre une multitude de visages : celui du trafiquant exploitant la misère à celui du citoyen·ne solidaire poursuivi·e pour avoir hébergé une personne migrante en passant par les personnes migrantes elles-mêmes. Dans leur diversité, l’existence même de ces acteurs et actrices qui viennent en aide aux personnes migrantes dans le passage des frontières est une conséquence directe des politiques restrictives des États, qui rendent leur aide ou leurs services nécessaires.

    Les « passeurs », pointés du doigt et coupables tout désignés des drames aux frontières, ont ainsi constitué un bon #alibi pour les États dans le #déni de leurs responsabilités. Les actions de lutte contre « les passeurs » ont été présentées comme le meilleur moyen pour « sauver des vies » dès 2015, comme en atteste l’opération maritime militaire européenne, #EUNAVfor_Med, visant à l’identification, la saisie et la destruction des embarcations utilisées par les « passeurs ». Loin de « #sauver_des_vies », cette opération a contribué à un changement de pratique des personnes organisant les traversées en Méditerranée : aux gros bateaux en bois (risquant d’être saisis et détruits) ont été préférés des bateaux pneumatiques peu sûrs et moins fiables, mettant encore plus en danger les personnes migrantes et compliquant les opérations de sauvetage. Bien que ces conséquences désastreuses aient été relevées par de nombreux·ses observateur·ice·s, la stratégie de l’UE et de ses États membres n’a nullement été remise en cause [1].

    Autres « #coupables » désignés par les États comme responsables des arrivées sur le sol européen et des drames en Méditerranée : les ONGs de #sauvetage. Tandis que ces dernières tentent de pallier depuis 2015 le manque d’intervention des États en matière de sauvetage en mer, elles subissent depuis 2017 des pressions et des poursuites judiciaires pour les dissuader d’intervenir : refus d’accès aux ports européens pour débarquer les personnes sauvées, saisies des navires, poursuites des capitaines et équipages pour « aide à l’immigration irrégulière » et même « collusion avec les passeurs », etc. Au mépris de l’obligation internationale du secours en mer des navires en détresse, les États membres criminalisent le sauvetage en Méditerranée lorsque celui-ci concerne des personnes en migration.

    Aujourd’hui, pour contourner les mesures de #blocage des personnes migrantes, les routes migratoires se déplacent à nouveau loin des côtes méditerranéennes et les naufrages se multiplient au large des îles Canaries, comme c’était le cas en 2006. Pourtant, l’Union européenne, ses États membres et les États de départ avec qui elle collabore n’interrogent toujours pas les conséquences désastreuses des politiques qu’ils mettent en œuvre.

    Cette logique de #déresponsabilisation des États pour le sort des personnes migrantes et de #criminalisation de celles et ceux qui leurs viennent en aide est aujourd’hui poussée à son comble puisque désormais ce sont des parents, déjà accablés par la perte de leur enfant, qui sont poursuivis et pointés du doigt comme responsable de ces drames. Tandis qu’à l’inverse, les acteurs étatiques et paramilitaires intervenant dans le contrôle des frontières, en particulier l’agence européenne #Frontex, jouissent d’une parfaite #impunité.

    Cette évolution alarmante de la criminalisation des personnes exilées, de leur famille et des solidarités qui se mobilisent autour d’elles cachent en réalité très mal les responsabilités des États dans les drames sur les routes migratoires. Les disparitions et décès aux frontières ne sauraient être uniquement attribués à des « passeurs sans scrupule », des « ONG irresponsables » et des « parents inconscients des risques ». L’Union européenne et les États doivent prendre la mesure des conséquences des politiques migratoires à l’œuvre. C’est bien le durcissement de la règlementation, la sophistication des contrôles aux frontières ainsi que la multiplication des instruments de coopération dans le domaine des migrations rendant le franchissement des frontières toujours plus difficile, qui est à l’origine du développement d’un « business » du passage et des décès et disparitions qui en découlent.

    http://www.migreurop.org/article3011.html

    #parents #père #criminalisation_de_la_migration #décès #mort #mourir_aux_frontières #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #culpabilité

    –---

    Sur l’incrimination du père iranien pour les événements en #mer_Egée :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/885779

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_ @reka

    • Le procès de trois pères ayant aidé leurs enfants à émigrer divise le Sénégal

      Trois pères de famille sont poursuivis au Sénégal pour avoir fait embarquer leurs enfants sur des pirogues à destination de l’Europe. L’un de ces jeunes, mineur, est décédé en mer fin octobre : il s’appelait Doudou et rêvait de devenir footballeur. Le jugement est attendu ce mardi à Mbour, à une centaine de kilomètres au sud de Dakar. Le procureur a requis 2 ans de prison.

      Des pères de famille sur le banc des accusés. Ils sont jugés pour « mise en danger de la vie d’autrui » et « complicité de trafic de migrants ». Depuis quelques mois, les départs reprennent de plus belle, depuis les plages de Mbour, Dakar ou encore Saint-Louis. Des dizaines de candidats au voyage entassés sur des pirogues surchargées qui tentent de rejoindre l’Espagne en dépit de conditions météo difficiles dans l’Atlantique en cette période de l’année. Des embarcations qui prennent l’eau. Des moteurs en surchauffe. Les pêcheurs ramènent des corps. Les récits dramatiques se succèdent dans les journaux.

      Pour le procureur, ceux qui ont laissé partir leurs enfants dans ces conditions ont fait preuve de grave négligence en organisant leur voyage. Le jeune Doudou Faye a trouvé la mort en mer. Son père avait payé un passeur 250 000 FCFA (un peu moins de 400 euros). Il n’a pas parlé de ce projet à la mère de l’adolescent. Une affaire qui a suscité émotion et indignation au Sénégal, et à l’étranger.
      Naufrages

      Des jeunes, mineurs, qui embarquent à destination de l’Europe avec des rêves plein la tête, Moustapha Diouf en a connu beaucoup. Président de l’AJRAP, l’association des jeunes rapatriés de Thiaroye sur Mer près de Dakar, il a lui-même fait la traversée en pirogue en 2006, vers les îles Canaries. « Depuis une quinzaine d’années maintenant, il y a des parents qui poussent leurs enfants à partir » explique-t-il.

      Moustapha Diouf est lui-même père de famille. Quand il évoque le cas de Doudou, il ne peut s’empêcher de penser à son fils de 14 ans. « La tempête, le froid, le manque d’eau, c’est insoutenable », se souvient-il avant d’ajouter : « Vous voyez ce qui se passe ici ? On ne peut pas retenir les gens… Il y a beaucoup de lassitude. On est fatigué. On nous parle de l’émergence au Sénégal, mais nous, nous ne sommes pas parvenus à émerger ». Lors de son procès, le père de Doudou Faye a dit « regretter » son acte. Ses avocats affirment que ce père « avait l’espoir d’un avenir meilleur pour son enfant, et qu’il puisse aussi aider sa famille ». Pour la défense, ces pères ne sont « pas des coupables, mais bien des victimes ». Des avocats qui disent « ne pas comprendre la nouvelle stratégie du parquet »
      Un procès pour dissuader ?

      Jusqu’à présent, les autorités sénégalaises s’employaient surtout à démanteler les réseaux de passeurs, et à interpeller de temps à autre les migrants qui voulaient monter à bord, ou ceux qui organisaient les départs à terre. Pour le sociologue Aly Tandian, professeur à l’université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis et directeur de l’Observatoire sénégalais des migrations, « viser » directement les familles des candidats à l’immigration est une première.

      « Le Sénégal s’est engagé dans une politique répressive, ce procès est destiné à alerter et clarifier la position du Sénégal. On a pu entendre des critiques dénonçant la quasi absence des autorités et leur incapacité à résoudre le problème, donc ce procès est une réponse forte apportée par l’État » conclut-il.
      L’État rejette toute responsabilité

      Interpellée lors d’une conférence de presse fin novembre, la ministre de la Jeunesse préfère pointer du doigt la « pression sociale ». Pour Néné Fatoumata Tall, les exigences sont fortes vis-à-vis de la jeunesse « dans leurs quartiers, dans leurs maisons ». Elle en appelle au sens de la responsabilité. Selon elle, il faut que les familles arrêtent de dire tous les jours à leurs enfants « que telle personne (partie à l’étranger) a réussi à construire un immeuble pour ses parents, alors qu’il n’est pas mieux élevé que toi (resté au pays). Ces mots reviennent souvent dans les foyers et c’est une pression insupportable », affirme la ministre.

      Pour le sociologue Aly Tandian, mettre en cause les familles ne conduira pas à enrayer le phénomène : « Faut-il s’engager dans cette logique d’épicier ? Ce n’est pas faire un procès aux parents qui va sensibiliser les populations. Il faudrait plutôt essayer de comprendre les causes profondes, et apporter une réponse ». Selon lui, « la logique sécuritaire a déjà suffisamment montré ses limites ». Les pères des jeunes migrants risquent donc deux ans de prison ferme. Mais pour le directeur de l’Observatoire sénégalais des migrations, ils ont de toute façon « déjà été condamnés aux yeux de la communauté ».

      https://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20201207-le-proc%C3%A8s-de-trois-p%C3%A8res-ayant-aid%C3%A9-leurs-enfants-%C3%A0

    • Immigration : les pères de migrants sénégalais condamnés à une peine inédite

      Trois pères de famille ont été jugés, mardi 8 décembre, au Sénégal pour avoir facilité et payé le trajet illégal de leurs fils en pirogue à destination des Canaries. Un procès qui illustre la nouvelle stratégie du gouvernement sénégalais pour tenter d’enrayer les départs illégaux vers l’Europe.

      C’est une première au Sénégal. Trois pères de famille ont été condamnés à une peine de prison d’un mois ferme et de deux ans avec sursis pour avoir payé un passeur pour que leur fils parte en pirogue aux îles Canaries. Reconnus « coupables pour mise en danger de la vie d’autrui », ils ont cependant été relaxés pour le « délit de complicité de trafic de migrants » par le tribunal de grande instance de Mbour, au sud de Dakar.

      « Depuis 2005, il existe une loi qui punit de cinq à dix ans d’emprisonnement et prévoit une amende de 1 à 5 millions de F CFA (de 1 520 € et 7 600 €) toute personne participant à la migration illégale. Mais jusqu’à présent, il était surtout question de punir les passeurs et les facilitateurs. C’est la première fois que les parents des candidats au voyage sont poursuivis et condamnés en justice », souligne Aly Tandian, sociologue et directeur de l’Observatoire sénégalais des migrations.

      Parmi les condamnés, Mamadou Lamine Faye. Il a versé 250 000 F CFA (environ 400 €) pour que son fils, Doudo, âgé de 14 ans, puisse partir aux Canaries. La mort de l’adolescent, plus jeune passager de l’embarcation qui a fait naufrage le 26 octobre dernier, a ému la population sénégalaise. « J’ai vraiment été choqué par cet acte irresponsable. Les conditions de vie peuvent être très difficiles ici, mais elles ne doivent pas servir d’excuse pour envoyer un innocent à la mort. Ce n’est pas à l’enfant de ramener de l’argent pour sa famille ! », s’emporte Simal, père de trois enfants.

      Ces dernières semaines, les naufrages de pirogues se sont succédé, ainsi que le nombre de disparus et de décès en mer, suscitant une vive émotion dans la population. En réponse à ces drames, une nouvelle stratégie, plus répressive, a été adoptée par le gouvernement sénégalais pour tenter de stopper le flux de départs vers l’Europe.

      Une orientation qui divise la population. « Les familles participent au départ des jeunes : certaines mamans vendent leurs bijoux pour réunir la somme à payer et les parents poussent leur enfant à partir. S’ils savent qu’ils risquent la prison, peut-être que ça les fera réfléchir, surtout en région où la pression est immense », rapporte Souleymane, jeune Dakarois qui a lui-même fait la traversée illégalement en 2006, sans que sa famille ne le sache et qui a été intercepté par les garde-côtes espagnols.

      À Mbour, ville de pêcheurs particulièrement touchée et qui a vu plusieurs de ses jeunes mourir en mer ces derniers temps, Ousmane Wade Diop, un militant de la société civile, pense que cette décision de justice va calmer les gens un temps seulement : « Ils auront peur des conséquences, mais cela ne les empêchera pas de continuer… en cachette. Il y a un sentiment de désespoir trop profond, une trop grande frustration », regrette-t-il.

      Cette gestion sécuritaire de la migration est décriée par le sociologue Aly Tandian. Il la juge trop répressive. Et il y voit surtout un moyen pour l’État de réaffirmer son engagement dans le dossier migratoire, alors qu’il était accusé par la population d’un certain immobilisme.

      Si les avis divergent sur le procès, tous soulignent la nécessité de résoudre les causes des départs. Les racines du mal que sont le chômage et la pauvreté sont pointées du doigt. « La pêche et le tourisme sont les deux mamelles de la région de Mbour mais actuellement, ces secteurs ne fonctionnent plus à cause du Covid-19 tandis que les accords de pêche conclus avec l’Union européenne privent les pêcheurs de leur travail », insiste Wade Diop.

      Aussi, de nombreux Sénégalais doutent de l’impact du procès sur des populations aux prises avec d’autres préoccupations du quotidien, comme le juge Aly Tandian : « La migration n’est pas un phénomène, c’est un fait social, explique-t-il. Les départs n’ont jamais cessé, c’est la médiatisation qui avait diminué. La population est tout à fait consciente des risques, elle est même surinformée ! Mais tant que ses attentes, c’est-à-dire de l’emploi, ne seront pas remplies, les départs continueront. »

      https://www.la-croix.com/Monde/Immigration-peres-migrants-senegalais-condamnes-peine-inedite-2020-12-09-1

  • Au #Niger, contrôler les flux de migrants

    Le Niger, deuxième pays le plus pauvre du monde, est au cœur de la région du Sahel en Afrique. Il accueille aujourd’hui quelque 300 000 réfugiés et personnes déplacées de pays voisins qui fuient les attaques terroristes. Beaucoup tentent de partir d’ici pour rejoindre l’Europe. Pour contrer cette migration, des fonds européens sont destinés à faire de ce pays de transit un lieu de réinstallation temporaire de certains migrants qui se trouvaient en Libye. Si ce programme, qui vise à répartir les migrants, a du mal à décoller, le flux migratoire s’est déjà tari : en 2016, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations comptaient 333 891personnes traversant la frontière du Niger, principalement vers la Libye. En 2017, le nombre a chuté à 17 634.


    https://www.mediapart.fr/studio/portfolios/au-niger-controler-les-flux-de-migrants

    #Agadez #portfolio #photographie #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #réinstallation #Libye #externalisation #OIM #IOM #FMP #Flow_monitoring_points #Tillabéri #Ayorou #Tabarey-barey #camps_de_réfugiés #HCR #Niamey #ETM #mécanisme_d'évacuation_d'urgence #passeurs

    ping @rhoumour @_kg_ @karine4 @isskein

  • La Ville monde

    Mars 2016, faisant face à l’arrivée massive de réfugiés dans sa ville, Grande-Synthe, le Maire crée le premier camp UNHCR de France. Idéaliste et déterminé, l’architecte qui a conseillé à sa conception essaye de convaincre les acteurs de projeter ce lieu comme un quartier, mais sa pensée se cogne sans cesse à la réalité du terrain. De l’emménagement du camp à sa destruction, le réalisateur suit l’expérience dans toute sa complexité, ses espoirs, ses impasses, témoignant du rêve des uns devenu cauchemar des autres.

    http://www.film-documentaire.fr/4DACTION/w_fiche_film/53160

    #film #film_documentaire
    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #camp #campement #Grande-Synthe #Damien_Carême #camp_de_la_Linière #Cyrill_Hanappe #architecture #Utopia_56 #impensé #temporaire #urbanité #espace_public #ordre_républicain #France #dignité #sécurité #risques #drapeau #transit #identification #Afeji #urgence_humanitaire #Calais #jungle #bidonville #CAO #passeurs #ville_accueillante #quartiers_d'accueil #police #participation #incendie

    –----

    1’32’15 : Maire de Mythilène (Grèce)

    « Mon très cher maire, toutes les municipalités ont besoin de joindre leurs forces, et grâce à de petites constructions, elles pourront supporter cette charge, qui peut être modeste, et si nous travaillons tous ensemble, elle peut même devenir bénéfique pour nos petites communes »

  • Pourquoi les migrants iraniens transitent par les Alpes

    De plus en plus d’Iraniens franchissent de nuit la frontière franco-italienne. La plupart tentent ensuite de rejoindre le Royaume-Uni ou l’Allemagne.

    Il est 21 heures à Montgenèvre en cette mi-octobre, et la station de ski des Hautes-Alpes est plongée dans l’obscurité. C’est ici, à 1 800 mètres d’altitude, que les migrants traversent la frontière franco-italienne. Il faut environ huit heures de marche pour rallier Briançon (Hautes-Alpes) depuis #Clavière, le dernier village côté italien. Entre les deux, le col de Montgenèvre, l’obscurité et la police aux frontières (PAF) qui patrouille. Ces dernières années, plusieurs migrants sont morts de froid en tentant le passage. À l’approche de l’hiver, plusieurs militants et bénévoles de l’ONG Médecins du Monde ont donc repris les maraudes. Leur objectif : récupérer les migrants après la frontière et les ramener au Refuge solidaire de Briançon, une quinzaine de kilomètres plus bas, avant de se faire attraper par la police.

    François*, 32 ans, est moniteur de ski saisonnier et bénévole au refuge. Caché derrière des arbres, il guette la pénombre à la recherche d’un signe de vie quand deux silhouettes apparaissent derrière un buisson. Ils s’appellent Azad* et Hedi et sont iraniens. « How much ? » nous questionnent-ils avant de comprendre que François n’est pas passeur mais bénévole. Ils finissent par le suivre. Arman a 28 ans, a étudié le génie civil en Iran puis travaillé dans une pharmacie. Mais son père est opposant politique au régime : « Il a insisté pour que je quitte le pays », raconte-t-il. « Il a donné 18 000 euros à un réseau de passeurs pour me faire arriver en Angleterre. » Cette nuit, Azad et Hedi dormiront au chaud et en sécurité au refuge solidaire. Demain, ils repartiront en train en direction de Dunkerque, pour tenter de passer au Royaume-Uni.
    Une jeunesse sans débouchés

    Ces derniers mois, les bénévoles du Refuge solidaire ont noté un changement de population. Les Guinéens, Ivoiriens et Maliens qui étaient majoritaires en 2017 ont laissé leur place aux Afghans et Iraniens. En 2017, ils n’étaient que 3, en 2018, ils étaient 55, et depuis début 2020, 357 Iraniens sont passés par le refuge, soit 23 % des arrivées, selon les statistiques transmises par le Refuge solidaire. L’Ofpra enregistre la même évolution concernant les nouvelles demandes d’asile iraniennes : 349 en 2017, 510 en 2018 et 443 en 2019. La plupart des nouveaux venus sont diplômés, comme Peshro, 26 ans, diplômé d’une licence en économie, et Peshawa, 29 ans, rencontrés au Refuge solidaire. Les deux frères viennent de la province kurde au nord-ouest de l’Iran : « On n’avait pas de travail, pas d’argent », explique Peshro.

    Depuis que les États-Unis ont rétabli les sanctions économiques contre l’Iran en 2018, la situation est devenue très dure pour la population. En juin 2020, le rial, la monnaie locale, avait perdu la moitié de sa valeur par rapport à mai 2018. Au-delà des difficultés économiques, les émeutes sanglantes survenues entre 2017 et 2019 pour protester contre la corruption du régime, et la répression qui s’abat sur les minorités ethniques (kurdes, arabes) et religieuses (derviche, bahaï) expliquent cette hausse des départs. Environ 200 000 Iraniens quitteraient chaque année le pays, selon Nader Vahabi, principalement pour la Turquie qui ne requiert pas de visa.

    Une fois en Turquie, ils traversent l’Europe, en passant par la Grèce et les Balkans ou directement en bateau jusqu’en Italie. Comme beaucoup, Azad rêve d’Angleterre, perçue comme la terre promise pour les immigrés. Là-bas, ils retrouvent leur seconde langue, les contrôles d’identité n’existent pas et le marché du travail est plus flexible qu’ailleurs. D’après l’Observatoire des migrations de l’université d’Oxford, en 2019, le Royaume-Uni a enregistré environ 45 000 premières demandes d’asiles, un record, avec une majorité d’Iraniens, Irakiens et Pakistanais. Mais la traversée de la Manche est toujours aussi périlleuse. Le 27 octobre, toute une famille iranienne a trouvé la mort au large de Dunkerque, lorsque l’embarcation sur laquelle elle se trouvait a chaviré. Il s’agit du pire drame migratoire survenu dans l’histoire de La Manche.

    https://www.lepoint.fr/societe/pourquoi-les-migrants-iraniens-transitent-par-les-alpes-15-11-2020-2401095_2

    #Alpes #montagne #Hautes-Alpes #refuge_solidaire #Briançon #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_iraniens #Iran #Montgenèvre #France #frontières #Italie #réfugiés_afghans

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les Hautes-Alpes :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721#message886920

    via @isskein

  • De la définition de « migrant », par #François_Gemenne

    « Un migrant, c’est quelqu’un qui refuse que sa vie et les #opportunités qui lui seront offertes soit déterminées par son seul #lieu_de_naissance. Il y a aujourd’hui une très grande injustice dans le monde qui est liée au lieu de naissance. »

    https://twitter.com/RomainVeys/status/1318087047136018433

    François Gemenne interviewé par Romain Veys autour de son dernier livre « #On_a_tous_un_ami_noir »


    https://seenthis.net/messages/879416#message879417

    #définition #migrations #migrant

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • Dans l’est de la #Turquie, le trajet tragique des migrants afghans

    Fuyant les talibans, de nombreuses familles partent trouver refuge en Europe. En chemin, elles sont souvent bloquées dans les #montagnes kurdes, où elles sont à la merci des #trafiquants d’êtres humains et de la #police.

    Le dos voûté sous leurs lourds sacs à dos, la peau brûlée par le soleil et les lèvres craquelées par la soif, Nizamuddin et Zabihulah sont à bout de forces. Se traînant pesamment en bord de route, près de la petite ville de #Çaldiran dans l’extrême est de la Turquie, ils cherchent désespérément un moyen d’abréger leur trajet. « Nous marchons presque sans arrêt depuis deux jours et deux nuits. Nous avons franchi sept ou huit montagnes pour arriver ici depuis l’Iran », raconte le premier. Affamés, les pieds enflés, et dépités par le refus généralisé de les conduire vers la grande ville de #Van à une centaine de kilomètres de là, ils finissent par se laisser tomber au sol, sous un arbre.

    « J’ai quitté l’#Afghanistan il y a huit mois parce que les talibans voulaient me recruter. C’était une question de temps avant qu’ils m’emmènent de force », explique Zabihulah. Originaire de la province de Jozjan, dans le nord de l’Afghanistan, où vivent sa femme et son très jeune fils, son quotidien était rythmé par les menaces de la rébellion afghane et la misère économique dans laquelle est plongé le pays en guerre depuis plus de quarante ans. « Je suis d’abord allé en Iran pour travailler. C’était épuisant et le patron ne m’a pas payé », relate-t-il. Ereinté par les conditions de vie, le jeune homme au visage fin mais marqué par le dur labeur a décidé de tenter sa chance en Turquie. « C’est ma deuxième tentative, précise-t-il. L’an dernier, la police iranienne m’a attrapé, m’a tabassé et tout volé. J’ai été renvoyé en Afghanistan. Cette fois, je vais rester en Turquie travailler un peu, puis j’irai en Grèce. »

    Pierres tombales

    Comme Nizamuddin et Zabihulah, des dizaines de milliers de réfugiés afghans (mais aussi iraniens, pakistanais et bangladais) pénètrent en Turquie illégalement chaque année, en quête d’un emploi, d’une vie plus stable et surtout de sécurité. En 2019, les autorités turques disent avoir appréhendé 201 437 Afghans en situation irrégulière. Deux fois plus que l’année précédente et quatre fois plus qu’en 2017. Pour la majorité d’entre eux, la province de Van est la porte d’entrée vers l’Anatolie et ensuite la Grèce. Cette région reculée est aussi la première muraille de la « forteresse Europe ».

    Si le désastre humanitaire en mer Méditerranée est largement documenté, la tragédie qui se déroule dans les montagnes kurdes des confins de la Turquie et de l’#Iran est plus méconnue mais tout aussi inhumaine. Régulièrement, des corps sont retrouvés congelés, à moitié dévorés par les animaux sauvages, écrasés aux bas de falaises, criblés de balles voire noyés dans des cours d’eau. Dans un des cimetières municipaux de Van, un carré comptant plus d’une centaine de tombes est réservé aux dépouilles des migrants que les autorités n’ont pas pu identifier. Sur les pierres tombales, quelques chiffres, lettres et parfois une nationalité. Ce sont les seuls éléments, avec des prélèvements d’ADN, qui permettront peut-être un jour d’identifier les défunts. Un large espace est prévu pour les futures tombes, dont certaines sont déjà creusées en attente de cercueils.

    Pour beaucoup de réfugiés, la gare routière de Van est le terminus du voyage. « Le passeur nous a abandonnés ici, nous ne savons pas où aller ni quoi faire », raconte Nejibulah, le téléphone vissé à la main dans l’espoir de pouvoir trouver une porte de sortie à ses mésaventures. A 34 ans, il a quitté Hérat, dans l’ouest de l’Afghanistan, avec douze membres de sa famille dont ses trois enfants. Après quinze jours passés dans des conditions déplorables dans les montagnes, la famille a finalement atteint le premier village turc pour tomber entre les mains de bandits locaux. « Ils nous ont battus et nous ont menacés de nous prendre nos organes si nous ne leur donnions pas d’argent », raconte Nejibulah. Son beau-frère exhibe deux profondes blessures ouvertes sur sa jambe. Leurs proches ont pu rassembler un peu d’argent pour payer leur libération : 13 000 lires turques (1 660 euros) en plus des milliers de dollars déjà payés aux passeurs. Ces derniers sont venus les récupérer pour les abandonner sans argent à la gare routière.
    Impasse

    La police vient régulièrement à la gare arrêter les nouveaux arrivants pour les emmener dans l’un des deux camps de rétention pour migrants de la province. Là-bas, les autorités évaluent leurs demandes de protection internationale. « Sur le papier, la Turquie est au niveau des standards internationaux dans la gestion des migrants. Le problème, c’est le manque de sensibilité aux droits de l’homme des officiers de protection », explique Mahmut Kaçan, avocat et membre de la commission sur les migrations du barreau de Van. Le résultat, selon lui, c’est une politique de déportation quasi systématique. Si les familles obtiennent en général facilement l’asile, les hommes seuls n’auraient presque aucune chance, voire ne pourraient même pas plaider leur cas.

    Pour ceux qui obtiennent le droit de rester, les conditions de vie n’en restent pas moins très difficiles. Le gouvernement qui doit gérer plus de 4 millions de réfugiés, dont 3,6 millions de Syriens, leur interdit l’accès aux grandes villes de l’ouest du pays telles Istanbul, Ankara et Izmir. Il faut parfois des mois pour obtenir un permis de séjour. L’obtention du permis de travail est quasiment impossible. En attendant, ils sont condamnés à la débrouille, au travail au noir et sous-payé et aux logements insalubres.

    La famille Amiri, originaire de la province de Takhar dans le nord de l’Afghanistan, est arrivée à Van en 2018. « J’étais cuisinier dans un commissariat. Les talibans ont menacé de me tuer. Nous avons dû tout abandonner du jour au lendemain », raconte Shah Vali, le père, quadragénaire. Sa femme était enceinte de sept mois à leur arrivée en Turquie. Ils ont dormi dans la rue, puis sur des cartons pendant des semaines dans un logement vétuste qu’ils occupent toujours. La petite dernière est née prématurément. Elle est muette et partiellement paralysée. « L’hôpital nous dit qu’il faudrait faire des analyses de sang pour trouver un traitement, sans quoi elle restera comme ça toute sa vie », explique son père. Coût : 800 lires. La moitié seulement est remboursée par la sécurité sociale turque. « Nous n’avons pas les moyens », souffle sa mère Sabira. Les adultes, souffrant aussi d’afflictions, n’ont pas accès à la moindre couverture de santé. Shah Vali est pourtant d’humeur heureuse. Après deux ans de présence en Turquie, il a enfin trouvé un emploi. Au noir, bien sûr. Il travaille dans une usine d’œufs. Salaire : 1 200 lires. Le seuil de faim était estimé en janvier à 2 219 lires pour un foyer de quatre personnes. « Nous avons dû demander de l’argent à des voisins, de jeunes Afghans, eux-mêmes réfugiés », informe Shah Vali. Pour lui et sa famille, le voyage est terminé. « Nous voulions aller en Grèce, mais nous n’avons pas assez d’argent. »

    Lointaines, économiquement peu dynamiques, les provinces frontalières de l’Iran sont une impasse pour les réfugiés. Et ce d’autant que, depuis 2013, aucun réfugié afghan n’a pu bénéficier d’une réinstallation dans un pays tiers. « Sans espoir légal de pouvoir aller en Europe ou dans l’ouest du pays, les migrants prennent toujours plus de risques », souligne Mahmut Kaçan. Pour contourner les check-points routiers qui quadrillent cette région très militarisée, les traversées du lac de Van - un vaste lac de montagne aux humeurs très changeantes - se multiplient. Fin juin, un bateau a sombré corps et biens avec des dizaines de personnes à bord. A l’heure de l’écriture de cet article, 60 corps avaient été retrouvés. L’un des passeurs était apparemment un simple pêcheur.

    Climat d’#impunité

    Face à cette tragédie, le ministre de l’Intérieur turc, Suleyman Soylu, a fait le déplacement, annonçant des moyens renforcés pour lutter contre le phénomène. Mahmut Kaçan dénonce cependant des effets d’annonce et l’incurie des autorités. « Combien de temps un passeur res te-t-il en prison généralement ? Quelques mois au plus, s’agace-t-il. Les autorités sont focalisées sur la lutte contre les trafics liés au PKK [la guérilla kurde active depuis les années 80] et ferment les yeux sur le reste. » Selon lui, les réseaux de trafiquants se structureraient rapidement. Publicités et contacts de passeurs sont aisément trouvables sur les réseaux sociaux, notamment sur Instagram. Dans un climat d’impunité, les #passeurs corrompent des #gardes-frontières, qui eux-mêmes ne sont pas poursuivis en cas de bavures. « Le #trafic_d’être_humain est une industrie sans risque, par comparaison avec la drogue, et très profitable », explique l’avocat. Pendant ce temps, les exilés qui traversent les montagnes sont à la merci de toutes les #violences. Avec la guerre qui s’intensifie à nouveau en Afghanistan, le flot de réfugiés ne va pas se tarir. Les Afghans représentent le tiers des 11 500 migrants interceptés par l’agence européenne Frontex aux frontières sud-est de l’UE, entre janvier et mai.

    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/07/20/dans-l-est-de-la-turquie-le-trajet-tragique-des-migrants-afghans_1794793
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #parcours_migratoires #itinéraires_migratoires #réfugiés_afghans #Caldiran #Kurdistan #Kurdistan_turc #morts #décès #Iran #frontières #violence

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Lake Van: An overlooked and deadly migration route to Turkey and Europe

      On the night of 27 June, at least 61 people died in a shipwreck on a lake in Van, a Turkish province bordering Iran. The victims were asylum seekers, mostly from Afghanistan, and the wreck shed light on a dangerous and often overlooked migration route used by people trying to move west from the border to major cities, such as Ankara and Istanbul, or further beyond to Europe.

      Turkey hosts the largest refugee population in the world, around four million people. A significant majority – 3.6 million – are Syrians. Afghans are the second largest group, but since 2018 they have been arriving irregularly in Turkey and then departing for Greece in larger numbers than any other nationality.

      Driven by worsening conflict in their country and an economic crisis in Iran, the number of Afghans apprehended for irregularly entering Turkey increased from 45,000 in 2017 to more than 200,000 in 2019. At the same time, the number of Afghans arriving in Greece by sea from Turkey increased from just over 3,400 to nearly 24,000.

      During that time, Turkey’s policies towards people fleeing conflict, especially Afghans, have hardened. As the number of Afghans crossing the border from Iran increased, Turkey cut back on protections and accelerated efforts to apprehend and deport those entering irregularly. In 2019, the Turkish government deported nearly 23,000 Afghans from the country, according to the UN’s emergency aid coordination body, OCHA.

      Early on, travel restrictions put in place due to the coronavirus appeared to reduce the number of people entering Turkey irregularly. But seven months on, the pandemic is worsening the problems that push people to migrate. The economic crisis in Iran has only intensified, and the head of the UN’s migration agency, IOM, in Afghanistan has warned that COVID-19-induced lockdowns have “amplified the effects of the conflict”.

      Like the victims of the wreck, most people travelling on the clandestine route through Van are from Afghanistan – others are mainly from Iran, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The lake, 50 kilometres from the border, straddles two provinces – Van and Bitlis – and offers a way for asylum seekers and migrants to avoid police and gendarmerie checkpoints set up along roads heading west.

      Due to its 200-kilometre border with Iran, Van has long been a hub for smuggling sugar, tea, and petrol, according to Mahmut Kaçan, a lawyer with the Migration and Asylum Commission at the Van Bar Association. In recent years, a people smuggling industry has also grown up to cater to the needs of people crossing the border and trying to move deeper into Turkey. Lake Van – so large that locals simply call it ‘the sea’ – plays an important role.

      “There have been a lot of refugees on ‘the sea’ in the last 10 years,” Mustafa Abalı, the elected leader of Çitören, a village close to where many of the boats set out across the lake, told The New Humanitarian, adding that the numbers have increased in the past two to three years.
      ‘Policy of impunity’

      When the shipwreck happened, on 27 June, the picture that initially emerged was murky: Rumours circulated, but the local gendarmerie blocked lawyers and journalists from reaching the lake’s shore.

      After two days, the Van governorship announced that security forces had found a missing boat captain alive and launched a search mission. It took weeks, but search teams eventually recovered 56 bodies from the wreck, which had come to rest more than 100 metres below the lake’s surface.

      Abalı described the scene on the beach where the rescue teams were working. “I was crying; everyone was crying; even the soldiers were crying… We were all asking, ‘how could this happen?’” he said.

      The testimony the boat captain provided to police after he was detained on smuggling charges gave a few clues. On board with his cousin and 70 to 80 asylum seekers, he recalled how they left that night at around 9pm from Van city to cross the lake. He said he pushed out into the open water, with the lights off to avoid attention, but the waves were large and the boat capsized. The captain, the lone known survivor, said he managed to swim ashore.

      The shipwreck was the deadliest on Lake Van, but not the first. In December 2019, seven asylum seekers died in a wreck on the lake. After that incident, authorities only issued one arrest warrant, which expired after 27 days, and the suspected smuggler was released.

      Kaçan, from the Van Bar Association, said the handling of that case pointed to a “policy of impunity” that allows the smuggling industry to flourish in Van. “It’s not a risky job,” he said, referring to the chances of getting caught and the lack of punishment for those who are.

      That said, the case against the captain from the 27 June shipwreck is ongoing, and at least eight other people have now been detained in connection with the incident, according to Kaçan.

      A report from the Van Bar Association alleges that this impunity extends to the Iran-Turkey border, but according to Kaçan it‘s unlikely smugglers bringing people into Turkey – sometimes in groups of up to 100 or 200 people – would pass the frontier entirely undetected. Turkey is building a wall along much of it, and there’s a heavy military and surveillance presence in the area. “Maybe not all of them, but some of the officers are cooperating with the smugglers,” Kaçan said. “Maybe [the smugglers] bribe them. That’s a possibility.”

      After a lull during the initial round of pandemic-related travel restrictions in March and April, migration across the Iran-Turkey border began to pick up again in May, according to people TNH spoke to in Van. Smugglers are even advertising their services on Instagram – a sign of the relative freedom with which they operate.

      TNH contacted a Turkish-speaking Iranian smuggler through the social media platform. The smuggler said he was based in the western Iranian city of Urmia, about 40 kilometres from the Turkish border, and gave his name as Haji Qudrat. On a video call, Haji Qudrat counted money as he spoke. “Everyone knows us,” he said. “There’s no problem with the police.” He turned the phone to show a room full of 20 to 30 people. “They’re all Afghans. Tonight they’re all going to Van,” he added.

      TNH asked both the Turkish interior ministry and the Van governorship for comment on the allegations of official cooperation with people smugglers and possible bribery, but neither had responded by the time of publication.
      A cemetery on a hill

      While crossing into Turkey from Iran doesn’t seem too problematic, the situation for asylum seekers in Van is not so relaxed.

      The region is the second poorest of Turkey’s 81 provinces – many people who enter irregularly want to head west to Turkey’s comparatively wealthier cities to search for informal employment, reunite with family members, or try to cross into Greece and seek protection in Europe, according to a recent report by the Mixed Migration Centre.

      Under Turkey’s system for international protection, non-Europeans fleeing war or persecution are supposed to get a temporary residency permit and access to certain services, such as medical care. But they are also registered to a particular city or town and are required to check in at the immigration office once a week. If they want to travel outside the province where they are registered, people with international protection have to first apply for permission from authorities. Even if it is granted, they are required to return within 30 days.

      Since the uptick in border crossings in 2018, it has become more difficult for Afghans to access international protection in Turkey, and Turkish authorities have occasionally apprehended and deported large numbers of Afghans – especially single men – without allowing them to apply for protection in the first place.

      As a result, many prefer to avoid contact with Turkish authorities altogether, using smugglers to carry on their journeys. In September, news channels aired footage of a minibus that had been stopped in the province. It had the capacity to hold 14 passengers, but there were 65 people inside, trying to head west.

      Buses carrying asylum seekers on Van’s windy, mountainous roads frequently crash, and every spring, when the snow melts, villagers find the corpses of those who tried to walk the mountain pass in the winter. Their bodies are buried in a cemetery with the scores who have drowned in Lake Van.

      The cemetery is on a hill in Van, the city, and it is full of the graves of asylum seekers who died somewhere along the way. The graves are marked by slabs, and most of the people are unidentified. Some of the slabs simply read “Afghan” or “Pakistan”. Others are only marked with the date the person died or their body was found. The cemetery currently has around 200 graves, but it has space for many more.

      https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/10/20/turkey-afghanistan-migrants-refugees-asylum

      –----


      http://www.vanbarosu.org.tr/uploads/2694.pdf
      #rapport

      #Van #lac #Lac_Van #cimetière

  • En danger Pas dangereux
    | FUMIGENE MAG : http://www.fumigene.org/2020/06/01/en-danger-pas-dangereux

    Souvent invisibilisées et repoussées aux marges des villes, les personnes exilées ont rarement l’occasion de faire entendre leurs difficultés et galères quotidiennes /.../

    Quand elles prennent la parole, c’est avec force et conviction que leurs récits se déploient et viennent dénoncer une vision caricaturale que l’on retrouve encore trop souvent. Celle de personnes menaçantes ou dangereuses, quand ce sont bien elles qui sont mises en danger par des expulsions quotidiennes ou un accès au droit rendu impossible par les lois actuelles.

    Le projet « En danger Pas dangereux » est parti de ce constat /.../

    #photo #photographie #temoignage #automedia #passeurs_de_maux #exils #migrations #migrants #vision #prejugés

    • Si par hasard, vous avez croisé ces collages dans Paris et que vous vous êtes demandé ce que c’était, la réponse est ci-dessous...
      📸 ⤵


      Ce sont des témoignages et des photos prises par des personnes éxilées fréquentant le Cèdre, à Porte d’Aubervilliers, dans le cadre d’un projet mené avec @LuciolesDuDoc.
      Au départ, l’envie de raconter une situation d’exil en s’adressant à quelqu’un ou à une institution. @LuciolesDuDoc ont fourni les outils pour collecter les témoignages, un micro, des appareils photo jetables, et cette table coulissante fabriquée par nos soins (cc Ulysse Mathieu)
      Les photos qui reviennent sont très variées, ça va du portrait à l’environnement. Pour les textes, de l’intime à la colère. Parmi les textes ou institutions visées : le 115, l’État, mais aussi les gens qui ont peur d’eux, l’impossibilité de séduire, de se faire des ami.e.s
      On a rassemblé les photos, les textes, on a fait des assemblages, en gardant toujours en tête cette idée d’interpellation, que ces témoignages étaient faits pour être entendus et écoutés.
      Ce sont ensuite devenus des collages, qu’on a décidé d’aller coller dans des lieux touristiques ou importants dans les parcous d’exils.
      Vous pouvez les retrouver autour de Porte d’Aubervilliers, Châtelet, République, Place des Fêtes... prenez un moment pour les lire & regarder ! Et pour suivre les nouveaux collages, c’est sur le compte instagram : endanger.pasdangereux

      Fil par Lucas Roxo : https://twitter.com/lucas_roxo/status/1230490204848500736

  • Ettore Castiglioni - Rai Radio 3 - RaiPlay Radio
    https://www.raiplayradio.it/audio/2019/05/WIKIRADIO-782ee5c2-5ed2-489c-9f41-0d859dbacd1d.html

    Ettore Castiglioni raccontato da Gian Luca Favetto
    Il 5 giugno 1944, nei pressi del passo del Forno, in provincia di Sondrio, viene ritrovato il corpo senza vita di Ettore Castiglioni

    con Gian Luca Favetto

    Repertorio:

    – Letture tratte da Il giorno delle Mésules. Diari di un alpinista antifascista di E. Castiglioni - Curatore: Marco Albino Ferrari - Editore: CDA & VIVALDA- voce di Claudio De Pasqualis,

    – Frammenti dal trailer Oltre il confine. La storia di Ettore Castiglioni , docufilm italo-svizzero (regia di Andrea Azzetti e Federico Massa) che ripercorre le vicende e la vita dello scalatore Ettore Castiglioni (1908-1944), attraverso le parole del suo diario. Produzione: Villi Hermann, Federico Massa, Giuliano Torghele, GIUMA PRODUZIONI, GOOLIVER, IMAGO FILM LUGANO, in coproduzione con RSI, 2015

    – Francesco De Gregori - Stelutis Alpinis

    #wikiradio #podcast #ettoreCastiglioni #alpinisme #CAI

  • «La montagna a casa» celebra l’eroismo di un grande alpinista antifascista - Lo scarpone on-line - L’house organ del Club Alpino Italiano
    http://www.loscarpone.cai.it/news/items/la-montagna-a-casa-celebra-leroismo-di-un-grande-alpinista.html

    «La montagna a casa» celebra l’eroismo di un grande alpinista antifascista
    “Oltre il confine. La storia di Ettore Castiglioni” di Andrea Azzetti e Federico Massa è il film che sarà proiettato questa sera per la rassegna cinematografica del Cai

    9 maggio 2020 - Inizia un altro weekend in compagnia della rassegna “La montagna a casa”. Oggi sarà protagonista Ettore Castiglioni, figura tra le più amate della storia del Cai, sia come accademico che per il suo impegno antifascista. Attraverso le Alpi Castiglioni ha portato in Svizzera tanti dissidenti e tanti ebrei. “Oltre il confine. La storia di Ettore Castiglioni” di Andrea Azzetti e Federico Massa cercherà anche una risposta all’ultima domanda rimasta insoluta, quella sulla missione a causa della quale morì in alta Valmalenco nella primavera del 1944.

    Il film sarà trasmesso alle 21 sul canale Youtube del Cai. “La montagna a casa” è organizzata dal Cai con la collaborazione di Sondrio Festival, Museo della Montagna e Parco dello Stelvio. Il link per guardare il film è: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUZmtHbevwk

    .

    Se volete rivedere il film di ieri, “Tamara Lunger – facing the limit”, appuntamento con la replica delle 17.30. Il link per partecipare alla proiezione è: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Z4I_vR0aQY

    .
    Ecco la scheda del film di oggi:

    “Oltre il confine. La storia di Ettore Castiglioni”
    Regia: Andrea Azzetti e Federico Massa
    Produzione: Giuma
    Sceneggiatura: Andrea Azzetti, Federico Massa e Gerassimos Valentis
    Fotografia: Andrea Azzetti
    Paese: Italia
    Anno: 2017
    Durata: 66 min.

    Attori: Stefano Scandaletti, Marco Albino Ferrari
    Con le testimonianze di Alessandro Tutino, Andrea Tognina, Maurizio Giordani, Annibale Salsa, Alessandro Rizzi, Ivano Marco Rebulaz, Ruggero Cominotti, Oscar Brandli, Milan Bier, Nenga Negrini, Dominik Lieinenbach.

    Sinossi:
    #Film dedicato alla nobile figura di Ettore Castiglioni, accademico del #CAI, compilatore di guide alpinistiche CAI-TCI, musicista, morto assiderato in alta Valmalenco nella primavera del 1944, durante la sua fuga dalla prigione svizzera del passo del Maloja, accusato di espatrio clandestino.
    #EttoreCastiglioni scelse di avere come unico confidente il suo diario. Le sue parole compongono il ritratto di un grande alpinista e insieme la figura di un uomo solo e inquieto. Ma raccontano un cambiamento profondo: da ragazzo di buona famiglia ad antifascista che all’indomani dell’8 settembre 1943 guidò un gruppo di ex soldati sulle montagne della Valle d’Aosta e si adoperò per portare in salvo sul confine svizzero profughi ed ebrei in fuga dalla guerra. “Dare la libertà alla gente per me adesso è una ragione di vita”: scriveva così qualche giorno prima di cadere in un tranello delle guardie di frontiera. L’ultima nota nel diario è del marzo ’44 e non svela nulla degli avvenimenti successivi. Sconfinò nuovamente in Svizzera e fu arrestato. Privato degli abiti e degli scarponi fu rinchiuso in una stanza d’albergo a Maloja. Durante la notte si calò dalla finestra e affrontò il ghiacciaio del Forno avvolto in una coperta. Cosa lo spinse a tentare una fuga impossibile? Quale missione aveva da compiere oltre il confine? Lo scrittore Marco Albino Ferrari, curatore dell’edizione critica del diario, ripercorre i momenti salienti dalla vita dell’alpinista, raccoglie documenti e testimonianze e si addentra nel mistero della sua morte.

    @cdb_77 #wwII #frontiere #alpes #suisse #italie #shoah

  • The #Milky_Way

    Les Alpes occidentales entre l’Italie et la France ont été au fur et à mesure des siècles une frontière naturelle, ainsi qu’un lieu de passage et de rencontre. Ses cols constituent une terre de connexion, de médiation entre peuples et cultures différents. L’histoire plus récente nous raconte que ces deux cents dernières années, c’étaient les Italiens qui traversaient clandestinement la frontière pour aller chercher du travail en France alors qu’aujourd’hui c’est une route utilisée notamment par des migrants d’origine africaine.
    Les politiques récentes de fermeture des frontières internes européennes ont poussé les personnes migrantes à rechercher des sentiers moins battus pour quitter l’Italie et continuer leur voyage au-delà de la frontière française, des sentiers de haute montagne comme ceux qui longent le domaine skiable « La voie lactée », à la frontière entre Claviere (IT) et Montgenèvre (FR).
    De jour, les pistes de ski sont un lieu d’amusement, de sport et de détente ; de nuit, elles se transforment en un théâtre de la peur, du danger et des violations des droits humains : les migrants, peu préparés et mal équipés, s’aventurent sur les sentiers en défiant l’obscurité, le froid et les contrôles des autorités françaises et en risquant leur vie.
    The Milky Way est un film choral qui retrace des histoires d’activistes, habitants des montagnes tout en proposant la reconstruction historique de l’émigration italienne des années 50 dans une graphic novel animée. Il raconte aussi les histoires des migrants mis à l’abri par des personnes solidaires des deux côtés de la frontière et met en lumière l’humanité qui refait surface quand le danger imminent réactive la solidarité, se basant sur la conviction que personne ne doit être laissé seul. Personne ne se sauve tout seul.

    https://www.milkywaydoc.com/lle-film/?lang=fr

    Trailer :
    https://vimeo.com/387650575

    #film #documentaire #film_documentaire
    #migrations #réfugiés #asile #montagne #frontière #frontières #frontière_sud-alpine #France #Alpes #Italie #clandestins #décès #morts #secours #passeurs #migrants_italiens #Bardonecchia #Col_de_l'Echelle #solidarité #Moncenisio #Montcenis #Claviere #Clavière #quand_eux_c'était_nous #histoire #colle_della_rho #Briançon #Refuge_solidaire #Briançon #maraudeur #maraudes #Névache #traque #chasse_à_l'homme #Col_de_la_Roue

    –---

    Citation :

    « La montagne partage les eaux et unit les gens »

    –---

    Citation, #Davide_Rostan, à partir de la minute 26’20 :

    Siamo al Lago del Moncenisio, questo è un colle di passaggio sin dall’Antichità. E’ un luogo importante per la nostra storia perché in qualche modo simboleggia il fatto che le popolazioni hanno attraversato questi confini dai tempi antichissimi, che è lo stesso tragitto che oggi molti migranti vogliono fare. L’anno scorso riuscivano più spesso dal Monginevro a scendere con l’autobus o in macchina con delle persone che portavano aiuto per evitare che rimanessero al freddo. Il Monginevro è il colle più facile, passa la strada, è aperta tutto l’anno. Le persone che arrivano scendono con il treno a #Oulx, prendono l’autobus, arrivano a Claviere e lì si avviano a piedi. Quest’anno i controlli sono aumentati, quindi molto spesso chi arriva a Claviere poi si deve fare una quindicina di chilometri fino a Briançon e sicuramente questo mette a rischio la loro vita, perché in qualche modo per non farsi fermare attraversano il valico di notte, non possono stare sull’autobus, sono costretti a camminare in mezzo alla neve. Una persona è morta proprio tentando da Bardonecchia di andare a scavalcare il Colle della Rho, questo ragazzo è stato ritrovato l’anno scorso in fondo a un burrone dove probabilmente era finito a causa di una slavina. Altri invece sono morti dopo aver scavalcato il colle del Monginevro, alcune rincorse dalla polizia sono finite nel fiume, altre si sono perse nei boschi sono morti di sfinimento o per il freddo. E tutto questo purtroppo è dovuto semplicemente alle nostre leggi.

    ping @isskein

  • Des trajectoires immobilisées : #protection et #criminalisation des migrations au #Niger

    Le 6 janvier dernier, un camp du Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) situé à une quinzaine de kilomètres de la ville nigérienne d’Agadez est incendié. À partir d’une brève présentation des mobilités régionales, l’article revient sur les contraintes et les tentatives de blocage des trajectoires migratoires dans ce pays saharo-sahélien. Depuis 2015, les projets européens se multiplient afin de lutter contre « les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière ». La Belgique est un des contributeurs du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’Union européenne pour l’Afrique (FFUE) et l’agence #Enabel met en place des projets visant la #stabilisation des communautés au Niger

    http://www.liguedh.be/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Chronique_LDH_190_voies-sures-et-legales.pdf
    #immobilité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Agadez #migrations #asile #réfugiés #root_causes #causes_profondes #Fonds_fiduciaire #mécanisme_de_transit_d’urgence #Fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence_pour_l’Afrique #transit_d'urgence #OIM #temporaire #réinstallation #accueil_temporaire #Libye #IOM #expulsions_sud-sud #UE #EU #Union_européenne #mise_à_l'abri #évacuation #Italie #pays_de_transit #transit #mixed_migrations #migrations_mixtes #Convention_des_Nations_Unies_contre_la_criminalité_transnationale_organisée #fermeture_des_frontières #criminalisation #militarisation_des_frontières #France #Belgique #Espagne #passeurs #catégorisation #catégories #frontières #HCR #appel_d'air #incendie #trafic_illicite_de_migrants #trafiquants

    –----

    Sur l’incendie de janvier 2020, voir :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/816450

    ping @karine4 @isskein :
    Cette doctorante et membre de Migreurop, Alizée Dauchy, a réussi un super défi : résumé en 3 pages la situation dans laquelle se trouve le Niger...

    –---

    Pour @sinehebdo, un nouveau mot : l’#exodant
    –-> #vocabulaire #terminologie #mots

    Les origine de ce terme :

    Sur l’origine et l’emploi du terme « exodant » au Niger, voir Bernus (1999), Bonkano et Boubakar (1996), Boyer (2005a). Les termes #passagers, #rakab (de la racine arabe rakib désignant « ceux qui prennent un moyen de trans-port »), et #yan_tafia (« ceux qui partent » en haoussa) sont également utilisés.

    https://www.reseau-terra.eu/IMG/pdf/mts.pdf

  • Hundreds of migrants stuck in #Niger amid coronavirus pandemic

    As countries close borders to curb spread of coronavirus, aid groups in Niger ’overwhelmed’ by requests of support.

    While countries across Africa have been closing their borders as part of efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic, migrants and people on the move are paying a high price.

    Over the past two weeks, hundreds of women, men and children have been stuck in Niger, a country that represents a traditional corridor of transit for seasonal labourers from West Africa heading to Libya or Algeria, as well as people hoping to move further to Europe across the Mediterranean Sea.

    “We’re being overwhelmed by requests of support,” said Barbara Rijks, Niger director for the International Organization for Migration (IOM).

    Deportations from Algeria to Niger have been a continuing trend since late 2016, with figures decreasing last year only to begin growing again from February onwards. The migrants, who were arrested during police roundups in Algeria’s coastal cities and forced to travel for days in overloaded trucks, were usually offered assistance by the IOM to return to their countries of origin.

    But now amid the pandemic, they are forced to quarantine in tent facilities set up in the military border post of Assamaka, where temperatures touch 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit), or in the southern city of Arlit.

    With borders closed all across West Africa, they risk being stuck in Niger much longer than they expected.

    “We’re extremely worried,” said Abderahmane Maouli, the mayor of Arlit, a city that hosts one of the six IOM transit centres in Niger and a new facility for those that end their quarantine in Assamaka.

    “Despite the border closure, we see that movements are continuing: People travel through minor routes to avoid border controls and reach Arlit without going through the quarantine, and this is a major public health issue for our community,” Maouli told Al Jazeera.

    The deportation of more than 8,000 people by Algeria since January this year, he says, had already put local welfare services under strain.

    ’First warning sign’

    An uncommon push-back operation happened also in late March at the border between Niger and Libya, where a convoy of travellers was intercepted and sent back in the middle of the desert, forcing the IOM to organise humanitarian assistance.

    The quarantine of these groups and other travellers - in a makeshift camp set up in record time - fosters worries from both migrants and local communities in a country already standing at the bottom of the United Nations human development index and facing deadly seasonal outbreaks of malaria and measles. Some 1,400 doctors are operational in Niger, according to the government, serving a population of about 22 million.

    “A first warning sign,” Rijks told Al Jazeera, “was the arrival of 767 people, half of which foreigners, at the border between Niger and Algeria, on March 19: From that moment on, we registered continuous arrivals and each one of these people needs to quarantine for 14 days.”

    Later in March, a convoy of pick-up cars carrying 256 people was pushed-back by Libyan militiamen close to Tummo, a military outpost marking the frontier between Niger and Libya, some 900 kilometres (559 miles) northeast of Agadez, where their perilous desert crossing started.

    Blocked in the garrison village of Madama, Nigeriens and migrants mostly from Nigeria, Ghana and Burkina Faso suffered the unmerciful Saharan heat for days before receiving humanitarian assistance by the IOM and Niger’s Civil Protection Department that organised their transfer to Agadez. Their drivers were arrested for breaching anti-smuggling rules.

    In Agadez, a once-coveted tourist destination for Europeans willing to explore Saharan dunes, they were lodged in a tent facility set up by the IOM alongside the main sports arena, where football games have been temporarily suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

    “It’s been a huge challenge, we had to boost our activities in less than one week, adopting hygienic measures in our six transit centres, that are already at full capacity, and opening up new structures to lodge people quarantining,” Rijks said.

    Another 44 people were found at Assamaka in the night between April 4-5 and welcomed at IOM’s quarantine site, where Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF) and the International Federation of the Red Cross provide medical and psychosocial assistance.
    ’Humanitarian corridors’

    IOM operations in Niger scaled up after the government enforced anti-smuggling measures in 2015, to prevent migrants from taking dangerous Saharan trails to Libya or Algeria.

    In the span of a few years, the number of crossings reduced, from about 330,000 in 2016 to 100,000 in 2018, while hundreds of “passeurs” - the French word for smugglers and middlemen active in the transportation business - were jailed.

    As a consequence, more and more people ended up being blocked in the country and turned to the organisation’s voluntary return programmes. From 2017 to early 2020, some 32,000 migrants returned home from Niger with IOM assistance.

    “People were usually staying for a few weeks in transit centres, where we arranged travel documents with consulates, before going back to their country of origin, while now they’re stuck in our transit centres and this adds frustrations,” said Rijks.

    She hopes that - despite border closures - governments in West Africa will agree soon on organising “humanitarian corridors to return their citizens from Niger”.

    While Rijks noted that countries are willing to receive back their citizens, the closure of land and air transportation routes, coupled with the need to set up costly quarantine facilities for returnees on arrival, put more strain on an already fragile logistic organisation.

    Currently, 2,371 people - mostly Nigerians, Guineans, Cameroonians and Malians - are lodged in the IOM’s six transit centres, Rijks said, while the size and number of new facilities set up to quarantine migrants are increasing by the day.
    ’Perfect storm’

    Niger has confirmed 342 coronavirus cases and 11 deaths as of Thursday, with the vast majority of cases found in the capital, Niamey. The country has introduced a series of containment measures to slow the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, including the closure of international borders, a ban on gatherings and non-essential activities and a night curfew.

    In addition to migrants on the move, humanitarian organisations are particularly concerned about the fate of 420,000 refugees and internally displaced Nigeriens who escaped violence by armed groups along the country’s borders with Nigeria, Chad, Mali and Burkina Faso. These people often live in crowded settlements, where physical distancing is a luxury.

    “On top of displacement caused by jihadists, malnutrition risks and socio-economic vulnerability, COVID-19 represents the perfect storm for Niger,” said Alessandra Morelli, country director for the UN’s refugee agency (UNHCR), pointing also at the interruption of evacuation flights for refugees from Libyan detention centres who are temporarily hosted in Niger while awaiting opportunities to resettle to Europe or North America.

    Morelli said the programme was launched in 2017 to offer “a vital lifeline” for the most vulnerable refugees detained in Libya.

    “We took them out of prisons, brought them here by plane and assisted them in their asylum and resettlement claim.”

    About 3,000 people have been evacuated to Niger so far and more than 2,300 resettled to Canada, Germany, Sweden, Netherlands, France and other countries.

    All operations are currently suspended.

    While the number of coronavirus cases grow by the day, with deepening worries over the effect of a severe outbreak in already fragile countries in the region, some refugees hosted in the reception centre of Hamdallaye started producing soap for local communities.

    “It’s a sign of hope in the midst of this situation,” said Morelli, whose WhatsApp account blinks continuously with information on new displacements and violence along Niger’s sealed borders.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/04/hundreds-migrants-stuck-niger-coronavirus-pandemic-200409131745319.html
    #IOM #OIM #immobilité #confinement #fermeture_des_frontières #Assamaka #épidémie #Arlit #Afrique_de_l'Ouest #centre_de_transit #centres_de_transit #renvois #Algérie #refoulement #push-back #quarantaine #migrerrance #frontières #Tummo #Madama #Agadez #passeurs
    ping @ceped_migrinter_afrique @karine4 @isskein

  • Yémen : à marche forcée - ARTE Reportage | ARTE
    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/090427-000-A/yemen-a-marche-forcee

    Chez eux, en #Éthiopie, les Oromos n’ont rien. Par centaines de milliers, ils migrent vers l’Arabie Saoudite, richissime contrée où ils s’imaginent un avenir.

    Mais la route est longue, périlleuse, impossible. Elle se pratique à pied, faute de pouvoir payer les passeurs et elle est semée d’embuches. Les montagnes de Galafi, à la frontière de #Djibouti, irradiées par un soleil brûlant, mettent à terre les plus vaillants, terrassés par la soif.

    A Obock, un petit port sans charme, les migrants sont convoyés de nuit vers des boutres surchargés qui affrontent les vagues de la #Mer_Rouge. Et, ultime danger : au #Yémen, l’industrie migratoire est infiltrée par les mafias locales. Là-bas, les #migrants #oromos deviennent des proies. Les plus pauvres sont les plus vulnérables. Déviés de la route, aux prises avec des #passeurs sans scrupules, ils sont torturés jusqu’à ce que leurs familles paient la rançon, parfois ruinées par la vente de toutes leurs terres pour tirer un fils ou une fille de l’enfer des maisons de torture.

    D’une rive à l’autre du Golfe d’Aden, Charles Emptaz et Olivier Jobard ont marché avec ces migrants éthiopiens, animés par une idée fixe et lancinante : gagner un jour son pain.

    Des bribes de cette odyssée, ils tentent de reconstituer le récit d’une traversée mortelle, dessinant en creux le portrait d’un peuple transfiguré par l’épreuve, les Oromos.

  • #Soudan : les #milices #Janjawid garde-frontières ou #passeurs ?

    Dans un communiqué, les #Forces_de_soutien_rapide (#RSF), groupe paramilitaire servant de “garde-frontières” au Soudan, ont annoncé avoir arrêté 138 migrants africains, jeudi 19 septembre. Pour le spécialiste Jérôme Tubiana, cette annonce fait partie d’une stratégie : le Soudan cherche à attirer l’attention de l’Union européenne qui a arrêté de lui verser des fonds.

    Les Forces de soutien rapide (RSF), une organisation paramilitaire soudanaise, ont annoncé avoir arrêté, jeudi 19 septembre, 138 Africains qui souhaitaient pénétrer “illégalement” en Libye. Parmi eux, se trouvaient des dizaines de Soudanais mais aussi des Tchadiens et des Éthiopiens.

    "Le 19 septembre, une patrouille des RSF a arrêté 138 personnes de différentes nationalités qui essayaient de traverser illégalement la frontière avec la Libye", précise le communiqué.

    Une partie de ces migrants ont été incarcérés dans la zone désertique de #Gouz_Abudloaa, situé environ à 100 km au nord de Khartoum, comme ont pu le constater des journalistes escortés sur place par des RSF, mercredi 25 septembre. Dans le communiqué, les RSF assurent également avoir saisi six véhicules appartenant à des passeurs libyens chargés du transit des migrants.

    Le même jour, le Soudan a décidé de fermer ses #frontières avec la Libye et la Centrafrique pour des raisons de sécurité. Dans les faits, le pays souhaite mettre fin aux départs de rebelles soudanais vers la Libye, qui sont parfois rejoints par des migrants.

    Créées en 2013 par l’ex-président soudanais, Omar el-Béchir, les RSF assurent le maintien de l’ordre dans le pays. Trois ans après leur création, elles ont été dotées d’une mission supplémentaire : empêcher les migrants et les rebelles de franchir les frontières nationales. C’est ce que montrent notamment des chercheurs dans un rapport publié par un think tank néerlandais, Clingendael, publié en septembre 2018.

    Les Forces de soutien rapide, véritables gardes-frontières du Soudan

    Si le document pointe une politique soudanaise de surveillance des frontières "en grande partie assignée aux ‘forces de soutien rapide’ (RSF)", derrière cette appellation officielle, se cache une réalité plus sombre. Connue localement sous le nom de Janjawid, cette milice fait notamment l’objet d’une enquête du Conseil militaire de transition, qui dirige le Soudan depuis la destitution, le 11 avril, du président Omar el-Béchir.

    D’après les conclusions de l’enquête, rendues publiques samedi 27 juillet, les RSF auraient frappé et tiré sur des manifestants lors d’un sit-in, le 3 juin, à Khartoum, alors qu’ils étaient venus protester contre la politique d’Omar el-Béchir. Si d’après un groupe de médecins, 127 manifestants ont été tués, le commission d’enquête compte, de son côté, 87 morts. Cette répression violente avait provoqué, dans la foulée, un levé de boucliers à l’échelle internationale.

    Un groupe armé qui a bénéficié de fonds européens

    Certains RSF sont aussi accusés d’avoir commis des exactions dans la région du Darfour, à l’ouest du Soudan. Le rapport précise pourtant que, grâce aux fonds versés par l’Union européenne, ils “sont mieux équipés, mieux financés et déployés non seulement au Darfour, mais partout au Soudan". D’après ce document, "160 millions d’euros ont été alloués au Soudan" entre 2016 et 2017. Et, une partie de cet argent a été versé par Khartoum aux RSF. Leur chef, Hemeti, est d’ailleurs officiellement le numéro 2 du Conseil militaire de transition.

    Fin juillet, l’Union européenne a toutefois annoncé le gel de ses financements au Soudan. "L’Union européenne a pris peur. Elle a considéré que cette coopération avec le Soudan était mauvaise pour son image car, depuis plusieurs années, elle finançait un régime très violent envers les migrants et les civils", explique Jérôme Tubiana, chercheur spécialiste du Soudan et co-auteur du rapport néerlandais.

    Non seulement les passeurs demandent de l’argent aux migrants mais ce ne sont pas les seuls à leur en réclamer. "La milice Janjawid taxe les migrants, elle joue à un double-jeu", dénonce sur RFI, Clotilde Warin, journaliste chercheuse et co-auteure du rapport. "Les miliciens […] qui connaissent très bien la zone frontalière entre le Soudan, le Tchad et le Niger […] deviennent eux-mêmes des passeurs, ils utilisent les voitures de l’armée soudanaise, le fuel de l’armée soudanaise. C’est un trafic très organisé."

    "Les RSF profitent de leur contrôle de la route migratoire pour vendre les migrants à des trafiquants libyens", ajoute, de son côté, Jérôme Tubiana, qui estime que ces miliciens s’enrichissent plus sur le dos des migrants qu’ils ne les arrêtent.

    Annoncer l’arrestation d’un convoi est donc un moyen, pour les RSF, de faire du chantage à l’Europe. "Ils essayent de lui dire que si elle veut moins de migrants sur son territoire, elle doit apporter son soutien aux RSF car, ils sont les seuls à connaître cette région dangereuse", précise Jérôme Tubiana, ajoutant qu’Hemeti, fragilisé, est en recherche de soutiens politiques.

    Un membre des RSF, interrogé dans le cadre de l’enquête néerlandaise, reconnaît lui-même le rôle actif de la milice dans le trafic des migrants. "De temps en temps, nous interceptons des migrants et nous les transférons à Khartoum, afin de montrer aux autorités que nous faisons le travail. Nous ne sommes pas censés prendre l’argent des migrants, [nous ne sommes pas censés] les laisser s’échapper ou les emmener en Libye… Mais la réalité est assez différente…", lit-on dans le rapport.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19795/soudan-les-milices-janjawid-garde-frontieres-ou-passeurs?ref=tw_i
    #gardes-frontière #para-militaires #paramilitaires #fermeture_des_frontières #maintien_de_l'ordre #contrôles_frontaliers #surveillance_des_frontières #fonds_européen #Hemeti #armée #trafic_d'êtres_humains #armée_soudanaise #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières

    ping @karine4 @isskein @pascaline

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message804171

    • Une nouvelle de juillet 2019...

      EU suspends migration control projects in Sudan amid repression fears

      The EU has suspended projects targeting illegal migration in Sudan. The move comes amid fears they might have aided security forces responsible for violently repressing peaceful protests in the country, DW has learned.

      An EU spokesperson has confirmed to DW that a German-led project that organizes the provision of training and equipment to Sudanese border guards and police was “halted” in mid-March, while an EU-funded intelligence center in the capital, Khartoum, has been “on hold” since June. The EU made no public announcements at the time.

      The initiatives were paid for from a €4.5 billion ($5 billion) EU fund for measures in Africa to control migration and address its root causes, to which Germany has contributed over €160 million. Sudan is commonly part of migration routes for people aiming to reach Europe from across Africa.

      Critics had raised concerns that working with the Sudanese government on border management could embolden repressive state forces, not least the notorious Rapid Support Forces (RSF) militia, which is accused by Amnesty International of war crimes in Sudan’s Darfur region. An EU summary of the project noted that there was a risk that resources could be “diverted for repressive aims.”

      Support for police

      A wave of protest swept the country in December, with demonstrators calling for the ouster of autocratic President Omar al-Bashir. Once Bashir was deposed in April, a transitional military council, which includes the commander of the RSF as deputy leader, sought to restore order. Among various incidents of repression, the militia was blamed for a massacre on June 3 in which 128 protesters were reportedly killed.

      While the EU maintains it has provided neither funding nor equipment to the RSF, there is no dispute that Sudanese police, who also stand accused of brutally repressing the protests, received training under the programs.

      Dr. Lutz Oette, a human rights expert at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), told DW: “The suspension is the logical outcome of the change in circumstances but it exposes the flawed assumptions of the process as far as working with Sudan is concerned.”

      Oette said continuing to work with the Sudanese government would have been incompatible with the European Union’s positions on human rights, and counterproductive to the goal of tackling the root causes of migration.

      Coordination center

      The intelligence center, known as the Regional Operational Center in Khartoum (ROCK), was to allow the security forces of nine countries in the Horn of Africa to share intelligence about human trafficking and people smuggling networks.

      A spokesperson for the European Commission told DW the coordination center had been suspended since June “until the political/security situation is cleared,” with some of its staff temporarily relocated to Nairobi, Kenya. Training and some other activities under the Better Migration Management (BMM) program were suspended in mid-March “because they require the involvement of government counterparts to be carried out.” The EU declined to say whether the risk of support being provided to repressive forces had contributed to the decision.

      The spokesperson said other EU activities that provide help to vulnerable people in the country were continuing.

      An official EU document dated December 2015 noted the risk that the provision of equipment and training to security services and border guards could be “diverted for repressive aims” or subject to “criticism by NGOs and civil society for engaging with repressive governments on migration (particularly in Eritrea and Sudan).”

      ’Regular monitoring’

      The BMM program is being carried out by a coalition of EU states — France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom — and aid agencies led by the German development agency GIZ. It includes projects in 11 African countries under the auspices of the “Khartoum process,” an international cooperation initiative targeting illegal migration.

      The ROCK intelligence center, which an EU document shows was planned to be situated within a Sudanese police training facility, was being run by the French state-owned security company Civipol.

      The EU spokesperson said, “Sudan does not benefit from any direct EU financial support. No EU funding is decentralized or channeled through the Sudanese government.”

      “All EU-funded activities in Sudan are implemented by EU member states development agencies, the UN, international organizations and NGOs, who are closely scrutinized through strict and regular monitoring during projects’ implementation,” the spokesperson added.

      A spokesperson for GIZ said: “The participant lists of BMM’s training courses are closely coordinated with the [Sudanese government] National Committee for Combating Human Trafficking (NCCHT) to prevent RSF militiamen taking part in training activities.”

      The GIZ spokesperson gave a different explanation for the suspension to that of the EU, saying the program had been stopped “in order not to jeopardize the safety of [GIZ] employees in the country.” The spokesperson added: “Activities in the field of policy harmonization and capacity building have slowly restarted.”

      https://www.dw.com/en/eu-suspends-migration-control-projects-in-sudan-amid-repression-fears/a-49701408

      #police #Regional_Operational_Center_in_Khartoum (#ROCK) #Better_Migration_Management (#BMM) #processus_de_Khartoum

      Et ce subtil lien entre migrations et #développement :

      Sudan does not benefit from any direct EU financial support. No EU funding is decentralized or channeled through the Sudanese government.

      “All EU-funded activities in Sudan are implemented by EU member states development agencies, the UN, international organizations and NGOs, who are closely scrutinized through strict and regular monitoring during projects’ implementation,” the spokesperson added.

      #GIZ

      Ajouté à la métaliste #migrations et développement :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

  • Le Niger, #nouvelle frontière de l’Europe et #laboratoire de l’asile

    Les politiques migratoires européennes, toujours plus restrictives, se tournent vers le Sahel, et notamment vers le Niger – espace de transit entre le nord et le sud du Sahara. Devenu « frontière » de l’Europe, environné par des pays en conflit, le Niger accueille un nombre important de réfugiés sur son sol et renvoie ceux qui n’ont pas le droit à cette protection. Il ne le fait pas seul. La présence de l’Union européenne et des organisations internationales est visible dans le pays ; des opérations militaires y sont menées par des armées étrangères, notamment pour lutter contre la pression terroriste à ses frontières... au risque de brouiller les cartes entre enjeux sécuritaires et enjeux humanitaires.

    On confond souvent son nom avec celui de son voisin anglophone, le Nigéria, et peu de gens savent le placer sur une carte. Pourtant, le Niger est un des grands pays du Sahel, cette bande désertique qui court de l’Atlantique à la mer Rouge, et l’un des rares pays stables d’Afrique de l’Ouest qui offrent encore une possibilité de transit vers la Libye et la Méditerranée. Environné par des pays en conflit ou touchés par le terrorisme de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes, le Niger accueille les populations qui fuient le Mali et la région du lac Tchad et celles évacuées de Libye.

    « Dans ce contexte d’instabilité régionale et de contrôle accru des déplacements, la distinction entre l’approche sécuritaire et l’approche humanitaire s’est brouillée », explique la chercheuse Florence Boyer, fellow de l’Institut Convergences Migrations, actuellement accueillie au Niger à l’Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey. Géographe et anthropologue (affiliée à l’Urmis au sein de l’IRD, l’Institut de recherche pour le Développement), elle connaît bien le Niger, où elle se rend régulièrement depuis vingt ans pour étudier les migrations internes et externes des Nigériens vers l’Algérie ou la Libye voisines, au nord, et les pays du Golfe de Guinée, au sud et à l’ouest. Sa recherche porte actuellement sur le rôle que le Niger a accepté d’endosser dans la gestion des migrations depuis 2014, à la demande de plusieurs membres de l’Union européenne (UE) pris dans la crise de l’accueil des migrants.
    De la libre circulation au contrôle des frontières

    « Jusqu’à 2015, le Niger est resté cet espace traversé par des milliers d’Africains de l’Ouest et de Nigériens remontant vers la Libye sans qu’il y ait aucune entrave à la circulation ou presque », raconte la chercheuse. La plupart venaient y travailler. Peu tentaient la traversée vers l’Europe, mais dès le début des années 2000, l’UE, Italie en tête, cherche à freiner ce mouvement en négociant avec Kadhafi, déplaçant ainsi la frontière de l’Europe de l’autre côté de la Méditerranée. La chute du dictateur libyen, dans le contexte des révolutions arabes de 2011, bouleverse la donne. Déchirée par une guerre civile, la Libye peine à retenir les migrants qui cherchent une issue vers l’Europe. Par sa position géographique et sa relative stabilité, le Niger s’impose progressivement comme un partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’UE.

    « Le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. »

    Marco Prencipe, ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey

    Le rôle croissant du Niger dans la gestion des flux migratoires de l’Afrique vers l’Europe a modifié les parcours des migrants, notamment pour ceux qui passent par Agadez, dernière ville du nord avant la traversée du Sahara. Membre du Groupe d’études et de recherches Migrations internationales, Espaces, Sociétés (Germes) à Niamey, Florence Boyer observe ces mouvements et constate la présence grandissante dans la capitale nigérienne du Haut-Commissariat des Nations-Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) et de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM) chargée, entre autres missions, d’assister les retours de migrants dans leur pays.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlIwqYKrw7c

    « L’île de Lampedusa se trouve aussi loin du Nord de l’Italie que de la frontière nigérienne, note Marco Prencipe, l’ambassadeur d’Italie à Niamey, le Niger est la nouvelle frontière de l’Italie. » Une affirmation reprise par plusieurs fonctionnaires de la délégation de l’UE au Niger rencontrés par Florence Boyer et Pascaline Chappart. La chercheuse, sur le terrain à Niamey, effectue une étude comparée sur des mécanismes d’externalisation de la frontière au Niger et au Mexique. « Depuis plusieurs années, la politique extérieure des migrations de l’UE vise à délocaliser les contrôles et à les placer de plus en plus au sud du territoire européen, explique la postdoctorante à l’IRD, le mécanisme est complexe : les enjeux pour l’Europe sont à la fois communautaires et nationaux, chaque État membre ayant sa propre politique ».

    En novembre 2015, lors du sommet euro-africain de La Valette sur la migration, les autorités européennes lancent le Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence pour l’Afrique « en faveur de la stabilité et de la lutte contre les causes profondes de la migration irrégulière et du phénomène des personnes déplacées en Afrique ». Doté à ce jour de 4,2 milliards d’euros, le FFUA finance plusieurs types de projets, associant le développement à la sécurité, la gestion des migrations à la protection humanitaire.

    Le président nigérien considère que son pays, un des plus pauvres de la planète, occupe une position privilégiée pour contrôler les migrations dans la région. Le Niger est désormais le premier bénéficiaire du Fonds fiduciaire, devant des pays de départ comme la Somalie, le Nigéria et surtout l’Érythrée d’où vient le plus grand nombre de demandeurs d’asile en Europe.

    « Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre lutte contre le terrorisme et lutte contre l’immigration “irrégulière”. »

    Florence Boyer, géographe et anthropologue

    Pour l’anthropologue Julien Brachet, « le Niger est peu à peu devenu un pays cobaye des politiques anti-migrations de l’Union européenne, (...) les moyens financiers et matériels pour lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière étant décuplés ». Ainsi, la mission européenne EUCAP Sahel Niger a ouvert une antenne permanente à Agadez en 2016 dans le but d’« assister les autorités nigériennes locales et nationales, ainsi que les forces de sécurité, dans le développement de politiques, de techniques et de procédures permettant d’améliorer le contrôle et la lutte contre les migrations irrégulières ».

    « Tout cela ne serait pas possible sans l’aval du Niger, qui est aussi à la table des négociations, rappelle Florence Boyer. Il ne faut pas oublier qu’il doit faire face à la pression de Boko Haram et d’autres groupes terroristes à ses frontières. Il a donc intérêt à se doter d’instruments et de personnels mieux formés. Le Niger s’y retrouve dans ce mélange des genres entre la lutte contre le terrorisme et la lutte contre l’immigration "irrégulière". »

    Peu avant le sommet de La Valette en 2015, le Niger promulgue la loi n°2015-36 sur « le trafic illicite de migrants ». Elle pénalise l’hébergement et le transport des migrants ayant l’intention de franchir illégalement la frontière. Ceux que l’on qualifiait jusque-là de « chauffeurs » ou de « transporteurs » au volant de « voitures taliban » (des 4x4 pick-up transportant entre 20 et 30 personnes) deviennent des « passeurs ». Une centaine d’arrestations et de saisies de véhicules mettent fin à ce qui était de longue date une source légale de revenus au nord du Niger. « Le but reste de bloquer la route qui mène vers la Libye, explique Pascaline Chappart. L’appui qu’apportent l’UE et certains pays européens en coopérant avec la police, les douanes et la justice nigérienne, particulièrement en les formant et les équipant, a pour but de rendre l’État présent sur l’ensemble de son territoire. »

    Des voix s’élèvent contre ces contrôles installés aux frontières du Niger sous la pression de l’Europe. Pour Hamidou Nabara de l’ONG nigérienne JMED (Jeunesse-Enfance-Migration-Développement), qui lutte contre la pauvreté pour retenir les jeunes désireux de quitter le pays, ces dispositifs violent le principe de la liberté de circulation adopté par les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest dans le cadre de la Cedeao. « La situation des migrants s’est détériorée, dénonce-t-il, car si la migration s’est tarie, elle continue sous des voies différentes et plus dangereuses ». La traversée du Sahara est plus périlleuse que jamais, confirme Florence Boyer : « Le nombre de routes s’est multiplié loin des contrôles, mais aussi des points d’eau et des secours. À ce jour, nous ne disposons pas d’estimations solides sur le nombre de morts dans le désert, contrairement à ce qui se passe en Méditerranée ».

    Partenaire de la politique migratoire de l’Union européenne, le Niger a également développé une politique de l’asile. Il accepte de recevoir des populations en fuite, expulsées ou évacuées des pays voisins : les expulsés d’Algérie recueillis à la frontière, les rapatriés nigériens dont l’État prend en charge le retour de Libye, les réfugiés en lien avec les conflits de la zone, notamment au Mali et dans la région du lac Tchad, et enfin les personnes évacuées de Libye par le HCR. Le Niger octroie le statut de réfugié à ceux installés sur son sol qui y ont droit. Certains, particulièrement vulnérables selon le HCR, pourront être réinstallés en Europe ou en Amérique du Nord dans des pays volontaires.
    Une plateforme pour la « réinstallation »
    en Europe et en Amérique

    Cette procédure de réinstallation à partir du Niger n’a rien d’exceptionnel. Les Syriens réfugiés au Liban, par exemple, bénéficient aussi de l’action du HCR qui les sélectionne pour déposer une demande d’asile dans un pays dit « sûr ». La particularité du Niger est de servir de plateforme pour la réinstallation de personnes évacuées de Libye. « Le Niger est devenu une sorte de laboratoire de l’asile, raconte Florence Boyer, notamment par la mise en place de l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM). »

    L’ETM, proposé par le HCR, est lancé en août 2017 à Paris par l’Allemagne, l’Espagne, la France et l’Italie — côté UE — et le Niger, le Tchad et la Libye — côté africain. Ils publient une déclaration conjointe sur les « missions de protection en vue de la réinstallation de réfugiés en Europe ». Ce dispositif se présente comme le pendant humanitaire de la politique de lutte contre « les réseaux d’immigration économique irrégulière » et les « retours volontaires » des migrants irréguliers dans leur pays effectués par l’OIM. Le processus s’accélère en novembre de la même année, suite à un reportage de CNN sur des cas d’esclavagisme de migrants en Libye. Fin 2017, 3 800 places sont promises par les pays occidentaux qui participent, à des degrés divers, à ce programme d’urgence. Le HCR annonce 6 606 places aujourd’hui, proposées par 14 pays européens et américains1.

    Trois catégories de personnes peuvent bénéficier de la réinstallation grâce à ce programme : évacués d’urgence depuis la Libye, demandeurs d’asile au sein d’un flux dit « mixte » mêlant migrants et réfugiés et personnes fuyant les conflits du Mali ou du Nigéria. Seule une minorité aura la possibilité d’être réinstallée depuis le Niger vers un pays occidental. Le profiling (selon le vocabulaire du HCR) de ceux qui pourront bénéficier de cette protection s’effectue dès les camps de détention libyens. Il consiste à repérer les plus vulnérables qui pourront prétendre au statut de réfugié et à la réinstallation.

    Une fois évacuées de Libye, ces personnes bénéficient d’une procédure accélérée pour l’obtention du statut de réfugié au Niger. Elles ne posent pas de problème au HCR, qui juge leur récit limpide. La Commission nationale d’éligibilité au statut des réfugiés (CNE), qui est l’administration de l’asile au Niger, accepte de valider la sélection de l’organisation onusienne. Les réfugiés sont pris en charge dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, construit récemment à une vingtaine de kilomètres de la capitale nigérienne, le temps que le HCR prépare la demande de réinstallation dans un pays occidental, multipliant les entretiens avec les réfugiés concernés. Certains pays, comme le Canada ou la Suède, ne mandatent pas leurs services sur place, déléguant au HCR la sélection. D’autres, comme la France, envoient leurs agents pour un nouvel entretien (voir ce reportage sur la visite de l’Ofpra à Niamey fin 2018).

    Parmi les évacués de Libye, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays dit « sûr ».

    Depuis deux ans, près de 4 000 personnes ont été évacuées de Libye dans le but d’être réinstallées, selon le HCR (5 300 autres ont été prises en charge par l’OIM et « retournées » dans leur pays). Un millier ont été évacuées directement vers l’Europe et le Canada et près de 3 000 vers le Niger. C’est peu par rapport aux 50 800 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile enregistrés auprès de l’organisation onusienne en Libye au 12 août 2019. Et très peu sur l’ensemble des 663 400 migrants qui s’y trouvent selon l’OIM. La guerre civile qui déchire le pays rend la situation encore plus urgente.

    Parmi les personnes évacuées de Libye vers le Niger, moins des deux tiers sont éligibles à une réinstallation dans un pays volontaire, selon le HCR. À ce jour, moins de la moitié ont été effectivement réinstallés, notamment en France (voir notre article sur l’accueil de réfugiés dans les communes rurales françaises).

    Malgré la publicité faite autour du programme de réinstallation, le HCR déplore la lenteur du processus pour répondre à cette situation d’urgence. « Le problème est que les pays de réinstallation n’offrent pas de places assez vite, regrette Fatou Ndiaye, en charge du programme ETM au Niger, alors que notre pays hôte a négocié un maximum de 1 500 évacués sur son sol au même moment. » Le programme coordonné du Niger ne fait pas exception : le HCR rappelait en février 2019 que, sur les 19,9 millions de réfugiés relevant de sa compétence à travers le monde, moins d’1 % sont réinstallés dans un pays sûr.

    Le dispositif ETM, que le HCR du Niger qualifie de « couloir de l’espoir », concerne seulement ceux qui se trouvent dans un camp accessible par l’organisation en Libye (l’un d’eux a été bombardé en juillet dernier) et uniquement sept nationalités considérées par les autorités libyennes (qui n’ont pas signé la convention de Genève) comme pouvant relever du droit d’asile (Éthiopiens Oromo, Érythréens, Iraquiens, Somaliens, Syriens, Palestiniens et Soudanais du Darfour).

    « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses. »

    Pascaline Chappart, socio-anthropologue

    En décembre 2018, des Soudanais manifestaient devant les bureaux d’ETM à Niamey pour dénoncer « un traitement discriminatoire (...) par rapport aux Éthiopiens et Somaliens » favorisés, selon eux, par le programme. La représentante du HCR au Niger a répondu à une radio locale que « la plupart de ces Soudanais [venaient] du Tchad où ils ont déjà été reconnus comme réfugiés et que, techniquement, c’est le Tchad qui les protège et fait la réinstallation ». C’est effectivement la règle en matière de droit humanitaire mais, remarque Florence Boyer, « comment demander à des réfugiés qui ont quitté les camps tchadiens, pour beaucoup en raison de l’insécurité, d’y retourner sans avoir aucune garantie ? ».

    La position de la France

    La question du respect des règles en matière de droit d’asile se pose pour les personnes qui bénéficient du programme d’urgence. En France, par exemple, pas de recours possible auprès de l’Ofpra en cas de refus du statut de réfugié. Pour Pascaline Chappart, qui achève deux ans d’enquêtes au Niger et au Mexique, il y a là une part d’hypocrisie : « Si les portes étaient ouvertes dès les pays d’origine, les gens ne paieraient pas des sommes astronomiques pour traverser des routes dangereuses par la mer ou le désert ». « Il est quasiment impossible dans le pays de départ de se présenter aux consulats des pays “sûrs” pour une demande d’asile », renchérit Florence Boyer. Elle donne l’exemple de Centre-Africains qui ont échappé aux combats dans leur pays, puis à la traite et aux violences au Nigéria, en Algérie puis en Libye, avant de redescendre au Niger : « Ils auraient dû avoir la possibilité de déposer une demande d’asile dès Bangui ! Le cadre législatif les y autorise. »

    En ce matin brûlant d’avril, dans le camp du HCR à Hamdallaye, Mebratu2, un jeune Érythréen de 26 ans, affiche un large sourire. À l’ombre de la tente qu’il partage et a décorée avec d’autres jeunes de son pays, il annonce qu’il s’envolera le 9 mai pour Paris. Comme tant d’autres, il a fui le service militaire à vie imposé par la dictature du président Issayas Afeworki. Mebratu était convaincu que l’Europe lui offrirait la liberté, mais il a dû croupir deux ans dans les prisons libyennes. S’il ne connaît pas sa destination finale en France, il sait d’où il vient : « Je ne pensais pas que je serais vivant aujourd’hui. En Libye, on pouvait mourir pour une plaisanterie. Merci la France. »

    Mebratu a pris un vol pour Paris en mai dernier, financé par l’Union européenne et opéré par l’#OIM. En France, la Délégation interministérielle à l’hébergement et à l’accès au logement (Dihal) confie la prise en charge de ces réinstallés à 24 opérateurs, associations nationales ou locales, pendant un an. Plusieurs départements et localités françaises ont accepté d’accueillir ces réfugiés particulièrement vulnérables après des années d’errance et de violences.

    Pour le deuxième article de notre numéro spécial de rentrée, nous nous rendons en Dordogne dans des communes rurales qui accueillent ces « réinstallés » arrivés via le Niger.

    http://icmigrations.fr/2019/08/30/defacto-10
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Europe #UE #EU #sécuritaire #humanitaire #approche_sécuritaire #approche_humanitaire #libre_circulation #fermeture_des_frontières #printemps_arabe #Kadhafi #Libye #Agadez #parcours_migratoires #routes_migratoires #HCR #OIM #IOM #retour_au_pays #renvois #expulsions #Fonds_fiduciaire #Fonds_fiduciaire_d'urgence_pour_l'Afrique #FFUA #développement #sécurité #EUCAP_Sahel_Niger #La_Valette #passeurs #politique_d'asile #réinstallation #hub #Emergency_Transit_Mechanism (#ETM) #retours_volontaires #profiling #tri #sélection #vulnérabilité #évacuation #procédure_accélérée #Hamdallaye #camps_de_réfugiés #ofpra #couloir_de_l’espoir

    co-écrit par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765325

  • Niger : Has Securitisation Stopped Traffickers ?

    In the past five years there has been an increase in border controls and foreign military presence in Niger; paradoxically this has only diversified and professionalised the criminal networks operating there. In fact, this development was to be expected. Sustained law enforcement against smugglers removes the weaker players while allowing those with greater means and connexions to adapt, evolve and in some cases even monopolise criminal markets. As such, although Western-supported goals of curtailing irregular migration in Niger have been reached in the short term, criminal networks continue to thrive with devastating consequences for the wider Sahel region. Recorded migrant deaths in northern Niger have hit record highs and illicit flows of drugs and arms through the country continue to fuel conflicts. To address the country’s chronic lack of security and underdevelopment, innovative approaches that prioritise the fight against criminal networks while considering the negative socio-economic impacts of interventions must be developed.

    The economic, social and security landscape of Niger has undergone four milestone events, which have all led to changes in the country’s criminal networks. These included the criminalisation of the migration industry in May 2015; the clampdown on the Djado goldfield in February 2017; the ensuing multiplication of armed actors and growing banditry, which had already increased after the outbreak of the conflicts in Libya in 2011 and northern Mali in 2012; and the militarisation of Niger since 2014.

    The EU-backed enforcement of law 2015-036 criminalising migrant smuggling in mid-2016 delivered a first, considerable blow to northern Niger’s informal economy. Transporting foreign migrants to Libya, a practice that had become a source of livelihood for thousands of people in northern Niger, was outlawed overnight. Dozens of passeurs (migrant smugglers) and coxeurs (middlemen who gather migrants for passeurs) were arrested and hundreds of vehicles were seized in a crackdown that shocked the system.

    The second blow, which was closely linked to the first, was the closure of the Djado goldfield in February 2017. Up until its closure, the gold economy had been a vital back-up for ex-passeurs. Many had repurposed their activities towards the transport of artisanal miners to and from northern Niger’s gold mines to compensate for lost revenue from the outlawing of migrant smuggling. Many passeurs also invested in artisanal gold extraction. The goldfield was officially shut down for security reasons, as it had become a key hub for the operations of armed bandits. However, the fact that it was also a key stopover location for migrants travelling north was perhaps more influential in the government’s decision-making.

    Many analysts have attributed the rise in banditry and convoy hijackings over the past two years to these two economic blows. While it is difficult to determine whether the actors involved in these attacks are the same as those previously involved in the migration industry, it is clear that the lack of economic opportunities have pushed some to seek alternative sources of revenue.

    Although the migration industry initially shrank, it has now partially recovered (albeit still very far from 2015/2016 levels) with the transport of Nigerien migrants who are increasingly seeking seasonal work in Libya. But although a majority of passeurs have repurposed their activities towards the tolerated practice of transporting Nigeriens to Libya, many passeurs are still ready to transport foreign migrants, who pay up to eight times what local Nigeriens pay. To do so, smuggling networks have become both more professional and clandestine. Passeurs also take more dangerous and remote routes through the desert that avoid security forces. This has posed a significant risk to migrants, who are increasingly vulnerable to death from unexpected breakdowns in the desert. The number of recorded migrant deaths increased from 71 in 2015 to 427 in 2017.

    Currently, the number of active drivers is close to that before the peak of migration in 2015/2016. But the number of migrants who can afford the journey has lessened. In some reported cases, the price for the Agadez-Sebha journey has increased five-fold since 2016. Passeurs incur higher costs primarily as a result of longer, more clandestine routes that require more fuel. They must also pay higher fees to coxeurs, whose role in gathering migrants for passeurs has become central since migrants have been more difficult to find in Agadez. Prior to 2016, migrants could easily reach the town with commercial bus companies. Today, these undergo stringent checks by Nigerien police. Even migrants from the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), who have the right to visa-free travel to Niger with valid documentation, are having to pay higher bribes to security forces to reach Agadez through commercial transportation.

    To compensate for this lack of more lucrative foreign migrants, many passeurs have turned to the smuggling of synthetic opioids (especially Tramadol), the demand for which has boomed across the Sahel-Sahara in recent years.[1] Smugglers can sell Tramadol purchased from Nigeria for up to 15 times the price in Libya, transporting the drugs along the Chadian border through Niger.

    These developments have mostly been undeterred by the increased militarisation of Niger since 2014, which saw the posting of French and American security forces in key strategic locations in the north (with bases in Madama, Dirkou, Agadez, Aguelal) and south (in the Tillabéri and Diffa regions). While their primary concern has been the fight against terrorist networks in the Sahel, French security forces in Madama have also specifically targeted arms and high-value narcotics trafficking (albeit prioritising those suspected of having links to terrorist networks). The increased scrutiny of French troops on key trafficking crossroads is seen as a key factor in making the trans-Sahelian cocaine route less attractive for conveying drugs from Latin America to destination markets in Europe and the Middle East, with traffickers increasingly favouring maritime routes instead.

    The increased targeting of drug convoys by armed groups is also a key factor behind the reduced use of the trans-Sahel cocaine route. These groups, which have multiplied in northern Mali, southern Libya and north-western Chad since the Libyan revolution in 2011 and Malian rebellion in 2012, have increasingly shifted their business model towards armed robbery and the hijacking of convoys that transit northern Niger. One such group includes armed men mostly composed of Chadian military defectors, who have used the Djado area (600 km north-east of Agadez) as a base to target convoys trafficking drugs, arms and goods but also artisanal miners traveling to and from gold mines (such as the Tchibarakaten goldfield).[2] The Forces Armées Nigériennes, whose capacity is limited in northern Niger’s difficult terrain, have so far failed to overrun the group.

    Nevertheless, recent cocaine seizures, including a record seizure of 789 kilograms of cocaine in March 2019 in Guinea-Bissau, suggest that the route is still being used, boosted by increasing cocaine production in Colombia in recent years. In fact, trafficking routes seem to have simply pushed outwards to areas bordering Algeria and Chad, avoiding the patrolling and surveillance activity taking place out of the French outpost of Madama.[3] However, this route shift may be temporary. France’s withdrawal from its temporary base in Madama since May (although officially announced in July) has reduced its oversight over the Toummo crossing and Salvador Pass, both key trafficking gateways to Libya. In reaction to France’s withdrawal from Madama, one passeur interviewed by phone boasted: ‘maintenant on opère comme des rois [now we operate like kings]’.[4]

    Niger’s stability relies on a fragile economic, political and social equilibrium that is threatened by the current approaches to achieving Western priorities of reduced terrorism and irregular migration. The EU and its member states successfully addressed the latter by disrupting the business model of passeurs and raising the costs of migration. But while the EU must be commended for initiating projects to compensate for passeurs’ lost income, these have not yielded the results that had been hoped for. Many passeurs accuse the local non-governmental organisation in charge of dispensing funds of having been nepotistic in its fund allocation. Only a fraction of passeurs received EU support, leaving many to be forced back into their old activities.

    If support is not effectively delivered in the long term, current approaches to reducing irregular migration and terrorism may be undermined: poverty and unemployment fuel the very elements that securitisation hopes to tackle.

    Currently, strategies to tackle smuggling and illicit flows have targeted easily-replaceable low-level actors in criminal economies. Yet to have a longer-lasting impact, actors higher up in the value chain would need to be targeted. Criminal culture in Niger is as much a top-down issue as it is a bottom-up one. The participation of the Nigerien political elite in trans-Sahelian illicit economies is strong. Their business interests are as much a catalyst of flows as the widespread poverty and lack of economic opportunities that push so many into criminal endeavours. This involvement is well-known and recognised by international partners behind the scenes, yet it is not prioritised, perhaps for fear of impeding on strategic counterterrorism and anti-irregular migration goals. Meanwhile, the illicit flows of arms, drugs, goods, and people continue to foster instability in the wider region.

    References

    [1] Micallef, M. Horsley R. & Bish, A. (2019) The Human Conveyor Belt Broken – assessing the collapse of the human-smuggling industry in Libya and the central Sahel, The Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, March 2019.

    [2] Micallef, M., Farrah, R. & Bish, A. (forthcoming) After the Storm, Organized Crime across the Sahel-Sahara following the Libyan Revolution and Malian Rebellion, Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime.

    [3] Micallef, M., Farrah, R. & Bish, A. (forthcoming) After the Storm, Organized crime across the Sahel-Sahara following the Libyan Revolution and Malian rebellion, Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime.

    [4] Telephone interview with Tebu passeur based in Dirkou, July 2019.

    https://www.ispionline.it/it/pubblicazione/niger-has-securitisation-stopped-traffickers-23838
    #Niger #trafiquants #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #smugglers #smuggling #migrations #réseaux_criminels #asile #réfugiés #criminalisation #économie #économie_informelle #passeurs #saisonniers_nigériens #prix #Sebha #Agadez #pauvreté #chômage #travail #Tramadol #drogue #trafic_de_drogue
    ping @karine4 @pascaline

  • Ventimiglia : sempre più caro e pericoloso il viaggio dei migranti al confine Italia-Francia

    Confine Francia-Italia: migranti fermati, bloccati, respinti

    I respingimenti sono stati monitorati uno ad uno dagli attivisti francesi del collettivo della Val Roja “#Kesha_Niya” (“No problem” in lingua curda) e dagli italiani dell’associazione Iris, auto organizzati e che si danno il cambio in staffette da quattro anni a Ventimiglia per denunciare gli abusi.

    Dalle 9 del mattino alle 20 di sera si piazzano lungo la frontiera alta di #Ponte_San_Luigi, con beni alimentari e vestiti destinati alle persone che hanno tentato di attraversare il confine in treno o a piedi. Migranti che sono stati bloccati, hanno passato la notte in un container di 15 metri quadrati e infine abbandonati al mattino lungo la strada di 10 km, i primi in salita, che porta all’ultima città della Liguria.

    Una pratica, quella dei container, che le ong e associazioni Medecins du Monde, Anafé, Oxfam, WeWorld e Iris hanno denunciato al procuratore della Repubblica di Nizza con un dossier il 16 luglio. Perché le persone sono trattenute fino a 15 ore senza alcuna contestazione di reato, in un Paese – la Francia – dove il Consiglio di Stato ha stabilito come “ragionevole” la durata di quattro ore per il fermo amministrativo e la privazione della libertà senza contestazioni. Dall’inizio dell’anno i casi sono 18 mila, scrive il Fatto Quotidiano che cita dati del Viminale rilasciati dopo la richiesta di accesso civico fatta dall’avvocata Alessandra Ballerini.

    Quando sia nato Sami – faccia da ragazzino sveglio – è poco importante. Più importante è che il suo primo permesso di soggiorno in Europa lo ha avuto a metà anni Duemila. All’età di 10 anni. Lo mostra. È un documento sloveno. A quasi 20 anni di distanza è ancora ostaggio di quei meccanismi.

    A un certo punto è stato riportato in Algeria – o ci è tornato autonomamente – e da lì ha ottenuto un visto per la Turchia e poi la rotta balcanica a piedi. Per provare a tornare nel cuore del Vecchio Continente. Sami prende un foglio e disegna le tappe che ha attraversato lungo la ex Jugoslavia. Lui è un inguaribile ottimista. Ci riproverà la sera stessa convinto di farcela.

    Altri sono in preda all’ansia di non riuscire. Come Sylvester, nigeriano dell’Edo State, vestito a puntino nel tentativo di farsi passare da turista sui treni delle Sncf – le ferrovie francesi. È regolare in Italia. Ha il permesso di soggiorno per motivi umanitari, oggi abolito da Salvini e non più rinnovabile.

    «Devo arrivare in Germania perché mi aspetta un lavoro come operaio. Ma devo essere lì entro ottobre. Ho già provato dal Brennero. Come faccio a passare?», chiede insistentemente.

    Ventimiglia: le nuove rotte della migrazione

    Il flusso a Ventimiglia è cambiato. Rispetto ai tunisini del 2011, ai sudanesi del 2015, ma anche rispetto all’estate del 2018. Nessuno, o quasi, arriva dagli sbarchi salvo sporadici casi, mostrando plasticamente una volta di più come la cosiddetta crisi migratoria in Europa può cambiare attori ma non la trama. Oggi sono tre i canali principali: rotta balcanica; fuoriusciti dai centri di accoglienza in Italia in seguito alle leggi del governo Conte e ai tagli da 35 a 18-21 euro nei bandi di gare delle Prefetture; persone con la protezione umanitaria in scadenza che non lavorano e non possono convertire il permesso di soggiorno. Questa la situazione in uscita.

    In entrata dalla Francia si assiste al corto circuito del confine. Parigi non si fida dell’Italia, pensa che non vengano prese le impronte digitali secondo Dublino e inserite nel sistema #Eurodac. Perciò respinge tutti senza badare ai dettagli, almeno via treno. Incluse persone con i documenti che devono andare nelle ambasciate francesi del loro Paese perché sono le uniche autorizzate a rilasciare i passaporti.

    Irregolari di lungo periodo bloccati in Italia

    In mezzo ci finiscono anche irregolari di lungo periodo Oltralpe che vengono “rastrellati” a Lione o Marsiglia e fatti passare per nuovi arrivi. Nel calderone finisce anche Jamal: nigeriano con una splendida voce da cantante, da nove mesi in Francia con un permesso di soggiorno come richiedente asilo e in attesa di essere sentito dalla commissione. Lo hanno fermato gli agenti a Breil, paesotto di 2 mila anime di confine, nella valle della Roja sulle Alpi Marittime. Hanno detto che i documenti non bastavano e lo hanno espulso.

    Da settimane gli attivisti italiani fanno il diavolo a quattro con gli avvocati francesi per farlo rientrare. Ogni giorno spunta un cavillo diverso: dichiarazioni di ospitalità, pec da inviare contemporaneamente alle prefetture competenti delle due nazioni. Spesso non servono i muri, basta la burocrazia.

    Italia-Francia: passaggi più difficili e costosi per i migranti

    Come è scontato che sia, il “proibizionismo” in frontiera non ha bloccato i passaggi. Li ha solo resi più difficili e costosi, con una sorta di selezione darwiniana su base economica. In stazione a Ventimiglia bastano due ore di osservazione da un tavolino nel bar all’angolo della piazza per comprendere alcune superficiali dinamiche di tratta delle donne e passeurs. Che a pagamento portano chiunque in Francia in automobile. 300 euro a viaggio.

    Ci sono strutture organizzate e altri che sono “scafisti di terra” improvvisati, magari per arrotondare. Come è sempre stato in questa enclave calabrese nel nord Italia, cuore dei traffici illeciti già negli anni Settanta con gli “spalloni” di sigarette.

    Sono i numeri in città a dire che i migranti transitato, anche se pagando. Nel campo Roja gestito dalla Croce Rossa su mandato della Prefettura d’Imperia – l’unico rimasto dopo gli sgomberi di tutti gli accampamenti informali – da gennaio ci sono stabilmente tra le 180 e le 220 persone. Turn over quasi quotidiano in città di 20 che escono e 20 che entrano, di cui un minore.

    Le poche ong che hanno progetti aperti sul territorio frontaliero sono Save The Children, WeWorld e Diaconia Valdese (Oxfam ha lasciato due settimane fa), oltre allo sportello Caritas locale per orientamento legale e lavorativo. 78 minori non accompagnati da Pakistan, Bangladesh e Somalia sono stati trasferiti nel Siproimi, il nuovo sistema Sprar. Il 6 e il 12 luglio, all’una del pomeriggio, sono partiti due pullman con a bordo 15 e 10 migranti rispettivamente in direzione dell’hotspot di Taranto. È stato trasferito per errore anche un richiedente asilo a cui la polizia ha pagato il biglietto di ritorno, secondo fonti locali.

    Questi viaggi sono organizzati da Riviera Trasporti, l’azienda del trasporto pubblico locale di Imperia e Sanremo da anni stabilmente con i conti in rosso e che tampona le perdite anche grazie al servizio taxi per il ministero dell’Interno: 5 mila euro a viaggio in direzione dei centri di identificazione voluti dall’agenda Europa nel 2015 per differenziare i richiedenti asilo dai cosiddetti “migranti economici”.
    A Ventimiglia vietato parlare d’immigrazione oggi

    A fine maggio ha vinto le elezioni comunali Gaetano Scullino per la coalizione di centrodestra, subentrando all’uscente Pd Enrico Ioculano, oggi consigliere di opposizione. Nel 2012, quando già Scullino era sindaco, il Comune era stato sciolto per mafia per l’inchiesta “La Svolta” in cui il primo cittadino era accusato di concorso esterno. Lui era stato assolto in via definitiva e a sorpresa riuscì a riconquistare il Comune.

    La nuova giunta non vuole parlare di immigrazione. A Ventimiglia vige un’ideologia. Quella del decoro e dei grandi lavori pubblici sulla costa. C’è da completare il 20% del porto di “Cala del Forte”, quasi pronto per accogliere i natanti.

    «Sono 178 i posti barca per yacht da 6,5 a oltre 70 metri di lunghezza – scrive la stampa del Ponente ligure – Un piccolo gioiello, firmato Monaco Ports, che trasformerà la baia di Ventimiglia in un’oasi di lusso e ricchezza. E se gli ormeggi sono già andati a ruba, in vendita nelle agenzie immobiliari c’è il complesso residenziale di lusso che si affaccerà sull’approdo turistico. Quarantaquattro appartamenti con vista sul mare che sorgeranno vicino a un centro commerciale con boutique, ristoranti, bar e un hotel». Sui migranti si dice pubblicamente soltanto che nessun info point per le persone in transito è necessario perché «sono pochi e non serve».

    Contemporaneamente abbondano le prese di posizione politiche della nuova amministrazione locale per istituire il Daspo urbano, modificando il regolamento di polizia locale per adeguarsi ai due decreti sicurezza voluti dal ministro Salvini. Un Daspo selettivo, solo per alcune aree della città. Facile immaginare quali. Tolleranza zero – si legge – contro accattonaggio, improperi, bivacchi e attività di commercio abusivo. Escluso – forse – quello stesso commercio abusivo in mano ai passeurs che libera la città dai migranti.

    https://www.osservatoriodiritti.it/2019/07/24/ventimiglia-migranti-oggi-bloccati-respinti-francia-situazione/amp
    #coût #prix #frontières #asile #migrations #Vintimille #réfugiés #fermeture_des_frontières #France #Italie #danger #dangerosité #frontière_sud-alpine #push-back #refoulement #Roya #Vallée_de_la_Roya

    –----------

    Quelques commentaires :

    Les « flux » en sortie de l’Italie, qui entrent en France :

    Oggi sono tre i canali principali: rotta balcanica; fuoriusciti dai centri di accoglienza in Italia in seguito alle leggi del governo Conte e ai tagli da 35 a 18-21 euro nei bandi di gare delle Prefetture; persone con la protezione umanitaria in scadenza che non lavorano e non possono convertire il permesso di soggiorno. Questa la situazione in uscita.

    #route_des_Balkans et le #Decrét_Salvini #Decreto_Salvini #decreto_sicurezza

    Pour les personnes qui arrivent à la frontière depuis la France (vers l’Italie) :

    In entrata dalla Francia si assiste al corto circuito del confine. Parigi non si fida dell’Italia, pensa che non vengano prese le impronte digitali secondo Dublino e inserite nel sistema Eurodac. Perciò respinge tutti senza badare ai dettagli, almeno via treno. Incluse persone con i documenti che devono andare nelle ambasciate francesi del loro Paese perché sono le uniche autorizzate a rilasciare i passaporti.
    (...)
    In mezzo ci finiscono anche irregolari di lungo periodo Oltralpe che vengono “rastrellati” a Lione o Marsiglia e fatti passare per nuovi arrivi.

    #empreintes_digitales #Eurodac #renvois #expulsions #push-back #refoulement
    Et des personnes qui sont arrêtées via des #rafles à #Marseille ou #Lyon —> et qu’on fait passer dans les #statistiques comme des nouveaux arrivants...
    #chiffres

    Coût du passage en voiture maintenant via des #passeurs : 300 EUR.

    Et le #business des renvois de Vintimille au #hotspot de #Taranto :

    Il 6 e il 12 luglio, all’una del pomeriggio, sono partiti due pullman con a bordo 15 e 10 migranti rispettivamente in direzione dell’hotspot di Taranto. È stato trasferito per errore anche un richiedente asilo a cui la polizia ha pagato il biglietto di ritorno, secondo fonti locali.

    Questi viaggi sono organizzati da #Riviera_Trasporti, l’azienda del trasporto pubblico locale di Imperia e Sanremo da anni stabilmente con i conti in rosso e che tampona le perdite anche grazie al servizio taxi per il ministero dell’Interno: 5 mila euro a viaggio in direzione dei centri di identificazione voluti dall’agenda Europa nel 2015 per differenziare i richiedenti asilo dai cosiddetti “migranti economici”.

    –-> l’entreprise de transport reçoit du ministère de l’intérieur 5000 EUR à voyage...

  • Le côté secret de l’opération canadienne contre les migrants
    Radio Canada, le 21 mai 2019
    https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1170403/operation-canadienne-contre-migrants-secrets-harper-trudeau

    S’associer à de présumés criminels, faire la chasse aux passeurs, fournir de l’équipement de surveillance à des régimes corrompus, voilà autant de moyens pour empêcher des migrants de faire la route jusqu’au Canada. Ce qui s’appelle officiellement la Stratégie canadienne de prévention du passage de clandestins a été lancée en 2010 par le gouvernement Harper et est maintenue depuis par le gouvernement Trudeau.

    En Guinée, le colonel Moussa Tiégboro Camara a été l’un des principaux alliés du Canada. Il y est le grand responsable de la lutte contre le trafic de drogue, la criminalité organisée et le terrorisme. « Le colonel Tiégboro Camara, c’est une personne qui nous a beaucoup aidés, mais son passé était trop lourd pour que je me sente à l’aise [avec le fait ] que le Canada travaille avec lui », affirme Robert.

    Il ne faut pas se leurrer quant au véritable but de la mission que mènent le Canada et d’autres pays étrangers, estime pour sa part François Crépeau. « L’objectif, c’est d’arrêter les migrants. On ne veut plus de migrants », soutient-il. « Tant que des passeurs font passer des migrants, il faut bloquer ça, sans tenir compte du fait que beaucoup de ces migrants sont des réfugiés qui ont besoin de passer et qui vont payer des prix de plus en plus chers, en argent, mais parfois au prix de leur vie. »

    Et les passeurs existent parce que les pays ferment leurs frontières, ajoute M. Crépeau, qui est aussi professeur de droit international à l’Université McGill, à Montréal. « On sait que l’interdiction de passer cause cette industrie. S’il n’y avait pas de blocages aux frontières, il n’y aurait pas de passeurs », explique-t-il.

    « Les systèmes de surveillance, on va les déployer sur d’autres terrains et on va surveiller des minorités, on va surveiller des opposants politiques, des journalistes, des étudiants », dénonce François Crépeau, ex-rapporteur spécial des Nations Unies.

    « Les systèmes que nous mettons en place peuvent servir à d’autres types de répression que cette répression-là. Déjà, celle-là, elle est problématique, compte tenu des violations des droits humains des migrants que ces pays commettent avec notre financement, notre soutien, notre équipement », déplore-t-il.

    "Ce qui m’indigne, c’est toujours l’hypocrisie, quelque part naturelle, des pays comme le Canada, la France, l’Allemagne, la Grande-Bretagne", affirme M. Crépeau. "Ils décident que, au fond, on va accueillir les réfugiés qui parviennent jusqu’à nos frontières, mais on va faire tout ce qu’on peut pour les empêcher d’arriver jusqu’à la frontière. Donc, on va financer, armer, entraîner, équiper des forces de sécurité dans des pays dans lesquels il n’y a pas de garanties de droits humains." »

    #Canada #immigration #migrants #réfugiés #clandestins #passeurs #frontières #dissuasion #surveillance #Stephen_Harper #Justin_Trudeau #Moussa_Tiégboro_Camara #Guinée #Ghana #Sri_Lanka

    • Le même jour, un documentaire choc relate l’existence au Québec de 200 criminels de haut vol (400 au KKKanada).

      La faute à qui ? A cette dernière loi qui permet aux ressortissants mexicains d’entrer « sans visa » au pays de l’hiver. La pègre colombienne aurait sauté sur l’occasion pour faire de faux passeports et se ruer en nombre aux frontières du pays.

      Ahh, la presse KKKanadienne, quel cinéma !