person:alice

  • Beyond the Hype of Lab-Grown Diamonds
    https://earther.gizmodo.com/beyond-the-hype-of-lab-grown-diamonds-1834890351

    Billions of years ago when the world was still young, treasure began forming deep underground. As the edges of Earth’s tectonic plates plunged down into the upper mantle, bits of carbon, some likely hailing from long-dead life forms were melted and compressed into rigid lattices. Over millions of years, those lattices grew into the most durable, dazzling gems the planet had ever cooked up. And every so often, for reasons scientists still don’t fully understand, an eruption would send a stash of these stones rocketing to the surface inside a bubbly magma known as kimberlite.

    There, the diamonds would remain, nestled in the kimberlite volcanoes that delivered them from their fiery home, until humans evolved, learned of their existence, and began to dig them up.

    The epic origin of Earth’s diamonds has helped fuel a powerful marketing mythology around them: that they are objects of otherworldly strength and beauty; fitting symbols of eternal love. But while “diamonds are forever” may be the catchiest advertising slogan ever to bear some geologic truth, the supply of these stones in the Earth’s crust, in places we can readily reach them, is far from everlasting. And the scars we’ve inflicted on the land and ourselves in order to mine diamonds has cast a shadow that still lingers over the industry.

    Some diamond seekers, however, say we don’t need to scour the Earth any longer, because science now offers an alternative: diamonds grown in labs. These gems aren’t simulants or synthetic substitutes; they are optically, chemically, and physically identical to their Earth-mined counterparts. They’re also cheaper, and in theory, limitless. The arrival of lab-grown diamonds has rocked the jewelry world to its core and prompted fierce pushback from diamond miners. Claims abound on both sides.

    Growers often say that their diamonds are sustainable and ethical; miners and their industry allies counter that only gems plucked from the Earth can be considered “real” or “precious.” Some of these assertions are subjective, others are supported only by sparse, self-reported, or industry-backed data. But that’s not stopping everyone from making them.

    This is a fight over image, and when it comes to diamonds, image is everything.
    A variety of cut, polished Ada Diamonds created in a lab, including smaller melee stones and large center stones. 22.94 carats total. (2.60 ct. pear, 2.01 ct. asscher, 2.23 ct. cushion, 3.01 ct. radiant, 1.74 ct. princess, 2.11 ct. emerald, 3.11 ct. heart, 3.00 ct. oval, 3.13 ct. round.)
    Image: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Same, but different

    The dream of lab-grown diamond dates back over a century. In 1911, science fiction author H.G. Wells described what would essentially become one of the key methods for making diamond—recreating the conditions inside Earth’s mantle on its surface—in his short story The Diamond Maker. As the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) notes, there were a handful of dubious attempts to create diamonds in labs in the late 19th and early 20th century, but the first commercial diamond production wouldn’t emerge until the mid-1950s, when scientists with General Electric worked out a method for creating small, brown stones. Others, including De Beers, soon developed their own methods for synthesizing the gems, and use of the lab-created diamond in industrial applications, from cutting tools to high power electronics, took off.

    According to the GIA’s James Shigley, the first experimental production of gem-quality diamond occurred in 1970. Yet by the early 2000s, gem-quality stones were still small, and often tinted yellow with impurities. It was only in the last five or so years that methods for growing diamonds advanced to the point that producers began churning out large, colorless stones consistently. That’s when the jewelry sector began to take a real interest.

    Today, that sector is taking off. The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA), a trade group formed in 2016 by a dozen lab diamond growers and sellers, now has about 50 members, according to IGDA secretary general Dick Garard. When the IGDA first formed, lab-grown diamonds were estimated to represent about 1 percent of a $14 billion rough diamond market. This year, industry analyst Paul Zimnisky estimates they account for 2-3 percent of the market.

    He expects that share will only continue to grow as factories in China that already produce millions of carats a year for industrial purposes start to see an opportunity in jewelry.
    “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not.”

    “This year some [factories] will come up from 100,000 gem-quality diamonds to one to two million,” Zimnisky said. “They already have the infrastructure and equipment in place” and are in the process of upgrading it. (About 150 million carats of diamonds were mined last year, according to a global analysis of the industry conducted by Bain & Company.)

    Production ramp-up aside, 2018 saw some other major developments across the industry. In the summer, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reversed decades of guidance when it expanded the definition of a diamond to include those created in labs and dropped ‘synthetic’ as a recommended descriptor for lab-grown stones. The decision came on the heels of the world’s top diamond producer, De Beers, announcing the launch of its own lab-grown diamond line, Lightbox, after having once vowed never to sell man-made stones as jewelry.

    “I would say shock,” Lightbox Chief Marketing Officer Sally Morrison told Earther when asked how the jewelry world responded to the company’s launch.

    While the majority of lab-grown diamonds on the market today are what’s known as melee (less than 0.18 carats), the tech for producing the biggest, most dazzling diamonds continues to improve. In 2016, lab-grown diamond company MiaDonna announced its partners had grown a 6.28 carat gem-quality diamond, claimed to be the largest created in the U.S. to that point. In 2017, a lab in Augsburg University, Germany that grows diamonds for industrial and scientific research applications produced what is thought to be the largest lab-grown diamond ever—a 155 carat behemoth that stretches nearly 4 inches across. Not gem quality, perhaps, but still impressive.

    “If you compare it with the Queen’s diamond, hers is four times heavier, it’s clearer” physicist Matthias Schreck, who leads the group that grew that beast of a jewel, told me. “But in area, our diamond is bigger. We were very proud of this.”

    Diamonds can be created in one of two ways: Similar to how they form inside the Earth, or similar to how scientists speculate they might form in outer space.

    The older, Earth-inspired method is known as “high temperature high pressure” (HPHT), and that’s exactly what it sounds like. A carbon source, like graphite, is placed in a giant, mechanical press where, in the presence of a catalyst, it’s subjected to temperatures of around 1,600 degrees Celsius and pressures of 5-6 Gigapascals in order to form diamond. (If you’re curious what that sort of pressure feels like, the GIA describes it as similar to the force exerted if you tried to balance a commercial jet on your fingertip.)

    The newer method, called chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is more akin to how diamonds might form in interstellar gas clouds (for which we have indirect, spectroscopic evidence, according to Shigley). A hydrocarbon gas, like methane, is pumped into a low-pressure reactor vessel alongside hydrogen. While maintaining near-vacuum conditions, the gases are heated very hot—typically 3,000 to 4,000 degrees Celsius, according to Lightbox CEO Steve Coe—causing carbon atoms to break free of their molecular bonds. Under the right conditions, those liberated bits of carbon will settle out onto a substrate—typically a flat, square plate of a synthetic diamond produced with the HPHT method—forming layer upon layer of diamond.

    “It’s like snow falling on a table on your back porch,” Jason Payne, the founder and CEO of lab-grown diamond jewelry company Ada Diamonds, told me.

    Scientists have been forging gem-quality diamonds with HPHT for longer, but today, CVD has become the method of choice for those selling larger bridal stones. That’s in part because it’s easier to control impurities and make diamonds with very high clarity, according to Coe. Still, each method has its advantages—Payne said that HPHT is faster and the diamonds typically have better color (which is to say, less of it)—and some companies, like Ada, purchase stones grown in both ways.

    However they’re made, lab-grown diamonds have the same exceptional hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity as their Earth-mined counterparts. Cut, they can dazzle with the same brilliance and fire—a technical term to describe how well the diamond scatters light like a prism. The GIA even grades them according to the same 4Cs—cut, clarity, color, and carat—that gemologists use to assess diamonds formed in the Earth, although it uses a slightly different terminology to report the color and clarity grades for lab-grown stones.

    They’re so similar, in fact, that lab-grown diamond entering the larger diamond supply without any disclosures has become a major concern across the jewelry industry, particularly when it comes to melee stones from Asia. It’s something major retailers are now investing thousands of dollars in sophisticated detection equipment to suss out by searching for minute differences in, say, their crystal shape or for impurities like nitrogen (much less common in lab-grown diamond, according to Shigley).

    Those differences may be a lifeline for retailers hoping to weed out lab-grown diamonds, but for companies focused on them, they can become another selling point. The lack of nitrogen in diamonds produced with the CVD method, for instance, gives them an exceptional chemical purity that allows them to be classified as type IIa; a rare and coveted breed that accounts for just 2 percent of those found in nature. Meanwhile, the ability to control everything about the growth process allows companies like Lightbox to adjust the formula and produce incredibly rare blue and pink diamonds as part of their standard product line. (In fact, these colored gemstones have made up over half of the company’s sales since launch, according to Coe.)

    And while lab-grown diamonds boast the same sparkle as their Earthly counterparts, they do so at a significant discount. Zimnisky said that today, your typical one carat, medium quality diamond grown in a lab will sell for about $3,600, compared with $6,100 for its Earth-mined counterpart—a discount of about 40 percent. Two years ago, that discount was only 18 percent. And while the price drop has “slightly tapered off” as Zimnisky put it, he expects it will fall further thanks in part to the aforementioned ramp up in Chinese production, as well as technological improvements. (The market is also shifting in response to Lightbox, which De Beers is using to position lab-grown diamonds as mass produced items for fashion jewelry, and which is selling its stones, ungraded, at the controversial low price of $800 per carat—a discount of nearly 90 percent.)

    Zimnisky said that if the price falls too fast, it could devalue lab-grown diamonds in the eyes of consumers. But for now, at least, paying less seems to be a selling point. A 2018 consumer research survey by MVI Marketing found that most of those polled would choose a larger lab-grown diamond over a smaller mined diamond of the same price.

    “The thing [consumers] seem most compelled by is the ability to trade up in size and quality at the same price,” Garard of IGDA said.

    Still, for buyers and sellers alike, price is only part of the story. Many in the lab-grown diamond world market their product as an ethical or eco-friendly alternative to mined diamonds.

    But those sales pitches aren’t without controversy.
    A variety of lab-grown diamond products arrayed on a desk at Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan. The stone in the upper left gets its blue color from boron. Diamonds tinted yellow (top center) usually get their color from small amounts of nitrogen.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Dazzling promises

    As Anna-Mieke Anderson tells it, she didn’t enter the diamond world to become a corporate tycoon. She did it to try and fix a mistake.

    In 1999, Anderson purchased herself a diamond. Some years later, in 2005, her father asked her where it came from. Nonplussed, she told him it came from the jewelry store. But that wasn’t what he was asking: He wanted to know where it really came from.

    “I actually had no idea,” Anderson told Earther. “That led me to do a mountain of research.”

    That research eventually led Anderson to conclude that she had likely bought a diamond mined under horrific conditions. She couldn’t be sure, because the certificate of purchase included no place of origin. But around the time of her purchase, civil wars funded by diamond mining were raging across Angola, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia, fueling “widespread devastation” as Global Witness put it in 2006. At the height of the diamond wars in the late ‘90s, the watchdog group estimates that as many as 15 percent of diamonds entering the market were conflict diamonds. Even those that weren’t actively fueling a war were often being mined in dirty, hazardous conditions; sometimes by children.

    “I couldn’t believe I’d bought into this,” Anderson said.

    To try and set things right, Anderson began sponsoring a boy living in a Liberian community impacted by the blood diamond trade. The experience was so eye-opening, she says, that she eventually felt compelled to sponsor more children. Selling conflict-free jewelry seemed like a fitting way to raise money to do so, but after a great deal more research, Anderson decided she couldn’t in good faith consider any diamond pulled from the Earth to be truly conflict-free in either the humanitarian or environmental sense. While diamond miners were, by the early 2000s, getting their gems certified “conflict free” according to the UN-backed Kimberley Process, the certification scheme’s definition of a conflict diamond—one sold by rebel groups to finance armed conflicts against governments—felt far too narrow.

    “That [conflict definition] eliminates anything to do with the environment, or eliminates a child mining it, or someone who was a slave, or beaten, or raped,” Anderson said.

    And so she started looking into science, and in 2007, launching MiaDonna as one of the world’s first lab-grown diamond jewelry companies. The business has been activism-oriented from the get-go, with at least five percent of its annual earnings—and more than 20 percent for the last three years—going into The Greener Diamond, Anderson’s charity foundation which has funded a wide range of projects, from training former child soldiers in Sierra Leone to grow food to sponsoring kids orphaned by the West African Ebola outbreak.

    MiaDonna isn’t the only company that positions itself as an ethical alternative to the traditional diamond industry. Brilliant Earth, which sells what it says are carefully-sourced mined and lab-created diamonds, also donates a small portion of its profits to supporting mining communities. Other lab-grown diamond companies market themselves as “ethical,” “conflict-free,” or “world positive.” Payne of Ada Diamonds sees, in lab-grown diamonds, not just shiny baubles, but a potential to improve medicine, clean up pollution, and advance society in countless other ways—and he thinks the growing interest in lab-grown diamond jewelry will help propel us toward that future.

    Others, however, say black-and-white characterizations when it comes to social impact of mined diamonds versus lab-grown stones are unfair. “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not,” Estelle Levin-Nally, founder and CEO of Levin Sources, which advocates for better governance in the mining sector, told Earther. “I think it’s always about your politics. And ethics are subjective.”

    Saleem Ali, an environmental researcher at the University of Delaware who serves on the board of the Diamonds and Development Initiative, agrees. He says the mining industry has, on the whole, worked hard to turn itself around since the height of the diamond wars and that governance is “much better today” than it used to be. Human rights watchdog Global Witness also says that “significant progress” has been made to curb the conflict diamond trade, although as Alice Harle, Senior Campaigner with Global Witness told Earther via email, diamonds do still fuel conflict, particularly in the Central African Republic and Zimbabwe.

    Most industry observers seems to agree that the Kimberley Process is outdated and inadequate, and that more work is needed to stamp out other abuses, including child labor and forced labor, in the artisanal and small-scale diamond mining sector. Today, large-scale mining operations don’t tend to see these kinds of problems, according to Julianne Kippenberg, associate director for children’s rights at Human Rights Watch, but she notes that there may be other community impacts surrounding land rights and forced resettlement.

    The flip side, Ali and Levin-Nally say, is that well-regulated mining operations can be an important source of economic development and livelihood. Ali cites Botswana and Russia as prime examples of places where large-scale mining operations have become “major contributors to the economy.” Dmitry Amelkin, head of strategic projects and analytics for Russian diamond mining giant Alrosa, echoed that sentiment in an email to Earther, noting that diamonds transformed Botswana “from one of the poorest [countries] in the world to a middle-income country” with revenues from mining representing almost a third of its GDP.

    In May, a report commissioned by the Diamond Producers Association (DPA), a trade organization representing the world’s largest diamond mining companies, estimated that worldwide, its members generate nearly $4 billion in direct revenue for employees and contractors, along with another $6.8 billion in benefits via “local procurement of goods and services.” DPA CEO Jean-Marc Lieberherr said this was a story diamond miners need to do a better job telling.

    “The industry has undergone such changes since the Blood Diamond movie,” he said, referring to the blockbuster 2006 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio that drew global attention to the problem of conflict diamonds. “And yet people’s’ perceptions haven’t evolved. I think the main reason is we have not had a voice, we haven’t communicated.”

    But conflict and human rights abuses aren’t the only issues that have plagued the diamond industry. There’s also the lasting environmental impact of the mining itself. In the case of large-scale commercial mines, this typically entails using heavy machinery and explosives to bore deep into those kimberlite tubes in search of precious stones.

    Some, like Maya Koplyova, a geologist at the University of British Columbia who studies diamonds and the rocks they’re found in, see this as far better than many other forms of mining. “The environmental footprint is the fThere’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.” ootprint of digging the hole in the ground and crushing [the rock],” Koplyova said, noting that there’s no need to add strong acids or heavy metals like arsenic (used in gold mining) to liberate the gems.

    Still, those holes can be enormous. The Mir Mine, a now-abandoned open pit mine in Eastern Siberia, is so large—reportedly stretching 3,900 feet across and 1,700 feet deep—that the Russian government has declared it a no-fly zone owing to the pit’s ability to create dangerous air currents. It’s visible from space.

    While companies will often rehabilitate other land to offset the impact of mines, kimberlite mining itself typically leaves “a permanent dent in the earth’s surface,” as a 2014 report by market research company Frost & Sullivan put it.

    “It’s a huge impact as far as I’m concerned,” said Kevin Krajick, senior editor for science news at Columbia University’s Earth Institute who wrote a book on the discovery of diamonds in far northern Canada. Krajick noted that in remote mines, like those of the far north, it’s not just the physical hole to consider, but all the development required to reach a previously-untouched area, including roads and airstrips, roaring jets and diesel-powered trucks.

    Diamonds grown in factories clearly have a smaller physical footprint. According to the Frost & Sullivan report, they also use less water and create less waste. It’s for these reasons that Ali thinks diamond mining “will never be able to compete” with lab-grown diamonds from an environmental perspective.

    “The mining industry should not even by trying to do that,” he said.

    Of course, this is capitalism, so try to compete is exactly what the DPA is now doing. That same recent report that touted the mining industry’s economic benefits also asserts that mined diamonds have a carbon footprint three times lower than that of lab-grown diamonds, on average. The numbers behind that conclusion, however, don’t tell the full story.

    Growing diamonds does take considerable energy. The exact amount can vary greatly, however, depending on the specific nature of the growth process. These are details manufacturers are typically loathe to disclose, but Payne of Ada Diamonds says he estimates the most efficient players in the game today use about 250 kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity per cut, polished carat of diamond; roughly what a U.S. household consumes in 9 days. Other estimates run higher. Citing unnamed sources, industry publication JCK Online reported that a modern HPHT run can use up to 700 kWh per carat, while CVD production can clock in north of 1,000 kWh per carat.

    Pulling these and several other public-record estimates, along with information on where in the world today’s lab diamonds are being grown and the energy mix powering the producer nations’ electric grids, the DPA-commissioned study estimated that your typical lab-grown diamond results in some 511 kg of carbon emissions per cut, polished carat. Using information provided by mining companies on fuel and electricity consumption, along with other greenhouse gas sources on the mine site, it found that the average mined carat was responsible for just 160 kg of carbon emissions.

    One limitation here is that the carbon footprint estimate for mining focused only on diamond production, not the years of work entailed in developing a mine. As Ali noted, developing a mine can take a lot of energy, particularly for those sited in remote locales where equipment needs to be hauled long distances by trucks or aircraft.

    There’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.”

    #dimants #Afrique #technologie #capitalisme

  • Raconter le monde (3/4) : Décoloniser le récit du monde | La série documentaire
    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/lsd-la-serie-documentaire/raconter-le-monde-34-decoloniser-le-recit-du-monde

    Depuis quelques années un mot apparaît de plus en plus fréquemment dans les conversations : « décoloniser ». Ce mot apparaît notamment dans le champs littéraire : « il faut décoloniser la littérature de voyage ». "Le décolonial, c’est avoir conscience que tout savoir, toute parole et tout point de vue est situé." dit Alice Lefilleul. Au travers de ce documentaire, nous interrogeons ce terme, cette affirmation, cette expression, « décoloniser le récit du monde ». Durée : 55 min. Source : France Culture

    http://rf.proxycast.org/1577998546072772608/10177-05.06.2019-ITEMA_22080427-0.mp3

  • La pellicule invisible d’Alice Guy
    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2019/06/05/la-pellicule-invisible-d-alice-guy_1731901

    Bien qu’Alice Guy-Blaché soit française et la réalisatrice d’une œuvre protéiforme, il y a peu de chances pour que Be Natural : The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché, le documentaire de Pamela B. Green sorti depuis peu aux Etats-Unis, soit montré en France. Il n’a trouvé, pour l’heure, aucun distributeur dans l’Hexagone, quand l’Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande, la Suède, la Norvège, le Danemark, la Finlande, l’Estonie, la Lettonie, la Lituanie et l’Espagne ont acheté les droits. Doit-on s’en étonner ? Non, à en croire la réalisatrice, dont le film dénonce l’indifférence têtue de la France vis-à-vis d’une pionnière du cinéma. A ce titre, il n’est pas exagéré de dire que le véritable sujet de Be Natural, enquête cinématographique et making of de cette enquête, porte sur la façon dont l’histoire se fait, puis s’écrit - ou pas - et se réécrit.

    Née en 1873, Alice Guy commence sa carrière en 1894, à 21 ans, comme sténodactylographe d’un certain Léon Gaumont. L’année suivante, elle assiste avec son patron à la première projection organisée par les frères Lumières. Gaumont saisit tout de suite l’importance du procédé, qu’il entend développer. Alice Guy se propose aussitôt de participer à l’aventure en créant des petits films courts. Gaumont accepte, au motif que « c’est un métier pour jeunes filles (sic) ». Loin d’être un art, le cinématographe n’est pas encore une profession, tout au plus une occupation d’amateurs - idéale pour une femme, donc.

    Alice Guy a trouvé sa vocation. Dès 1896, elle réalise ce qui peut être considéré comme le premier film de fiction, la Fée aux choux, soit moins d’une minute où l’on voit une plantureuse fée sortir des nourrissons de choux en cartons, artistiquement dessinés. Suivront près de mille films, sur dix-sept ans de carrière où Alice Guy, désormais directrice de production chez Gaumont, assure souvent tous les rôles - réalisatrice, scénariste, habilleuse… Elle touche à tous les genres, le comique, le drame sentimental, le western, le « clip » musical avec des chansonniers comme Mayol ou Dranem, et même le péplum avec son « chef-d’œuvre », la Vie du Christ (1906), film en vingt-cinq tableaux, d’une longueur totale de trente-cinq minutes, très inhabituelle pour l’époque. Elle participe à toutes les innovations comme la colorisation et, surtout, le chronophone, ancêtre du parlant, qu’elle part introduire aux Etats-Unis en 1907. C’est le deuxième volet de sa carrière, qui la voit s’épanouir à New York, où elle est partie avec son mari, le réalisateur Herbert Blaché. Bien que jeune mère, elle ne renonce pas à sa passion, bien au contraire, et ce malgré la difficulté qu’elle éprouvera toujours à maîtriser l’anglais. Elle parvient même à fonder sa propre compagnie, Solax, implantée à Fort Lee (New Jersey) et considérée comme le studio le plus important aux Etats-Unis de l’ère pré-Hollywood. Mais en 1921, en instance de divorce, alors que Solax a été en partie endommagé par un incendie, elle décide de rentrer en France.

    Commence alors une période sombre, qui s’étirera jusqu’à la fin de sa vie, en 1968. Sombre car Alice Guy, avec deux enfants à charge, ne parvient pas à trouver de travail. On ne l’a pas seulement oubliée : alors que paraissent les premières histoires du cinéma, son œuvre est effacée ou attribuée à d’autres, acteurs ou assistants qu’elle a employés, comme Feuillade. Même Gaumont, qui publie l’histoire de sa maison, la passe sous silence. Il promet des corrections pour la seconde édition - et des brouillons prouvent qu’il entendait tenir sa promesse - mais il meurt en 1946, avant la parution prévue du volume, qui ne verra jamais le jour.

    Comprenant que le cinéma lui a désormais fermé ses portes, Alice Guy entreprend de se faire elle-même justice. Elle corrige les premières histoire(s) du cinéma qui paraissent, tente de récupérer ses œuvres, perdues, oubliées, éparpillées chez les premiers collectionneurs. Non signés, dépourvus de génériques, sans crédits ni copyrights, les films d’Alice Guy semblent ne plus exister que dans la mémoire de leur créatrice. En désespoir de cause, elle écrit ses souvenirs. Aucun éditeur n’en voudra. L’Autobiographie d’une pionnière du cinéma paraîtra à titre posthume chez Denoël, en 1976. Une préface de Nicole-Lise Bernheim ouvre le livre par ces mots : « Si j’étais née en 1873 […]. / Si j’avais travaillé chez Gaumont pendant onze ans / […]. Si j’avais été la seule femme metteur en scène du monde entier pendant dix-sept ans, / Qui serais-je ? / Je serais connue, / Je serais célèbre, / Je serais fêtée, / Je serais reconnue. / […]. Qui suis-je ? / Méliès, Lumière, Gaumont ? / Non. / Je suis une femme. »

    Encouragée par Léon Gaumont, qui sut lui confier d’importantes responsabilités, objet d’hommages appuyés signés - excusez du peu - Eisenstein ou Hitchcock, Alice Guy n’a pas tant été victime « des hommes » que des historiens du cinéma. Son effacement est l’exemplification même d’un déni d’histoire. Une femme peut réussir - et Alice Guy l’a prouvé avec éclat - mais à partir du moment où une pratique amateur devient une profession, un art et un enjeu commercial, elle n’a plus sa place dans la légende. Prenez Méliès. Lui aussi a été oublié, son œuvre effacée, tandis qu’il tombait dans la misère et survivait en vendant des bonbons devant la gare Montparnasse. Mais dès 1925, l’Histoire du cinématographe de ses origines à nos jours, par Georges-Michel Coissac lui redonnait sa place, qui ne fera dès lors que grandir. Le nom d’Alice Guy n’y est même pas mentionné. Georges Sadoul a attribué ses films à d’autres, Langlois l’a négligée, Toscan du Plantier, directeur de la Gaumont de 1975 à 1985, ne savait même pas qui elle était. Et la France, aujourd’hui, rechigne à diffuser Be Natural, documentaire passionnant et presque trop dense, tant le nombre d’informations, glanées pendant dix ans, peine à rentrer dans les 103 minutes du film. On se consolera avec les quelques films d’Alice Guy disponibles sur YouTube (1), dont l’hilarant les Résultats du féminisme (1906), qui inverse les rôles de genre. Edifiant.

    (1) On trouvera aussi sur YouTube le Jardin oublié : la vie et l’œuvre d’Alice Guy-Blaché (1995), documentaire de Marquise Lepage. A mentionner également, le prix Alice-Guy, qui a récompensé cette année Un amour impossible, de Catherine Corsini.

    #invisibilisation #historicisation #femmes #cinema

    Quand est-ce qu’on efface les historiens du cinéma ?

  • Procrastination nocturne 2. Quand tu t’endors crevé super tôt sans même l’avoir voulu, toute lumière allumée et que tu te réveilles à 1h35 la lampe dans la gueule…
    Après : https://seenthis.net/messages/753114

    Je me lève pour tout éteindre et me changer, j’envoie un message à mon amoureuse pour dire que je n’avais pas vu son mot vu que je m’étais endormi et…

    Du coup, devant l’ordi, je tombe sur l’onglet ouvert pour plus tard avec la préface par Robert Kurz au Debord d’Anselm Jappe
    https://seenthis.net/messages/782666
    http://www.palim-psao.fr/2019/05/la-societe-du-spectacle-trente-ans-plus-tard.par-robert-kurz-preface-a-l-

    Ce n’est pas très long, donc je me mets à la lire. Puis je suis un lien vers un article de Jappe de l’année dernière que j’avais déjà lu et épinglé :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/690117
    http://www.palim-psao.fr/2018/04/guy-debord.plus-que-jamais-en-situation-par-anselm-jappe-paru-dans-le-nou

    À partir de là, c’est foutu.

    Je me mets à relire sa fiche WP, pour lire des choses sur son suicide :
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Debord
    https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/from-being-to-nothingness-1524917.html

    Je retombe sur cet article sur le livre à charge d’Apostolidès :
    https://next.liberation.fr/livres/2015/12/23/guy-debord-satiete-du-spectacle_1422654
    que @supergeante avait épinglé à l’époque :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/442991

    Du coup ça m’amène à lire sur Alice Becker-Ho et « l’affaire Riesel »
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Becker-Ho
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren%C3%A9_Riesel

    Là je cherche des photos d’eux tous, et je retombe sur… le journal pro-situ américain Not Bored qui contient de nombreuses correspondances de Debord traduites en anglais et disponibles sur le web. Comme je n’ai pas les livres, pour résumer, je me plonge dedans et je passe plus de 3h à lire des lettres de Debord en pleine nuit.
    http://notbored.org/debord.html

    Je ne me rappelle plus trop dans quel ordre ça s’est passé : est-ce que j’ai d’abord cherché les mots de Debord sur Jappe, puis je suis retombé sur le conflit avec René Riesel, ou bien était-ce l’inverse ?…

    Le dernier mot de Debord sur Jappe est dans une lettre pour Makoto Kinoshita :
    http://notbored.org/debord-5April1994.html

    Dis moi si un de tes amis sait lire italien. Dans ce cas, je t’enverrais un livre d’Anselm Jappe (Debord, Edizioni Tracce, Pescara). C’est sans aucun doute le livre le mieux informé sur moi, écrit par un Allemand qui assume explicitement un point de vue Hegeliano-Marxiste.

    Mais on trouve donc aussi des choses sur « l’affaire Riesel ». À commencer par sa lettre de rupture définitive à Riesel, où en goujat sans pincettes, il traite sa femme de misérable conne et de vache :
    http://notbored.org/debord-7September1971.html

    À l’inverse dans une autre lettre il s’explique très en détail sur une autre relation libertine de son couple avec Eve et Jean-Marc :
    http://notbored.org/debord-2October1971.html
    Le point commun étant qu’il haïssait absolument le mensonge (Apostolidès dit qu’il mentait et manipulait lui-même mais je n’ai pas lu de témoignage ailleurs, qu’il était excluant, violent, etc oui, mais pas menteur et Sanguinetti dit le contraire alors qu’Apostolidès est censé s’être basé sur ses sources justement). Et que donc toute relation amoureuse et/ou sexuelle doit toujours se faire sans jamais mentir à personne (y compris pendant l’acte, ce qui est le point qui a énervé Alice avec la femme de Riesel).

    Toujours autour des mêmes gens, je tombe aussi sur un article de Bourseiller, qui au milieu de notes sur Debord et le libertinage, détaille la vie de l’écrivain et pornographe Alexander Trocchi plus que sa fiche Wikipédia. À n’en pas douter c’était un aventurier… et une grosse merde qui a prostitué sa femme enceinte (et pas qu’un peu) pour se payer de l’héroine, et moult autre.
    http://christophebourseiller.fr/blog/2017/03/transgresser-ou-disparaitre-les-situationnistes-a-lepreuve-de-

    Bon, ça a dérivé (haha) et j’avoue sans mal qu’il doit y avoir du voyeurisme à être parti dans tout ça. Je préfère généralement rester sur le contenu lui-même, comme le fait très bien le livre de Jappe justement. Mais je garde toujours en tête que les idées doivent être pratiquées au quotidien, donc il y a quand même un intérêt à savoir la vie réelle des gens (et c’était très exactement le crédo principal de Debord et tous les situs, et justement lui pensait être assez en accord avec ce qu’il disait).

    Et là, il était 5h45. Et le réveil à 7h.

    #procrastination #sérendipité #Debord #Guy_Debord #Alice_Becker-Ho #René_Riesel #situationniste #internationale_situationniste #nuit #sommeil #Robert_Kurz #Anselm_Jappe #théorie_critique #libertinage #Alexander_Trocchi #Christophe_Bourseiller #Jean-Marie_Apostolidès et #dérive !!

  • La situation des classes laborieuses aux États-Unis d’Amérique 19 Mai 2019 Librairie Tropiques
    http://www.librairie-tropiques.fr/2019/05/la-situation-des-classes-laborieuses-aux-etats-unis-d-amerique.h

    Présentation par Nat London d’un nouveau livre de Mary-Alice Waters, publié par les éditions Pathfinder .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAHT4r7ay-g

    Déjà publié en anglais et en espagnol, à paraître bientôt en français, ce livre fait l’état des conditions actuelles de vie, de la renaissance et des perspectives de lutte d’un des plus importants secteurs de la classe ouvrière dans le monde aujourd’hui :

    « Vous ne pouvez pas comprendre ce qui se passe aux États-Unis sans comprendre la dévastation des vies des familles de travailleurs dans des régions comme la Virginie occidentale, et l’augmentation considérable des inégalités de classe depuis la crise de 2008. »

    Un géant a commencé à bouger...
    
Hillary Clinton les appelle « les déplorables » qui habitent des régions « reculées » entre New York et San Francisco. Mais des dizaines de milliers de professeurs et de personnels des écoles de Virginie occidentale, d’Oklahoma et au-delà ont montré l’exemple par leurs grèves victorieuses en 2018. Les travailleurs à travers la Floride se sont mobilisés et ont gagné le rétablissement du droit de vote pour plus d’un millions d’anciens prisonniers.

    S’appuyant sur les meilleures traditions de lutte des opprimés et des producteurs exploités de toutes les couleurs de peau et origines nationales aux US, ils ont lutté pour la dignité et le respect pour eux-mêmes, pour leurs familles et pour tous les travailleurs.

    #usa, #Nat_London, #Pathfinder, #Working_Class, #communisme, #marxisme #GiletsJaunes #Révoltes #donald_trump

  • Pakistan : des insurgés baloutches visent les intérêts chinois à #Gwadar
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/05/13/pakistan-des-insurges-baloutches-visent-les-interets-chinois-a-gwadar_546151


    Des forces de sécurité pakistanaises patrouillent dans le port de Gwadar, à 700 km à l’ouest de Karachi, le 13 novembre 2016. La cité portuaire doit devenir le point d’ancrage sur la mer du Corridor économique Chine-Pakistan (CPEC).
    AAMIR QURESHI / AFP

    L’attaque, samedi 11 mai, contre le seul hôtel de luxe de la petite ville portuaire de Gwadar, aux confins de la province du Baloutchistan, symbole de la présence chinoise au Pakistan, a fait cinq morts, dont quatre employés de l’établissement et un soldat. Les forces de sécurité sont parvenues à reprendre le contrôle des lieux, dimanche, après avoir tué les trois assaillants qui s’y étaient repliés. L’opération a été revendiquée par l’Armée de libération du Baloutchistan (ALB) qui visait « les Chinois et autres investisseurs étrangers ».

    Le commando armé, habillé en militaires, s’était introduit à l’intérieur de l’hôtel, construit sur une colline faisant face à la mer. Souvent peu occupé, voire quasi désert, le Pearl Continental accueille généralement des officiels pakistanais de passage ou des étrangers, surtout des cadres chinois, travaillant à la construction d’un port en eau profonde qui doit être l’un des maillons des « nouvelles routes de la soie » promues par Pékin. Le premier ministre pakistanais, Imran Khan, a condamné l’attaque, considérant qu’elle voulait « saboter [les] projets économiques et [la] prospérité » du pays.

    Le symbole est fort. Gwadar doit devenir le point d’ancrage sur la mer du Corridor économique Chine-Pakistan (CPEC), dans lequel Pékin a prévu d’investir 55 milliards d’euros pour relier la province occidentale chinoise du Xinjiang et la mer d’Arabie. En 2018, le responsable du développement portuaire de Gwadar, Dostain Jamaldini, indiquait au Monde « qu’en 2014, la ville n’était encore qu’un village de pêcheurs mais en 2020-23, nous disposerons de 2,6 kilomètres de quais capables de recevoir cinq cargos, et dans vingt ans, ce sera l’un des principaux ports du monde ».

    Pour l’heure, en dépit de l’inauguration, au printemps 2018, par le premier ministre pakistanais d’alors, de plusieurs bâtiments construits par les Chinois dans la zone franche qui longe le port, l’activité demeure très faible.

    #OBOR #One_Belt_One_Road

  • Dossier spécial Soudan. « À bas le gouvernement des voleurs ! » : Retour sur les dynamiques révolutionnaires soudanaises. - Noria
    https://www.noria-research.com/fr/dossier-special-soudan-a-bas-le-gouvernement-des-voleurs

    Depuis le mois de décembre 2018, le Soudan est le théâtre de manifestations réclamant la chute d’Omar el-Beshir, à la tête du pays depuis 1989, ainsi que de l’ensemble du régime.

    Dans ce dossier spécial consacré aux révoltes soudanaises, Noria propose une analyse des dynamiques socio-historiques qui sous-tendent les mobilisations inédites de ces quatre derniers mois . Ce dossier regroupe une série d’analyses originales de la situation soudanaise.

    Clément Deshayes, Margaux Etienne et Khadidja Medani, trois chercheurs de Noria travaillant sur le Soudan, ont mené une série d’entretiens avec d’autres chercheurs, spécialistes du Soudan, dont le travail est basé sur des données de première main, issues de leurs enquêtes de terrain. Chaque entretien vient éclairer et approfondir une dimension spécifique de la situation politique. Le dossier dans son ensemble permet d’esquisser les principales dynamiques de cette révolte, en interrogeant les dynamiques sociales, économiques et politiques qui la façonne.
    Sommaire
    Partie 1 – 7 mai
    ‣ Introduction générale
    ‣ Les dynamiques de classes dans la diffusion du soulèvement soudanais. Entretien avec Magdi El Gizouli
    ‣ Économie politique du régime et de la révolte. Clientélisme, asymétrie et injustice dans la dynamique protestataire. Entretien avec Raphaelle Chevrillon Guibert
    ‣ Militer du dehors. Les ressorts du mouvement révolutionnaire chez les soudanais de la diaspora. Entretien avec Alice Franck
    ‣ Le soulèvement populaire soudanais : des premières manifestations à la proclamation de l’État d’urgence. Carte chronologique nationale réalisée par Claire Gillette
    ‣ Carte des manifestations de la diaspora soudanaise en soutien au soulèvement populaire entre décembre 2018 et avril 2019
    ‣ Carte des manifestations dans l’agglomération de Khartoum. Des premières manifestations à la proclamation de l’État d’urgence.
    ‣ Reportage photo d’Elsadig Mohamed
    Partie 2 – 14 mai
    ‣ La troisième révolution soudanaise : rétablir toutes les femmes sur la carte de l’espace public. Entretien avec Azza Ahmed A. Azziz
    ‣ La révolution soudanaise ou l’apogée d’une décennie de contestation de l’ordre politique ? Entretien avec Clément Deshayes
    ‣ Organisation et mobilisation de la révolte de décembre au Soudan : regard sur les mobilisations des zones périphériques de Khartoum. Entretien avec Mohamed A. G. Bakhit, Sherein Ibrahim et Rania Madani

    #Soudan #soulèvement #manifestations

  • De l’âge de Pierre aux micropuces : comment de minuscules outils peuvent avoir fait de nous des humains : la technologie de la miniaturisation nous distingue des autres primates.

    Les anthropologues ont longtemps fait le cas que l’élaboration d’outils est l’un des comportements clés qui séparaient nos ancêtres humains d’autres primates. Un nouveau document, cependant, fait valoir que ce n’était pas la fabrication d’outils qui a mis les homininés à part -c’était la miniaturisation des outils.

    Tout comme les minuscules transistors ont transformé les télécommunications il y a quelques décennies, nos ancêtres de l’âge de pierre ont ressenti l’envie de fabriquer des outils minuscules. "C’est un besoin auquel nous avons été éternellement confrontés et qui a conduit notre évolution." dit Justin Pargeter, un anthropologue à l’Université Emory et auteur principal de l’article. "La miniaturisation est la chose que nous faisons. "

    La revue l’anthropologie évolutive publie le document—le premier aperçu complet de la miniaturisation des outils préhistoriques. Elle propose que la miniaturisation soit une tendance centrale dans les technologies de l’Homininé qui remonte à au moins 2,6 millions ans.

    « Lorsque d’autres singes utilisaient des outils en pierre, ils ont choisi de les garder sous la forme de leur grande taille et sont restés dans les forêts où ils ont évolué, » dit le co-auteur John Shea, professeur d’anthropologie à l’université Stony Brook. "Les homininés ont choisi de les miniaturiser et sont allés partout, transformant des habitats autrement hostiles pour répondre à nos besoins changeants. "

    L’article montre la façon dont les flocons de pierre de moins d’un pouce de longueur—utilisé pour percer, couper et gratter- sont ressortis dans les dossiers archéologiques pour des sites sur tous les continents (...).

    Ces petits flocons de pierre,(...) étaient comme les lames de rasoir jetables ou des trombones d’aujourd’hui -omniprésent, facile à faire et facilement remplacés.

    Il identifie trois points de flexion pour la miniaturisation dans l’évolution de l’Homininé. Le premier pic s’est produit il y a environ 2 millions années, entraîné par la dépendance croissante de nos ancêtres aux flocons de pierre à la place des ongles et des dents pour les tâches de découpe, de tranchage et de perçage. Un deuxième pic a eu lieu quelque temps après 100 000 ans avec le développement d’armes à grande vitesse, comme l’arc et la flèche [il y a sûrement une erreur ici car l’arc est apparu vers 12000BP] , qui nécessitaient des inserts en pierre légères. Un troisième pic de miniaturisation s’est produit il y a environ 17 000 ans. La dernière ère glaciaire se terminait, forçant certains humains à s’adapter aux changements climatiques rapides, à l’élévation des niveaux de la mer et à l’accroissement des densités de population. Ces changements ont accru la nécessité de conserver les ressources, y compris les roches et les minéraux nécessaires pour fabriquer des outils.

    (...)

    From Stone Age chips to microchips : How tiny tools may have made us human : The technology of miniaturization set hominins apart from other primates — ScienceDaily

    Manuel Will, Christian Tryon, Matthew Shaw, Eleanor M. L. Scerri, Kathryn Ranhorn, Justin Pargeter, Jessica McNeil, Alex Mackay, Alice Leplongeon, Huw S. Groucutt, Katja Douze, Alison S. Brooks. Comparative analysis of Middle Stone Age artifacts in Africa (CoMSAfrica). Evolutionary Anthropology : Issues, News, and Reviews, 2019 ; DOI : 10.1002/evan.21772

    #Préhistoire #Paléolithique #outils #industrie_microlithique #Anthropologie #2MaBP

  • Tout déplacement d’un demandeur d’asile en dehors de la région où il est domicilié est interdit"



    Alice Bougenot ajoute sur twitter (https://twitter.com/Alicebis/status/1118589980832669702) :

    Merci de nous donner la #base_légale que nous puissions en discuter avec vos supérieurs

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #France #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #OFII #demandeurs_d'asile #France

    Une sorte d’#assignation_à_résidence

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Artificialisation des sols : en France, on bétonne même quand ce n’est pas nécessaire Marina Fabre - 8 Avril 2019 - Novethic
    https://www.novethic.fr/actualite/environnement/agriculture/isr-rse/l-artificialisation-des-sols-progresse-plus-vite-que-la-croissance-demograp

    L’artificialisation des terres progresse plus vite que la croissance démographie et économique. Autrement dit, en France, même quand il n’y a pas de besoin spécifique, les sols sont bétonnés. À ce rythme d’ici la fin du siècle, 18 % du territoire sera artificialisé, prévient l’Iddri. Une situation qui pose question quand à la souveraineté alimentaire de la France et sa capacité à résister au changement climatique. 


    L’artificialisation des sols consiste à convertir des terres agricoles, forestières ou naturelles pour l’urbanisation ou le développement d’infrastructures. ©CC0

    C’est un phénomène que les politiques publiques ont dû mal à endiguer malgré les promesses. En 2015, l’artificialisation de sols représentait 9,4 % du territoire métropolitain contre 8,3 % en 2006. "La France a perdu un quart de sa surface agricole sur les 50 dernières années", a ainsi rappelé Emmanuel Macron lors de sa visite au Salon de l’Agriculture. Aujourd’hui, c’est l’équivalent de la superficie d’un département moyen qui est bétonné tous les 7 à 10 ans.

    Or selon une nouvelle étude menée par l’Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales (#Iddri), « un nombre préoccupant de territoires connaissent une forte artificialisation malgré une faible croissance démographique et économique ». Autrement dit l’artificialisation progresse même quand elle n’est pas nécessaire. « En dix ans, la superficie des terres artificialisées a augmenté de 13 % alors que la croissance du produit intérieur brut est de 6 % et celle de la démographie de 5 % », détaille Alice Colsaet, doctorante à l’Iddri et autrice de l’étude.

    L’habitat et les zones d’activité responsables de l’artificialisation
    Plusieurs facteurs sont évoqués, notamment l’évolution de nos modes de vie. Les Français vivent de plus en plus seuls, les familles sont moins nombreuses et ont besoin de plus d’espace. Ils privilégient les maisons individuelles pourtant responsables d’un hectare sur deux artificialisé et achètent de plus en plus de maisons secondaires. Mais les collectivités sont également pointées du doigt.

    « Il y a une tendance à consommer de l’espace pour essayer de créer un dynamisme », décrypte Alice Colsaet, « certaines collectivités vont construire des zones d’activité même s’il n’y a pas de demande et qu’elles sont en concurrence avec la zone d’activité de la collectivité voisine. C’est une offre surabondante qui est déconnectée des besoins et qui créé des zones vides ». Il n’y a pas un responsable, c’est le cumul entre les nouveaux logements, les complexes commerciaux, les réseaux routiers… qui favorise cette artificialisation galopante. 

    Moins de terres agricoles, un enjeu de sécurité alimentaire
    Selon les estimations de l’Iddri, si la France continue à ce rythme, d’ici la fin du siècle, 18 % de son territoire sera artificialisé contre 9,7 % aujourd’hui. Cela paraît peu mais les conséquences pourraient être terribles. « D’abord cela signifierait une perte d’autonomie alimentaire dans l’Hexagone alors qu’il y a une croissance démographique », alerte Emmanuel Hyest, président des Sociétés d’aménagement foncier et d’établissement rural (#Safer), « ensuite les terres agricoles participent à la lutte contre le changement climatique. Elles permettent de capter le carbone mais également l’eau qui recharge les nappes phréatiques ».

    Pour Emmanuel Hyest, pas de doute, il faut considérer les terres agricoles comme des surfaces intouchables, à l’instar des forêts. Emmanuel Macron, lui, vise l’objectif de zéro artificialisation nette. Cette ambition, introduite dans le Plan biodiversité de 2018, « suppose que toute nouvelle construction devrait être compensée par une déconstruction équivalente, par exemple dans des zones d’activités devenues vacantes ou des parkings surdimensionnés », rappelle l’Iddri. Reste à voir, dans le temps, les effets de cette nouvelle réforme. 

     #artificialisation #agriculture #écologie #sols #urbanisme #bétonnage #artificialisation_des_terres #terres_agricoles #bétonnage #changement_climatique

    • déconstruction équivalente ? ? ? ? ?
      Juste avant la construction d’une zone soit disant industrielle, de la chaux vive est mélangée à la terre, par chez moi.

      Question : Que reste il après la déconstruction ?
      La notion de déconstruction équivalente, c’est du pur macron.

  • Votes for Women : A Portrait of Persistence | National Portrait Gallery

    https://npg.si.edu/exhibition/votes-for-women

    https://artsandculture.google.com/exhibit/2AKyZX3r7pZoJA

    Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” will outline the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. The presentation is divided chronologically and thematically to address “Radical Women: 1832–1869,” “Women Activists: 1870–1892,” “The New Woman: 1893–1912,” “Compelling Tactics: 1913–1916,” “Militancy in the American Suffragist Movement: 1917–1919” and “The Nineteenth Amendment and Its Legacy.” These thematic explorations are complemented by a chronological narrative of visual biographies of some of the movement’s most influential leaders.

    On view will be portraits of the movement’s pioneers, notably Susan B. Anthony and abolitionist Sojourner Truth, and 1848 Seneca Falls participants, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucy Stone. Other portraits of activists will represent such figures as Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for President; Carrie Chapman Catt, who devised successful state-by-state persuasion efforts; Alice Paul, who organized the first-ever march on Washington’s National Mall; and Lucy Burns, who served six different prison sentences for picketing the White House.

    Avec trois documents très intéressants dans cette remarquable exposition :

    Et cette carte thématique commentée

    #droits_civiques #droits_humains #droit_de_vote #droit_des_femmes #féminisme #états-unis

  • Lessons learned: Enabling #crypto bikes with the #blockchain-powered ID
    https://hackernoon.com/lessons-learned-enabling-crypto-bikes-with-the-blockchain-powered-id-fdd

    Pilot project of AirBie and uPortPhoto by Adli Wahid on UnsplashAre you curious about the advancement of blockchain pilot projects? Get behind the scenes of relevant use cases with us. Future Atelier has interviewed Oliver Terbu and Alice Nawfal from uPort (spoke of ConsenSys) and Philipp Zollinger (CMO) and Christian Raemy (CEO/CTO) from the crypto bike company AirBie.Project description:AirBie has built a prototype of a GPS-tracked Smart Bike Lock to be installed on bicycles for a free-floating bike sharing system. To manage digital identification/managing access rights, AirBie is relying on uPort — where users of AirBie share credentials (stored on their uPort wallet) with the AirBie mobile app to verify their identity and access the (...)

    #crypto-bike #technology #use-cases

  • Hollywood Froze Out the Founding Mother of Cinema | JSTOR Daily
    https://daily.jstor.org/hollywood-froze-out-the-founding-mother-of-cinema

    Alice Guy (1873-1968) was the first woman film director. She worked for French film pioneer Leon Gaumont as a secretary in 1896 before she moved into production. Guy was bored, however, by Gaumont’s films, essentially very short documentaries expressing the novelty of the moving image: street scenes, marching troops, trains arriving at stations.

    As historian Susan Hayward tells it, Gaumont was more interested in the technology than what it could produce. “Guy found the repetitiveness [of his films] irksome and decided she could do something better. She submitted a couple of short comedies to Gaumont and he gave her the go-ahead (almost absent-mindedly, according to Guy),” writes Hayward.

    Guy may very well have been the only female movie-maker for the next decade, during which she directed or produced hundreds of films ranging from one to thirty minutes in length. As “film-maker, artistic director and studio and location sets manager all rolled into one” in the days before the multi-reel feature length film, Guy was a key figure in the birth of the fiction film, the form that eventually trumped documentaries the world over. Hayward lists Guy’s innovations: using scripts; having rehearsals; stressing “natural” performances; deploying trick photography; shooting in studio and on location; and, beginning in 1900, experimenting with sound (Gaumont’s Chronophone synchronized phonograph and film).
    Lobby card for the silent film The Pit and the Pendulum directed by Alice Guy-Blaché, 1913
    Lobby card for the silent film The Pit and the Pendulum directed by Alice Guy-Blaché, 1913 via Wikimedia Commons

    In 1907, Guy resigned from Gaumont’s production company and married fellow Gaumont employee Herbert Blaché. Generally known afterwards as Alice Guy-Blaché, she journeyed with her husband to New York City. In 1910 the Blachés started their own company, Solax, with Alice as director general. They did well enough to have a new studio built in Fort Lee, New Jersey in 1911.

    Solax had two strong years, then both Blachés worked for hire into the teens. In 1914, Guy-Blaché wrote, “it has long been a source of wonder to me that many women have not seized upon the wonderful opportunity offered to them by the motion picture art… Of all the arts there is probably none in which they can make such splendid use of talents so much more natural to a woman than to a man and so necessary to its perfection.” And yet, when the couple arrived in Hollywood in 1918, they found few opportunities for women behind the camera.

    Karen Ward Mahar, in her analysis of the “rise and fall of the woman filmmaker” between 1896 and 1928, argues that the consolidating industry forced women out of behind-the-camera jobs because it gendered those occupations as male. Sex-typing of work in Hollywood would end up allowing for woman screenwriters and continuity workers (a.k.a. “script girls”), but little else—besides, obviously, the women on-screen.

    Understanding how filmmaking became masculinized is particularly important with regard to Hollywood, because those who create American movies wield immense cultural power. Once women were excluded from that power in the 1920s, they did not reappear in significant numbers until the 1970s.

    Mahar notes that Guy-Blaché had been “regularly singled out between 1910 and 1913 as one of the guiding lights of the industry.” Hollywood, however, was not interested in Madame Blaché’s light. Mahar also writes, “women needed male partners to gain access to all the necessary segments of the industry.” She notes that Guy-Blaché had experienced this while running Solax with her husband—despite being in a position of leadership, she was not welcome at distributor’s meetings, “because, as her husband alleged, her presence would embarrass the men.

    Alice Guy-Blaché split up with her husband in 1920 and returned to France in 1922. She never made another movie.

    #historicisation #cinéma #femmes

  • Il est temps pour moi de faire une #recension sur #appropriation_culturelle et #Palestine, qui recouvre des sujets aussi larges que : #Houmous #Hummus #rrroumous #Chakchouka #falafel #couscous #Shawarma #zaatar #Nourriture #Cuisine #Danse #dabke #vêtements #langage #arabe #Art #Cinéma #Photos #Littérature #Poésie #Photographie #Documentaire ...

    Le Rrrizbollah aime le rrroumous
    @nidal, Loubnan ya Loubnan, le 10 octobre 2008
    https://seenthis.net/messages/97763

    Israel’s cuisine not always kosher but travelling well
    Stephen Cauchi, The Age, le 22 mai 2011
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    Make Hummus Not War
    Trevor Graham, 2012
    https://seenthis.net/messages/718124

    NYC Dabke Dancers respond to ZviDance "Israeli Dabke"
    Dabke Stomp, Youtube, le 3 août 2013
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JM9-2Vmq524

    La Chakchouka, nouveau plat tendance (PHOTOS)
    Rebecca Chaouch, HuffPost Maghreb, le 15 avril 2014
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    Exploring Israel’s ‘ethnic’ cuisine
    Amy Klein, JTA, le 28 janvier 2015
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    International Hummus Day : Israeli Entrepreneur’s Middle Eastern Food Celebration Is Still Political For Some
    Lora Moftah, IB Times, le 13 mai 2015
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    Israel’s obsession with hummus is about more than stealing Palestine’s food
    Ben White, The National, le 23 mai 2015
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    Palestine : étude d’un vol historique et culturel
    Roger Sheety, Middle East Eye, le 15 juillet 2015
    https://seenthis.net/messages/646413

    La « guerre du houmous »
    Akram Belkaïd, Le Monde Diplomatique, septembre 2015
    https://seenthis.net/messages/718124

    L’appropriation culturelle : y voir plus clair
    LAETITIA KOMBO, Le Journal En Couleur, le 31 août 2016
    https://seenthis.net/messages/527510

    Hummus restaurant
    The Angry Arab News Service, le 5 novembre 2016
    https://seenthis.net/messages/539732

    Le Houmous israélien est un vol et non une appropriation
    Steven Salaita, Al Araby, 4 September 2017
    https://seenthis.net/messages/632441

    Looted and Hidden – Palestinian Archives in Israel (46 minutes)
    Rona Sela, 2017
    https://seenthis.net/messages/702565
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tBP-63unME


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVTlLsXQ5mk

    Avec Cyril Lignac, Israël fait découvrir son patrimoine et sa gastronomie
    Myriam Abergel, Le Quotidien du Tourisme, le 27 janvier 2018
    http://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    Why does Virgin find “Palestinian couscous” offensive ?
    Gawan Mac Greigair, The Electronic Intifada, le 10 février 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/668039

    Maghreb : une labellisation du couscous moins anodine qu’il n’y paraît
    Le Point, le 13 février 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/764021

    Medieval Arabic recipes and the history of hummus
    Anny Gaul, Recipes, le 27 mars 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/744327

    Que font de vieilles photos et de vieux films de Palestiniens dans les archives de l’armée israélienne ?
    Ofer Aderet, Haaretz, le 2 juillet 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/612498

    En Israël, une exposition montre des œuvres arabes sans le consentement des artistes
    Mustafa Abu Sneineh, Middle East Eye, le 17 juillet 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/708368

    Yalla
    https://seenthis.net/messages/716429

    Houmous, cuisine et diplomatie
    Zazie Tavitian, France Inter, le 21 août 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/718124

    Pourquoi un éditeur israélien a-t-il publié sans agrément un livre traduit d’essais en arabe ?
    Hakim Bishara, Hyperallergic, le 13 septembre 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/723466

    La nouvelle cuisine israélienne fait un carton à Paris
    Alice Boslo, Colette Monsat, Hugo de Saint-Phalle, Le Figaro, le 26 septembre 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/725555

    Cuisine, art et littérature : comment Israël vole la culture arabe
    Nada Elia, Middle East Eye, le 3 octobre 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/726570

    Pins Daddy - Israel Costume
    https://seenthis.net/messages/726570

    Shawarma, the Iconic Israeli Street Food, Is Slowly Making a Comeback in Tel Aviv
    Eran Laor, Haaretz, le 8 janvier 2019
    https://seenthis.net/messages/493046

    What is Za’atar, the Israeli Spice You Will Want to Sprinkle on Everything
    Shannon Sarna, My Jewish Learning, le 7 mars 2019
    https://seenthis.net/messages/767162

    #Vol #appropriation_culinaire #racisme #colonialisme #Invisibilisation #Histoire #Falsification #Mythologie #Musique #Musique_et_Politique #Boycott_Culturel #BDS

    ========================================

    En parallèle, un peu de pub pour la vraie cuisine palestinienne ou moyen-orientale :

    Rudolf el-Kareh - Le Mezzé libanais : l’art de la table festive
    https://seenthis.net/messages/41187

    Marlène Matar - Ma’idat Marlene min Halab
    https://seenthis.net/messages/537468

    La cuisine palestinienne, c’est plus que ce qu’on a dans l’assiette
    Laila El-Haddad, Electronic Intifada, le 15 Juin 2017
    https://seenthis.net/messages/612651

    Palestine : la cuisine de Jerusalem et de la diaspora
    Alain Kruger, France Culture, le 25 février 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/671981

    La Palestine, ce n’est pas seulement de la géographie, c’est notre façon à nous de faire la cuisine, de manger, de bavarder
    Shira Rubin, Eater, le 9 novembre 2018
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737305

    Une écrivaine décrit la cuisine palestinienne et le monde qui l’entoure
    Mayukh Sen, The New-York Times, le 4 février 2019
    https://seenthis.net/messages/760255

    La Troika Libanaise
    https://www.facebook.com/LaTroikaLibanaise

    Les Ptits Plats Palestiniens de Rania
    https://lesptitsplatspalestiniensderania.wordpress.com

    Une Palestinienne à Paris
    https://unepalestinienneaparis.wordpress.com

    Hind Tahboub - Bandora
    https://www.bandoracuisine.com/bandora-cuisine

    Askini
    Karim Haidar, 195 rur Saint Maur, Paris 10eme
    https://askiniparis.business.site

    #Livres_de_recettes #Restaurants #Traiteurs #Cheffes

  • Informatique, astronomie ou chimie : toutes ces inventions de femmes attribuées à des hommes - Politique - Numerama
    https://www.numerama.com/politique/469570-informatique-astronomie-ou-chimie-toutes-ces-inventions-de-femmes-a

    Le Wi-Fi, la fission nucléaire ou le pulsar : quel est le point commun entre ces inventions ? Elles ont toutes été créées par des inventrices, éclipsées dans l’ombre de leurs confrères masculins. Nous rappelons leur histoire ce 8 mars 2019.

    Où sont les femmes dans les technologies et les sciences ? Dans l’ombre de leurs homologues masculins, pour nombre d’entre elles. À l’occasion de la journée internationale des droits des femmes, le 8 mars 2019, nous avons décidé de revenir sur le parcours d’inventrices éclipsées par l’Histoire, dont les exploits ont été notamment attribués à des hommes.

    On parle d’effet Matilda pour désigner la manière dont la contribution de nombreuses femmes scientifiques a été minimisée, voir attribuée à des confrères masculins.

    Son manuscrit en atteste encore aujourd’hui : Ada Lovelace, née en 1815 et décédée à 37 ans, a réalisé le premier programme informatique. Entre 1842 et 1843, la comtesse traduit en anglais un article du mathématicien Federico Luigi, qui décrit la machine analytique de Babbage. Sur les conseils de ce dernier, elle va enrichir cette traduction avec ses propres notes, dont le volume est plus imposant que le texte de départ.

    Dans la note G, elle présente un algorithme particulièrement détaillé. Ce travail est considéré comme le premier programme informatique du monde, rédigé dans un langage exécutable par une machine. Charles Babbage, qui a consacré sa vie à la construction de cette fameuse machine analytique, a bien bénéficié du travail sur l’algorithme mené par Ada Lovelace.
    Ada Lovelace. // Source : Wikimedia/CC/Science Museum Group (photo recadrée)
    Hedy Lamarr et le Wi-Fi

    On ne doit pas seulement à Hedy Lamarr, actrice autrichienne naturalisée américaine, une trentaine de films. L’inventrice, née en 1914 et décédée en 2000, a aussi joué un autre rôle important dans l’histoire de nos télécommunications. Le brevet qu’elle a déposé en 1941 (enregistré l’année suivante) en atteste encore : Hedy Lamarr avait inventé un « système secret de communication » pour des engins radio-guidés, comme des torpilles. La découverte, à l’origine du GPS et du Wi-Fi, était le fruit d’une collaboration avec George Antheil, un pianiste américain.

    Le brevet ainsi déposé permettait à l’Armée des États-Unis de l’utiliser librement. La technologie n’a pourtant pas été mobilisée avant 1962, lors de la crise des missiles de Cuba. La « technique Lamarr » a valu à l’actrice un prix en de l’Electronic Frontier Foundation… en 1997.
    Hedy Lamarr en 1944. // Source : Wikimedia/CC/MGM (photo recadrée)
    Alice Ball et le traitement contre la lèpre

    Pendant 90 ans, l’université d’Hawaï n’a pas reconnu son travail. Pourtant, Alice Ball a contribué au développement d’un traitement efficace contre la lèpre au cours du 20e siècle. Cette chimiste, née en 1892 et morte en 1916 à l’âge seulement de 24 ans, est devenue la première afro-américaine diplômée de cet établissement. Plus tard, elle y est devenue la première femme à enseigner la chimie.

    Alice Ball s’est penchée sur une huile naturelle produite par les arbres de l’espèce « Chaulmoogra », réputée pour soigner la lèpre. En isolant des composants de l’huile, elle est parvenue à conserver ses propriétés thérapeutiques tout en la rendant injectable dans le cops humain. Décédée avant d’avoir eu le temps de publier ses travaux, Alice Ball est tombée dans l’oubli tandis qu’Arthur L. Dean, le président de l’université d’Hawaï, s’est attribué son travail.
    Alice Ball (1915). // Source : Wikimedia/CC/University of Hawaii System
    Grace Hopper et le premier compilateur

    En 1951, Grace Hopper a conçu le premier compilateur, c’est-à-dire un programme capable de traduire un code source (écrit dans un langage de programmation) en code objet (comme le langage machine). Née en 1906 et décédée en 1992, cette informaticienne américaine a fait partie de la marine américaine où elle s’est hissée au grade d’officière générale.

    Pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, elle a travaillé sur le Harvard Mark I, le premier grand calculateur numérique construit aux États-Unis. Le mathématicien John von Neumann est présenté comme celui qui a initié l’un des premiers programmes exécutés par la machine. Grace Hopper faisait pourtant partie de l’équipe des premiers programmateurs du Mark I.
    Grace Hopper (1984). // Source : Wikimedia/CC/James S. Davis (photo recadrée)
    Esther Lederberg et la génétique bactérienne

    Cette spécialiste de microbiologie était une pionnière de la génétique microbienne, une discipline croisant la microbiologie (l’étude des micro-organismes) et le génie génétique (l’ajout et la suppression de l’ADN dans un organisme). La génétique microbienne consiste à étudier les gènes des micro-organismes.

    Esther Lederberg est née en 1922 et décédée en 2006. Elle a découvert ce qu’on appelle le « phage lambda », un virus qui infecte notamment la bactérie E.coli. Le phage lambda est très étudié en biologie et il est utilisé pour permettre le clonage de l’ADN. Esther Lederberg l’a identifié en 1950. Elle collaborait régulièrement avec son mari Joshua Ledeberg : c’est lui qui a obtenu le prix Nobel de médecine en 1958, récompensant ces travaux sur la manière dont les bactéries échangent des gènes sans se reproduire.
    Esther Lederberg. // Source : Wikimedia/CC/Esther M. Zimmer Lederberg
    Jocelyn Bell et le pulsar

    En 1974, le prix Nobel de physique est remis à l’astronome britannique Antony Hewish. Pourtant, ce n’est pas lui qui a découvert le pulsar, un objet astronomique qui pourrait être une étoile à neutrons tournant sur elle-même. Antony Hewish était le directeur de thèse de Jocelyn Bell : il s’est contenté de construire le télescope nécessaire à ces observations. C’est bien l’astrophysicienne, née en 1943, qui a identifié la première le pulsar.

    En 2018, elle a finalement reçu le Prix de physique fondamentale. Elle a choisi d’utiliser les 3 millions de dollars qui lui ont été offerts pour encourager les étudiants sous-représentés dans le domaine de la physique.
    Jocelyn Bell (2015). // Source : Wikimedia/CC/Conor McCabe Photography (photo recadrée)
    Chien-Shiung Wu et la physique nucléaire

    Chien-Shiung Wu, née en 1912 et décédée en 1997, était une spécialiste de la physique nucléaire. En 1956, elle démontre par l’expérience la « non conservation de la parité dans les interactions faibles », au cours de ses travaux sur les interactions électromagnétiques. C’est une contribution importante à la physique des particules.

    Deux physiciens théoriciens chinois, Tsung-Dao Lee et Chen Ning Yang, avaient mené des travaux théoriques sur cette question. Tous deux ont reçu le prix Nobel de physique en 1957. Il faut attendre 1978 pour que la découverte expérimentale de Chien-Shiung Wu soit récompensée par l’obtention du prix Wolf de physique.
    Chien-Shiung Wu en 1963. // Source : Wikimedia/CC/Smithsonian Institution (photo recadrée)
    Rosalind Franklin et la structure de l’ADN

    La physico-chimiste Rosalind Franklin, née en 1920 et décédée en 1958, a joué un rôle important dans la découverte de la structure de l’ADN, notamment sa structure à double hélice. Grâce à la diffraction des rayons X, elle prend des clichés d’ADN qui permettent de faire cette découverte. Elle présente ses résultats en 1951 au King’s College.

    Un certain James Dewey Watson assiste à cette présentation. Ce généticien et biochimiste informe le biologiste Francis Crick de la découverte de Rosalind Franklin. En utilisant les photos de la physico-chimiste, ils publient ce qui semble être leur découverte de la structure de l’ADN. En 1953, ils publient ces travaux dans la revue Nature. Ils obtiennent un prix Nobel en 1962, sans mentionner le travail pionnier de Rosalind Franklin.
    Rosalind Franklin. // Source : Flickr/CC/retusj (photo recadrée)
    Lise Meitner et la fission nucléaire

    Nommée trois fois pour recevoir un prix Nobel, cette physicienne autrichienne n’a jamais reçu la précieuse distinction. C’est pourtant une collaboration entre Elise Meitner et Otto Frisch, son neveu, qui permis d’apporter la première explication théorique de la fusion, en 1939.

    La scientifique, née en 1878 et décédée en 1968, n’a jamais reçu du comité remettant la distinction la même estime que celle que lui portaient ses collègues. En 1944, le prix Nobel de chimie fut donné à Otto Hahn, chimiste considéré à tort comme le découvreur de la fission nucléaire.
    Lise Meitner (1906). // Source : Wikimedia/CC (photo recadrée)
    Katherine Johnson et la navigation astronomique

    L’action déterminante de Katherine Johnson dans les programmes aéronautiques et spatiaux de la Nasa a fait l’objet d’un film, Les Figures de l’ombre. Née en 1918, cette physicienne et mathématicienne a calculé de nombreuses trajectoires et travaillé sur les fenêtres de lancement de nombreuses missions. Véritable « calculatrice humaine », elle a vérifié à la main des trajectoires de la mission Mercury-Atlas 6, qui a envoyé un homme en orbite autour de la Terre.

    En 1969, elle calcule des trajectoires essentielles lors de la mission Apollo 11. C’est à cette occasion que des humains — des hommes — se sont posés pour la première fois sur la Lune. En 2015, elle est récompensée et reçoit la médaille présidentielle de la Liberté.
    Katherine Johnson en 1966. // Source : Wikimedia/CC/Nasa (photo recadrée)

    #femmes #historicisation #effet_Matilda #sexisme #discrimination #invisibilisation #science

  • – Dre Ingeborg Kraus : « La prostitution est incompatible avec l’égalité hommes-femmes » |
    https://ressourcesprostitution.wordpress.com/2015/12/23/dre-ingeborg-kraus-la-prostitution-est-incompatibl

    Voici ce qu’en dit Ellen Templin, gérante d’un studio de Domina à Berlin : « Il n’y a pas de prostitution volontaire. Une femme qui se prostitue a des raisons pour le faire. Ce sont en premier lieu des raisons psychiques. Ici dans mon studio, toutes les femmes ont été abusées durant leur enfance. Toutes ! L’âme de ces femmes qui se prostituent a déjà été détruite. » (Alice Schwarzer HG, Prostitution, ein Deutscher Skandal, 2013, p. 171-178)

    Rosen Hircher, qui a commencé à se prostituer à l’âge de 31 ans, dit : « Cela me semblait tout à fait normal ce que je faisais. Je savais exactement où j’allais et cela me semblait normal d’y rester. Je ne vais jamais oublier jamais la phrase qu’une prostituée m’a dite dès le premier jour : ‘Alors tu as déjà fait cela toute ta vie.’ En effet, j’ai été abusée sexuellement par mon oncle lorsque j’étais enfant. Mon père était alcoolique et extrêmement agressif. Depuis mon enfance, j’avais l’habitude de subir la violence des hommes. » (Rosen Hircher, Une prostituée témoigne, 2009)

    Effectivement, les multiples études faites sur ce sujet démontrent une corrélation étroite entre le passage à la prostitution et la violence subie durant l’enfance :

    L’étude de Melissa Farley de 2003 démontre que 55 à 90% des femmes prostituées ont été victimes d’agressions sexuelles pendant leur enfance, et 59% de maltraitance. (Farley, « Prostitution and Trafficking in Nine Countries : An Update on Violence and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder », 2003)
    Une étude menée en 2004 par le ministère allemand de la Famille, des Aînés, des Femmes et de la Jeunesse a conclu que 87% de ces femmes avaient subi des violences physiques avant l’âge de 16 ans. (Bundesministerium für Familie, Senioren, Frauen und Jugend : Gender Datenreport, 2004)
    Une étude de Sibylle Zumbeck menée en Allemagne en 2001 a établi que 65% d’entre elles avaient été maltraitées physiquement et 50%, victimes de violences sexuelles. (Zumbeck, Sibylle : « Die Prävalenz traumatischer Erfahrungen, Posttraumatische Belastungsstörungen und Dissoziation bei Prostituierten », Hambourg, 2001)

    Le système prostitutionnel utilise ces traumatismes d’enfance dans son propre intérêt et pour son profit. Une telle enfance entraîne en effet trois mécanismes psychiques :

    Täterintrojekte : L’identification avec l’agresseur : c’est l’estime de soi brisée, le sentiment que l’on n’a pas de valeur et que l’on ne mérite pas mieux.
    Wiederholungszwang : La compulsion de répétition, soit le fait de revivre volontairement des situations traumatiques similaires avec l’illusion de contrôler le jeu à chaque fois.
    La dissociation : J’aimerais développer ce point-là.

  • The Awesome Duo: 6 Cases of How #fintech Benefits From AI
    https://hackernoon.com/the-awesome-duo-6-cases-of-how-fintech-benefits-from-ai-bb408242a1c5?sou

    Photo by Alice Pasqual on UnsplashIf you’ve ever used the Internet to transfer money between accounts or apply for a bank loan or trade, you’re probably aware of how deeply rooted fintech has become in our day-to-day lives. In 2018, about 61% of Americans used digital banking services and this number is set to exceed 65% in 2022. One of the newly-emerged traits of the 4th Industrial Era, fintech is an application of fast-evolving digital technologies to improve and facilitate financial services.Companies are rapidly adopting fintech to keep abreast of the competition. The investments into this industry are also impressive: in 2018, it attracted over $16 billion investment in the UK alone, according to KMPG.On the other hand, entire countries are rapidly adopting AI technologies to compete (...)

    #artificial-intelligence #chatbots #machine-learning #deep-learning

  • Karin Clercq
    http://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/panikabaret/karin-clercq

    « La boite de Pandore », quatrième disque de Karin Clercq, arrive 8 ans après le précédent.

    « J’attendais d’avoir quelque chose à dire », confie l’artiste en souriant. Ce vendredi après-midi, elle m’accorde du temps dans sa loge, quelques heures avant d’assurer la première partie de Dominique A, en formule simplifiée avec Alice Vande Voorde.

    Quelque chose à dire est un euphémisme. Sur ce CD, toujours au plus près du féminin, les arrangements sont recherchés et le propos est nuancé. Tout comme leur auteur et interprète, pétrie de la culture textuelle puisée à sa formation de comédienne. Une poésie qui se prolonge dans la musique, comme un fluide vital permettant de choisir ses propres rôles, et son propre propos.

    Un disque à écouter plusieurs fois, à éplucher en plusieurs écoutes, tant il (...)

    http://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/panikabaret/karin-clercq_06246__1.mp3

  • Mercredi ! L’école démocratique // 13.02.2019
    http://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/mercredi-/mercredi-lecole-democratique-13-02-2019-

    Au programme ce mercredi !

    L’école n’est pas obligatoire ! Gayane, accompagnée de Souen, sa maman, nous parle de l’école démocratique, bien différente de l’école classique. Comme promis dans l’émission, voici différents liens qui alimentent la réflexion de Souen sur l’éducation libre :

    Livres :

    Christiane Rochefort, Les enfants d’abord

    Jean-Pierre Lepri, « Éducation » authentique : Pourquoi ?

    Melissa Plavis, Apprendre par soi-même, avec les autres, dans le monde

    Catherine Baker, Pourquoi faudrait-il punir ?

    Alice Miller, C’est pour ton bien

    John Holt, Les apprentissages autonomes et Apprendre sans l’école

    Peter Grey, Libres pour apprendre

    Yves Bonnardel, La domination adulte

    Sites web :

    Association Leda : www.lesenfantsdabord.org

    Forum de familles pratiquants (...)

    #éducation #jeune_public #école_démocratique #éducation,jeune_public,école_démocratique
    http://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/mercredi-/mercredi-lecole-democratique-13-02-2019-_06223__1.mp3

  • Depuis quelques jours, le collectif Désarmons-les se fait régulièrement agresser. Voici son communiqué :
    MISE AU POINT, sur les menaces que nous recevons.
    https://desarmons.net/index.php/2019/02/04/mise-au-point-sur-les-menaces-que-nous-recevons

    Depuis quelques jours, nous nous faisons régulièrement agresser.

    Notre collectif existe depuis 2012. Depuis 2014, il s’organise quotidiennement auprès de personnes mutilées par la police, y compris déjà en 1999. Certain-es de ces blessé-es graves l’ont été dans les quartiers populaires, d’autres en marge de matchs de foot, tous n’ont pas les mêmes convictions politiques. Nous n’avons pas attendu le mouvement des gilets jaunes.

    Oui, il y avait des blessé-es grave avant les gilets jaunes. Nous en comptions au moins 53 avant le mois de novembre 2018. On en parlait peu. Notre combat était peu visible. Nous n’avons jamais cherché la reconnaissance, notre priorité étant d’aider les blessé-es dans leur combat, en apportant un soutien juridique, psychologique, politique, selon des principes clairs et en accord avec une analyse radicale du système actuel.

    Depuis quelques semaines, des enjeux de pouvoir ont pris leur place dans un combat que nous menons depuis des années avec bienveillance. Des gens se présentent en icônes d’un mouvement qui avait pourtant affirmé qu’il ne voulait pas de porte-paroles, écrasant au passage les pieds des autres. Certaines croient également pertinent de dire qu’ils sont « neutres » et que leur action est « apolitique », tout en laissant agir des populistes de la droite dure et en condamnant les militants antifascistes qui combattent l’hydre fasciste avec conviction (autant préciser qu’on ne la combat pas avec des fleurs).

    Nous ne sommes pas d’accord avec cette neutralité, car pour nous les violences d’État, dont font partie les violences racistes et les violences policières, sont un problème politique. Depuis des années, nous essayons de faire admettre au plus grand nombre que ce ne sont pas des « dérapages », des « bavures », mais des violences systémiques, institutionnelles, assumées par le pouvoir.

    Aujourd’hui, nous faisons l’objet d’insultes diverses et de menaces.

    Des gens nous disent que nous mentons et que nous « ne maîtrisons pas notre sujet », sans avoir lu un seul des articles de notre site internet. Nous mettons au défi qui que ce soit de trouver un mensonge sur notre site ou une information qui soit fausse.

    Depuis quelques jours, nous faisons également l’objet d’attaques verbales et de menaces de personnes qui ne supportent pas la critique politique et ne sont pas capables d’autocritique, exigeant de nous qu’on supprime des publications sous prétexte qu’elles leur déplaisent, confondent « critique » et « appel à la haine ».

    Parmi elles, des personnes qui se disent « medics » et ont inventé un clivage entre « street medics » et « médics », comme si ces catégories existaient avant que ces mêmes personnes ne débarquent et négocient leur intervention avec les autorités, niant et piétinant du même coup des décennies de pratiques militantes, réfléchies et autonomes (qu’elles semblent mépriser). « street medic » n’est pas une identité, mais une pratique, au même titre que les « legal team » (soutien juridique), les « trauma team » (soutien psychologique), le « black bloc » (tactique collective permettant d’agir et se défendre en bénéficiant de l’anonymat), les « zones d’autonomie temporaire » ou les « cantines mobiles ». Cette pratique a une histoire et une philosophie, qui remonte au mouvement américain des droits civiques. Elle n’a jamais été neutre, ni apolitique.

    Déjà en 2012, nous avions des liens constants avec des groupes de « street medics ». Sur certaines manifestations, nous avons nous-mêmes été street medics.

    Faire « street medic », c’est être capable d’humilité, refuser la professionnalisation, dans le but de protéger les manifestant-es de la répression et d’organiser le soin en manifestation autour de principes de lutte clairs, qui n’acceptent aucune négociation avec les flics pour quémander le droit d’agir. Oui, être medic en manif, ce n’est pas offrir un substitut à la sécurité civile ou aux pompiers : il s’agit d’un combat politique, pas de l’encadrement légal d’un événement festif.

    Toutes celles et ceux qui voient dans ces pratiques une manière égocentrique d’exister, d’avoir de la reconnaissance, de se faire passer pour des héros, n’ont pas compris l’esprit de la chose.

    On n’a pas à nous faire des pressions parce que nous dénonçons les compromis avec la police. Nous avons nos valeurs et principes, nous les défendrons. Que ceux à qui ça ne plaît pas passent leur chemin au lieu de nous empêcher d’agir et de nous faire perdre notre temps.

    Laissez nous respirer !

    (je l’ai copié en entier parce que je veux être sûre qu’il soit lu, tant ses bases politiques / éthiques sont importantes !)

    #apolitisme #streetmedics #street_medic #trauma_team #legal_team #black_bloc #radicalité #oppression_systémique

    • ajout sur leur facebook : Une liste non exhaustive des avocat-es que Désarmons-les ! conseille, pour des raisons liées à leur compréhension des enjeux de la défense collective, leur fiabilité, leur accessibilité et leur engagement personnel dans la défense de personnes touchées par la répression ou les violences policières :

      Lucie SIMON (Paris / IDF) : 06 33 50 30 64
      Raphael KEMPF (Paris / IDF) : 06 28 06 37 93
      Ainoha PASCUAL (Paris / IDF) : 07 68 97 17 68
      Eduardo MARIOTTI (Paris / IDF) : 07 68 40 72 76
      Alice BECKER (Paris / IDF) : 06 23 76 19 82
      Samuel DELALANDE (Paris / IDF) : 06 01 95 93 59
      Matteo BONAGLIA (Paris / IDF) : 01 40 64 00 25
      Emilie BONVARLET (Paris / IDF) : 06 23 53 33 08
      Xavier SAUVIGNET (Paris / IDF) : 01 56 79 00 68
      Arié ALIMI (Paris / IDF) : 06 32 37 88 52
      Chloé CHALOT (Rouen) : 06 98 83 29 52
      Claire DUJARDIN (Toulouse / SUD OUEST) : 06 74 53 68 95
      Romain FOUCARD (Bordeaux / SUD OUEST) : 07 62 07 73 56
      Muriel RUEF (Lille / NORD) : 06 84 16 63 02
      Florian REGLEY (Lille / NORD) : 07 83 46 30 82
      Maxime GOUACHE (Nantes / OUEST) : 06 59 89 37 57
      Pierre HURIET (Nantes / OUEST) : 06 15 82 31 62
      Stephane VALLEE (Nantes / OUEST) : 06 09 93 94 61
      Florence ALLIGIER (Lyon / EST) : 06 07 27 41 77
      Olivier FORRAY (Lyon / EST) : 04 78 39 28 28
      Christelle MERCIER (Saint Etienne / EST) : 06 28 67 53 52
      Jean Louis BORIE (Clermont Ferrand / CENTRE) : 04 73 36 37 35

    • On remarquera que certain.e.s leaders blessé.e.s ne l’ont pas été dans un groupe de manifestant.e.s agité.e.s mais étaient seuls, dans un coin calme, presque en retrait.

      Exemple, Louis Boyard :

      à l’écart et sans gilet jaune, il prend la décision de s’éloigner « sans courir ».

      https://www.liberation.fr/checknews/2019/02/04/le-president-de-l-union-nationale-lyceenne-louis-boyard-a-t-il-ete-victim

      Questions :
      Qui donne l’ordre aux policiers de blesser volontairement les opposant.e.s qui dérangent ?
      Qui fournit les noms des opposants.e.s à « neutraliser » ?

      – Ministère de l’intérieur ?
      – Attaché au cabinet du président de la république ?
      – Direction de la police ?

  • #elles_tournent : Clap 11ème
    http://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/les-promesses-de-l-aube/elles-tournent-clap-11eme

    Ce mercredi nous recevrons Nèle Pigeon et Letizia Finizio, coordinatrices du #festival Elles Tournent, ainsi que Stéfanne Prijot, réalisatrice du documentaire "La vie d’une petite culotte et de celles qui la fabriquent".

    Tournez, mesdames ! » disait en 1914 Alice Guy Blaché, pionnière du cinéma. Un siècle après, les #femmes réalisatrices continuent d’enrichir notre vision du monde. Elles résistent, inventent, cassent les stéréotypes. Et leurs films, pleins d’humour, de fureur ou d’impertinence, nous font découvrir d’autres réalités, d’autres vérités.

    Elles Tournent promeut et valorise le travail des femmes dans le monde artistique et culturel en général et tout particulièrement le secteur audiovisuel et multimédia. Dans ce but, l’association développe des activités telles que la création et l’animation (...)

    #film #femmes,festival,film,elles_tournent
    http://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/les-promesses-de-l-aube/elles-tournent-clap-11eme_06027__1.mp3

  • #12
    http://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/les-courriers-du-coeur-du-cul/-12-5

    Au programme :

    Lexiculqueer et micro-trottoir sur la thématique

    Capsules de textes issus d’un atelier d’écriture autour du fantasme entre Leïla et Lili (Moutarde, Mrs White, Une autre toi)

    Chronique de Max d’UTSOPI sur les fantasmes de ses clients

    Capsule de Cosmikass issue de discussions des membres du Porn Project autour de la question du fantasme du viol

    Série sur le Self Help épisode 2 : Triplex et Alice Practice sont parties à la recherche de spéculums....

    Playlist : Sexy Sushi / Sex Appeal, Boy harsher / Spell, Christine and the Queens / IT

    http://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/les-courriers-du-coeur-du-cul/-12-5_05975__1.mp3

  • La sonde New Horizons poursuit sa visite des confins du Système solaire
    https://www.lemonde.fr/sciences/article/2018/12/31/la-sonde-new-horizons-poursuit-sa-visite-des-confins-du-systeme-solaire_5403


    Ultima Thulé, dans la ceinture de Kuiper.
    AP/NASA

    Cependant, la mission de #New_Horizons n’était pas terminée. Voilà que la sonde, désormais à 6,5 milliards de kilomètres de nous, resurgit pour le premier jour de 2019 où elle a survolé un petit astre glacé que la #NASA a baptisé #Ultima_Thulé, en référence au nom de Thulé que le navigateur massaliote Pythéas avait attribué, au IVe siècle av. J.-C., à la contrée la plus septentrionale de l’Europe.
    Le nom officiel de cet objet céleste d’une trentaine de kilomètres de diamètre est 2014 MU69. Il s’agit de l’un des milliers de corps qui occupent ce que les spécialistes nomment la ceinture de Kuiper, du nom de l’astronome néerlando-américain Gerard Kuiper (1905-1973) qui, le premier, suggéra l’existence, au-delà de l’orbite de Neptune, d’une zone peuplée d’astres froids et modestes en taille.
    […]
    Mardi 1er janvier, à 6 h 33 (heure de Paris), l’émissaire robotisé de la NASA, filant dans l’espace à près de 51 000 km/h, passera à 3 500 km d’Ultima Thulé, dont on sait déjà qu’il s’agit d’un objet de forme allongée, cette information ayant été obtenue en le regardant occulter une étoile.
    […]
    Dans une déclaration publiée par le Guardian, Alan Stern, le responsable de la mission, explique qu’il faudra « environ vingt mois pour récupérer les données » enregistrées lors du survol du 1er janvier. Et il pense déjà à la suite. La sonde a encore du carburant, ses instruments sont opérationnels, sa batterie nucléaire peut lui fournir de l’électricité pendant des années. Mais aucune nouvelle cible n’est en vue… Cette fois-ci, New Horizons pourrait bien poursuivre sa course vers nulle part.