person:antonio canova

  • Today In Gay History THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1 « MasterAdrian’s Weblog
    http://masteradrian.com/2012/11/02/today-in-gay-history-thursday-november-1

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    Gay Wisdom for Daily Living…

    from White Crane Institute
    Exploring Gay Wisdom
    & Culture for over 20 Years!

    www.gaywisdom.org

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    Today In Gay History
    THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2012
    Self-portrait by Canova in 1792
    1757 - on this date the Italian sculptor ANTONIO CANOVA was born (d. 1822) When Canova was thirteen, Senator Falier of Venice became his patron and financed his training in sculpting. Falier’s son became Canova’s intimate friend for life. Among his works are some beautiful male nudes statues of Theseus and the Minotaur,Hercules, Palamedes. and a pretty stunning sculpture of a “Greek God” that I’m sure is a favorite at the Vatican.

    1877 - Roger Quilter (d. 1953), was an English composer.
    Born in Hove, Sussex, Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, who was a noted art collector. Quilter was educated at Eton College, later becoming a fellow-student of Percy Grainger, Cyril Scott and Henry Balfour Gardiner at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt. He belonged to the Frankfurt Group, a circle of composers who studied at the Hoch Conservatory in the late 1890s. His reputation in England rests largely on his songs and on his light music for orchestra, such as his Children’s Overture, with its interwoven nursery rhyme tunes, and a suite of music for the play “Where the Rainbow Ends“. He is noted as an influence on several English composers, including Peter Warlock.
    Roger Quilter’s output of songs, more than one hundred in total, added to the canon of English art song that is still sung today.

    Among the most popular are “Love’s Philosophy”, “Come Away Death,” “Weep You No More,” “By the Sea,” and his setting of “O Mistress Mine.” Quilter’s setting of verses from the Tennyson poem “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal” is one of his earliest songs but is nonetheless characteristic of the later, mature style.

    In 1936, Quilter’s opera Julia was presented at Covent Garden by the British Music Drama Opera Company under the direction of Vladimir Rosing.

    Quilter enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with the tenor Gervase Elwes until the latter’s death in 1921. As a homosexual, he found it difficult to cope with some of the pressures which he felt were imposed upon him, and eventually deteriorated into mental illness after the loss of his nephew during the Second World War.
    He died at his home in St John’s Wood, London, a few months after celebrations to mark his 75th birthday.

    1972 - on this date “That Certain Summer,” an ABC made-for-TV movie starring Hal Holbrook and Martin Sheen as lovers was broadcast nationwide. In the film a teenager must deal with his divorced father’s homosexuality. The made-for-tv movie was written by the Emmy-winning writing team of Richard Levinson and William Link (Columbo, Mannix). Hal Holbrook stars as a middle-aged divorced man, whose son played by Scott Jacoby cannot fathom the reason for his parents’ split. During a summer visit (to San Francisco natch), Jacoby meets his father’s much-younger “best friend,” played by Martin Sheen. Holbrook hedges, but finds he can no longer hold back the truth from his son: Sheen is Holbrook’s male lover. Originally telecast on November 1, 1972, That Certain Summer was the first TV film to take a mature and non-remonstrative approach to the subject of homosexuality.

    Thanks to YouTube you can see the episode:
    Part 1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqScy-7Kt6U


    Part 2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eubpq8ikfG8

    Part 3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfAGeesH5Jg

    The other parts are linked alongside these on Youtube.

    A low rectangular public monument, with a bust of Wilde’s face built into one raised end, at the other at seat that one straddles to experience being in conversation with Wilde.
    1998 - on this date a statue of Oscar Wilde unveiled in central London.

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  • Today In Gay History THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1 « MasterAdrian’s Weblog
    http://masteradrian.com/2012/11/02/today-in-gay-history-thursday-november-1

    |8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|

    Gay Wisdom for Daily Living…

    from White Crane Institute
    Exploring Gay Wisdom
    & Culture for over 20 Years!

    www.gaywisdom.org

    |8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|

    Today In Gay History
    THURSDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2012
    Self-portrait by Canova in 1792
    1757 - on this date the Italian sculptor ANTONIO CANOVA was born (d. 1822) When Canova was thirteen, Senator Falier of Venice became his patron and financed his training in sculpting. Falier’s son became Canova’s intimate friend for life. Among his works are some beautiful male nudes statues of Theseus and the Minotaur,Hercules, Palamedes. and a pretty stunning sculpture of a “Greek God” that I’m sure is a favorite at the Vatican.

    1877 - Roger Quilter (d. 1953), was an English composer.
    Born in Hove, Sussex, Quilter was a younger son of Sir William Quilter, 1st Baronet, who was a noted art collector. Quilter was educated at Eton College, later becoming a fellow-student of Percy Grainger, Cyril Scott and Henry Balfour Gardiner at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt. He belonged to the Frankfurt Group, a circle of composers who studied at the Hoch Conservatory in the late 1890s. His reputation in England rests largely on his songs and on his light music for orchestra, such as his Children’s Overture, with its interwoven nursery rhyme tunes, and a suite of music for the play “Where the Rainbow Ends“. He is noted as an influence on several English composers, including Peter Warlock.
    Roger Quilter’s output of songs, more than one hundred in total, added to the canon of English art song that is still sung today.

    Among the most popular are “Love’s Philosophy”, “Come Away Death,” “Weep You No More,” “By the Sea,” and his setting of “O Mistress Mine.” Quilter’s setting of verses from the Tennyson poem “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal” is one of his earliest songs but is nonetheless characteristic of the later, mature style.

    In 1936, Quilter’s opera Julia was presented at Covent Garden by the British Music Drama Opera Company under the direction of Vladimir Rosing.

    Quilter enjoyed a fruitful collaboration with the tenor Gervase Elwes until the latter’s death in 1921. As a homosexual, he found it difficult to cope with some of the pressures which he felt were imposed upon him, and eventually deteriorated into mental illness after the loss of his nephew during the Second World War.
    He died at his home in St John’s Wood, London, a few months after celebrations to mark his 75th birthday.

    1972 - on this date “That Certain Summer,” an ABC made-for-TV movie starring Hal Holbrook and Martin Sheen as lovers was broadcast nationwide. In the film a teenager must deal with his divorced father’s homosexuality. The made-for-tv movie was written by the Emmy-winning writing team of Richard Levinson and William Link (Columbo, Mannix). Hal Holbrook stars as a middle-aged divorced man, whose son played by Scott Jacoby cannot fathom the reason for his parents’ split. During a summer visit (to San Francisco natch), Jacoby meets his father’s much-younger “best friend,” played by Martin Sheen. Holbrook hedges, but finds he can no longer hold back the truth from his son: Sheen is Holbrook’s male lover. Originally telecast on November 1, 1972, That Certain Summer was the first TV film to take a mature and non-remonstrative approach to the subject of homosexuality.

    Thanks to YouTube you can see the episode:
    Part 1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqScy-7Kt6U


    Part 2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eubpq8ikfG8

    Part 3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfAGeesH5Jg

    The other parts are linked alongside these on Youtube.

    A low rectangular public monument, with a bust of Wilde’s face built into one raised end, at the other at seat that one straddles to experience being in conversation with Wilde.
    1998 - on this date a statue of Oscar Wilde unveiled in central London.

    |8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|O|8|