person:delia derbyshire

  • Doctor Who theme’s co-creator honoured with posthumous PhD | Music | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/nov/20/delia-derbyshire-doctor-who-theme-co-creator-posthumous-phd

    The under-appreciated electronic music pioneer behind the Doctor Who theme is to be honoured posthumously with a doctorate from her hometown university as the programme gears up for the debut of its first female lead.

    Largely ignored in life and barred from working in studios because she was a woman, Delia Derbyshire, will be awarded an honorary PhD from Coventry University on Monday.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rH0hHZA0U5c

    Career of Delia Derbyshire, an under-appreciated electronic music pioneer, recognised by hometown university



  • https://twitter.com/ubuweb/status/815998840436363264

    RIP #John_Berger (1927-2017). Watch his classic “Ways of Seeing” (1972) in its entirety

    http://www.ubu.com/film/berger_seeing.html

    Ways of Seeing was a #BBC television series consisting of visual essays that raise questions about hidden ideologies in visual images. The series gave rise to a later book of the same name written by John Berger.

    It would be easy to say that Ways of Seeing is hopelessly dated — made in 1972, the films come across as a puritan-groovy mix of Monty Python, the Open University and the Look Around You spoofs. And yet what’s so remarkable about this series is that it seems more apposite, subversive and thought-provoking than ever. The Britain we glimpse in the films, already alienated by spooky BBC Radiophonic Workshop music by Delia Derbyshire, is alienated even more by the passing of time. Alienated usefully, in the Brechtian sense; we look at a capitalist society which is like, and unlike, our own.

    #film


  • Women In Electronic Music
    http://ubu.com/sound/leidecker.html

    Women In Electronic Music 1938-1982, broadcast April 1, 2010
    http://ubusound.memoryoftheworld.org/leidecker_jon/Leidecker-Jon_Women-In-Electronic-Music-Part-1.mp3


    Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden

    Clara Rockmore – Vocalise (Rachmaninoff) (recorded 1987)
    Johanna M. Beyer – Music of the Spheres (1938, recorded 1977)
    Bebe and Louis Barron – Forbidden Planet / Main Titles, Overture (1956)
    Daphne Oram – Bird of Parallax (1962-1972)
    Delia Derbyshire – Dr. Who (1963)
    Delia Derbyshire - Blue Veils and Golden Sands (1967)
    Delia Derbyshire - Ziwzih Ziwzih OO-OO-OO (1966)
    Else Marie Pade – Faust and Mephisto (1962)
    Mirelle Chamass-Kyrou – Etude 1 (1960)
    Pauline Oliveros – Mnemonics III (1965)
    Ruth White – Evening Harmony (1969)
    Ruth White - Sun (1969)
    Micheline Colulombe Saint-Marcoux – Arksalalartoq (1970-71)
    Pril Smiley – Koloysa (1970)
    Alice Shields – Study for Voice and Tape (1968)
    Daria Semegen – Spectra (Electronic Composition No. 2) (1979)
    Annette Peacock – I’m The One (1972)
    Wendy Carlos – Timesteps (1972)
    Ruth Anderson – DUMP (1970)
    Priscilla McLean – Night Images (1973)
    Laurie Spiegel – Sediment (1972)
    Eliane Radigue – Adnos III (1980)
    Maggi Payne – Spirals (1977)
    Maryanne Amacher – Living Sound Patent Pending: Music Gallery, Toronto (1982)

    Women In Electronic Music Part 2, broadcast February 8, 2013
    http://ubusound.memoryoftheworld.org/leidecker_jon/Leidecker-Jon_Women-In-Electronic-Music-Part-2.mp3


    Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden

    Monique Rollin — Etude Vocale (1952)
    Jean Eichelberger Ivey — Pinball (1967)
    Gruppo NPS - Module Four (1967)
    Jocy De Oliviera - Estória II (1967)
    Tera de Marez Oyens - Safed (1967)
    Franca Sacchi - Arpa Eolia (1970)
    Sofia Gubaidulina - Viente-non-Vivente (1970)
    Beatriz Ferreyra - l’Orvietan (1970)
    Suzanne Ciani - Paris 1971 (1971)
    Françoise Barrière - Cordes-Ci, Cordes-Ça (1972)
    Jacqueline Nova - Creation de la Tierra (1972)
    Teresa Rampazzi - Musica Endoscopica (1972)
    Lily Greenham - Traffic (1975)
    Annea Lockwood - World Rhythms (1975-97)
    Megan Roberts - I Could Sit Here All Day (1976)
    Laurie Anderson - Is Anybody Home? (1977)
    Laetitia de Compiegne Sonami - Migration (1978)
    Constance Demby - The Dawning (1980)
    Miquette Giraudy (w/Steve Hillage) - Garden of Paradise (1979)
    Ann McMillan - Syrinx (1979)
    Doris Hays - Celebration of No (from Beyond Violence) (1982)
    Brenda Hutchinson - Fashion Show (1983)
    Barbara Golden / Melody Sumner Carnahan - My Pleasure (1997)
    Catherine Christer Hennix - The Electric Harpsichord (1976)

    Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden
    Two episodes of Barbara Golden’s Crack’O’Dawn, KPFA FM, 94.1,

    #playlist #femmes #musique


  • Infiné news - Podcast 024 - Arandel
    http://www.infine-music.com/news/374/podcast-024-arandel
    https://soundcloud.com/infine-music/podcast-024-arandel-bog-bog-the-electronic-ladyland-mixtape/s-vQhzm

    To receive a new mixtape by Arandel in the office is in itself an event.

    Before the release of In D, Arandel´s collaboration with InFiné starts with an intial mixtape : Carols - The Minuit Mixtape. This activity is part of the identity of the project just like their record releases – the podcasts of Arandel are driven by a main thematic and a strong narrative. They follow a strict méthodologie, but leaves place to accidental effects or ghostly voice intrusions. They tell you a story and a piece of history.

    Sadly most of them had fleeting lives online. Looking for them has become truly rewarding treasure hunt.

    For Bog Bog - the Electronic Ladyland, we decided to pair up with the French website The Drone, who directed the interview ( vers l´interview en francais) and host the sounds and the words in english on our timeless website.

    (Special Thanks to Oliver Lamm from The Drone who conducted Arandel´s interview)

    Bog Bog, The Electronic Ladyland Mixtape

    1. Glynis Jones : Magic Bird Song (1976)

    2. Doris Norton : Norton Rythm Soft (1986)

    3. Colette Magny : « Avec » Poème (1966)

    4. Daphne Oram : Just For You (Excerpt 1)

    5. Laurie Spiegel : Clockworks (1974)

    6. Pauline Oliveiros : Bog Bog (1966)

    7. Megan Roberts - I Could Sit Here All Day (1977)

    8. Suzanne Ciani : Paris 1971

    9. Laurie Anderson : Tape Bow Trio (Say Yes) (1981)

    10. Glynis Jones : Schlum Rooli (1975)

    11. Ruth White : Mists And Rains (1969)

    12. Wendy Carlos : Spring (1972)

    13. Ann McMillan : Syrinx (1978)

    14. Delia Derbyshire : Restless Relays (1969)

    15. Maggi Payne : Flights Of Fancy (1986)

    16. Else Marie Pade : Syv Cirkler (1958)

    17. Daniela Casa : Ricerca Della Materia (1975)

    18. The Space Lady : Domine, Libra Nos (1990)

    19. Johanna Beyer : Music Of The Spheres [1938]

    20. Maddalena Fagandini : Interval Signal (1960)

    21. Eliane Radigue : Chryptus I (1970)

    22. Ruth White : Owls (1969)

    23. Ursula Bogner : Speichen (1979)

    24. Beatriz Ferreyra - Demeures Aquatiques (1967)

    25. Doris Norton : War Mania Analysis (1983)

    26. Tera De Marez Oyens : Safed (1967)

    27. Daphne Oram : Rhythmic Variation II (1962)

    28. Mireille Chamass-Kyrou : Etude 1 (1960)

    29. Laurie Spiegel : Drums (1983)

    30. Teresa Rampazzi : Stomaco 2 (1972)

    31. Teresa Rampazzi : Esofago 1 (1972)

    32. Suzanne Ciani : Fourth Voice: Sound Of Wetness (1970)

    33. Ursula Bogner : Expansion (1979)

    34. Alice Shields : Sacrifice (1993)

    35. Megan Roberts and Raymond Ghirardo : ATVO II (1987)

    36. Laurie Anderson : Drums (1981)

    37. Doris Hays : Somersault Beat (1971)

    38. Lily Greenham : Tillid (1973)

    39. Ruth Anderson : Points (1973-74)

    40. Pril Smiley : Kolyosa (1970)

    41. Catherine Christer Hennix : The Electric Harpsichord (1976)

    42. Joan La Barbara : Solo for Voice 45 (from Songbooks) (1977)

    43. Slava Tsukerman, Brenda Hutchinson & Clive Smith : Night Club 1 (1983)

    44. Monique Rollin : Motet (Etude Vocale) (1952)

    45. Sofia Gubaidulina : Vivente – Non Vivente (1970)

    46. Ruth White : Spleen (1967)

    47. Doris Hays : Scared Trip (1971)

    48. Daphne Oram : Pulse Persephone (Alternate Parts For Mixing)

    49. Maggi Payne : Gamelan (1984)

    50. Laurie Spiegel : The Unquestioned Answer (1980)

    51. Ursula Bogner : Homöostat (1985)

    52. Wendy Carlos : Summer (1972)

    53. Suzanne Ciani : Princess With Orange Feet

    54. Pauline Oliveiros : Poem Of Change (1993)

    55. Suzanne Ciani : Thirteenth Voice: And All Dreams Are Not For Sale (1970)

    Mix exclu : dans Bog Bog - The Electronic Ladyland Mixtape, Arandel condense 5 décennies d’invention électronique féminine | The Drone
    http://www.the-drone.com/magazine/arandel-bog-bog-the-electronic-ladyland-mixtape

    « 45 minutes, 55 morceaux, 50 femmes artistes et la musique électronique en seule et unique ligne de mire : voilà, dans les grandes lignes, le programme que s’est fixé Arandel pour cette nouvelle mixtape thématique logiquement titrée The Electronic Ladyland Mixtape.

    Résultats d’années d’explorations dans les bas-fonds d’Internet et les bacs early electronic music des conventions de disque, ce mix maniaque et généreux engage dans une conversation magique tout ce que les années 50, 60, 70, 80 et 90 ont compté de pionnières de l’oscillateur et de la reverb à ressort. Toutefois, ne parlez pas à l’âme derrière Arandel d’un acte militant ou de discrimination positive : le genre choisi ici comme un fil rouge n’est qu’un point d’entrée vers le continent de la musique électronique de recherche, continent qui reste trop peu écouté en dépit des documentaires, des hommages sans cesse rendus par les jeunes générations techno et des anthologies qu’on édite à tour de bras.

    Personne, surtout pas Arandel, n’oserait réfuter l’existence d’un lien magique entre la femme et le son électronique - le flux fabuleux formé par ces 55 fragments collés ensemble en est la meilleure manifestation - mais l’idée, ici, est de poser des questions plutôt que d’y répondre. On a tout de même conversé avec Arandel pour savoir ce pouvait bien se tramer derrière son amour pour l’art de Pauline Oliveros, Delia Derbyshire ou Beatriz Ferreyra. »

    Comment est venue l’idée d’une mixtape entièrement composée de musique électronique composée par des femmes ?

    C’est au gré des écoutes et des pérégrinations que l’idée s’est précisée, à la suite de notre série de mixtapes sur Noël, la mode dans les 60’s, les musiques d’illustration. On s’est rendu compte qu’il existait vraiment une internationale inconsciente de la musique électronique féminine à travers les âges. Et on s’est demandé s’il y avait une intuition secrète qui avait pu les rassembler autour d’un champ de recherche commun, s’il n’y avait pas eu des désirs partagées qui s’étaient réalisés de manières différentes dans des pays différents, avec des outils différents. L’idée était de voir ce qui pourrait bien se passer si on les rassemblait dans une même pièce fictive pendant 40 ou 45 minutes, si on construisait une chorale de toutes leurs productions. Il est apparu surtout que la thématique féminine était un bon biais pour faire découvrir beaucoup de morceaux de musique pas forcément très connus en dehors du cercle des spécialistes. On veut vraiment que les gens puissent s’emparer de la musique qu’on entend sur cette mixtape. Ces musiques ont beau venir du passé, elles n’y appartiennent pas, dans le sens où beaucoup des idées qu’on y trouve sont encore très fertiles pour la musique du présent, voire celle du futur.

    Il existe un lien presque magique entre les femmes et la musique électronique, qui remonte aux années 50 et 60. Est-ce que vous vous êtes posé la question des raisons sociales, artistiques, voire magiques derrière ce lien ?

    Jean-Yves Leloup a écrit tout un article sur le sujet qu’on peut lire sur son blog. Mais au-delà des pistes avancées, on n’a jamais trouvé d’explications vraiment convaincantes, ni de citations des compositrices elles-mêmes vraiment éclairantes sur leur parcours, sur la manière dont elles ont dû batailler ou pas pour accéder au studio, sur leur sensibilité au son électronique. Quand tu regardes le nombre de femmes qui travaillaient au BBC Radiophonic Workshop, la présence féminine reste pourtant notable, voire remarquable. Et on ne sait pas pourquoi. On pose la question avec ce mix, mais on serait bien incapable d’y répondre...

    @intempestive @mad_meg #playlist #femmes #experimental #musique


  • Hear Seven Hours of Women Making Electronic Music (1938- 2014) | Open Culture
    http://www.openculture.com/2015/06/hear-seven-hours-of-women-making-electronic-music-1938-2014.html

    Two years ago, in a post on the pioneering composer of the original Doctor Who theme, we wrote that “the early era of experimental electronic music belonged to Delia Derbyshire.” Derbyshire—who almost gave Paul McCartney a version of “Yesterday” with an electronic backing in place of strings—helped invent the early electronic music of the sixties through her work with the Radiophonic Workshop, the sound effects laboratory of the BBC.

    She went on to form one of the most influential, if largely obscure, electronic acts of the decade, White Noise. And yet, calling the early eras of the electronic music hers is an exaggeration. Of course her many collaborators deserve mention, as well as musicians like Bruce Haack, Pierre Henry, Kraftwerk, Brian Eno, and so many others. But what gets almost completely left out of many histories of electronic music, as with so many other histories, is the prominent role so many women besides Derbyshire played in the development of the sounds we now hear all around us all the time.

    In recognition of this fact, musician, DJ, and “escaped housewife/schoolteacher” Barbara Golden devoted two episodes of her KPFA radio program “Crack o’ Dawn” to women in electronic music, once in 2010 and again in 2013. She shares each broadcast with co-host Jon Leidecker (“Wobbly”), and in each segment, the two banter in casual radio show style, offering history and context for each musician and composer. Recently highlighted on Ubu’s Twitter stream, the first show, “Women in Electronic Music 1938-1982 Part 1” (above) gives Derbyshire her due, with three tracks from her, including the Doctor Who theme. It also includes music from twenty one other composers, beginning with Clara Rockmore, a refiner and popularizer of the theremin, that weird instrument heard in the Doctor Who intro, designed to simulate a high, tremulous human voice. Also featured is Wendy Carlos’s “Timesteps,” an original piece from her A Clockwork Orange score. (You’ll remember her enthralling synthesizer recreations of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony from the film).

    • Women In Electronic Music 1938-1982, broadcast April 1, 2010
      Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden

      http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/leidecker_jon/Leidecker-Jon_Women-In-Electronic-Music-Part-1.mp3

      Clara Rockmore – Vocalise (Rachmaninoff) (recorded 1987)
      Johanna M. Beyer – Music of the Spheres (1938, recorded 1977)
      Bebe and Louis Barron – Forbidden Planet / Main Titles, Overture (1956)
      Daphne Oram – Bird of Parallax (1962-1972)
      Delia Derbyshire – Dr. Who (1963)
      Delia Derbyshire - Blue Veils and Golden Sands (1967)
      Delia Derbyshire - Ziwzih Ziwzih OO-OO-OO (1966)
      Else Marie Pade – Faust and Mephisto (1962)
      Mirelle Chamass-Kyrou – Etude 1 (1960)
      Pauline Oliveros – Mnemonics III (1965)
      Ruth White – Evening Harmony (1969)
      Ruth White - Sun (1969)
      Micheline Colulombe Saint-Marcoux – Arksalalartoq (1970-71)
      Pril Smiley – Koloysa (1970)
      Alice Shields – Study for Voice and Tape (1968)
      Daria Semegen – Spectra (Electronic Composition No. 2) (1979)
      Annette Peacock – I’m The One (1972)
      Wendy Carlos – Timesteps (1972)
      Ruth Anderson – DUMP (1970)
      Priscilla McLean – Night Images (1973)
      Laurie Spiegel – Sediment (1972)
      Eliane Radigue – Adnos III (1980)
      Maggi Payne – Spirals (1977)
      Maryanne Amacher – Living Sound Patent Pending: Music Gallery, Toronto (1982)

      Women In Electronic Music Part 2, broadcast February 8, 2013
      Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden

      http://ubumexico.centro.org.mx/sound/leidecker_jon/Leidecker-Jon_Women-In-Electronic-Music-Part-2.mp3

      Monique Rollin — Etude Vocale (1952)
      Jean Eichelberger Ivey — Pinball (1967)
      Gruppo NPS - Module Four (1967)
      Jocy De Oliviera - Estória II (1967)
      Tera de Marez Oyens - Safed (1967)
      Franca Sacchi - Arpa Eolia (1970)
      Sofia Gubaidulina - Viente-non-Vivente (1970)
      Beatriz Ferreyra - l’Orvietan (1970)
      Suzanne Ciani - Paris 1971 (1971)
      Françoise Barrière - Cordes-Ci, Cordes-Ça (1972)
      Jacqueline Nova - Creation de la Tierra (1972)
      Teresa Rampazzi - Musica Endoscopica (1972)
      Lily Greenham - Traffic (1975)
      Annea Lockwood - World Rhythms (1975-97)
      Megan Roberts - I Could Sit Here All Day (1976)
      Laurie Anderson - Is Anybody Home? (1977)
      Laetitia de Compiegne Sonami - Migration (1978)
      Constance Demby - The Dawning (1980)
      Miquette Giraudy (w/Steve Hillage) - Garden of Paradise (1979)
      Ann McMillan - Syrinx (1979)
      Doris Hays - Celebration of No (from Beyond Violence) (1982)
      Brenda Hutchinson - Fashion Show (1983)
      Barbara Golden / Melody Sumner Carnahan - My Pleasure (1997)
      Catherine Christer Hennix - The Electric Harpsichord (1976)

      Jon Leidecker and Barbara Golden
      Two episodes of Barbara Golden’s Crack’O’Dawn, KPFA FM, 94.1, Berkeley, California


  • « Love Without Sound » par #White_Noise sur l’album An electric storm (1969) : tu l’as certainement entendu de multiples fois, je le mets pour alimenter un peu l’#histoire de la #création_radiophonique ici

    http://vimeo.com/22708328

    Experimental electronic psychedelic band featuring Synthi work from Dave Vorhaus and tape manipulation from #BBC Radiophonic Workshop musicians #Delia_Derbyshire and #Brian_Hodgson.

    A propos de White Noise
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Noise_%28band%29

    #musique #audio #radio


  • A la découverte des pionnières électroniques | Jean-Yves Leloup « Global Techno (Relevé sur le Net...)
    http://globaltechno.wordpress.com/2009/12/21/a-la-decouverte-des-pionnieres-electroniques

    Ignorées, méconnues ou parfois même méprisées, de nombreuses femmes ont participé depuis le début du 20e siècle à la grande aventure de la musique électronique. A l’heure où l’on redécouvre les œuvres des Britanniques Delia Derbyshire et Daphne Oram, ainsi qu’une grande partie de l’électronique primitive des années 50 à 70, voici l’histoire de quelques artistes injustement oubliées. Source : Relevé sur le Net...


  • A la découverte des pionnières électroniques | Jean-Yves Leloup « Global Techno
    http://globaltechno.wordpress.com/2009/12/21/a-la-decouverte-des-pionnieres-electroniques

    Ignorées, méconnues ou parfois même méprisées, de nombreuses #femmes ont participé depuis le début du 20e siècle à la grande aventure de la #musique #électronique. A l’heure où l’on redécouvre les œuvres des Britanniques Delia Derbyshire et Daphne Oram, ainsi qu’une grande partie de l’électronique primitive des années 50 à 70, voici l’histoire de quelques artistes injustement oubliées.

    via @baroug