person:elon musk

  • To Become a #space Faring Civilization, We need to Move Beyond Rockets, including #spacex and Blue…
    https://hackernoon.com/to-become-a-space-faring-civilization-we-need-to-move-beyond-rockets-inc

    To Become a Space Faring Civilization, We need to Move Beyond Rockets, including SpaceX and Blue Origin“It’s not rocket science. Or at least It shouldn’t be!”Recently, the idea of humanity becoming a space faring civilization has gotten lots of attention, particularly from billionaires like Elon Musk, founder of SpaceX, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos’ with his Blue Origin, and Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic. Along with this increased interest has been the mega-trend of the privatization of space, showing that our space-based future may not rely on governments at all but private companies.The short term goals that are most talked about are launching smaller satellites more cheaply, space tourism, ferrying to space stations, missions to and around the moon, and eventually, settling on Mars.Since (...)

    #space-exploration #nasa #science-fiction


  • AI in #medicine : A Beginner’s Guide
    https://hackernoon.com/ai-in-medicine-a-beginners-guide-a3b34b1dd5d7?source=rss----3a8144eabfe3

    Introduction“My AI will seek to collaborate with people for the greater good, rather than usurp the human role and supplant them” — from the Hippocratic oath on artificial intelligence by Oren Etzioni [1]Artificial Intelligence (AI) is currently one of the most hotly debated topics in technology with seemingly every business leader and computer scientist voicing an extreme opinion on the topic. Elon Musk, Bill Gates, and Stephen Hawking are all pessimists who have posited that AI poses an existential threat to humanity. Musk even publicly states that, “AI is far more dangerous than nukes” [2]. Famed futurist and technologist Ray Kurzweil, who studied under the inventor of the AI field, has a more optimistic outlook, “My view is not that AI is going to displace us. It’s going to enhance us. It (...)

    #healthcare #artificial-intelligence #machine-learning


  • Working Through the Pain at TeslaReveal
    https://www.revealnews.org/article/inside-teslas-factory-a-medical-clinic-designed-to-ignore-injured-worker

    Inside Tesla’s factory, a medical clinic designed to ignore injured workers
    By Will Evans / November 5, 2018

    When a worker gets smashed by a car part on Tesla’s factory floor, medical staff are forbidden from calling 911 without permission.

    The electric carmaker’s contract doctors rarely grant it, instead often insisting that seriously injured workers – including one who severed the top of a finger – be sent to the emergency room in a Lyft.

    Injured employees have been systematically sent back to the production line to work through their pain with no modifications, according to former clinic employees, Tesla factory workers and medical records. Some could barely walk.

    The on-site medical clinic serving some 10,000 employees at Tesla Inc.’s California assembly plant has failed to properly care for seriously hurt workers, an investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting has found.

    The clinic’s practices are unsafe and unethical, five former clinic employees said.

    But denying medical care and work restrictions to injured workers is good for one thing: making real injuries disappear.

    “The goal of the clinic was to keep as many patients off of the books as possible,” said Anna Watson, a physician assistant who worked at Tesla’s medical clinic for three weeks in August.

    Watson has nearly 20 years of experience as a medical professional, examining patients, diagnosing ailments and prescribing medications. She’s treated patients at a petroleum refinery, a steel plant, emergency rooms and a trauma center. But she said she’s never seen anything like what’s happening at Tesla.


    Anna Watson was a physician assistant at the medical clinic inside Tesla’s electric car factory in Fremont, Calif. She was fired in August after raising concerns. Credit: Paul Kuroda for Reveal

    “The way they were implementing it was very out of control,” said Watson, who was fired in August after she raised her concerns. “Every company that I’ve worked at is motivated to keep things not recordable. But I’ve never seen anybody do it at the expense of treating the patient.”

    Workers with chest pain, breathing problems or extreme headaches have been dismissed as having issues unrelated to their work, without being fully evaluated or having workplace exposures considered, former employees said. The clinic has turned away temp workers who got hurt on Tesla’s assembly lines, leaving them without on-site care. And medical assistants, who are supposed to have on-site supervision, say they were left on their own at night, unprepared to deal with a stream of night-shift injuries.

    If a work injury requires certain medical equipment – such as stitches or hard braces – then it has to be counted in legally mandated logs. But some employees who needed stitches for a cut instead were given butterfly bandages, said Watson and another former clinic employee. At one point, hard braces were removed from the clinic so they wouldn’t be used, according to Watson and a former medical assistant.

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing.

    An investigation by Reveal in April showed that Tesla prioritized style and speed over safety, undercounted injuries and ignored the concerns of its own safety professionals. CEO Elon Musk’s distaste for the color yellow and beeping forklifts eroded factory safety, former safety team members said.

    The new revelations about the on-site clinic show that even as the company forcefully pushed back against Reveal’s reporting, behind the scenes, it doubled down on its efforts to hide serious injuries from the government and public.

    In June, Tesla hired a new company, Access Omnicare, to run its factory health center after the company promised Tesla it could help reduce the number of recordable injuries and emergency room visits, according to records.

    A former high-level Access Omnicare employee said Tesla pressured the clinic’s owner, who then made his staff dismiss injuries as minor or not related to work.

    “It was bullying and pressuring to do things people didn’t believe were correct,” said the former employee, whom Reveal granted anonymity because of the worker’s fear of being blackballed in the industry.

    Dr. Basil Besh, the Fremont, California, hand surgeon who owns Access Omnicare, said the clinic drives down Tesla’s injury count with more accurate diagnoses, not because of pressure from Tesla. Injured workers, he said, don’t always understand what’s best for them.

    “We treat the Tesla employees just the same way we treat our professional athletes,” he said. “If Steph Curry twists his knee on a Thursday night game, that guy’s in the MRI scanner on Friday morning.”

    Yet at one point, Watson said a Tesla lawyer and a company safety official told her and other clinic staff to stop prescribing exercises to injured workers so they wouldn’t have to count the injuries. Recommending stretches to treat an injured back or range-of-motion exercises for an injured shoulder was no longer allowed, she said.

    The next day, she wrote her friend a text message in outrage: “I had to meet with lawyers yesterday to literally learn how not to take care of people.”

    Tesla declined interview requests for this story and said it had no comment in response to detailed questions. But after Reveal pressed the company for answers, Tesla officials took time on their October earnings call to enthusiastically praise the clinic.

    “I’m really super happy with the care they’re giving, and I think the employees are as well,” said Laurie Shelby, Tesla’s vice president for environment, health and safety.

    Musk complained about “unfair accusations” that Tesla undercounts its injuries and promised “first-class health care available right on the spot when people need it.”

    Welcome to the new Tesla clinic
    Back in June, on stage at Tesla’s shareholder meeting, Musk announced a declining injury rate for his electric car factory.

    “This is a super important thing to me because we obviously owe a great debt to the people who are building the car. I really care about this issue,” Musk said to applause.

    It wasn’t long after that that Stephon Nelson joined the company. Working the overnight shift Aug. 13, Nelson got a sudden introduction to Tesla’s new model of care.

    He was bent over putting caulk inside the trunk of a Model X. Something slipped and the hatchback crunched down on his back. Nelson froze up in agonizing pain. He had deep red bruises across his back.

    “I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t sit down. I couldn’t even stand up straight,” said Nelson, who’s 30 and used to play semiprofessional football.

    He asked for an ambulance, but the on-call Tesla doctor said no – he could take a Lyft to the hospital instead.

    “I just felt heartbroken,” Nelson said. “What they was telling us in the orientation, that Tesla is a company that cares about their employees’ safety, it just seemed like it was just a whole reversal.”

    No one was allowed to call 911 without a doctor’s permission, said Watson and two medical assistants who used to work at the clinic under Besh’s direction. Anyone who did so would get in trouble, they said.

    “There was a strong push not to send anybody in an ambulance,” Watson said.


    “I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t sit down. I couldn’t even stand up straight,” Stephon Nelson says of what happened when he injured his back while working on a Tesla Model X. Credit: Paul Kuroda for Reveal

    It’s unclear why there was such a focus on avoiding 911, though some former employees thought it was to save money. Also, 911 logs become public records. And first responders, unlike drivers for ride-hailing services, are required to report severe work injuries to California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health, the state’s workplace safety agency. Besh said ambulance use is based on “clinical judgment only.”

    The system was especially problematic on the night shift, as the factory continued churning out vehicles around the clock, but there were no doctors or nurses around, former employees said.

    Two medical assistants who used to work there said they often were left on their own – one on duty at a time – and struggled to tend to all the injured. Both had to do things such as take vital signs, which medical assistants aren’t allowed to do without on-site supervision, according to the Medical Board of California. Reveal granted them anonymity because they fear speaking out will hurt their careers. Besh said no one works alone.

    For a severely injured worker lying on the assembly line, it could take 10 to 15 minutes for a medical assistant to arrive and then contact on-call doctors, a medical assistant said. Getting a code for Tesla’s Lyft account was a drawn-out process that could take hours, she said.

    The medical assistants said they were alarmed and uncomfortable with the doctors’ orders to use Lyft because they worried some patients could pass out or need help en route. One worker directed to take a Lyft was light-headed and dizzy. Another had his fingers badly broken, contorted and mangled.

    Besh, who often serves as the on-call doctor, said anyone could call 911 in a life-threatening situation. He said he recommends using Lyft for workers who don’t need advanced life support.

    Besh gave the example of a worker who had the top of his finger cut off. He needed to go to the hospital, but not by ambulance, Besh said. He likened the situation to people at home who get a ride to the hospital instead of calling an ambulance.

    “We right-size the care,” he said. “Obviously, it’s all about the appropriate care given for the appropriate situation.”

    It’s a doctor’s judgment call to use Lyft, but many on the factory floor found it inhumane. In some cases, including the worker with an amputated fingertip, factory supervisors refused to put their employees in a Lyft and instead drove them to the hospital, according to a medical assistant.

    Injured workers sent back to work

    In Nelson’s case, he called his girlfriend to take him to the hospital. But he said his supervisor told him that he had to show up for work the next day or Nelson would get in trouble.

    Nelson needed the job, so he forced himself to come in. He shuffled slowly, hunched over in pain, to his department, he said. When it was clear he couldn’t do the job, he was sent to the Tesla health center, a small clinic on an upper level of the factory.

    Workers too injured to do their regular jobs are supposed to receive job restrictions and a modified assignment that won’t make the injury worse.

    But the health center wouldn’t give Nelson any accommodations. He could go home that day, but he had to report to work full duty the following day, he said.

    By law, work-related injuries must be recorded on injury logs if they require medical treatment beyond first aid, days away from work or job restrictions. The clinic’s practices were designed to avoid those triggers, said Anna Watson, the physician assistant.

    There was a clinic rule, for example, that injured employees could not be given work restrictions, Watson said. No matter what type of injuries workers came in with – burns, lacerations, strains and sprains – clinic staff were under instructions to send them back to work full duty, she said. Watson said she even had to send one back to work with what appeared to be a broken ankle.

    Medical clinics are supposed to treat injuries and keep workers safe, she said, “and none of that’s happening. So at the most acute time of their injury, they don’t have any support, really.”

    A medical assistant who formerly worked at the clinic remembered an employee who was sent back to work even though he couldn’t stand on one of his feet. Another employee passed out face down on the assembly line – then went back to work.

    “You always put back to full duty, no matter what,” said the medical assistant.

    Dr. Basil Besh said patients are given work restrictions when appropriate. He said those hurt at night get first aid and triage, followed by an accurate diagnosis from a physician the next day.

    “There’s always going to be somebody who says, ‘No, I shouldn’t be working,’ ” he said. “But if you look objectively at the totality of the medical examination, that’s not always the case.”

    Four days after Nelson’s injury, Watson herself sent him back to work with no restrictions, according to medical records he provided. Nelson said this happened repeatedly as he hobbled in pain.

    But Watson did what she could to help: She referred him to Access Omnicare’s main clinic, about 5 miles from the auto factory. It was allowed to give work restrictions, Watson said. But most workers aren’t sent there, and it can take a while to get an appointment.

    Eight days after his injury, the outside clinic diagnosed Nelson with a “crushing injury of back,” contusions and “intractable” pain. He finally was given work restrictions that said he shouldn’t be bending, squatting, kneeling, climbing stairs or lifting more than 10 pounds.

    Even after that, the health center at one point sent Nelson back to his department in a wheelchair, he said.

    “And I’m rocking back and forth, just ready to fall out of the wheelchair because I’m in so much pain,” he said.

    In September, Nelson got a warehouse job at another company. It was a pay cut, but he quit Tesla right away. “I feel like it’s really not safe at all,” he said.

    Besh said he couldn’t comment on a specific case without a signed release from the patient. But, he said, “a physician examined that patient and saw that there was not a safety issue.”

    Besh was named chairman of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Board of Councilors this year. A Tesla spokeswoman set up and monitored his interview with Reveal.

    There’s been a “culture shift” at the health center since Tesla hired him to take over, he said.

    “So culturally, there were folks in the past who were expecting that any time they come to the clinic, they would be taken off of work,” he said. “And when we told them, ‘No, we really want to do what’s best for you’ … it’s taking some time to get buy-in.”

    In the end, Tesla counted Nelson on its injury logs, which is how Reveal identified him. That’s another reason the system didn’t make sense to Watson: Some workers whose injuries were so serious that they eventually would have to be counted still were denied proper care when they needed it most, she said.

    Many more injured workers never were counted, she said. Tesla’s official injury logs, provided to Reveal by a former employee, show 48 injuries in August. Watson reviewed the list for the three weeks she was there and estimated that more than twice as many injuries should have been counted if Tesla had provided appropriate care and counted accurately.

    Other ways Tesla’s clinic avoids treating workers
    The clinic seemed geared toward sending workers away instead of treating them, Watson said. The culture of the clinic, she said, was to discount workers’ complaints and assume they were exaggerating.

    The clinic would look for reasons to dismiss injuries as not work-related, even when they seemed to be, former employees said.

    Watson recalled one worker who had passed out on the job and went to the hospital because of her exposure to fumes in the factory. Even though a work-related loss of consciousness is required to be counted, no such injury was recorded on Tesla’s injury logs.

    Temp workers hurt on the production line also were often rebuffed by the clinic, said former clinic employees. At one point, there was a blanket policy to turn away temps, they said.


    Tracy Lee wears a brace to help with a repetitive stress injury she developed while working at Tesla’s factory. She says the in-house health center sent her away without evaluating her because she wasn’t a permanent employee. Credit: Paul Kuroda for Reveal

    Tracy Lee developed a repetitive stress injury over the summer when a machine broke and she had to lift car parts by hand, she said. Lee said the health center sent her away without evaluating her because she wasn’t a permanent employee.

    “I really think that’s messed up,” said Lee, who later sought medical treatment on her own. “Don’t discriminate just because we’re temps. We’re working for you.”

    By law, Tesla is required to record injuries of temp workers who work under its supervision, no matter where they get treatment. But not all of them were. Lee said her Tesla supervisor knew about the injury. But Lee’s name doesn’t appear on Tesla’s injury logs.

    Besh pushed back on the claims of his former employees.

    He said the clinic didn’t treat some temp workers because Access Omnicare wasn’t a designated health care provider for their staffing agencies. About half of the agencies now are able to use the clinic, and the rest should be early next year, he said.

    Besh said a physician accurately and carefully determines whether an injury is work-related and the clinic is not set up to treat personal medical issues. He said the clinic is fully stocked.

    As for prescribing exercises, Besh said the clinic automatically was giving exercise recommendations to workers who were not injured and simply fixed the error.


    These sample Work Status Reports, posted in Tesla’s health center, show how clinic staff were instructed to handle different situations. The document on the left, labeled “Work Related,” is marked “First Aid Only” and “Return to full duty with no limitations or restrictions,” scenarios that would mean Tesla wouldn’t have to count the injury. Those were the only options, says Anna Watson, a physician assistant who used to work there. One document for contract employees such as temp workers (center) and another for non-occupational injuries (right) both say to refer the patients elsewhere. Credit: Obtained by Reveal

    Clinic source: Tesla pressured doctor
    Access Omnicare’s proposal for running Tesla’s health center states that Tesla’s priorities include reducing recordable injuries and emergency room visits, according to a copy obtained by Reveal.

    It says Access Omnicare’s model, with more accurate diagnoses, reduces “un-necessary use of Emergency Departments and prevents inadvertent over-reporting of OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) recordability.”

    Even before Access Omnicare took over the on-site health center in June, Tesla sent many injured workers to its main clinic as one of the automaker’s preferred providers.

    Tesla exercised an alarming amount of pressure on the clinic to alter how it treated patients in order to keep injury rates down, said the former high-level Access Omnicare employee.

    “There was a huge, huge push from Tesla to keep things nonrecordable,” said the former employee.

    A Tesla workers’ compensation official routinely would contact the clinic to intervene in individual cases, said the former employee. Tesla would take issue with diagnoses and treatment decisions, arguing that specific workers should be sent back to work full duty or have their injuries labeled as unrelated to work. The clinic gave Tesla what it wanted, the former employee said.

    For example, Bill Casillas’ diagnosis suddenly was changed by Access Omnicare after discussions with Tesla.

    In December, Casillas was working in Tesla’s seat factory. When he touched a forklift, he felt an electric shock jolt him back. Later that shift, it happened again. He said he felt disoriented and found he had urinated on himself.

    Casillas said he hasn’t been the same since. He struggles with pain, tingling and numbness. At 47, he’s unsteady, uses a cane and hasn’t been able to work, he said.

    A doctor at Access Omnicare diagnosed a work-related “injury due to electrical exposure” and gave him severe work restrictions and physical therapy, medical records show.

    Then, nearly two months after his injury, another Access Omnicare physician, Dr. Muhannad Hafi, stepped in and dismissed the injury.

    “I have spoken again with (the workers’ compensation official) at Tesla and he informed that the forklift did not have electric current running. With that said, in my medical opinion, the patient does not have an industrial injury attributed to an electrical current,” he wrote.

    Hafi, who’s no longer with Access Omnicare, didn’t respond to questions. Besh said he can’t discuss patient details.

    The co-worker who was in the forklift during the second shock, Paul Calderon, said he disagrees with the Tesla official but no one asked him. He backed up Casillas’ account and said Tesla “tried to really downplay what happened to him.”

    Hafi’s January report noted that Casillas said he was “miserable,” used a cane and had pain all over his body. But he discharged him back to work full duty, writing, “No further symptoms of concern.”

    A Tesla safety team manager informed Casillas last month that his injury was not counted because it was “determined to not be work-related.” Casillas is still a Tesla employee, but he’s off work because of his injury. His workers’ comp claim was denied based on Hafi’s report, but his lawyer, Sue Borg, is seeking an independent medical evaluation.

    Besh said Tesla does not pressure him to dismiss injuries.

    “What Tesla pressures us on is accurate documentation,” he said. “What they want is their OSHA log to be as accurate as possible, so what they’ll push back on is, ‘Doctor I need more clarity on this report.’ And we do that for them.”

    “They are not in the business of making clinical determinations at all,” he said. “We make those clinical determinations only based on what the patient needs.”

    State regulators not interested
    By late August, Watson, the physician assistant, reached her breaking point. She got into an argument with Besh, who fired her for not deferring to doctors.

    Afterward, she filed a complaint to Cal/OSHA, California’s workplace safety agency.

    “I just see the workers at Tesla as having absolutely no voice,” she said. “I do feel extra responsible to try to speak up for what’s going on there.”

    Watson thought Cal/OSHA would put an immediate stop to the practices she witnessed. But the agency wasn’t interested.

    Cal/OSHA sent her a letter saying it folded her complaint into the investigation it started in April after Reveal’s first story ran. The letter said it had investigated and cited Tesla for a recordkeeping violation.

    But Cal/OSHA already had closed that investigation two weeks before Watson’s complaint. The agency issued a fine of $400 for a single injury it said was not recorded within the required time period. Tesla appealed, calling it an administrative error.

    Reveal had documented many other cases of injuries that Tesla had failed to record. But the agency had only about six months from the date of an injury to fine a company. By the time Cal/OSHA concluded its four-month investigation, the statute of limitations had run out.

    After Reveal reported that the time limitation makes it difficult to hold employers accountable, state legislators passed a bill giving investigators six months from when Cal/OSHA first learns of the violation. It was signed by Gov. Jerry Brown, but it was too late for the Tesla investigation.

    A Cal/OSHA spokeswoman said the investigation found four other “injury recording violations that fell outside of the statute of limitations.” Even if those other violations had been included, the spokeswoman said Cal/OSHA would have had to combine them in a single $400 citation.

    Tesla, meanwhile, inaccurately cites Cal/OSHA’s investigation as vindication.

    “We do get these quite unfair accusations,” Musk said on his October earnings call. “One of them was that we were underreporting injuries. And it’s worth noting that OSHA completed their investigation and concluded that we had not been doing anything of the sort.”

    Watson called Cal/OSHA officials to insist they investigate her complaint. She told them that she had detailed knowledge of a system that undercounted injuries by failing to treat injured workers.

    But Cal/OSHA officials told her that it wasn’t the agency’s responsibility, she said. They suggested contacting another agency, such as the medical board or workers’ compensation regulators.

    As Watson kept pushing and Reveal began asking questions, a Cal/OSHA spokeswoman said her complaint now is being investigated.

    Watson has a new job at an urgent care clinic. She said she just wants someone to make sure that Tesla workers get the care they need.

    “You go to Tesla and you think it’s going to be this innovative, great, wonderful place to be, like this kind of futuristic company,” she said. “And I guess it’s just kind of disappointing that that’s our future, basically, where the worker still doesn’t matter.”

    #USA #Tesla #Arbeit #Krankheit


  • Military robots are getting smaller and more capable (https://www.e...
    https://diasp.eu/p/7664483

    Military robots are getting smaller and more capable

    Soon, they will travel in swarms Article word count: 1557

    HN Discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17898057 Posted by prostoalex (karma: 64719) Post stats: Points: 90 - Comments: 68 - 2018-09-02T18:45:51Z

    #HackerNews #and #are #capable #getting #military #more #robots #smaller

    Article content:

    ON NOVEMBER 12th a video called “Slaughterbots” was uploaded to YouTube. It is the brainchild of Stuart Russell, a professor of artificial intelligence at the University of California, Berkeley, and was paid for by the Future of Life Institute (FLI), a group of concerned scientists and technologists that includes Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Martin Rees, Britain’s Astronomer Royal. It is set in a near-future in which (...)


  • L’enfer vert s’étend au Palais Rameau – Contre la cyber-agriculture Hors-sol, Braderie 2018 - 31 Aout 2018 - hors-sol.herbesfolles

    http://hors-sol.herbesfolles.org/2018/08/31/lenfer-vert-setend-au-palais-rameau-contre-la-cyber-agricultu

    La Ville de Lille vient de céder le Palais Rameau à trois écoles d’ingénieur qui en feront un laboratoire d’agriculture automatisée et hors-sol. Alors que la Ville détruit les derniers espaces possibles de verdure, îlot Pépinière et friche Saint-Sauveur, elle recrée une nature artificielle, sous cloche, et pilotée par des capteurs. Cette artificialisation des terres et de l’agriculture avance d’un pas serein grâce l’appui des Verts qui voient là une réponse aux « enjeux écologiques du XXIe siècle ». Avec des amis pareils, la nature n’a plus besoin d’ennemis.


    Le calendrier se passe parfois de commentaire. Dans le même Conseil municipal, Martine Aubry rappelle son engagement dans la bétonnisation de l’îlot Pépinière, ancienne parcelle horticole, et cède le Palais Rameau, du nom d’un horticulteur lillois, à trois écoles d’ingénieur spécialisées dans l’« agriculture de précision ». Donc : Martine Aubry remplace des horticulteurs avec de la terre sur les mains par des agro-informaticiens du substrat chimique. Après que la mécanisation des champs ait saigné les rangs des paysans, l’automatisation supprime les derniers « travailleurs de la terre ».

    Une agriculture sans terre ni agriculteurs
    Les trois écoles d’ingénieur en question appartiennent à la Catho et se nomment ensemble « Yncréa ». Leur regroupement forme des ingénieurs et chercheurs en nanotechnologies, smart farming, chimie verte, smart grids (ex : Linky) ou maison intelligente. Yncréa est donc un agent du renouvellement actuel du capitalisme dans les technologies de pilotage de la planète, de la ville, de la maison et du vivant, pour aller decrescendo dans la perspective. Détail qui ne manque pas de saveur : le directeur d’Yncréa est ingénieur militaire, à la fois chevalier de la Légion d’honneur et du Mérite agricole, passé par la Délégation générale à l’armement et la sûreté nucléaire. Ses rangs de topinambours seront bien désherbés sur les côtés.

    Leur agriculture hors-sol (préférez « urbaine », « de précision », « connectée » ou « verticale » si vous deviez masquer vos intentions) passe au stade 2.0. Les semences sont toujours sélectionnées pour ce type de terroir hydroponique. Les légumes plongent toujours leurs racines dans un substrat et des intrants artificiels. Mais les bâtiments sont désormais « pilotés par des technologies contrôlant les paramètres de production (luminosité, apports en eau, en nutriments…) et alliant les compétences en conception de bâtiments intelligents, agronomie et automatisation. »1 Les Pays-Bas par exemple, surnommés la « Silicon Valley de l’agriculture », ont les meilleurs rendements du monde grâce à des serres où la lumière, l’arrosage, les intrants ou la ventilation sont entièrement automatisés. Le modèle vaut aussi pour les élevages de porcs, de volailles – sans parler des citadins. Le smart farming est à l’agriculture ce qu’un « réseau social » est à l’amitié. Une relation à la terre pilotée par ordinateur, privatisée par des ingénieurs et leurs firmes, produisant une alimentation sans goût pour une vie sans qualité.

    L’avancée du désert vert
    L’élu Julien Dubois soutint l’initiative au nom du groupe écologiste. Reprenant les éléments de langage de circonstance, celle-ci répondrait aux « enjeux écologiques du XXI° siècle ».2 Quels sont ces « enjeux » ? En quoi Yncréa y « répond » ? Nulle explication chez les élus qui s’écharpent à peine sur le superflu, l’absence d’appel d’offres ou la privatisation du Palais Rameau. Mais sur le fond : rien.

    Dans les Hauts-de-France comme au niveau global, les terres cultivables manquent. La planète compte bientôt 10 milliards d’estomacs en même temps que les terres arables disparaissent sous les effets conjoints de l’urbanisation, de la pollution et l’appauvrissement des sols, de l’élevage intensif ou du manque d’eau. Près de nous, autour de l’ancien site Metalleurop, 500ha de terres saturées en plomb interdisent toute culture comestible. À Lille, les 23 ha de la friche Saint Sauveur seront enfouis sous du logement intensif et des bureaux, plutôt que rendus – enfin ! – à des activités plus humaines.

    Face à ce dilemme comptable, les technocrates ont leurs solutions. Pour aller des plus lointaines aux plus proches, Elon Musk (Tesla) souhaite coloniser Mars ; Peter Thiel (PayPal, Facebook) bâtit des villes flottantes alimentées aux algues3 ; Larry Page (Google) finança le premier steak in vitro ; et toute une flopée d’urbanistes se gaussent d’agriculture urbaine : soit en utilisant les toits des buildings, soit sur les sols pollués des friches industrielles, soit encore dans les souterrains des grandes villes, ainsi qu’Anne Hidalgo l’expérimente à Paris. Après avoir épuisé la Terre, la cyber-agriculture s’attaque aux océans, aux sous-sols, et pourquoi pas à l’espace, dans une fuite en avant technologique. Les écologistes applaudissent. Et l’Union européenne s’interroge sur une labellisation « bio » du hors-sol.

    Ce scénario d’artificialisation et de privatisation du vivant ne devrait surprendre aucun Lillois. Non seulement parce qu’il est d’une banalité confondante au regard de l’état du monde. Surtout parce que la Ville nous avait prévenus, dès 2013, dans une exposition « Natures artificielles » à la Gare Saint-Sauveur. Les artistes convoqués nous y jetaient leurs « visions originales d’un réel transfiguré par une époque mutante où l’homme joue de son emprise ambiguë [sur la nature]. On y crois[ait] des expérimentations scientifiques qui réécrivent l’Histoire, théâtres de robots agriculteurs, parcelles de cosmos comprimées, poupées mutantes issues d’expérimentations génétiques, végétaux à humeurs variables, terre tremblant au son de la voix, etc. »4 L’enfer vert était annoncé.

    Quant à ceux qui ne veulent pas ajouter de l’artifice au désastre, qui ne souhaitent pas gérer les nuisances mais bien les supprimer, ils peuvent se joindre à nous dans une opposition résolue à la bétonnisation de Saint-Sauveur et à la reconversion technologique du Palais Rameau.

    Hors-sol, Braderie 2018

    1Yncrea.fr

    2Conseil municipal du 22 juin 2018, site d’Europe écologie – Les Verts

    3Paradis Pourri – Smart islands en Polynésie, https://hors-sol.herbesfolles.org/2017/10/02/paradis-pourri-smart-islands-en-polynesie

    4L’art de nous acclimater à la technopole – Visite de l’expo « Natures artificielles », http://hors-sol.herbesfolles.org/2013/07/31/lart-de-sacclimater-a-la-technopole-contre-visite-guidee-de-l

    #Lille #artificialisation #martine_aubry #écologie #agro-informaticiens #Catho #Yncréa #nanotechnologies #smart_farming #chimie_verte #smart_grids #agriculture_urbaine #agriculture_connectée #agriculture_verticale #smart_farming #hydroponique #Julien_Dubois #Hauts-de-France #écologistes #enfer_vert #nuisances


  • No Saudi #Aramco IPO? No problem, potentially, for Saudi Arabia’s investment dreams
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/24/business/dealbook/saudi-arabia-aramco-ipo.html

    The world’s largest initial public offering is on hiatus. The spending it was to enable may not be.

    Saudi Arabia planned to take its giant oil company, Saudi Aramco, to the public markets. It was to be the linchpin of a grand economic vision, generating billions of dollars to pay for future-proofing the kingdom’s economy, including huge investments in technology.

    It is now postponed, leaving a large funding shortfall. But Saudi Arabia is pursuing alternative transactions that could ensure its dreams aren’t dashed:

    • Saudi Aramco is in discussions to buy a large stake in Sabic, a publicly traded chemical company. Sabic’s controlling shareholder is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, the Public Investment Fund. While the size of that potential acquisition is unclear, media reports say it could be as big as $70 billion.

    • The Public Investment Fund is in talks to raise $11 billion in bank loans from international lenders, according to The Financial Times. It would be the first time the sovereign wealth fund borrowed money.

    • Saudi Aramco could still sell a stake in itself. Big companies in China and Russia reportedly expressed interest in an investment in the past. It isn’t clear how much a sale would raise, but it would almost certainly run to billions of dollars.

    The Saudi government planned to sell about 5 percent of Saudi Aramco on public stock markets. If the oil giant could have fetched a $2 trillion valuation — and there has been skepticism over that figure — the kingdom would have received roughly $100 billion.

    The three new moves, if they were to happen, could yield almost as much as Saudi Aramco’s I.P.O. would have. The Saudi government would then have the financial firepower to pursue its grand economic goals, collectively known as #Vision_2030.

    That means money to invest in Silicon Valley start-ups. Or to create a giant new city that runs on clean energy and robots.

    Or to even help Elon Musk take Tesla private. Saudi Arabia already has a nearly 5 percent stake in the carmaker, and Mr. Musk has said it is interested in helping fund a buyout. But the Public Investment Fund has yet to send such a signal, and is reportedly in talks to invest in a Tesla rival.

    #arabie_saoudite


  • Les fournisseurs de Tesla s’inquiètent de ne plus être payés Arthur Marcadé - 22 Aout 2018 - le figaro
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/societes/2018/08/22/20005-20180822ARTFIG00276-les-fournisseurs-de-tesla-s-inquietent-de-ne-plus

    Le constructeur de voitures électriques demande à ses fournisseurs des remises sur des factures déjà réglées, ainsi qu’un prolongement de ses délais de paiement, rapporte le Wall Street Journal. De quoi alimenter les doutes des partenaires de Tesla sur sa solidité financière.

    Les chaînes d’assemblage de Tesla semblent produire autant de voitures que d’ennuis pour son fondateur, Elon Musk. Alors qu’il subit la pression des marchés financiers depuis l’annonce de sa potentielle sortie de la Bourse, le constructeur suscite également des doutes chez ses fournisseurs, d’après le Wall Street Journal. Ceux-ci craignent que leur client en vienne à ne plus pouvoir honorer ses factures. Cette inquiétude est née à la suite de demandes de ristournes faites par Tesla, de délais de paiement rallongés ainsi que d’un rythme de production de la Model 3 tel que les commandes peinent à suivre.


    Tesla dans l’œil du cyclone
    Selon un sondage mené par l’OESA, une association d’équipementiers auto, auprès de cadres supérieurs du secteur, 18 des 22 participants estiment que Tesla représente désormais un risque financier pour les entreprises sous-traitantes. Les remises exigées par le constructeur, allant de 9 à 20% sur des factures payées en 2016 ainsi que des délais de paiement doublés de 60 à 120 jours ont suffi à semer le trouble. Dans une série de mails échangés avec ses fournisseurs, Tesla tient des propos jugés inquiétants par ces derniers. « Cette requête est essentielle pour que Tesla puissent poursuivre ses opérations. Ces sommes sont un investissement dans la société visant à faire perdurer la croissance au long terme de Tesla et de ses fournisseurs », peut-on lire. Denis Virag, consultant en construction interrogé par le Wall street Journal, juge que la situation est « ridicule » et que « cela montre que Tesla est désespéré. Ils sont préoccupés par leur profitabilité mais ne tiennent pas compte de celle de leurs fournisseurs ».

    Depuis, de nombreux petits partenaires en ont profité pour dénoncer des défauts de paiement sur des commandes récentes. Tesla a rapidement cherché à éteindre la polémique. « Nous ne sommes pas en retard car nous ne pouvons pas les payer, c’est simplement parce que nous vérifions si les pièces sont correctes », a répondu Elon Musk au journal américain.

    « 7000 voitures, 7 jours »
    L’inquiétude des prestataires vient aussi du rythme de production actuel de l’entreprise et des sommes qu’impliquent ses commandes. La marque a atteint son objectif de produire 7000 Model 3 en sept jours, comme l’annonçait Elon Musk début juillet sur son compte Twitter. Pour autant, elle connaît des difficultés dans la distribution et la logistique de ses voitures. Pire, elle n’enregistre désormais plus assez de commandes, toujours selon le Wall Street Journal. Des milliers de Tesla attendent ainsi leur acquéreur sous le soleil californien. La dette de l’entreprise envers ses partenaires s’élève aujourd’hui à 2,26 milliards de dollars. Le constructeur inquiète aussi les investisseurs, qui doutent de plus en plus de la capacité de Tesla à devenir un jour rentable.

    De leur côté, Musk et son directeur financier Deepak Ahuka ont réagi dans le Wall Street Journal : « La force financière de Tesla se développe actuellement et est encore sur le chemin d’un rapport trimestriel positif et rentable. Nos relations avec nos fournisseurs sont très bonnes », assurent-ils en concluant : « Nous n’allons assurément pas vers la faillite. »

    #tesla #voiture #mobilité #robotisation #innovation #batteries #électricité #elon_musk #faillitte #économie #baudruche


  • Shocked, burnt and bruised: the plight of workers at Tesla’s plants Peoples Dispatch - 10 Juillet 2018
    https://peoplesdispatch.org/2018/07/10/shocked-burnt-and-bruised-the-plight-of-workers-at-teslas-plants

    A third investigation has been opened last week into carmaker Tesla by California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA), which received a complaint from a worker at the company’s automobile assembly plant in Fremont. The details of the complaint will be disclosed by the body only after the completion of the investigation.

    The investigation has been launched only days after the company’s CEO, Elon Musk, announced that he would be launching a new production line at the Fremont plant.

    Over the past years, Tesla’s Fremont plant, which employs over 10,000 workers, has proven to be an extremely dangerous workplace, where employes have been “sliced by machinery, crushed by forklifts, burned in electrical explosions and sprayed with molten metal.”


    In 2014, the rate of work-related recordable injuries – i.e injuries that require medical treatment beyond first aid – was 15% higher than the average rate in the automobile industry. The following year, when the industry average of such injuries came down from 7.3 per 100 workers to 6.7, at the Fremont plant, the rate of injuries increased from 8.4 per 100 workers to 8.8, which was 31% higher than the industry average.

    The figures on the rate of serious injuries – i.e those that require days off from work or restricted duty or transfer to a different task – paint a much darker picture of how dangerous working in Tesla is for its employees. As with recordable injuries, the rate of serious injuries also came down industry-wide in 2015. In the case of Tesla’s plant, however, the rate of serious injuries soared and was 103% higher than the industry average, according to a report by Work Safe, a non-profit organization that specializes in workplace health and safety issues.

    The 2018 annual report of The National Council for Occupational Safety and Health, which identified Tesla as one of the 12 most dangerous workplaces in the US that puts its employees at risk of physical injuries, pointed out that the rate of recordable injuries was 31% higher than the industry average in 2016, while the rate of serious injuries was 83% higher. Last year, another 722 instances of work-related injuries were reported at the Fremont plant, of which 600 were serious injuries.

    While the industry-average for last year is not yet available, Tesla’s Vice President of Environment, Health and Safety claimed on its website, under an article titled “Becoming the Safest Car Factory in the World”, that the recordable injuries last year had declined by 25% compared to the year before.

    “Relying on 2017 injury data to reach any conclusions about safety trends at the plant is premature and could have misleading results,” said Workspace’s report, which pointed to many irregularities in the way in which the injury logs were maintained by the company.

    “I hear coworkers quietly say that they are hurting but they are too afraid to report it for fear of being labeled as a complainer or bad worker.”

    . . . . . . .

    #tesla#voiture #mobilité  #robotisation #innovation #batteries #électricité #accidents_du_travail #pénibilité #danger #elon_musk

    • Une troisième enquête a été ouverte début juillet contre le constructeur automobile Tesla par la Division de la sécurité et de la santé au travail de Californie (OSHA dans son acronyme anglais), à la suite de la plainte d’un ouvrier de l’usine d’assemblage automobile de l’entreprise de Fremont. Les détails de la plainte ne seront divulgués par le service qu’après la fin de l’enquête.

      L’enquête a été entamée quelques jours seulement après l’annonce, par le PDG de l’entreprise Elon Musk, qu’il lancerait une nouvelle ligne de production dans l’usine de Fremont.

      Ces dernières années, l’usine Tesla de Fremont, qui emploie plus de 10 000 ouvriers, s’est avérée être un lieu de travail extrêmement dangereux, où les employés ont été « taillés en pièces par des machines, écrasés par des chariots élévateurs, brûlés dans des explosions électriques et aspergés de métal en fusion ».

      En 2014, le taux de blessures liées au travail rapportées – c’est-à-dire des blessures exigeant un traitement médical au-delà des premiers soins – était de 15% plus élevé que le taux moyen dans l’industrie automobile. L’année suivante, lorsque le taux moyen de ces blessures dans l’industrie est passé de 7.3 à 6.7 pour 100 ouvriers, il a augmenté de 8.4% à 8.8% dans l’usine de Fremont, ce qui était plus élevé de 31% que la moyenne de l’industrie.

      Les chiffres du taux de blessures graves – c’est-à-dire celles qui nécessitent des jours d’arrêt de travail ou un horaire de travail limité ou encore le transfert à un autre poste – brossent un tableau beaucoup plus sombre de la dangerosité du travail chez Tesla pour ses employés. Comme pour les blessures signalées, le taux de blessures graves a aussi diminué dans toute l’industrie en 2015. Dans le cas de l’usine de Tesla, ce taux de blessures graves a explosé pour se situer à 103% de la moyenne de l’industrie, selon un rapport de Work Safe, une organisation à but non lucratif spécialisée dans les questions de santé et de sécurité au travail.

      Le rapport annuel 2018 du Conseil national pour la sécurité et la santé au travail, qui a identifié Tesla comme l’un des 12 lieux de travail les plus dangereux aux États-Unis, qui exposent leurs employés au risque de blessures physiques, a souligné que le taux de blessures signalées était plus élevé de 31% que la moyenne dans l’industrie en 2016, tandis que le taux de blessures graves était plus élevé de 83%. L’an dernier, 722 cas de blessures liées au travail ont été rapportées dans l’usine de Fremont, dont 600 étaient graves.
      . . . . .


  • Pénuries de batteries pour la Model 3 de Tesla 28 Juin 2018 - L’Essentiel
    http://www.lessentiel.lu/fr/economie/story/27098663

    L’accélération de la cadence de production de la Model 3 de Tesla, après plusieurs mois de retards, a entraîné une pénurie temporaire de batteries.


    Le PDG de Tesla Elon Musk a fait savoir début juin qu’il était confiant dans la capacité du groupe à produire 5 000 berlines Model 3 d’ici la fin du mois, ce qui a été accueilli avec scepticisme par certains analystes à Wall Street. Yoshio Ito, responsable la division automobile de Panasonic, a déclaré jeudi lors de l’assemblée générale du groupe japonais qu’il y avait eu une « forte amélioration de la production », entraînant des pénuries occasionnelles de batteries.

    Panasonic, qui dispose d’un site de production de batteries au Japon et qui exploite avec Tesla l’usine Gigafactory dans l’état du Nevada, est le fournisseur exclusif des cellules de batteries pour les modèles de voitures en cours de production. Le groupe japonais a également une usine en commun avec Tesla pour produire des cellules et des modules solaires à Buffalo, dans l’État de New York.

    Les batteries sont au cœur du plan de Panasonic visant à un quasi-doublement des revenus de son activité automobile à 2 500 milliards de yens (19,6ámilliards d’euros) d’ici mars 2022, contre 1 800 milliards attendus pour l’exercice en cours. Selon les analystes, le partenariat entre le groupe japonais et le constructeur américain n’est toutefois pas sans risque, comme en témoignent les retards de production de la Model 3 ou encore les accidents de route mettant en cause des Tesla.

    Batteries à l’état solide pas prêtes
    Tesla a en outre annoncé le 12 juin son intention de supprimer des milliers d’emplois à travers le groupe, soit environ 9% de ses effectifs, afin de réduire les coûts et d’améliorer sa rentabilité sans mettre en danger la montée en puissance de la production de sa berline Model 3.

    Les retards de la Model 3 ont conduit Panasonic à abaisser en février les perspectives de son pôle batteries. « Je ne dirais pas que le retard (dans la production de la Model 3 de Tesla) n’a eu aucun impact sur nos activités mais nous sommes en étroite communication avec Tesla et travaillons à améliorer constamment la production », a déclaré Yoshio Ito.

    Soucieux de réduire sa dépendance vis-à-vis de Tesla, Panasonic s’est récemment associé à Toyota Motor pour développer et fournir des batteries de véhicules électriques. Le directeur général de Panasonic, Kazuhiro Tsuga, a déclaré lors de l’AG que les batteries à l’état solide, considérées comme plus stables, ne devraient pas arriver sur le marché automobile avant un moment, même si le groupe reste engagé dans le développement de cette batterie de nouvelle génération.

    « Nous pensons que nous pouvons continuer à améliorer les performances des batteries lithium-ion actuelles au moins jusqu’en 2025 », a-t-il ajouté. « La commercialisation des batteries à l’état solide viendrait après ces progrès ». Le constructeur automobile japonais Toyota entend commercialiser des véhicules équipés de batteries à l’état solide d’ici le début des années 2020.

    #tesla #Panasonic #transport #voiture #mobilité #automobile #robotisation #innovation #batteries #électricité #bricolos #elon_musk #pénuries


  • Tesla va supprimer 9% de ses effectifs RTBF - AFP - 12 juin 2018
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/economie/detail_tesla-va-supprimer-9-de-ses-effectifs?id=9943762

    Le fabricant de voitures électriques américain Tesla a annoncé mardi dans un courriel adressé à ses employés et consulté par l’AFP qu’il prévoyait de supprimer 9% de ses effectifs.

    Ces licenciements n’affecteront pas la montée en cadence de la production du « Model 3 », voiture censée faire de Tesla un groupe automobile de masse, a assuré l’entreprise qui avait annoncé en mai envisager un plan de restructuration sans en donner les grandes lignes.

    Ils vont épargner les équipes de production, affirme Elon Musk, le PDG auteur du document.


    « Tesla a grandi et évolué rapidement lors des dernières années, ce qui s’est traduit par des doublons dans certains rôles et fonctions », explique Elon Musk. Si ces doublons « faisaient sens par le passé, ils sont difficiles à justifier aujourd’hui ».
    Au 31 décembre 2017, Tesla employait 37.543 salariés à temps plein, mais ses effectifs évoluent beaucoup en fonction de ses montées en cadences et de nouveaux modèles à l’instar du Model 3.

    A Wall Street, le titre gagnait 2,91% à 141,78 dollars vers 18H35 GMT, les investisseurs semblant saluer les efforts du groupe, qui brûle beaucoup d’argent depuis sa création il y a 15 ans, pour essayer d’être rentable cette année.

    #Tesla #licenciement #licenciements #USA #voiture_autopilotée #voiture_autonome #transport  #voitures_autonomes #voiture #mobilité #automobile #robotisation #innovation 


  • Elon Musk, le Pdg de Tesla et SpaceX, veut noter les journalistes et les médias
    https://www.latribune.fr/technos-medias/medias/la-derniere-idee-d-elon-musk-et-si-on-notait-les-journalistes-et-les-media

    Pas très content des critiques qui fusent sur ses entreprises et sa personnalité, le milliardaire inventeur tous azimuts prend la mouche. Le fondateur de multiples sociétés innovantes fustige la course au clic des journalistes et leur « hypocrisie ». Les internautes qu’il a sollicités via son compte Twitter ont massivement approuvé son initiative.

    «  Je vais créer un site où le public pourra noter la vérité fondamentale de n’importe quel article, suivre la note de crédibilité de chaque journaliste, rédacteur en chef ou publication. Je songe à l’appeler #Pravda (ndlr, le mot russe pour vérité qui renvoie aussi au titre du journal soviétique)  », a-t-il annoncé sur Twitter.
    Apparemment irrité par de récents articles de presse sur Tesla, Elon Musk, le Pdg de la firme spécialisée dans la construction de voitures électriques, a proposé de créer un site d’évaluation de la crédibilité des journalistes et des médias.

    Le milliardaire, qui préside également la société spatiale SpaceX, a soumis son idée aux 21,8 millions d’abonnés à son compte Twitter. Plus de 680.000 d’entre eux ont donné leur avis, 88% d’entre eux jugeant que « créer un site de notation de la crédibilité des médias (qui signale aussi les réseaux automatiques de propagande) » serait une bonne chose contre 12% qui pensent que « non, les médias sont formidables ».


  • Tesla Model 3 robotic ’production hell’ highlights danger of automating too quickly - TechRepublic
    https://www.techrepublic.com/article/tesla-model-3-robotic-production-hell-highlights-danger-of-automating-

    Tesla may be one of the most high-tech car companies, but being on the cutting edge may have led to the Model 3 “production hell” that the company recently found itself in, CEO Elon Musk said in a Sunday interview with Gayle King on CBS This Morning.

    When the Model 3 was announced in July 2017, the company promised that it would produce 5,000 cars per week. However, it has been building only about 2,000 per week, according to CBS.

    We got complacent about some of the things we felt were our core technology,” Musk said in the interview. “We put too much new technology into the Model 3 all at once. This should have been staged.

    Tesla’s Fremont, CA factory is widely regarded as one of the most robotic-driven assembly lines on the planet, King noted. However, Musk agreed that there were too many robots, and that the company needs more people, as robots sometimes slow production. “We had this crazy complex network of conveyor belts and it was not working, so we got rid of that whole thing,” Musk said.
    […]
    I have a pretty clear understanding of the path out of hell,” he said.
    […]
    Autopilot will “never be perfect,” Musk said during the interview. “Nothing in the real world is perfect. But I do think that long term, it can reduce accidents by a factor of 10. So there are 10 fewer fatalities and tragedies and serious injuries. And that’s a really huge difference.

    Musk emphasized that Autopilot is not supposed to replace a human driver. “The probability of an accident with Autopilot is just less” when a human is at the wheel, Musk said.

    Before the March fatal crash, the Model X driver had received several warnings earlier in the drive, according to a Tesla statement. The system worked “as described,” as a hands on system, Musk said.


  • Désaccords entre Tesla et les enquêteurs après un accident mortel
    https://www.rtbf.be/info/economie/detail_desaccords-entre-tesla-et-les-enqueteurs-apres-un-accident-mortel?id=989

    Le ton est monté jeudi entre Tesla et l’organisme chargé de faire la lumière sur les causes d’un accident mortel, aboutissant au retrait du constructeur de voitures électriques de l’enquête portant notamment sur son logiciel de conduite semi-automatique Autopilot.

    Cette enquête avait été ouverte par le régulateur des transports américain (NTSB) à la suite de cet accident survenu le 23 mars en Californie. Le conducteur y avait trouvé la mort alors que le logiciel de conduite semi-automatique Autopilot conçu par Tesla était activé. Les batteries de la voiture, disloquée dans le choc, avaient également pris feu.

    Dans des communiqués diffusés jeudi, Tesla et le NTSB se sont renvoyés la responsabilité de cette décision.


    Tesla veut « trop » communiquer
    « Tesla s’est retiré de l’accord avec le NTSB car il requiert que nous ne diffusions pas d’informations publiquement concernant Autopilot et nous considérons que cette exigence a un impact négatif sur la sécurité du public », a indiqué Tesla dans une première déclaration dans la matinée.

    « Nous croyons en la transparence et un accord qui empêche la publication d’informations pendant près d’un an n’est pas acceptable », y a affirmé le constructeur, précisant qu’il continuera néanmoins de collaborer à l’enquête du NTSB.

    Celui-ci a répondu qu’il avait « révoqué » le statut de Tesla comme partie à l’enquête. « Le NTSB a pris cette décision car Tesla a violé l’accord conclu entre les parties en publiant des informations liées à l’enquête avant qu’elles ne soient vérifiées et confirmées par le NTSB ».
    « De telles publications d’informations incomplètes donnent souvent lieu à des spéculations et des conclusions incorrectes sur les causes probables d’un accident ce qui nuit à l’enquête et au public », ajoute-t-on de même source.

    « Il est malheureux que Tesla, de par ses initiatives, n’ait pas respecté l’accord conclu entre les parties », a souligné le président du NTSB Robert Sumwait en précisant que le PDG de Tesla, Elon Musk, avait été informé de cette décision mercredi soir par téléphone et jeudi par courrier.

    Une telle mesure est rare a souligné l’organisme public mais a connu des précédents, notamment lors d’enquêtes sur des accidents d’avions en 2009 et 2014.
    . . . . . . . . .
    « La fonction Autopilot de Tesla présente des défauts » 
    Ce cabinet, Minami Tamaki LLP, a affirmé que, selon ses conclusions préliminaires, d’autres plaintes de conducteurs de Tesla concernant Autopilot ont été recensées et qu’il estime que « la fonction #Autopilot de #Tesla présente des défauts et a vraisemblablement provoqué la #mort de Huang ».

    Le NTSB avait déjà mené une enquête sur un précédent accident mortel d’une Tesla équipée d’Autopilot survenu en 2016 en Floride. Le constructeur avait alors modifié certaines fonctionnalités du système afin de mieux prévenir les utilisateurs de l’approche d’un danger.
    Le NTSB a toutefois souligné jeudi qu’il « continuait d’inciter Tesla à prendre des mesures dans le cadre des recommandations émises dans le cadre de notre enquête sur l’accident de 2016 en Floride » , ce qui pourrait laisser entendre qu’il n’est pas entièrement satisfait des modifications apportées par le constructeur.

    Suite à ces développements, le titre Tesla a perdu près de 2,3% à Wall Street à 294,08 dollars. Il a cédé plus de 14% de sa valeur sur le mois écoulé, en raison de retards de production sur son dernier modèle, le Model 3, et d’inquiétudes sur la santé financière du groupe.

    #autopilote #voiture_autopilotée #voiture_autonome #transport #Tesla #voitures_autonomes #voiture #mobilité #automobile #robotisation #innovation #silicon_valley #intelligence_artificielle #Tesla #poubelle


  • Will This “Neural Lace” Brain Implant Help Us Compete with AI? - Facts So Romantic
    http://nautil.us/blog/-will-this-neural-lace-brain-implant-help-us-compete-with-ai

    Smarter artificial intelligence is certainly being developed, but how far along are we on producing a neural lace?Photograph by Ars Electronica / FlickrSolar-powered self-driving cars, reusable space ships, Hyperloop transportation, a mission to colonize Mars: Elon Musk is hell-bent on turning these once-far-fetched fantasies into reality. But none of these technologies has made him as leery as artificial intelligence. At Code Conference 2016, Musk stated publicly that given the current rate of A.I. advancement, humans could ultimately expect to be left behind—cognitively, intellectually—“by a lot.” His solution to this unappealing fate is a novel brain-computer interface similar to the implantable “neural lace” described by the Scottish novelist Iain M. Banks in Look to Windward, part of (...)


  • Facebook détecte notre classe sociale. Et déclenche la lutte (algorithmique) finale _ 23 Fév 2018 - Olivier Ertzscheid

    “Les spécifications sociales pour l’automatisation se sont basées sur l’épuisement et l’usure des bénéficiaires, sur des postulats de classes et de races qui ont été encodées en métriques de performances.”
    https://www.investigaction.net/fr/facebook-detecte-notre-classe-sociale-et-declenche-la-lutte-algorith
    http://affordance.typepad.com//mon_weblog/2018/02/cest-la-lutte-algorithmique-finale-.html
     
     . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    A lire tout cela on se souvient bien sûr de Lawrence Lessig et de son Code Is Law. De l’importance qu’il soulignait déjà en 1999 de former les ingénieurs et les développeurs à des questions juridiques, éthiques, philosophiques ; à ce qu’il racontait sur le fait que les programmes transmettaient avant tout des chaînes de valeurs, et que ces valeurs n’étaient pas uniquement des “variables” mais bien des postures et des postulats relevant de la morale. Une thèse reprise et développée par Virginia Eubanks :
     
    “Quand on parle de technologies, on évoque toujours leurs qualités. Leurs promoteurs parlent de technologies disruptives, arguant combien elles secouent les relations de pouvoirs instituées, produisant une gouvernementalité plus transparente, plus responsable, plus efficace, et intrinsèquement plus démocratique.”  Mais c’est oublier combien ces outils sont intégrés dans de vieux systèmes de pouvoirs et de privilèges.”

    La métaphore de l’hospice numérique qu’elle utilise permet de résister à l’effacement du contexte historique, à la neutralité, que la technologie aimerait produire. L’hospice numérique produit les mêmes conséquences que les institutions de surveillance passées : elle limite le nombre de bénéficiaires des aides, entrave leur mobilité, sépare les familles, diminue les droits politiques, transforme les pauvres en sujets d’expérience, criminalise, construit des suspects et des classifications morales, créé une distance avec les autres classes sociales, reproduit les hiérarchies racistes et ségrégationnistes… Sa seule différence avec les institutions d’antan est de ne plus produire de l’enfermement physique. Certainement parce que l’enfermement dans les institutions de surveillance a pu produire des solidarités qui ont permis de les combattre … Les outils numériques produisent non seulement de la discrimination, mais aussi de l’isolement entre ceux qui partagent pourtant les mêmes souffrances.

    (…) Les problèmes sont toujours interprétés comme relevant de la faute du demandeur, jamais de l’Etat ou du prestataire. La présomption d’infaillibilité des systèmes déplace toujours la responsabilité vers l’élément humain. Elle renforce le sentiment que ces systèmes fonctionnent et que ceux qui échouent dans ces systèmes sont ingérables ou criminels. 

    Ces modèles distinguent les pauvres parmi les pauvres. La classe moyenne ne tolérerait pas qu’on applique des outils de ce type sur elle. Ils sont déployés à l’encontre de ceux qui n’ont pas le choix.”
     
    Briseurs de grève et d’égalité
     Ces systèmes, en effet, sont déployés “à l’encontre de ceux qui n’ont pas le choix“. * Et chacun en est aujourd’hui la victime dans la trivialité du moindre de ses comportements connectés ou en tout cas observables sous le radar d’une connectivité ambiante et d’une surveillance idoine. Les plus pauvres bien sûr, mais toute la “classe moyenne” également. “Ceux qui n’ont pas le choix” _ ont désormais celui de faire confiance à des “modules de prédiction” qui choisissent à leur place et qui intègrent différents “briseurs d’égalité” (tiebreaker) comme les vieux systèmes capitalistes, dès l’invention du Fordisme, nourrissaient en leur sein des briseurs de grève. 

     . . . . . . . . . . . . .


  • A propos de John Perry Barlow, Seenthis, The Grateful Dead et The WELL
    https://www.well.com


    En réponse à https://seenthis.net/messages/667401 d’ @arno

    Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind. On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.

    Aujourd’hui les manifestes ne sont guere d’intérêt pour les jeunes. C’est la la conclusion que j’ai tiré de la rencontre avec des étudiants de la création multimedia à qui j’ai eu l’honneur d’enseigner les systèmes de publication sur internet. Du côté des militants politiques c’est pareil en ce qui concerne le choix et la maîtrise des logiciels pour leur publications.

    Nous, nous sommes les enfants du mariage entre les idées libertaires et les révolutions européennes à l’ère digitale. Nous avons grandi à une époque extraordinaire quand se croisaient le monde ancien et l’ère digitale post-communiste. Nous avons assisté et participé à ses guerres analogues, à ses luttes des classes, nous avons adopté ses modèles de liberté antagonistes et ses musiques bruyantes. Nous avons bâti les premières marches de l’échelle digitale avec JPB et ses amis. Nous avons connu l’époque quand l’internet consistait dans une centaine de serveurs nationaux et quelques milliers dans le reste du monde. C’était notre internet. Les admins étaient nos copains qui restaient au téléphone avec nous pendant des heures quand il fallait implémenter un changement de config important. Tout était encore à faire et il n’y avait que nous qui pouvaient le faire.

    Aujourd’hui #Seenthis est notre The WELL que nous utilison pour créer notre internet à nous. Voilà l’héritage de JPB.

    Bon, après ce discours il est temps d’écouter un des derniers concerts des Grateful Dead avec Jerry Garcia.

    Grateful Dead - The Spectrum - 3-17-95 - Full Show
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9iJ21xbYqc

    The WELL
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_WELL

    The Whole Earth ’Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation. As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.

    Home > The WELL
    https://www.well.com

    Why is conversation so treasured on The WELL? Why did members of this community band together to buy the site in 2012? Check out the story of The WELL.

    The Internet Age Began on August 9, 1995
    http://www.litkicks.com/AugustNine

    Two separate things happened on August 9, 1995, both by chance emerging from Northern California though they had little else in common. The first was a scheduled event: the initial public offering (IPO) by Netscape, a startup tech firm designed to make software to power the Internet.
    ...
    I remember walking through the hallway at work that morning, probably heading for a coffee refill, when I saw a clump of co-workers and magazine editors talking anxiously. I thought they were talking about the Netscape IPO, but they weren’t. “Jerry Garcia died,” one of the editors said to me. “We need to replace the front page and get a new headline up, stat.”

    Jerry Garcia. This one hit home.
    ...
    Nobody said “going viral” yet by the summer of 1995, but that’s exactly what Jerry Garcia’s death did, and it was pretty much the biggest anything had gone viral anywhere up to this point.
    ...
    The Grateful Dead’s influence on the evolving culture of the Internet has always been a godsend, and still is. When music-sharing became a way of life with the advent of Napster a few years later, and when online publishers began to give content away for free, many smart observers realized that the Grateful Dead (who had always allowed fans to freely create and share concert recordings) were the greatest success model in the world for a profitable long-term business cycle based on peer-to-peer sharing. The positive and peaceful philosophy the band had always stood for seemed to fit the Internet’s optimistic emerging culture as well.

    John Perry Barlow, Internet Pioneer, 1947-2018 | Electronic Frontier Foundation
    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/02/john-perry-barlow-internet-pioneer-1947-2018

    Barlow knew that new technology could create and empower evil as much as it could create and empower good. He made a conscious decision to focus on the latter: "I knew it’s also true that a good way to invent the future is to predict it. So I predicted Utopia, hoping to give Liberty a running start before the laws of Moore and Metcalfe delivered up what Ed Snowden now correctly calls ’turn-key totalitarianism.’”

    A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace | Electronic Frontier Foundation
    https://www.eff.org/cyberspace-independence

    by John Perry Barlow, Davos, Switzerland, February 8, 1996

    John Perry Barlow
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=John%20Perry%20Barlow

    The Grateful Dead
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=%22Grateful%20Dead%22

    Jerry Garcia Band
    https://archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22Jerry+Garcia+Band%22

    #internet #musique

    • un manifeste d’une naïveté confondante, et qui ne veut strictement rien dire.

      Justement, tu en fais ce que tu veux ;-)

      You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather.

      Là par contre ce n’est pas dépourvu de sens ; en plus c’est du rock’n’roll, JPB sur son ranch en train de traire les vaches, et qu’il refuse que le gouvernement s’y mêle, c’est une belle image allégorique pour la liberté, non ?

      Autrement c’est vrai l’histoire avec le néoibéralisme, mais bof, pas la peine de tout prendre trop sérieusement. On sait que le vieux était un peu réac, mais son manifeste c’était un beau texte, un truc sentimental quoi.

      Oui, oui, je sais, la CIA payait des écrivains pour qu’ils arrêtent de dire des choses contre les #USA, etc. - mais tu ne critiques pas Bach parce qu’il était religieux, pas vrai ?

      L’ironie de l’histoire c’est qu’aujourd’hui les vaches sont télécommandées par internet ;-)

    • Le rôle joué par l’évangélisme internet dans la victoire du néo-libéralisme est toujours incompris par beaucoup de gens à gauche.

      Coup d’État contre Allende, Chicago Boys, 1973.
      Margaret Thatcher, première Ministre en 1979.
      Milton Friedman, prix Nobel d’économie en 1979.
      Ronald Reagan élu en 1981.
      Georges Stigler, prix Nobel d’économie en 1982.
      Tournant de la rigueur de Mitterrand en 1983
      etc.

      Quand commence l’« évangélisme internet » ?

      Plus sérieusement, comme je l’écrivais dans mon message sur le sujet :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/667401
      dans mon souvenir l’« évangélisme internet » en France était critique de l’espace libertarien américain (même si, à l’époque, ce n’était pas un courant très connu en France). Pour notre petite chapelle, c’est peut-être aussi pour ça qu’on a voulu faire notre propre Manifeste, et pas s’aligner sur une traduction de la Déclaration de Barlow.

      Et paradoxalement, j’ai toujours ressenti que ceux qui agitaient le chiffon route du « libéral libertaire » pour sauver « nos valeurs », l’utilisaient justement pour flinguer la possibilité d’un usage progressiste et social de la liberté d’expression, tout en renforçant l’usage purement mercantile du Net.

    • Qu’il repose en paix.

      Ses propes acolytes ne le laisseront pas reposer longtemps avant de le sortir de sa tombe pour en faire leur zombie pour les basses besognes idéologiques. A ce stade il ne restera pas grand chose du hippie et le « farmer » réactionnaire brandira so revolver pour éliminer tous les défenseur d’un réseau libre au service des peuples du monde.



  • How an A.I. ‘Cat-and-Mouse Game’ Generates Believable Fake Photos - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/02/technology/ai-generated-photos.html

    At a lab in Finland, a small team of Nvidia researchers recently built a system that can analyze thousands of (real) celebrity snapshots, recognize common patterns, and create new images that look much the same — but are still a little different. The system can also generate realistic images of horses, buses, bicycles, plants and many other common objects.

    The project is part of a vast and varied effort to build technology that can automatically generate convincing images — or alter existing images in equally convincing ways. The hope is that this technology can significantly accelerate and improve the creation of computer interfaces, games, movies and other media, eventually allowing software to create realistic imagery in moments rather than the hours — if not days — it can now take human developers.

    In recent years, thanks to a breed of algorithm that can learn tasks by analyzing vast amounts of data, companies like Google and Facebook have built systems that can recognize faces and common objects with an accuracy that rivals the human eye. Now, these and other companies, alongside many of the world’s top academic A.I. labs, are using similar methods to both recognize and create.

    As it built a system that generates new celebrity faces, the Nvidia team went a step further in an effort to make them far more believable. It set up two neural networks — one that generated the images and another that tried to determine whether those images were real or fake. These are called generative adversarial networks, or GANs. In essence, one system does its best to fool the other — and the other does its best not to be fooled.

    “The computer learns to generate these images by playing a cat-and-mouse game against itself,” said Mr. Lehtinen.

    A second team of Nvidia researchers recently built a system that can automatically alter a street photo taken on a summer’s day so that it looks like a snowy winter scene. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have designed another that learns to convert horses into zebras and Monets into Van Goghs. DeepMind, a London-based A.I. lab owned by Google, is exploring technology that can generate its own videos. And Adobe is fashioning similar machine learning techniques with an eye toward pushing them into products like Photoshop, its popular image design tool.

    Trained designers and engineers have long used technology like Photoshop and other programs to build realistic images from scratch. This is what movie effects houses do. But it is becoming easier for machines to learn how to generate these images on their own, said Durk Kingma, a researcher at OpenAI, the artificial intelligence lab founded by Tesla chief executive Elon Musk and others, who specializes in this kind of machine learning.

    “We now have a model that can generate faces that are more diverse and in some ways more realistic than what we could program by hand,” he said, referring to Nvidia’s work in Finland.

    But new concerns come with the power to create this kind of imagery.

    With so much attention on fake media these days, we could soon face an even wider range of fabricated images than we do today.

    “The concern is that these techniques will rise to the point where it becomes very difficult to discern truth from falsity,” said Tim Hwang, who previously oversaw A.I. policy at Google and is now director of the Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence Fund, an effort to fund ethical A.I. research. “You might believe that accelerates problems we already have.”

    But many of us still put a certain amount of trust in photos and videos that we don’t necessarily put in text or word of mouth. Mr. Hwang believes the technology will evolve into a kind of A.I. arms race pitting those trying to deceive against those trying to identify the deception.

    Mr. Lehtinen downplays the effect his research will have on the spread of misinformation online. But he does say that, as a time goes on, we may have to rethink the very nature of imagery. “We are approaching some fundamental questions,” he said.

    #Image #Fake_news #Post_truth #Intelligence_artificielle #AI_war #Désinformation


  • We can’t ban killer robots – it’s already too late | Philip Ball | Opinion | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/22/killer-robots-international-arms-traders

    One response to the call by experts in robotics and artificial intelligence for an ban on “killer robots” (“lethal autonomous weapons systems” or Laws in the language of international treaties) is to say: shouldn’t you have thought about that sooner?

    Figures such as Tesla’s CEO, Elon Musk, are among the 116 specialists calling for the ban. “We do not have long to act,” they say. “Once this Pandora’s box is opened, it will be hard to close.” But such systems are arguably already here, such as the “unmanned combat air vehicle” Taranis developed by BAE and others, or the autonomous SGR-A1 sentry gun made by Samsung and deployed along the South Korean border. Autonomous tanks are in the works, while human control of lethal drones is becoming just a matter of degree.
    Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban of killer robots
    Read more

    #robot_tueurs #drones


  • The ’creepy Facebook AI’ story that captivated the media - BBC News
    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-40790258

    Where did the story come from?

    Way back in June, Facebook published a blog post about interesting research on chatbot programs - which have short, text-based conversations with humans or other bots. The story was covered by New Scientist and others at the time.

    Facebook had been experimenting with bots that negotiated with each other over the ownership of virtual items.

    It was an effort to understand how linguistics played a role in the way such discussions played out for negotiating parties, and crucially the bots were programmed to experiment with language in order to see how that affected their dominance in the discussion.

    A few days later, some coverage picked up on the fact that in a few cases the exchanges had become - at first glance - nonsensical:

    Bob: “I can can I I everything else”
    Alice: “Balls have zero to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to”

    Although some reports insinuate that the bots had at this point invented a new language in order to elude their human masters, a better explanation is that the neural networks were simply trying to modify human language for the purposes of more successful interactions - whether their approach worked or not was another matter.

    As technology news site Gizmodo said: “In their attempts to learn from each other, the bots thus began chatting back and forth in a derived shorthand - but while it might look creepy, that’s all it was.”

    AIs that rework English as we know it in order to better compute a task are not new.

    Google reported that its translation software had done this during development. “The network must be encoding something about the semantics of the sentence” Google said in a blog.

    And earlier this year, Wired reported on a researcher at OpenAI who is working on a system in which AIs invent their own language, improving their ability to process information quickly and therefore tackle difficult problems more effectively.

    The story seems to have had a second wind in recent days, perhaps because of a verbal scrap over the potential dangers of AI between Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg and technology entrepreneur Elon Musk.

    Robo-fear

    But the way the story has been reported says more about cultural fears and representations of machines than it does about the facts of this particular case.

    Plus, let’s face it, robots just make for great villains on the big screen.

    In the real world, though, AI is a huge area of research at the moment and the systems currently being designed and tested are increasingly complicated.


  • Mark Facebook contre le “catastrophisme irresponsable”
    http://www.dedefensa.org/article/mark-facebook-contre-le-catastrophisme-irresponsable

    Mark Facebook contre le “catastrophisme irresponsable”

    Ils se connaissent bien, ils sont de la même génération des petits génies devenus grands, mais ils ne sont pas d’accord du tout. On parle d’une part de Elon Musk qui parlait de l’IA il y a onze jours pour avertir son auditoire que l’on tenait peut-être là la formule de l’anéantissement de l’espèce humaine et qu’il serait urgent de réglementer son développement ; et d’autre part de Mark Zuckerberg, l’homme de Facebook et l’imprécateur qui dénonce tous ceux qui se risquent à improviser des fausses notes dans les lendemains qui chantent façon-Silicon Valley.

    Zuckerberg a répondu à Musk. Il croit que l’AI est formidable et qu’“on n’arrête pas le Progrès” qui va nous rendre la vie si formidable à tous égard. Les progrès produits par le Progrès abondent pour nous (...)


  • Will This “Neural Lace” Brain Implant Help Us Compete with AI? - Facts So Romantic
    http://nautil.us/blog/with-this-neural-lace-brain-implant-we-can-stay-as-smart-as-ai

    Solar-powered self-driving cars, reusable space ships, Hyperloop transportation, a mission to colonize Mars: Elon Musk is hell-bent on turning these once-far-fetched fantasies into reality. But none of these technologies has made him as leery as artificial intelligence. Earlier this summer at Code Conference 2016, Musk stated publicly that given the current rate of A.I. advancement, humans could ultimately expect to be left behind—cognitively, intellectually—“by a lot.” His solution to this unappealing fate is a novel brain-computer interface similar to the implantable “neural lace” described by the Scottish novelist Iain M. Banks in Look to Windward, part of his “Culture series” books. Along with serving as a rite of passage, it upgrades the human brain to be more competitive against A.I.’s (...)


  • Here’s How the New Teslas Stack Up Against Bugatti, Lamborghini, and Ferrari - Bloomberg
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-24/here-s-how-the-new-teslas-stack-up-against-bugatti-lamborghini-and-ferrar

    On Tuesday, Tesla announced new versions of its luxury cars that break major barriers for electric vehicles. But are the upgrades, as Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk claims, enough to hand Tesla the title of fastest car in the world? 
    The P100D Model S with Ludicrous mode will propel the car to 60 miles per hour in just 2.5 seconds. Tesla’s Model X sport utility vehicle will get there in 2.9 seconds. The bigger, 100-kilowatt-hour batteries also provide the first official U.S. Environmental Protection Agency range of more than 300 miles on a charge. 
    These speeds are crazy fast, matched only by sold-out supercars with tiny production runs: Ferrari’s $1.4 million LaFerrari, Porsche’s $845,000 918 Spyder, and Bugatti’s $2.3 million Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse. Tesla’s new Model S, at $134,500, is just as quick as any vehicle on the road. Even its seven-seat SUV beats the McLaren 675LT.


  • Aristotle at the Gigafactory: Why Physics Is a Philosophy - Facts So Romantic
    http://nautil.us/blog/aristotle-at-the-gigafactory-why-physics-is-a-philosophy

    On Friday, in Storey County, Nevada, a woman at Tesla’s Gigafactory inauguration hollered, “Beam me up, Elon!” Elon Musk, the electric car company’s chief executive officer, had just taken the stage along with J.B. Straubel, Tesla’s chief technical officer. “Okay, we’re working on that one,” Musk gamely replied before saying: “Alright—welcome everyone to the Gigafactory launch party! I hope you’re having a good time.” They were. The party’s attendees were almost exclusively Tesla devotees. “To be there in person,” according to Recode, “you would have to be a Tesla owner who referred five other buyers or just be a very important person of some sort.” Musk didn’t disappoint them. After being coached to “smile a lot” and to remember that “everything is awesome,” Musk and Straubel regaled everyone with a (...)


  • Joshua Brown, Who Died in Self-Driving Accident, Tested Limits of His Tesla - The New York Times
    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/02/business/joshua-brown-technology-enthusiast-tested-the-limits-of-his-tesla.html

    Joshua Brown loved his all-electric #Tesla Model S so much he nicknamed it Tessy.

    And he celebrated the #Autopilot feature that made it possible for him to cruise the highways, making YouTube videos of himself driving hands-free. In the first nine months he owned it, Mr. Brown put more than 45,000 miles on the car.
    […]
    Mr. Brown’s most recent video was his most popular. Titled “Autopilot Saves Model S,” it shows Mr. Brown driving on an interstate highway from Cleveland to Canton. A white truck cuts in front of Mr. Brown’s vehicle, and by his account, the Tesla’s Autopilot feature swerves the car to the right, avoiding a collision.

    After Elon Musk, Tesla’s founder, called attention to the video on Twitter, it went viral.

    Mr. Brown seemed to be elated.

    He had said, ‘For something to catch Elon Musk’s eye, I can die and go to heaven now,’” said a neighbor, Krista Kitchen, choking up. “He was absolutely thrilled – and then a couple weeks later he died.

    Et le NYT, outre la reproduction du tweet d’Iron Man himself, donne le lien de cette vidéo…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifpBWxTKhLU