person:eva illouz

  • Feu sur la liberté d’expression en Europe
    dimanche 30 juin 2019 par Coordination nationale de l’UJFP
    http://www.ujfp.org/spip.php?article7264

    Il aura fallu que Yossi Bartal, guide au musée juif de Berlin, démissionne pour qu’apparaissent toutes les manœuvres de l’État d’Israël, toutes ses compromissions aussi.

    La démission de Yossi Bartal(1) se produit huit jours après celle du Directeur du musée, Peter Schäfer (2).

    Peter Schäfer avait protesté avec 240 intellectuels juifs (dont Avraham Burg et Eva Illouz) pour s’opposer à une motion du Parlement allemand qui considérait le mouvement BDS comme antisémite. Il a été directement attaqué par l’ambassadeur d’Israël, Jeremy Issacharoff et Josef Schuster, directeur de l’équivalent du Crif allemand qui n’ont pas hésité à utiliser des « fake news » pour le salir.

    L’année dernière déjà le budget d’une exposition consacrée à Jérusalem, montrant aussi son versant palestinien a été divisé par 2 à la suite d’une intervention de Benjamin Netanyahou (qui réclamait l’annulation totale du budget). De son côté, Josef Schuster avait critiqué le fait que la majorité des employés du musée n’étaient pas juifs. Et les détracteurs de la liberté d’esprit du musée sont soutenus par l’ALD, le parti d’extrême droite…

    Un panier de crabe insoupçonné que nous révèle son (ex) guide. (...)

    ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““"
    (1) Opinion Why I Resigned From Berlin’s Jewish Museum
    Yossi Bartal - Jun 22, 2019 9:39 AM
    https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/why-i-resigned-from-berlin-s-jewish-museum-1.7398301

    Last Monday, after guiding hundreds of different tour groups from Germany and around the world to various exhibitions, I submitted my resignation as a guide at the Jewish Museum of Berlin in protest against the crass political intervention by the German government and the State of Israel in the work of the museum.

    The shameful firing of Peter Schäfer, among the most important scholars of Judaism in the world, in the wake of an aggressive campaign of “fake news” conducted by the Israeli Ambassador to Germany, Jeremy Issacharoff, and Josef Schuster, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, made it clear that the German government is not interested any more in guarding the artistic and academic autonomy of the museum. And I am not interested in working for an institution that relinquishes its independence to serve the political interests of this or that state.

    From the beginning, working as a Jewish guide at a Jewish museum where most of the staff and visitors are not Jews presented personal, political and pedagogical challenges. Thus questions of representation of the other and of speaking in their name have accompanied the work of the museum since its opening in 2003.

    Is it appropriate for a German state museum to be called a Jewish museum at all, or must it be under the complete control of the official Jewish community (that itself only represents part of German Jewry)? Is a Jewish museum, in the absence of a similar institution addressing the Muslim community or other minority groups, responsible for providing space for the perspectives of children of migrants in Germany, many of whom live in neighborhoods nearby, and for conducting Jewish-Muslim dialogue?

    Should the museum function as a forum in which various opinions in the Jewish world can be heard, those touching on Israel as well? The answer of the head of the Jewish community, the Israeli ambassador and right-wing journalists, who for years have been running a toxic and untruthful campaign against museum staff, is an absolute no.

    Thus a significant portion of the criticism of the museum suggests, or even declares openly, that the very fact that many of the staff members of the museum are not Jews negates their right to social activism that is not in keeping with the political preferences of the Jewish community’s representatives. This discourse reached the point of absurdity when Schuster, the leader of a community in which many members are not considered Jewish according to halakha, negated the museum’s right to call itself Jewish.

    But we should not be confused by the legitimate criticism over the lack of Jewish representation in leading positions in Germany, because this criticism is raised only when non-Jews dare, even in the most sensitive way, to criticize policies of the Israeli government, or to come out against anti-Muslim racism. Proof of this may be seen in the Jewish community’s support for the 10 officials who have been nominated to fight anti-Semitism in the country: All 10 are non-Jews, and all 10 support the position that strong criticism of the occupation and of Israel’s religiously discriminatory character should be seen as an expression of anti-Semitism.

    Not surprisingly, the extreme right-wing “Alternative for Germany” is the party that, by way of parliamentary questions, has been leading the campaign against the museum for the last year, as reported sympathetically by the house newspaper of Benjamin Netanyahu. Despite the Israeli Embassy’s contention that it is not in contact with members of the party, its opposition to museum activities is based on a fervent rejection of democratic discourse, and its absolute conflation of the interests of the Israeli government with those of world Jewry. Already in the past year, as part of an exhibition on Jerusalem and its significance to three religions, the museum was forced to cancel a lecture on the status of LGBTQ Palestinians in East Jerusalem because the Israeli ambassador suspected that the speaker, God help us, supports BDS.

    Accusations of anti-Semitism, which carry enormous weight in Germany, lead more and more to censorship and self-censorship. Cultural institutions in Germany, which are supposed to provide a stage for critical positions, are threatened financially and politically if they even dare to host artists and musicians who at any time expressed support for non-violent resistance to the Israeli occupation. This policy of fear-mongering that Miri Regev leads in Israel is imported by supporters of Israel to Germany. Only in Germany, because of its great sensitivity to anti-Semitism and deep identification with Israel in the wake of the Shoah, are there politicians not only on the right but on the left as well who vehemently endorse the silencing of criticism of Israel.

    The extreme right’s ascendance to power in places across the globe is based in great part on the constriction of democratic space and the intimidation and sanctioning of anyone who dares to oppose suppressive nationalist policies. The efforts of the Ministry of Strategic Affairs and the Foreign Ministry, in cooperation with Jewish and right-wing organizations around the world, to defame and slander anyone who refuses to join their campaign of incitement against human rights activists, has now led to the firing of an esteemed scholar, strictly because he chose to defend the rights of Israeli academics to oppose the designation of the BDS movement as an anti-Semitic movement.

    Against this paranoid impulse toward purges, which to a great extent recalls the years of McCarthyism in the United States, one must take a clear public stance. If the firing of Peter Schäfer has a moral, it is that no matter how much approbation a person has received for his opposition to anti-Semitism and support for Israel, opposition to Netanyahu’s anti-democratic policies is enough to turn him into an enemy of the people and the nation.

    If the German and Israeli governments are interested in the Jewish Museum representing only their narrow political interests and denying its staff members freedom of expression, I am not interested in having a part in it. So despite my deep respect for the museum’s staff, I proffered my resignation. I and many other Jews of my generation do not want or need a kashrut certificate from the State of Israel or the heads of the institutional Jewish community, nor, certainly, from the German government. Judaism, as a pluralistic and democratic world culture, will continue to exist after the racist, ultra-nationalist politics that has taken over many communal institutions passes from the world.

    The writer has lived in Berlin for 13 years and works as a tour guide.

    ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““
    (2) https://seenthis.net/messages/788398

  • Le directeur du musée juif de Berlin démissionne après une polémique sur l’antisémitisme
    Mis à jour le 15/06/2019
    https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/allemagne/le-directeur-du-musee-juif-de-berlin-demissionne-apres-une-polemique-su

    Le directeur du musée juif de Berlin, Peter Schäfer, a démissionné, vendredi 14 juin, sur fond de polémique. En cause : un tweet controversé de son établissement recommandant la lecture d’un article critique de la décision, en mai, du Parlement allemand de considérer comme « antisémites » les méthodes du mouvement BDS (Boycott Désinvestissement Sanctions). Peter Schäfer a remis sa démission à la ministre de la Culture allemande, Monika Grütters, « pour éviter de nouveaux préjudices au musée juif de Berlin », a indiqué ce dernier.

    #BDS

    • Berlin Jewish Museum Director Resigns After Tweet Supporting BDS Freedom of Speech

      Peter Schäfer steps down days after sharing of petition calling on German government not to adopt motion defining anti-Israel boycotts as anti-Semitic
      Noa Landau - Jun 14, 2019 8:48 PM
      https://www.haaretz.com/world-news/europe/berlin-jewish-museum-director-resigns-after-tweet-supporting-bds-freedom-of

      The director of Berlin’s Jewish Museum has resigned, the museum announced Friday, days after it was criticized for endorsing a petition against a parliamentary motion defining anti-Israel boycotts as anti-Semitic and banning the boycott movement from using public buildings.

      The resignation of museum Director Peter Schäfer comes after Israeli Ambassador to Germany Jeremy Issacharoff called the museum’s sharing of the petition “shameful.”

      The petition, asserting that “boycotts are a legitimate and nonviolent tool of resistance,” was signed by 240 Jewish intellectuals.

      The signatories, among them Avraham Burg and Eva Illouz, called on the German government not to adopt the motion, to protect freedom of speech and continue funding of Israeli and Palestinian organizations “that peacefully challenge the Israeli occupation, expose severe violations of international law and strengthen civil society. These organizations defend the principles and values at the heart of liberal democracy and rule of law, in Germany and elsewhere. More than ever, they need financial support and political backing.”

      An Israeli guide at the Berlin museum told Haaretz he planned to resign in protest of “the crude interventions by the Israeli government and Germany in the museum’s work.”

      Professor Emeritus Yaacov Shavit, former head of the department of History of the Jewish People at Tel Aviv University, told Haaretz that “this whole story is nothing more than a cause to displace Prof. Sheffer, a researcher of international renown of the Second Temple period, Mishna, and Talmud.”

      “Community leaders in Berlin needed to be grateful that someone like him agreed to serve as manager of the museum. This foolish act by community leaders is outrageous and bothersome,” he added.

      Last year, it was reported that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu demanded from Chancellor Angela Merkel that Germany stop funding the museum because it had held an exhibition about Jerusalem, “that presents a Muslim-Palestinian perspective.” Merkel was asked to halt funding to other organizations as well, on grounds that they were anti-Israel, among them the Berlin International Film Festival, pro-Palestinian Christian organizations, and the Israeli news website +972, which receives funding from the Heinrich Böll Foundation.

      Netanyahu did not deny the report and his bureau confirmed that he had raised “with various leaders the issue of funding Palestinian and Israeli groups and nonprofit organizations that depict the Israel Defense Forces as war criminals, support Palestinian terrorism and call for boycotting the State of Israel.”

      The Bundestag’s motion last month marked the first time a European parliament had officially defined the BDS movement as anti-Semitic. The motion, which is a call to the government and isn’t legally binding, won broad multiparty support from Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union, the Social Democrats and the Free Democratic Party. Some members of the Greens Party also supported the motion, though others abstained at the last minute. The motion stated that the BDS movement’s “Don’t Buy” stickers on Israeli products evoke the Nazi slogan “Don’t buy from Jews.”

  • [Le culte du bonheur créé] de nouvelles hiérarchies émotionnelles où ceux qui râlent, ceux qui sont en colère sont « pathologisés ».

    En plus d’être le jour du Printemps, aujourd’hui c’est aussi la Journée Mondiale du Bonheur ! C’est donc l’occasion idéale pour (ré)écouter la sociologue Eva Illouz, co-auteur de « Happycratie : Comment l’industrie du bonheur a pris le contrôle de nos vies »...
    Youpee !

    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/la-grande-table-2eme-partie/heureux-qui-comme-moi-je


    #bonheur #marchandisation #Printemps #JournéeMondialeduBonheur

  • Sois heureux et travaille : quand le bonheur devient une injonction de tous les instants - Idées - Télérama.fr
    https://www.telerama.fr/idees/sois-heureux-et-travaille-quand-le-bonheur-devient-une-injonction-de-tous-l

    Selon la sociologue israélienne Eva Illouz, professeure à l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem et directrice d’études à l’EHESS, auteure avec Edgar Cabanas d’Happycratie. Comment l’industrie du bonheur a pris le contrôle de nos vies, la psychologie positive, née aux Etats-Unis à la fin des années 1990, qui promeut à tout-va l’épanouissement personnel et le bien-être, a fait des ravages. Le bonheur n’est plus une émotion, idéale source de vertu durant des siècles de philosophie, il est devenu une injonction de tous les instants, une norme sociale qui dicte sa loi et enferme l’individu dans un moule. « Le portrait-robot de la personne heureuse correspond point par point au portrait idéal du ­citoyen néolibéral »…

    L’une des caractéristiques de cette « happycratie », c’est d’étouffer toute revendication sociale ou politique…
    L’happycratie est cette injonction permanente au bonheur, considéré comme l’horizon suprême du moi, l’expression la plus haute de l’accomplissement personnel. Qu’elle soit portée par des psys, des coachs, des conférenciers, des manuels, des blogs, des applications pour téléphone ou des émissions télévisuelles, la pseudo-science du bonheur promet d’enseigner à tous l’art d’être heureux, l’art de voir les choses de façon positive. Cette idéologie, centrée sur l’individu, le considère logiquement comme responsable de ses succès et de ses échecs, source de ses biens et de ses maux : il n’y aurait donc jamais de problème structurel, politique ou social, mais seulement des déficiences psychologiques individuelles, pouvant être traitées et améliorées. Nous ne sommes pas loin de la vision néolibérale d’une Margaret Thatcher qui disait que la société n’existait pas, et qu’il n’y avait que des individus… La tyrannie du bonheur fait en effet peser sur le seul individu tout le poids de son destin social.

    A partir du moment où Martin Seligman, l’inventeur de la psychologie positive, professeur à l’Université de Pennsylvanie, a été élu en 1998 à la tête de l’APA (American Psychological ­Association), des multinationales comme Coca-Cola et des institutions comme l’armée ont commencé à financer ce nouveau champ de recher­che, qui optimisait à leurs yeux les chances d’avoir des salariés ou des soldats performants et obéissants. Car ce qu’exalte Martin Seligman, ce sont très étrangement les qualités psychiques nécessaires à l’organisation économique et au mode de travail des gran­des entreprises ; la capacité à être flexible, à passer d’un emploi à un autre ; l’aptitude à gérer cette incertitude sans anxiété et à voir toujours le bon côté des choses ; le fait de pouvoir non seulement accepter un probable licenciement mais de s’en réjouir.

    Comment cette science du bonheur est-elle devenue une industrie ?
    Appliquée à tous les domaines de la vie quotidienne, le travail, la sexualité, le couple, l’alimentation, le sommeil, etc., elle est gouvernée par une pure logique de marché. Avec elle, le marché des consommateurs potentiels de la psychologie n’a cessé de s’élargir. Au départ, la psychologie s’occupait des fous et des névrosés ; elle s’intéresse aujourd’hui à tous ceux qui se sentent bien, ou pas trop mal, et leur vend l’idée qu’ils pourraient maximiser leur bien-être, dans la lignée de la pensée libérale et utilitariste du philosophe anglais Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832). C’est le grand tournant opéré par Martin Seligman : changer le paradigme d’une psychologie centrée sur la pathologie par une psychologie centrée sur le bonheur. C’est comme si on allait chez le médecin pour qu’il nous parle exclusivement des organes qui fonctionnent bien dans notre corps… La psychologie ne cherche plus à remédier à la souffrance — elle la nie au contraire, comme on l’a vu. Elle cherche à maximiser les potentialités de l’individu.

    #Psychologie #Néolibéralisme #Happycratie #Eva_Illouz

  • Des universitaires et des artistes israéliens mettent en garde contre une mise en équation de l’antisionisme et de l’antisémitisme
    22 novembre | Ofer Aderet pour Haaretz |Traduction J.Ch. pour l’AURDIP
    https://www.aurdip.org/des-universitaires-et-des-artistes.html

    Une lettre ouverte de 34 éminents Israéliens, dont des chercheurs en histoire juive et des lauréats du Prix Israël, a été publiée mardi dans les média autrichiens appelant à faire une différence entre critique légitime d’Israël, « aussi dure puisse-t-elle être », et antisémitisme.

    Cette lettre a été émise avant un rassemblement international à Vienne sur antisémitisme et antisionisme en Europe.

    L’ événement de cette semaine, « L’Europe par delà l’antisémitisme et l’antisionisme », se tient sous les auspices du Chancelier autrichien Sebastian Kurz. Son homologue israélien, Benjamin Netanyahu, devait y prendre part, mais est resté en Israël pour s’occuper de la crise dans sa coalition gouvernementale.

    « Nous adoptons et soutenons totalement le combat intransigeant [de l’Union Européenne] contre l’antisémitisme. La montée de l’antisémitisme nous inquiète. Comme nous l’a enseigné l’histoire, elle a souvent été l’annonce de désastres ultérieurs pour toute l’humanité », déclare la lettre.

    « Cependant, l’UE défend les droits de l’Homme et doit les protéger avec autant de force qu’elle combat l’antisémitisme. Il ne faudrait pas instrumentaliser ce combat contre l’antisémitisme pour réprimer la critique légitime de l’occupation par Israël et ses graves violations des droits fondamentaux des Palestiniens. » (...)

    #antisionisme #antisémitisme

    • La liste des signataires:
      Moshe Zimmerman, an emeritus professor at Hebrew University and a former director of the university’s Koebner Center for German History; Moshe Zukermann, emeritus professor of history and philosophy of science at Tel Aviv University; Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University emeritus professor in political science and a current Haaretz columnist; Israel Prize laureate, sculptor Dani Karavan; Israel Prize laureate, photographer Alex Levac; Israel Prize laureate, artist Michal Naaman; Gadi Algazi, a history professor at Tel Aviv University; Eva Illouz, a professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and former President of Bezalel Academy of Art and Design; Gideon Freudenthal, a professor in the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas at Tel Aviv University; Rachel Elior, an Israeli professor of Jewish philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Anat Matar, philosophy professor at Tel Aviv University; Yael Barda, a professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem; Miki Kratsman, a former chairman of the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design; Jose Brunner, an emeritus professor at Tel Aviv University and a former director of the Minerva Institute for German History; Alon Confino, a professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; Israel Prize laureate, graphic designer David Tartakover; Arie M. Dubnov, Chair of Israel Studies at George Washington University; David Enoch, history, philosophy and Judaic Studies professor at Israel’s Open University; Amos Goldberg, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Israel Prize laureate and vice-president of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities David Harel; Hannan Hever, comparative literature and Judaic Studies professor at Yale University; Hannah Kasher, professor emerita in Jewish Thought at Bar-Ilan University; Michael Keren, emeritus professor of economics at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Israel Prize laureate, Yehoshua Kolodny, professor emeritus in the Institute of Earth Sciences at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Nitzan Lebovic, professor of Holocaust studies at Lehigh University; Idith Zertal, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Dmitry Shumsky, professor of Jewish History at Hebrew University; Israel Prize laureate David Shulman, professor emeritus of Asian studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Ishay Rosen-Zvi, Jewish philosophy professor at Tel Aviv University; Dalia Ofer, professor emerita in Jewry and Holocaust Studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Paul Mendes-Flohr, professor emeritus for Jewish thoughts at the Hebrew University; Jacob Metzer, former president of Israel’s Open University; and Israel Prize laureate Yehuda Judd Ne’eman, professor emeritus at Tel Aviv University arts faculty

      #Palestine

  • Israeli academics and artists warn against equating anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism
    Their open letter ahead of a conference in Vienna advises against giving Israel immunity for ‘grave and widespread violations of human rights and international law’

    Ofer Aderet
    Nov 20, 2018

    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-israeli-professors-warn-against-equating-anti-zionism-with-anti-se

    An open letter from 35 prominent Israelis, including Jewish-history scholars and Israel Prize laureates, was published Tuesday in the Austrian media calling for a distinction between legitimate criticism of Israel, “harsh as it may be,” and anti-Semitism.
    To really understand Israel and the Middle East - subscribe to Haaretz
    The letter was released before an international gathering in Vienna on anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in Europe.
    The event this week, “Europe beyond anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism: Securing Jewish life in Europe,” is being held under the auspices of Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz. His Israeli counterpart, Benjamin Netanyahu, had been due to take part but stayed in Israel to deal with the crisis in his coalition government. 
    “We fully embrace and support the [European Union’s] uncompromising fight against anti-Semitism. The rise of anti-Semitism worries us. As we know from history, it has often signaled future disasters to all mankind,” the letter states. 
    Keep updated: Sign up to our newsletter
    Email* Sign up

    “However, the EU also stands for human rights and has to protect them as forcefully as it fights anti-Semitism. This fight against anti-Semitism should not be instrumentalized to suppress legitimate criticism of Israel’s occupation and severe violations of Palestinian human rights.” 

    The signatories accuse Netanyahu of suggesting an equivalence between anti-Israel criticism and anti-Semitism. The official declaration by the conference also notes that anti-Semitism is often expressed through disproportionate criticism of Israel, but the letter warns that such an approach could “afford Israel immunity against criticism for grave and widespread violations of human rights and international law.”
    The signatories object to the declaration’s alleged “identifying” of anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism. “Zionism, like all other modern Jewish movements in the 20th century, was harshly opposed by many Jews, as well as by non-Jews who were not anti-Semitic,” they write. “Many victims of the Holocaust opposed Zionism. On the other hand, many anti-Semites supported Zionism. It is nonsensical and inappropriate to identify anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism.”
    Among the signatories are Moshe Zimmerman, an emeritus professor at Hebrew University and a former director of the university’s Koebner Center for German History; Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University emeritus professor in political science and a current Haaretz columnist; sculptor Dani Karavan; Miki Kratsman, a former chairman of the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design; Jose Brunner, an emeritus professor at Tel Aviv University and a former director of the Minerva Institute for German History; Alon Confino, a professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; and graphic designer David Tartakover.

    Ofer Aderet
    Haaretz Correspondent

    Send me email alerts

    • La liste des signataires:
      Moshe Zimmerman, an emeritus professor at Hebrew University and a former director of the university’s Koebner Center for German History; Moshe Zukermann, emeritus professor of history and philosophy of science at Tel Aviv University; Zeev Sternhell, a Hebrew University emeritus professor in political science and a current Haaretz columnist; Israel Prize laureate, sculptor Dani Karavan; Israel Prize laureate, photographer Alex Levac; Israel Prize laureate, artist Michal Naaman; Gadi Algazi, a history professor at Tel Aviv University; Eva Illouz, a professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and former President of Bezalel Academy of Art and Design; Gideon Freudenthal, a professor in the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas at Tel Aviv University; Rachel Elior, an Israeli professor of Jewish philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Anat Matar, philosophy professor at Tel Aviv University; Yael Barda, a professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem; Miki Kratsman, a former chairman of the photography department at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design; Jose Brunner, an emeritus professor at Tel Aviv University and a former director of the Minerva Institute for German History; Alon Confino, a professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; Israel Prize laureate, graphic designer David Tartakover; Arie M. Dubnov, Chair of Israel Studies at George Washington University; David Enoch, history, philosophy and Judaic Studies professor at Israel’s Open University; Amos Goldberg, Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Israel Prize laureate and vice-president of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities David Harel; Hannan Hever, comparative literature and Judaic Studies professor at Yale University; Hannah Kasher, professor emerita in Jewish Thought at Bar-Ilan University; Michael Keren, emeritus professor of economics at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Israel Prize laureate, Yehoshua Kolodny, professor emeritus in the Institute of Earth Sciences at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Nitzan Lebovic, professor of Holocaust studies at Lehigh University; Idith Zertal, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Dmitry Shumsky, professor of Jewish History at Hebrew University; Israel Prize laureate David Shulman, professor emeritus of Asian studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Ishay Rosen-Zvi, Jewish philosophy professor at Tel Aviv University; Dalia Ofer, professor emerita in Jewry and Holocaust Studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Paul Mendes-Flohr, professor emeritus for Jewish thoughts at the Hebrew University; Jacob Metzer, former president of Israel’s Open University; and Israel Prize laureate Yehuda Judd Ne’eman, professor emeritus at Tel Aviv University arts faculty

  • Les classes de Segpa font mentir ceux qui croiraient encore à la #méritocratie | Slate.fr
    http://www.slate.fr/story/169398/echec-scolaire-education-segpa

    Et ces chercheurs ont raison d’en vouloir autant à la méritocratie. Le second pré-requis pour enseigner en Segpa selon moi, c’est de se défaire de ce mythe libéral qui fait porter un poids déraisonnable sur les épaules des élèves. Comme le fait remarquer l’éditorialiste britannique Nick Cohen dans cette perle de billet, The lies of meritocratic Britain : l’ancienne société de classe accordait au moins à celles et ceux qui étaient en bas de l’échelle la liberté d’être et de se sentir victimes d’une injustice. Aujourd’hui, le système méritocratique nous fait croire que nous sommes responsables de notre situation, et qu’on ne doit ses mauvaises notes qu’à un excès de flemme et de stupidité. La méritocratie a donné naissance à l’immonde psychologie active, bien présente à l’école, que la sociologue Eva Illouz dénonce vigoureusement dans Happycratie (2018). Elle permet, selon elle, « d’oblitérer les facteurs sociaux objectifs et de faire peser sur l’individu l’entière responsabilité de sa situation ». Or, selon une note d’information de la direction de l’évaluation, de la prospective et de l’évaluation (Depp), on a quatre fois plus de chances d’être élève en Segpa quand on vit en foyer ou en famille d’accueil, deux fois plus quand on est immigré ou membre d’une fratrie nombreuse. Et 73% des élèves de Segpa viennent d’une CSP défavorisée contre seulement 40% pour les collégiens hors Segpa : la méritocratie est un mensonge pesant.

  • America’s Jews are watching Israel in horror
    The Washington Post - By Dana Milbank - September 21 at 7:25 PM

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/israel-is-driving-jewish-america-farther-and-farther-away/2018/09/21/de2716f8-bdbb-11e8-8792-78719177250f_story.html

    My rabbi, Danny Zemel, comes from Zionist royalty: His grandfather, Rabbi Solomon Goldman, led the Zionist Organization of America in the late 1930s, and presided over the World Zionist Convention in Zurich in 1939. So Zemel’s words carried weight when he told his flock this week on Kol Nidre, the holiest night of the Jewish year, that “the current government of Israel has turned its back on Zionism.”

    “My love for Israel has not diminished one iota,” he said, but “this is, to my way of thinking, Israel’s first anti-Zionist government.”

    He recounted Israel’s transformation under Benjamin Netanyahu: the rise of ultranationalism tied to religious extremism, the upsurge in settler violence, the overriding of Supreme Court rulings upholding democracy and human rights, a crackdown on dissent, harassment of critics and nonprofits, confiscation of Arab villages and alliances with regimes — in Poland, Hungary and the Philippines — that foment anti-Semitism. The prime minister’s joint declaration in June absolving Poland of Holocaust culpability, which amounted to trading Holocaust denial for good relations, earned a rebuke from Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust memorial.

    “The current government in Israel has, like Esau, sold its birthright,” Zemel preached.

    Similarly anguished sentiments can be heard in synagogues and in Jewish homes throughout America. For 70 years, Israel survived in no small part because of American Jews’ support. Now we watch in horror as Netanyahu, with President Trump’s encouragement, leads Israel on a path to estrangement and destruction.

    Both men have gravely miscalculated. Trump seems to think support for Netanyahu will appeal to American Jews otherwise appalled by his treatment of immigrants and minorities. (Trump observed Rosh Hashanah last week by ordering the Palestinian office in Washington closed, another gratuitous blow to the moribund two-state solution that a majority of American Jews favor.) But his green light to extremism does the opposite.

    Netanyahu, for his part, is dissolving America’s bipartisan pro-Israel consensus in favor of an unstable alliance of end-times Christians, orthodox Jews and wealthy conservatives such as Sheldon Adelson.

    The two have achieved Trump’s usual result: division. They have split American Jews from Israelis, and America’s minority of politically conservative Jews from the rest of American Jews.

    A poll for the American Jewish Committee in June found that while 77 percent of Israeli Jews approve of Trump’s handling of the U.S.-Israeli relationship, only 34 percent of American Jews approve. Although Trump is popular in Israel, only 26 percent of American Jews approve of him. Most Jews feel less secure in the United States than they did a year ago. (No wonder, given the sharp rise in anti-Semitic incidents and high-level winks at anti-Semitism, from Charlottesville to Eric Trump’s recent claim that Trump critics are trying to “make three extra shekels.”) The AJC poll was done a month before Israel passed a law to give Jews more rights than other citizens, betraying the country’s 70-year democratic tradition.

    “We are the stunned witnesses of new alliances between Israel, Orthodox factions of Judaism throughout the world, and the new global populism in which ethnocentrism and even racism hold an undeniable place,” Hebrew University of Jerusalem sociologist Eva Illouz wrote in an article appearing this week on Yom Kippur in Israel’s Haaretz newspaper titled “The State of Israel vs. the Jewish people.” (...)

  • The State of Israel vs. the Jewish people -
    Israel has aligned itself with one nationalist, even anti-Semitic, regime after another. Where does that leave world Jewry?
    By Eva Illouz Sep 13, 2018
    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-the-state-of-israel-vs-the-jewish-people-1.6470108

    Orban, left, and Netanyahu, in Jerusalem in July 2018. DEBBIE HILL / AFP

    An earthquake is quietly rocking the Jewish world.

    In the 18th century, Jews began playing a decisive role in the promotion of universalism, because universalism promised them redemption from their political subjection. Through universalism, Jews could, in principle, be free and equal to those who had dominated them. This is why, in the centuries that followed, Jews participated in disproportionate numbers in communist and socialist causes. This is also why Jews were model citizens of countries, such as France or the United States, with universalist constitutions.

    The history of Jews as promoters of Enlightenment and universalist values, however, is drawing to a close. We are the stunned witnesses of new alliances between Israel, Orthodox factions of Judaism throughout the world, and the new global populism in which ethnocentrism and even racism hold an undeniable place.

    When Prime Minister Netanyahu chose to align himself politically with Donald Trump before and after the U.S. presidential election of 2016, some people could still give him the benefit of doubt. Admittedly, Trump was surrounded by people like Steve Bannon, the former head of Breitbart News, who reeked of racism and anti-Semitism, but no one was sure of the direction the new presidency would take. Even if Trump refused to condemn the anti-Semitic elements of his electoral base or the Ku Klux Klan, which had enthusiastically backed him, and even if it took him a long time to dissociate himself from David Duke – we were not yet certain of the presence of anti-Semitism in Trump’s discourse and strategies (especially since his daughter Ivanka was a convert to Judaism).

    But the events in Charlottesville in August 2017 no longer allowed for doubt. The neo-Nazi demonstrators committed violent acts against peaceful counter-protesters, killing one woman by plowing through a crowd with a car (an act reminiscent in its technique of terrorist attacks in Europe). Trump reacted to the events by condemning both the neo-Nazis and white supremacists and their opponents. The world was shocked by his conflation of the two groups, but Jerusalem did not object. Once again, the indulgent (or cynical) observer could have interpreted this silence as the reluctant obeisance of a vassal toward his overlord (of all the countries in the world, Israel receives the most military aid from the United States). One was entitled to think that Israel had no choice but to collaborate, despite the American leader’s outward signs of anti-Semitism.

    This interpretation, however, is no longer tenable. Before and since Charlottesville, Netanyahu has courted other leaders who are either unbothered by anti-Semitism or straightforwardly sympathetic to it, and upon whom Israel is not economically dependent. His concessions go as far as participating in a partial form of Holocaust denial.

    Take the case of Hungary. Under the government of Viktor Orban, the country shows troubling signs of legitimizing anti-Semitism. In 2015, for example, the Hungarian government announced its intention to erect a statue to commemorate Balint Homan, a Holocaust-era minister who played a decisive role in the murder or deportation of nearly 600,000 Hungarian Jews. Far from being an isolated incident, just a few months later, in 2016, another statue was erected in tribute to Gyorgy Donáth, one of the architects of anti-Jewish legislation during World War II. It was thus unsurprising to hear Orban employing anti-Semitic tropes during his reelection campaign in 2017, especially against Georges Soros, the Jewish, Hungarian-American billionaire-philanthropist who supports liberal causes, including that of open borders and immigration. Reanimating the anti-Semitic cliché about the power of Jews, Orban accused Soros of harboring intentions to undermine Hungary.

    Whom did Netanyahu choose to support? Not the anxious Hungarian Jewish community that protested bitterly against the anti-Semitic rhetoric of Orban’s government; nor did he choose to support the liberal Jew Soros, who defends humanitarian causes. Instead, the prime minister created new fault lines, preferring political allies to members of the tribe. He backed Orban, the same person who resurrects the memory of dark anti-Semites. When the Israeli ambassador in Budapest protested the erection of the infamous statue, he was publicly contradicted by none other than Netanyahu.

    To my knowledge, the Israeli government has never officially protested Orban’s anti-Semitic inclinations and affinities. In fact, when the Israeli ambassador in Budapest did try to do so, he was quieted down by Jerusalem. Not long before the Hungarian election, Netanyahu went to the trouble of visiting Hungary, thus giving a “kosher certificate” to Orban and exonerating him of the opprobrium attached to anti-Semitism and to an endorsement of figures active in the Shoah. When Netanyahu visited Budapest, he was given a glacial reception by the Federation of the Jewish Communities, while Orban gave him a warm welcome. To further reinforce their touching friendship, Netanyahu invited Orban to pay a reciprocal visit to Israel this past July, receiving him in a way usually reserved for the most devoted national allies.

    The relationship with Poland is just as puzzling. As a reminder, Poland is governed by the nationalist Law and Justice party, which has an uncompromising policy against refugees and appears to want to eliminate the independence of the courts by means of a series of reforms that would allow the government to control the judiciary branch. In 2016 the Law and Justice-led government eliminated the official body whose mission was to deal with problems of racial discrimination, xenophobia and intolerance, arguing that the organization had become “useless.”

    An illustration depicting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shaking hands with Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki in Auschwitz. Eran Wolkowski

    Encouraged by this and other governmental declarations and policies, signs of nationalism multiplied within Polish society. In February 2018, president Andrzej Duda declared that he would sign a law making it illegal to accuse the Polish nation of having collaborated with the Nazis. Accusing Poland of collusion in the Holocaust and other Nazi atrocities would be from now prosecutable. Israel initially protested the proposed legislation, but then in June, Benjamin Netanyahu and the Polish prime minister, Mateusz Morawiecki, signed an agreement exonerating Poland of any and all crimes against the Jews during the time of the German occupation. Israel also acceded to Poland’s move to outlaw the expression “Polish concentration camp.” Moreover, Netanyahu even signed a statement stipulating that anti-Semitism is identical to anti-Polonism, and that only a handful of sad Polish individuals were responsible for persecuting Jews – not the nation as a whole.

    A billboard displaying George Soros urges Hungarians to take part in a national consultation about what it calls a plan by the Hungarian-born financier to settle migrants in Europe, in Budapest. ATTILA KISBENEDEK / AFP

    Like the American, Hungarian and Polish alt-right, Israel wants to restore national pride unstained by “self-hating” critics. Like the Poles, for two decades now, Israel has been waging a war over the official narrative of the nation, trying to expunge school textbooks of inconvenient facts (such as the fact that Arabs were actively chased out of Israel in 1948). In order to quash criticism, Israel’s Culture Ministry now predicates funding to creative institutions on loyalty to the state. As in Hungary, the Israeli government persecutes NGOs like Breaking the Silence, a group whose only sin has been to give soldiers a forum for reporting their army experiences and to oppose Israeli settlers’ violence against Palestinians or the expropriation of land, in violation of international law. Purging critics from public life (as expressed in barring the entry into the country of BDS supporters, denying funding to theater companies or films critical of Israel, etc.) is an expression of direct state power.

    When it comes to refugees, Israel, like Hungary and Poland, refuses to comply with international law. For almost a decade now, Israel has not respected international conventions on the rights of refugees even though it is a signatory of said conventions: The state has detained refugees in camps, and imprisoned and deported them. Like Poland, Israel is trying to do away with the independence of its judiciary. Israel feels comfortable with the anti-democratic extreme right of European states in the same way that one feels comfortable with a family member who belches and gossips, losing any sense of self-control or table manners.

    More generally, these countries today share a deep common political core: fear of foreigners at the borders (it must be specified, however, that Israelis’ fears are less imaginary than those of Hungarians or Polish); references to the nation’s pride untainted by a dubious past, casting critics as traitors to the nation; and outlawing human rights organizations and contesting global norms based on moral principles. The Netanyahu-Trump-Putin triumvirate has a definite shared vision and strategy: to create a political bloc that would undermine the current liberal international order and its key players.

    In a recent article about Trump for Project Syndicate, legal scholar Mark S. Weiner suggested that Trump’s political vision and practice follow (albeit, unknowingly) the precepts of Carl Schmitt, the German legal scholar who joined the Nazi Party in 1933.

    “In place of normativity and universalism, Schmitt offers a theory of political identity based on a principle that Trump doubtless appreciates deeply from his pre-political career: land,” wrote Weiner. “For Schmitt, a political community forms when a group of people recognizes that they share some distinctive cultural trait that they believe is worth defending with their lives. This cultural basis of sovereignty is ultimately rooted in the distinctive geography… that a people inhabit. At stake here are opposing positions about the relation between national identity and law. According to Schmitt, the community’s nomos [the Greek word for “law”] or sense of itself that grows from its geography, is the philosophical precondition for its law. For liberals, by contrast, the nation is defined first and foremost by its legal commitments.”

    Netanyahu and his ilk subscribe to this Schmittian vision of the political, making legal commitments subordinate to geography and race. Land and race are the covert and overt motives of Netanyahu’s politics. He and his coalition have, for example, waged a politics of slow annexation in the West Bank, either in the hope of expelling or subjugating the 2.5 million Palestinians living there, or of controlling them.

    They have also radicalized the country’s Jewishness with the highly controversial nation-state law. Playing footsie with anti-Semitic leaders may seem to contradict the nation-state law, but it is motivated by the same statist and Schmittian logic whereby the state no longer views itself as committed to representing all of its citizens, but rather aims to expand territory; increase its power by designating enemies; define who belongs and who doesn’t; narrow the definition of citizenship; harden the boundaries of the body collective; and undermine the international liberal order. The line connecting Orban to the nationality law is the sheer and raw expansion of state power.

    Courting Orban or Morawiecki means having allies in the European Council and Commission, which would help Israel block unwanted votes, weaken Palestinian international strategies and create a political bloc that could impose a new international order. Netanyahu and his buddies have a strategy and are trying to reshape the international order to meet their own domestic goals. They are counting on the ultimate victory of reactionary forces to have a free hand to do what they please inside the state.

    But what is most startling is the fact that in order to promote his illiberal policies, Netanyahu is willing to snub and dismiss the greatest part of the Jewish people, its most accepted rabbis and intellectuals, and the vast number of Jews who have supported, through money or political action, the State of Israel. This suggests a clear and undeniable shift from a politics based on the people to a politics based on the land.

    For the majority of Jews outside Israel, human rights and the struggle against anti-Semitism are core values. Netanyahu’s enthusiastic support for authoritarian, anti-Semitic leaders is an expression of a profound shift in the state’s identity as a representative of the Jewish people to a state that aims to advance its own expansion through seizure of land, violation of international law, exclusion and discrimination. This is not fascism per se, but certainly one of its most distinctive features.

    This state of affairs is worrisome but it is also likely to have two interesting and even positive developments. The first is that in the same way that Israel has freed itself from its “Jewish complex” – abandoning its role as leader and center of the Jewish people as a whole – many or most Jews will now likely free themselves from their Israel complex, finally understanding that Israel’s values and their own are deeply at odds. World Jewish Congress head Ron Lauder’s August 13, 2018, op-ed in The New York Times, which was close to disowning Israel, is a powerful testimony to this. Lauder was very clear: Israel’s loss of moral status means it won’t be able to demand the unconditional loyalty of world Jewry. What was in the past experienced by many Jews as an inner conflict is now slowly being resolved: Many or most members of Jewish communities will give preference to their commitment to the constitutions of their countries – that is to universalist human rights.

    Israel has already stopped being the center of gravity of the Jewish world, and as such, it will be able to count only on the support of a handful of billionaires and the ultra-Orthodox. This means that for the foreseeable future, Israel’s leverage in American politics will be considerably weakened.

    Trumpism is a passing phase in American politics. Latinos and left-wing Democrats will become increasingly involved in the country’s politics, and as they do, these politicians will find it increasingly difficult to justify continued American support of Israeli policies that are abhorrent to liberal democracies. Unlike in the past, however, Jews will no longer pressure them to look the other way.

    The second interesting development concerns Europe. The European Union no longer knows what its mission was. But the Netanyahus, Trumps, Orbans and Morawieckis will help Europe reinvent its vocation: The social-democrat bloc of the EU will be entrusted with the mission of opposing state-sanctioned anti-Semitism and all forms of racism, and above all defending Europe’s liberal values that we, Jews and non-Jews, Zionists and anti-Zionists, have all fought so hard for. Israel, alas, is no longer among those fighting that fight.

    A shorter version of this article has originally appeared in Le Monde.

    • Eva Illouz : « Orban, Trump et Nétanyahou semblent affectionner barrières et murs »
      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2018/08/08/eva-illouz-israel-contre-les-juifs_5340351_3232.html?xtor=RSS-3208
      Dans une tribune au « Monde », l’universitaire franco-israélienne estime que l’alliance du gouvernement israélien avec les régimes « illibéraux » d’Europe de l’Est crée une brèche au sein du peuple juif, pour qui la lutte contre l’antisémitisme et la mémoire de la Shoah ne sont pas négociables.

      LE MONDE | 08.08.2018 à 06h39 • Mis à jour le 08.08.2018 à 19h18 | Par Eva Illouz (directrice d’études à l’Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales)

      Tribune. Un tremblement de terre est tranquillement en train de secouer le monde juif. Lorsque le premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Nétanyahou, choisit de soutenir Donald Trump avant et après l’élection présidentielle américaine de 2016, certains pouvaient encore donner à ce dernier le bénéfice du doute. Certes, Trump s’était entouré de gens comme Steve Bannon dont émanaient des relents antisémites, certes, il refusait aussi de condamner sa base électorale sympathisante du Ku Klux Klan, mais personne n’était encore sûr de la direction que prendrait sa nouvelle présidence.

      Les événements de Charlottesville, en août 2017, n’ont plus permis le doute. Les manifestants néonazis commirent des actes de violence contre des contre-manifestants pacifiques (tuant une personne en fonçant dans la foule avec une voiture), mais Trump condamna de la même façon opposants modérés et manifestants néonazis.

      Le monde entier fut choqué de cette mise en équivalence, mais Jérusalem ne protesta pas. L’observateur indulgent (ou cynique) aurait pu interpréter ce silence comme l’acquiescement forcé du vassal vis-à-vis de son suzerain : de tous les pays du monde, Israël est celui qui reçoit la plus grande aide militaire des Etats-Unis.

      Cette interprétation n’est désormais plus possible. Il est devenu clair que Nétanyahou a de fortes sympathies pour d’autres dirigeants qui, comme Trump, front preuve d’une grande indulgence vis-à-vis de l’antisémitisme et dont il ne dépend ni militairement ni économiquement.
      Une statue à Budapest

      Prenons l’exemple de la Hongrie. En 2015, le gouvernement y annonça son intention de dresser une statue à la mémoire de Balint Homan, ministre qui joua un rôle décisif dans la déportation de 600 000 juifs hongrois. Quelques mois plus tard, en 2016, il fut question d’ériger à Budapest une statue à la mémoire d’un des architectes de la législation antijuive durant la seconde guerre mondiale, György Donáth....

  • Heureux qui comme « Moi, Je »
    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/la-grande-table-2eme-partie/heureux-qui-comme-moi-je

    De plus en plus d’ouvrages surfent aujourd’hui sur cette « injonction au bonheur ». Leurs auteurs sont psychiatres, philosophes, sociologues, managers... ils ont la recette d’un bonheur sans illusions, les clés d’un Narcisse retrouvé. Une injonction permanente et une invitation à trouver la voie du #bonheur, en cas d’impasse prolongée.

    Devenu grande cause nationale aux Etats-Unis, dont la figure du « #self_made_man » est la corollaire emblématique, le phénomène s’est mondialisé, au point que les Emirats Arabes Unis aient nommé une ministre du bonheur en 2016.

    Il s’agit de voir ses expériences comme des opportunités pour renforcer notre structure psychique et faire preuve de positivité là où il n’y aurait que de la négativité, comme dans un monde de guerre.
    (Eva Illouz)

    Plus encore, l’injonction au bonheur est le pilier d’une véritable #industrie. Marchandise intangible, le bonheur est une bonne affaire, ce qu’avaient déjà compris des groupes comme Coca-Cola, fort de son Coca-Cola Happiness Institute. Les entreprises actuelles, start-up en tête, se développent de plus en plus dans ce sens, smiley et Chief Happiness Officer à l’appui.

    Nous voyons une affinité entre le #néolibéralisme et cette quête du bonheur. (…) Les individus sont seuls face à eux-mêmes et ne doivent donc demander de comptes qu’à eux-mêmes.
    (Eva Illouz)

  • Le #développement_personnel est-il vraiment l’#arnaque du siècle ? (Jean-Laurent Cassely, Slate)
    http://www.slate.fr/story/166196/societe-happycratie-bonheur-developpement-personnel-pensee-positive

    Dans la période post-crise 2008, durant laquelle les #inégalités se creusent, les chances de #mobilité_sociale s’aménuisent, le fonctionnement du #marché_du_travail se durcit, l’appel à faire preuve d’#enthousiasme, de #positivité et d’#autonomie contribue à faire porter sur les individus la #responsabilité de tout ce qui dysfonctionne.

    Des phénomènes structurels lourds comme les variations du taux de #chômage ou la #dette des États peuvent passer au second plan ou même être occultés au profit de l’encouragement à devenir l’#entrepreneur de #soi-même, à rebondir et à faire de ses #échecs des #opportunités – autant de maximes qui forment un néo-bouddhisme absurde, une « #pornographie_émotionnelle » que les adeptes des fils d’actualité du réseau Linkedin ne connaissent malheureusement que trop bien.

    […]

    Le véritable débat concerne peut-être moins l’efficacité des techniques du mieux-être que la vision du monde qu’elles véhiculent. Sur le plan individuel, toutes celles et ceux qui ne parviennent pas à être riches, heureux, en bonne santé, épanouis et débordants d’énergie sont soupçonnés de ne pas avoir fait suffisamment d’#efforts –et donc quelque part de vouloir et de mériter leur sort. Ils cumulent leur #souffrance avec un sentiment de #culpabilité.

  • #MeToo : le retour de bâton médiatique… dans les pages de L’Obs

    http://www.slate.fr/story/165545/hommes-apres-metoo-dossier-lobs-masculinite-retour-baton-mouvement-feministe-e

    #backlash

    Les fameux hashtags ont été lancés en octobre 2017 (le mouvement Me Too, lui, existe depuis 2007). Cela fait donc dix mois, durée suffisante pour que tout être pourvu d’un cerveau puisse entreprendre une phase d’introspection. Autrement dit, depuis octobre, tout homme se sentant concerné aurait eu le loisir de se mettre enfin à réfléchir sur lui-même, de prendre conscience de ses privilèges, de réaliser qu’il a, d’une façon ou d’une autre, contribué à cette gigantesque entreprise de maltraitance des femmes.

    Il semble déjà assez aberrant que tant d’hommes aient dû attendre l’éclosion des hashtags et la prolifération de reportages dans les médias (une prolifération éphémère, comme un effet de mode) pour réaliser qu’autour d’eux, partout, tout le temps, des femmes vivaient en insécurité parce qu’elles étaient traitées comme des êtres inférieurs et/ou des objets sexuels. Mais admettons. Admettons que, par inattention, ils n’aient rien vu jusque-là (« Je ne m’étais jamais rendu compte », m’a dit un proche, un peu penaud). #MeToo et #BalanceTonPorc étaient justement là pour les aider à ouvrir enfin grand les yeux sur ce problème dont ils sont la cause.

    Dix mois après, il est temps de faire le bilan, non ? Le dossier de L’Obs est parfaitement représentatif de l’avancée (ou de la non-avancée) des opérations. Quatre pages de reportage sur un camp proposant aux hommes d’« explorer leur masculinité », durant un stage de deux jours (dont, au passage, la non-mixité ne dérange personne alors qu’elle crée la polémique ailleurs), c’est très bien, parce que la pensée masculiniste doit être combattue.

    Mais quel est l’effet de ce reportage au sein d’un tel dossier ? Détourner une nouvelle fois les yeux des problèmes du quotidien. Pour un homme, lire un article sur des types qui vivent nus dans la forêt en scandant des psaumes à la gloire de leur masculinité, c’est finalement assez rassurant. On se dit que ces types sont fêlés, que leurs femmes n’ont pas de bol, et puis on tourne la page sans se poser de question sur soi-même. Pourquoi le faire, puisqu’on est forcément moins extrême que ces mecs ?

    • Il y a une petite partie sur les #incels et la prétendue #misère_sexuelle

      Rien que la notion de « misère sexuelle » pose problème, comme l’expliquait Daphnée Leportois dans un article publié sur Slate peu après le massacre perpétré par Minassian. Sur Twitter, suite à sa lecture de l’article d’Eva Illouz, qui l’a scandalisée à juste titre, une utilisatrice résumait les choses en quelques mots : « La misère sexuelle n’existe pas, c’est la nostalgie de la domination sur les corps féminins ». On parle bien de la perte de ce que les hommes considéraient comme un acquis, et qu’ils vivent mal de voir leur échapper.

  • Vous cherchez un homme ? Soyez sexxxxxxy - Libération.fr
    http://sexes.blogs.liberation.fr/2017/08/28/vous-cherchez-un-homme-soyez-sexxxxxxy
    Confondre le sentiment amoureux et le désir est probablement le prélude à de profondes désillusions…

    Il faut se méfier des « explications scientifiques », ajoute Eva Illouz, car elles tendent à naturaliser des inégalités qui n’ont rien de naturel ni de normal. Dans notre société obsédée par le champ sexuel, les hommes, mais surtout les femmes, se doivent d’être sexy, désirables, attirant(e)s, excitant(e)s. Pourquoi ? Parce que le #désir #sexuel est devenu la métaphore opérative de la #consommation . La collusion des termes appartenant aux registres a priori très différents de l’amour et de l’économie marquent bien cette « confusion », typique de notre époque : pour être sexy, il faut augmenter son « capital érotique » (sic), faire son « marché en ligne » sur des sites de rencontre et monter des « plans séduction » à coup d’achats ciblés : produits de beauté, suppléments vitaminés, articles de fitness et même… prothèses de sein.

  • L’amour – un piège à femmes | Une sociologue chez le coiffeur
    https://systemececilia.wordpress.com/2016/07/01/lamour-un-piege-a-femmes

    L’amour. L’amour romantique, s’entend, pas l’amour filial ou les autres formes d’affection. Et l’amour hétérosexuel, puisque l’amour homosexuel est considéré comme un phénomène trop minoritaire pour mériter qu’on s’y intéresse. L’amour, ce qui fait courir les hommes et les femmes. L’amour romantique hétérosexuel, qui a fait couler beaucoup d’encre, est à la base de nombreuses fictions, fait l’objet de moult chansons… Pourquoi écrire un article de plus ?

    Lorsque je travaillais sur mon article sur l’amour romantique (et nécessairement hétérosexuel) dans les dystopies young adult, j’ai été amenée à repenser à plusieurs des ouvrages féministes ou de sociologie qui en parlaient, à titre principal ou de manière périphérique. Et au fait qu’ils en disaient un peu tous la même chose : l’amour romantique hétérosexuel est une idéologie qui limite les femmes, dans leurs choix, leurs possibilités, leur énergie… Entendons-nous. Ici, je ne parle pas de l’amour romantique tel qu’une personne peut le ressentir envers une autre. Je parle des discours qui sont tenus sur lui et les représentations dominantes dans notre société contemporaine sur ce que l’amour est et doit être, l’idéologie de l’amour.

    Cette idéologie est constituée d’un certain nombre d’idées reçues. Par commodité, je vais reprendre les six « idées de base de l’amour » décrites par Ruwen Ogien : l’amour est plus important que tout, l’être aimé est irremplaçable, on peut aimer sans raison, l’amour est au-delà du bien et du mal, on ne peut pas aimer sur commande, l’amour qui ne dure pas n’est pas un amour véritable. Rien de propre à un sexe plutôt que l’autre à première vue. Et pourtant. Si l’amour est perçu comme étant plus important que tout, il est présenté comme l’étant encore plus pour les femmes que par les hommes. Et je vais tenter de le prouver.

    #amour #domination_masculine #hétérosexualité #patriarcat

    • L’amour – un piège à femmes (cas pratique) | Une sociologue chez le coiffeur
      https://systemececilia.wordpress.com/2017/01/31/lamour-un-piege-a-femmes-cas-pratique

      C’est l’histoire d’une copine. De plusieurs copines en fait. D’ailleurs, certaines d’entre elles ne sont même pas des amies à moi, ce sont des amies d’amies ou de vagues connaissances. Ce sont des filles entre vingt-cinq et trente ans, disons , hétérosexuelles. Un âge où les relations amoureuses deviennent « sérieuses », elles durent souvent depuis un an ou plus. Mes copines commence à parler d’emménager ensemble, de se marier, d’avoir des enfants (pas forcément dans cet ordre). Certaines ont franchi un de ses pas. Et un autre point commun de toutes ces copines, c’est qu’elles ont fait des compromis. Il y en a une qui a déménagé à six-cents kilomètres de sa famille et de ses amis, dans une ville o`elle ne connait personne, pour suivre son copain qui est originaire de là-bas. Il y en a une qui fait toutes les tâches ménagères parce qu’elle travaille chez elle pendant que son copain a un emploi salarié à l’extérieur du domicile. Il y en a une qui fait des choses sur le plan sexuel qui lui plaisent moyennement pour faire plaisir à son copain. Il y en a une qui a arrêté de voir un de ses amis parce que son copain était jaloux. Bref, toutes mes copines ont fait des compromis. Ou du moins, elles ont accepté de sacrifier quelque chose pour le bien de la relation. Peut-être qu’elles ont reçu quelque chose en échange. L’histoire ne le dit pas. En tous cas, elles ne le disent pas. Bien sûr, elles avaient de bonnes raisons de les faire. Leurs copains se montrent reconnaissants (parfois). Et puis souvent, c’est pas grand-chose, ces compromis, et c’est temporaire. Sauf que le plus souvent ça ne l’est pas.

  • Les 400 culs - Etes-vous sûr(e) de l’aimer ? - Libération.fr
    http://sexes.blogs.liberation.fr/2017/08/14/etes-vous-sure-de-laimer

    Epousez qui vous aimez. Séparez-vous sans regrets. Dans notre société moderne, il n’y a plus de raison d’être malheureux en amour. On se choisit et on rompt librement. Le problème… c’est prendre la décision. Dans Pourquoi l’amour fait mal, un ouvrage de 400 pages qui se lisent à perdre haleine, Eva Illouz –experte en sociologie des émotions– dissèque les raisons pour lesquelles nous nous sentons si mal lorsque nous devons faire des choix.

    #amour #sociologie #couple #émotions

  • En Israël, l’extrême droite se déchaîne, en toute impunité | Mediapart

    http://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/310714/en-israel-lextreme-droite-se-dechaine-en-toute-impunite?onglet=full

    En Israël, l’extrême droite se déchaîne, en toute impunité

    31 juillet 2014 | Par Pierre Puchot

    En Israël, il ne se passe désormais plus trois jours sans qu’une manifestation contre la guerre à Gaza ne fasse l’objet d’une violente répression de la part des militants d’extrême droite. Jafar Farah dirige le centre Mossawa, dédié à l’étude des discriminations subies par la communauté arabe en Israël. « Une manifestation de haine à cette échelle, plus seulement de la part des colons de Cisjordanie, je n’ai jamais vu cela, c’est un phénomène nouveau », dit-il.

    #israel #extrême_droite

  • Interview with Sociologist Eva Illouz about Gaza and Israeli Society - SPIEGEL ONLINE

    « Where you see human beings, Israelis see enemies. In front of enemies »

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/interview-with-sociologist-eva-illouz-about-gaza-and-israeli-society-a-98453

    Israel pulled out of the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, but left behind death and destruction. Israeli sociologist Eva Illouz tells SPIEGEL that her country is gripped by fear and is becoming increasingly suspicious of democracy.

    #israËl #palestine #gaza

  • Not apartheid, slavery - A new perspective on the Israeli occupation Haaretz

    By Eva Illouz | Feb. 7, 2014
    http://www.haaretz.com/news/features/.premium-1.572880

    Open Haaretz on any given day. Half or three quarters of its news items will invariably revolve around the same two topics: people struggling to protect the good name of Israel, and people struggling against its violence and injustices.

    An almost random example: On December 17, 2013, one could read, on a single Haaretz page, Chemi Shalev reporting on the decision of the American Studies Association to boycott Israeli academic institutions in order to “honor the call of Palestinian civil society.” In response, former Harvard University President Lawrence Summers dubbed the decision “anti-Semitic in effect, if not in intent.”

    On the same page, MK Naftali Bennett called the bill to prevent outside funding of left-wing NGOs in Israel “too soft.” The proposed law was meant to protect Israel and Israeli soldiers from “foreign forces” which, in his view, work against the national interest of Israel through those left-wing nonprofits (for Bennett and many others in Israel, to defend human rights is to be left-wing).The Haaretz editorial, backed by an article by regular columnist Sefi Rachlevsky, referred to the treatment of illegal immigrants by the Israeli government as shameful, with Rachlevsky calling the current political regime “radical rightist-racist-capitalist,” because “it tramples democracy and replaces it with fascism.” The day after, it was the turn of Alan Dershowitz to call the American Studies Association vote to boycott Israel shameful, “for singling out the Jew among nations. Shame on them for applying a double standard to Jewish universities” (December 18).

    This mudslinging has become a normal spectacle to the bemused eyes of ordinary Israelis and Jews around the world. But what’s astonishing is that this mud is being thrown by Jews at Jews. Indeed, the valiant combatants for the good name of Israel miss an important point: the critiques of Israel in the United States are increasingly waged by Jews, not anti-Semites. The initiators and leaders of the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement are such respected academics as Judith Butler, Jacqueline Rose, Noam Chomsky, Hilary Rose and Larry Gross, all Jews.

    If Israel is indeed singled out among the many nations that have a bad record in human rights, it is because of the personal sense of shame and embarrassment that a large number of Jews in the Western world feel toward a state that, by its policies and ethos, does not represent them anymore. As Peter Beinart has been cogently arguing for some time now, the Jewish people seems to have split into two distinct factions: One that is dominated by such imperatives as “Israeli security,” “Jewish identity” and by the condemnation of “the world’s double standards” and “Arabs’ unreliability”; and a second group of Jews, inside and outside Israel, for whom human rights, freedom, and the rule of law are as visceral and fundamental to their identity as membership to Judaism is for the first group. Supreme irony of history: Israel has splintered the Jewish people around two radically different moral visions of Jews and humanity.

    If we are to find an appropriate analogy to understand the rift inside the Jewish people, let us agree that the debate between the two groups is neither ethnic (we belong to the same ethnic group) nor religious (the Judith Butlers of the world are not trying to push a new or different religious dogma, although the rift has a certain, but imperfect, overlap with the religious-secular positions). Nor is the debate a political or ideological one, as Israel is in fact still a democracy. Rather, the poignancy, acrimony and intensity of the debate are about two competing and ultimately incompatible conceptions of morality. This statement is less trivial than it sounds.

  • Les infortunes de l’amour - La Vie des idées
    http://www.laviedesidees.fr/Les-infortunes-de-l-amour.html

    Peut-on alors identifier les acteurs du désamour ? La psychologie clinique et la culture freudienne, auxquelles beaucoup sont fidèles, défendent l’idée selon laquelle c’est l’individu et lui seul qui est responsable de sa vie amoureuse et érotique, et que la famille est à la source de leur configuration. Autrement dit, le partenaire choisi est le reflet direct des expériences d’enfance, de sorte que la psyché devient responsable des malheurs amoureux dès lors inévitables. Eva Illouz essaie à l’inverse de démontrer que les chagrins sont le produit des institutions, ou de la structuration de la vie affective par les institutions.

    Elle propose alors une lecture féministe de l’amour, qui l’appréhende comme une marchandise : « l’amour est produit par les rapports sociaux concrets, [...] l’amour circule sur un marché fait d’acteurs en situation de concurrence, et inégaux, [...où] certaines personnes disposent d’une plus grande capacité de définir les conditions dans lesquelles elles sont aimées que d’autres » (p. 30). La sociologie, selon elle, a négligé l’amour et divers types de souffrances qu’il génère, laissant à la psychologie clinique les émotions. Alors que la famine et la pauvreté ont été analysées par les anthropologues comme des souffrances sociales [1], d’autres types de souffrances, comme l’angoisse et la dépression, ont été délaissées malgré leur caractère ordinaire.

    #amour #soiologie

  • Séparation, la part des #femmes | Exploration sociologique intéressante de l’autonomisation des femmes
    http://www.laviedesidees.fr/Separation-la-part-des-femmes.html

    À partir de ces multiples formes de séparation, François de Singly annonce un changement des règles de l’amour conjugal, prioritairement impulsé par les femmes. La montée en puissance du « souci de soi » parmi elles va de pair avec une forme de dissolution de l’agapé féminin, entendue comme amour inconditionnel et marqué par un don sans retour, au profit de la philia, amour marqué par l’exigence de réciprocité. Le processus d’individualisation des femmes aurait ainsi pour conséquence de séparer les amours parentaux et conjugaux : il s’est d’abord traduit par une exigence d’eros féminin tout au long du 20ème siècle, puis désormais par une attente grandissante de réciprocité voire de reconnaissance individuelle. Les relations de #couple seraient gagnées par de nouveaux enjeux, notamment ceux de l’égalité et de la conditionnalité. Les séparations peuvent désormais être motivées par le refus d’une existence routinière – et ce au nom du développement personnel –, ou par l’insuffisance d’un monde commun.

    Exigence conjointe d’agapé pour des hommes qui jusqu’ici y étaient peu habitués, restriction de l’agapé et baisse de l’investissement féminin : l’amour conjugal deviendrait un « amour rationnel, conditionnel, et contractuel ». Dans un ton qu’on lui connaît moins, François de Singly souligne les risques de la « rationalisation des relations intimes », en référence aux travaux d’Eva Illouz, voire de la « marchandisation » des liens conjugaux. Face à ce qu’il entrevoit comme l’entrée du calcul rationnel et de la raison instrumentale dans le couple, il plaide finalement pour un amour qui puisse conserver « l’agapé » et la « philia ».

    #sociologie #livre #fb #tw

  • La fabrique de l’âme standard | Eva Illouz
    http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2011/11/ILLOUZ/46926

    Construire le consensus, privilégier le dialogue, maîtriser ses émotions : des vertus recommandées parce qu’elles incarnent un comportement idéalement adulte, ou parce qu’elles favorisent une meilleure rentabilité de l’individu ? / #Communication, #Idées, #Intellectuels, #Recherche, #Science, Société, (...) / Communication, Idées, Intellectuels, Recherche, Science, Société, #Travail, #Psychanalyse - 2011/11

    #2011/11