person:jean

  • Beyond the Hype of Lab-Grown Diamonds
    https://earther.gizmodo.com/beyond-the-hype-of-lab-grown-diamonds-1834890351

    Billions of years ago when the world was still young, treasure began forming deep underground. As the edges of Earth’s tectonic plates plunged down into the upper mantle, bits of carbon, some likely hailing from long-dead life forms were melted and compressed into rigid lattices. Over millions of years, those lattices grew into the most durable, dazzling gems the planet had ever cooked up. And every so often, for reasons scientists still don’t fully understand, an eruption would send a stash of these stones rocketing to the surface inside a bubbly magma known as kimberlite.

    There, the diamonds would remain, nestled in the kimberlite volcanoes that delivered them from their fiery home, until humans evolved, learned of their existence, and began to dig them up.

    The epic origin of Earth’s diamonds has helped fuel a powerful marketing mythology around them: that they are objects of otherworldly strength and beauty; fitting symbols of eternal love. But while “diamonds are forever” may be the catchiest advertising slogan ever to bear some geologic truth, the supply of these stones in the Earth’s crust, in places we can readily reach them, is far from everlasting. And the scars we’ve inflicted on the land and ourselves in order to mine diamonds has cast a shadow that still lingers over the industry.

    Some diamond seekers, however, say we don’t need to scour the Earth any longer, because science now offers an alternative: diamonds grown in labs. These gems aren’t simulants or synthetic substitutes; they are optically, chemically, and physically identical to their Earth-mined counterparts. They’re also cheaper, and in theory, limitless. The arrival of lab-grown diamonds has rocked the jewelry world to its core and prompted fierce pushback from diamond miners. Claims abound on both sides.

    Growers often say that their diamonds are sustainable and ethical; miners and their industry allies counter that only gems plucked from the Earth can be considered “real” or “precious.” Some of these assertions are subjective, others are supported only by sparse, self-reported, or industry-backed data. But that’s not stopping everyone from making them.

    This is a fight over image, and when it comes to diamonds, image is everything.
    A variety of cut, polished Ada Diamonds created in a lab, including smaller melee stones and large center stones. 22.94 carats total. (2.60 ct. pear, 2.01 ct. asscher, 2.23 ct. cushion, 3.01 ct. radiant, 1.74 ct. princess, 2.11 ct. emerald, 3.11 ct. heart, 3.00 ct. oval, 3.13 ct. round.)
    Image: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Same, but different

    The dream of lab-grown diamond dates back over a century. In 1911, science fiction author H.G. Wells described what would essentially become one of the key methods for making diamond—recreating the conditions inside Earth’s mantle on its surface—in his short story The Diamond Maker. As the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) notes, there were a handful of dubious attempts to create diamonds in labs in the late 19th and early 20th century, but the first commercial diamond production wouldn’t emerge until the mid-1950s, when scientists with General Electric worked out a method for creating small, brown stones. Others, including De Beers, soon developed their own methods for synthesizing the gems, and use of the lab-created diamond in industrial applications, from cutting tools to high power electronics, took off.

    According to the GIA’s James Shigley, the first experimental production of gem-quality diamond occurred in 1970. Yet by the early 2000s, gem-quality stones were still small, and often tinted yellow with impurities. It was only in the last five or so years that methods for growing diamonds advanced to the point that producers began churning out large, colorless stones consistently. That’s when the jewelry sector began to take a real interest.

    Today, that sector is taking off. The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA), a trade group formed in 2016 by a dozen lab diamond growers and sellers, now has about 50 members, according to IGDA secretary general Dick Garard. When the IGDA first formed, lab-grown diamonds were estimated to represent about 1 percent of a $14 billion rough diamond market. This year, industry analyst Paul Zimnisky estimates they account for 2-3 percent of the market.

    He expects that share will only continue to grow as factories in China that already produce millions of carats a year for industrial purposes start to see an opportunity in jewelry.
    “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not.”

    “This year some [factories] will come up from 100,000 gem-quality diamonds to one to two million,” Zimnisky said. “They already have the infrastructure and equipment in place” and are in the process of upgrading it. (About 150 million carats of diamonds were mined last year, according to a global analysis of the industry conducted by Bain & Company.)

    Production ramp-up aside, 2018 saw some other major developments across the industry. In the summer, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reversed decades of guidance when it expanded the definition of a diamond to include those created in labs and dropped ‘synthetic’ as a recommended descriptor for lab-grown stones. The decision came on the heels of the world’s top diamond producer, De Beers, announcing the launch of its own lab-grown diamond line, Lightbox, after having once vowed never to sell man-made stones as jewelry.

    “I would say shock,” Lightbox Chief Marketing Officer Sally Morrison told Earther when asked how the jewelry world responded to the company’s launch.

    While the majority of lab-grown diamonds on the market today are what’s known as melee (less than 0.18 carats), the tech for producing the biggest, most dazzling diamonds continues to improve. In 2016, lab-grown diamond company MiaDonna announced its partners had grown a 6.28 carat gem-quality diamond, claimed to be the largest created in the U.S. to that point. In 2017, a lab in Augsburg University, Germany that grows diamonds for industrial and scientific research applications produced what is thought to be the largest lab-grown diamond ever—a 155 carat behemoth that stretches nearly 4 inches across. Not gem quality, perhaps, but still impressive.

    “If you compare it with the Queen’s diamond, hers is four times heavier, it’s clearer” physicist Matthias Schreck, who leads the group that grew that beast of a jewel, told me. “But in area, our diamond is bigger. We were very proud of this.”

    Diamonds can be created in one of two ways: Similar to how they form inside the Earth, or similar to how scientists speculate they might form in outer space.

    The older, Earth-inspired method is known as “high temperature high pressure” (HPHT), and that’s exactly what it sounds like. A carbon source, like graphite, is placed in a giant, mechanical press where, in the presence of a catalyst, it’s subjected to temperatures of around 1,600 degrees Celsius and pressures of 5-6 Gigapascals in order to form diamond. (If you’re curious what that sort of pressure feels like, the GIA describes it as similar to the force exerted if you tried to balance a commercial jet on your fingertip.)

    The newer method, called chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is more akin to how diamonds might form in interstellar gas clouds (for which we have indirect, spectroscopic evidence, according to Shigley). A hydrocarbon gas, like methane, is pumped into a low-pressure reactor vessel alongside hydrogen. While maintaining near-vacuum conditions, the gases are heated very hot—typically 3,000 to 4,000 degrees Celsius, according to Lightbox CEO Steve Coe—causing carbon atoms to break free of their molecular bonds. Under the right conditions, those liberated bits of carbon will settle out onto a substrate—typically a flat, square plate of a synthetic diamond produced with the HPHT method—forming layer upon layer of diamond.

    “It’s like snow falling on a table on your back porch,” Jason Payne, the founder and CEO of lab-grown diamond jewelry company Ada Diamonds, told me.

    Scientists have been forging gem-quality diamonds with HPHT for longer, but today, CVD has become the method of choice for those selling larger bridal stones. That’s in part because it’s easier to control impurities and make diamonds with very high clarity, according to Coe. Still, each method has its advantages—Payne said that HPHT is faster and the diamonds typically have better color (which is to say, less of it)—and some companies, like Ada, purchase stones grown in both ways.

    However they’re made, lab-grown diamonds have the same exceptional hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity as their Earth-mined counterparts. Cut, they can dazzle with the same brilliance and fire—a technical term to describe how well the diamond scatters light like a prism. The GIA even grades them according to the same 4Cs—cut, clarity, color, and carat—that gemologists use to assess diamonds formed in the Earth, although it uses a slightly different terminology to report the color and clarity grades for lab-grown stones.

    They’re so similar, in fact, that lab-grown diamond entering the larger diamond supply without any disclosures has become a major concern across the jewelry industry, particularly when it comes to melee stones from Asia. It’s something major retailers are now investing thousands of dollars in sophisticated detection equipment to suss out by searching for minute differences in, say, their crystal shape or for impurities like nitrogen (much less common in lab-grown diamond, according to Shigley).

    Those differences may be a lifeline for retailers hoping to weed out lab-grown diamonds, but for companies focused on them, they can become another selling point. The lack of nitrogen in diamonds produced with the CVD method, for instance, gives them an exceptional chemical purity that allows them to be classified as type IIa; a rare and coveted breed that accounts for just 2 percent of those found in nature. Meanwhile, the ability to control everything about the growth process allows companies like Lightbox to adjust the formula and produce incredibly rare blue and pink diamonds as part of their standard product line. (In fact, these colored gemstones have made up over half of the company’s sales since launch, according to Coe.)

    And while lab-grown diamonds boast the same sparkle as their Earthly counterparts, they do so at a significant discount. Zimnisky said that today, your typical one carat, medium quality diamond grown in a lab will sell for about $3,600, compared with $6,100 for its Earth-mined counterpart—a discount of about 40 percent. Two years ago, that discount was only 18 percent. And while the price drop has “slightly tapered off” as Zimnisky put it, he expects it will fall further thanks in part to the aforementioned ramp up in Chinese production, as well as technological improvements. (The market is also shifting in response to Lightbox, which De Beers is using to position lab-grown diamonds as mass produced items for fashion jewelry, and which is selling its stones, ungraded, at the controversial low price of $800 per carat—a discount of nearly 90 percent.)

    Zimnisky said that if the price falls too fast, it could devalue lab-grown diamonds in the eyes of consumers. But for now, at least, paying less seems to be a selling point. A 2018 consumer research survey by MVI Marketing found that most of those polled would choose a larger lab-grown diamond over a smaller mined diamond of the same price.

    “The thing [consumers] seem most compelled by is the ability to trade up in size and quality at the same price,” Garard of IGDA said.

    Still, for buyers and sellers alike, price is only part of the story. Many in the lab-grown diamond world market their product as an ethical or eco-friendly alternative to mined diamonds.

    But those sales pitches aren’t without controversy.
    A variety of lab-grown diamond products arrayed on a desk at Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan. The stone in the upper left gets its blue color from boron. Diamonds tinted yellow (top center) usually get their color from small amounts of nitrogen.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    Dazzling promises

    As Anna-Mieke Anderson tells it, she didn’t enter the diamond world to become a corporate tycoon. She did it to try and fix a mistake.

    In 1999, Anderson purchased herself a diamond. Some years later, in 2005, her father asked her where it came from. Nonplussed, she told him it came from the jewelry store. But that wasn’t what he was asking: He wanted to know where it really came from.

    “I actually had no idea,” Anderson told Earther. “That led me to do a mountain of research.”

    That research eventually led Anderson to conclude that she had likely bought a diamond mined under horrific conditions. She couldn’t be sure, because the certificate of purchase included no place of origin. But around the time of her purchase, civil wars funded by diamond mining were raging across Angola, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Liberia, fueling “widespread devastation” as Global Witness put it in 2006. At the height of the diamond wars in the late ‘90s, the watchdog group estimates that as many as 15 percent of diamonds entering the market were conflict diamonds. Even those that weren’t actively fueling a war were often being mined in dirty, hazardous conditions; sometimes by children.

    “I couldn’t believe I’d bought into this,” Anderson said.

    To try and set things right, Anderson began sponsoring a boy living in a Liberian community impacted by the blood diamond trade. The experience was so eye-opening, she says, that she eventually felt compelled to sponsor more children. Selling conflict-free jewelry seemed like a fitting way to raise money to do so, but after a great deal more research, Anderson decided she couldn’t in good faith consider any diamond pulled from the Earth to be truly conflict-free in either the humanitarian or environmental sense. While diamond miners were, by the early 2000s, getting their gems certified “conflict free” according to the UN-backed Kimberley Process, the certification scheme’s definition of a conflict diamond—one sold by rebel groups to finance armed conflicts against governments—felt far too narrow.

    “That [conflict definition] eliminates anything to do with the environment, or eliminates a child mining it, or someone who was a slave, or beaten, or raped,” Anderson said.

    And so she started looking into science, and in 2007, launching MiaDonna as one of the world’s first lab-grown diamond jewelry companies. The business has been activism-oriented from the get-go, with at least five percent of its annual earnings—and more than 20 percent for the last three years—going into The Greener Diamond, Anderson’s charity foundation which has funded a wide range of projects, from training former child soldiers in Sierra Leone to grow food to sponsoring kids orphaned by the West African Ebola outbreak.

    MiaDonna isn’t the only company that positions itself as an ethical alternative to the traditional diamond industry. Brilliant Earth, which sells what it says are carefully-sourced mined and lab-created diamonds, also donates a small portion of its profits to supporting mining communities. Other lab-grown diamond companies market themselves as “ethical,” “conflict-free,” or “world positive.” Payne of Ada Diamonds sees, in lab-grown diamonds, not just shiny baubles, but a potential to improve medicine, clean up pollution, and advance society in countless other ways—and he thinks the growing interest in lab-grown diamond jewelry will help propel us toward that future.

    Others, however, say black-and-white characterizations when it comes to social impact of mined diamonds versus lab-grown stones are unfair. “I have a real problem with people claiming one is ethical and another is not,” Estelle Levin-Nally, founder and CEO of Levin Sources, which advocates for better governance in the mining sector, told Earther. “I think it’s always about your politics. And ethics are subjective.”

    Saleem Ali, an environmental researcher at the University of Delaware who serves on the board of the Diamonds and Development Initiative, agrees. He says the mining industry has, on the whole, worked hard to turn itself around since the height of the diamond wars and that governance is “much better today” than it used to be. Human rights watchdog Global Witness also says that “significant progress” has been made to curb the conflict diamond trade, although as Alice Harle, Senior Campaigner with Global Witness told Earther via email, diamonds do still fuel conflict, particularly in the Central African Republic and Zimbabwe.

    Most industry observers seems to agree that the Kimberley Process is outdated and inadequate, and that more work is needed to stamp out other abuses, including child labor and forced labor, in the artisanal and small-scale diamond mining sector. Today, large-scale mining operations don’t tend to see these kinds of problems, according to Julianne Kippenberg, associate director for children’s rights at Human Rights Watch, but she notes that there may be other community impacts surrounding land rights and forced resettlement.

    The flip side, Ali and Levin-Nally say, is that well-regulated mining operations can be an important source of economic development and livelihood. Ali cites Botswana and Russia as prime examples of places where large-scale mining operations have become “major contributors to the economy.” Dmitry Amelkin, head of strategic projects and analytics for Russian diamond mining giant Alrosa, echoed that sentiment in an email to Earther, noting that diamonds transformed Botswana “from one of the poorest [countries] in the world to a middle-income country” with revenues from mining representing almost a third of its GDP.

    In May, a report commissioned by the Diamond Producers Association (DPA), a trade organization representing the world’s largest diamond mining companies, estimated that worldwide, its members generate nearly $4 billion in direct revenue for employees and contractors, along with another $6.8 billion in benefits via “local procurement of goods and services.” DPA CEO Jean-Marc Lieberherr said this was a story diamond miners need to do a better job telling.

    “The industry has undergone such changes since the Blood Diamond movie,” he said, referring to the blockbuster 2006 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio that drew global attention to the problem of conflict diamonds. “And yet people’s’ perceptions haven’t evolved. I think the main reason is we have not had a voice, we haven’t communicated.”

    But conflict and human rights abuses aren’t the only issues that have plagued the diamond industry. There’s also the lasting environmental impact of the mining itself. In the case of large-scale commercial mines, this typically entails using heavy machinery and explosives to bore deep into those kimberlite tubes in search of precious stones.

    Some, like Maya Koplyova, a geologist at the University of British Columbia who studies diamonds and the rocks they’re found in, see this as far better than many other forms of mining. “The environmental footprint is the fThere’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.” ootprint of digging the hole in the ground and crushing [the rock],” Koplyova said, noting that there’s no need to add strong acids or heavy metals like arsenic (used in gold mining) to liberate the gems.

    Still, those holes can be enormous. The Mir Mine, a now-abandoned open pit mine in Eastern Siberia, is so large—reportedly stretching 3,900 feet across and 1,700 feet deep—that the Russian government has declared it a no-fly zone owing to the pit’s ability to create dangerous air currents. It’s visible from space.

    While companies will often rehabilitate other land to offset the impact of mines, kimberlite mining itself typically leaves “a permanent dent in the earth’s surface,” as a 2014 report by market research company Frost & Sullivan put it.

    “It’s a huge impact as far as I’m concerned,” said Kevin Krajick, senior editor for science news at Columbia University’s Earth Institute who wrote a book on the discovery of diamonds in far northern Canada. Krajick noted that in remote mines, like those of the far north, it’s not just the physical hole to consider, but all the development required to reach a previously-untouched area, including roads and airstrips, roaring jets and diesel-powered trucks.

    Diamonds grown in factories clearly have a smaller physical footprint. According to the Frost & Sullivan report, they also use less water and create less waste. It’s for these reasons that Ali thinks diamond mining “will never be able to compete” with lab-grown diamonds from an environmental perspective.

    “The mining industry should not even by trying to do that,” he said.

    Of course, this is capitalism, so try to compete is exactly what the DPA is now doing. That same recent report that touted the mining industry’s economic benefits also asserts that mined diamonds have a carbon footprint three times lower than that of lab-grown diamonds, on average. The numbers behind that conclusion, however, don’t tell the full story.

    Growing diamonds does take considerable energy. The exact amount can vary greatly, however, depending on the specific nature of the growth process. These are details manufacturers are typically loathe to disclose, but Payne of Ada Diamonds says he estimates the most efficient players in the game today use about 250 kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity per cut, polished carat of diamond; roughly what a U.S. household consumes in 9 days. Other estimates run higher. Citing unnamed sources, industry publication JCK Online reported that a modern HPHT run can use up to 700 kWh per carat, while CVD production can clock in north of 1,000 kWh per carat.

    Pulling these and several other public-record estimates, along with information on where in the world today’s lab diamonds are being grown and the energy mix powering the producer nations’ electric grids, the DPA-commissioned study estimated that your typical lab-grown diamond results in some 511 kg of carbon emissions per cut, polished carat. Using information provided by mining companies on fuel and electricity consumption, along with other greenhouse gas sources on the mine site, it found that the average mined carat was responsible for just 160 kg of carbon emissions.

    One limitation here is that the carbon footprint estimate for mining focused only on diamond production, not the years of work entailed in developing a mine. As Ali noted, developing a mine can take a lot of energy, particularly for those sited in remote locales where equipment needs to be hauled long distances by trucks or aircraft.

    There’s also the question of just how representative the report’s energy consumption estimates for lab-grown diamonds are. While he wouldn’t offer a specific number, Coe said that De Beers’ Group diamond manufacturer Element Six—arguably the most advanced laboratory-grown diamond company in the world—has “substantially lower” per carat energy requirements than the headline figures found inside the new report. When asked why this was not included, Rick Lord, ESG analyst at Trucost, the S&P global group that conducted the analysis, said it chose to focus on energy estimates in the public record, but that after private consultation with Element Six it did not believe their data would “materially alter” the emissions estimates in the study.

    Finally, it’s important to consider the source of the carbon emissions. While the new report states that about 40 percent of the emissions associated with mining a diamond come from fossil fuel-powered vehicles and equipment, emissions associated with growing a diamond come mainly from electric power. Today, about 68 percent of lab-grown diamonds hail from China, Singapore, and India combined according to Zimnisky, where the power is drawn from largely fossil fuel-powered grids. But there is, at least, an opportunity to switch to renewables and drive that carbon footprint way down.
    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption.”

    And some companies do seem to be trying to do that. Anderson of MiaDonna says the company only sources its diamonds from facilities in the U.S., and that it’s increasingly trying to work with producers that use renewable energy. Lab-grown diamond company Diamond Foundry grows its stones inside plasma reactors running “as hot as the outer layer of the sun,” per its website, and while it wouldn’t offer any specific numbers, that presumably uses more energy than your typical operation running at lower temperatures. However, company spokesperson Ye-Hui Goldenson said its Washington State ‘megacarat factory’ was cited near a well-maintained hydropower source so that the diamonds could be produced with renewable energy. The company offsets other fossil fuel-driven parts of its operation by purchasing carbon credits.

    Lightbox’s diamonds currently come from Element Six’s UK-based facilities. The company is, however, building a $94-million facility near Portland, Oregon, that’s expected to come online by 2020. Coe said he estimates about 45 percent of its power will come from renewable sources.

    “The reality is both mining and manufacturing consume energy and probably the best thing we could do is focus on reducing energy consumption,” Coe said. “That’s something we’re focused on in Lightbox.”

    In spite of that, Lightbox is somewhat notable among lab-grown diamond jewelry brands in that, in the words of Morrison, it is “not claiming this to be an eco-friendly product.”

    “While it is true that we don’t dig holes in the ground, the energy consumption is not insignificant,” Morrison told Earther. “And I think we felt very uncomfortable promoting on that.”
    Various diamonds created in a lab, as seen at the Ada Diamonds showroom in Manhattan.
    Photo: Sam Cannon (Earther)
    The real real

    The fight over how lab-grown diamonds can and should market themselves is still heating up.

    On March 26, the FTC sent letters to eight lab-grown and diamond simulant companies warning them against making unsubstantiated assertions about the environmental benefits of their products—its first real enforcement action after updating its jewelry guides last year. The letters, first obtained by JCK news director Rob Bates under a Freedom of Information Act request, also warned companies that their advertising could falsely imply the products are mined diamonds, illustrating that, even though the agency now says a lab-grown diamond is a diamond, the specific origin remains critically important. A letter to Diamond Foundry, for instance, notes that the company has at times advertised its stones as “above-ground real” without the qualification of “laboratory-made.” It’s easy to see how a consumer might miss the implication.

    But in a sense, that’s what all of this is: A fight over what’s real.
    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in. They are a type of diamond.”

    Another letter, sent to FTC attorney Reenah Kim by the nonprofit trade organization Jewelers Vigilance Committee on April 2, makes it clear that many in the industry still believe that’s a term that should be reserved exclusively for gems formed inside the Earth. The letter, obtained by Earther under FOIA, urges the agency to continue restricting the use of the terms “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” and “semi-precious” to Earth-mined diamonds and gemstones. Even the use of such terms in conjunction with “laboratory grown,” the letter argues, “will create even more confusion in an already confused and evolving marketplace.”

    JVC President Tiffany Stevens told Earther that the letter was a response to a footnote in an explanatory document about the FTC’s recent jewelry guide changes, which suggested the agency was considering removing a clause about real, precious, natural and genuine only being acceptable modifiers for gems mined from the Earth.

    “We felt that given the current commercial environment, that we didn’t think it was a good time to take that next step,” Stevens told Earther. As Stevens put it, the changes the FTC recently made, including expanding the definition of diamond and tweaking the descriptors companies can use to label laboratory-grown diamonds as such, have already been “wildly misinterpreted” by some lab-grown diamond sellers that are no longer making the “necessary disclosures.”

    Asked whether the JVC thinks lab-grown diamonds are, in fact, real diamonds, Stevens demurred.

    “It’s a nuanced reality that we’re in,” she said. “They are a type of diamond.”

    Change is afoot in the diamond world. Mined diamond production may have already peaked, according to the 2018 Bain & Company report. Lab diamonds are here to stay, although where they’re going isn’t entirely clear. Zimnisky expects that in a few years—as Lightbox’s new facility comes online and mass production of lab diamonds continues to ramp up overseas—the price industry-wide will fall to about 80 percent less than a mined diamond. At that point, he wonders whether lab-grown diamonds will start to lose their sparkle.

    Payne isn’t too worried about a price slide, which he says is happening across the diamond industry and which he expects will be “linear, not exponential” on the lab-grown side. He points out that lab-grown diamond market is still limited by supply, and that the largest lab-grown gems remain quite rare. Payne and Zimnisky both see the lab-grown diamond market bifurcating into cheaper, mass-produced gems and premium-quality stones sold by those that can maintain a strong brand. A sense that they’re selling something authentic and, well, real.

    “So much has to do with consumer psychology,” Zimnisky said.

    Some will only ever see diamonds as authentic if they formed inside the Earth. They’re drawn, as Kathryn Money, vice president of strategy and merchandising at Brilliant Earth put it, to “the history and romanticism” of diamonds; to a feeling that’s sparked by holding a piece of our ancient world. To an essence more than a function.

    Others, like Anderson, see lab-grown diamonds as the natural (to use a loaded word) evolution of diamond. “We’re actually running out of [mined] diamonds,” she said. “There is an end in sight.” Payne agreed, describing what he sees as a “looming death spiral” for diamond mining.

    Mined diamonds will never go away. We’ve been digging them up since antiquity, and they never seem to lose their sparkle. But most major mines are being exhausted. And with technology making it easier to grow diamonds just as they are getting more difficult to extract from the Earth, the lab-grown diamond industry’s grandstanding about its future doesn’t feel entirely unreasonable.

    There’s a reason why, as Payne said, “the mining industry as a whole is still quite scared of this product.”

    #dimants #Afrique #technologie #capitalisme

  • Renaud Epstein & station urbaner kulturen

    (Feben Amara, Jochen Becker, Christian Hanussek, Eva Hertzsch, Adam Page) with Oliver Pohlisch and Birgit Schlieps

    One day, one ZUP, one postcard (2014-…), 2018

    Wallpaper / Display cabinet
    Collection station urbaner kulturen, Berlin-Hellersdorf

    The sociologist Renaud Epstein’s project has first and foremost been an online format since its initiation in 2014: he posts a new postcard of large housing estates (Zones à Urbaniser par Priorité / ZUP) on his Twitter account every day. From a time when France dreamed of being modern and urban and believed in its architectural utopias, the ZUP postcards evoke at best a golden era, at worst a contemporary delusion.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/vte4ejv9wsumzyh/ARLES%202019-PRESS%20KIT-kl.pdf?dl=0

    The Berlin collective station urbaner kulturen, based in the last big housing estate built in the GDR, has extracted sections from Epstein’s Twitter timeline in order to materialize the interaction between internet users and images. Their project «Going out of Circles / Kreise ziehen» presents a wider series of exhibitions that aims to create connections between the housing estates on the periphery of urban and economic centers, around Berlin and beyond.

    A display case with original postcards next to the Twitter wallpaper emphasises the different readings of formats of communication.

    Postcards – News from a Dream World
    Musée départemental Arles Antique

    1 July - 25 August / 10 - 18

    Exhibition curators: Magali Nachtergael and Anne Reverseau

    Eric Baudart & Thu-Van Tran (1972 et 1979), Fredi Casco (1967), Moyra Davey (1958), documentation céline duval (1974), Renaud Epstein & station urbane kulturen (1971 et créé en 2014), Jean Geiser (1848-1923), Joana Hadjithomas & Khalil Joreige (1969), Roc Herms (1978), Susan Hiller (1940-2019), John Hinde (1916-1997), Katia Kameli (1973), Aglaia Konrad (1960), Valérie Mréjen (1969), Martin Parr (1952), Mathieu Pernot (1970), Brenda Lou Schaub (1993), Stephen Shore (1947), John Stezaker (1948), Oriol Vilanova (1980), William Wegman (1943)

    The postcard is the ultimate circulating picture, constantly subject to a sense of déjà-vu. Throughout the twentieth century, it went hand in hand with the bottling of the visible world, the rise of image globalization and mass tourism. Collectors, hoarders, retouchers and iconographers seize existing pictures to give them a new meaning, clarify their status or context.

    By comparing this artistic vision with the making of postcards, this exhibition questions what they show and tell of the world, like a visual anthropology. What did they convey throughout the twentieth century, during their hour of glory? What vision of the world did they plant in the minds of their recipients, who got them from relatives and friends?

    Both a symbol of our private and collective imagination, the postcard represents an illusion, always close to hand. It shows us a dream world in which can project ourselves, as in a desirable fiction story.

    www.rencontres-arles.com/en/expositions/view/779/cartes-postales

    https://archiv.ngbk.de/projekte/station-urbaner-kulturen-hellersdorf-seit-2014
    https://www.ngbk.de/en/program/initiative-urbane-kulturen

    #renaud_epstein #cartes_postales

  • Les Africains qui migrent viennent de moins en moins en #France

    Selon la dernière note de l’#OCDE consacrée aux migrations africaines vers les pays développés entre 2001 et 2016, l’attractivité de l’Hexagone décroît sensiblement.

    Les tenants de la théorie du grand remplacement ou les agitateurs du spectre de la ruée africaine – vers l’Europe en général et la France en particulier – n’apprécieront sans doute pas la lecture de la dernière note de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE) consacrée aux évolutions des migrations africaines vers les pays développés entre 2001 et 2016.

    On y lit en effet que « représentant un immigré sur dix, la migration africaine vers les pays de l’OCDE a vu son poids légèrement augmenter au cours des dernières années ; elle demeure toutefois faible par rapport à la part de l’Afrique dans la population mondiale […]. La France est toujours la principale destination, mais sa part se réduit. »

    Ces conclusions découlent de la dernière actualisation de la base de données développée depuis plusieurs années par l’OCDE, en coopération avec l’Agence française de développement (AFD), sur les immigrés dans les pays développés. Celle-ci compile des statistiques, par pays de naissance, des migrants internationaux, « définis comme les personnes [âgées de plus de 15 ans] résidant dans un pays autre que celui de leur naissance » sans tenir compte de leur « statut légal ou de la catégorie de migration. »
    « Pas de raz-de-marée annoncé »

    Ces données couvrent non seulement les effectifs d’immigrés par âge, sexe et niveau d’éducation, mais également des variables clés de l’analyse des migrations internationales et de l’intégration comme la nationalité, la durée de séjour, le statut dans l’emploi et la profession.

    Passées ces quelques précisions d’ordre méthodologique, il ressort de cette étude que « la part de la population originaire d’Afrique vivant dans un pays de l’OCDE a augmenté au cours des quinze dernières années, mais reste très modeste ». Le nombre de migrants africains y est en effet passé de 7,2 millions en 2000 à 12,5 millions en 2016. Mais ils ne représentent encore que 10,4 % des 121 millions de migrants répertoriés dans les pays développés, contre 9,2 % en 2000. A titre de comparaison, le nombre total de migrants venus du Mexique – pays classé en tête de liste des pays d’origine devant l’Inde et la Chine – s’établissait à 11,7 millions en 2016.

    L’OCDE remarque ainsi que « la croissance démographique africaine est encore loin de se traduire en un accroissement équivalent de la migration vers les pays de l’OCDE. » En marge de la polémique née de la publication en 2018 du livre de Stephen Smith – La Ruée vers l’Europe (éd. Grasset) –, le démographe François Héran remarquait également que « les projections démographiques de l’ONU actualisées tous les deux ans ont beau annoncer un peu plus qu’un doublement de la population subsaharienne d’ici à 2050 (elle passerait de 900 millions à 2,2 milliards dans le scénario médian), cela ne suffira pas à déclencher le raz-de-marée annoncé ». « Il n’existe pas de lien mécanique entre la croissance démographique et celle du taux de migration », ajoute Jean-Christophe Dumont, chef du département des migrations internationales à l’OCDE.

    #Féminisation et hausse du niveau d’éducation

    Et si la France demeure le principal pays de destination, « sa part s’est considérablement réduite, passant de 38 % des migrants africains installés dans les pays de l’OCDE en 2001 à 30 % en 2016 ». La part des immigrés dans la population totale (14 %), toutes origines confondues, a légèrement augmenté sur cette même période (environ 2 %), est supérieure à la moyenne des pays de l’OCDE (12 %), mais demeure très inférieure à celle de pays comme la Suède, l’Irlande ou l’Autriche (20 %).

    La « préférence » française s’explique en partie par l’origine géographique des migrants africains. En effet, 54 % d’entre eux provenaient d’un pays francophone, notent les auteurs, or « les liens historiques et linguistiques restent des déterminants clés des migrations africaines ». Dans cet espace continental, les pays d’Afrique du Nord demeurent, de loin, les premiers pays d’origine (46 % de l’ensemble des migrants africains en 2016 contre 54 % en 2000). Le Maroc devançant tous les autres, étant « le pays de naissance de près d’un migrant africain sur quatre, devant l’Algérie (1 sur 8) ». Si la part de la France demeure prééminente, la surprise vient des Etats-Unis, dont la part est « en forte augmentation » avec l’accueil de 16 % des migrants africains en 2016 – notamment éthiopiens et nigérians – contre 12 % seize ans plus tôt. Les Etats-unis sont ainsi la deuxième destination devant le Royaume-Uni, l’Espagne, l’Italie, le Canada et l’Allemagne.

    Si la jeunesse des migrants africains par rapport aux autres continents d’origine demeure une constante, les évolutions de deux autres données sont plus notables : la féminisation et le niveau d’éducation. Concernant ce dernier point, plus de 60 % des migrants ont au moins un niveau de 2e cycle du secondaire (lycée), dont la moitié (30 %) sont diplômés de l’enseignement supérieur (contre 24 % en 2000). « Cette évolution s’explique en partie par la conjugaison de deux facteurs, note Jean-Christophe Dumont. D’une part, la compétition entre pays de l’OCDE pour attirer les talents. D’autre part, la baisse des besoins de main-d’œuvre non qualifiée dans les économies des pays développées ».

    La part des femmes augmente également sensiblement. Alors que celles-ci représentaient 46,7 % des migrants africains en 2000, elles étaient 48,2 % en 2016. « Dans des pays comme le Royaume-Uni, la France, l’Irlande, le Portugal, Israël, le Luxembourg ou encore l’Australie, les femmes sont même devenues majoritaires dans les diasporas africaines », note l’OCDE.

    Enfin, si la recherche d’un emploi et d’une vie meilleure figure parmi les motivations des candidats à l’émigration, cette quête s’avère difficile. « Sur le marché de l’emploi des pays de l’OCDE, les migrants africains sont fortement touchés par le chômage (13 %) et l’inactivité (28 %). » Surtout, une grande part de ceux qui trouvent un emploi doivent accepter une forme de relégation par rapport à leur niveau d’études. Le taux de déclassement professionnel était ainsi de 35 % en 2016. Concernant les raisons, l’OCDE se montre prudente : « Cette situation peut être due à une discrimination sur le marché du travail, mais aussi à des questions de qualité et de reconnaissance des diplômes. »

    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2019/06/11/les-africains-qui-migrent-viennent-de-moins-en-moins-en-france_5474740_3212.
    #attractivité #Afrique #migrations #réfugiés #préjugés #grand_remplacement #statistiques #chiffres #femmes #ruée #ruée_vers_l'Europe

    Ajouté à ce fil de discussion autour du #livre de #Stephen_Smith, La ruée vers l’Afrique :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/673774

  • Balade commentée 2019 sur les pas de Jean meslier ce Samedi 15 Juin 2019 à partir d’Etrépigny

    Pour fêter le 355ème anniversaire du curé Meslier,l’association « Les Amis de Jean Meslier » organise, le samedi 15 juin 2019 à 16h30 à partir d’Etrépigny,
     
    Un circuit commenté sur 4 sites que Meslier a fréquentés,
    (Etrépigny – Villers-le-Tourneur – Mazerny – Hagnicourt), circuit en voiture personnelle ou en covoiturage de 25 km ouvert à tout public, gratuit – sans réservation
    Suivi d’un pique-nique semi-nocturne tiré des sacs.

    Programme :
    16h30 : Etrépigny : visite du village et de l’église où officia Meslier durant 40 ans.
    17h15 : Départ devant la mairie d’Etrépigny en convoi de voitures (et covoiturage) pour Villers-le-Tourneur
    17h30 : visite de l’église énigmatique de Villers-le-Tourneur et du village
    18h30 : Départ pour Mazerny visite de l’église fortifiée de Mazerny et du village
    19h30 : Départ pour Hagnicourt visite de l’église classée d’Hagnicourt
    20h30 : Apéritif offert par l’association et pique-nique tiré des sacs à Hagnicourt
    Retour à Etrépigny pour les covoiturés

    Sources : http://www.jeanmeslier.fr/jeanmeslierfr/infobox/balade-sur-les-pas-de-meslier-15-juin-2019
    https://www.facebook.com/Meslier.athee.revolutionnaire/photos/pb.1345994418759850.-2207520000.1553873122./3149591801733427/?type=3&eid=ARB1FZUVipugKiZpHVyQLe6eUfEF_aIrWYcWQ--mnVuiuUo-p3JUQYX_f-dv72

    #Jean_Meslier (Curé) #révolutions #laïcité #utopies #religion #balade #Ardennes

  • « Gilets jaunes » : face aux manifestants, de plus en plus de policiers choisissent l’anonymat au tribunal
    https://www.lemonde.fr/police-justice/article/2019/05/24/gilets-jaunes-face-aux-manifestants-de-plus-en-plus-de-policiers-choisissent

    Le titre est réducteur : on voit bien que l’anonymisation va bien au delà des seuls tribunaux.

    L’anonymisation des forces de l’ordre dans les procédures judiciaires, auparavant réservée aux dossiers d’antiterrorisme, s’est multipliée depuis le début du mouvement des « gilets jaunes ». Une disposition adoptée après l’assassinat de deux fonctionnaires de police à Magnanville (Yvelines) à l’été 2016, et entrée en vigueur en avril 2018, a permis d’élargir la possibilité de l’identification « sous RIO » d’un policier dès lors que « la révélation de son identité (…) est susceptible de mettre en danger sa vie ou son intégrité physique, ou celle de ses proches ». A charge pour la hiérarchie policière de délivrer les autorisations.

    L’identification sous RIO est apparue dans au moins une centaine de dossiers depuis le début des manifestations

    En Loire-Atlantique par exemple, la DDSP a autorisé dès 2018 ses 1 300 policiers à avoir recours à l’anonymat dans plusieurs situations : lorsqu’ils rédigent un procès-verbal ou sont amenés à témoigner ou à demander des dommages et intérêts pour des faits passibles de plus de trois ans d’emprisonnement. L’anonymat reste cependant impossible lorsque les policiers sont eux-mêmes mis en cause.

    Inutilisée jusqu’au mois de novembre 2018, l’identification sous RIO est apparue, depuis le début des manifestations des « gilets jaunes », dans plus d’une cinquantaine de dossiers jugés dans les tribunaux de grande instance de Nantes et de Saint-Nazaire (Loire-Atlantique), selon les remontées d’avocats de manifestants et de policiers recueillies par Le Monde. Le dispositif est encore inutilisé à Paris, Toulouse ou Lyon, selon plusieurs avocats, mais une dizaine de policiers l’ont demandé à Bordeaux, affirme leur conseil, Me Guillaume Sapata.
    Lire : Quand des « gilets jaunes » disent manifester « la boule au ventre »

    Ce recours à l’anonymat pour des procédures liées au maintien de l’ordre traduit un niveau de crainte inédit des policiers quant à l’exposition de leur identité. « Ce n’est pas le fait que le prévenu connaisse notre nom qui pose problème, mais le fait qu’il puisse, avec son entourage, le diffuser sur Internet », estime le fonctionnaire menacé. Le précédent du site CopWatch, qui diffusait en 2011 les noms et les photographies de fonctionnaires avant d’être fermé, hante encore une partie de la profession.

    « On sait où il étudie, fais gaffe »

    L’identification sous RIO est avant tout demandée par les fonctionnaires de la BAC et des compagnies départementales d’intervention, qui évoluent chaque samedi « à domicile », selon l’expression d’un policier, contrairement aux CRS et aux escadrons de gendarmes mobiles, opérant dans toute la France. A Nantes, un policier raconte qu’il y a quelques mois un manifestant l’a interpellé par son prénom et celui de l’un de ses enfants, avant de lui lancer : « On sait où il étudie, fais gaffe. »

    Selon Jean-Christophe Bertrand, directeur départemental de la sécurité publique en Loire-Atlantique, la présence d’une « mouvance d’ultragauche » dans la région de Nantes a favorisé la multiplication de ce type de menaces.

    « Les manifestations d’opposition au projet d’aéroport de Notre-Dame-des-Landes, puis contre la loi travail, ont été très dures et très violentes pour les fonctionnaires, estime le chef de la police nantaise. L’anonymat est une bonne extension de la protection policière, notamment quand les menaces touchent leur famille. »

    A Nantes, le recours de plus en plus fréquent à l’anonymat par les fonctionnaires fait, cependant, débat. Le 14 mai, un manifestant « gilet jaune », jugé pour avoir lancé des pierres et des morceaux de grenade lacrymogène sur des fonctionnaires de police lors de l’acte XII de la mobilisation, le 2 février, a été relaxé par le tribunal. Les magistrats ont considéré que « la décision générale d’anonymisation n’apparaît pas motivée » pour les deux victimes présumées et les deux auteurs des procès-verbaux, et qu’« aucun élément ne permet d’établir l’existence du risque d’atteinte à l’intégrité physique des quatre agents concernés ».

    Les juges nantais ont décidé de la nullité de la procédure. Une logique qui a abouti à au moins trois relaxes de manifestants depuis janvier – dans le reste des dossiers, les magistrats ont mené la procédure jusqu’au bout, malgré l’anonymat des policiers.

    #maintien_de_l'ordre #police #justice

  • Jean-Michel Blanquer continue d’avoir la réformite aiguë
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/100619/jean-michel-blanquer-continue-d-avoir-la-reformite-aigue

    Le ministre de l’éducation nationale multiplie les projets de réforme. Il vient d’annoncer qu’il allait repenser le brevet des collèges. Parallèlement, la réforme du baccalauréat continue de crisper les enseignants. Plusieurs syndicats appellent à la grève le jour de l’examen le 17 juin.

    #éducation #réformes,_baccalauréat,_jean-Michel_Blanquer

  • Après les européennes, La France insoumise s’enfonce dans la crise
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/070619/apres-les-europeennes-la-france-insoumise-s-enfonce-dans-la-crise

    Le mouvement de Jean-Luc Mélenchon survivra-t-il à la défaite des européennes ? Depuis une semaine, les polémiques s’enchaînent entre des Insoumis divisés sur la stratégie, qui commencent à s’interroger sur la capacité de leur leader à relancer la machine.

    #GAUCHE_S_ #Jean-Luc_Mélenchon,_Clémentine_Autain,_La_France_insoumise,_Raquel_Garrido,_élections_européennes,_Alexis_Corbière

  • Le numéro 13 de notre magazine critique et théorique consacré aux bandes dessinées, Pré Carré , est en cours de maquettage, sous les petits doigts habiles de Pierre Constantin qui va me remplacer à cette tâche après mes quatre ans de bons et loyaux services (pour tout dire, je suis grave soulagé).

    Si tout se passe bien, si la couverture de Oriane Lassus est tirée à temps en sérigraphie dans l’atelier de PCCBA, si Identic a imprimé à temps le cahier central, si le cahier mobile arrive à temps de Lyon, si tout ça est monté ensemble à temps, hé bien vous pourrez le découvrir au THC Circus, à « la générale » (Paris https://www.lagenerale.fr/?p=13191) le week end des 15 et 16
    juin, au stand PCCBA où vous serez accueillis par moi.

    Au sommaire, des tas de trucs, comme toujours, de Gwladys Le Cuff, Alexandra Achard, Guillaume Massard, Samplerman, Jean-François Savang, Loïc Largier, François Poudevigne, Pedro Moura, Thomas Gosselin, moi-même et notre toute nouvelle collaboratrice, Claude Dominique.

    #pré_carré #bande_dessinée #critique #théorie #revue

  • Une note interne à La France insoumise dénonce « un fonctionnement dangereux pour l’avenir du mouvement »
    https://www.lemonde.fr/politique/article/2019/06/06/une-note-interne-a-la-france-insoumise-denonce-un-fonctionnement-dangereux-p


    Jean-Luc Mélenchon, le 5 juin à l’Assemblée nationale.
    JACQUES DEMARTHON / AFP

    Dans un document que « Le Monde » s’est procuré, plusieurs dirigeants « insoumis » demandent plus de démocratie interne et critiquent sévèrement le mauvais score du parti aux élections européennes.

    C’est un texte de cinq pages qui secoue La France insoumise (LFI) et qui tombe au pire moment : juste après la défaite aux élections européennes où la liste emmenée par Manon Aubry a recueilli 6,31 % des suffrages, et en pleine crise interne autour de la stratégie à adopter. Une note qui va par ailleurs gâcher l’installation des eurodéputés aujourd’hui au Parlement européen et la réunion intergroupe prévue avec les députés LFI.

    Intitulée « Repenser le fonctionnement de La France insoumise », envoyée le 5 juin, cette note que Le Monde s’est procurée, est signée par quarante-deux cadres et militants « insoumis » – dont des figures du mouvement, comme Charlotte Girard, ex-responsable du programme ; Manon Le Bretton, qui dirige l’école de formation ; ou encore Hélène Franco, magistrate et coanimatrice du livret Justice de LFI. Elle est un réquisitoire en règle contre la gouvernance du mouvement populiste de gauche.

    « Cette prétention de construction d’un mouvement suffisamment “gazeux” pour être à l’abri des tensions entre “courants” ou “fractions”, et à l’abri des enjeux de pouvoir, est un leurre. »

    Sans jamais nommer ni Jean-Luc Mélenchon, leader de fait de LFI, ni Manuel Bompard, son dirigeant statutaire, mais en les visant constamment, ce texte – qui se présente comme une « contribution interne et positive » – affirme qu’après « la séquence présidentielle de 2017, [LFI n’a pas su] maintenir la dynamique » ni « s’ancrer durablement dans la société », souligne « l’affaiblissement du réseau militant et le départ de plusieurs responsables » dus « en grande partie au mode de fonctionnement du mouvement depuis sa création ». Pour les auteurs de cette note, « le fonctionnement actuel de LFI combine une certaine horizontalité en termes de fonctionnement mais une grande verticalité en termes de décisions collectives ».

    Pour les signataires, il s’agit de préserver l’outil créé pour les élections de 2017. Pour l’un d’eux, « la maison brûle, il faut agir ». Le texte s’inquiète ainsi de la perte « d’un nombre considérable de militants, mettant en péril la possibilité de présenter des listes aux municipales ».

  • Immigration : le vrai #coût des expulsions

    Les expulsions d’étrangers en situation irrégulière ont coûté 500 millions d’euros à l’Etat en 2018. Selon un rapport parlementaire, inciter un immigré au retour grâce à une aide financière coûte près de six fois moins cher qu’un retour par la force.

    Le dossier est ultrasensible. La question des étrangers en situation irrégulière en France, et surtout le coût de leur reconduite à la frontière, peut rapidement enflammer les débats. D’autant que le nombre d’expulsions forcées n’a jamais été aussi élevé depuis dix ans. Et leur coût pour les finances publiques a représenté la bagatelle d’un demi-milliard d’euros l’an dernier. De quoi aiguiser l’intérêt des députés en charge de la mission Asile-Immigration-Intégration, dont l’enveloppe globale annuelle pour l’Etat est d’1,7 milliard d’euros.

    Dans le cadre du Printemps de l’évaluation, ces élus ont décidé de passer au peigne fin la politique d’expulsion. Avec un double objectif : contrôler l’action du gouvernement et identifier des leviers d’économie.

    Jean-Noël Barrot (MoDem) et Alexandre Holroyd (LREM) ont donc toqué à la porte des ministères concernés - Intérieur, Justice, Quai d’Orsay, etc. - pour récolter des chiffres précis. Le Parisien-Aujourd’hui en France dévoile en exclusivité leur rapport, présenté jeudi en commission des finances. Il livre un bilan rigoureux des expulsions en France, qu’il s’agisse de retours aidés, c’est-à-dire consentis et accompagnés d’une aide financière, ou d’éloignements forcés, quand la personne est reconduite par des policiers ou des gendarmes.
    Augmenter le montant de l’aide ?

    Contraires aux idées reçues, ses conclusions sont sans appel : les expulsions forcées, très majoritaires (entre 70 et 80 % des raccompagnements), coûtent plus de six fois plus cher qu’un retour aidé dans le pays d’origine. En moyenne, 13 800 euros contre 2 500 euros. Nos voisins européens sont nombreux à favoriser les retours aidés.

    Mais ces derniers sont-ils efficaces ? Dans son rapport de 2016, la Cour des comptes relevait qu’avec « l’adhésion de la Roumanie et de la Bulgarie le 1er juin 2007, de nombreux Roms repartis dans ces deux pays avec une aide au retour humanitaire (revenaient) en France et (faisaient) parfois des allers-retours pour percevoir plusieurs fois l’allocation de 300 euros ».

    Aujourd’hui, ce scénario n’est plus possible. Car depuis 2018, les ressortissants des pays membres de l’Union européenne n’ont plus accès à l’aide au retour. Et ce pécule ne peut être perçu qu’une seule fois. De quoi peser en faveur des retours aidés ? « Ce dispositif fonctionne de manière satisfaisante », observe Jean-Noël Barrot. « Et pour certaines destinations, si l’on augmente l’enveloppe, les retours dans les pays d’origine sont en hausse ». L’Afghanistan, le Pakistan, la Chine, l’Irak et le Soudan pourraient faire partie de ces pays à cibler.

    Faut-il donc multiplier les retours aidés, quitte à augmenter le montant de l’aide ? « Notre travail était de fournir une estimation précise, répond prudemment Alexandre Holroyd. Désormais, c’est une décision politique. » Les deux députés envisagent de déposer une proposition de résolution dans les jours qui viennent pour inviter le gouvernement à statuer.


    http://www.leparisien.fr/societe/immigration-le-vrai-cout-des-expulsions-05-06-2019-8086461.php
    #France #expulsions #renvois #asile #migrations #réfugiés #business
    ping @isskein @karine4 @daphne @marty

  • #Fraude aux #prestations_sociales : un rapport du Sénat tord le cou aux #idées_reçues | Public Senat
    https://www.publicsenat.fr/article/parlementaire/fraude-aux-prestations-sociales-un-rapport-du-senat-tord-le-cou-aux-idee

    La fraude documentaire aux prestations sociales entraînerait chaque année pour l’État un préjudice de 200 à 300 millions d’euros. C’est ce qui ressort d’un rapport du Sénat remis ce mercredi. L’année dernière, un magistrat spécialisé, l’évaluait pourtant à 14 milliards par an. « Une extrapolation un peu abusive » selon le sénateur MoDem, Jean-Marie Vanlerenberghe.

    #sécurité_sociale #immatriculation #étrangers

  • Je vois comme un thème, là… Si tu veux mon avis, le gars François il aurait meilleur temps de carrément dissoudre le truc et de remonter un nouveau parti avec un nouveau nom, un nouveau logo et un nouveau slogan.

    – Le Pape sur Touitteur :
    https://twitter.com/pontifex_fr/status/894521005712035841?lang=fr

    Le pardon libère le cœur et permet de recommencer : le pardon donne espoir. Sans pardon on n’édifie pas l’Église.

    – Roumanie : le pape François présente des excuses aux Roms
    http://www.rfi.fr/europe/20190602-roumanie-le-pape-francois-presente-excuses-roms

    – Le pape François présente des excuses aux victimes d’abus sexuels
    https://www.lemonde.fr/religions/article/2018/01/22/le-pape-francois-presente-des-excuses-aux-victimes-d-abus-sexuels_5245408_16

    – Le pape demande pardon pour « le scandale et la trahison »
    https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1120135/abus-sexuels-pape-francois-accuse-ex-ambassadeur-vatican

    – Le Pape présente ses excuses aux jeunes
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/actualite-france/2018/10/28/01016-20181028ARTFIG00160-le-pape-presente-ses-excuses-aux-jeunes.php

    – Excuses officielles de l’église catholique par Jean Paul II
    https://www.ina.fr/video/CAB00012437

    Ce matin, en la basilique Saint Pierre, lors d’une cérémonie religieuse, Jean Paul II, portant sur les épaules les péchés du passé, a prononcé ses méa culpa solennels incluant les violences de l’inquisition jusqu’au coupable silence à l’égard des juifs, plus explicitement la shoah. Un reportage d’Isabelle STAES.

    – Le pape présente des excuses pour les crimes commis contre les peuples indigènes par l’Eglise catholique
    https://www.survivalinternational.fr/actu/10847

    – Le pape s’excuse auprès d’une femme défigurée par son mari avec de l’acide
    http://paroissiens-progressiste.over-blog.com/2018/11/le-pape-s-excuse-aupres-d-une-femme-defiguree-pa

    – Le pape François demande pardon aux Vaudois
    http://unitedeschretiens.fr/Le-pape-Francois-demande-pardon-aux-Vaudois.html

    – Le Pape demande pardon aux protestants
    https://www.bbc.com/afrique/monde/2016/01/160126_pope

    – Le Pape demande pardon à l’Eglise orthodoxe
    https://www.ina.fr/video/CAB01022479

    – Espagne : le pape demande pardon à trois prêtres lavés de toute accusation de pédophilie ou d’abus
    https://www.infocatho.fr/espagne-le-pape-demande-pardon-a-trois-pretres-laves-de-toute-accusation-d

    – Génocide rwandais : Le pape François demande pardon pour l’Eglise
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2017/03/20/genocide-rwandais-le-pape-francois-demande-pardon-pour-l-eglise_1557116

    – Le pape François demande "pardon" aux réfugiés "rohingyas"
    https://www.lepoint.fr/monde/le-pape-francois-demande-pardon-aux-refugies-rohingyas-02-12-2017-2176725_24

    – Le Pape François demande pardon au nom de l’Église pour les scandales à Rome et au Vatican
    https://www.jeuneafrique.com/271764/societe/pape-francois-souverain-pontife-demande-pardon-nom-de-leglise-scandale

    Après, y’en a qui ne sont visiblement pas convaincus :

    – Le Canada réclame des excuses du Pape François
    https://www.lexpress.fr/actualite/monde/amerique-nord/le-canada-reclame-des-excuses-du-pape-francois_2005071.html

    – "Jusqu’ici nous n’avons que des excuses" : le pape attendu en Irlande sur les scandales de pédophilie dans l’Église
    https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/vatican/pape-francois/jusquici-nous-navons-que-des-excuses-le-pape-attendu-en-irlande-sur-les

    – Le président mexicain demande des excuses pour les “abus” coloniaux, l’Espagne refuse
    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/diplomatie-le-president-mexicain-demande-des-excuses-pour-les

    – Le pape François a-t-il trahi les catholiques de Chine ?
    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/geopolitique/geopolitique-27-septembre-2018

    Et c’est là que tu te rends compte qu’à Facebook, ils sont vraiment sur une mauvaise pente quand…
    – Le patron de Facebook s’excuse pour la censure anti-catholique
    https://www.cath.ch/newsf/le-patron-de-facebook-sexcuse-pour-la-censure-anti-catholique

  • Le #productivisme aura-t-il une fin ? - La Vie des idées
    https://laviedesidees.fr/Le-productivisme-aura-t-il-une-fin.html

    Le productivisme aura-t-il une fin ?
    À propos de : #Serge_Audier, L’Âge productiviste, hégémonie prométhéenne, brèches et alternatives écologiques, La Découverte

    par Jean Bérard , le 5 juin

    Mots-clés Télécharger l’article
    Les doctrines les plus influentes (#libérales, #socialistes, #marxistes) qui se sont affrontées depuis le XIXe siècle pour définir l’avenir des sociétés industrielles ont en partage le productivisme, dont l’#hégémonie a marginalisé les #alternatives_écologiques. Vivons-nous la fin de cette #domination ?

    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2019/02/08/serge-audier-la-gauche-porte-une-part-de-responsabilite-historique-dans-l

  • Dans la tête d’un programmateur de festival d’été - Arts et scènes - Télérama.fr
    https://www.telerama.fr/scenes/dans-la-tete-dun-programmateur-de-festival-dete,n6273267.php

    Théâtre, chanson française ou art lyrique, comment réussir la programmation d’un festival ? Les organisateurs Jean Varela du Printemps des comédiens, Pierre Pauly des Francofolies et Olivier Desbordes de Saint-Céré nous donnent leurs recettes pour séduire les spectateurs.

  • Le HCR évacue des centaines de réfugiés vulnérables depuis la Libye vers des lieux en sécurité

    Dans un contexte d’affrontements violents et de détérioration de la situation sécuritaire à Tripoli, 149 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile vulnérables ont été évacués aujourd’hui vers Rome.

    Les personnes évacuées sont originaires d’Érythrée, de Somalie, du Soudan et d’Éthiopie. Parmi elles se trouvent 65 enfants, dont 13 de moins d’un an. L’un d’entre eux est né il y a tout juste deux mois.

    De nombreuses personnes évacuées ont besoin de soins médicaux et souffrent de malnutrition.

    Ce groupe avait été transféré depuis le Centre de rassemblement et de départ (GDF) qui est géré par le HCR, l’Agence des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés, après avoir survécu pendant des mois dans des conditions difficiles au sein de centres de détention situés dans d’autres quartiers de la ville. L’évacuation a été menée en collaboration avec les autorités libyennes et italiennes.

    « D’autres évacuations humanitaires sont nécessaires », a déclaré Jean-Paul Cavalieri, chef de mission du HCR en Libye. « Elles s’avèrent une bouée de sauvetage vitale pour les réfugiés dont la seule autre alternative est de remettre leur vie entre les mains de passeurs et de trafiquants sans scrupules pour traverser la mer Méditerranée. »

    En début de semaine, 62 réfugiés originaires de Syrie, du Soudan et de Somalie et vivant en milieu urbain ont également été évacués depuis Tripoli vers le Centre de transit d’urgence du HCR à Timisoara, en Roumanie. Ils y recevront de la nourriture, des vêtements et des soins médicaux avant de partir pour la Norvège. L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) a fourni un appui pour leur transport.

    Le HCR est reconnaissant envers les Etats qui ont proposé et mis en place des lieux d’évacuation, mais les nouveaux détenus arrivent à un rythme plus rapide que les personnes sur le départ. Plus de 1000 réfugiés et migrants ont été évacués ou réinstallés hors de la Libye par le HCR en 2019. Par ailleurs, plus de 1200 autres ont été renvoyés en Libye par les garde-côtes libyens durant le seul mois de mai, après avoir été secourus ou interceptés lors d’une tentative de traversée par bateau après avoir fui la Libye.

    Les combats à Tripoli ne montrent aucun signe de ralentissement, et les risques que des détenus soient pris au piège dans les affrontements augmentent. Le HCR réitère son appel aux Etats pour qu’ils présentent d’urgence de nouvelles offres de couloirs humanitaires et de places de réinstallation pour les personnes évacuées, afin de pouvoir mettre en sécurité les réfugiés détenus en Libye.

    Plus de 83 000 Libyens ont été contraints de fuir leur foyer depuis début avril, les forces rivales continuant de s’engager dans des combats et des bombardements violents. Les administrations municipales locales et les communautés d’accueil ont joué un rôle crucial dans l’assistance aux personnes déplacées, dont beaucoup ont trouvé abri à l’intérieur des écoles ou d’autres bâtiments publics. D’autres sont hébergés chez des amis et des proches dans les villes et villages voisins.

    Le HCR a fourni une aide d’urgence et des articles de secours à plus de 9000 personnes déplacées et a fait don de matériel médical et d’ambulances aux hôpitaux par l’intermédiaire du Ministère de la santé et du Croissant-Rouge libyen.

    Selon l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), près de 600 personnes ont perdu la vie lors des récents affrontements. La semaine dernière, deux ambulanciers sont morts après avoir été pris au piège dans des bombardements. Le HCR réaffirme que le fait de prendre pour cible des civils et des travailleurs humanitaires constitue une violation du droit international et appelle à ce que tous les auteurs de ces attaques en répondent.

    https://www.unhcr.org/fr/news/press/2019/5/5cf0d99ea/hcr-evacue-centaines-refugies-vulnerables-libye-vers-lieux-securite.html

    #évacuation #Italie #Libye #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réinstallation #HCR

    Alors que Salvini dit que les ports sont fermés (je ne vais pas rentrer dans les détails de cela)... les aéroports semblent, eux, ouverts... même si pour une petite minorité des personnes qui auraient besoin d’être évacuées de Libye...

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • @philippe_de_jonckheere me conduisant à refoutre le nez dans le bordel qui règne dans mes disques de stockage, je sui parvenu à arracher au quasi néant (ça vieillit très mal, les DVDs, et ce que je cherchais datait de 2003 et 2007) le deuxième numéro de Chutes que je croyais paumé définitivement.
    Un fichier qu’avait pas le bon nom, dans un tiroir qu’avait pas le bon nom, dormait dans un DVD avec rien d’écrit dessus.
    Bref, afin que ça n’arrive plus, je me suis dit que le meilleur moyen de le sauvegarder vraiment était de le foutre sur tous vos disques durs. Comme ça, si je le reperds, je pourrai vous le demander.

    C’est là : http://www.le-terrier.net/chutes

    avec Céline Guichard, Philippe De Jonckheere, Antoine Ronco, Dr. C., Jean-Luc Guionnet, Mardi Noir, Bertoyas, Stéphane Batsal, Alain Hurtig

  • XAMP Duo pour accordéons microtonals
    Premier samedi du mois, à Le Mans c’est la fièvre du samedi matin, et concert le soir.
    Voilà le programme, plus une œuvre de Ligeti pour commencer. Les deux artistes explorent leur instrument (doté de quart de ton) de façon subtile et magnifique.

    XAMP réunit les accordéonistes Fanny Vicens et Jean-Etienne Sotty : musicalement inclassables, artistiquement indomptables, ils partent à la découverte de nouvelles sonorités avec les compositeurs de leur temps, revisitent les musiques du passé, étonnent et enthousiasment leurs auditeurs.
    En 2015, ils révolutionnent le paysage musical en créant deux accordéons microtonals, instruments aux gammes et aux vibrations nouvelles. Au fil de leurs périples, ils rallient deux bandonéons Arnold, un sheng, et s’équipent en matériel électronique : leur instrumentarium évolue sans cesse, décuplant les possibles sonores.
    Autant d’instruments qu’il nous feront découvrir au cours de la fièvre du samedi matin et qu’ils mettront en action durant leur récital du soir, où résonneront des musiques de Régis Campo, Juan Arroyo, Edith Canat de Chizy, Jacques Rebotier, Mauricio Kagel, Steve Reich ou encore Pascale Criton.

    L’œuvre de Pascale Criton est incroyable, avec une seule note jouée avec sensibilité et doigté tout un univers emplit l’espace.
    http://duoxamp.com/instrumentarium
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=584&v=xBdmZOvHFUg


    #musique

  • A Notre-Dame, les failles de la protection incendie
    https://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article/2019/05/31/a-notre-dame-les-failles-de-la-protection-incendie_5470055_3246.html

    Des anciens chefs d’équipe de l’entreprise chargée de la sécurité du site avaient alerté leur hiérarchie et la direction régionale des affaires culturelles sur des dysfonctionnements de matériel et d’organisation.

    Personne ne voulait vraiment les écouter, ou les prendre au sérieux. « La cathédrale est debout depuis plus de huit cents ans, elle ne va pas brûler comme ça », recevaient régulièrement en guise de réponse les anciens chefs d’équipe du PC sécurité de Notre-Dame, qui, à longueur de notes et de rapports, alertaient sur un système de protection incendie qu’ils jugeaient trop bancal.

    Lundi 15 avril, lorsque les flammes ont ravagé la toiture de l’édifice sur lequel ils ont veillé des journées entières et dont ils connaissaient les moindres recoins, un sentiment de gâchis a gagné ces spécialistes de la sécurité, la plupart ex ou encore employés de la société privée Elytis.
    Les premiers éléments de l’enquête qui leur sont parvenus – laquelle écarte toujours, à ce jour, l’acte criminel – n’ont rien arrangé.

    Une mauvaise interprétation du signal au moment du déclenchement de l’alerte a considérablement retardé l’intervention des secours, comme l’ont déjà évoqué Marianne et Le Canard enchaîné. La personne en poste au PC ce jour-là, à peine formée, ne connaissait pas bien les lieux. Grâce à de nombreux témoignages, Le Monde a pu reconstituer cette demi-heure où tout a basculé et prendre la mesure, documents à l’appui, des failles du système que ces hommes dénonçaient.

    Notre-Dame, monument historique le plus visité d’Europe, est l’unique cathédrale en France à être dotée d’un PC sécurité. Le local est installé dans le presbytère, cette petite maison côté Seine qui ne jouxte pas tout à fait l’église mais abrite l’appartement du gardien.

    En 2014, lorsque la société Elytis s’y installe, deux de ses salariés sont prévus par vacation. Dans le jargon de la protection incendie, le Ssiap 2, chef d’équipe, veille sur le SSI (système de sécurité incendie), cette espèce de grande armoire sur laquelle des voyants et un petit écran s’allument en cas de « feu », ou de « dérangement ». Le Ssiap 1, lui, fait des rondes, et doit effectuer la « levée de doute », en moins de cinq minutes, lorsque l’alerte retentit. Mais, rapidement, le dispositif est allégé : un seul salarié Elytis par vacation et, en appui, un surveillant de la cathédrale formé aux bases de la sécurité incendie.

    Une demi-heure de perdue

    Lundi 15 avril, M. D., employé d’Elytis (nous avons fait le choix de ne pas publier les noms des agents) prend son poste à 7 h 30. A 15 h 30, comme personne ne le relève, il enchaîne avec la deuxième vacation, celle qui se termine à 23 heures. Ce sont ses premières heures au PC de Notre-Dame : il a déjà travaillé trois jours, depuis le début du mois, mais n’a encore jamais fait le tour complet du bâtiment.

    A 18 h 18, lorsque le voyant rouge « feu » s’allume, il alerte l’agent d’astreinte et lui lit ce qui s’affiche à l’écran : « combles nef/sacristie », suivi d’un code à plusieurs chiffres.

    C’est Jean-Paul B., l’agent de permanence ce soir-là. Ancien policier, depuis cinq ans à Notre-Dame, il connaît bien la cathédrale. En une minute à peine, le voilà à la sacristie. Rien à signaler dans les combles, annonce-t-il à la radio. Mais, à 18 h 23, l’origine de l’alerte n’étant toujours pas trouvée, les haut-parleurs diffusent le message d’évacuation générale. Quelque 600-800 visiteurs – à l’échelle du site, ce n’est pas la grande foule –, dont certains sont venus assister à la messe du soir, se retrouvent sur le parvis.

    Lundi 15 avril, M.D., employé d’Elytis, prend son poste à 7 h 30. Ce sont ses premières heures au PC de Notre-Dame
    Dans le même temps, averti du signal, Joachim, l’ancien chef sacristain et désormais gardien de la cathédrale, part rejoindre Jean-Paul B. à la sacristie. Employé de Notre-Dame depuis trente-cinq ans, il est de ceux qui connaissent le mieux le bâtiment. Et quasiment le seul à s’y retrouver lorsqu’il fallait, il y a encore quelques années, 700 clés pour ouvrir et fermer portes, grilles et portails de l’église. Depuis peu, deux-trois passes lui ont simplifié le travail.

    En passant devant le PC, le gardien demande à l’employé d’Elytis – qu’il sait tout nouveau à ce poste – d’appeler son responsable, Emmanuel P., pour savoir à quoi renvoie précisément le code de l’écran. A la sacristie, le gardien aide le surveillant à fouiller les bureaux du premier étage, mais toujours rien à signaler. Et pour cause : c’est dans les combles de la nef qu’il faut se rendre, explique Emmanuel P. d’Elytis en appelant Jean-Paul B. sur son portable. Il est alors 18 h 43.

    Mauvais pressentiment

    Les escaliers sud du transept sont les plus proches pour gagner les hauteurs. Les plus pratiques aussi, car ils mènent directement aux combles. Mais il faut bien cinq minutes au surveillant, accompagné cette fois du régisseur de la cathédrale, qui devait organiser une répétition de concert une fois la messe terminée, pour atteindre la charpente, la « forêt », comme étaient surnommées ces centaines de poutres multiséculaires qui soutenaient l’édifice. Gagné par un mauvais pressentiment, Joachim, le gardien, a préféré commencer à déverrouiller les portes de l’église au cas où les secours devraient intervenir.

    Inévitablement, l’enquête s’attardera sur ce délai et sur l’interprétation qui a été faite de l’alarme, retardant considérablement l’arrivée des pompiers

    L’ascension vers le toit est sportive. Vers 18 h 45, l’alarme générale retentit une seconde fois et les fidèles qu’on avait fait rentrer dix minutes plus tôt pour la messe sont à nouveau évacués. Lorsque les deux employés de Notre-Dame franchissent enfin la troisième porte qui sépare le rez-de-chaussée des combles et gravissent la dernière volée de marches, des flammes de plusieurs mètres dévorent déjà la charpente, non loin du mécanisme de l’horloge situé juste avant la croisée des transepts. L’horloge, dont les quatre cadrans donnaient l’heure aux passants, était remontée tous les mercredis matin de 254 coups de manivelle.

    « Il y a le feu, il y a le feu », alertent les deux hommes, à la radio, en dévalant les escaliers. Il est 18 h 48. Le PC sécurité prévient enfin les secours. Soit une demi-heure après la première détection. Inévitablement, l’enquête s’attardera sur ce délai et sur l’interprétation qui a été faite de l’alarme, retardant considérablement l’arrivée des pompiers. Les premiers engins arrivent un peu avant 19 heures, mais, très vite, il n’y a plus aucun espoir de sauver la toiture.

    Un seul salarié Elytis au poste de sécurité

    Nombreux sont les chefs d’équipe d’Elytis qui ont dénoncé, ces dernières années, une organisation défaillante au regard de ce qui pouvait être attendu pour un tel édifice.

    Certains d’entre eux ont détaillé aux enquêteurs les incidents relatés sur la main courante, ce grand registre où tout est inscrit : les prises de poste des agents, le nom des personnes à qui les clés sont remises, les détecteurs hors service, mais aussi les allers et venues des entreprises de travaux. Le 9 mars 2018, il est ainsi précisé que « la société Europe échafaudage [celle chargée d’édifier la structure autour de la flèche de la cathédrale] interviendra le lundi 12 mars sur le site ».

    Lorsque les dysfonctionnements étaient jugés trop sérieux, un rapport d’incident était rédigé par les chefs d’équipe d’Elytis puis adressé à leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques, ainsi qu’à la personne de la direction régionale des affaires culturelles (DRAC) chargée de cette question, la responsable unique de sécurité (RUS). Contactés, ces derniers n’ont pas donné suite aux sollicitations du Monde.

    Le passage de deux à un seul salarié Elytis au poste de sécurité est la critique qui revient le plus fréquemment dans les témoignages. Les premiers mois, en 2014, « le dispositif est bien dimensionné », explique Cee Elung, ancien de la société, le seul à bien vouloir s’exprimer en son nom depuis qu’il est aux prud’hommes après avoir été licencié par son ex-employeur. Mais, très vite, l’allègement du dispositif rend les vacations inconfortables.

    Avec la nouvelle organisation – un chef d’équipe Elytis secondé par un surveillant cathédrale –, les rondes de prévention sont devenues impossibles

    Avec la nouvelle organisation – un chef d’équipe Elytis secondé par un surveillant cathédrale –, s’entraîner à monter en haut des tours et les rondes de prévention sont devenus impossibles, déplorent les agents.
    Pourtant, la main courante du 9 février 2015 prouve l’utilité de celles-ci : « Pendant la ronde [dans la] charpente et la forêt, tours nord et sud : des mégots au sol partout : des matériaux de haut potentiel calorifique trouvés partout. Mr Benjamin Mouton [architecte] informé. Réponse de Mr Mouton : ça fait rien – rien peut passer que on ne peut pas maîtriser [sic]. Mr P. [Emmanuel P.] avisé. » Quant aux agents, ils n’ont désormais plus d’autre choix que de rester la journée entière, l’œil rivé sur l’écran. Les pauses sont un casse-tête, à moins de laisser le SSI sans surveillance.

    L’appareil n’est d’ailleurs pas 100 % fiable, écrivent-ils. Ici, relève un salarié, le 9 février 2015, c’est un déclencheur manuel qui renvoie au « magasin » alors qu’il a été déclenché dans la tour. Là, c’est la « sonorisation », qui ne fonctionne plus. Ce problème, très fréquent l’hiver et au printemps 2015, agace d’ailleurs Cee Elung. « Si une personne se présentait pour un renseignement ou une remise de clés, c’était autant de temps pendant lequel je quittais l’écran des yeux et que je prenais le risque de manquer une détection », explique-t-il. Le 27 mai 2015, il écrit avoir une énième fois « rendu compte » à son supérieur de ce « dysfonctionnement du SSI ». Mais ce dernier, ajoute-il, l’aurait alors accusé d’un « manque de loyauté envers Elytis » et de « mettre en danger leur contrat » avec Notre-Dame. Ambiance.

    Surveillance des travaux problématique

    Il arrive aussi que la relève ne se présente pas. Certaines fois sont plus problématiques que d’autres. Dimanche 18 octobre 2015, le chef d’équipe Elytis constatant qu’à 12 h 30 on lui rapporte passe et radio, et qu’« il n’y a pas d’agent Ssiap dans la cathédrale pour le reste de la journée/soirée », il signale l’incident en lettres rouges sur la main courante et rédige un rapport.

    Le PC sécurité est censé aussi être informé des chantiers en cours. Or, le 18 mai 2015, à 13 h 45, le chef d’équipe s’étonne que des « travaux de point chaud » aient été effectués « sans permis feu ». « Lors de rondes, l’agent trouve des ouvriers en train de découper et de faire du meulage. Après vérification, aucune confirmation avec le PC SSiap-NDP. Aucun email, document ou appel téléphonique pour nous informer ou aviser. »

    Avec la nouvelle organisation, la délivrance de ces permis feu et la surveillance des travaux sont devenues problématiques. « Contrairement à ce qui a pu être dit, personne n’allait vérifier le chantier après le départ des ouvriers », rapporte aujourd’hui un agent de la cathédrale.

    Tous ces hommes, anciens employés ou toujours en poste, déplorent avoir été si souvent pris de haut et déconsidérés. La première oreille attentive qu’ils aient réellement trouvée, c’est finalement celle de la brigade criminelle, ces dernières semaines.

  • Accord à l’amiable dans le procès de Sara Netanyahu
    Reuters29 mai 2019
    https://fr.news.yahoo.com/accord-%C3%A0-lamiable-proc%C3%A8s-sara-150814898.html

    JERUSALEM (Reuters) - L’épouse du Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu, soupçonnée de fraude dans une affaire de frais de bouche, a conclu un accord à l’amiable dans le cadre d’un plaider-coupable, rapporte mercredi Radio Israël.

    Sara Netanyahu a accepté de verser 45.000 shekels (11.000 euros) à l’Etat et de s’acquitter d’une amende de 10.000 shekels (2.500 euros), tout en assurant que le préjudice était moindre.

    L’acte d’accusation initial lui reprochait 90.000 euros de frais de bouche, une pratique interdite lorsqu’un cuisinier est affecté au service d’un haut fonctionnaire.

    (Jeffrey Heller, Jean-Philippe Lefief pour le service français)

  • How We Investigated the New York Taxi Medallion Bubble - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/22/reader-center/taxi-medallion-investigation.html

    It took a year, 450 interviews and a database built from scratch to answer a simple question: Why had anyone ever agreed to pay $1 million for the right to drive a yellow cab?

    By Brian M. Rosenthal
    May 22, 2019

    Times Insider explains who we are and what we do, and delivers behind-the-scenes insights into how our journalism comes together.

    The story started, like a lot of stories seem to, with President Trump’s former lawyer, Michael D. Cohen.

    On April 9, 2018, the F.B.I. raided Mr. Cohen’s office, thrusting him into the national spotlight. The next day, the top editors at The New York Times asked five reporters to start working on a profile. I was one of them.

    The other reporters researched Mr. Cohen’s family, his legal career, his real estate interests and, of course, his work for the president. I took on the last piece of his business empire: his ownership of 30 New York taxi medallions, the coveted permits needed to own a yellow cab.

    After a few weeks of reporting, the team learned enough to publish our story on Mr. Cohen. And I discovered enough to know what I wanted to investigate next.

    At that time, the taxi industry was becoming a big story. Mr. Cohen had owned his medallions as an investment, counting on them rising in value because of the city’s decision to issue only about 13,000 permits. But thousands of the medallions were owned by drivers themselves, and two driver-owners had just died by suicide. Public officials were talking about how the price of a medallion had plummeted from over $1 million to under $150,000. Most were blaming ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

    I had a different question: Why had anybody ever paid $1 million for the right to the grueling job of being a cabby?

    When I pursue an investigation, I identify the single most important question that I am trying to answer, and orient all of my reporting around it. (For example, why did it cost more to build subway track in New York than anywhere else in the world? Or why did Texas have the lowest special education rate in the country?) In this case, I ended up interviewing about 450 people, and I asked almost all the same question: Why did the price reach $1 million? It became my North Star.

    I heard plenty of theories, but I began to get somewhere only when I had an epiphany: No driver-owner had ever really paid close to $1 million for a medallion. On paper, thousands of low-income immigrants had. But while they had poured their life savings into their purchase, virtually all had signed loans for most of the cost — and never really had a chance to repay.

    I needed to examine as many loans as possible, to see if they were as unusual and reckless — and predatory — as some of my sources said they were. But how?

    I got a lead from an unexpected source: the lenders themselves.

    After prices had started crashing, the lenders in the industry had tried to squeeze money out of borrowers. Many of them had filed lawsuits against borrowers — lawsuits which had to include copies of the loans.

    I ultimately reviewed 500 of these loans, and I saw disturbing patterns: Almost none of them included a large down payment. Almost all of them required the borrower to repay everything within three years, which was impossible. There were a lot of interest-only loans, and a wide variety of fees, including charges for paying loans off too early. Many of the loans required borrowers to sign away their legal rights.

    Armed with the loan documents, I started calling dozens of current and former industry bankers, brokers, lawyers and investors. Some pointed me to disclosures that lenders had filed with the government, which were enormously helpful. Others shared internal records, which were even better.

    New York City did not have reliable digital data on medallion sales, so I used paper records to build a database of all the 10,888 sales between 1995 and 2018. The city taxi commission had never analyzed the financial records submitted by medallion buyers, so I did. Nobody knew how many medallion owners had gone bankrupt because of the crisis, so I convinced my boss to pay a technology company, Epiq, to create a program that sped through court records and spat out a tentative list — and then two news assistants helped me verify every result.

    As I dug into the data and the documents, I sought out driver-owners. I wanted to understand what they had been through. To find them, I went to Kennedy International Airport.

    The fare from taking someone from the airport into Manhattan can make a cabby’s day, and so drivers wait in line for hours. And over several visits during a couple of months, I waited with them, striking up conversations outside a food stand run by a Greek family and next to pay phones that had stopped working years ago. After talking briefly, I asked if I could visit their homes and meet their friends.

    In all, I met 200 taxi drivers, including several I interviewed through translators because they did not speak English fluently. (Some of those men still had signed loans of up to $1 million.) One by one, they told me how they had come to New York seeking the American dream, worked hard and gotten trapped in loans they did not understand, which often made them give up almost all of their monthly income. Several said that after the medallion bubble burst, wiping out their savings and their futures, they had contemplated suicide. One said he had already attempted it.

    The day after we began publishing our findings, city officials announced they were exploring ways to help these driver-owners, and the mayor and state attorney general said they were going to investigate the people who channeled them into the loans.

    In the end, the three front-page stories that we published this week about the taxi industry barely mentioned Mr. Cohen at all.

    But they did something much more important: They told the stories of Mohammed Hoque, of Jean Demosthenes and of Wael Ghobrayal.

    Brian M. Rosenthal is an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk. Previously, he covered state government for the Houston Chronicle and for The Seattle Times. @brianmrosenthal

    #USA #New_York #Taxi #Betrug #Ausbeutung

  • Opinion | How New York Taxi Drivers Got Mired in Debt - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/22/opinion/letters/new-york-taxi-drivers.html

    Readers decry unscrupulous lending practices and sympathize with the unwitting drivers whose lives were ruined.

    May 22, 2019

    The New York attorney general’s office said Monday it had opened an inquiry into more than a decade of lending practices that left thousands of immigrant taxi drivers in crushing debt.

    To the Editor:

    “Driven to Despair,” by Brian M. Rosenthal (“Taken for a Ride” series, front page, May 19), is both shocking and significant. It explains how medallion brokers and unscrupulous bank loan sharks have for personal profit put many thousands of unsophisticated New York City taxi drivers in debt and ruined their and their families’ lives by manipulating the taxi medallion business and writing risky loans.

    New York City and New York State governments need to exert better, fairer control of the taxi medallion business, help debt-ridden drivers and punish severely those money-grubbing entrepreneurs who have profited unduly at the expense of others.

    Norton Mezvinsky
    New York

    To the Editor:

    The corrupt practices outlined in this valuable exposé have created a new genre of poverty among taxi drivers. Many can no longer afford to drive, while others can barely afford routine maintenance and their cabs are often in need of repair. The same situation exists in Chicago. Restitution must be paid to those who were duped by city governments eager for revenue.

    The other half of the story that requires documentation is how Uber and Lyft grew up unimpeded by rules that applied only to taxi drivers, creating an environment of unfair competition.

    Bruce Joshua Miller
    Chicago

    To the Editor:

    Why in the world did New York City allow the value of medallions to rise and fall, such that industry leaders “steadily and artificially drove up the price of taxi medallions, creating a bubble that eventually burst”?

    Why not simply set a fixed price adjusted for inflation that drivers could pay, period? All the problems described in your article would have been avoided.

    Jean-François Brière
    Delmar, N.Y.

    #USA #New_York #Taxi #Betrug #Ausbeutung