person:miri regev

  • Feu sur la liberté d’expression en Europe
    dimanche 30 juin 2019 par Coordination nationale de l’UJFP
    http://www.ujfp.org/spip.php?article7264

    Il aura fallu que Yossi Bartal, guide au musée juif de Berlin, démissionne pour qu’apparaissent toutes les manœuvres de l’État d’Israël, toutes ses compromissions aussi.

    La démission de Yossi Bartal(1) se produit huit jours après celle du Directeur du musée, Peter Schäfer (2).

    Peter Schäfer avait protesté avec 240 intellectuels juifs (dont Avraham Burg et Eva Illouz) pour s’opposer à une motion du Parlement allemand qui considérait le mouvement BDS comme antisémite. Il a été directement attaqué par l’ambassadeur d’Israël, Jeremy Issacharoff et Josef Schuster, directeur de l’équivalent du Crif allemand qui n’ont pas hésité à utiliser des « fake news » pour le salir.

    L’année dernière déjà le budget d’une exposition consacrée à Jérusalem, montrant aussi son versant palestinien a été divisé par 2 à la suite d’une intervention de Benjamin Netanyahou (qui réclamait l’annulation totale du budget). De son côté, Josef Schuster avait critiqué le fait que la majorité des employés du musée n’étaient pas juifs. Et les détracteurs de la liberté d’esprit du musée sont soutenus par l’ALD, le parti d’extrême droite…

    Un panier de crabe insoupçonné que nous révèle son (ex) guide. (...)

    ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““"
    (1) Opinion Why I Resigned From Berlin’s Jewish Museum
    Yossi Bartal - Jun 22, 2019 9:39 AM
    https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/why-i-resigned-from-berlin-s-jewish-museum-1.7398301

    Last Monday, after guiding hundreds of different tour groups from Germany and around the world to various exhibitions, I submitted my resignation as a guide at the Jewish Museum of Berlin in protest against the crass political intervention by the German government and the State of Israel in the work of the museum.

    The shameful firing of Peter Schäfer, among the most important scholars of Judaism in the world, in the wake of an aggressive campaign of “fake news” conducted by the Israeli Ambassador to Germany, Jeremy Issacharoff, and Josef Schuster, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, made it clear that the German government is not interested any more in guarding the artistic and academic autonomy of the museum. And I am not interested in working for an institution that relinquishes its independence to serve the political interests of this or that state.

    From the beginning, working as a Jewish guide at a Jewish museum where most of the staff and visitors are not Jews presented personal, political and pedagogical challenges. Thus questions of representation of the other and of speaking in their name have accompanied the work of the museum since its opening in 2003.

    Is it appropriate for a German state museum to be called a Jewish museum at all, or must it be under the complete control of the official Jewish community (that itself only represents part of German Jewry)? Is a Jewish museum, in the absence of a similar institution addressing the Muslim community or other minority groups, responsible for providing space for the perspectives of children of migrants in Germany, many of whom live in neighborhoods nearby, and for conducting Jewish-Muslim dialogue?

    Should the museum function as a forum in which various opinions in the Jewish world can be heard, those touching on Israel as well? The answer of the head of the Jewish community, the Israeli ambassador and right-wing journalists, who for years have been running a toxic and untruthful campaign against museum staff, is an absolute no.

    Thus a significant portion of the criticism of the museum suggests, or even declares openly, that the very fact that many of the staff members of the museum are not Jews negates their right to social activism that is not in keeping with the political preferences of the Jewish community’s representatives. This discourse reached the point of absurdity when Schuster, the leader of a community in which many members are not considered Jewish according to halakha, negated the museum’s right to call itself Jewish.

    But we should not be confused by the legitimate criticism over the lack of Jewish representation in leading positions in Germany, because this criticism is raised only when non-Jews dare, even in the most sensitive way, to criticize policies of the Israeli government, or to come out against anti-Muslim racism. Proof of this may be seen in the Jewish community’s support for the 10 officials who have been nominated to fight anti-Semitism in the country: All 10 are non-Jews, and all 10 support the position that strong criticism of the occupation and of Israel’s religiously discriminatory character should be seen as an expression of anti-Semitism.

    Not surprisingly, the extreme right-wing “Alternative for Germany” is the party that, by way of parliamentary questions, has been leading the campaign against the museum for the last year, as reported sympathetically by the house newspaper of Benjamin Netanyahu. Despite the Israeli Embassy’s contention that it is not in contact with members of the party, its opposition to museum activities is based on a fervent rejection of democratic discourse, and its absolute conflation of the interests of the Israeli government with those of world Jewry. Already in the past year, as part of an exhibition on Jerusalem and its significance to three religions, the museum was forced to cancel a lecture on the status of LGBTQ Palestinians in East Jerusalem because the Israeli ambassador suspected that the speaker, God help us, supports BDS.

    Accusations of anti-Semitism, which carry enormous weight in Germany, lead more and more to censorship and self-censorship. Cultural institutions in Germany, which are supposed to provide a stage for critical positions, are threatened financially and politically if they even dare to host artists and musicians who at any time expressed support for non-violent resistance to the Israeli occupation. This policy of fear-mongering that Miri Regev leads in Israel is imported by supporters of Israel to Germany. Only in Germany, because of its great sensitivity to anti-Semitism and deep identification with Israel in the wake of the Shoah, are there politicians not only on the right but on the left as well who vehemently endorse the silencing of criticism of Israel.

    The extreme right’s ascendance to power in places across the globe is based in great part on the constriction of democratic space and the intimidation and sanctioning of anyone who dares to oppose suppressive nationalist policies. The efforts of the Ministry of Strategic Affairs and the Foreign Ministry, in cooperation with Jewish and right-wing organizations around the world, to defame and slander anyone who refuses to join their campaign of incitement against human rights activists, has now led to the firing of an esteemed scholar, strictly because he chose to defend the rights of Israeli academics to oppose the designation of the BDS movement as an anti-Semitic movement.

    Against this paranoid impulse toward purges, which to a great extent recalls the years of McCarthyism in the United States, one must take a clear public stance. If the firing of Peter Schäfer has a moral, it is that no matter how much approbation a person has received for his opposition to anti-Semitism and support for Israel, opposition to Netanyahu’s anti-democratic policies is enough to turn him into an enemy of the people and the nation.

    If the German and Israeli governments are interested in the Jewish Museum representing only their narrow political interests and denying its staff members freedom of expression, I am not interested in having a part in it. So despite my deep respect for the museum’s staff, I proffered my resignation. I and many other Jews of my generation do not want or need a kashrut certificate from the State of Israel or the heads of the institutional Jewish community, nor, certainly, from the German government. Judaism, as a pluralistic and democratic world culture, will continue to exist after the racist, ultra-nationalist politics that has taken over many communal institutions passes from the world.

    The writer has lived in Berlin for 13 years and works as a tour guide.

    ““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““
    (2) https://seenthis.net/messages/788398

  • Netanyahu à une star de la télé : « Israël n’est pas l’État de tous ses citoyens »
    The Times of Israël - 10 mars 2019
    https://fr.timesofisrael.com/netanyahu-a-une-star-de-la-tele-israel-nest-pas-letat-de-tous-ses-

    Dimanche, le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu s’est lancé dans un débat avec une présentatrice populaire de télé-réalité qui a critiqué la rhétorique anti-arabe du parti du Likud, après que la ministre de la Culture Miri Regev a répété dans un entretien de samedi une affirmation fréquente du Likud que le parti Kakhol lavan de Bennny Gantz tenterait de former un gouvernement avec des partis arabes.

    Dans sa confrontation écrite avec l’actrice et mannequin Rotem Sela, Netanyahu a souligné qu’Israël n’est « pas l’État-nation de tous ses citoyens », mais plutôt « l’État-nation du peuple juif ».

    « Quel est le problème avec les Arabes ??? », avait écrit l’actrice de 35 ans sur Instagram.

    « Cher Dieu, il y a aussi des citoyens arabes dans ce pays. Quand donc quelqu’un dans ce gouvernement passera le message au public qu’Israël est l’état de tous ses citoyens et que tous les gens ont été créés égaux, et que même les Arabes, les Druzes, les LGBT et – grand choc – les gauchistes sont humains », a-t-elle déclaré.

    Netanyahu a répliqué sur les réseaux sociaux : « Chère Rotem, une correction importante : Israël n’est pas un état de tous ses citoyens. Selon la loi sur l’Etat-nation que nous avons adoptée, Israël est l’État-nation du peuple juif – et personne d’autre ».

    • Wonder Woman contre Bibi
      Richard Hétu - 11/03/2019
      https://richardhetu.com/2019/03/11/wonder-woman-contre-bibi

      « Quand diable quelqu’un dans ce gouvernement dira-t-il au public [qu’Israël] est un pays où tous les citoyens et chaque personne sont nés égaux. Et aussi, que les Arabes sont des êtres humains. » Samedi soir, la présentatrice et mannequin israélienne Rotem Sela a lancé ce cri du coeur aux quelques 830 000 abonnés de son compte Instagram. Elle réagissait ainsi aux propos tenus à la télévision par une ministre du gouvernement israélien. Lors d’une interview, Miri Regev avait averti les téléspectateurs que le principal rival de Benjamin Nétanyahou aux élections législatives du 9 avril, Benny Gantz, pourrait former un gouvernement avec l’appui de partis arabes. Nétanyahou, dit Bibi, a ajouté son grain de sel après la sortie de Sela, suivi de Gal Gadot, alias Wonder Woman. (...)

  • Israeli Arab slate, far-left candidate banned from election hours after Kahanist leader allowed to run
    Jonathan Lis and Jack Khoury Mar 07, 2019 7:07 AM
    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/elections/.premium-far-left-lawmaker-banned-from-israeli-election-for-supporting-terr

    Arab political sources say the move is evidence of racism and the delegitimization of Arab society in Israel, accusing Netanyahu’s Likud party of anti-Arab incitement

    The Central Election Committee disqualified the Arab joint slate Balad-United Arab List and Ofer Cassif, a member of politicial alliance Hadash-Ta’al, from running in the election on Wednesday, opposing the opinion of Attorney General Avichai Mendelblit.

    Michael Ben Ari and Itamar Ben-Gvir from the Kahanist, far-right Otzma Yehudit party had petitioned against both lists. The committee approved Ben Air to run in the election earlier Wednesday.

    The decisions will be referred to the Supreme Court on Sunday for approval. A ban against a party slate may be appealed in the Supreme Court, which holds a special “election appeals” process, while a ban on an individual candidate automatically requires approval by the Supreme Court if it is to take effect.

    Arab political sources described the disqualification of the Balad-United Arab List slate as evidence of racism and the delegitimization of Arab society in Israel and accused Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party of anti-Arab incitement.

    MK David Bitan petitioned on behalf of Likud against Balad-United Arab List, and Yisrael Beitenu chairman Avigdor Lieberman petitioned against Cassif. Petitioners claimed both lists and Cassif supported terror and ruled out Israel’s right to exist as a Jewish and Democratic state. Mendelblit said he opposed all the petitions.

    Ben-Gvir presented the committee with findings he claimed should disqualify the Hadash-Ta’al slate. He mentioned a call from Ta’al chairman Ahmed Tibi to annul the Declaration of Independence, and quoted a Facebook post by Ayman Odeh, the head of Hadash.

    In the post, written following a meeting with Fatah member Marwan Barghouti at an Israeli prison, Odeh compared Barghouti to Nelson Mandela. “The meeting was moving, as well as speaking to a leader who shares my political stances.” Ben-Gvir noted Odeh defined Ahed Tamimi as an “excellent girl,” and said she showed “legitimate resistance.” Tamimi, a Palestinian teenage girl, served time in prison for slapping an Israeli soldier in 2018.

    Cassif was accused of equating Israel and the Israel Defense Forces with the Nazi regime, and it was noted that he called to fight “Judeo-Nazism,” expressed support for changing the anthem, and called Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked “Neo-Nazi scum.” He did not attend the session, but was called after committee chairman Justice Hanan Melcer insisted on his presence.

    “I come from an academic background, and my area of expertise is among other things the subject of Fascism, Nazis and nationalism in general,” said Cassif, explaining his comments. “When I speak to a friend or write a post as a private person, I use metaphors. When I used the aforementioned terms – they were metaphors.”

    In an interview last month, Cassif said Israel conducts a “creeping genocide” against the Palestinian people.

    The top candidate on the slate, Mansour Abbas, said he had expected that most of the representatives of the Zionist parties on the election committee would support the move to disqualify the slate, but added: “We are a democratic Arab list that is seeking to represent Arab society with dignity and responsibility.”

    Commenting on Benny Gantz, the leader of Kahol Lavan, which is ahead of Likud in recent polls, Abbas said: “There’s no difference between Benjamin Netanyahu and Benjamin Gantz.”

    Mtanes Shehadeh, who is No. 2 on the Balad-United Arab list slate said the decision to disqualify his slate was expected because he said the Central Election Committee has a right-wing majority and “is also controlled by a fascist, right-wing ideology.”

    His Balad faction, Shehadeh said, “presents a challenge to democracy in Israel” and challenges what he called “the right-wing regime that is controlling the country.”

    Sources from the Balad-United Arab list slate said there is in an urgent need to strip the Central Election Committee of the authority to disqualify candidates and parties from running in elections. The considerations that go into the decision are purely political, the sources said.

    Balad chairman Jamal Zahalka said the decision to disqualify the slate sends a “hostile message to the Arab public” in the country. “We will petition the High Court of Justice against the decision and in any event, we will not change our position, even if we are disqualified.”

    Earlier Wednesday, the Central Elections Committee approved Ben Ari, the chairman of the far-right Otzma Yehudit party, to run for the Knesset.

    Meretz, Stav Shaffir (Labor) and the Reform Movement, who filed the petition to the Central Elections Committee to ban Ben Ari from running for Knesset, all said they would file a petition with the High Court of Justice against the committee’s decision.

    Prior to deliberations, Attorney General Avichai Mendelblit submitted his opinion to the comittee, stating he was in favor of disqualifying Ben Ari from running for Knesset on the grounds of incitement to racism.

    In November 2017, for instance, at an annual memorial for Rabbi Meir Kahane, Ben Ari gave a speech in which he said of Israeli Arabs, “Let’s give them another 100,000 dunams [of land] and affirmative action, maybe they’ll love us. In the end, yes, they’ll love us when we’re slaughtered.”

    In May 2018, Ben Ari gave another speech in which he said, “The Arabs of Haifa aren’t different in any way from the Arabs of Gaza. How are they different? In that they’re here, enemies from within. They’re waging war against us here, within the state. And this is called – it has a name – it’s called a fifth column. We need to call the dog by its name. They’re our enemies. They want to destroy us. Of course there are loyal Arabs, but you can count them – one percent or less than one percent.”

    #Hadash

    • Outlaw Israel’s Arabs
      They are already regarded as illegitimate citizens. Why not just say so and anchor it in law?
      Gideon Levy | Mar 10, 2019 3:15 AM
      https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-outlaw-israel-s-arabs-1.7003010

      The time has come to put an end to the stammering and going around in circles: Outlaw the Arabs, all of them. Make them all illegal dwellers in their land and have the Border Police hunt them down like animals, as they know how to do. They are already regarded as illegitimate citizens. It’s time to say so and to anchor it in law.

      Discerning the differences among them is artificial: What’s the difference between the United Arab List–Balad ticket and between the Hadash–Ta’al ticket (acronyms for the Arab political parties)? Why is only the first one on this list being disqualified? And what is the difference between the Palestinians who are Israeli citizens and those living under occupation?

      Why does one group have rights while the others don’t? The time has come to rectify the situation: Ta’al should be treated like Balad; citizens of the state should be treated like those under occupation. Anything less is like paying lip service to the guardians of political correctness, to a supposed semblance of fairness, to a deceptive image of democracy. Outlawing all the Arabs is the way to ensure you have a Jewish state. Who’s against that?

      Whoever thinks what I’ve written is wrong or an exaggeration isn’t reading reality. Disqualifying the Arabs is the issue that has the broadest consensus of the current election campaign. “I’ll put it simply,” Yair Lapid, the democrat, said. “We won’t form a blocking majority with the Arabs. Period.”

      Now I, will humbly put it simply, too: This is a revolting display of racism. Period. More than the torture of the residents of Gaza and the West Bank under the guise of security concerns, in this we see a broader Israeli racism in all its glory: Pure, unadulterated and acceptable racism. It’s not Balad, but the Arabs who are being disqualified. It’s not Ofer Kassif but the left that’s being disqualified. It’s a step-by-step slide down the slope and we can no longer shut our eyes to it.

      If this discourse delegitimizing our Arab citizens isn’t driving Israeli democrats mad – then there is no democracy. We don’t need any studies or institutes: A regime that disqualifies voters and elected officials because of their blood and nationality is not a democracy.

      You don’t need to cite the occupation to expose the lie of democracy – now it’s also apparent at home, within. From Benny Gantz to Bezalel Smotrich – all of them are Ben-Zion Gopsteins. The laws against racism and all the rest are only lip service. The Israeli Knesset has 107 lawmakers; thirteen of them, most of them among the best there are, are outside the game, they have less say than the ushers.

      Now we must try to imagine what they’re going through. They hear everyone trying to distance themselves from them, as though they’re a contagious disease, and they’re silent. They hear nobody seeking to get near them as though their bodies stink, and they avoid comment. The Knesset is like a bus that has segregated its Jewish and Arab passengers, an arena of political apartheid, not yet officially so, which declares from the outset that the Arabs are disqualified.

      Why even bother participating in this game that’s already been decided? The response should have been to boycott the elections. If you don’t want us, we don’t want you. The fig leaf is torn and has long been full of holes. But this is exactly what Israel wants: A country only for Jews. Therefore Arab citizens must not play this game and must head in their masses to the polling stations, just like the prime minister said, to poke Israeli racism painfully in the eye.

      For avowed racists, it’s all very clear. They say what they think: The Jews are a supreme race, the recipients of a divine promise, they have rights to this land, the Arabs are, at best, fleeting guests.

      The problem is with the racists in masquerade like Gantz and Lapid. I have a question for them: Why are Hadash and Ta’al not eligible to be part of a bloc? Why can’t you rely on their votes and why shouldn’t their representatives belong to the government? Would Ayman Odeh be any worse a culture minister than Miri Regev? Would Ahmad Tibi be any less skillful a health minister than Yaakov Litzman? The truth is this: The center-left is as racist as the right.

      Let’s hope no Gantz-Lapid government can be formed, just because of the Arab votes that it fails to have. That would be the sweetest revenge for racism.

    • La Cour suprême israélienne invalide la candidature d’un leader d’extrême droite
      La justice a interdit la candidature du chef d’Otzma Yehudit. Elle a approuvé la liste arabe, les présences d’un candidat juif d’extrême gauche et de Ben Gvir d’Otzma Yehudit
      Par Times of Israel Staff 18 mars 2019,
      https://fr.timesofisrael.com/la-cour-supreme-israelienne-invalide-la-candidature-dun-leader-dex

      (...) Les juges ont en revanche fait savoir que Itamar Ben Gvir, qui appartient également à la formation d’extrême-droite, est autorisé à se présenter.

      Ils ont aussi donné le feu vert à une participation au scrutin du 9 avril à Ofer Kassif ainsi qu’aux factions de Balad-Raam. Kassif est le seul candidat juif à figurer que la liste Hadash-Taal et il avait été disqualifié par la commission centrale électorale en raison de déclarations controversées faites dans le passé, notamment une dans laquelle il avait qualifié la ministre de la Justice Ayelet Shaked de « racaille néo-nazie ». (...)

      #Ofer_Kassif

  • The Knesset candidate who says Zionism encourages anti-Semitism and calls Netanyahu ’arch-murderer’ - Israel Election 2019 - Haaretz.com
    https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/elections/.premium.MAGAZINE-knesset-candidate-netanyahu-is-an-arch-murderer-zionism-e

    Few Israelis have heard of Dr. Ofer Cassif, the Jewish representative on the far-leftist Hadash party’s Knesset slate. On April 9, that will change
    By Ravit Hecht Feb 16, 2019

    Ofer Cassif is fire and brimstone. Not even the flu he’s suffering from today can contain his bursting energy. His words are blazing, and he bounds through his modest apartment, searching frenetically for books by Karl Marx and Primo Levi in order to find quotations to back up his ideas. Only occasional sips from a cup of maté bring his impassioned delivery to a momentary halt. The South American drink is meant to help fight his illness, he explains.

    Cassif is third on the slate of Knesset candidates in Hadash (the Hebrew acronym for the Democratic Front for Peace and Equality), the successor to Israel’s Communist Party. He holds the party’s “Jewish slot,” replacing MK Dov Khenin. Cassif is likely to draw fire from opponents and be a conspicuous figure in the next Knesset, following the April 9 election.

    Indeed, the assault on him began as soon as he was selected by the party’s convention. The media pursued him; a columnist in the mass-circulation Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper, Ben-Dror Yemini, called for him to be disqualified from running for the Knesset. It would be naive to say that this was unexpected. Cassif, who was one of the first Israeli soldiers to refuse to serve in the territories, in 1987, gained fame thanks to a number of provocative statements. The best known is his branding of Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked as “neo-Nazi scum.” On another occasion, he characterized Jews who visit the Temple Mount as “cancer with metastases that have to be eradicated.”

    On his alternate Facebook page, launched after repeated blockages of his original account by a blitz of posts from right-wing activists, he asserted that Culture Minister Miri Regev is “repulsive gutter contamination,” that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is an “arch-murderer” and that the new Israel Defense Forces chief of staff, Lt. Gen. Aviv Kochavi, is a “war criminal.”

    Do you regret making those remarks?

    Cassif: “‘Regret’ is a word of emotion. Those statements were made against a background of particular events: the fence in Gaza, horrible legislation, and the wild antics of Im Tirtzu [an ultranationalist organization] on campus. That’s what I had to say at the time. I didn’t count on being in the Knesset. That wasn’t part of my plan. But it’s clear to me that as a public personality, I would not have made those comments.”

    Is Netanyahu an arch-murderer?

    “Yes. I wrote it in the specific context of a particular day in the Gaza Strip. A massacre of innocent people was perpetrated there, and no one’s going to persuade me that those people were endangering anyone. It’s a concentration camp. Not a ‘concentration camp’ in the sense of Bergen-Belsen; I am absolutely not comparing the Holocaust to what’s happening.”

    You term what Israel is doing to the Palestinians “genocide.”

    “I call it ‘creeping genocide.’ Genocide is not only a matter of taking people to gas chambers. When Yeshayahu Leibowitz used the term ‘Judeo-Nazis,’ people asked him, ‘How can you say that? Are we about to build gas chambers?’ To that, he had two things to say. First, if the whole difference between us and the Nazis boils down to the fact that we’re not building gas chambers, we’re already in trouble. And second, maybe we won’t use gas chambers, but the mentality that exists today in Israel – and he said this 40 years ago – would allow it. I’m afraid that today, after four years of such an extreme government, it possesses even greater legitimacy.

    “But you know what, put aside ‘genocide’ – ethnic cleansing is taking place there. And that ethnic cleansing is also being carried out by means of killing, although mainly by way of humiliation and of making life intolerable. The trampling of human dignity. It reminds me of Primo Levi’s ‘If This Is a Man.’”

    You say you’re not comparing, but you repeatedly come back to Holocaust references. On Facebook, you also uploaded the scene from “Schindler’s List” in which the SS commander Amon Goeth picks off Jews with his rifle from the balcony of his quarters in the camp. You compared that to what was taking place along the border fence in the Gaza Strip.

    “Today, I would find different comparisons. In the past I wrote an article titled, ‘On Holocaust and on Other Crimes.’ It’s online [in Hebrew]. I wrote there that anyone who compares Israel to the Holocaust is cheapening the Holocaust. My comparison between here and what happened in the early 1930s [in Germany] is a very different matter.”

    Clarity vs. crudity

    Given Cassif’s style, not everyone in Hadash was happy with his election, particularly when it comes to the Jewish members of the predominantly Arab party. Dov Khenin, for example, declined to be interviewed and say what he thinks of his parliamentary successor. According to a veteran party figure, “From the conversations I had, it turns out that almost none of the Jewish delegates – who make up about 100 of the party’s 940 delegates – supported his candidacy.

    “He is perceived, and rightly so,” the party veteran continues, “as someone who closes doors to Hadash activity within Israeli society. Each of the other Jewish candidates presented a record of action and of struggles they spearheaded. What does he do? Curses right-wing politicians on Facebook. Why did the party leadership throw the full force of its weight behind him? In a continuation of the [trend exemplified by] its becoming part of the Joint List, Ofer’s election reflects insularity and an ongoing retreat from the historical goal of implementing change in Israeli society.”

    At the same time, as his selection by a 60 percent majority shows, many in the party believe that it’s time to change course. “Israeli society is moving rightward, and what’s perceived as Dov’s [Khenin] more gentle style didn’t generate any great breakthrough on the Jewish street,” a senior source in Hadash notes.

    “It’s not a question of the tension between extremism and moderation, but of how to signpost an alternative that will develop over time. Clarity, which is sometimes called crudity, never interfered with cooperation between Arabs and Jews. On the contrary. Ofer says things that we all agreed with but didn’t so much say, and of course that’s going to rile the right wing. And a good thing, too.”

    Hadash chairman MK Ayman Odeh also says he’s pleased with the choice, though sources in the party claim that Odeh is apprehensive about Cassif’s style and that he actually supported a different candidate. “Dov went for the widest possible alliances in order to wield influence,” says Odeh. “Ofer will go for very sharp positions at the expense of the breadth of the alliance. But his sharp statements could have a large impact.”

    Khenin was deeply esteemed by everyone. When he ran for mayor of Tel Aviv in 2008, some 35 percent of the electorate voted for him, because he was able to touch people who weren’t only from his political milieu.

    Odeh: “No one has a higher regard for Dov than I do. But just to remind you, we are not a regular opposition, we are beyond the pale. And there are all kinds of styles. Influence can be wielded through comments that are vexatious the first time but which people get used to the second time. When an Arab speaks about the Nakba and about the massacre in Kafr Kassem [an Israeli Arab village, in 1956], it will be taken in a particular way, but when uttered by a Jew it takes on special importance.”

    He will be the cause of many attacks on the party.

    “Ahlan wa sahlan – welcome.”

    Cassif will be the first to tell you that, with all due respect for the approach pursued by Khenin and by his predecessor in the Jewish slot, Tamar Gozansky, he will be something completely different. “I totally admire what Tamar and Dov did – nothing less than that,” he says, while adding, “But my agenda will be different. The three immediate dangers to Israeli society are the occupation, racism and the diminishment of the democratic space to the point of liquidation. That’s the agenda that has to be the hub of the struggle, as long as Israel rules over millions of people who have no rights, enters [people’s houses] in the middle of the night, arrests minors on a daily basis and shoots people in the back.

    "Israel commits murder on a daily basis. When you murder one Palestinian, you’re called Elor Azaria [the IDF soldier convicted and jailed for killing an incapacitated Palestinian assailant]; when you murder and oppress thousands of Palestinians, you’re called the State of Israel.”

    So you plan to be the provocateur in the next Knesset?

    “It’s not my intention to be a provocateur, to stand there and scream and revile people. Even on Facebook I was compelled to stop that. But I definitely intend to challenge the dialogue in terms of the content, and mainly with a type of sarcasm.”

    ’Bags of blood’

    Cassif, 54, who holds a doctorate in political philosophy from the London School of Economics, teaches political science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Sapir Academic College in Sderot and at the Academic College of Tel Aviv-Yaffo. He lives in Rehovot, is married and is the father of a 19-year-old son. He’s been active in Hadash for three decades and has held a number of posts in the party.

    As a lecturer, he stands out for his boldness and fierce rhetoric, which draws students of all stripes. He even hangs out with some of his Haredi students, one of whom wrote a post on the eve of the Hadash primary urging the delegates to choose him. After his election, a student from a settlement in the territories wrote to him, “You are a determined and industrious person, and for that I hold you in high regard. Hoping we will meet on the field of action and growth for the success of Israel as a Jewish, democratic state (I felt obliged to add a small touch of irony in conclusion).”

    Cassif grew up in a home that supported Mapai, forerunner of Labor, in Rishon Letzion. He was an only child; his father was an accountant, his mother held a variety of jobs. He was a news hound from an early age, and at 12 ran for the student council in school. He veered sharply to the left in his teens, becoming a keen follower of Marx and socialism.

    Following military service in the IDF’s Nahal brigade and a period in the airborne Nahal, Cassif entered the Hebrew University. There his political career moved one step forward, and there he also forsook the Zionist left permanently. His first position was as a parliamentary aide to the secretary general of the Communist Party, Meir Wilner.

    “At first I was closer to Mapam [the United Workers Party, which was Zionist], and then I refused to serve in the territories. I was the first refusenik in the first intifada to be jailed. I didn’t get support from Mapam, I got support from the people of Hadash, and I drew close to them. I was later jailed three more times for refusing to serve in the territories.”

    His rivals in the student organizations at the Hebrew University remember him as the epitome of the extreme left.

    “Even in the Arab-Jewish student association, Cassif was considered off-the-wall,” says Motti Ohana, who was chairman of Likud’s student association and active in the Student Union at the end of the 1980s and early 1990s. “One time I got into a brawl with him. It was during the first intifada, when he brought two bags of blood, emptied them out in the university’s corridors and declared, ‘There is no difference between Jewish and Arab blood,’ likening Israeli soldiers to terrorists. The custom on campus was that we would quarrel, left-right, Arabs-Jews, and after that we would sit together, have a coffee and talk. But not Cassif.”

    According to Ohana, today a member of the Likud central committee, the right-wing activists knew that, “You could count on Ofer to fall into every trap. There was one event at the Hebrew University that was a kind of political Hyde Park. The right wanted to boot the left out of there, so we hung up the flag. It was obvious that Ofer would react, and in fact he tore the flag, and in the wake of the ruckus that developed, political activity was stopped for good.”

    Replacing the anthem

    Cassif voices clearly and cogently positions that challenge the public discourse in Israel, and does so with ardor and charisma. Four candidates vied for Hadash’s Jewish slot, and they all delivered speeches at the convention. The three candidates who lost to him – Efraim Davidi, Yaela Raanan and the head of the party’s Tel Aviv branch, Noa Levy – described their activity and their guiding principles. When they spoke, there was the regular buzz of an audience that’s waiting for lunch. But when Cassif took the stage, the effect was magnetic.

    “Peace will not be established without a correction of the crimes of the Nakba and [recognition of] the right of return,” he shouted, and the crowd cheered him. As one senior party figure put it, “Efraim talked about workers’ rights, Yaela about the Negev, Noa about activity in Tel Aviv – and Ofer was Ofer.”

    What do you mean by “right of return”?

    Cassif: “The first thing is the actual recognition of the Nakba and of the wrong done by Israel. Compare it to the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions in South Africa, if you like, or with the commissions in Chile after Pinochet. Israel must recognize the wrong it committed. Now, recognition of the wrong also includes recognition of the right of return. The question is how it’s implemented. It has to be done by agreement. I can’t say that tomorrow Tel Aviv University has to be dismantled and that Sheikh Munis [the Arab village on whose ruins the university stands] has to be rebuilt there. The possibility can be examined of giving compensation in place of return, for example.”

    But what is the just solution, in your opinion?

    “For the Palestinian refugees to return to their homeland.”

    That means there will be Jews who will have to leave their home.

    “In some places, unequivocally, yes. People will have to be told: ‘You must evacuate your places.’ The classic example is Ikrit and Biram [Christian-Arab villages in Galilee whose residents were promised – untruly – by the Israeli authorities in 1948 that they would be able to return, and whose lands were turned over to Jewish communities]. But there are places where there is certainly greater difficulty. You don’t right one wrong with another.”

    What about the public space in Israel? What should it look like?

    “The public space has to change, to belong to all the state’s residents. I dispute the conception of ‘Jewish publicness.’”

    How should that be realized?

    “For example, by changing the national symbols, changing the national anthem. [Former Hadash MK] Mohammed Barakeh once suggested ‘I Believe’ [‘Sahki, Sahki’] by [Shaul] Tchernichovsky – a poem that is not exactly an expression of Palestinian nationalism. He chose it because of the line, ‘For in mankind I’ll believe.’ What does it mean to believe in mankind? It’s not a Jew, or a Palestinian, or a Frenchman, or I don’t know what.”

    What’s the difference between you and the [Arab] Balad party? Both parties overall want two states – a state “of all its citizens” and a Palestinian state.

    “In the big picture, yes. But Balad puts identity first on the agenda. We are not nationalists. We do not espouse nationalism as a supreme value. For us, self-determination is a means. We are engaged in class politics. By the way, Balad [the National Democratic Assembly] and Ta’al [MK Ahmad Tibi’s Arab Movement for Renewal] took the idea of a state of all its citizens from us, from Hadash. We’ve been talking about it for ages.”

    If you were a Palestinian, what would you do today?

    “In Israel, what my Palestinian friends are doing, and I with them – [wage] a parliamentary and extra-parliamentary struggle.”

    And what about the Palestinians in the territories?

    “We have always been against harming innocent civilians. Always. In all our demonstrations, one of our leading slogans was: ‘In Gaza and in Sderot, children want to live.’ With all my criticism of the settlers, to enter a house and slaughter children, as in the case of the Fogel family [who were murdered in their beds in the settlement of Itamar in 2011], is intolerable. You have to be a human being and reject that.”

    And attacks on soldiers?

    “An attack on soldiers is not terrorism. Even Netanyahu, in his book about terrorism, explicitly categorizes attacks on soldiers or on the security forces as guerrilla warfare. It’s perfectly legitimate, according to every moral criterion – and, by the way, in international law. At the same time, I am not saying it’s something wonderful, joyful or desirable. The party’s Haifa office is on Ben-Gurion Street, and suddenly, after years, I noticed a memorial plaque there for a fighter in Lehi [pre-state underground militia, also known as the Stern Gang] who assassinated a British officer. Wherever there has been a struggle for liberation from oppression, there are national heroes, who in 90 percent of the cases carried out some operations that were unlawful. Nelson Mandela is today considered a hero, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, but according to the conventional definition, he was a terrorist. Most of the victims of the ANC [African National Congress] were civilians.”

    In other words, today’s Hamas commanders who are carrying out attacks on soldiers will be heroes of the future Palestinian state?

    “Of course.”

    Anti-Zionist identity

    Cassif terms himself an explicit anti-Zionist. “There are three reasons for that,” he says. “To begin with, Zionism is a colonialist movement, and as a socialist, I am against colonialism. Second, as far as I am concerned, Zionism is racist in ideology and in practice. I am not referring to the definition of race theory – even though there are also some who impute that to the Zionist movement – but to what I call Jewish supremacy. No socialist can accept that. My supreme value is equality, and I can’t abide any supremacy – Jewish or Arab. The third thing is that Zionism, like other ethno-nationalistic movements, splits the working class and all weakened groups. Instead of uniting them in a struggle for social justice, for equality, for democracy, it divides the exploited classes and the enfeebled groups, and by that means strengthens the rule of capital.”

    He continues, “Zionism also sustains anti-Semitism. I don’t say it does so deliberately – even though I have no doubt that there are some who do it deliberately, like Netanyahu, who is connected to people like the prime minister of Hungary, Viktor Orban, and the leader of the far right in Austria, Hans Christian Strache.”

    Did Mapai-style Zionism also encourage anti-Semitism?

    “The phenomenon was very striking in Mapai. Think about it for a minute, not only historically, but logically. If the goal of political and practical Zionism is really the establishment of a Jewish state containing a Jewish majority, and for Diaspora Jewry to settle there, nothing serves them better than anti-Semitism.”

    What in their actions encouraged anti-Semitism?

    “The very appeal to Jews throughout the world – the very fact of treating them as belonging to the same nation, when they were living among other nations. The whole old ‘dual loyalty’ story – Zionism actually encouraged that. Therefore, I maintain that anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism are not the same thing, but are precisely opposites. That doesn’t mean, of course, that there are no anti-Zionists who are also anti-Semites. Most of the BDS people are of course anti-Zionists, but they are in no way anti-Semites. But there are anti-Semites there, too.”

    Do you support BDS?

    “It’s too complex a subject for a yes or no answer; there are aspects I don’t support.”

    Do you think that the Jews deserve a national home in the Land of Israel?

    “I don’t know what you mean by ‘national home.’ It’s very amorphous. We in Hadash say explicitly that Israel has a right to exist as a sovereign state. Our struggle is not against the state’s existence, but over its character.”

    But that state is the product of the actions of the Zionist movement, which you say has been colonialist and criminal from day one.

    “That’s true, but the circumstances have changed. That’s the reason that the majority of the members of the Communist Party accepted the [1947] partition agreement at the time. They recognized that the circumstances had changed. I think that one of the traits that sets communist thought apart, and makes it more apt, is the understanding and the attempt to strike the proper balance between what should be, and reality. So it’s true that Zionism started as colonialism, but what do you do with the people who were already born here? What do you tell them? Because your grandparents committed a crime, you have to leave? The question is how you transform the situation that’s been created into one that’s just, democratic and equal.”

    So, a person who survived a death camp and came here is a criminal?

    “The individual person, of course not. I’m in favor of taking in refugees in distress, no matter who or what they are. I am against Zionism’s cynical use of Jews in distress, including the refugees from the Holocaust. I have a problem with the fact that the natives whose homeland this is cannot return, while people for whom it’s not their homeland, can, because they supposedly have some sort of blood tie and an ‘imaginary friend’ promised them the land.”

    I understand that you are in favor of the annulment of the Law of Return?

    “Yes. Definitely.”

    But you are in favor of the Palestinian right of return.

    “There’s no comparison. There’s no symmetry here at all. Jerry Seinfeld was by chance born to a Jewish family. What’s his connection to this place? Why should he have preference over a refugee from Sabra or Chatila, or Edward Said, who did well in the United States? They are the true refugees. This is their homeland. Not Seinfeld’s.”

    Are you critical of the Arabs, too?

    “Certainly. One criticism is of their cooperation with imperialism – take the case of today’s Saudi Arabia, Qatar and so on. Another, from the past, relates to the reactionary forces that did not accept that the Jews have a right to live here.”

    Hadash refrained from criticizing the Assad regime even as it was massacring civilians in Syria. The party even torpedoed a condemnation of Assad after the chemical attack. Do you identify with that approach?

    “Hadash was critical of the Assad regime – father and son – for years, so we can’t be accused in any way of supporting Assad or Hezbollah. We are not Ba’ath, we are not Islamists. We are communists. But as I said earlier, the struggle, unfortunately, is generally not between the ideal and what exists in practice, but many times between two evils. And then you have to ask yourself which is the lesser evil. The Syrian constellation is extremely complicated. On the one hand, there is the United States, which is intervening, and despite all the pretense of being against ISIS, supported ISIS and made it possible for ISIS to sprout.

    "I remind you that ISIS started from the occupation of Iraq. And ideologically and practically, ISIS is definitely a thousand times worse than the Assad regime, which is at base also a secular regime. Our position was and is against the countries that pose the greatest danger to regional peace, which above all are Qatar and Saudi Arabia, and the United States, which supports them. That doesn’t mean that we support Assad.”

    Wrong language

    Cassif’s economic views are almost as far from the consensus as his political ideas. He lives modestly in an apartment that’s furnished like a young couple’s first home. You won’t find an espresso maker or unnecessary products of convenience in his place. To his credit, it can be said that he extracts the maximum from Elite instant coffee.

    What is your utopian vision – to nationalize Israel’s conglomerates, such as Cellcom, the telecommunications company, or Osem, the food manufacturer and distributor?

    “The bottom line is yes. How exactly will it be done? That’s an excellent question, which I can’t answer. Perhaps by transferring ownership to the state or to the workers, with democratic tools. And there are other alternatives. But certainly, I would like it if a large part of the resources were not in private hands, as was the case before the big privatizations. It’s true that it won’t be socialism, because, again, there can be no such thing as Zionist socialism, but there won’t be privatization like we have today. What is the result of capitalism in Israel? The collapse of the health system, the absence of a social-welfare system, a high cost of living and of housing, the elderly and the disabled in a terrible situation.”

    Does any private sector have the right to exist?

    “Look, the question is what you mean by ‘private sector.’ If we’re talking about huge concerns that the owners of capital control completely through their wealth, then no.”

    What growth was there in the communist countries? How can anyone support communism, in light of the grim experience wherever it was tried?

    “It’s true, we know that in the absolute majority of societies where an attempt was made to implement socialism, there was no growth or prosperity, and we need to ask ourselves why, and how to avoid that. When I talk about communism, I’m not talking about Stalin and all the crimes that were committed in the name of the communist idea. Communism is not North Korea and it is not Pol Pot in Cambodia. Heaven forbid.”

    And what about Venezuela?

    “Venezuela is not communism. In fact, they didn’t go far enough in the direction of socialism.”

    Chavez was not enough of a socialist?

    “Chavez, but in particular Maduro. The Communist Party is critical of the regime. They support it because the main enemy is truly American imperialism and its handmaidens. Let’s look at what the U.S. did over the years. At how many times it invaded and employed bullying, fascist forces. Not only in Latin America, its backyard, but everywhere.”

    Venezuela is falling apart, people there don’t have anything to eat, there’s no medicine, everyone who can flees – and it’s the fault of the United States?

    “You can’t deny that the regime has made mistakes. It’s not ideal. But basically, it is the result of American imperialism and its lackeys. After all, the masses voted for Chavez and for Maduro not because things were good for them. But because American corporations stole the country’s resources and filled their own pockets. I wouldn’t make Chavez into an icon, but he did some excellent things.”

    Then how do you generate individual wealth within the method you’re proposing? I understand that I am now talking to you capitalistically, but the reality is that people see the accumulation of assets as an expression of progress in life.

    “Your question is indeed framed in capitalist language, which simply departs from what I believe in. Because you are actually asking me how the distribution of resources is supposed to occur within the capitalist framework. And I say no, I am not talking about resource distribution within a capitalist framework.”

    Gantz vs. Netanyahu

    Cassif was chosen as the polls showed Meretz and Labor, the representatives of the Zionist left, barely scraping through into the next Knesset and in fact facing a serious possibility of electoral extinction. The critique of both parties from the radical left is sometimes more acerbic than from the right.

    Would you like to see the Labor Party disappear?

    “No. I think that what’s happening at the moment with Labor and with Meretz is extremely dangerous. I speak about them as collectives, because they contain individuals with whom I see no possibility of engaging in a dialogue. But I think that they absolutely must be in the Knesset.”

    Is a left-winger who defines himself as a Zionist your partner in any way?

    “Yes. We need partners. We can’t be picky. Certainly we will cooperate with liberals and Zionists on such issues as combating violence against women or the battle to rescue the health system. Maybe even in putting an end to the occupation.”

    I’ll put a scenario to you: Benny Gantz does really well in the election and somehow overcomes Netanyahu. Do you support the person who led Operation Protective Edge in Gaza when he was chief of staff?

    “Heaven forbid. But we don’t reject people, we reject policy. I remind you that it was [then-defense minister] Yitzhak Rabin who led the most violent tendency in the first intifada, with his ‘Break their bones.’ But when he came to the Oslo Accords, it was Hadash and the Arab parties that gave him, from outside the coalition, an insurmountable bloc. I can’t speak for the party, but if there is ever a government whose policy is one that we agree with – eliminating the occupation, combating racism, abolishing the nation-state law – I believe we will give our support in one way or another.”

    And if Gantz doesn’t declare his intention to eliminate the occupation, he isn’t preferable to Netanyahu in any case?

    “If so, why should we recommend him [to the president to form the next government]? After the clips he posted boasting about how many people he killed and how he hurled Gaza back into the Stone Age, I’m far from certain that he’s better.”

    #Hadash

    • traduction d’un extrait [ d’actualité ]

      Le candidat à la Knesset dit que le sionisme encourage l’antisémitisme et qualifie Netanyahu de « meurtrier »
      Peu d’Israéliens ont entendu parler de M. Ofer Cassif, représentant juif de la liste de la Knesset du parti d’extrême gauche Hadash. Le 9 avril, cela changera.
      Par Ravit Hecht 16 février 2019 – Haaretz

      (…) Identité antisioniste
      Cassif se dit un antisioniste explicite. « Il y a trois raisons à cela », dit-il. « Pour commencer, le sionisme est un mouvement colonialiste et, en tant que socialiste, je suis contre le colonialisme. Deuxièmement, en ce qui me concerne, le sionisme est raciste d’idéologie et de pratique. Je ne fais pas référence à la définition de la théorie de la race - même si certains l’imputent également au mouvement sioniste - mais à ce que j’appelle la suprématie juive. Aucun socialiste ne peut accepter cela. Ma valeur suprême est l’égalité et je ne peux supporter aucune suprématie - juive ou arabe. La troisième chose est que le sionisme, comme d’autres mouvements ethno-nationalistes, divise la classe ouvrière et tous les groupes sont affaiblis. Au lieu de les unir dans une lutte pour la justice sociale, l’égalité, la démocratie, il divise les classes exploitées et affaiblit les groupes, renforçant ainsi le pouvoir du capital. "
      Il poursuit : « Le sionisme soutient également l’antisémitisme. Je ne dis pas qu’il le fait délibérément - même si je ne doute pas qu’il y en a qui le font délibérément, comme Netanyahu, qui est connecté à des gens comme le Premier ministre de la Hongrie, Viktor Orban, et le chef de l’extrême droite. en Autriche, Hans Christian Strache. ”

      Le sionisme type-Mapaï a-t-il également encouragé l’antisémitisme ?
      « Le phénomène était très frappant au Mapai. Pensez-y une minute, non seulement historiquement, mais logiquement. Si l’objectif du sionisme politique et pratique est en réalité de créer un État juif contenant une majorité juive et de permettre à la communauté juive de la diaspora de s’y installer, rien ne leur sert mieux que l’antisémitisme. "

      Qu’est-ce qui, dans leurs actions, a encouragé l’antisémitisme ?
      « L’appel même aux Juifs du monde entier - le fait même de les traiter comme appartenant à la même nation, alors qu’ils vivaient parmi d’autres nations. Toute la vieille histoire de « double loyauté » - le sionisme a en fait encouragé cela. Par conséquent, j’affirme que l’antisémitisme et l’antisionisme ne sont pas la même chose, mais sont précisément des contraires. Bien entendu, cela ne signifie pas qu’il n’y ait pas d’antisionistes qui soient aussi antisémites. La plupart des membres du BDS sont bien sûr antisionistes, mais ils ne sont en aucun cas antisémites. Mais il y a aussi des antisémites.

  • En Israël, la culture est prise entre deux feux
    Pierre Sorgue, Le Monde, le 16 novembre 2018
    https://www.lemonde.fr/m-actu/article/2018/11/16/en-israel-la-culture-est-prise-entre-deux-feux_5384505_4497186.html

    Lana Del Rey, Brian Eno, Peter Gabriel ou Arcade Fire… L’appel au boycott d’Israël pour dénoncer le sort des Palestiniens rencontre de plus en plus d’écho chez les artistes. Un dilemme pour le monde de la culture israélien.

    A trois heures du matin, The Block est à bloc. Le plus célèbre club électro de Tel-Aviv, enfoui sous le béton de la gare routière centrale, reçoit Carl Craig, ponte de la techno de Detroit (Michigan) aux Etats-Unis.

    La foule ondule, saute, tressaute au rythme des basses, dans le brouillard bleu que découpent les faisceaux de projecteurs épileptiques.

    BDS pour Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions

    Yaron Trax, le maître des lieux, s’est glissé entre les danseurs pour s’assurer des bons réglages de sa sono analogique, réputée l’une des meilleures du monde. Le quadragénaire aux airs adolescents est aux anges parmi ces jeunes gens dont beaucoup sont venus au club comme ils étaient à la plage, en short et tee-shirt. Celui que porte Yaron ce soir-là reproduit les briques et la typographie reconnaissable entre toutes : Pink Floyd, The Wall. Lorsqu’on lui fait remarquer, il sourit comme un enfant contrit : « C’est un tee-shirt formidable et l’album l’est aussi. Quel dommage que Roger Waters soit devenu aussi décevant… »

    Car le musicien britannique, ex-membre de Pink Floyd, est le spectre qui hante la scène israélienne et dérange l’intelligentsia de gauche, celui qui empêche la bulle libérale et hédoniste qu’est Tel-Aviv de flotter innocemment à cinquante kilomètres du mouroir à ciel ouvert qu’est la bande de Gaza.

    Depuis des années, Roger Waters offre sa voix aux militants internationaux du BDS (Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions), mouvement né en 2005 de la société civile palestinienne, un an après que la Cour internationale de justice a jugé illégal le mur de séparation construit entre Israël et les territoires occupés.

    Il prône les pressions sur l’État d’Israël pour parvenir à ce que n’ont jamais obtenu des décennies de guerre, de résolutions de l’ONU et de vains processus de paix pendant lesquels le nombre des colons n’a cessé de croître (500 000 aujourd’hui) : la fin de l’occupation des territoires, la pleine égalité pour les citoyens palestiniens d’Israël, le droit au retour des réfugiés chassés de leurs terres.

    La scène musicale comme estrade politique

    Il suffit de voir les gratte-ciel bleutés qui poussent à Tel-Aviv pour s’en convaincre : le boycott économique n’a que peu d’effets. La « start-up nation » se porte bien, ses relations commerciales et diplomatiques n’ont cessé de se développer avec l’Afrique, l’Inde, la Chine, voire certains pays arabes. En ce mois d’octobre encore estival, les plages sont noires de monde, les ruelles de la vieille ville de Jérusalem, pleines de visiteurs : le pays aura accueilli plus de 4 millions de touristes à la fin de l’année, soit 46 % de plus qu’en 2016.

    Au-delà du portefeuille, le BDS s’attaque aussi aux cœurs et aux têtes. Il appelle au boycott culturel et académique, comme celui qui s’exerçait sur l’Afrique du Sud au temps de l’apartheid. Et celui-là trouve, ces derniers mois, un écho bien supérieur. Depuis longtemps, la scène musicale sert d’estrade politique. D’un côté, Roger Waters, Peter Gabriel, Brian Eno, Elvis Costello, Lauryn Hill (The Fugees), Arcade Fire et d’autres ont annoncé qu’ils ne joueront plus en Israël tant qu’ils ne pourront en accepter la politique.

    De l’autre, Nick Cave, Radiohead, Paul McCartney, Alicia Keys, parmi beaucoup, sont venus au nom du dialogue et du refus de se voir dicter leur conduite. Mais, récemment, deux chanteuses moins politisées et plus populaires parmi les adolescents ont suivi le mouvement : en décembre, Lorde, la jeune rockeuse néo-zélandaise, annulait son concert après avoir été « alertée » par une lettre ouverte signée de deux fans – l’une Juive, l’autre Palestinienne –, puis en septembre, après de nombreux appels dont celui de Roger Waters, Lana Del Rey faisait faux bond. Parce qu’elle ne pourrait pas se produire également dans les territoires palestiniens, dit-elle, elle renonçait à jouer au festival Meteor qui devait être une sorte de Coachella version kibboutznik, dans le nord d’Israël.

    Un « tsunami d’annulations »

    Après le refus, en avril, de l’actrice Natalie Portman de recevoir le Genesis Prize (considéré comme un « Nobel » israélien) pour exprimer son désaccord avec le gouvernement Nétanyahou et les violences commises à Gaza, après la défection de l’équipe d’Argentine de Lionel Messi qui, en juin, a annulé une rencontre amicale avec celle d’Israël à la suite de pressions internationales (de menaces, dit-on du côté israélien), le retrait de Lana Del Rey fut une autre secousse médiatique.

    « Une belle surprise qui aidera peut-être les jeunes à se poser des questions sur une politique insoutenable dans les territoires occupés, mais aussi en Israël, où les Palestiniens, qui représentent 20 % de la population, sont victimes d’une cinquantaine de lois discriminatoires, à commencer par le logement et la terre », explique Kobi Snitz, chercheur en neurobiologie au Weizmann Institute et cofondateur de Boycott from Within (« boycott de l’intérieur »), qui rassemble une poignée de militants suffisamment téméraires pour affronter les torrents de haine qu’ils suscitent au sein du pouvoir, des médias et sur les réseaux sociaux.

    Dans la foulée de Lana Del Rey, quatorze artistes, dont plusieurs DJ, ont décliné l’invitation du festival. Des dizaines d’autres ont exprimé leur soutien au boycott sur les réseaux sociaux. Yaron Trax commence à se faire du souci pour « la capitale du clubbing » qu’est Tel-Aviv. Idit Frenkel, qui officie souvent derrière les platines de The Block, a signé un long article dans le quotidien israélien Haaretz, pour évoquer le « tsunami d’annulations ». Le titre de la tribune était emprunté aux paroles d’une chanson de Don McLean, American Pie (1971) : « The day the music died » [« le jour où la musique est morte »].

    Le boycott la laisse amère : « On peut comprendre ceux qui veulent lutter de manière non violente contre les morts de Gaza, le développement des colonies ou la décision de Trump d’installer l’ambassade des Etats-Unis à Jérusalem. Mais ne pas venir, c’est punir ceux qui essaient de changer les choses, y compris dans la minuscule scène underground qu’abhorrent les nationalistes et les religieux du gouvernement. »

    Si certaines figures de l’électro, comme l’Américano-Chilien Nicolas Jaar ou les Français d’Acid Arab, viennent encore en Israël, ils ne jouent plus à Tel-Aviv mais à Haïfa, au Kabareet, tenu et animé par Jazar Crew, un collectif d’artistes palestiniens. Haïfa, la cité portuaire qui soigne sa réputation de tolérance et de coexistence entre Juifs et Arabes…

    Une forme d’apartheid ?

    Attablé dans un café du centre-ville, Ayez Fadel, 31 ans, l’un des fondateurs et DJ de Jazar Crew, connaît l’antienne par cœur : « Mais même ici, grandir en étant palestinien, c’est éprouver la discrimination. Les écoles publiques arabes moins dotées que les établissements juifs, les boîtes de nuit où l’on te demande ton “Hoger”, le livret militaire que tu n’as pas [la majorité des Arabes citoyens d’Israël n’effectuent pas leur service militaire], la langue… Une nouvelle loi fait de l’hébreu la seule langue officielle, elle dit aussi que le pays est “l’Etat-nation du peuple juif”, alors que je suis un Palestinien vivant ici par la force de l’histoire, que mes impôts servent à protéger les colonies juives et à financer une armée qui a tué 44 enfants palestiniens ces trois derniers mois… Parler d’apartheid ne me paraît pas exagéré. »

    Ayez Fadel comprend le boycott et revendique la dimension politique de Jazar Crew : « Une manière de sensibiliser les jeunes. Nous n’avons plus honte d’être palestiniens, nous sommes éduqués et confiants. Et nous ne cessons de répéter que nos positions ne sont pas contre les Juifs mais contre ce régime. » Le jeune homme se dit prêt à collaborer avec Yaron Trax, qui l’a appelé pour que The Block et Kabareet « organisent quelque chose ensemble ». Mais, précise-t-il, « à condition qu’il fasse une déclaration claire sur l’occupation des territoires et les droits des Palestiniens ».

    Les turbulences qui agitent le microcosme underground reflètent assez bien le désarroi du monde de la culture devant ces appels au boycott. « En ce moment, pas un dîner sans qu’on en parle », reconnaît la responsable d’une galerie d’art installée aux franges de Florentine, ancien quartier d’entrepôts et d’ateliers de Tel-Aviv devenu le préféré des artistes et des bobos. Comme beaucoup d’opposants à l’occupation, elle refuse d’acheter les produits des colonies – certaines se sont spécialisées dans l’agriculture et l’élevage bio – ou le vin venu du Golan. « Mais le BDS culturel, dit-elle, frappe ce qui reste de l’élite de gauche, celle que Nétanyahou et son gouvernement détestent. Si on la muselle, on n’entendra plus que les voix des plus réactionnaires… »

    C’est aussi ce que pense Avi Pitchon, écrivain, critique et commissaire d’expositions : « Le boycott culturel réduit le débat à une polarisation extrême entre les activistes et le gouvernement, il déshumanise et nourrit la paranoïa, ce “nous” contre “eux” dont joue un régime de moins en moins démocratique. Ce tout ou rien est un piège, quoi que disent les créateurs ils seront perdants. Alors, ils préfèrent laisser parler leur art… »

    C’est peut-être pour cela que chercher à les rencontrer pour évoquer la question relève de la chasse au dahu. Groupe pop connu pour ses textes radicaux, écrivain loué comme l’une des « grandes voix morales » du pays, cinéastes, producteurs de concerts, responsables de théâtre, de centre d’art contemporain… tous se disent trop occupés. D’autres se ravisent après avoir parlé et demandent à n’être plus cités.

    Pnina Blayer, la directrice artistique du Festival international du film de Haïfa qui s’est déroulé fin septembre sans les « grands noms » invités, exige les questions par courriel et adresse des réponses aussi sèches que le fleuve Jourdain surexploité : selon elle, la situation dans la bande Gaza et la guerre en Syrie sont les motifs des absences, dont aucune n’a été motivée par le BDS, qui n’aura découragé qu’un film marocain, et si Agnès Varda, à qui le festival rendait hommage, n’est pas venue, ce n’est pas pour des raisons politiques.

    Il faut comprendre sa prudence : pendant que le festival est soumis aux pressions de l’étranger, sa propre ministre de la culture, la très droitière Miri Regev, demande à celui des finances de lui couper les vivres pour avoir accueilli deux films israéliens qui « sapent les valeurs et symboles » de l’Etat (l’un d’eux raconte l’histoire d’un metteur en scène palestinien qui monte une pièce narrant un amour entre une Juive et un Arabe…).

    Le projet de loi « Loyauté dans la culture »

    La même ministre se démène pour l’adoption d’un projet de loi « Loyauté dans la culture » qui veut supprimer les fonds à toute organisation déniant « Israël comme un Etat juif et démocratique » ou qui ferait du jour de l’indépendance celui de la Nakba, la « catastrophe » que vécurent 700 000 Palestiniens expulsés en 1948.

    Le monde de la culture a manifesté le 27 octobre contre ce texte, de nombreux cinéastes israéliens, comme Amos Gitaï ou Ari Folman, sont parmi les signataires d’une tribune parue lundi 12 novembre dans Le Monde pour demander le retrait du texte. En attendant, des députés ont également proposé de punir de sept ans de prison tout appel au boycott et l’entrée du pays est déjà interdite à tout étranger qui soutient activement le BDS.

    Car, pour le gouvernement, c’est la guerre. Au vingt-neuvième étage d’une tour de Bnei Brak, dans la banlieue de Tel-Aviv, une trentaine de personnes travaillent au sein de la National Task Force for Countering Delegitimization (« force d’intervention contre la délégitimisation »), qui dépend du ministère des affaires étrangères.

    « Nous révélons les relations entre le BDS et des organisations terroristes comme le Hamas ou le Front populaire de libération de la Palestine ; comment, sous couvert de droits de l’homme, il s’attaque à la légitimité d’Israël ; comment il bombarde les artistes par des cyberattaques menées par des robots. Nous travaillons avec des centaines d’organisations pro-israéliennes en leur offrant articles, vidéos et autres outils pour affronter les arguments du BDS », résume Tzahi Gavrieli, le directeur.

    Le bureau a lancé la plate-forme 4il sur Internet, Facebook et Twitter : des images de jolies filles montrent la diversité du pays, des vidéos soulignent la réussite de certains « Arabes israéliens ». Des posts saluent la criminalisation du boycott en France (en 2015, la justice a confirmé la condamnation de militants ayant appelé au boycott des produits israéliens) ou en Allemagne (le BDS a été jugé antisémite par l’Office fédéral de la protection de la constitution de Berlin).

    Un post du 23 octobre relaie le rapport de Human Rights Watch sur la torture pratiquée par le Hamas et l’Autorité palestinienne en demandant si la communauté internationale va exercer sur eux les mêmes pressions que sur Israël… Des messages vantent le concours Eurovision de la chanson de mai prochain : avec ses 186 millions de téléspectateurs, la manifestation est une vitrine que le gouvernement ne veut pas voir entachée, malgré l’appel au boycott lancé par 140 artistes internationaux.

    L’« instrumentalisation » du monde de la culture ?

    La lutte contre le BDS est aussi l’affaire d’Adam Shay au sein du Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, un think tank niché dans un quartier tranquille de la ville sainte. Il « scrute » les militants locaux, conseille les promoteurs de spectacles, essaie de convaincre des artistes ciblés que ce qu’on leur raconte est un tissu de mensonges et qu’ils ne regretteront pas de venir.

    « David Guetta était là la semaine dernière », se réjouit le jeune homme avant de confier qu’il cherchait à faire venir Rachid Taha, peu avant sa mort, en septembre : « Cela aurait été un gros truc » (vu les relations qui liaient le rockeur français à Brian Eno, très impliqué dans le BDS, on imagine mal une réponse positive).

    C’est cette « instrumentalisation » du monde de la culture qui, aux yeux des militants du BDS, justifie les appels au boycott de ceux dont les travaux ou les voyages sont financés par le gouvernement. Ils aident, disent-ils, le pays à soigner son image de démocratie favorable à la liberté d’expression. Les artistes se retrouvent coincés entre le marteau du gouvernement, qui tient (et serre) les cordons de la bourse, et l’enclume des pressions internationales.

    « À l’étranger, nous sommes considérés par certains comme des collaborateurs ; ici, comme des traîtres. Mais l’argent du ministère est aussi celui de mes impôts. Si la solution est de dire non, où va-t-il aller et qui va dire ce que l’on dit ? », demande Hillel Kogan, danseur et chorégraphe de la célèbre compagnie Batsheva, qui dut affronter cet été quelques militants pro-BDS à Montpellier et à Toulouse alors que, invité de la très diplomatique saison « France-Israël », il s’apprêtait, avec le Palestinien d’Israël Adi Boutros, à interpréter sa pièce We Love Arabs.

    Certains dans le pays ont regretté que l’écrivain David Grossman, considéré comme une « conscience » par le camp de la paix, se laisse « enrôler » par le pouvoir en acceptant le prix Israël de littérature 2018 des mains du ministre de l’éducation ou, en 2017, lorsqu’il accompagne à New York une pièce tirée de l’un de ses romans et adaptée par deux troupes israéliennes qui s’étaient produites dans les colonies (ce que l’auteur désapprouve). Ce, sous les yeux de la ministre de la culture qui avait fait le voyage. « Une manière de résister au BDS qui est une nouvelle forme d’antisémitisme », avait dit Miri Regev ce jour-là.

    Car c’est l’argument massue des contempteurs du BDS. Le mouvement a beau condamner racisme et antisémitisme, le public hétéroclite qu’il mobilise laisse parfois suinter des attaques haineuses, voire négationnistes. Dans le petit théâtre de Jérusalem où il travaille avec de jeunes comédiens juifs et arabes, Arik Eshet se souvient du festival de théâtre d’Édimbourg de 2014, lorsque des militants « agressifs » avaient fait annuler son spectacle : « Tu entends des gens crier qu’Israël ne devrait pas exister. C’est traumatisant… »

    La nécessaire mobilisation de la société civile

    Roger Waters est systématiquement accusé d’infamie. Du coup, Gideon Levy, le journaliste de Haaretz qui se démène inlassablement pour évoquer le sort des Palestiniens, ne cesse de défendre le chanteur. « J’ai passé de longues nuits à discuter avec lui, rien ne lui est plus étranger que les sentiments antisémites, ces accusations sont intolérables », assène-t-il dans le salon de sa maison, dont un mur est orné d’une vieille publicité ensoleillée où est inscrit : « Visit Palestine ».

    Un BDS efficace, ajoute-t-il, serait le seul moyen d’en finir avec les bains de sang : « Le changement ne viendra pas de l’intérieur d’Israël, la vie est trop bonne ici. Or les Etats-Unis soutiennent le pays et l’Europe est une plaisanterie : le seul espoir est la mobilisation de la société civile. La gauche sioniste appelle depuis des lustres à deux Etats mais n’a rien fait pour ça, nous devons en payer le prix. La criminalisation du BDS est un scandale : pourquoi serait-il légitime de boycotter l’Iran et pas Israël ? »

    En les réduisant au rang de producteurs de « biens culturels » ou d’instruments du soft power d’un Etat dont ils n’approuvent pas la politique, le BDS interroge les artistes de manière inconfortable sur leurs responsabilités de créateurs et de citoyens au cœur d’une opinion publique au mieux indifférente, au pis de plus en plus xénophobe. Et dans les conversations un nom revient souvent, comme s’ils étaient orphelins d’une figure capable d’indignation, de « courage », disent certains.

    « Il nous manque un penseur comme Leibowitz », glisse le photographe Miki Kratsman, l’un des fondateurs de l’ONG Breaking the Silence qui recueille les témoignages des soldats sur les exactions auxquelles les contraint l’occupation. C’est aussi ce que dit Zeev Tene, un vieux rockeur dont Ari Folman utilisa une chanson pour son film Valse avec Bachir et qui, depuis deux ans, part, le 6 juin, date anniversaire de la guerre des Six-Jours, le long du mur de séparation avec quelques musiciens et un camion en guise d’estrade pour jouer devant une banderole qui proclame « Make Israel small again ».

    Yeshayahu Leibowitz, mort en 1994, grand penseur et moraliste, religieux convaincu et sioniste affirmé, fut un critique féroce de l’occupation qui « détruit la moralité du conquérant ». Outré par la torture, il alla jusqu’à employer le terme de « judéo-nazis »… Or, constate l’historien « post-sioniste » Shlomo Sand, qui fait lui aussi référence à Leibowitz, « je n’ai pas vu l’Université se mettre en grève lorsqu’une succursale a été ouverte dans la colonie d’Ariel. Je n’ai entendu aucune de nos voix de la gauche sioniste prôner l’objection de conscience dans les territoires ou soutenir les refuzniks [qui refusent de servir dans l’armée]. Le BDS les met devant leurs contradictions… »

    Mais le malaise, explique-t-il, vient aussi du fait que, « en posant le droit au retour des réfugiés, le BDS questionne les conditions mêmes de la naissance d’Israël dans un pays encore hanté par la Shoah. Ce droit au retour ne peut être ignoré, mais il faut être honnête : on ne pourra pas accueillir 5 millions de réfugiés. Je soutiens le BDS à condition qu’il ne mette pas en danger l’existence d’Israël. »

    Une situation parfois absurde

    L’historien déplore aussi la « stupidité » de certains appels au boycott culturel. Les musiciens d’Apo and the Apostles, un Arménien de Jérusalem et trois Palestiniens de Bethléem, partagent sûrement son avis. Lorsque ces talentueux garçons qui mêlent leur folk-rock à des nuances orientales doivent se produire dans un festival de musique alternative arabe à Tel-Aviv, le BDS décrète que ce n’est pas acceptable parce qu’ils ne sont pas des « Palestiniens de 48 », ceux restés en Israël…

    Shady Srour aussi a quelques remarques à faire sur les censeurs du BDS : cinéaste palestinien de Nazareth, il a tourné un très joli film dans sa ville natale, Holy Air, où comment un homme essaie de s’en sortir en vendant de l’« air saint » aux touristes venus sur les traces de Jésus. C’est drôle, féministe, sexy, acide, « beckettien », plus grave lorsque les rêves sont empêchés par le seul fait de n’être pas un citoyen comme les autres.

    Mais le BDS ne rit pas : il a demandé son retrait d’un festival du film israélien à Londres, puis du Festival des cinémas arabes de l’Institut du monde arabe, à Paris, qui a congédié le réalisateur d’un bref courrier. « Je suis palestinien, mon père fut l’un de ceux chassés vers le Liban. Me boycotter, c’est m’empêcher d’affirmer mon propre récit face à celui des Israéliens. Le BDS vient chez moi pour me couper la langue… Aucun financement arabe ne m’est accordé parce que j’ai un passeport israélien, où est-ce que je trouve l’argent ? » On comprend que son film soit teinté de tristesse et d’absurde.

    #Palestine #Culture #Apartheid #BDS #Boycott_culturel

  • Ilan Gilon refuse les excuses d’Oren Hazan qui l’a traité de « moitié d’humain »
    The Times of Israël - Par Times of Israel Staff 8 novembre 2018,
    https://fr.timesofisrael.com/ilan-gilon-refuse-les-excuses-doren-hazan-qui-la-traite-de-moitie-

    Le député du Meretz Ilan Gilon, qui est handicapé, a refusé les excuses de son confrère du Likud Oren Hazan, après que ce dernier l’a traité de « moitié d’humain » durant un débat à la Knesset lundi, a rapporté mercredi la Dixième chaîne.

    Le reportage télévisé montre Hazan qui s’approche de Gilon à l’assemblée générale, et qui lui tend la main en présentant des excuses.

    Gilon a alors refusé de lui serrer la main.

    • Un élu du Likud qualifie un député handicapé de « moitié d’humain » qui riposte
      Oren Hazan a ensuite affirmé que l’insulte ne visait pas le handicap d’Ilan Gilon et s’est excusé si ses propos ont pu être interprétés de cette manière
      Par Times of Israel Staff 6 novembre 2018, 13:35
      https://fr.timesofisrael.com/un-elu-du-likud-qualifie-un-depute-handicape-de-moitie-dhumain-qui

      (...) Hazan a affirmé plus tard qu’il n’avait pas voulu se référer au handicap de Gilon.

      Ces propos ont été tenus au cours d’un débat animé à la Knesset sur une législation qui conditionnerait le financement gouvernemental des arts à une supposée « loyauté ».

      Gilon avait critiqué la ministre de la Culture Miri Regev, également issue du parti du Likud, depuis la tribune où Hazan est venu ensuite prendre sa défense.

      Gilon et Hazan ont échangé quelques mots avant que le parlementaire du Likud ne dise que « si vous n’étiez pas une moitié d’humain, alors je vous répondrais probablement ».

      Gilon a riposté en disant que Hazan était le « Golem de Prague ».

      Gilon s’est ensuite exprimé devant les caméras de la Dixième chaîne, répondant aux propos tenus la veille par Oren Hazan qui l’avait qualifié de « moitié d’humain ».(...)

  • Les dictateurs arabes vont à marche forcée vers la normalisation avec l’État sioniste
    Abdel Bari Atwan – 28 octobre 2018 – Raï al-Yaoum – Traduction : Chronique de Palestine
    http://www.chroniquepalestine.com/dictateurs-arabes-a-marche-forcee-vers-normalisation-avec-etat-s

    Trois douloureux coups ont été récemment infligés à ce qui restait d’amour-propre aux États arabes.

    Le premier était la participation d’une délégation israélienne à un tournoi sportif au Qatar. Le second était l’envoi d’une autre délégation sportive dans l’émirat d’Abou Dhabi, dirigée par la ministre de la Culture israélienne notoirement raciste et haineuse, Miri Regev. Mais le coup le plus dur et le plus douloureux a été la visite officielle du Premier ministre de l’État d’occupation, Binyamin Netanyahu, à Oman, où lui et la délégation qui l’accompagnait ont reçu un accueil chaleureux et ont rencontré le sultan Qaboos.

    Il s’agit d’une opération de normalisation coordonnée menée sous la pression des États-Unis. Cela n’a absolument rien à voir avec la paix israélo-palestinienne, mais tout à voir avec la réalisation d’une paix « sans frais » entre Israël et les gouvernements arabes. Ceci est un prélude à l’imposition de ce qui subsiste du « Deal of the Century« , qui revient à exploiter l’effondrement de l’ordre arabe officiel pour liquider la cause palestinienne, mettre fin au conflit israélo-arabe et reconnaître Israël comme un pays « frère » du Moyen-Orient.

    C’est le dernier et peut-être le plus important épisode d’un processus planifié, ce qui explique les raisons qui ont conduit à la destruction de l’Irak, puis de la Syrie, puis de la Libye et, plus tard du Yémen, et à la paralysie de l’Égypte. Sans la destruction de ces pays, sous divers faux prétextes, ce plan ne pourrait être mis à exécution et nous n’aurions jamais vu ses douloureuses conséquences sous la forme d’étapes de normalisation. (...)

  • Netanyahou à Oman. Opération normalisation d’Israël dans le Golfe | Courrier international
    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/netanyahou-oman-operation-normalisation-disrael-dans-le-golfe

    Le sultan d’Oman, Qabous ben Saïd, sert la main du Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Netanyahou, en visite surprise dans le sultanat, le 26 octobre 2018. Photo : Omani Royal Palace / AFP

    La présence du Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahou à Mascate a pris de court de nombreux observateurs. Pourtant, les pas vers une normalisation des relations se multiplient dans tous les pays du Golfe.

    #IsraelOman #catastrophe_arabe

    • Le ministre israélien des sports aux Émirats arabes unis se joindra à l’équipe d’Abu Dhabi pour un tournoi de judo
      26 octobre 2018
      http://www.fr.awdnews.com/index/le-ministre-israelien-des-sports-aux-emirats-arabes-unis-se-joindra-a-le

      Le ministre israélien de la Culture et des Sports Miri Regev s’est rendu aux Emirats Arabes Unis (EAU) pour accompagner l’équipe de judo israélienne au Grand Chelem d’Abu Dhabi 2018 alors que les pays arabes de la région réchauffent considérablement leurs relations avec le régime de Tel Aviv après des rapports de contacts secrets.

      Mme Regev est arrivée à Abu Dhabi vendredi matin, et elle doit participer à la cérémonie d’ouverture de l’événement international qui se tiendra demain à Zayed Sports City, la capitale émiratie, a rapporté une agence de presse palestinienne de langue arabe, Ma’an.

      #IsraelEAU
      “““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““

      Palestine Alqadi
      ‏ @ALQadiPAL - 07:43 - 28 oct. 2018
      https://twitter.com/ALQadiPAL/status/1056496579992059905

      ويستمر مسلسل التطبيع بعد قطر وعمان

      وزيرة الثقافة والرياضة الصهيونية ميري ريجيف في لحظة امتنان مع رئيس الجودو الإماراتي،

      الوزيرة عملت كمتحدثة باسم جيش الاحتلال، تكره العرب ، لإحظوا ، اين يركز نظره خجلا

      ليش يا عرب ليش تطعنو القدس بظهرها ؟

    • La visite d’une ministre israélienne aux Émirats interroge sur les relations d’Israël avec le Golfe
      Nadda Osman - 30 octobre 2018
      https://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/reportages/la-visite-d-une-ministre-isra-lienne-aux-mirats-interroge-sur-les-rel

      En moins d’une semaine, trois hauts responsables israéliens, dont le Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahou, se sont rendus en visite officielle dans le Golfe

      La visite officielle de la ministre israélienne Miri Regev aux Émirats arabes unis ce week-end a suscité des réactions mitigées sur les réseaux sociaux. Les internautes se demandaient si cela marquait le début du réchauffement des relations entre Israël et les EAU.

      Regev, la ministre israélienne de la Culture et des Sports, a assisté dimanche au grand tournoi de judo à Abou Dabi, où l’un des athlètes israéliens a remporté l’or. Cet événement a particulièrement attiré l’attention car c’était la première fois que l’hymne national israélien, Hatikvah, était joué aux Émirats.

      Regev a ensuite tweeté : « Nous avons fait l’histoire. Le peuple d’Israël vit ! »

      Bien que les Israéliens aient déjà assisté à des événements sportifs dans le Golfe auparavant, leur participation était souvent subordonnée à l’absence de symboles nationaux.

      L’année dernière, la Fédération internationale de judo a toutefois menacé d’annuler le grand chelem d’Abou Dabi si les athlètes israéliens ne bénéficiaient pas des mêmes droits que les autres concurrents.
      (...)
      La visite de la ministre est survenue quelques jours seulement après le voyage surprise du Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahou à Oman pour rencontrer le sultan Qaboos, marquant la première visite d’un dirigeant israélien dans ce pays du Golfe depuis 1996.
      (...)
      La rencontre de Mascate portait plus sur le désir d’Oman de jouer un rôle dans la région que sur la conclusion d’un accord de paix entre Israéliens et Palestiniens, a déclaré à MEE une source diplomatique occidentale.

      « Oman tente de jouer un rôle régional entre les divers parties et axes de la région et considère Israël comme un acteur important concernant diverses questions régionales », a déclaré le diplomate.

      Ce mardi, un troisième haut responsable israélien s’est rendu dans un pays du Golfe. Le ministre israélien des Communications, Ayoub Kara, participe en ce moment à la Conférence de plénipotentiaires de l’Union internationale des télécommunications à Dubaï, où il a appelé à la « paix et la stabilité » dans la région.

      #Golfe

  • Israël adopte un projet de loi controversé contre les oeuvres « déloyales »
    Publié le 21 octobre 2018
    http://www.lapresse.ca/international/moyen-orient/201810/21/01-5201110-israel-adopte-un-projet-de-loi-controverse-contre-les-oeuvres-de

    Le gouvernement israélien a adopté dimanche un projet de loi controversé, qui doit permettre de couper les subventions publiques aux films et pièces de théâtre accusés de ne pas faire preuve de « loyauté » envers l’État, selon la ministre de la Culture.

    Ce projet de loi, dénoncé par les milieux artistiques, a été présenté par la ministre israélienne de la Culture et des Sports, Miri Regev.

    Le texte, qui doit être présenté et voté en trois lectures par le Parlement avant d’entrer en vigueur, accorde aux ministères des Finances et de la Culture le pouvoir de supprimer les subventions à toute institution présentant des oeuvres artistiques niant le droit à l’existence de l’État d’Israël, s’attaquant au drapeau national, présentant le jour de l’indépendance du pays comme un jour de deuil ou incitant au racisme et au terrorisme.

    « Je suis très contente que cette loi ait été adoptée par la commission ministérielle des lois. Elle sera ensuite présentée à la Knesset pour être adoptée, si Dieu le veut, le mois prochain. Oui à la liberté de la culture, non aux provocations ! » a proclamé la ministre sur Facebook. (...)

  • Discours de Hagai El-Ad au Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies, le 18 octobre 2018
    AURDIP | 20 octobre | B’Tselem |Hagai El-Ad
    https://www.aurdip.org/discours-de-hagai-el-ad-au-conseil.html

    Hagai El-Ad, Directeur exécutif de B’Tselem, a pris la parole devant le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies ce soir, à la session trimestrielle prévue par la résolution 2334.

    Merci, Monsieur le Président,

    Merci, membres du Conseil de Sécurité,

    Il est très difficile, voire impossible, de décrire l’indignité, l’outrage et la souffrance d’un peuple privé de droits pendant plus de cinquante ans. Ici, dans ces locaux, il est difficile de donner corps aux vies que les Palestiniennes endurent sous occupation. Mais bien plus grande que cette difficulté, est celle de faire face à une existence intolérable au quotidien, d’essayer de vivre, de fonder une famille, de développer une communauté dans ces conditions.

    Cela fait bientôt deux ans que j’ai eu l’honneur d’être convié à témoigner devant ce Conseil. Deux ans de plus d’occupation, deux ans durant lesquels la routine des 49 années d’occupation s’est prolongée. Depuis ma dernière présentation ici, 317 Palestiniens ont été tués par les forces de sécurité israéliennes, et treize Israéliens ont été tués par des Palestiniens. Israël a démoli 294 maisons palestiniennes, et a continué d’effectuer des arrestations quotidiennes, notamment de mineurs. Des colons israéliens ont vandalisé et déraciné des milliers d’oliviers et de vignes. Les forces de sécurité israéliennes ont continué, sur une base régulière, d’entrer dans des maisons palestiniennes, parfois au milieu de la nuit pour réveiller des enfants, noter leurs noms et les prendre en photo. Les Palestiniens ont perdu d’innombrables heures à attendre aux check-points, sans explications. Et ainsi se poursuit la routine de l’occupation. (...)

    • The Real Hero Is the B’Tselem Chief
      Gideon Levy Oct 20, 2018 9:22 PM
      https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-the-real-hero-is-the-b-tselem-chief-1.6574668

      On the day the world realizes that the UN ambassador is Israel and Hagai El-Ad represents a muzzled minority, maybe its forgiving attitude toward Israel will change

      Who contributes more to Israel’s status in the world, UN Ambassador Danny Danon or B’Tselem director Hagai El-Ad? Who generates more respect, the diplomat or the human rights activist? Which of the two disgraced Israel with his words and who retained some of its humane image? Who told the truth and who lied? Whom does the world believe – excluding Nikki Haley, the only true collaborator in the hall – and whom can the no world no longer believe?

      They sat opposite each other at the Security Council – two Israelis of the same age, born here, army veterans, with totally different worldviews and conflicting moral standards. Their values are contradictory and their information on what’s happening under the occupation is divergent. One relies on the lies of Israel’s propaganda machine while the other’s views are based on the investigative efforts of an organization whose work couldn’t be more reliable and professional.

      El-Ad reminded the world of something the world still clings to, the belief that there is still a difference between Israel and Saudi Arabia. Danon tried to erase the difference with his pitiful response: “IDF soldiers protect you and you come here and slander them. You should be ashamed, collaborator.”

      Danon is a faithful representative of the majority in Israel. His appearances are important – he reminds the world that the illusion of the “only democracy in the Middle East” must be dispelled. On the day the world realizes that Danon is Israel and El-Ad represents not just a negligible minority but one muzzled by an aggressive majority, maybe its forgiving attitude toward Israel will change.

      The reactions in Israel only intensified the damage wrought by Danon. Not only the right pounced on El-Ad with viciousness – the center-left took part in the fascist revelry as well. There was Yair Lapid, as could only be expected. There were Zionist Union Knesset members such as Ayelet Nahmias-Verbin (“these are one-sided texts deserving every condemnation”) and Eitan Cabel (“hateful words and an abomination”). Their words attested to the urgency of dispensing with this party and its rotting ideas. None of their colleagues came to El-Ad’s defense – how shameful. There is no alternative to the rule of the right.

      El-Ad showed the truth – naked, ugly and disturbing. Anyone calling him a snitch actually admits to this truth and is ashamed of it. It’s not only El-Ad’s right to behave this way, it’s his obligation. The occupation is not and cannot be an internal Israeli matter. The abuse of people without rights under a military tyranny in occupied territory is an international crime.

      Anyone seeing these crimes must report them to the authorities. If you see a man striking a woman or abusing a child or some other helpless creature, you have an obligation to report it to the police. If you see a tyrannical government abusing another nation for decades, killing, destroying, causing hunger, imprisoning people and blocking medical aid, you are obliged to report this to the United Nations, to The Hague and to other international institutions.

      El-Ad fulfilled his civic and moral duty. The chorus of his detractors knows this, which is why it’s so vicious and strident. If Danon really believed his own hollow speeches at the United Nations, he wouldn’t be alarmed at one Israeli speaking out differently. But Danon and Cabel, Benjamin Netanyahu and Miri Regev know that not one word in the restrained and to-the-point speech by El-Ad wasn’t truthful. This is why their reaction was so aggressive.

      El-Ad was modest, as is his wont. He said he was no traitor or hero; the Palestinians are the true heroes. He’s right, of course. Every demonstrator along the Gaza border is far more courageous than any Israel sniper shooting him from a distance. Every shepherd at the Bedouin village of Khan al-Ahmar exudes more justice than the entire chorus of those attacking B’Tselem.

      But El-Ad too is a hero; he’s the ambassador of Israel as it should be, a public relations officer of an alternative Israel, a beautiful and just one. Now we have to be concerned about his safety. He has been marked as a target and must wear a bulletproof vest. If he comes to harm we’ll remember those who are to blame: Not just people on the right, but also the sanctimonious hypocrites on the center-left – Lapid, Cabel and Nahmias-Verbin, the spokespeople of Israel’s shameful and imaginary opposition.

    • réaction à son intervention d’il y a deux ans :

      Le chef de B’Tselem est “un vrai patriote”, selon des sources de l’unité d’élite où il a servi
      Hagai El-Ad est décrit comme un excellent soldat qui a grandement contribué à la sécurité d’Israël par ceux qui ont servi avec lui dans l’unité 504, élite du renseignement
      Par Alexander Fulbright 31 octobre 2016,
      https://fr.timesofisrael.com/le-chef-de-btselem-est-un-vrai-patriote-selon-des-sources-de-lunit

      Hagai El-Ad, le directeur de B’Tselem, est un « vrai patriote », qui a apporté une contribution inestimable à la sécurité d’Israël quand il servait dans l’une des unités d’élites les plus secrètes de l’armée israélienne, ont déclaré dimanche des sources internes à l’unité, dans un contexte de tempête médiatique et politique après son discours devant le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies ce mois-ci.

      Il avait à ce moment demandé une intervention mondiale contre les implantations israéliennes en Cisjordanie.

      Pendant la session du 14 octobre, El-Ad avait dénoncé la “violence invisible et bureaucratique” qui domine la vie des Palestiniens “du berceau à la tombe”, faisant notamment allusion aux contrôles exercés lors de l’entrée et de la sortie des Territoires et les droits liés à l’agriculture.

      Hagai El-Ad, le directeur de B’Tselem, est un « vrai patriote », qui a apporté une contribution inestimable à la sécurité d’Israël quand il servait dans l’une des unités d’élites les plus secrètes de l’armée israélienne, ont déclaré dimanche des sources internes à l’unité, dans un contexte de tempête médiatique et politique après son discours devant le Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies ce mois-ci.

      Il avait à ce moment demandé une intervention mondiale contre les implantations israéliennes en Cisjordanie.

      Pendant la session du 14 octobre, El-Ad avait dénoncé la “violence invisible et bureaucratique” qui domine la vie des Palestiniens “du berceau à la tombe”, faisant notamment allusion aux contrôles exercés lors de l’entrée et de la sortie des Territoires et les droits liés à l’agriculture.
      El-Ad a servi au sein de l’unité entre 1987 et 1991, aux côtés de l’actuel coordinateur des activités gouvernementales dans les territoires (COGAT), Yoav Mordechai, qui est responsable de la mise en place des politiques du gouvernement israélien en Cisjordanie, selon la chaîne.

      Pendant ces années, a annoncé la Dixième chaîne, l’unité travaillait principalement dans le sud du Liban pour mettre en place des réseaux d’informateurs.

      Pendant son discours, El-Ad avait déclaré qu’Israël a utilisé le processus de paix « pour acheter du temps » afin d’établir des faits sur le terrain pour les implantations.

      Le pays ne peut pas occuper un peuple pendant 50 ans et se dire démocratique, a-t-il déclaré, ajoutant que les droits des Palestiniens devaient être réalisés, et que l’occupation devait cesser.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NE5x4IqxTq0

  • It’s even allowed to hate Israel

    If cabinet Minister Erdan, scourge of left-wing dissidents, visited Sweden, he certainly did not love the liberalism and equality there, yet Swedish airport officials wouldn’t have asked him about it

    Gideon Levy
    Oct 07, 2018

    https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-it-s-even-allowed-to-hate-israel-1.6532475

    News flash for the minister in charge of combating hatred, Gilad Erdan: One is allowed to hate Israel. Sometimes one must even hate its policies. A democratic country doesn’t ask new arrivals whether they love it. It’s none of their business. The gates of democracy are open to everyone, as long as they don’t endanger its security. That is the test.
    Erdan may also have visited a country whose policies he despised; he certainly did not love the liberalism and equality in Sweden, or Germany’s willingness to take in asylum-seekers – and nobody asked him what he thought. His colleague, Culture Minister Miri Regev, a sworn Arab-hater, intends to fly to Abu Dhabi soon. Will they deport her because of her hatred? If only. Maybe that way Erdan would learn.
    >>Ex-Shin Bet chief on questioning of foreigners at Israel’s borders: Shin Bet becoming a problem
    The world that Gilad McCarthy is building for us now, together with the Shin Bet security service that has long been in charge of this, is motivated by the darkness of a different worldview. Erdan described it well on Friday.
    “Everyone understands,” he wrote, “that these are hypocritical organizations uninterested in human rights. They will never act to help the citizens of Syria or Iran. It’s not human rights that motivate them, but hatred of Israel.” Erdan tried to excuse banning the entry to Israel of the student Lara Alqasem and in so doing revealed his worldview once again.
    Keep updated: Sign up to our newsletter
    Email* Sign up

    “Everyone understands,” Erdan? Well, almost everyone. Even the minister of strategic affairs can’t yet speak for everyone in Israel. Maybe he will be able to do so soon.
    Meanwhile, there are also some people who don’t understand. Not everyone here has been brainwashed by the propagandistic lies. The “hypocritical organizations” are more interested in human rights than anything else. They are people of conscience. Some are veterans of long-standing work against the Vietnam War and apartheid in South Africa, some are young people who should be a source of pride. At a time when most Israelis their age are not interested in anything that doesn’t involve them directly, they are fighting for something. They are certainly immeasurably more moral than any settler in the territories.

  • Miri Regev found another enemy: Bedouin women with cameras - Opinion - #Israel News | Haaretz.com
    https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-miri-regev-found-another-enemy-bedouin-women-with-cameras-1.615201

    It’s hard to believe that the culture minister perceives a threat from women who have learned, for the first time, to hold a camera and look at the reality of their lives

    #menaces

  • Israël boycotte l’ouverture d’un festival de cinéma israélien à Paris | The Times of Israël
    https://fr.timesofisrael.com/israel-boycotte-louverture-dun-festival-de-cinema-israelien-a-pari

    L’ambassadrice d’Israël en France ne participera pas à la soirée d’ouverture du festival du cinéma israélien de Paris en raison de la diffusion du film controversé « #Foxtrot », a annoncé dimanche le ministère des Affaires étrangères de l’Etat hébreu.

    L’ambassade « a suggéré à la direction du festival de choisir un film qui ne suscite pas la controverse pour sa soirée d’ouverture mais à la suite de son refus (…), le ministère a décidé que l’ambassadrice ne sera pas présente à cette soirée », a-t-il affirmé dans un communiqué.

    Recevez gratuitement notre édition quotidienne par mail pour ne rien manquer du meilleur de l’info INSCRIPTION GRATUITE !
    Le film complexe et surréel « Foxtrot » du réalisateur israélien Samuel Maoz a obtenu l’an dernier le Lion d’argent Grand Prix du Jury à la Mostra de Venise et le prix du meilleur film à la cérémonie des Ophirs.

    La ministre israélienne de la Culture Miri Regev avait alors accusé le film de prêter le flanc à une accusation de « meurtre rituel » à l’encontre de soldats israéliens.

    Elle s’était réjouie de la non-sélection aux Oscars de « Foxtrot » en janvier, affirmant que « cette décision nous a épargné une déception amère et une représentation mensongère dans le monde de l’armée israélienne ».

    « L’ambassade d’Israël en France est fière de soutenir le festival du cinéma israélien à Paris depuis sa création il y a 18 ans et n’a pas l’habitude de se mêler du choix des films diffusés durant le festival », a néanmoins précisé le communiqué du ministère.

    Le réalisateur avait affirmé en septembre 2017 qu’il critiquait l’endroit où il vivait « parce que je me fais du souci, parce que je veux le protéger, je le fais par amour ».

    La 18e édition du festival du cinéma israélien se déroulera du 13 au 20 mars à Paris.

    • “Foxtrot”, le film de guerre qui dérange en Israël - Cinéma - Télérama.fr
      http://www.telerama.fr/cinema/foxtrot,-le-film-de-guerre-qui-derange-en-israel,n5391546.php

      Mettant en scène une bavure de l’armée, “Foxtrot”, de Samuel Maoz, qui représente Israël aux Oscars, a créé la polémique dans son pays. Raya Morag, professeur d’études du cinéma à l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem, nous explique pourquoi.

      Lion d’argent à la Mostra de Venise, Foxtrot, de Samuel Maoz, qui représente Israël aux Oscars, vient d’être sacré meilleur film étranger par le National Board of Review. Une pluie de récompenses à laquelle la très controversée ministre israélienne de la Culture n’est sans doute pas étrangère, même s’il y a fort à parier qu’elle n’en tire aucune fierté… Et pour cause, en septembre dernier, Miri Regev s’en est violemment pris au second film du réalisateur Samuel Maoz (après Lebanon), affirmant « avoir honte » que l’académie israélienne ait loué les mérites d’une œuvre qui « salit l’image de l’armée » de son pays.

      Miri Regev s’est tout particulièrement insurgée contre une scène du film montrant des soldats israéliens tuant accidentellement des civils innocents à un check-point, puis la dissimulation de cette bavure par un bulldozer. Samuel Maoz, qui a lui-même participé à la première guerre du Liban de 1982, a riposté en expliquant que cette scène « allégorique » était destinée à montrer comment la société israélienne préférait « enterrer la vérité dans la boue que nous avons créée au lieu de s’y confronter »

      Avec une lecture particulière du #prix_à_payer

      En quoi renouvelle-t-il le genre du film antiguerre ?
      Ce long métrage revisite la norme du film de guerre israélien. Au cours de la dernière décennie, la guerre du Liban de 1982 a inspiré une série de films de fiction comme Valse avec Bachir (Ari Folman), Beaufort (Joseph Cedar) ou Lebanon (le premier film de Samuel #Maoz) qui présentaient les soldats israéliens comme les principales victimes du conflit. Par contraste, Foxtrot montre le traumatisme du soldat israélien qui a commis une erreur tragique, qu’il aurait préféré ne jamais commettre, tout en désignant le civil palestinien comme la véritable victime du drame qui se joue dans un check-point. Le film présente le prix élevé de l’occupation militaire israélienne payé de part et d’autre du conflit.

    • Peut-être une des meilleures critiques du film…

      Foxtrot (2017 film) - Wikipedia
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foxtrot_(2017_film)

      In a follow-up statement, [Israel’s Minister of Culture Miri] Regev said it was “outrageous that Israeli artists contribute to the incitement of the young generation against the most moral army in the world by spreading lies in the form of art.

      #l'armée_la_plus_morale_du_monde, il fallait en effet que ce fut rappelé…

  • Paris : Miri Regev fait pression sur le Festival du film israélien qui projettera "Foxtrot"
    https://www.i24news.tv/fr/actu/international/167412-180211-miri-regev-veut-retirer-le-soutien-financier-a-un-festival-par

    Le ministre de la Culture, Miri Regev, fait pression sur le ministère des Affaires étrangères pour qu’il retire son soutien financier du Festival du film israélien qui se tiendra à Paris en mai prochain, après avoir découvert que le film « Foxtrot » y serait projeté.La ministre a dit avoir l’intention « d’informer le Premier ministre afin qu’il ordonne au ministère des Affaires étrangères de ne fournir aucun soutien pour le festival ».

    Actuellement à Paris, Miri Regev a rencontré l’ambassadrice d’Israël en France, Aliza Ben-Nun, et son équipe pour discuter d’un projet visant à promouvoir les liens culturels entre Israël et la France.

    Lors de leur entretien, la ministre de la Culture a appris que « Foxtrot » devait ouvrir le Festival à Paris ce qui « contredit les accords précédents », selon Regev.Israël ne devrait pas « soutenir un festival qui présente des films qui nous calomnient dans le monde et contiennent de faux contenus sur les soldats de Tsahal et ses citoyens », a déclaré Regev au quotidien israélien Haaretz.

    Festival du cinéma israélien à Paris : Israël boycotte la soirée d’ouverture
    http://www.lepoint.fr/cinema/festival-du-cinema-israelien-a-paris-israel-boycotte-la-soiree-d-ouverture-1

    En raison de la diffusion du film controversé Foxtrot, l’ambassadrice d’Israël en France ne participera pas à la soirée d’ouverture du festival du cinéma israélien de Paris. L’annonce a été faite dimanche 11 février par le ministère des Affaires étrangères de l’État hébreu. L’ambassade « a suggéré à la direction du festival de choisir un film qui ne suscite pas la controverse pour sa soirée d’ouverture, mais à la suite de son refus [...], le ministère a décidé que l’ambassadrice ne sera pas présente à cette soirée », a-t-il affirmé dans un communiqué.

    Et de « préciser » sans rire :

    « L’ambassade d’Israël en France est fière de soutenir le festival du cinéma israélien à Paris depuis sa création il y a 18 ans et n’a pas l’habitude de se mêler du choix des films diffusés durant le festival », a néanmoins précisé le communiqué du ministère.

    Bon, s’ils se mettent à se #BDSser tout seuls, maintenant…

    (Le film dans lequel le gentil israélien se lamente de la souffrance psychique du gardien de check-point et du soldat d’occupation me semble constituer un pan entier de la production destinée à l’exportation par Israël.)

  • How Likud MK Miri Regev talked her way to the top - Haaretz - #Israel News | Haaretz.com
    https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-how-a-likud-mk-talked-her-way-to-the-top-1.5277198

    2012,

    In November, she gleefully declared she is “happy to be a fascist” during a televised interview, a statement that could be seen as both hilarious and frightening. Mostly frightening.

    Actuellement ministre des sports

  • Israeli minister gets ’Palestine’ removed from NBA site
    http://www.tampabay.com/israeli-minister-gets-palestine-removed-from-nba-site-ap_world20a56324e0bc

    Israel’s sports minister says she got the words “Palestine-occupied territory” removed from an NBA website.

    Miri Regev, in her letter to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, called Palestine “an imaginary ’state’.” She said the listing was not in line with President Donald Trump’s recent recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

  • Israel: Apartheid under the law

    If a genuine opposition existed in Israel with a worthy leader, it would shout from every platform that the policy of theft and dispossession is destroying whatever chance remains of a two-state solution

    Zeev Sternhell Nov 23, 2017
    read more: https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.824732

    In the past, a story was famously told in Israel about a clash between Golda Meir and Justice Minister Haim Tzadok, who disagreed with her in a cabinet meeting. At the end of the meeting, she went over to him and told him she thought they were friends. Yes, he replied, but I’m also the justice minister of Israel.
    His words reflected the governmental culture of yore, a culture that current Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked and her post-fascist party deem infantile. But the crude violence she propagates is much more dangerous than the primitive vulgarity of Likud’s Miri Regev, David Amsalem or Oren Hazan.
    This is all nothing new. What’s new is the way the attorney general is kowtowing to the will of the justice minister and her party. Shaked wanted Avichai Mendelblit from the beginning, apparently because she knew from what cloth the former cabinet secretary was cut regarding issues critical to the government – the occupation, the settlements and Palestinian rights.
    And now he’s supplying the goods. How is the heir to Haim Cohen, Aharon Barak and Yitzhak Zamir not embarrassed to revoke his professional opinion concerning the “illegal outposts” – as if the rest were legal – while brazenly sanctioning the minister’s request to steal Palestinian land, both private and public, for the “public need” of the settlers; i.e., to pave roads for Jews only? This is what the rule of law has come to in Israel.
    Based on the figures reported by Nahum Barnea in Yedioth Ahronoth last Friday, an extensive amount of territory is to be expropriated and, for the convenience of the occupiers, construction will be prohibited “only” on some of it. This isn’t the first intolerable act of an apartheid system that receives a legal seal of approval. High Court petitions against the move will surely be filed, but they may not be enough to bring this policy to an enduring halt. Settlement advocates dominate in the government and the army, so there’s no real way to stop it.
    Keep updated: Sign up to our newsletter
    Email* Sign up

    So there is no recourse but to call on public opinion, the media and the universities to apply pressure. There is an urgent need for a broad campaign on American and European campuses, and in EU institutions, against this apartheid. The Israeli public is an equally important target, and in the absence of an active opposition party, the social justice organizations must reach this audience.

    If a genuine opposition existed in Israel with a worthy leader, it would be shouting from every possible platform that the policy of theft and dispossession is destroying whatever remains of the possibility of separating from the Palestinians via the establishment of a Palestinian state. Who will fight this government? Certainly not someone who thinks that groveling and ideological kowtowing to the right are the recipe for getting elected.
    It’s important to stress that there’s a big difference between appealing to groups that, for historical reasons, can’t identify with Labor, and signing on to the right’s crude nationalism. This nationalism is a violent and destructive European phenomenon that has nothing to do with the culture of North African Jewry, any kind of Jewish identity or the Jewish religion. To win the hearts of the people who live in the country’s outskirts, it’s not necessary to support the occupation and settlements, which does nothing to redress social injustice – just the opposite.
    Thus a party that wants to replace Likud in power must first convince people that it has an alternative national policy. This goal will not be achieved by making foolish statements about how peace can be reached with the Palestinians without evacuating a single settlement, or by being complicit in turning Judaism into a means of control and oppression of people who had the misfortune not to be born Jews.

    Zeev Sternhell
    Haaretz Contributor

    Send me email alerts

  • Pourquoi Ziad Dueiri n’est pas un héros national libanais | Le Club de Mediapart
    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/les-invites-de-mediapart/blog/300917/pourquoi-ziad-dueiri-n-est-pas-un-heros-national-libanais

    Le 24 septembre 2017, Miri Regev, ministre israélienne de la Culture, a demandé au Procureur général d’Israël Avichai Mandelblit d’ouvrir une enquête sur le réalisateur Mohammed Bakri, un Palestinien détenteur de la citoyenneté israélienne. L’auteur de Jénine Jénine (2002) s’était en effet rendu les jours précédents au Liban. Trois ans plus tôt, en janvier 2014, c’est un jeune écrivain palestinien, Majd al-Kayali, qui était arrêté à l’aéroport de Tel Aviv pour s’être rendu à Beyrouth à l’invitation du quotidien al-Safir. Les Palestiniens de Cisjordanie qui se rendent au Liban à l’invitation de centres de recherches, d’associations ou d’universités libanaises sont toujours susceptibles d’être interrogés et appréhendés par l’armée israélienne à leur retour. Cela fait rarement l’actualité.

    « L’affaire Ziad Doueri » a par contre été bien plus médiatisée. Le 10 septembre 2017, le réalisateur franco-libanais Ziad Doueiri est arrêté par la Sûreté Générale libanaise à l’aéroport de Beyrouth. Relâché après deux heures d’interrogatoires, il est convoqué le lendemain devant le Tribunal militaire. Ce n’est pas son dernier film, l’Insulte, récemment primé au Festival de Venise, qui est dans le collimateur des autorités libanaises, mais L’attentat, réalisé en 2013 : adapté d’un ouvrage de l’écrivain algérien Yasmina Khadra, l’Attentat a été en partie filmé en Israël, où le réalisateur et son équipe se sont rendus à l’époque. Or, l’article 285 du code pénal libanais, édicté en 1964, pénalise tout citoyen libanais ou tout ressortissant d’un État arabe résidant au Liban qui serait entré en « territoire ennemi » (Israël) sans l’accord du Gouvernement libanais. Le délit est passible d’un an de prison et d’une amende symbolique de 200 000 Livres libanaises (112 euros).

    #Liban #Israël #cinéma #boycott

  • La ministre de la Culture israélienne se déchaîne contre un film candidat aux Oscars
    Par AFP | Mis à jour le 21/09/2017
    http://www.lefigaro.fr/cinema/2017/09/21/03002-20170921ARTFIG00008-la-ministre-de-la-culture-israelienne-se-dechaine

    Miri Regev est indignée par le long-métrage Foxtrot , éligible aux Oscars, qui relate l’occupation israélienne en Palestine. Elle juge l’œuvre primée à la Mostra de Venise « diffamatoire » et « mensongère », bien qu’elle ne l’ait jamais vue.

    Un film israélien candidat aux Oscars a suscité mercredi l’indignation de la ministre de la Culture Miri Regev pour qui cette œuvre prête le flanc à une accusation de « meurtre rituel » à l’encontre de soldats israéliens. Foxtrot, qui a obtenu cette année le Lion d’argent Grand Prix du Jury à la Mostra de Venise, raconte une histoire de deuil avec pour toile de fond deux générations traumatisées par le service militaire et traite notamment de l’occupation israélienne des territoires palestiniens.

    Ce film réalisé par Samuel Maoz a remporté mardi le prix de l’Académie israélienne du Film, qui doit lui permettre d’être sélectionné aux Oscars dans la catégorie des films étrangers. Ce choix a été dénoncé par Miri Regev, qui entretient des relations tumultueuses avec le monde artistique de son pays. Elle n’a d’ailleurs pas été invitée à la cérémonie de remise des prix.

    Reconnaissant ne pas avoir vu le film, la ministre s’est insurgée contre une scène du film qui montre des soldats israéliens tuant un Palestinien innocent dans un moment de panique. Un officier masque alors la bavure : « Il s’agit d’une terrible accusation de meurtre rituel », s’est indignée Miri Regev dans une vidéo sur sa page Facebook. Avant d’ajouter : « En tant que ministre et mère d’enfants qui ont servi au sein de Tsahal (l’armée israélienne) j’ai honte qu’un tel film ait obtenu une récompense aussi prestigieuse. »

  • A la recherche d’un refuge en Israël : questionnement sur les demandeurs d’asile venus d’Erythrée

    C’est à la lecture de ces mots, prononcés en mai 2012 par Miri Regev, ministre israélienne de la culture, que j’ai décidé d’effectuer un travail de recherche sur la situation des demandeurs d’asile africains en Israël, au sein du Centre de Recherche Français à Jérusalem (CRFJ) durant l’été 2015. En raison de ma formation académique très centrée sur les droits de l’homme, cette expression m’a choquée au premier abord, puis elle m’a donné envie de réfléchir. En effet, Israël fait face depuis une décennie à une arrivée massive de migrants venus du Soudan et des pays de la Corne de l’Afrique, principalement d’Érythrée. Il ne s’agit pas d’une immigration appuyée par le pays d’accueil pour des raisons religieuses comme cela avait pu être le cas dans les années 1980 avec les juifs éthiopiens. En effet, les opérations « Moïse » et « Salomon »[2] menées par Israël et les Etats-Unis pour les sauver de la grande famine touchant à cette époque le pays, ont été grandement motivées par des raisons religieuses et démographiques. Il s’agissait d’augmenter le nombre de juifs présents sur le territoire israélien. Ces deux « sauvetages en masse » conduiront ensuite 6 000 Ethiopiens à accomplir leur alya[3], mettant pratiquement fin à l’existence de la communauté juive d’Éthiopie, vieille de 3 000 ans.


    http://crfj.hypotheses.org/379
    #Israël #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_érythréens #asile #Erythrée #Holot #détention_administrative #rétention
    via @ville_en

  • More moral than the Shin Bet - Opinion

    A Likud legislator criticizes the security service, and people rush to defend this enabler of the tyrannical occupation

    Gideon Levy Jul 30, 2017
    read more: http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.804072

    How scandalous: Coalition Chairman David Bitan criticized the Shin Bet security service. How dare he? He said they’re cowards who only want to get home safely. What gall! They protect him day and night and he’s a bigger coward – he hid for a month when his checks bounced.
    And who raised the cry? The Zionist left, obviously. This includes all those patriots, friends of the Shin Bet, from Isaac Herzog to Ofer Shelah, as well as the daily Yedioth Ahronoth, which put on a particularly grotesque show the other day, showing what could be likened to a sequel to “The Gatekeepers.”
    Whereas in Dror Moreh’s excellent documentary former Shin Bet heads lament the occupation, in which they obviously played no role, in part two they would whine about some guy Bitan daring to criticize the apple of their eyes. The old-boy network, excluding Likud’s Avi Dichter, whose spokesman said he couldn’t be located (speaking of cowards), called on politicians to keep their hands off this organization.
    They’re very sensitive people, these Shin Bet chiefs, fragile and vulnerable, just like the organization they used to command. They were thus offended to the depths of their souls by Bitan’s comments, as well as those by Culture Minister Miri Regev, who called the Shin Bet’s positions “delusional.” The Shin Bet as victim – soon we’ll be passing around donation trays – the heart commiserates with this moving welfare organization and its wonderful employees, the gatekeepers of Israel who never sleep, while Bitan only talks.

  • La robe de la ministre israélienne de la Culture provoque la polémique sur les marches de Cannes | Middle East Eye
    http://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/reportages/la-robe-de-la-ministre-isra-lienne-de-la-culture-provoque-la-pol-miqu

    L’objet de la polémique : une robe longue blanche et dorée sur laquelle est imprimée une vue de Jérusalem comprenant la Tour de David, le Dôme du Rocher et le Mur occidental.

    Selon ses propres déclarations, la ministre voulait marquer « les 50 ans de la libération et de la réunification de Jérusalem ».

    « Je suis fière de célébrer cette date historique par le biais de l’art et de la mode, et je suis heureuse que cet ouvrage réalisé par le styliste israélien Aviad Herman soit si émouvant et qu’il honore le beau statut de notre capitale éternelle, Jérusalem. »

    Sur Twitter, l’enthousiasme était moins partagé. Plusieurs utilisateurs ont détourné sa robe en y incrustant le mur de séparation construit par Israël dans les territoires palestiniens ou encore des scènes de bombardements israéliens sur la bande de Gaza.

    https://twitter.com/BalkisCj/status/865154045224394752

  • Israel backtracks, delays vote after initially agreeing to EU program that excludes settlements - Israel News - Haaretz.com

    Following Haaretz report, Israel changes course on proposal for joint culture program that would have effectively endorsed European boycott of the settlements in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights.

    Barak Ravid Jan 29, 2017
    read more: http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.768161

    Culture and Sports Minister Miri Regev said on Sunday morning, following a report in Haaretz, that she objects to a proposal set to be brought to the cabinet on Israel joining an EU cultural initiative since it would exclude the settlements. Since then, the cabinet secretariat announced that the issue will be taken off the agenda of Sunday’s cabinet meeting. 
    Regev published her statement despite the fact that the official document on the government proposal, circulated to ministers by the Prime Minister’s Bureau on Wednesday, clearly states that she supports the move.
    The EU program, called Creative Europe, involves cooperation between EU and non-EU countries in the areas of culture and media. The significance of the proposal is that the government of Israel would in effect be agreeing to a European boycott of the settlements in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Golan Heights.
    “The culture minister supports international cooperation in the field of culture. However, if the agreement with the European Union that the Foreign Ministry is proposing includes a boycott of Judea and Samaria – Minister Regev will oppose it and the Culture Ministry won’t be a party to this agreement,” the statement said, referring to the West Bank settlements.
    Regev’s office also said that she plans to turn to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is to submit the proposal in his capacity as foreign minister, clarify her opposition and ask to remove the topic from the cabinet meeting’s agenda.
    By joining the initiative, Israel would be showing its willingness to accept the exclusion of cultural institutions from the settlements in exchange for EU funding of institutions within Israel.

  • Le défunt poète national palestinien va continuer à hanter Israël
    dimanche 24 juillet 2016
    par Gidéon Lévy – 23 juillet 2016 – Haaretz – Traduction CSPRN [Comité Solidarité Palestine de la Région nazairienne] relu et corrigé par JPP.
    http://chroniquepalestine.com/defunt-poete-national-palestinien-va-continuer-a-hanter-israel

    Mahmoud Darwish insiste pour mentionner ce que les Israéliens ne veulent pas reconnaître : Un grand péché a été commis ici lorsque l’État d’Israël a été fondé en 1948.

    Le spectre du poète national palestinien Mahmoud Darwish ne nous quittera jamais. Périodiquement, une chasse aux sorcières éclatera sur sa poésie, en remuant les émotions et agaçant les Israéliens jusqu’à ce qu’ils le comparent à Hitler. Cela s’atténue mais cela revient à nouveau plus tard. Il n’y a pas moyen d’y échapper. Aucun des fantômes de la guerre d’indépendance de 1948 nous laissera jusqu’à ce que nous reconnaissions notre culpabilité, admettions le péché et en assumions la responsabilité en présentant des excuses, en versant des indemnités et, surtout, jusqu’à ce que nous changions nous-mêmes. Sans cela, les fantômes continueront à nous tourmenter et ne nous donnerons pas de repos.

    Le plus récent scandale de Darwish, qui a été attisé par deux ministres ignorants – la ministre de la Culture et des Sports Miri Regev et le ministre de la Défense Avigdor Lieberman, dont il est douteux qu’ils aient jamais lu un poème de Darwish – est un autre maillon de la chaîne. Malgré leur ignorance, ces deux-là savaient qui attaquer. Ils savaient que, plus que toute autre personnage, Darwish frappe le nerf le plus sensible de la société israélienne et rend les Israéliens fous à chaque fois. Ils essayent toujours de le dissimuler par n’importe quel moyen – cachant, niant, mentant et réprimant – mais toujours sans succès.

    Darwish touche au péché originel, ce qui fait de lui un Hitler. Il expose la plaie béante, ce qui le place en dehors des limites. Si les Israéliens étaient convaincus qu’il n’y avait eu aucun péché, ni aucune plaie ouverte, ils n’auraient pas si peur de sa poésie. S’ils étaient convaincus que tout avait été fait correctement à l’époque, en 1948, et que rien n’aurait pu être différent, Darwish aurait été relégué au domaine des départements de littérature.(...)

    https://seenthis.net/messages/511473

  • The Mahmoud Darwish Poem That Enraged Lieberman and Regev - Poem of the Week - Haaretz

    http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/culture/poem-of-the-week/1.732421

    Aux chiottes Lieberman, aux chiottes.

    ID Card

    Mahmoud Darwish

    Write it down! I’m an Arab
    My card number is 50000
    My children number eight
    And after this summer, a ninth on his way.
    Does this make you rage?
    I am an Arab.
    With my quarry comrades I labor hard
    My children number eight
    I tug their bread, their clothes
    And their notebooks
    From within the rock
    I don’t beg at your door
    I don’t cower on your threshold
    So does this make you rage?
    Write it down!
    I am an Arab.
    I am a name with no honorific.
    Patient in a land
    Where everything lives in bursting rage
    My roots were planted before time was born
    Before history began
    Before the cypress and the olive trees
    Before grass sprouted
    My father is from the plough clan
    Not from the noble class
    My grandfather was a peasant farmer
    Had no pedigree
    Taught me the pride of the sun
    Before teaching me to read
    A shack to guard groves is my home,
    Made of branches and reeds
    Are you pleased with my status?
    I am a name with no honorific.
    Write it down!
    I am an Arab.
    Hair color: charcoal
    Eye color: brown
    Attributes:
    A cord around the quffiyeh on my head
    My hand as hard as rock
    That scratches if you touch it
    My address:
    I am from a forgotten abandoned village
    Its streets nameless
    All its men in the fields and quarries
    Does this make you rage?
    Write it down!
    I am an Arab.
    You have stolen my ancestors’ groves
    And the land we cultivated
    I and all my children
    Leaving nothing for us and all my grandchildren
    Except these rocks
    Will your government take them
    Like people say?
    Therefore,
    Write down on the top of the first page:
    I do not hate people
    And I do not steal from anyone
    But if I starve
    I will eat my oppressor’s flesh
    Beware, beware of my starving
    And my rage.

    1964. Translated from Arabic by Salman Masalha and Vivian Eden

    In yet another swipe by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government at freedom of the press, Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman summoned Army Radio commander Yaron Dekel for a dressing-down over the broadcast last week of a discussion of this poem by Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish – in a series on formative Israeli texts on the station’s “University on the Air” program.

    Earlier, Culture and Sport Minister Miri Regev slammed the radio station, which has been on the government’s hit list for a while, for having “gone off the rails.”

    #darwish for ever

    • Inscris « Je suis Arabe », Mahmoud Darwich

      Inscris !
      Je suis Arabe
      Le numéro de ma carte : cinquante mille
      Nombre d’enfants : huit
      Et le neuvième. . . arrivera après l’été !
      Et te voilà furieux !

      Inscris !
      Je suis Arabe
      Je travaille à la carrière avec mes compagnons de peine
      Et j’ai huit bambins
      Leur galette de pain
      Les vêtements, leur cahier d’écolier
      Je les tire des rochers. . .
      Oh ! je n’irai pas quémander l’aumône à ta porte
      Je ne me fais pas tout petit au porche de ton palais
      Et te voilà furieux !

      Inscris !
      Je suis Arabe
      Sans nom de famille – je suis mon prénom
      « Patient infiniment » dans un pays où tous
      Vivent sur les braises de la Colère
      Mes racines. . .
      Avant la naissance du temps elles prirent pied
      Avant l’effusion de la durée
      Avant le cyprès et l’olivier
      . . .avant l’éclosion de l’herbe
      Mon père. . . est d’une famille de laboureurs
      N’a rien avec messieurs les notables
      Mon grand-père était paysan – être
      Sans valeur – ni ascendance.
      Ma maison, une hutte de gardien
      En troncs et en roseaux
      Voilà qui je suis – cela te plaît-il ?
      Sans nom de famille, je ne suis que mon prénom.

      Inscris !
      Je suis Arabe
      Mes cheveux. . . couleur du charbon
      Mes yeux. . . couleur de café
      Signes particuliers :
      Sur la tête un kefiyyé avec son cordon bien serré
      Et ma paume est dure comme une pierre
      . . .elle écorche celui qui la serre
      La nourriture que je préfère c’est
      L’huile d’olive et le thym

      Mon adresse :
      Je suis d’un village isolé. . .
      Où les rues n’ont plus de noms
      Et tous les hommes. . . à la carrière comme au champ
      Aiment bien le communisme
      Inscris !
      Je suis Arabe
      Et te voilà furieux !

      Inscris
      Que je suis Arabe
      Que tu as rafflé les vignes de mes pères
      Et la terre que je cultivais
      Moi et mes enfants ensemble
      Tu nous as tout pris hormis
      Pour la survie de mes petits-fils
      Les rochers que voici
      Mais votre gouvernement va les saisir aussi
      . . .à ce que l’on dit !

      DONC

      Inscris !
      En tête du premier feuillet
      Que je n’ai pas de haine pour les hommes
      Que je n’assaille personne mais que
      Si j’ai faim
      Je mange la chair de mon Usurpateur
      Gare ! Gare ! Gare
      À ma fureur !

    • The Late Palestinian National Poet Will Continue to Haunt Israel

      Mahmoud Darwish insists on mentioning what Israelis don’t want to acknowledge: A great sin took place here when the State of Israel was founded in 1948.
      Gideon Levy Jul 23, 2016 11:53 PM
      http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.732885

      The specter of Palestinian national poet Mahmoud Darwish will never leave us. Every few years, a witch hunt will erupt over his poetry, stirring emotions and riling Israelis until they compare him to Hitler. It subsides but then revives again. There’s no escaping it. None of the ghosts of the 1948 War of Independence will leave us until we recognize the guilt, acknowledge the sin and take responsibility for it by apologizing, paying compensation and, above all, changing ourselves. Until then, the ghosts will continue to torment us and not give us rest.

      The most recent Darwish scandal, which was fanned by two ignorant ministers – Culture and Sports Minister Miri Regev and Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman, whom it’s doubtful ever read a Darwish poem – is another link in the chain. Even in their ignorance, the two knew whom to attack. They knew that, more than any other figure, Darwish hits Israeli society’s most sensitive nerve and drives Israelis crazy every time. They always try to cover up any way they can – concealing, denying, lying and repressing – but always without success.

      Darwish touches on the original sin, which makes him Hitler. He exposes the gaping wound, which makes him off-limits. If Israelis had been convinced that there was no sin and no bleeding wound, they wouldn’t have been so afraid of his poetry. If they were convinced that everything had been done properly back then, in 1948, and that nothing could have been different, Darwish would have been left to the realm of literature departments.

      But the late poet insists on mentioning what Israelis don’t want to know: a great sin took place here. The establishment of Israel – just as it was – was accompanied by the unforgiveable crime of ethnic cleansing of wide parts of the country. No Jewish National Fund grove can cover up the moral ruins on which the state was built. Israel added insult to injury by not allowing the Palestinians who were expelled or fled to return. A thousand historical testimonies, which we also avoid like fire, are not equal to one line of Darwish poetry: “Where will you take me, my father?”

      I will never forget that punch to the stomach, or rather, the dagger to my heart, from the Spring 1996 issue of the Hebrew journal Hadarim, edited by Halit Yeshurun. A dozen pages of Darwish poems from “Why Did You Leave the Horse Alone?” (translated into Hebrew by Anton Shammas): “And who will live in the house after us, my father? / The house, my son, will remain as it was! / Why did you leave the horse alone? / To keep the house company, my son. / When their residents go, the houses will die. / Together we will hold on / until we return. / When, my father? / Tomorrow, my son, and perhaps in another day or two! / That tomorrow trailed behind them, chewing the wind / in the endless winter nights.”

      I didn’t know at the time, and don’t know today, what we as Israelis do with those lines. With: “In our hut, the enemy rids himself of his rifle / which he lays on my grandfather’s chair. He eats of our bread / like guests do, and without being moved. Grabs a little nap / on the bamboo chair.”

      Or: “Ask how my home is doing, foreign sir. / My small coffee cups / of our bitter coffee / still left as they were. Will it enter your nose / the scent of our fingers on the cups?” Or: “And I will carry the yearning / until / my beginning and until its beginning / and I will go on my way / until my end and until its end”!

      Darwish’s end came too early, unfortunately, and some time ago, in 2008. But it was not the end of his poetry – just ask Regev and Lieberman. The year 1948 was also some time ago but, just like Darwish’s poetry, it has never ended, not even for a moment. Israel has never altered its conduct – not its violent and overbearing approach to the Palestinians, who were born here, not their dispossession, the occupation and sometimes also their expulsions.

      In 2016, Israel is handling the Palestinians exactly like it did in 1948. That’s why Darwish isn’t leaving Israel alone, and that’s why he’s so frightening to the country: He confronts Israel with the most primordial truth about itself.