person:robert mueller

  • Pan Am Flight 103 : Robert Mueller’s 30-Year Search for Justice | WIRED
    https://www.wired.com/story/robert-muellers-search-for-justice-for-pan-am-103

    Cet article décrit le rôle de Robert Mueller dans l’enquête historique qui a permis de dissimuler ou de justifier la plupart des batailles de la guerre non déclarée des États Unis contre l’OLP et les pays arabes qui soutenaient la lutte pour un état palestinien.

    Aux États-Unis, en Allemagne et en France le grand public ignore les actes de guerre commis par les États Unis dans cette guerre. Vu dans ce contexte on ne peut que classer le récit de cet article dans la catégorie idéologie et propagande même si les intentions et faits qu’on y apprend sont bien documentés et plausibles.

    Cette perspective transforme le contenu de cet article d’une variation sur un thème connu dans un reportage sur l’état d’âme des dirigeants étatsuniens moins fanatiques que l’équipe du président actuel.

    THIRTY YEARS AGO last Friday, on the darkest day of the year, 31,000 feet above one of the most remote parts of Europe, America suffered its first major terror attack.

    TEN YEARS AGO last Friday, then FBI director Robert Mueller bundled himself in his tan trench coat against the cold December air in Washington, his scarf wrapped tightly around his neck. Sitting on a small stage at Arlington National Cemetery, he scanned the faces arrayed before him—the victims he’d come to know over years, relatives and friends of husbands and wives who would never grow old, college students who would never graduate, business travelers and flight attendants who would never come home.

    Burned into Mueller’s memory were the small items those victims had left behind, items that he’d seen on the shelves of a small wooden warehouse outside Lockerbie, Scotland, a visit he would never forget: A teenager’s single white sneaker, an unworn Syracuse University sweatshirt, the wrapped Christmas gifts that would never be opened, a lonely teddy bear.

    A decade before the attacks of 9/11—attacks that came during Mueller’s second week as FBI director, and that awoke the rest of America to the threats of terrorism—the bombing of Pan Am 103 had impressed upon Mueller a new global threat.

    It had taught him the complexity of responding to international terror attacks, how unprepared the government was to respond to the needs of victims’ families, and how on the global stage justice would always be intertwined with geopolitics. In the intervening years, he had never lost sight of the Lockerbie bombing—known to the FBI by the codename Scotbom—and he had watched the orphaned children from the bombing grow up over the years.

    Nearby in the cemetery stood a memorial cairn made of pink sandstone—a single brick representing each of the victims, the stone mined from a Scottish quarry that the doomed flight passed over just seconds before the bomb ripped its baggage hold apart. The crowd that day had gathered near the cairn in the cold to mark the 20th anniversary of the bombing.

    For a man with an affinity for speaking in prose, not poetry, a man whose staff was accustomed to orders given in crisp sentences as if they were Marines on the battlefield or under cross-examination from a prosecutor in a courtroom, Mueller’s remarks that day soared in a way unlike almost any other speech he’d deliver.

    “There are those who say that time heals all wounds. But you know that not to be true. At its best, time may dull the deepest wounds; it cannot make them disappear,” Mueller told the assembled mourners. “Yet out of the darkness of this day comes a ray of light. The light of unity, of friendship, and of comfort from those who once were strangers and who are now bonded together by a terrible moment in time. The light of shared memories that bring smiles instead of sadness. And the light of hope for better days to come.”

    He talked of Robert Frost’s poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and of inspiration drawn from Lockerbie’s town crest, with its simple motto, “Forward.” He spoke of what was then a two-decade-long quest for justice, of how on windswept Scottish mores and frigid lochs a generation of FBI agents, investigators, and prosecutors had redoubled their dedication to fighting terrorism.

    Mueller closed with a promise: “Today, as we stand here together on this, the darkest of days, we renew that bond. We remember the light these individuals brought to each of you here today. We renew our efforts to bring justice down on those who seek to harm us. We renew our efforts to keep our people safe, and to rid the world of terrorism. We will continue to move forward. But we will never forget.”

    Hand bells tolled for each of the victims as their names were read aloud, 270 names, 270 sets of bells.

    The investigation, though, was not yet closed. Mueller, although he didn’t know it then, wasn’t done with Pan Am 103. Just months after that speech, the case would test his innate sense of justice and morality in a way that few other cases in his career ever have.

    ROBERT S. MUELLER III had returned from a combat tour in Vietnam in the late 1960s and eventually headed to law school at the University of Virginia, part of a path that he hoped would lead him to being an FBI agent. Unable after graduation to get a job in government, he entered private practice in San Francisco, where he found he loved being a lawyer—just not a defense attorney.

    Then—as his wife Ann, a teacher, recounted to me years ago—one morning at their small home, while the two of them made the bed, Mueller complained, “Don’t I deserve to be doing something that makes me happy?” He finally landed a job as an assistant US attorney in San Francisco and stood, for the first time, in court and announced, “Good morning your Honor, I am Robert Mueller appearing on behalf of the United States of America.” It is a moment that young prosecutors often practice beforehand, and for Mueller those words carried enormous weight. He had found the thing that made him happy.

    His family remembers that time in San Francisco as some of their happiest years; the Muellers’ two daughters were young, they loved the Bay Area—and have returned there on annual vacations almost every year since relocating to the East Coast—and Mueller found himself at home as a prosecutor.

    On Friday nights, their routine was that Ann and the two girls would pick Mueller up at Harrington’s Bar & Grill, the city’s oldest Irish pub, not far from the Ferry Building in the Financial District, where he hung out each week with a group of prosecutors, defense attorneys, cops, and agents. (One Christmas, his daughter Cynthia gave him a model of the bar made out of Popsicle sticks.) He balanced that family time against weekends and trainings with the Marines Corps Reserves, where he served for more than a decade, until 1980, eventually rising to be a captain.

    Over the next 15 years, he rose through the ranks of the San Francisco US attorney’s office—an office he would return to lead during the Clinton administration—and then decamped to Massachusetts to work for US attorney William Weld in the 1980s. There, too, he shined and eventually became acting US attorney when Weld departed at the end of the Reagan administration. “You cannot get the words straight arrow out of your head,” Weld told me, speaking of Mueller a decade ago. “The agencies loved him because he knew his stuff. He didn’t try to be elegant or fancy, he just put the cards on the table.”

    In 1989, an old high school classmate, Robert Ross, who was chief of staff to then attorney general Richard Thornburgh, asked Mueller to come down to Washington to help advise Thornburgh. The offer intrigued Mueller. Ann protested the move—their younger daughter Melissa wanted to finish high school in Massachusetts. Ann told her husband, “We can’t possibly do this.” He replied, his eyes twinkling, “You’re right, it’s a terrible time. Well, why don’t we just go down and look at a few houses?” As she told me, “When he wants to do something, he just revisits it again and again.”

    For his first two years at so-called Main Justice in Washington, working under President George H.W. Bush, the family commuted back and forth from Boston to Washington, alternating weekends in each city, to allow Melissa to finish school.

    Washington gave Mueller his first exposure to national politics and cases with geopolitical implications; in September 1990, President Bush nominated him to be assistant attorney general, overseeing the Justice Department’s entire criminal division, which at that time handled all the nation’s terrorism cases as well. Mueller would oversee the prosecution of Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, mob boss John Gotti, and the controversial investigation into a vast money laundering scheme run through the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, known as the Bank of Crooks and Criminals

    None of his cases in Washington, though, would affect him as much as the bombing of Pan Am 103.

    THE TIME ON the clocks in Lockerbie, Scotland, read 7:04 pm, on December 21, 1988, when the first emergency call came into the local fire brigade, reporting what sounded like a massive boiler explosion. It was technically early evening, but it had been dark for hours already; that far north, on the shortest day of the year, daylight barely stretched to eight hours.

    Soon it became clear something much worse than a boiler explosion had unfolded: Fiery debris pounded the landscape, plunging from the sky and killing 11 Lockerbie residents. As Mike Carnahan told a local TV reporter, “The whole sky was lit up with flames. It was actually raining, liquid fire. You could see several houses on the skyline with the roofs totally off and all you could see was flaming timbers.”

    At 8:45 pm, a farmer found in his field the cockpit of Pan Am 103, a Boeing 747 known as Clipper Maid of the Seas, lying on its side, 15 of its crew dead inside, just some of the 259 passengers and crew killed when a bomb had exploded inside the plane’s cargo hold. The scheduled London to New York flight never even made it out of the UK.

    It had taken just three seconds for the plane to disintegrate in the air, though the wreckage took three long minutes to fall the five miles from the sky to the earth; court testimony later would examine how passengers had still been alive as they fell. Nearly 200 of the passengers were American, including 35 students from Syracuse University returning home from a semester abroad. The attack horrified America, which until then had seen terror touch its shores only occasionally as a hijacking went awry; while the US had weathered the 1983 bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut, attacks almost never targeted civilians.

    The Pan Am 103 bombing seemed squarely aimed at the US, hitting one of its most iconic brands. Pan Am then represented America’s global reach in a way few companies did; the world’s most powerful airline shuttled 19 million passengers a year to more than 160 countries and had ferried the Beatles to their US tour and James Bond around the globe on his cinematic missions. In a moment of hubris a generation before Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, the airline had even opened a “waiting list” for the first tourists to travel to outer space. Its New York headquarters, the Pan Am building, was the world’s largest commercial building and its terminal at JFK Airport the biggest in the world.

    The investigation into the bombing of Pan Am 103 began immediately, as police and investigators streamed north from London by the hundreds; chief constable John Boyd, the head of the local police, arrived at the Lockerbie police station by 8:15 pm, and within an hour the first victim had been brought in: A farmer arrived in town with the body of a baby girl who had fallen from the sky. He’d carefully placed her in the front seat of his pickup truck.

    An FBI agent posted in London had raced north too, with the US ambassador, aboard a special US Air Force flight, and at 2 am, when Boyd convened his first senior leadership meeting, he announced, “The FBI is here, and they are fully operational.” By that point, FBI explosives experts were already en route to Scotland aboard an FAA plane; agents would install special secure communications equipment in Lockerbie and remain on site for months.

    Although it quickly became clear that a bomb had targeted Pan Am 103—wreckage showed signs of an explosion and tested positive for PETN and RDX, two key ingredients of the explosive Semtex—the investigation proceeded with frustrating slowness. Pan Am’s records were incomplete, and it took days to even determine the full list of passengers. At the same time, it was the largest crime scene ever investigated—a fact that remains true today.

    Investigators walked 845 square miles, an area 12 times the size of Washington, DC, and searched so thoroughly that they recovered more than 70 packages of airline crackers and ultimately could reconstruct about 85 percent of the fuselage. (Today, the wreckage remains in an English scrapyard.) Constable Boyd, at his first press conference, told the media, “This is a mammoth inquiry.”

    On Christmas Eve, a searcher found a piece of a luggage pallet with signs of obvious scorching, which would indicate the bomb had been in the luggage compartment below the passenger cabin. The evidence was rushed to a special British military lab—one originally created to investigate the Guy Fawkes’ Gunpowder Plot to blow up Parliament and kill King James I in 1605.

    When the explosive tests came back a day later, the British government called the State Department’s ambassador-at-large for combating terrorism, L. Paul Bremer III (who would go on to be President George W. Bush’s viceroy in Baghdad after the 2003 invasion of Iraq), and officially delivered the news that everyone had anticipated: Pan Am 103 had been downed by a bomb.

    Meanwhile, FBI agents fanned out across the country. In New York, special agent Neil Herman—who would later lead the FBI’s counterterrorism office in New York in the run up to 9/11—was tasked with interviewing some of the victims’ families; many of the Syracuse students on board had been from the New York region. One of the mothers he interviewed hadn’t heard from the government in the 10 days since the attack. “It really struck me how ill-equipped we were to deal with this,” Herman told me, years later. “Multiply her by 270 victims and families.” The bombing underscored that the FBI and the US government had a lot to learn in responding and aiding victims in a terror attack.

    INVESTIGATORS MOVED TOWARD piecing together how a bomb could have been placed on board; years before the 9/11 attack, they discounted the idea of a suicide bomber aboard—there had never been a suicide attack on civil aviation at that point—and so focused on one of two theories: The possibility of a “mule,” an innocent passenger duped into carrying a bomb aboard, or an “inside man,” a trusted airport or airline employee who had smuggled the fatal cargo aboard. The initial suspect list stretched to 1,200 names.

    Yet even reconstructing what was on board took an eternity: Evidence pointed to a Japanese manufactured Toshiba cassette recorder as the likely delivery device for the bomb, and then, by the end of January, investigators located pieces of the suitcase that had held the bomb. After determining that it was a Samsonite bag, police and the FBI flew to the company’s headquarters in the United States and narrowed the search further: The bag, they found, was a System 4 Silhouette 4000 model, color “antique-copper,” a case and color made for only three years, 1985 to 1988, and sold only in the Middle East. There were a total of 3,500 such suitcases in circulation.

    By late spring, investigators had identified 14 pieces of luggage inside the target cargo container, known as AVE4041; each bore tell-tale signs of the explosion. Through careful retracing of how luggage moved through the London airport, investigators determined that the bags on the container’s bottom row came from passengers transferring in London. The bags on the second and third row of AVE4041 had been the last bags loaded onto the leg of the flight that began in Frankfurt, before the plane took off for London. None of the baggage had been X-rayed or matched with passengers on board.

    The British lab traced clothing fragments from the wreckage that bore signs of the explosion and thus likely originated in the bomb-carrying suitcase. It was an odd mix: Two herring-bone skirts, men’s pajamas, tartan trousers, and so on. The most promising fragment was a blue infant’s onesie that, after fiber analysis, was conclusively determined to have been inside the explosive case, and had a label saying “Malta Trading Company.” In March, two detectives took off for Malta, where the manufacturer told them that 500 such articles of clothing had been made and most sent to Ireland, while the rest went locally to Maltese outlets and others to continental Europe.

    As they dug deeper, they focused on bag B8849, which appeared to have come off Air Malta Flight 180—Malta to Frankfurt—on December 21, even though there was no record of one of that flight’s 47 passengers transferring to Pan Am 103.

    Investigators located the store in Malta where the suspect clothing had been sold; the British inspector later recorded in his statement, “[Store owner] Anthony Gauci interjected and stated that he could recall selling a pair of the checked trousers, size 34, and three pairs of the pajamas to a male person.” The investigators snapped to attention—after nine months did they finally have a suspect in their sights? “[Gauci] informed me that the man had also purchased the following items: one imitation Harris Tweed jacket; one woolen cardigan; one black umbrella; one blue colored ‘Baby Gro’ with a motif described by the witness as a ‘sheep’s face’ on the front; and one pair of gents’ brown herring-bone material trousers, size 36.”

    Game, set, match. Gauci had perfectly described the clothing fragments found by RARDE technicians to contain traces of explosive. The purchase, Gauci went on to explain, stood out in his mind because the customer—whom Gauci tellingly identified as speaking the “Libyan language”—had entered the store on November 23, 1988, and gathered items without seeming to care about the size, gender, or color of any of it.

    As the investigation painstakingly proceeded into 1989 and 1990, Robert Mueller arrived at Main Justice; the final objects of the Lockerbie search wouldn’t be found until the spring of 1990, just months before Mueller took over as assistant attorney general of the criminal division in September.

    The Justice Department that year was undergoing a series of leadership changes; the deputy attorney general, William Barr, became acting attorney general midyear as Richard Thornburgh stepped down to run for Senate back in his native Pennsylvania. President Bush then nominated Barr to take over as attorney general officially. (Earlier this month Barr was nominated by President Trump to become attorney general once again.)

    The bombing soon became one of the top cases on Mueller’s desk. He met regularly with Richard Marquise, the FBI special agent heading Scotbom. For Mueller, the case became personal; he met with victims’ families and toured the Lockerbie crash site and the investigation’s headquarters. He traveled repeatedly to the United Kingdom for meetings and walked the fields of Lockerbie himself. “The Scots just did a phenomenal job with the crime scene,” he told me, years ago.

    Mueller pushed the investigators forward constantly, getting involved in the investigation at a level that a high-ranking Justice Department official almost never does. Marquise turned to him in one meeting, after yet another set of directions, and sighed, “Geez, if I didn’t know better, I’d think you want to be FBI director.”

    The investigation gradually, carefully, zeroed in on Libya. Agents traced a circuit board used in the bomb to a similar device seized in Africa a couple of years earlier used by Libyan intelligence. An FBI-created database of Maltese immigration records even showed that a man using the same alias as one of those Libyan intelligence officers had departed from Malta on October 19, 1988—just two months before the bombing.

    The circuit board also helped makes sense of an important aspect of the bombing: It controlled a timer, meaning that the bomb was not set off by a barometric trigger that registers altitude. This, in turn, explained why the explosive baggage had lain peacefully in the jet’s hold as it took off and landed repeatedly.

    Tiny letters on the suspect timer said “MEBO.” What was MEBO? In the days before Google, searching for something called “Mebo” required going country to country, company to company. There were no shortcuts. The FBI, MI5, and CIA were, after months of work, able to trace MEBO back to a Swiss company, Meister et Bollier, adding a fifth country to the ever-expanding investigative circle.

    From Meister et Bollier, they learned that the company had provided 20 prototype timers to the Libyan government and the company helped ID their contact as a Libyan intelligence officer, Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi, who looked like the sketch of the Maltese clothing shopper. Then, when the FBI looked at its database of Maltese immigration records, they found that Al Megrahi had been present in Malta the day the clothing was purchased.

    Marquise sat down with Robert Mueller and the rest of the prosecutorial team and laid out the latest evidence. Mueller’s orders were clear—he wanted specific suspects and he wanted to bring charges. As he said, “Proceed toward indictment.” Let’s get this case moving.

    IN NOVEMBER 1990, Marquise was placed in charge of all aspects of the investigation and assigned on special duty to the Washington Field Office and moved to a new Scotbom task force. The field offce was located far from the Hoover building, in a run-down neighborhood known by the thoroughly unromantic moniker of Buzzard Point.

    The Scotbom task force had been allotted three tiny windowless rooms with dark wood paneling, which were soon covered floor-to-ceiling with 747 diagrams, crime scene photographs, maps, and other clues. By the door of the office, the team kept two photographs to remind themselves of the stakes: One, a tiny baby shoe recovered from the fields of Lockerbie; the other, a picture of the American flag on the tail of Pan Am 103. This was the first major attack on the US and its civilians. Whoever was responsible couldn’t be allowed to get away with it.

    With representatives from a half-dozen countries—the US, Britain, Scotland, Sweden, Germany, France, and Malta—now sitting around the table, putting together a case that met everyone’s evidentiary standards was difficult. “We talked through everything, and everything was always done to the higher standard,” Marquise says. In the US, for instance, the legal standard for a photo array was six photos; in Scotland, though, it was 12. So every photo array in the investigation had 12 photos to ensure that the IDs could be used in a British court.

    The trail of evidence so far was pretty clear, and it all pointed toward Libya. Yet there was still much work to do prior to an indictment. A solid hunch was one thing. Having evidence that would stand up in court and under cross-examination was something else entirely.

    As the case neared an indictment, the international investigators and prosecutors found themselves focusing at their gatherings on the fine print of their respective legal code and engaging in deep, philosophical-seeming debates: “What does murder mean in your statute? Huh? I know what murder means: I kill you. Well, then you start going through the details and the standards are just a little different. It may entail five factors in one country, three in another. Was Megrahi guilty of murder? Depends on the country.”

    At every meeting, the international team danced around the question of where a prosecution would ultimately take place. “Jurisdiction was an eggshell problem,” Marquise says. “It was always there, but no one wanted to talk about it. It was always the elephant in the room.”

    Mueller tried to deflect the debate for as long as possible, arguing there was more investigation to do first. Eventually, though, he argued forcefully that the case should be tried in the US. “I recognize that Scotland has significant equities which support trial of the case in your country,” he said in one meeting. “However, the primary target of this act of terrorism was the United States. The majority of the victims were Americans, and the Pan American aircraft was targeted precisely because it was of United States registry.”

    After one meeting, where the Scots and Americans debated jurisdiction for more than two hours, the group migrated over to the Peasant, a restaurant near the Justice Department, where, in an attempt to foster good spirits, it paid for the visiting Scots. Mueller and the other American officials each had to pay for their own meals.

    Mueller was getting ready to move forward; the federal grand jury would begin work in early September. Prosecutors and other investigators were already preparing background, readying evidence, and piecing together information like the names and nationalities of all the Lockerbie victims so that they could be included in the forthcoming indictment.

    There had never been any doubt in the US that the Pan Am 103 bombing would be handled as a criminal matter, but the case was still closely monitored by the White House and the National Security Council.

    The Reagan administration had been surprised in February 1988 by the indictment on drug charges of its close ally Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, and a rule of thumb had been developed: Give the White House a heads up anytime you’re going to indict a foreign agent. “If you tag Libya with Pan Am 103, that’s fair to say it’s going to disrupt our relationship with Libya,” Mueller deadpans. So Mueller would head up to the Cabinet Room at the White House, charts and pictures in hand, to explain to President Bush and his team what Justice had in mind.

    To Mueller, the investigation underscored why such complex investigations needed a law enforcement eye. A few months after the attack, he sat through a CIA briefing pointing toward Syria as the culprit behind the attack. “That’s always struck with me as a lesson in the difference between intelligence and evidence. I always try to remember that,” he told me, back when he was FBI director. “It’s a very good object lesson about hasty action based on intelligence. What if we had gone and attacked Syria based on that initial intelligence? Then, after the attack, it came out that Libya had been behind it? What could we have done?”

    Marquise was the last witness for the federal grand jury on Friday, November 8, 1991. Only in the days leading up to that testimony had prosecutors zeroed in on Megrahi and another Libyan officer, Al Amin Khalifa Fhimah; as late as the week of the testimony, they had hoped to pursue additional indictments, yet the evidence wasn’t there to get to a conviction.

    Mueller traveled to London to meet with the Peter Fraser, the lord advocate—Scotland’s top prosecutor—and they agreed to announce indictments simultaneously on November 15, 1991. Who got their hands on the suspects first, well, that was a question for later. The joint indictment, Mueller believed, would benefit both countries. “It adds credibility to both our investigations,” he says.

    That coordinated joint, multi-nation statement and indictment would become a model that the US would deploy more regularly in the years to come, as the US and other western nations have tried to coordinate cyber investigations and indictments against hackers from countries like North Korea, Russia, and Iran.

    To make the stunning announcement against Libya, Mueller joined FBI director William Sessions, DC US attorney Jay Stephens, and attorney general William Barr.

    “We charge that two Libyan officials, acting as operatives of the Libyan intelligence agency, along with other co-conspirators, planted and detonated the bomb that destroyed Pan Am 103,” Barr said. “I have just telephoned some of the families of those murdered on Pan Am 103 to inform them and the organizations of the survivors that this indictment has been returned. Their loss has been ever present in our minds.”

    At the same time, in Scotland, investigators there were announcing the same indictments.

    At the press conference, Barr listed a long set of names to thank—the first one he singled out was Mueller’s. Then, he continued, “This investigation is by no means over. It continues unabated. We will not rest until all those responsible are brought to justice. We have no higher priority.”

    From there, the case would drag on for years. ABC News interviewed the two suspects in Libya later that month; both denied any responsibility for the bombing. Marquise was reassigned within six months; the other investigators moved along too.

    Mueller himself left the administration when Bill Clinton became president, spending an unhappy year in private practice before rejoining the Justice Department to work as a junior homicide prosecutor in DC under then US attorney Eric Holder; Mueller, who had led the nation’s entire criminal division was now working side by side with prosecutors just a few years out of law school, the equivalent of a three-star military general retiring and reenlisting as a second lieutenant. Clinton eventually named Mueller the US attorney in San Francisco, the office where he’d worked as a young attorney in the 1970s.

    THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY of the bombing came and went without any justice. Then, in April 1999, prolonged international negotiations led to Libyan dictator Muammar Qaddafi turning over the two suspects; the international economic sanctions imposed on Libya in the wake of the bombing were taking a toll on his country, and the leader wanted to put the incident behind him.

    The final negotiated agreement said that the two men would be tried by a Scottish court, under Scottish law, in The Hague in the Netherlands. Distinct from the international court there, the three-judge Scottish court would ensure that the men faced justice under the laws of the country where their accused crime had been committed.

    Allowing the Scots to move forward meant some concessions by the US. The big one was taking the death penalty, prohibited in Scotland, off the table. Mueller badly wanted the death penalty. Mueller, like many prosecutors and law enforcement officials, is a strong proponent of capital punishment, but he believes it should be reserved for only egregious crimes. “It has to be especially heinous, and you have to be 100 percent sure he’s guilty,” he says. This case met that criteria. “There’s never closure. If there can’t be closure, there should be justice—both for the victims as well as the society at large,” he says.

    An old US military facility, Kamp Van Zeist, was converted to an elaborate jail and courtroom in The Hague, and the Dutch formally surrendered the two Libyans to Scottish police. The trial began in May 2000. For nine months, the court heard testimony from around the world. In what many observers saw as a political verdict, Al Megrahi was found guilty and Fhimah was found not guilty.

    With barely 24 hours notice, Marquise and victim family members raced from the United States to be in the courtroom to hear the verdict. The morning of the verdict in 2001, Mueller was just days into his tenure as acting deputy US attorney general—filling in for the start of the George W. Bush administration in the department’s No. 2 role as attorney general John Ashcroft got himself situated.

    That day, Mueller awoke early and joined with victims’ families and other officials in Washington, who watched the verdict announcement via a satellite hookup. To him, it was a chance for some closure—but the investigation would go on. As he told the media, “The United States remains vigilant in its pursuit to bring to justice any other individuals who may have been involved in the conspiracy to bring down Pan Am Flight 103.”

    The Scotbom case would leave a deep imprint on Mueller; one of his first actions as FBI director was to recruit Kathryn Turman, who had served as the liaison to the Pan Am 103 victim families during the trial, to head the FBI’s Victim Services Division, helping to elevate the role and responsibility of the FBI in dealing with crime victims.

    JUST MONTHS AFTER that 20th anniversary ceremony with Mueller at Arlington National Cemetery, in the summer of 2009, Scotland released a terminally ill Megrahi from prison after a lengthy appeals process, and sent him back to Libya. The decision was made, the Scottish minister of justice reported, on “compassionate grounds.” Few involved on the US side believed the terrorist deserved compassion. Megrahi was greeted as a hero on the tarmac in Libya—rose petals, cheering crowds. The US consensus remained that he should rot in prison.

    The idea that Megrahi could walk out of prison on “compassionate” ground made a mockery of everything that Mueller had dedicated his life to fighting and doing. Amid a series of tepid official condemnations—President Obama labeled it “highly objectionable”—Mueller fired off a letter to Scottish minister Kenny MacAskill that stood out for its raw pain, anger, and deep sorrow.

    “Over the years I have been a prosecutor, and recently as the Director of the FBI, I have made it a practice not to comment on the actions of other prosecutors, since only the prosecutor handling the case has all the facts and the law before him in reaching the appropriate decision,” Mueller began. “Your decision to release Megrahi causes me to abandon that practice in this case. I do so because I am familiar with the facts, and the law, having been the Assistant Attorney General in charge of the investigation and indictment of Megrahi in 1991. And I do so because I am outraged at your decision, blithely defended on the grounds of ‘compassion.’”

    That nine months after the 20th anniversary of the bombing, the only person behind bars for the bombing would walk back onto Libyan soil a free man and be greeted with rose petals left Mueller seething.

    “Your action in releasing Megrahi is as inexplicable as it is detrimental to the cause of justice. Indeed your action makes a mockery of the rule of law. Your action gives comfort to terrorists around the world,” Mueller wrote. “You could not have spent much time with the families, certainly not as much time as others involved in the investigation and prosecution. You could not have visited the small wooden warehouse where the personal items of those who perished were gathered for identification—the single sneaker belonging to a teenager; the Syracuse sweatshirt never again to be worn by a college student returning home for the holidays; the toys in a suitcase of a businessman looking forward to spending Christmas with his wife and children.”

    For Mueller, walking the fields of Lockerbie had been walking on hallowed ground. The Scottish decision pained him especially deeply, because of the mission and dedication he and his Scottish counterparts had shared 20 years before. “If all civilized nations join together to apply the rules of law to international terrorists, certainly we will be successful in ridding the world of the scourge of terrorism,” he had written in a perhaps too hopeful private note to the Scottish Lord Advocate in 1990.

    Some 20 years later, in an era when counterterrorism would be a massive, multibillion dollar industry and a buzzword for politicians everywhere, Mueller—betrayed—concluded his letter with a decidedly un-Mueller-like plea, shouted plaintively and hopelessly across the Atlantic: “Where, I ask, is the justice?”

    #USA #Libye #impérialisme #terrorisme #histoire #CIA #idéologie #propagande


  • 20 minutes - « Il pourrait démissionner dans les semaines à venir » - Monde
    https://www.20min.ch/ro/news/monde/story/12981956

    Selon un éminent journaliste politique de la chaîne MSNBC, le président des Etats-Unis pourrait passer un accord avec le procureur Mueller pour éviter une inculpation.

    Le procureur spécial Robert Mueller, qui enquête depuis mai 2017 sur les liens entre Donald Trump et la Russie, serait à bout touchant. Aucune preuve n’a été dévoilée jusqu’ici, mais les semaines à venir s’annoncent explosives à Washington.

    Selon Chris Matthews, journaliste politique de la chaîne MSNBC, Donald Trump pourrait conclure un accord avec Robert Mueller afin d’éviter une inculpation, relève le Huffington Post. Le présentateur pense également que Donald Trump Jr. et Ivanka Trump pourraient être « les prochains dominos à tombe_r », qu’ils risquent des poursuites et des peines de prison. Chris Matthews verrait bien le procureur spécial proposer au président des Etats-Unis d’abandonner ses fonctions « _en échange d’une tournée d’acquittements, pas seulement pour lui, mais aussi pour ses enfants ».


  • USA : l’ingérence russe visait à inciter les Noirs à s’abstenir à la présidentielle
    https://www.linformaticien.com/actualites/id/51008/usa-l-ingerence-russe-visait-a-inciter-les-noirs-a-s-abstenir-a-la-p

    L’agence Internet Research Agency (IRA), basée à Saint-Pétersbourg et considérée par la justice américaine comme une ferme à « trolls » payée par le Kremlin, a cherché pendant la campagne présidentielle à dissuader des franges de la population plutôt proches des démocrates, comme les jeunes, les minorités ethniques et la communauté LGBT, de voter, selon ces textes.

    Elle a mis un accent particulier sur les électeurs noirs d’après l’analyse la plus complète à ce jour des milliers de messages et publications diffusés sur les réseaux sociaux par l’IRA, entre 2015 et 2017, menée conjointement par l’Université d’Oxford et des spécialistes des nouveaux médias Graphika.

    L’autre rapport commandé par le Sénat a lui été élaboré par la compagnie New Knowledge et l’université de Columbia notamment.

    L’IRA avait ainsi créé de nombreux comptes sous de faux profils américains destinés à la communauté noire. L’un d’eux, intitulé « Blacktivist », envoyait des messages négatifs sur la candidate démocrate Hillary Clinton, accusée d’être une opportuniste, seulement soucieuse de gagner des voix.

    « Cette campagne visait à convaincre que la meilleure manière d’améliorer la cause de la communauté afro-américaine était de boycotter les élections et de se concentrer sur d’autres sujets », écrivent les auteurs du rapport.

    Parallèlement, une partie des 3.841 comptes Facebook, Instagram, Twitter ou Youtube étudiés cherchait à pousser les électeurs blancs proches des républicains à participer au scrutin.

    Initialement, les messages soutenaient les thèses républicaines - la défense du port d’armes ou la lutte contre l’immigration - sans citer de favori. Une fois que la candidature de Donald Trump a pris de la consistance, les messages de l’IRA lui ont été clairement favorables, selon cette étude.

    Selon une étude du Pew Research Center, le taux de participation des électeurs blancs avait augmenté en 2016, alors que celui des Noirs, à 59,6%, était en recul de cinq points par rapport à 2012.

    Plusieurs employés de l’IRA, financée par l’oligarque Evguéni Prigojine, ont été inculpés par la justice américaine pour ingérence dans l’élection de 2016.

    La campagne de propagande a ensuite évolué pour se trouver une nouvelle cible après la victoire de Donald Trump : le procureur spécial Robert Mueller, chargé d’enquêter sur les soupçons de collusion entre l’équipe de campagne du républicain et la Russie, a indiqué lundi soir le Washington Post.

    Des comptes alimentés par des Russes sur les réseaux sociaux ont ainsi partagé des publications affirmant que M. Mueller était corrompu, un post sur Instagram allant jusqu’à prétendre qu’il avait par le passé travaillé avec « des groupes islamistes radicaux ».

    #Médias_sociaux #Politique #Russie #USA


  • How Russia Hacked U.S. Politics With Instagram Marketing – Foreign Policy
    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/12/17/how-russia-hacked-us-politics-with-instagram-marketing

    The Internet Research Agency took to the photo-sharing network to boost Trump and depress voter turnout.

    Donald Trump as U.S. president, Kremlin operatives running a digital interference campaign in American politics scored a viral success with a post on Instagram.

    The post appeared on the account @blackstagram__, which was in fact being run by the Internet Research Agency, a Kremlin-linked troll farm that U.S. authorities say orchestrated an online campaign to boost Trump’s candidacy in 2016. It racked up 254,000 likes and nearly 7,000 comments—huge numbers for the Kremlin campaign.

    But oddly, the post contained no political content.

    Instead, it repurposed an ad for a women’s shoe, with a photo of women of different skin tones wearing the same strappy high heel in different colors. The caption pitched the shoes as a symbol of racial equality: “All the tones are nude! Get over it!

    While the message itself was not aimed at swaying voters in any direction, researchers now believe it served another purpose for the Russian group: It boosted the reach of its account, likely won it new followers, and tried to establish the account’s bona fides as an authentic voice for the black community.

    That advertising pitch was revealed in a report released Monday by the Senate Intelligence Committee and produced by the cybersecurity firm New Knowledge. The report provides the most comprehensive look to date at the Kremlin’s attempt to boost Trump’s candidacy and offers a surprising insight regarding that campaign: Moscow’s operatives operated much like digital marketers, making use of Instagram to reach a huge audience.

    By blending marketing tactics with political messaging, the Internet Research Agency (IRA) established a formidable online presence in the run-up to the 2016 election (and later), generating 264 million total engagements—a measure of activity such as liking and sharing content—and building a media ecosystem across Facebook and Instagram.

    That campaign sought to bring Russian political goals into the mainstream, exacerbate and inflame divisions in American society, and blur the line between truth and fiction, New Knowledge’s report concludes.

    Amid the intense discussion of Russian interference in the 2016 election, investigators probing that campaign had devoted relatively little attention to Instagram until now. But following their exposure in 2016 and early 2017, the IRA’s operatives shifted resources to Instagram, where their content often outperformed its postings on Facebook. (Instagram is owned by Facebook.)

    Of the 133 Instagram accounts created by the IRA, @blackstagram__ was arguably its most successful, with more than 300,000 followers. Its June 2017 ad for the shoe, made by Kahmune, was the most widely circulated post dreamed up by the Kremlin’s operatives—from a total of some 116,000. (The shoe continues to be marketed by Kahmune. Company officials did not respond to questions from Foreign Policy.)

    The authors of the report believe @blackstagram__ served as a vehicle for Kremlin propaganda targeting the American black community, skillfully adopting the language of Instagram, where viral marketing schemes exist side by side with artfully arranged photographs of toast.

    As Americans streamed to the polls on Nov. 8, 2016, @blackstagram__ offered its contribution to the Kremlin’s campaign to depress turnout, borrowing a line from a Michael Jackson song to tell African-Americans that their votes didn’t matter: “Think twice before you vote. All I wanna say is that they don’t really care about us. #Blacktivist #hotnews._

    Special counsel Robert Mueller and his team of investigators have secured indictments against the Internet Research Agency’s owner, Yevgeny Prigozhin, and a dozen of its employees.

    While the effect of the IRA’s coordinated campaign to depress voter turnout is difficult to assess, the evidence of the group’s online influence is stark. Of its 133 Instagram accounts, 12 racked up more than 100,000 followers—the typical threshold for being considered an online “_influencer” in the world of digital marketing. Around 50 amassed more than 10,000 followers, making them what marketers call “micro-influencers.”

    These accounts made savvy use of hashtags, built relationships with real people, promoted merchandise, and targeted niche communities. The IRA’s most popular Instagram accounts included pages devoted to veterans’ issues (@american.veterans), American Christianity (@army_of_jesus), and feminism (@feminism_tag).

    In a measure of the agency’s creativity, @army_of_jesus appears to have been launched in 2015 as a meme account featuring Kermit the Frog. It then switched subjects and began exclusively posting memes related to the television show The Simpsons. By January 2016, the account had amassed a significant following and reached its final iteration with a post making extensive use of religious hashtags: “#freedom #love #god #bible #trust #blessed #grateful. ” It later posted memes comparing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to Satan.

    The Internet Research Agency operated like a digital marketing agency: develop a brand (both visual and voice), build presences on all channels across the entire social ecosystem, and grow an audience with paid ads as well as partnerships, influencers, and link-sharing,” the New Knowledge report concludes. “Instagram was perhaps the most effective platform.

    Monday’s report, which was published alongside another by researchers at the University of Oxford and the network analysis firm Graphika, is likely to increase scrutiny of social media platforms. The New Knowledge report accuses technology firms of possibly misleading Congress and says companies have not been sufficiently transparent in providing data related to the Russian campaign.


  • USA : l’ingérence russe visait à inciter les Noirs à s’abstenir à la présidentielle
    https://www.linformaticien.com/actualites/id/51008/usa-l-ingerence-russe-visait-a-inciter-les-noirs-a-s-abstenir-a-la-p

    La campagne de propagande menée par la Russie sur les réseaux sociaux avant la présidentielle américaine de 2016 a tenté d’inciter les Noirs à s’abstenir de voter, avant de prendre le procureur spécial Robert Mueller lui-même pour cible après la victoire de Donald Trump, selon des rapports commandés par le Sénat.

    L’agence Internet Research Agency (IRA), basée à Saint-Pétersbourg et considérée par la justice américaine comme une ferme à « trolls » payée par le Kremlin, a cherché pendant la campagne présidentielle à dissuader des franges de la population plutôt proches des démocrates, comme les jeunes, les minorités ethniques et la communauté LGBT, de voter, selon ces textes.

    Elle a mis un accent particulier sur les électeurs noirs d’après l’analyse la plus complète à ce jour des milliers de messages et publications diffusés sur les réseaux sociaux par l’IRA, entre 2015 et 2017, menée conjointement par l’Université d’Oxford et des spécialistes des nouveaux médias Graphika.

    L’autre rapport commandé par le Sénat a lui été élaboré par la compagnie New Knowledge et l’université de Columbia notamment.

    L’IRA avait ainsi créé de nombreux comptes sous de faux profils américains destinés à la communauté noire. L’un d’eux, intitulé « Blacktivist », envoyait des messages négatifs sur la candidate démocrate Hillary Clinton, accusée d’être une opportuniste, seulement soucieuse de gagner des voix.

    « Cette campagne visait à convaincre que la meilleure manière d’améliorer la cause de la communauté afro-américaine était de boycotter les élections et de se concentrer sur d’autres sujets », écrivent les auteurs du rapport.

    Parallèlement, une partie des 3.841 comptes Facebook, Instagram, Twitter ou Youtube étudiés cherchait à pousser les électeurs blancs proches des républicains à participer au scrutin.

    Initialement, les messages soutenaient les thèses républicaines - la défense du port d’armes ou la lutte contre l’immigration - sans citer de favori. Une fois que la candidature de Donald Trump a pris de la consistance, les messages de l’IRA lui ont été clairement favorables, selon cette étude. 

    Selon une étude du Pew Research Center, le taux de participation des électeurs blancs avait augmenté en 2016, alors que celui des Noirs, à 59,6%, était en recul de cinq points par rapport à 2012. 

    Plusieurs employés de l’IRA, financée par l’oligarque Evguéni Prigojine, ont été inculpés par la justice américaine pour ingérence dans l’élection de 2016.

    La campagne de propagande a ensuite évolué pour se trouver une nouvelle cible après la victoire de Donald Trump : le procureur spécial Robert Mueller, chargé d’enquêter sur les soupçons de collusion entre l’équipe de campagne du républicain et la Russie, a indiqué lundi soir le Washington Post.

    Des comptes alimentés par des Russes sur les réseaux sociaux ont ainsi partagé des publications affirmant que M. Mueller était corrompu, un post sur Instagram allant jusqu’à prétendre qu’il avait par le passé travaillé avec « des groupes islamistes radicaux ».

    (source : AFP)


  • Un témoignage clé dans le procès de l’ex-directeur de campagne de Trump
    https://www.lemonde.fr/donald-trump/article/2018/08/07/un-temoignage-cle-dans-le-proces-de-l-ex-directeur-de-campagne-de-trump_5340

    Le procès de Paul Manafort, ex-directeur de campagne de Donald Trump, a connu un moment important lundi 6 août avec le témoignage de Richard Gates, son ancien collaborateur. Ce dernier a reconnu à la barre, dans une salle d’audience comble, qu’il s’était entendu avec Paul Manafort pour cacher des millions de dollars auprès de banques à l’étranger.

    Il a raconté avoir assisté Paul Manafort pour remplir de fausses déclarations de revenus et cacher l’existence de quinze comptes bancaires à l’étranger, la plupart à Chypre. « A la demande de M. Manafort, nous n’avons pas signalé les comptes en banque à l’étranger », a précisé M. Gates.

    L’ancien consultant politique a estimé que les sommes en question représentaient « plusieurs millions de dollars » au fil des années où la paire a travaillé pour des campagnes politiques en Ukraine.

    Richard Gates, 46 ans, qui coopère avec le procureur Robert Mueller depuis qu’il a accepté de plaider coupable en février, en échange d’une peine de prison plus clémente, a aussi admis avoir volé des centaines de milliers de dollars à son ancien patron Paul Manafort, en déposant de faux rapports de dépense.

    Paul Manafort, 69 ans, est le premier à se retrouver mis sur le banc des accusés par l’équipe de Robert Mueller, procureur spécial chargé d’enquêter sur les soupçons d’ingérence russe dans la présidentielle américaine de novembre 2016, qui empoisonnent le mandat de Donald Trump.

    Mais M. Manafort est jugé sur des faits présumés antérieurs à son passage à la tête de l’équipe Trump, entre mai et août 2016. Il est accusé de blanchiment d’argent, fraudes fiscale et bancaire sur des millions de dollars tirés de ses activités de lobbyiste pour l’ex-président ukrainien Viktor Ianoukovitch, soutenu par Moscou, qu’il n’a pas déclarés au fisc.

    La question cruciale d’une possible collusion entre des membres de la campagne Trump et Moscou ne devrait toutefois pas être abordée pendant ce procès. Risquant déjà de passer le restant de ses jours en prison, Paul Manafort devra affronter un second procès en septembre, toujours dans le cadre de l’enquête du procureur spécial Robert Mueller.


  • Noam Chomsky on Mass Media Obsession with Russia & the Stories Not Being Covered in the Trump Era
    https://www.filmsforaction.org/watch/noam-chomsky-on-mass-media-obsession-with-russia-and-the-stories-not

    The New York Times reports special counsel Robert Mueller is scrutinizing President Trump’s tweets as part of Mueller’s expanding probe into Trump’s ties to Russia. This latest revelation in the...


  • Seychelles meetings probed by Mueller included several Russians : exclusive | NJ.com
    https://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2018/07/seychelles_meetings_probed_in_mueller_investigatio.html

    Several Russians, some linked to the Kremlin, participated in meetings in the Seychelles in January 2017 and are subjects of an ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, according to the island’s aircraft data and sources with knowledge of the meetings.

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller is examining a series of meetings that took place in the Seychelles, an archipelago in the Indian Ocean, as part of a broader investigation into Russian meddling. The inquiry into the meetings suggests there is growing interest by the Mueller team into whether foreign financing, specifically from Gulf states, has influenced President Donald Trump and his administration.

    Much speculation has centered on one particular meeting between Erik Prince, founder of the security company Blackwater; Kirill Dmitriev, the director of one of Russia’s sovereign wealth funds; and Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, the effective ruler of the United Arab Emirates, also known as “MBZ.”

    La presse arabe (http://www.alquds.co.uk/?p=976231) s’intéresse bien entendu à la présence de MBZ....


    • . . . .
      Le Guardian se plaint que « comme l’enquête s’est élargie et a dominé l’agenda des infos au cours de l’année dernière, les vrais problèmes de la vie des gens risques d’être noyés par la couverture obsessionnelle de l’enquête sur la Russie par la télévision câblée » – comme si la propre couverture du Guardian n’avait pas été aussi obsessionnelle que tout ce que CNN a pu inventer.

      Le Washington Post, qui n’a pas son pareil lorsqu’il s’agit de dépeindre Poutine comme un Lord Voldemort (NdT : Sorcier dans la Saga Harry Potter) réel, dit maintenant que le conseiller spécial Robert Mueller « doit relever un défi particulier pour maintenir la confiance des citoyens » alors que son enquête entre dans sa deuxième année – bien qu’il maintienne que le problème ne soit pas l’enquête elle-même, mais « les attaques régulières auxquelles il est confronté de la part du président Trump, qui a décrié la enquête comme une “chasse aux sorcières” ».

      Et puis il y a le New York Times, qui a consacré cette semaine un article de 3 600 mots en première page pour expliquer pourquoi le FBI n’avait pas d’autre choix que de lancer une investigation sur les liens russes présumés de Trump et comment, le cas échéant, l’enquête n’avait pas été pas assez agressive. Comme le dit l’article, « des auditions d’ une douzaine de représentants actuels et anciens du gouvernement et un examen des documents montrent que le FBI a été encore plus circonspect dans cette affaire qu’on ne le croyait ».

      . . . .


  • America first, la rencontre d’Helsinki et la menace existentielle de Trump contre l’Empire
    Par David Stockman.


    http://lesakerfrancophone.fr/america-first-la-rencontre-dhelsinki-et-la-menace-existentielle-d

    Il est clair qu’il espère retirer les 29 000 militaires américains actuellement stationnés en Corée du Sud en échange d’une sorte de traité de paix, d’une normalisation économique et d’un accord de dénucléarisation avec Kim Jong-un.

    De même, il a raisonnablement laissé entendre que la diabolisation de la Russie et de Poutine n’a mené à rien et qu’elle devrait être invitée à réintégrer le G-8. Et dès que Robert Mueller en aura fini avec sa farce du RussiaGate, Trump pourra se débarrasser des inutiles sanctions prises actuellement contre divers officiels russes et amis de Poutine.


  • Middle Eastern Monarchs Look at the Trumps and See Themselves – Foreign Policy
    http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/05/28/middle-eastern-monarchs-look-at-the-trumps-and-see-themselves

    It seems that in the span of not quite two decades, the guy [George Nader] who ran a small, likely not profitable, but influential policy magazine become a conduit between Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan of the Abu Dhabi, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, and Donald Trump’s closest inner circle, both after, and — crucially for special counsel Robert Mueller’s ongoing criminal investigation — before Trump’s election as U.S. president.

    Nader’s story is yet another example of the sleaze, greed, and influence-peddling that has come to seem ordinary in Trump-era Washington. But it also offers a view into a more extraordinary and unprecedented problem: a decision by some of America’s closest allies in the Middle East to leverage their financial resources in common cause with a bunch of #ganefs to influence U.S. foreign policy. It is a problem that can be traced back, in ways that haven’t generally been understood, to Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner and his mobile phone.

    #riyalpolitik

    ganef - Wiktionary
    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ganef

    From Yiddish גנבֿ‎ (ganef), from Hebrew גנב‎ (ganáv, “thief”).



  • USA - Iran : Pour faire oublier les dessous de table de trump
    Trump : La couche de fange la plus épaisse Paul Jorion
    https://www.pauljorion.com/blog/2018/05/09/trump-la-couche-de-fange-la-plus-epaisse

    Quand on s’attribue généreusement l’image de celui qui asséchera le bourbier, qui drainera le marécage (« To Drain the Swamp »), le risque que l’on court, c’est que quelqu’un découvre que c’est dans votre propre jardin que la couche de fange est en réalité la plus épaisse.

    Le président #Trump a accepté de courir ce risque et il en récolte aujourd’hui les fruits amers.

    Mercredi de la semaine dernière, le 2 mai, Rudolph Giuliani, ancien maire de New York et candidat malheureux à l’investiture du Parti républicain aux élections présidentielles de 2008, qui venait de rejoindre l’équipe d’avocats de Trump, jetait un pavé dans la mare : « Non, les 130.000 $ de prix du silence versés à l’actrice porno #Stormy_Daniels ne constituaient pas une infraction au financement de la campagne présidentielle : ils avaient été remboursés par #Trump lui-même, par l’intermédiaire de son avocat Michael Cohen, grâce à des versements mensuels d’un montant de 35.000 dollars ».

    Or on apprend aujourd’hui dans un document versé au dossier par l’avocat de Daniels (de son vrai nom Stephanie Clifford), le très haut en couleurs Michael Avenatti (il a couru entre autres les 24 heures du Mans), que d’autres – et en particulier, la compagnie #AT&T – alimentaient par des versements du même ordre de grandeur le compte de Essential Consultants, la coquille créée par Cohen dans l’état du #Delaware, fameux pour son moins-disant juridique, moins de quinze jours avant le premier versement à Clifford.

    La justification des 200.000 $ versés par AT&T : « Obtenir des lumières (insights) quant au fonctionnement de la nouvelle administration », par le truchement de quelqu’un fort bien placé pour connaître ce type d’information : nul autre que l’avocat de Trump lui-même. Aucun rapport donc entre ce versement et l’approbation que la firme cherche à obtenir en ce moment dans sa tentative de prise de contrôle de #Time_Warner_Inc. d’un montant de 85 milliards de dollars, tentative bloquée depuis novembre de l’année dernière par le ministère de la Justice dans le cadre de l’application des lois anti-trust (une décision est attendue le 12 juin). Le principal souci pour les deux cocontractants est sans doute aujourd’hui que le vin au fond du pot ne noie la chandelle dont on espérait la lumière !

    Et AT&T n’était pas seule à verser, entre la fin de l’année dernière et le début de celle-ci, des fonds considérables à l’avocat de Trump. On compte aussi la firme coréenne #Korea_Aerospace_Industries qui s’efforce en ce moment, en concurrence avec l’Américain #Lockheed_Martin, d’obtenir un contrat juteux d’avions de chasse d’essai pour l’US Air Force. Il y avait aussi la firme pharmaceutique suisse #Novartis, qui n’a pas hésité à verser à Essential Consultants, en douze tranches, 1,2 millions de dollars, à l’époque où les paiements dits « de M. Trump » remboursaient son avocat de sa généreuse avance (dont il a affirmé lui, de manière un peu pitoyable, qu’elle était alimentée par une ligne de crédit dont son logement servait de collatéral) .

    Mais ce n’est pas tout : les généreux #donateurs de l’avocat de M. Trump, à l’époque où il s’efforçait de gérer la cupidité d’amantes – ou s’affirmant telles – importunes du Président, comptaient aussi le fonds Columbus Nova, essentiellement financé par l’#oligarque_russe #Viktor_Vekselberg et géré par son cousin #Andrew_Intrater, lequel a offert 250.000 $ comme contribution personnelle au financement de l’inauguration officielle de M. Trump.

    Or Vekselberg est déjà l’objet de sanctions imposées début avril par Robert Mueller dans le cadre de son enquête sur une éventuelle collusion entre la campagne de Trump et la Russie, comme l’interdiction pour lui de se rendre aux États-Unis ou d’y ouvrir un compte en banque. La raison pour laquelle Vekselberg était sanctionné était loin d’être claire à l’époque car il était question surtout d’interférences russes avec la campagne électorale par le biais de la diffusion de propagande populiste, suprématiste, etc. sur les réseaux sociaux.

    Et ceci signifie que ce que nous découvrons aujourd’hui du fait de la diligence d’Avenatti, l’avocat de Stormy Daniels, la commission Mueller le sait déjà depuis le 6 avril, jour où ces sanctions furent prises à l’égard de « sept oligarques russes et douze compagnies dont ils sont les propriétaires ou qu’ils contrôlent, dix-sept fonctionnaires de haut rang du gouvernement russe, ainsi qu’une firme d’État de commerce d’armement et une banque russe, sa filiale. »

    Et l’on comprend mieux du coup a posteriori l’affolement de Trump le 9 avril quand la totalité des dossiers de son avocat Michael Cohen furent saisis dans un raid du #FBI, conjointement chez lui, dans le bureau qu’il occupait dans une firme d’avocats qui rompit immédiatement ses relations avec lui, ainsi que dans la chambre qu’il occupait dans un hôtel durant la rénovation de son domicile.

    La conclusion à tirer, c’est que pour des versements comme des peccadilles du genre 130.000 $ pour faire taire des empêcheurs ou empêcheuses de danser en rond du type Stormy Daniels, les candidats se bousculaient en réalité au portillon, allant d’#oligarques russes à des compagnies américaines à la tête de conglomérats internationaux comme AT&T, et que les #pots-de-vin tombaient comme à #Gravelotte (4,4 millions de dollars versés à Essential Consultants selon le New York Times).

    Ce que les tribulations de tous ces généreux #corrupteurs et #corrompus suggèrent, c’est que tout pays se révèle peut-être une république bananière aussitôt que l’on s’intéresse à la partie immergée de l’iceberg, la différence entre les cas flagrants et les autres n’étant qu’au niveau de la gestion des apparences.

    Quoi qu’il en soit, l’assèchement du bourbier, le « Du balai », ce n’est donc pas Trump qui s’en occupe en réalité, c’est Robert Mueller, et le bourbier s’assèche de jour en jour de lui-même, sans que Mueller doive même dire quoi que ce soit. Et avec un peu de chance, Trump disparaîtra du paysage avant même que celui-ci ne dépose ses conclusions.

    On comprend mieux dans ce contexte l’empressement de Trump ces jours-ci à mettre en application les propositions les plus décervelées de son programme, du genre de sa dénonciation hier du traité avec l’#Iran : l’étau se resserre pour lui, et le temps presse toujours davantage. « J’aurai au moins honoré mes promesses de campagne ! », se dit-il sans doute. Et s’il se retrouve en prison, il aura au moins la satisfaction de ne pas avoir trahi sa base. Laquelle exultera, nul n’en doute, et le portera en triomphe, à sa sortie de Sing-Sing dans quelques dizaines d’années.


  • Iran. « Pas acceptable » que les États-Unis soient le « gendarme » de la planète
    https://www.crashdebug.fr/international/14867-iran-pas-acceptable-que-les-etats-unis-soient-le-gendarme-de-la-pla

    J’espère que ce petit épisode sur l’Iran permettra au commun des mortels d’entrevoir la dictature sans partage qu’exerce les États-unis sur la France et sur le monde… (vidéo ci-dessous)

    Il faut dire que quand on consacre 700 Milliards de dollars par an à son armé ont a quelques arguments...

    Selon Bruno Le Maire, il n’est « pas acceptable » que les États-Unis se placent en « gendarme économique de la planète » après la décision de Donald Trump de rétablir les sanctions visant l’Iran.

    Jugeant que le retrait américain de l’accord nucléaire est « une erreur » pour la sécurité internationale, mais aussi du point de vue économique, Bruno Le Maire a observé que cette décision aurait des « conséquences » pour les entreprises françaises, telles que Total, Sanofi, Renault ou encore Peugeot. « En deux ans, la France a (...)

    • Trump : La couche de fange la plus épaisse Paul Jorion
      https://www.pauljorion.com/blog/2018/05/09/trump-la-couche-de-fange-la-plus-epaisse

      Quand on s’attribue généreusement l’image de celui qui asséchera le bourbier, qui drainera le marécage (« To Drain the Swamp »), le risque que l’on court, c’est que quelqu’un découvre que c’est dans votre propre jardin que la couche de fange est en réalité la plus épaisse.

      Le président #Trump a accepté de courir ce risque et il en récolte aujourd’hui les fruits amers.

      Mercredi de la semaine dernière, le 2 mai, Rudolph Giuliani, ancien maire de New York et candidat malheureux à l’investiture du Parti républicain aux élections présidentielles de 2008, qui venait de rejoindre l’équipe d’avocats de Trump, jetait un pavé dans la mare : « Non, les 130.000 $ de prix du silence versés à l’actrice porno #Stormy_Daniels ne constituaient pas une infraction au financement de la campagne présidentielle : ils avaient été remboursés par #Trump lui-même, par l’intermédiaire de son avocat Michael Cohen, grâce à des versements mensuels d’un montant de 35.000 dollars ».

      Or on apprend aujourd’hui dans un document versé au dossier par l’avocat de Daniels (de son vrai nom Stephanie Clifford), le très haut en couleurs Michael Avenatti (il a couru entre autres les 24 heures du Mans), que d’autres – et en particulier, la compagnie #AT&T – alimentaient par des versements du même ordre de grandeur le compte de Essential Consultants, la coquille créée par Cohen dans l’état du #Delaware, fameux pour son moins-disant juridique, moins de quinze jours avant le premier versement à Clifford.

      La justification des 200.000 $ versés par AT&T : « Obtenir des lumières (insights) quant au fonctionnement de la nouvelle administration », par le truchement de quelqu’un fort bien placé pour connaître ce type d’information : nul autre que l’avocat de Trump lui-même. Aucun rapport donc entre ce versement et l’approbation que la firme cherche à obtenir en ce moment dans sa tentative de prise de contrôle de #Time_Warner_Inc. d’un montant de 85 milliards de dollars, tentative bloquée depuis novembre de l’année dernière par le ministère de la Justice dans le cadre de l’application des lois anti-trust (une décision est attendue le 12 juin). Le principal souci pour les deux cocontractants est sans doute aujourd’hui que le vin au fond du pot ne noie la chandelle dont on espérait la lumière !

      Et AT&T n’était pas seule à verser, entre la fin de l’année dernière et le début de celle-ci, des fonds considérables à l’avocat de Trump. On compte aussi la firme coréenne #Korea_Aerospace_Industries qui s’efforce en ce moment, en concurrence avec l’Américain #Lockheed_Martin, d’obtenir un contrat juteux d’avions de chasse d’essai pour l’US Air Force. Il y avait aussi la firme pharmaceutique suisse #Novartis, qui n’a pas hésité à verser à Essential Consultants, en douze tranches, 1,2 millions de dollars, à l’époque où les paiements dits « de M. Trump » remboursaient son avocat de sa généreuse avance (dont il a affirmé lui, de manière un peu pitoyable, qu’elle était alimentée par une ligne de crédit dont son logement servait de collatéral) .

      Mais ce n’est pas tout : les généreux #donateurs de l’avocat de M. Trump, à l’époque où il s’efforçait de gérer la cupidité d’amantes – ou s’affirmant telles – importunes du Président, comptaient aussi le fonds Columbus Nova, essentiellement financé par l’#oligarque_russe #Viktor_Vekselberg et géré par son cousin #Andrew_Intrater, lequel a offert 250.000 $ comme contribution personnelle au financement de l’inauguration officielle de M. Trump.

      Or Vekselberg est déjà l’objet de sanctions imposées début avril par Robert Mueller dans le cadre de son enquête sur une éventuelle collusion entre la campagne de Trump et la Russie, comme l’interdiction pour lui de se rendre aux États-Unis ou d’y ouvrir un compte en banque. La raison pour laquelle Vekselberg était sanctionné était loin d’être claire à l’époque car il était question surtout d’interférences russes avec la campagne électorale par le biais de la diffusion de propagande populiste, suprématiste, etc. sur les réseaux sociaux.

      Et ceci signifie que ce que nous découvrons aujourd’hui du fait de la diligence d’Avenatti, l’avocat de Stormy Daniels, la commission Mueller le sait déjà depuis le 6 avril, jour où ces sanctions furent prises à l’égard de « sept oligarques russes et douze compagnies dont ils sont les propriétaires ou qu’ils contrôlent, dix-sept fonctionnaires de haut rang du gouvernement russe, ainsi qu’une firme d’État de commerce d’armement et une banque russe, sa filiale. »

      Et l’on comprend mieux du coup a posteriori l’affolement de Trump le 9 avril quand la totalité des dossiers de son avocat Michael Cohen furent saisis dans un raid du #FBI, conjointement chez lui, dans le bureau qu’il occupait dans une firme d’avocats qui rompit immédiatement ses relations avec lui, ainsi que dans la chambre qu’il occupait dans un hôtel durant la rénovation de son domicile.

      La conclusion à tirer, c’est que pour des versements comme des peccadilles du genre 130.000 $ pour faire taire des empêcheurs ou empêcheuses de danser en rond du type Stormy Daniels, les candidats se bousculaient en réalité au portillon, allant d’#oligarques russes à des compagnies américaines à la tête de conglomérats internationaux comme AT&T, et que les #pots-de-vin tombaient comme à #Gravelotte (4,4 millions de dollars versés à Essential Consultants selon le New York Times).

      Ce que les tribulations de tous ces généreux #corrupteurs et #corrompus suggèrent, c’est que tout pays se révèle peut-être une république bananière aussitôt que l’on s’intéresse à la partie immergée de l’iceberg, la différence entre les cas flagrants et les autres n’étant qu’au niveau de la gestion des apparences.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, l’assèchement du bourbier, le « Du balai », ce n’est donc pas Trump qui s’en occupe en réalité, c’est Robert Mueller, et le bourbier s’assèche de jour en jour de lui-même, sans que Mueller doive même dire quoi que ce soit. Et avec un peu de chance, Trump disparaîtra du paysage avant même que celui-ci ne dépose ses conclusions.

      On comprend mieux dans ce contexte l’empressement de Trump ces jours-ci à mettre en application les propositions les plus décervelées de son programme, du genre de sa dénonciation hier du traité avec l’#Iran : l’étau se resserre pour lui, et le temps presse toujours davantage. « J’aurai au moins honoré mes promesses de campagne ! », se dit-il sans doute. Et s’il se retrouve en prison, il aura au moins la satisfaction de ne pas avoir trahi sa base. Laquelle exultera, nul n’en doute, et le portera en triomphe, à sa sortie de Sing-Sing dans quelques dizaines d’années.


  • Novartis a versé 400’000 dollars à une société liée à l’avocat de Trump RTS - mre - 9 Mai 2018

    La défense de l’actrice porno Stormy Daniels a révélé mardi que Novartis avait versé de l’argent à une société liée à l’avocat de Donald Trump. Le géant suisse a été contacté par le procureur spécial Mueller à ce sujet.

    La société Essential Consultants, contrôlée par Michael Cohen, a reçu entre fin 2017 et début 2018 quatre versements de 100’000 dollars en provenance de Suisse, révèle un document rendu public par l’avocat de Stormy Daniels.


    L’avocat de Stormy Daniels souligne que les versements ont eu lieu juste avant une rencontre à Davos entre Donald Trump et le future CEO de Novartis

    "En février 2017, Novartis a conclu un contrat d’un an avec #Essentiel_Consultants peu de temps après l’élection du président Trump. L’accord s’est concentré sur les questions de politique de santé aux États-Unis, a expliqué à reuters mercredi Novartis, qui a précisé que l’accord « a expiré en février 2018 ».

    La même société qui a payé pour le silence de Stormy Daniels
    Le groupe bâlois a affirmé avoir été contacté par l’équipe du procureur spécial Robert Mueller, qui enquête sur une éventuelle collusion entre l’équipe de campagne de Trump et Moscou : « Novartis a coopéré et transmis toutes les informations demandées et considère cette affaire comme close ».

    Essential Consultants est la structure qui a payé 130’000 dollars à #Stormy_Daniels en échange de son silence sur une relation supposée avec Donald Trump.


    #novartis #big_pharma #industrie_pharmaceutique #corruption #lobbying #capitalisme #pharmacie #influence #trump #etats-unis #international #donald_trump #usa #états-unis #metoo #balancetonporc #moiaussi #me_too


    • Escuse moi @bce_106_6 je t’ai pas cité comme source. C’est assez interessant, surtout la partie sur le type de contrat qu’a signé Stormy Daniels et dont il faut se méfié.
      Je trouve regrettable qu’a la fin il n’appel que les mâles pas dominants à s’occuper du cas de Trump. Il prend la peine de parler des femmes dominantes mais quant il s’agit de lutter il n’en fait plus qu’une affaire de mâles alphas VS mâles pas alphas alors que c’est quant même les femmes (et en particulier ici Stormy Daniels ), qui depuis le début de son mandat, luttent le plus contre Trump - et se font confisquer leurs actions ( cf par exemple ; https://seenthis.net/messages/562751 ).

    • Retranscription de Les temps qui sont les nôtres : Trump ou la star du porno ? Merci à Catherine Cappuyns et Pascale Duclaud !
      https://www.pauljorion.com/blog/2018/03/29/les-temps-qui-sont-les-notres-trump-ou-la-star-du-porno-le-26-mars-2018-retranscription/#more-103442
      . . . . . . . je vais vous parler cette fois-ci de ce qui s’est passé hier soir aux États-Unis : l’émission ‘60 Minutes’ où était interviewée la star du porno, Stormy Daniels (de son nom de naissance : Stéphanie Gregory, et au point de vue, je dirais, des autorités : Stéphanie Clifford, du nom de son premier époux).

      Pourquoi était-elle interviewée ? En raison des différends entre elle et le Président Trump depuis un certain temps. Elle a été payée 130.000 dollars, pas par #Trump directement mais par l’avocat de Trump, pour ne pas parler de la relation sexuelle qu’ils ont eue (si j’ai bon souvenir c’est en 2006), et du procès qui lui est intenté pour ce qui apparaît un non-respect de son #NDA – « Non Disclosure Agreement » (je ne sais pas comment on appelle ça en français, un « accord de ne pas en parler »). Ça devient de plus en plus courant dans les entreprises : vous devez jurer sur la tête de votre grand-mère et de vos enfants de ne jamais parler de ce qui s’est passé là où vous étiez. Je ne sais pas si c’est un statut véritablement légal mais comme vous le savez sans doute, ce qui se passe maintenant dans le milieu des affaires, le plus souvent, n’a pas de statut légal véritable et c’est pour ça qu’il vous reste toujours la possibilité de vous tourner vers les #tribunaux, comme le fait Madame Clifford en ce moment : on lui a imposé un #arbitrage_privé sur l’accord qu’elle a passé en échange des 130.000 dollars et son avocat lui a dit qu’il fallait dire que tout ça n’était pas légal.

      Vous vous souvenez des aventures de l’État français avec Monsieur #Tapie ? Où l’État français était passé avec Monsieur Tapie, dans un accord, par un arbitrage, ce qui est quand même assez sinistre de voir qu’alors que l’État dispose quand même de l’exercice de la justice – ça fait partie d’un des trois piliers du fonctionnement de l’État : l’exécutif, le législatif et le judiciaire – que l’État accepte aussi de se tourner vers des individus privés qui pourraient décider de la justesse, de la justice, dans une affaire. Et l’illustration dans le cas de Monsieur Tapie, bien entendu a été remarquable : non, l’État, s’il vous plaît, abstenez-vous – au moins vous ! – de faire ce genre de choses. Bien entendu, un des arbitres était de mèche avec Monsieur X et toute l’affaire s’est écroulée.

      D’où est-ce que ça nous vient ça ? Ça nous vient de la #lex_mercatoria. C’est le droit marchand, qui avait souvent lieu entre les marchands qui n’appartenaient pas à de mêmes pays et on se mettait d’accord de se tourner vers des arbitres, des arbitres privés. Alors, avertissement à vous tous : n’acceptez jamais un contrat où on vous dit que le règlement éventuel du conflit passera par un arbitrage privé : ce sont des gens qui sont de mèche avec ceux qui vous font signer le contrat. N’acceptez jamais ça ! Ce sont des gens qui… (il y a des statistiques qui ont été faites par des sociologues et autres) qui donnent raison dans 95% des cas à celui qui vous a fait signer le contrat et donc c’est de l’escroquerie pure et simple. Non, non : il existe des #lois dans nos pays et elles continuent de fonctionner et donc il faut se tourner vers elles – tant que ce système-là n’est toujours pas entièrement vendu d’ailleurs aux marchands, qui disposent déjà du système d’arbitrage !

      Alors, qu’est-ce qui s’était passé ? Donc, effectivement Monsieur Trump a eu un « one night stand » : ils ont dormi une fois ensemble, Madame Clifford et lui. Ça n’a eu lieu qu’une fois apparemment, en 2006, et les circonstances méritent d’être racontées parce qu’elles sont importantes pour la conclusion de ce que je vais dire : Monsieur Trump et Madame Clifford se sont trouvés dans une chambre dans un des golfs qui lui appartient et une fois la porte fermée, il lui a montré la couverture d’un magazine où il y avait une photo de lui et il a dit : « Est-ce que ce n’est pas formidable ? » et elle lui a dit : « Pour avoir dit ça, vous méritez une bonne fessée. Baissez votre pantalon ». Et prenant le magazine pour le fesser, elle l’a fessé avec le magazine ; lui, ayant aimablement accepté de baisser son pantalon.

      Alors, pourquoi est-ce que tout se tourne maintenant vers la télévision, vers l’opinion publique, comme étant un moyen de trancher ? Parce qu’elle explique que tous les accords dans lesquels elle a accepté de signer, ça a été sous la menace. Ça a été dans un climat d’intimidation, et elle a raconté pour la première fois hier – c’est un élément dont le public ne disposait pas – qu’en 2011, en se rendant à un club de fitness avec sa toute petite gamine, au moment où elle sort de sa voiture sur le parking, il y a un gars qui l’attend et qui lui dit comme dans la tradition des #gangsters, qui lui dit en regardant la gamine : « Cette petite fille n’aimerait pas qu’il arrive quelque chose de pas sympathique à sa maman ! ». Et l’avocat actuel de Madame Clifford dit que l’accord – elle a reçu 130.000 dollars pour ne rien dire – et qui la menace par arbitrage privé un million de dollars chaque fois qu’elle ouvre la bouche, il a affirmé hier : « Tout cela n’est pas très différent finalement de la menace sur le parking. Si on vous dit : « Chaque fois que vous ouvrez la bouche pour dire quelque chose à mon sujet, vous devrez payer un million de dollars », dit-il « ce sont des méthodes de gangsters et c’est de l’intimidation du même ordre. »

      J’en sais quelque chose : je me suis retrouvé dans une affaire – vous avez peut-être entendu parler de ça – où on m’a traité de la pire des manières et en me disant : « Si vous bronchez, ça va vous coûter très très cher. » Et dans ce cas-là, chers amis, faites comme Madame Clifford, faites comme moi : expliquez à ces gens-là que oui ! souvent le vrai monde c’est effectivement le monde des gangsters, que les gangsters l’emportent souvent mais rappelez à la personne qui vous dit ça, dites-lui la chose suivante : « Même Al Capone a fini en prison ». Parce que nous avons heureusement encore – et ça c’est la #solidarité – la solidarité entre les êtres humains qui fait que nous avons encore des systèmes qui permettent à celui qui apparaît en position de faiblesse de se défendre.

      Alors, ce qu’on apprend là de Monsieur Trump, ce n’est pas nouveau si vous regardez un petit peu ce que des biographes ont déjà écrit à son sujet. C’est un monsieur qui est… je dirais, il est né #voyou et il a été voyou toutes les années qui se sont écoulées depuis sa naissance jusque maintenant. Comment est-ce qu’on devient voyou comme ça ? Eh bien, avec un père comme le sien : membre du #Ku_Klux_Klan et qui répète à son gosse d’ être un #tueur  : on s’en sort dans la vie en étant un tueur. Manque de pot pour ce Monsieur #Fred_Trump (il s’est trouvé dans pas mal d’ennuis du point de vue légal), un jour son fils devient vraiment un voyou et il est obligé de l’envoyer dans une espèce de maison de correction de type militaire. L’affaire officielle, c’est qu’il serait allé acheter avec un copain des couteaux à cran d’arrêt en ville. En ville, où il disparaissait souvent. Mais le biographe en question écrit : « La maison de correction, c’était peut-être un peu fort pour un couteau à cran d’arrêt. Il y a peut-être encore des choses qu’on ne sait pas ». Alors, voilà : il y a peut-être encore des choses qu’on ne sait pas.

      Et à partir de là, ce Monsieur s’est toujours conduit de la même manière, si vous regardez un petit peu ses affaires. Si vous regardez #Trump_University , « l’université Trump », c’est une escroquerie en grand, où simplement des bonimenteurs poussaient les gens à s’endetter pour suivre des pseudo-cours qui en fait étaient des trucs recopiés de bouquins écrits par d’autres que Trump, et des choses assez expédiées. Plusieurs milliers de dollars pour trois jours de cours, un montant – si j’ai bon souvenir – de trente neuf mille dollars pour un cours approfondi et des choses de cet ordre-là, et qui s’adressent bien entendu aux gens qui n’ont que les billets de loterie pour sortir de leur condition. « C’est peut-être ma dernière chance », « Ça vaut peut-être la mise », et ainsi de suite. Et cet argent est entièrement pompé. Trump avait dit qu’il allait donner cet argent-là à des bonnes œuvres et ça s’est retrouvé, vous allez voir, c’est dans les « records », dans les attendus : « Les sommes sont difficiles à tracer » (rires). Pas les bonus bien sûr qui lui ont été donnés ! Et quand on regarde ses affaires, ses affaires immobilières, eh bien en général ce sont des catastrophes. Il commence par… en fait ce sont des pyramides. Il s’attribue à lui des bonus énormes sur le premier argent qui rentre et puis après si ça marche ou si ça ne marche pas, ça c’est une question liée au hasard.

      Alors, pourquoi ça a marché pour lui ? Pourquoi est-ce qu’il se retrouve quand même président des États Unis ? Eh bien c’est parce que voilà : j’ai mis l’autre jour, sans commentaire, un petit truc que j’ai trouvé sur Wikipedia : sur le mâle dominant chez les chimpanzés. Si vous avez lu ça, eh bien vous avez vu cette description du comportement de Monsieur Trump. Je n’ai pas mis la dernière phrase parce que je me suis dit que ça pourrait apparaître comme une incitation au meurtre (rires). J’ai mis simplement une des phrases qui disait : « Quand le mâle dominant exagère, les autres se liguent contre lui et lui font passer un mauvais quart d’heure ». Et la phrase que je n’ai pas mise est : « Parfois il se fait même tuer ».

      C’est comme ça que ça marche. C’est comme ça que ça marche dans certains cas : c’est que ce comportement de mâle dominant – qui, chez nous, est plus ou moins caché par les #institutions, plus ou moins caché par le fait que les gens [aillent] à l’ #école, par le fait que les gens raisonnent et ne réagissent pas purement « à l’instinct » comme on dit (ce que le corps nous dicte dans l’instant immédiat), font des plans à long terme, essayent de s’en tenir à des principes, à prendre de bonnes résolutions et à essayer de – voilà – de s’en tenir à leurs bonnes résolutions, etc. mais il y a aussi l’aspect purement voyou, c’est-à-dire King Kong (rires) : le mâle dominant de la bande de chimpanzés ou de gorilles : ça aussi ça existe.

      Et malheureusement… malheureusement si nous avons permis dans nos institutions – qu’est l’ #État en particulier – que ce comportement soit plus ou moins mis entre parenthèses dans les entreprises – moi j’ai travaillé dans des #entreprises qui étaient des bonnes entreprises, et dans de mauvaises, mais même dans les bonnes, c’est toujours le modèle King Kong qui décide ! C’est toujours un #mâle_dominant qui se trouve au sommet ! Ou alors une #femelle_dominante, ça arrive aussi, mais qui est du même style alors que le mâle dominant : c’est-à-dire un « Moi, Je ! », « Fermez votre gueule ! », « C’est moi qui gagnerai de toute manière : je peux vous foutre à la porte demain si vous répétez ce que vous venez de dire ! », etc. Pourquoi est-ce que j’ai perdu treize de mes emplois : parce que je leur ai à chaque fois dit « Allez vous faire foutre ! », hé hé hé ! (rires) Mais euh… tout le monde n’est pas comme ça ! Alors ça continue.

      De #La_Boétie a parlé de « #servitude_volontaire »… Ce n’est pas de la servitude volontaire. Il faut survivre aussi, hein ! Il faut survivre ! Les mâles non dominants doivent aussi survivre et les femelles doivent survivre quand même, etc. Il faut leur trouver des excuses. Comme les généticiens… il y a un bel article, je ne sais plus si c’est dans le Washington Post ou dans le New York Times que j’ai lu ça hier, un article d’un #généticien disant : « Ecoutez, on trouve quand même des choses ! Il est quand même vrai qu’il y a dix-sept gènes qui sont liés au fait d’être intelligent et si on ne les a pas ou s’ils sont en mauvais état, c’est pour ça qu’on ne réussit pas à l’école », etc. etc.

      Bon, alors : les gens qui ne réussissent pas à l’école, eh bien on le sait, Todd en parle dans son dernier bouquin (il y a d’autres analyses qui sont faites) : qu’est-ce qu’ils ont fait, les gens qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école ? Ils ont voté pour Trump massivement ! C’est surtout eux ! C’est surtout les blancs qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école qui ont voté pour Trump. Ils ont reconnu : « Voilà, après tout ce n’est pas si mal ! Après tout ce n’est pas si mal de réussir comme ça ! ». Et il dit… il dit en fait, ce gars-là qui est mu essentiellement par le ressentiment (alors que lui, il ne devrait pas hein ! avec tous les millions qu’il a), mais il sait que les millions qu’il a, il ne les mérite pas. C’est ça le problème, c’est ça qui le taraude.

      Enfin voilà : ces gens-là ont voté pour ça et ils ont le résultat de leurs actions, d’avoir voté de cette manière-là. Alors qu’est-ce que cela nous donne ? Cela nous donne un Trump qui, vendredi dernier, nomme comme conseiller pour les affaires de sécurité nationale – c’est-à-dire à la défense – il nomme un certain Bolton qui est partisan de frappes préventives sur l’Iran et sur la Corée du Nord.

      On est véritablement bien embarqués… ! Quand même, le moment est venu… le moment est venu pour les mâles non dominants de se mettre d’accord et d’éliminer le gars-là ! Alors, qui est-ce qui va réussir à le faire ? Est-ce que c’est M. Robert Mueller qui est un héros, un type irréprochable qui s’est conduit comme un héros incroyable dans des situations de batailles… sur un champ de bataille, un monsieur d’une intégrité extraordinaire : est-ce que c’est lui qui va parvenir à faire tomber King Kong ? Ou bien est-ce que c’est Mme #Stormy_Daniels ? Parce que les gens ordinaires et peut-être en particulier ceux qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école parce qu’ils n’ont pas les dix-sept gènes qui permettent d’être intelligents et qui se reconnaissent en Trump ? Avec qui est-ce que maintenant les gens ordinaires vont s’identifier ? Avec King Kong ? Ou avec la jolie blonde kidnappée par King Kong et qui lui dit de baisser son pantalon parce qu’elle va lui donner la fessée ?

      Alors je ne suis pas sûr (sourire) que ce soit avec King Kong dans cette situation-là. Alors bonne chance Madame Daniels ! Madame Daniels nous explique qu’à dix-sept ans, elle a participé volontairement à un #strip-tease, à un concours de strip-tease, et que de fil en aiguille, bon, elle est devenue une star du #porno. Elle dit aussi, quand on lui parle de sa vie, de sa vie à cette époque-là, elle disait : « Je vivais dans un quartier de merde. Ce n’est pas donné de travailler dans des… de vivre dans des conditions comme celles-là ». Alors voilà ! Voilà comment on devient une star du porno, sans être une mauvaise personne, parce qu’on est à des endroits où comme elle le disait : « J’ai gagné à cette soirée-là, la première soirée du strip-tease, j’ai gagné tout ce que je gagnais d’autre part comme serveuse en une seule semaine ». Et voilà comment les choses se décident.

      Alors, le [dilemme] de l’américain moyen à partir de demain : Stormy Daniels (Stephanie Clifford ou encore #Stephanie_Gregory ) ou Monsieur Donald Trump, le King Kong facilement dominé par quelqu’un d’autre (rires) ? À eux de choisir !

      Bon, je ne suis pas Américain… Je prie… « Praise the Lord » [Le Seigneur soit loué !], je prie le Seigneur pour ma famille américaine puisque c’est comme ça qu’on parle là-bas ! Allez, à bientôt !
      #BDSM #féssée

      il sait que les millions qu’il a, il ne les mérite pas. _ C’est ça le problème, c’est ça qui le taraude.


    • Je crois que je n’arriverais jamais à comprendre l’intérêt de ces vidéos de personnes, pourtant pas toutes idiotes, qui nous parlent depuis leur salon à propos d’un truc qu’elles ont relevé dans l’actualité, un livre qu’elles ont lu, d’un film qu’elles vu et donc, face caméra : on y lit tellement le fantasme d’être vu, écouté par des millions, des multitudes, et ce qu’ils ou elles disent, en étant nullement contredit ou renchéri, n’a, en fait, aucune portée, beaucoup moins que si ils ou elles étaient filmées dans leur salon avec des connaissances avec lesquelles ils et elles échangeraient.

      Paul Jorion peut dire, de temps en temps, des choses assez remarquables, ce n’est pas @laurent2 qui me contredirait pour en avoir repris de larges extraits dans son excellent Journal de la crise , en revanche là, quel néant et comment est-ce qu’il s’écoute pisser sur les feuilles !

      Et j’ai naturellement l’esprit très mal tourné (c’est de notoriété publique), parce que chaque fois que je tombe sur de tels extraits, je ne peux m’empêcher de penser que les membres de leur famille doivent les entendre depuis la pièce d’à côté et se dire : « tiens le vieux il est encore en train de parler à sa webcam » avec une comparable suspicion que si le vieux était justement en train de se masturber devant tel ou tel film pornographique en streaming .

      Si j’avais un peu de talent pour le montage et du temps pour cela je crois que je téléchargerais tant et tant de ces extraits vidéo masturbatoires (je ne peux vraiment pas voir les choses autrement) et que je mes monterais entre eux pour recréer, très artifiellement, les conditions du dialogue, de la conversation. (D’ici à ce que j’étoffe ce commentaire pour en faire une chronique de ma nouvelle rubrique de Pendant qu’il est trop tard , façon le vieux il se défoule sur son clavier en espérant être lu par des multitudes !)

    • @philippe_de_jonckheere Même réflexion. « On » a dû leur dire que les vidéos, ça allait supermarcher sur l’internet, et que d’ailleurs les jeunes ils regardent que ça.

      Mais alors, tu la lances, sa vidéo, et tu te rends compte qu’un type va te causer lentement pendant 18 minutes en plan fixe face caméra, et c’est déjà une certaine idée de la mort. L’idée même des youtubeurs me fait généralement chier, essentiellement parce qu’ils disent en 20 minutes ce que je pourrais lire en 2, et comme je l’ai déjà dit pour Le Média, généralement je peux décider de survoler, zapper ou savourer un texte même long, dont on m’aurait par exemple cité ici un extrait pertinent, alors que pour une vidéo, il faut vraiment que j’ai une vie entière à perdre pour regarder des gens qui me font la lecture.

      D’un côté on se plaint qu’avec l’interwebz « les gens ne lisent plus », et dans le même temps on s’empresse d’enterrer l’un des grandes innovations de l’internet : on a accès à tout, trop, tout le temps, et justement on a développé des méthodes de lecture à vitesse variable pour repérer, échanger et recommander les pépites, les passages pertinents, dans tout ce bazar. Et au lieu de ça, on devrait renoncer à cette possibilité, dans notre flux, de choisir notre niveau d’attention. Parce que là, à moins de regarder Jorion me ternir la bavette pendant 20 minutes en attendant de faire bouillir les nouilles, je vois même pas comment on peut tenir jusqu’au bout.

      Et ces monologues sont aussi – et ça c’est quand même génial en 2020 – le meilleur moyen qu’on ait découvert sur le Webz pour définitivement renoncer à la richesse de l’intertextualité, aux liens internes et externes, aux « Do you want to know more ? », et aux constructions collectives en ligne et aux échanges croisés. (Ah, on peut profiter tout de même des « forums » débilitants que ce type de support favorise.)

      C’est un format tellement hostile au Web que les gens se retrouvent à en extraire des GIFS sous-titrés pour partager les moments « significatifs » sur Twitter quand ils veulent pouvoir recommander une vidéo.

      (…et est-ce qu’à la fin, Paul Jorion, comme le premier Mélenchon venu, t’implore de t’abonner à sa chaîne Youtube et de lui mettre des pouces bleus ?)

    • @arno Je ne peux pas répondre à toutes tes questions, je n’arrive jamais à regarder ces trucs-là jusqu’au bout. Et celle-là n’a pas fait exception. D’autant qu’elle n’est vraiment pas brillante.

      Et oui, l’imploration qui est de moins en moins masquée pour un soutien aussi dérisoire d’une étoile, un pouce levé ou un abonnement gratuit (dans tous les sens du terme), cette imploration est absolument obscène et pathétique à la fois.

      De même tu as raison à propos de ce que cela représente de détournement des usages possiblement collectifs, et c’est précisément ce que j’entends habituellement quand je parle de réseaux asociaux .

      Enfin, même en retournant très fort la question dans ma tête, je ne parviens pas à trouver de réponses à la question, pourtant simple : « mais à qui il ou elles parlent ? »

    • Plutôt que de se faire téter les yeux par #youtube et ses #videos_masturbatoires. Le bref thriller de #Frédéric_Ciriez
      illustre bien ce sujet. @philippe_de_jonckheere @arno @bce_106_6
      http://www.editions-verticales.com/fiche_ouvrage.php?id=402&rubrique=3


      J’ai découvert cet auteur dans @cqfd qui faisait l’éloge de son premier bouquin. Depuis F.Ciriez ne m’a jamais déçu.
      #dystopie

    • Si nous sommes tout·e·s sur SeenThis, c’est bien parce que nous préférons l’écrit.
      Je reste de même perplexe face au phénomène des Youtubeur·se·s. Mais illes existent, leur public existe, ... et même Mélenchon, puisque vous en parlez, a été contraint d’adhérer à ce canal, pourtant bien tardivement, lui dont on lui reproche si régulièrement la densité de ses billets de blog, dès 2005.

    • @biggrizzly qui dit :

      Si nous sommes tous sur SeenThis, c’est bien parce que nous préférons l’écrit.

      C’est ça. En fait, les vidéo (et les images télévisuelles en général), je trouve ça de plus en plus chiant. Pour preuve, je suis devenu incapable de regarder quoi que ce soit à la télé ; au bout d’un quart d’heure, c’est la télé qui me regarde. C’est grave, docteur ?

    • @philippe_de_jonckheere , @arno la re transcription de la vidéo, ce qui demande un travail non négligeable.

      Retranscription de Les temps qui sont les nôtres : Trump ou la star du porno ? Merci à Catherine Cappuyns et Pascale Duclaud !
      https://www.pauljorion.com/blog/2018/03/29/les-temps-qui-sont-les-notres-trump-ou-la-star-du-porno-le-26-mars-2018-retranscription/#more-103442
      . . . . . . . je vais vous parler cette fois-ci de ce qui s’est passé hier soir aux États-Unis : l’émission ‘60 Minutes’ où était interviewée la star du porno, Stormy Daniels (de son nom de naissance : Stéphanie Gregory, et au point de vue, je dirais, des autorités : Stéphanie Clifford, du nom de son premier époux).

      Pourquoi était-elle interviewée ? En raison des différends entre elle et le Président Trump depuis un certain temps. Elle a été payée 130.000 dollars, pas par #Trump directement mais par l’avocat de Trump, pour ne pas parler de la relation sexuelle qu’ils ont eue (si j’ai bon souvenir c’est en 2006), et du procès qui lui est intenté pour ce qui apparaît un non-respect de son #NDA – « Non Disclosure Agreement » (je ne sais pas comment on appelle ça en français, un « accord de ne pas en parler »). Ça devient de plus en plus courant dans les entreprises : vous devez jurer sur la tête de votre grand-mère et de vos enfants de ne jamais parler de ce qui s’est passé là où vous étiez. Je ne sais pas si c’est un statut véritablement légal mais comme vous le savez sans doute, ce qui se passe maintenant dans le milieu des affaires, le plus souvent, n’a pas de statut légal véritable et c’est pour ça qu’il vous reste toujours la possibilité de vous tourner vers les #tribunaux, comme le fait Madame Clifford en ce moment : on lui a imposé un #arbitrage_privé sur l’accord qu’elle a passé en échange des 130.000 dollars et son avocat lui a dit qu’il fallait dire que tout ça n’était pas légal.

      Vous vous souvenez des aventures de l’État français avec Monsieur #Tapie ? Où l’État français était passé avec Monsieur Tapie, dans un accord, par un arbitrage, ce qui est quand même assez sinistre de voir qu’alors que l’État dispose quand même de l’exercice de la justice – ça fait partie d’un des trois piliers du fonctionnement de l’État : l’exécutif, le législatif et le judiciaire – que l’État accepte aussi de se tourner vers des individus privés qui pourraient décider de la justesse, de la justice, dans une affaire. Et l’illustration dans le cas de Monsieur Tapie, bien entendu a été remarquable : non, l’État, s’il vous plaît, abstenez-vous – au moins vous ! – de faire ce genre de choses. Bien entendu, un des arbitres était de mèche avec Monsieur X et toute l’affaire s’est écroulée.

      D’où est-ce que ça nous vient ça ? Ça nous vient de la #lex_mercatoria. C’est le droit marchand, qui avait souvent lieu entre les marchands qui n’appartenaient pas à de mêmes pays et on se mettait d’accord de se tourner vers des arbitres, des arbitres privés. Alors, avertissement à vous tous : n’acceptez jamais un contrat où on vous dit que le règlement éventuel du conflit passera par un arbitrage privé : ce sont des gens qui sont de mèche avec ceux qui vous font signer le contrat. N’acceptez jamais ça ! Ce sont des gens qui… (il y a des statistiques qui ont été faites par des sociologues et autres) qui donnent raison dans 95% des cas à celui qui vous a fait signer le contrat et donc c’est de l’escroquerie pure et simple. Non, non : il existe des #lois dans nos pays et elles continuent de fonctionner et donc il faut se tourner vers elles – tant que ce système-là n’est toujours pas entièrement vendu d’ailleurs aux marchands, qui disposent déjà du système d’arbitrage !

      Alors, qu’est-ce qui s’était passé ? Donc, effectivement Monsieur Trump a eu un « one night stand » : ils ont dormi une fois ensemble, Madame Clifford et lui. Ça n’a eu lieu qu’une fois apparemment, en 2006, et les circonstances méritent d’être racontées parce qu’elles sont importantes pour la conclusion de ce que je vais dire : Monsieur Trump et Madame Clifford se sont trouvés dans une chambre dans un des golfs qui lui appartient et une fois la porte fermée, il lui a montré la couverture d’un magazine où il y avait une photo de lui et il a dit : « Est-ce que ce n’est pas formidable ? » et elle lui a dit : « Pour avoir dit ça, vous méritez une bonne fessée. Baissez votre pantalon ». Et prenant le magazine pour le fesser, elle l’a fessé avec le magazine ; lui, ayant aimablement accepté de baisser son pantalon.

      Alors, pourquoi est-ce que tout se tourne maintenant vers la télévision, vers l’opinion publique, comme étant un moyen de trancher ? Parce qu’elle explique que tous les accords dans lesquels elle a accepté de signer, ça a été sous la menace. Ça a été dans un climat d’intimidation, et elle a raconté pour la première fois hier – c’est un élément dont le public ne disposait pas – qu’en 2011, en se rendant à un club de fitness avec sa toute petite gamine, au moment où elle sort de sa voiture sur le parking, il y a un gars qui l’attend et qui lui dit comme dans la tradition des #gangsters, qui lui dit en regardant la gamine : « Cette petite fille n’aimerait pas qu’il arrive quelque chose de pas sympathique à sa maman ! ». Et l’avocat actuel de Madame Clifford dit que l’accord – elle a reçu 130.000 dollars pour ne rien dire – et qui la menace par arbitrage privé un million de dollars chaque fois qu’elle ouvre la bouche, il a affirmé hier : « Tout cela n’est pas très différent finalement de la menace sur le parking. Si on vous dit : « Chaque fois que vous ouvrez la bouche pour dire quelque chose à mon sujet, vous devrez payer un million de dollars », dit-il « ce sont des méthodes de gangsters et c’est de l’intimidation du même ordre. »

      J’en sais quelque chose : je me suis retrouvé dans une affaire – vous avez peut-être entendu parler de ça – où on m’a traité de la pire des manières et en me disant : « Si vous bronchez, ça va vous coûter très très cher. » Et dans ce cas-là, chers amis, faites comme Madame Clifford, faites comme moi : expliquez à ces gens-là que oui ! souvent le vrai monde c’est effectivement le monde des gangsters, que les gangsters l’emportent souvent mais rappelez à la personne qui vous dit ça, dites-lui la chose suivante : « Même Al Capone a fini en prison ». Parce que nous avons heureusement encore – et ça c’est la #solidarité – la solidarité entre les êtres humains qui fait que nous avons encore des systèmes qui permettent à celui qui apparaît en position de faiblesse de se défendre.

      Alors, ce qu’on apprend là de Monsieur Trump, ce n’est pas nouveau si vous regardez un petit peu ce que des biographes ont déjà écrit à son sujet. C’est un monsieur qui est… je dirais, il est né #voyou et il a été voyou toutes les années qui se sont écoulées depuis sa naissance jusque maintenant. Comment est-ce qu’on devient voyou comme ça ? Eh bien, avec un père comme le sien : membre du #Ku_Klux_Klan et qui répète à son gosse d’ être un #tueur  : on s’en sort dans la vie en étant un tueur. Manque de pot pour ce Monsieur #Fred_Trump (il s’est trouvé dans pas mal d’ennuis du point de vue légal), un jour son fils devient vraiment un voyou et il est obligé de l’envoyer dans une espèce de maison de correction de type militaire. L’affaire officielle, c’est qu’il serait allé acheter avec un copain des couteaux à cran d’arrêt en ville. En ville, où il disparaissait souvent. Mais le biographe en question écrit : « La maison de correction, c’était peut-être un peu fort pour un couteau à cran d’arrêt. Il y a peut-être encore des choses qu’on ne sait pas ». Alors, voilà : il y a peut-être encore des choses qu’on ne sait pas.

      Et à partir de là, ce Monsieur s’est toujours conduit de la même manière, si vous regardez un petit peu ses affaires. Si vous regardez #Trump_University , « l’université Trump », c’est une escroquerie en grand, où simplement des bonimenteurs poussaient les gens à s’endetter pour suivre des pseudo-cours qui en fait étaient des trucs recopiés de bouquins écrits par d’autres que Trump, et des choses assez expédiées. Plusieurs milliers de dollars pour trois jours de cours, un montant – si j’ai bon souvenir – de trente neuf mille dollars pour un cours approfondi et des choses de cet ordre-là, et qui s’adressent bien entendu aux gens qui n’ont que les billets de loterie pour sortir de leur condition. « C’est peut-être ma dernière chance », « Ça vaut peut-être la mise », et ainsi de suite. Et cet argent est entièrement pompé. Trump avait dit qu’il allait donner cet argent-là à des bonnes œuvres et ça s’est retrouvé, vous allez voir, c’est dans les « records », dans les attendus : « Les sommes sont difficiles à tracer » (rires). Pas les bonus bien sûr qui lui ont été donnés ! Et quand on regarde ses affaires, ses affaires immobilières, eh bien en général ce sont des catastrophes. Il commence par… en fait ce sont des pyramides. Il s’attribue à lui des bonus énormes sur le premier argent qui rentre et puis après si ça marche ou si ça ne marche pas, ça c’est une question liée au hasard.

      Alors, pourquoi ça a marché pour lui ? Pourquoi est-ce qu’il se retrouve quand même président des États Unis ? Eh bien c’est parce que voilà : j’ai mis l’autre jour, sans commentaire, un petit truc que j’ai trouvé sur Wikipedia : sur le mâle dominant chez les chimpanzés. Si vous avez lu ça, eh bien vous avez vu cette description du comportement de Monsieur Trump. Je n’ai pas mis la dernière phrase parce que je me suis dit que ça pourrait apparaître comme une incitation au meurtre (rires). J’ai mis simplement une des phrases qui disait : « Quand le mâle dominant exagère, les autres se liguent contre lui et lui font passer un mauvais quart d’heure ». Et la phrase que je n’ai pas mise est : « Parfois il se fait même tuer ».

      C’est comme ça que ça marche. C’est comme ça que ça marche dans certains cas : c’est que ce comportement de mâle dominant – qui, chez nous, est plus ou moins caché par les #institutions, plus ou moins caché par le fait que les gens [aillent] à l’ #école, par le fait que les gens raisonnent et ne réagissent pas purement « à l’instinct » comme on dit (ce que le corps nous dicte dans l’instant immédiat), font des plans à long terme, essayent de s’en tenir à des principes, à prendre de bonnes résolutions et à essayer de – voilà – de s’en tenir à leurs bonnes résolutions, etc. mais il y a aussi l’aspect purement voyou, c’est-à-dire King Kong (rires) : le mâle dominant de la bande de chimpanzés ou de gorilles : ça aussi ça existe.

      Et malheureusement… malheureusement si nous avons permis dans nos institutions – qu’est l’ #État en particulier – que ce comportement soit plus ou moins mis entre parenthèses dans les entreprises – moi j’ai travaillé dans des #entreprises qui étaient des bonnes entreprises, et dans de mauvaises, mais même dans les bonnes, c’est toujours le modèle King Kong qui décide ! C’est toujours un #mâle_dominant qui se trouve au sommet ! Ou alors une #femelle_dominante, ça arrive aussi, mais qui est du même style alors que le mâle dominant : c’est-à-dire un « Moi, Je ! », « Fermez votre gueule ! », « C’est moi qui gagnerai de toute manière : je peux vous foutre à la porte demain si vous répétez ce que vous venez de dire ! », etc. Pourquoi est-ce que j’ai perdu treize de mes emplois : parce que je leur ai à chaque fois dit « Allez vous faire foutre ! », hé hé hé ! (rires) Mais euh… tout le monde n’est pas comme ça ! Alors ça continue.

      De #La_Boétie a parlé de « #servitude_volontaire »… Ce n’est pas de la servitude volontaire. Il faut survivre aussi, hein ! Il faut survivre ! Les mâles non dominants doivent aussi survivre et les femelles doivent survivre quand même, etc. Il faut leur trouver des excuses. Comme les généticiens… il y a un bel article, je ne sais plus si c’est dans le Washington Post ou dans le New York Times que j’ai lu ça hier, un article d’un #généticien disant : « Ecoutez, on trouve quand même des choses ! Il est quand même vrai qu’il y a dix-sept gènes qui sont liés au fait d’être intelligent et si on ne les a pas ou s’ils sont en mauvais état, c’est pour ça qu’on ne réussit pas à l’école », etc. etc.

      Bon, alors : les gens qui ne réussissent pas à l’école, eh bien on le sait, Todd en parle dans son dernier bouquin (il y a d’autres analyses qui sont faites) : qu’est-ce qu’ils ont fait, les gens qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école ? Ils ont voté pour Trump massivement ! C’est surtout eux ! C’est surtout les blancs qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école qui ont voté pour Trump. Ils ont reconnu : « Voilà, après tout ce n’est pas si mal ! Après tout ce n’est pas si mal de réussir comme ça ! ». Et il dit… il dit en fait, ce gars-là qui est mu essentiellement par le ressentiment (alors que lui, il ne devrait pas hein ! avec tous les millions qu’il a), mais il sait que les millions qu’il a, il ne les mérite pas. _ C’est ça le problème, c’est ça qui le taraude.

      Enfin voilà : ces gens-là ont voté pour ça et ils ont le résultat de leurs actions, d’avoir voté de cette manière-là. Alors qu’est-ce que cela nous donne ? Cela nous donne un Trump qui, vendredi dernier, nomme comme conseiller pour les affaires de sécurité nationale – c’est-à-dire à la défense – il nomme un certain Bolton qui est partisan de frappes préventives sur l’Iran et sur la Corée du Nord.

      On est véritablement bien embarqués… ! Quand même, le moment est venu… le moment est venu pour les mâles non dominants de se mettre d’accord et d’éliminer le gars-là ! Alors, qui est-ce qui va réussir à le faire ? Est-ce que c’est M. Robert Mueller qui est un héros, un type irréprochable qui s’est conduit comme un héros incroyable dans des situations de batailles… sur un champ de bataille, un monsieur d’une intégrité extraordinaire : est-ce que c’est lui qui va parvenir à faire tomber King Kong ? Ou bien est-ce que c’est Mme #Stormy_Daniels ? Parce que les gens ordinaires et peut-être en particulier ceux qui n’ont pas réussi à l’école parce qu’ils n’ont pas les dix-sept gènes qui permettent d’être intelligents et qui se reconnaissent en Trump ? Avec qui est-ce que maintenant les gens ordinaires vont s’identifier ? Avec King Kong ? Ou avec la jolie blonde kidnappée par King Kong et qui lui dit de baisser son pantalon parce qu’elle va lui donner la fessée ?

      Alors je ne suis pas sûr (sourire) que ce soit avec King Kong dans cette situation-là. Alors bonne chance Madame Daniels ! Madame Daniels nous explique qu’à dix-sept ans, elle a participé volontairement à un #strip-tease, à un concours de strip-tease, et que de fil en aiguille, bon, elle est devenue une star du #porno. Elle dit aussi, quand on lui parle de sa vie, de sa vie à cette époque-là, elle disait : « Je vivais dans un quartier de merde. Ce n’est pas donné de travailler dans des… de vivre dans des conditions comme celles-là ». Alors voilà ! Voilà comment on devient une star du porno, sans être une mauvaise personne, parce qu’on est à des endroits où comme elle le disait : « J’ai gagné à cette soirée-là, la première soirée du strip-tease, j’ai gagné tout ce que je gagnais d’autre part comme serveuse en une seule semaine ». Et voilà comment les choses se décident.

      Alors, le [dilemme] de l’américain moyen à partir de demain : Stormy Daniels (Stephanie Clifford ou encore #Stephanie_Gregory ) ou Monsieur Donald Trump, le King Kong facilement dominé par quelqu’un d’autre (rires) ? À eux de choisir !

      Bon, je ne suis pas Américain… Je prie… « Praise the Lord » [Le Seigneur soit loué !], je prie le Seigneur pour ma famille américaine puisque c’est comme ça qu’on parle là-bas ! Allez, à bientôt !
      #BDSM #féssée

    • @philippe_de_jonckheere Pourquoi les 1 % n’arrêtent ils pas de nous faire la leçon sur leur courage, leur capacité de travail, leur efficacité, leur tolérance . . . et nous traitent ils de fainéants, d’imbéciles et de sans dents. . . .

      Exemple, la salle de création.

      Les actionnaires, nés avec une cuillère en diamant dans le bouche culpabilisent.

    • @philippe_de_jonckheere

      Je crois que c’est la chose la plus idiote que je n’ai jamais lue à propos de Trump.

      C’était (peut-être) une sorte d’humour ?

      Je sais pas vous, mais dès que j’entends le mot « mérite » aujourd’hui, j’attrape vite la nausée. Quoiqu’il en soit, peut-on parler de mérite lorsqu’il s’agit d’accumulation de biens (capitaux, marchandises, propriétés foncières et immobilières) ? Ce ne serait pas plutôt du vol ?
      Je reconnaîtrais volontiers une société comme pouvant être « civilisée » si elle se dotait d’une constitution dont le préambule dirait : « Nul·le ne s’élèvera ici au dessus-de quiconque ».

    • Un p’tit croquis de Joost Swarte photographié dans l’appendice de son New York Book. (je ne sais pas si Swarte pensait à Trump en réalisant ce dessin).


      quelques liens vers ce talentueux illustrateur et bien plus encore :
      http://www.scratchbooks.nl
      http://www.joostswarte.com/swf/flash.html
      http://www.dargaud.com/bd/New-Yorkers-collected
      #Joost_Swarte


  • Emails show UAE-linked effort against Tillerson - BBC News
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43281519

    The BBC has obtained leaked emails that show a lobbying effort to get US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson sacked for failing to support the United Arab Emirates against regional rival Qatar.
    Major Trump fundraiser and UAE-linked businessman Elliott Broidy met Mr Trump in October 2017 and urged him to sack Mr Tillerson, the emails reveal.
    In other emails, he calls the top US diplomat “a tower of Jello”, “weak” and says he “needs to be slammed”.
    Mr Broidy says Qatar hacked his emails.
    “We have reason to believe this hack was sponsored and carried out by registered and unregistered agents of Qatar seeking to punish Mr Broidy for his strong opposition to state-sponsored terrorism,” a spokesman for the businessman said.
    He said some of the emails “may have been altered” but did not elaborate.
    Saudi Arabia, UAE and a number of Arab countries cut diplomatic ties with Qatar in June 2017 over its alleged support for terrorism, a claim which it denies. The unprecedented move was seen as a major split between powerful Gulf countries, who are also close US allies.
    Qatari royal ’held against will’ in UAE
    Nations silent on Tillerson Qatar blockade plea
    The BBC has asked the Qatar embassy in Washington for a response to the accusations.
    Mr Broidy’s defence company Circinus has hundreds of millions of dollars worth of contracts with the UAE, according to the New York Times newspaper.
    He had recently returned from the UAE when he met Mr Trump at the White House in October.
    What did the emails say?
    According to a memorandum he prepared of the meeting, Mr Broidy urged continued support of US allies the UAE and Saudi Arabia and advised Mr Trump against getting involved in last year’s row with Qatar.
    Mr Broidy called Qatar “a television station with a country” - alluding to broadcaster Al Jazeera - and said it was doing “nothing positive”, according to the emails.
    He said he touted a regional counter-terrorism force being set up by the UAE that his company was involved with, and suggested that the US president “sit down” with Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, the crown prince of Abu Dhabi and a top UAE military commander.
    “I offered that MBZ [the crown prince] is available to come to the US very soon and preferred a quiet meeting in New York or New Jersey. President Trump agreed that a meeting with MBZ was a good idea,” Mr Broidy wrote in an email.
    He also said he advised the president on Mr Tillerson - who was “performing poorly and should be fired at a politically convenient time”.
    Mr Tillerson had criticised the blockade of Qatar and called for it to be eased, in comments that contrasted with Mr Trump’s support for the move.
    Mr Tillerson spent most of the first year in his position embattled and weakened.
    Last autumn, in a rare move for the soft-spoken secretary, the state department held a press conference in which Mr Tillerson pushed back against reports he had called the president “a moron”.
    Who did Mr Broidy email?
    He emailed a detailed account of his meeting with the president to George Nader, a Lebanese-American businessman with decades of experience serving as an interlocutor between the Middle East and Washington.
    Sources familiar with the investigation of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is looking into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 US election and possible links between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, tell the BBC that Mr Nader has become a person of interest and has been questioned in recent weeks.
    Investigators questioned Mr Nader and other witnesses on whether there were any efforts by the Emiratis to buy political influence by directing money to Mr Trump’s presidential campaign, according to a New York Times report.

    What else was in the leaked emails?
    Mr Broidy also detailed a separate sit-down with Mr Trump’s son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner, according to the emails.
    After Mr Broidy criticised Qatar extensively to Mr Kushner, “Jared’s demeanour was very passive and pleasant but he seemed to not want to engage on this issue,” he wrote to Mr Nader.
    Kushner Companies - owned by the family of Jared Kushner - is reported to have in April 2017 sought financing from Qatar for its flagship property at 666 5th Avenue, New York.
    However, Mr Kushner has maintained that he has had no role in his family’s business since joining the White House last year.
    Has anyone else claimed to have been hacked?
    UAE ambassador to Washington Yousef al-Otaiba - who in diplomatic circles is known as the most effective and influential ambassador in Washington - has himself been a recent victim of email hacking.
    It’s well known in Washington that Mr Otaiba and Mr Kushner have enjoyed close relationship.
    Industry experts looking at both hacks have drawn comparisons between the two, showing reason to suspect links to Qatar.
    “This is rinse and repeat on Otaiba,” a source familiar with the hack told the BBC.
    The UAE has also been known to use similar tactics, and was accused of hacking Qatari government websites prior to the blockade, according to the FBI.


  • Jared Kushner’s Real-Estate Firm Sought Money Directly From Qatar Government Weeks Before Blockade
    https://theintercept.com/2018/03/02/jared-kushner-real-estate-qatar-blockade

    The real estate firm tied to the family of presidential son-in-law and top White House adviser Jared Kushner made a direct pitch to Qatar’s minister of finance in April 2017 in an attempt to secure investment in a critically distressed asset in the company’s portfolio, according to two sources. At the previously unreported meeting, Jared Kushner’s father Charles, who runs Kushner Companies, and Qatari Finance Minister Ali Sharif Al Emadi discussed financing for the Kushners’ signature 666 Fifth Avenue property in New York City.

    En prime
    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/mueller-team-asking-if-kushner-foreign-business-ties-influenced-trump-n8526

    Mueller team asking if Kushner foreign business ties influenced Trump policy

    by Carol E. Lee, Julia Ainsley and Robert Windrem

    WASHINGTON — Federal investigators are scrutinizing whether any of Jared Kushner’s business discussions with foreigners during the presidential transition later shaped White House policies in ways designed to either benefit or retaliate against those he spoke with, according to witnesses and other people familiar with the investigation.

    Special counsel Robert Mueller’s team has asked witnesses about Kushner’s efforts to secure financing for his family’s real estate properties, focusing specifically on his discussions during the transition with individuals from Qatar and Turkey, as well as Russia, China and the United Arab Emirates, according to witnesses who have been interviewed as part of the investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign to sway the 2016 election.

    #nuit_torride ou encore "#complotisme_autorisé


  • Un ancien travailleur d’une « usine à mensonges » numérique russe se confie
    https://www.numerama.com/politique/330494-un-ancien-travailleur-dune-usine-a-mensonges-numerique-russe-se-con

    Entre 2014 et 2015, Marat Mindiyarov a travaillé dans une « usine à mensonges » en Russie. Alors que la justice américaine vient d’inculper plusieurs individus et entreprises russes, il a raconté ses anciennes conditions de travail lors d’une interview au Washington Post. Le 16 février 2018, le procureur américain Robert Mueller, chargé depuis mai dernier de l’enquête sur l’affaire du Russiagate, a inculpé treize individus et trois sociétés russes. Dans l’acte d’inculpation, consultable en ligne, la (...)

    #manipulation #travail


  • The FBI Hand Behind Russia-gate
    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/48572.htm

    Special Report: In the Watergate era, liberals warned about U.S. intelligence agencies manipulating U.S. politics, but now Trump-hatred has blinded many of them to this danger becoming real, as ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern notes.

    By Ray McGovern

    January 12, 2017 “Information Clearing House” - Russia-gate is becoming FBI-gate, thanks to the official release of unguarded text messages between loose-lipped FBI counterintelligence official Peter Strzok and his garrulous girlfriend, FBI lawyer Lisa Page. (Ten illustrative texts from their exchange appear at the end of this article.)

    Despite his former job as chief of the FBI’s counterintelligence section, Strzok had the naive notion that texting on FBI phones could not be traced. Strzok must have slept through “Security 101.” Or perhaps he was busy texting during that class. Girlfriend Page cannot be happy at being misled by his assurance that using office phones would be a secure way to conduct their affair(s).

    It would have been unfortunate enough for Strzok and Page to have their adolescent-sounding texts merely exposed, revealing the reckless abandon of star-crossed lovers hiding (they thought) secrets from cuckolded spouses, office colleagues, and the rest of us. However, for the never-Trump plotters in the FBI, the official release of just a fraction (375) of almost 10,000 messages does incalculably more damage than that.

    We suddenly have documentary proof that key elements of the U.S. intelligence community were trying to short-circuit the U.S. democratic process. And that puts in a new and dark context the year-long promotion of Russia-gate. It now appears that it was not the Russians trying to rig the outcome of the U.S. election, but leading officials of the U.S. intelligence community, shadowy characters sometimes called the Deep State.

    More of the Strzok-Page texting dialogue is expected to be released. And the Department of Justice Inspector General reportedly has additional damaging texts from others on the team that Special Counsel Robert Mueller selected to help him investigate Russia-gate.

    Besides forcing the removal of Strzok and Page, the text exposures also sounded the death knell for the career of FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, in whose office some of the plotting took place and who has already announced his plans to retire soon.


  • What Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury” says about Trump’s collusion with Israel
    https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/ali-abunimah/what-michael-wolffs-fire-and-fury-says-about-trumps-collusion-is

    However, the special counsel probe by Robert Mueller has indeed uncovered some collusion between the Trump team and a foreign power: Israel.

    In a plea agreement last month for making false statements to the FBI, Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn admitted that he had contacted foreign governments during the final weeks of the Obama administration to try to derail a UN vote condemning Israeli settlements.

    This possibly illegal effort to undermine the policy of the sitting administration was done at the direction of Kushner and at the request of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

    Yet mainstream pundits have shown little concern, just as they have shown little interest in any further revelations about what we might well call Israelgate coming out of the Wolff book.

    As the book’s publication was brought forward amid the media frenzy, I decided to take a look.

    It turns out that Fire and Fury contains evidence that Trump’s policy is not so much America First as it is Israel First.

    Wolff recounts an early January 2017 dinner in New York where Bannon and disgraced former Fox News boss Roger Ailes discussed cabinet picks.

    Bannon observed that they did not have a “deep bench,” but both men agreed the extremely pro-Israel neocon John Bolton would be a good pick for national security adviser. “He’s a bomb thrower,” Ailes said of Bolton, “and a strange little fucker. But you need him. Who else is good on Israel?”

    “Day one we’re moving the US embassy to Jerusalem. Netanyahu’s all in,” Bannon said, adding that anti-Palestinian casino billionaire Sheldon Adelson was on board too.

    “Let Jordan take the West Bank, let Egypt take Gaza. Let them deal with it. Or sink trying,” Bannon proposed. “The Saudis are on the brink, Egyptians are on brink, all scared to death of Persia.”

    Asked by Ailes, “Does Donald know” the plan, Bannon reportedly just smiled.

    Bannon’s idea reflected “the new Trump thinking” about the Middle East: “There are basically four players,” writes Wolff, “Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Iran. The first three can be united against the fourth.” Egypt and Saudi Arabia would be “given what they want” in respect to Iran, and in return would “pressure the Palestinians to make a deal.”

    Another key foreign policy relationship for the Trump administration has been with Mohammad bin Salman, the reckless crown prince and real power in Saudi Arabia, who has been willing to go along with the plan, especially by cozying up to Israel.

    According to Wolff, the lack of education of both Trump and MBS – as the Saudi prince is commonly known – put them on an “equal footing” and made them “oddly comfortable with each other.”

    Trump, ignorant and constantly flattered by regional leaders, appeared to naively believe he could pull off what he called “the biggest breakthrough in Israel-Palestine negotiations ever.”


  • Jackson Lears · What We Don’t Talk about When We Talk about Russian Hacking : #Russiagate · LRB 4 January 2018
    https://www.lrb.co.uk/v40/n01/jackson-lears/what-we-dont-talk-about-when-we-talk-about-russian-hacking
    La pensée unique aux États Unis de plus en plus sectaire et pesante

    Jackson Lears

    American politics have rarely presented a more disheartening spectacle. The repellent and dangerous antics of Donald Trump are troubling enough, but so is the Democratic Party leadership’s failure to take in the significance of the 2016 election campaign. Bernie Sanders’s challenge to Hillary Clinton, combined with Trump’s triumph, revealed the breadth of popular anger at politics as usual – the blend of neoliberal domestic policy and interventionist foreign policy that constitutes consensus in Washington. Neoliberals celebrate market utility as the sole criterion of worth; interventionists exalt military adventure abroad as a means of fighting evil in order to secure global progress. Both agendas have proved calamitous for most Americans. Many registered their disaffection in 2016. Sanders is a social democrat and Trump a demagogic mountebank, but their campaigns underscored a widespread repudiation of the Washington consensus. For about a week after the election, pundits discussed the possibility of a more capacious Democratic strategy. It appeared that the party might learn something from Clinton’s defeat. Then everything changed.

    A story that had circulated during the campaign without much effect resurfaced: it involved the charge that Russian operatives had hacked into the servers of the Democratic National Committee, revealing embarrassing emails that damaged Clinton’s chances. With stunning speed, a new centrist-liberal orthodoxy came into being, enveloping the major media and the bipartisan Washington establishment. This secular religion has attracted hordes of converts in the first year of the Trump presidency. In its capacity to exclude dissent, it is like no other formation of mass opinion in my adult life, though it recalls a few dim childhood memories of anti-communist hysteria during the early 1950s.

    The centrepiece of the faith, based on the hacking charge, is the belief that Vladimir Putin orchestrated an attack on American democracy by ordering his minions to interfere in the election on behalf of Trump. The story became gospel with breathtaking suddenness and completeness. Doubters are perceived as heretics and as apologists for Trump and Putin, the evil twins and co-conspirators behind this attack on American democracy. Responsibility for the absence of debate lies in large part with the major media outlets. Their uncritical embrace and endless repetition of the Russian hack story have made it seem a fait accompli in the public mind. It is hard to estimate popular belief in this new orthodoxy, but it does not seem to be merely a creed of Washington insiders. If you question the received narrative in casual conversations, you run the risk of provoking blank stares or overt hostility – even from old friends. This has all been baffling and troubling to me; there have been moments when pop-culture fantasies (body snatchers, Kool-Aid) have come to mind.

    Like any orthodoxy worth its salt, the religion of the Russian hack depends not on evidence but on ex cathedra pronouncements on the part of authoritative institutions and their overlords. Its scriptural foundation is a confused and largely fact-free ‘assessment’ produced last January by a small number of ‘hand-picked’ analysts – as James Clapper, the director of National Intelligence, described them – from the CIA, the FBI and the NSA. The claims of the last were made with only ‘moderate’ confidence. The label Intelligence Community Assessment creates a misleading impression of unanimity, given that only three of the 16 US intelligence agencies contributed to the report. And indeed the assessment itself contained this crucial admission: ‘Judgments are not intended to imply that we have proof that shows something to be a fact. Assessments are based on collected information, which is often incomplete or fragmentary, as well as logic, argumentation and precedents.’ Yet the assessment has passed into the media imagination as if it were unassailable fact, allowing journalists to assume what has yet to be proved. In doing so they serve as mouthpieces for the intelligence agencies, or at least for those ‘hand-picked’ analysts.

    It is not the first time the intelligence agencies have played this role. When I hear the Intelligence Community Assessment cited as a reliable source, I always recall the part played by the New York Times in legitimating CIA reports of the threat posed by Saddam Hussein’s putative weapons of mass destruction, not to mention the long history of disinformation (a.k.a. ‘fake news’) as a tactic for advancing one administration or another’s political agenda. Once again, the established press is legitimating pronouncements made by the Church Fathers of the national security state. Clapper is among the most vigorous of these. He perjured himself before Congress in 2013, when he denied that the NSA had ‘wittingly’ spied on Americans – a lie for which he has never been held to account. In May 2017, he told NBC’s Chuck Todd that the Russians were highly likely to have colluded with Trump’s campaign because they are ‘almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favour, whatever, which is a typical Russian technique’. The current orthodoxy exempts the Church Fathers from standards imposed on ordinary people, and condemns Russians – above all Putin – as uniquely, ‘almost genetically’ diabolical.

    It’s hard for me to understand how the Democratic Party, which once felt scepticism towards the intelligence agencies, can now embrace the CIA and the FBI as sources of incontrovertible truth. One possible explanation is that Trump’s election has created a permanent emergency in the liberal imagination, based on the belief that the threat he poses is unique and unprecedented. It’s true that Trump’s menace is viscerally real. But the menace posed by George W. Bush and Dick Cheney was equally real. The damage done by Bush and Cheney – who ravaged the Middle East, legitimated torture and expanded unconstitutional executive power – was truly unprecedented, and probably permanent. Trump does pose an unprecedented threat to undocumented immigrants and Muslim travellers, whose protection is urgent and necessary. But on most issues he is a standard issue Republican. He is perfectly at home with Paul Ryan’s austerity agenda, which involves enormous transfers of wealth to the most privileged Americans. He is as committed as any other Republican to repealing Obama’s Affordable Care Act. During the campaign he posed as an apostate on free trade and an opponent of overseas military intervention, but now that he is in office his free trade views are shifting unpredictably and his foreign policy team is composed of generals with impeccable interventionist credentials.

    Trump is committed to continuing his predecessors’ lavish funding of the already bloated Defence Department, and his Fortress America is a blustering, undisciplined version of Madeleine Albright’s ‘indispensable nation’. Both Trump and Albright assume that the United States should be able to do as it pleases in the international arena: Trump because it’s the greatest country in the world, Albright because it’s an exceptional force for global good. Nor is there anything unprecedented about Trump’s desire for détente with Russia, which until at least 2012 was the official position of the Democratic Party. What is unprecedented about Trump is his offensive style: contemptuous, bullying, inarticulate, and yet perfectly pitched to appeal to the anger and anxiety of his target audience. His excess has licensed overt racism and proud misogyny among some of his supporters. This is cause for denunciation, but I am less persuaded that it justifies the anti-Russian mania.

    Besides Trump’s supposed uniqueness, there are two other assumptions behind the furore in Washington: the first is that the Russian hack unquestionably occurred, and the second is that the Russians are our implacable enemies. The second provides the emotional charge for the first. Both seem to me problematic. With respect to the first, the hacking charges are unproved and may well remain so. Edward Snowden and others familiar with the NSA say that if long-distance hacking had taken place the agency would have monitored it and could detail its existence without compromising their secret sources and methods. In September, Snowden told Der Spiegel that the NSA ‘probably knows quite well who the invaders were’. And yet ‘it has not presented any evidence, although I suspect it exists. The question is: why not? … I suspect it discovered other attackers in the systems, maybe there were six or seven groups at work.’ He also said in July 2016 that ‘even if the attackers try to obfuscate origin, ‪#XKEYSCORE makes following exfiltrated data easy. I did this personally against Chinese ops.’ The NSA’s capacity to follow hacking to its source is a matter of public record. When the agency investigated pervasive and successful Chinese hacking into US military and defence industry installations, it was able to trace the hacks to the building where they originated, a People’s Liberation Army facility in Shanghai. That information was published in the New York Times, but, this time, the NSA’s failure to provide evidence has gone curiously unremarked. When The Intercept published a story about the NSA’s alleged discovery that Russian military intelligence had attempted to hack into US state and local election systems, the agency’s undocumented assertions about the Russian origins of the hack were allowed to stand as unchallenged fact and quickly became treated as such in the mainstream media.

    Meanwhile, there has been a blizzard of ancillary accusations, including much broader and vaguer charges of collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. It remains possible that Robert Mueller, a former FBI director who has been appointed to investigate these allegations, may turn up some compelling evidence of contacts between Trump’s people and various Russians. It would be surprising if an experienced prosecutor empowered to cast a dragnet came up empty-handed, and the arrests have already begun. But what is striking about them is that the charges have nothing to do with Russian interference in the election. There has been much talk about the possibility that the accused may provide damaging evidence against Trump in exchange for lighter sentences, but this is merely speculation. Paul Manafort, at one point Trump’s campaign manager, has pleaded not guilty to charges of failing to register his public relations firm as a foreign agent for the Ukrainian government and concealing his millions of dollars in fees. But all this occurred before the 2016 campaign. George Papadopolous, a foreign policy adviser, has pleaded guilty to the charge of lying to the FBI about his bungling efforts to arrange a meeting between Trump’s people and the Russian government – an opportunity the Trump campaign declined. Mueller’s most recent arrestee, Michael Flynn, the unhinged Islamophobe who was briefly Trump’s national security adviser, has pleaded guilty to charges of lying to the FBI about meeting the Russian ambassador in December – weeks after the election. This is the sort of backchannel diplomacy that routinely occurs during the interim between one administration and the next. It is not a sign of collusion.

    So far, after months of ‘bombshells’ that turn out to be duds, there is still no actual evidence for the claim that the Kremlin ordered interference in the American election. Meanwhile serious doubts have surfaced about the technical basis for the hacking claims. Independent observers have argued it is more likely that the emails were leaked from inside, not hacked from outside. On this front, the most persuasive case was made by a group called Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, former employees of the US intelligence agencies who distinguished themselves in 2003 by debunking Colin Powell’s claim that Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, hours after Powell had presented his pseudo-evidence at the UN. (There are members of VIPS who dissent from the VIPS report’s conclusions, but their arguments are in turn contested by the authors of the report.) The VIPS findings received no attention in major media outlets, except Fox News – which from the centre-left perspective is worse than no attention at all. Mainstream media have dismissed the VIPS report as a conspiracy theory (apparently the Russian hacking story does not count as one). The crucial issue here and elsewhere is the exclusion from public discussion of any critical perspectives on the orthodox narrative, even the perspectives of people with professional credentials and a solid track record.

    Both the DNC hacking story and the one involving the emails of John Podesta, a Clinton campaign operative, involve a shadowy bunch of putatively Russian hackers called Fancy Bear – also known among the technically inclined as APT28. The name Fancy Bear was introduced by Dimitri Alperovitch, the chief technology officer of Crowdstrike, a cybersecurity firm hired by the DNC to investigate the theft of their emails. Alperovitch is also a fellow at the Atlantic Council, an anti-Russian Washington think tank. In its report Crowdstrike puts forward close to zero evidence for its claim that those responsible were Russian, let alone for its assertion that they were affiliated with Russian military intelligence. And yet, from this point on, the assumption that this was a Russian cyber operation was unquestioned. When the FBI arrived on the scene, the Bureau either did not request or was refused access to the DNC servers; instead it depended entirely on the Crowdstrike analysis. Crowdstrike, meanwhile, was being forced to retract another claim, that the Russians had successfully hacked the guidance systems of the Ukrainian artillery. The Ukrainian military and the British International Institute for Strategic Studies both contradicted this claim, and Crowdstrike backed down. But its DNC analysis was allowed to stand and even become the basis for the January Intelligence Community Assessment.

    The chatter surrounding the hack would never have acquired such urgency were it not for the accompanying assumption: Russia is a uniquely dangerous adversary, with which we should avoid all contact. Without that belief, Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s meetings with Russians in September 2016 would become routine discussions between a senator and foreign officials. Flynn’s post-election conversations with the Russian ambassador would appear unremarkable. Trump’s cronies’ attempts to do business in Russia would become merely sleazy. Donald Trump Jr’s meeting at Trump Tower with the Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya would be transformed from a melodrama of shady intrigue to a comedy of errors – with the candidate’s son expecting to receive information to use against Clinton but discovering Veselnitskaya only wanted to talk about repealing sanctions and restarting the flow of Russian orphans to the United States. And Putin himself would become just another autocrat, with whom democracies could engage without endorsing.

    Sceptical voices, such as those of the VIPS, have been drowned out by a din of disinformation. Flagrantly false stories, like the Washington Post report that the Russians had hacked into the Vermont electrical grid, are published, then retracted 24 hours later. Sometimes – like the stories about Russian interference in the French and German elections – they are not retracted even after they have been discredited. These stories have been thoroughly debunked by French and German intelligence services but continue to hover, poisoning the atmosphere, confusing debate. The claim that the Russians hacked local and state voting systems in the US was refuted by California and Wisconsin election officials, but their comments generated a mere whisper compared with the uproar created by the original story. The rush to publish without sufficient attention to accuracy has become the new normal in journalism. Retraction or correction is almost beside the point: the false accusation has done its work.

    The consequence is a spreading confusion that envelops everything. Epistemological nihilism looms, but some people and institutions have more power than others to define what constitutes an agreed-on reality. To say this is to risk dismissal as the ultimate wing-nut in the lexicon of contemporary Washington: the conspiracy theorist. Still, the fact remains: sometimes powerful people arrange to promote ideas that benefit their common interests. Whether we call this hegemony, conspiracy or merely special privilege hardly matters. What does matter is the power to create what Gramsci called the ‘common sense’ of an entire society. Even if much of that society is indifferent to or suspicious of the official common sense, it still becomes embedded among the tacit assumptions that set the boundaries of ‘responsible opinion’. So the Democratic establishment (along with a few Republicans) and the major media outlets have made ‘Russian meddling’ the common sense of the current moment. What kind of cultural work does this common sense do? What are the consequences of the spectacle the media call (with characteristic originality) ‘Russiagate’?

    The most immediate consequence is that, by finding foreign demons who can be blamed for Trump’s ascendancy, the Democratic leadership have shifted the blame for their defeat away from their own policies without questioning any of their core assumptions. Amid the general recoil from Trump, they can even style themselves dissenters – ‘#the resistance’ was the label Clintonites appropriated within a few days of the election. Mainstream Democrats have begun to use the word ‘progressive’ to apply to a platform that amounts to little more than preserving Obamacare, gesturing towards greater income equality and protecting minorities. This agenda is timid. It has nothing to say about challenging the influence of concentrated capital on policy, reducing the inflated defence budget or withdrawing from overextended foreign commitments; yet without those initiatives, even the mildest egalitarian policies face insuperable obstacles. More genuine insurgencies are in the making, which confront corporate power and connect domestic with foreign policy, but they face an uphill battle against the entrenched money and power of the Democratic leadership – the likes of Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, the Clintons and the DNC. Russiagate offers Democratic elites a way to promote party unity against Trump-Putin, while the DNC purges Sanders’s supporters.

    For the DNC, the great value of the Russian hack story is that it focuses attention away from what was actually in their emails. The documents revealed a deeply corrupt organisation, whose pose of impartiality was a sham. Even the reliably pro-Clinton Washington Post has admitted that ‘many of the most damaging emails suggest the committee was actively trying to undermine Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign.’ Further evidence of collusion between the Clinton machine and the DNC surfaced recently in a memoir by Donna Brazile, who became interim chair of the DNC after Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned in the wake of the email revelations. Brazile describes discovering an agreement dated 26 August 2015, which specified (she writes)

    that in exchange for raising money and investing in the DNC, Hillary would control the party’s finances, strategy, and all the money raised. Her campaign had the right of refusal of who would be the party communications director, and it would make final decisions on all the other staff. The DNC also was required to consult with the campaign about all other staffing, budgeting, data, analytics and mailings.

    Before the primaries had even begun, the supposedly neutral DNC – which had been close to insolvency – had been bought by the Clinton campaign.

    Another recent revelation of DNC tactics concerns the origins of the inquiry into Trump’s supposed links to Putin. The story began in April 2016, when the DNC hired a Washington research firm called Fusion GPS to unearth any connections between Trump and Russia. The assignment involved the payment of ‘cash for trash’, as the Clinton campaign liked to say. Fusion GPS eventually produced the trash, a lurid account written by the former British MI6 intelligence agent Christopher Steele, based on hearsay purchased from anonymous Russian sources. Amid prostitutes and golden showers, a story emerged: the Russian government had been blackmailing and bribing Donald Trump for years, on the assumption that he would become president some day and serve the Kremlin’s interests. In this fantastic tale, Putin becomes a preternaturally prescient schemer. Like other accusations of collusion, this one has become vaguer over time, adding to the murky atmosphere without ever providing any evidence. The Clinton campaign tried to persuade established media outlets to publicise the Steele dossier, but with uncharacteristic circumspection, they declined to promote what was plainly political trash rather than reliable reporting. Yet the FBI apparently took the Steele dossier seriously enough to include a summary of it in a secret appendix to the Intelligence Community Assessment. Two weeks before the inauguration, James Comey, the director of the FBI, described the dossier to Trump. After Comey’s briefing was leaked to the press, the website Buzzfeed published the dossier in full, producing hilarity and hysteria in the Washington establishment.

    The Steele dossier inhabits a shadowy realm where ideology and intelligence, disinformation and revelation overlap. It is the antechamber to the wider system of epistemological nihilism created by various rival factions in the intelligence community: the ‘tree of smoke’ that, for the novelist Denis Johnson, symbolised CIA operations in Vietnam. I inhaled that smoke myself in 1969-70, when I was a cryptographer with a Top Secret clearance on a US navy ship that carried missiles armed with nuclear warheads – the existence of which the navy denied. I was stripped of my clearance and later honourably discharged when I refused to join the Sealed Authenticator System, which would have authorised the launch of those allegedly non-existent nuclear weapons. The tree of smoke has only grown more complex and elusive since then. Yet the Democratic Party has now embarked on a full-scale rehabilitation of the intelligence community – or at least the part of it that supports the notion of Russian hacking. (We can be sure there is disagreement behind the scenes.) And it is not only the Democratic establishment that is embracing the deep state. Some of the party’s base, believing Trump and Putin to be joined at the hip, has taken to ranting about ‘treason’ like a reconstituted John Birch Society.

    I thought of these ironies when I visited the Tate Modern exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, which featured the work of black American artists from the 1960s and 1970s, when intelligence agencies (and agents provocateurs) were spearheading a government crackdown on black militants, draft resisters, deserters and antiwar activists. Amid the paintings, collages and assemblages there was a single Confederate flag, accompanied by grim reminders of the Jim Crow past – a Klansman in full regalia, a black body dangling from a tree. There were also at least half a dozen US flags, juxtaposed in whole or in part with images of contemporary racial oppression that could have occurred anywhere in America: dead black men carted off on stretchers by skeletons in police uniform; a black prisoner tied to a chair, awaiting torture. The point was to contrast the pretensions of ‘the land of the free’ with the practices of the national security state and local police forces. The black artists of that era knew their enemy: black people were not being killed and imprisoned by some nebulous foreign adversary, but by the FBI, the CIA and the police.

    The Democratic Party has now developed a new outlook on the world, a more ambitious partnership between liberal humanitarian interventionists and neoconservative militarists than existed under the cautious Obama. This may be the most disastrous consequence for the Democratic Party of the new anti-Russian orthodoxy: the loss of the opportunity to formulate a more humane and coherent foreign policy. The obsession with Putin has erased any possibility of complexity from the Democratic world picture, creating a void quickly filled by the monochrome fantasies of Hillary Clinton and her exceptionalist allies. For people like Max Boot and Robert Kagan, war is a desirable state of affairs, especially when viewed from the comfort of their keyboards, and the rest of the world – apart from a few bad guys – is filled with populations who want to build societies just like ours: pluralistic, democratic and open for business. This view is difficult to challenge when it cloaks itself in humanitarian sentiment. There is horrific suffering in the world; the US has abundant resources to help relieve it; the moral imperative is clear. There are endless forms of international engagement that do not involve military intervention. But it is the path taken by US policy often enough that one may suspect humanitarian rhetoric is nothing more than window-dressing for a more mundane geopolitics – one that defines the national interest as global and virtually limitless.

    Having come of age during the Vietnam War, a calamitous consequence of that inflated definition of national interest, I have always been attracted to the realist critique of globalism. Realism is a label forever besmirched by association with Henry Kissinger, who used it as a rationale for intervening covertly and overtly in other nations’ affairs. Yet there is a more humane realist tradition, the tradition of George Kennan and William Fulbright, which emphasises the limits of military might, counselling that great power requires great restraint. This tradition challenges the doctrine of regime change under the guise of democracy promotion, which – despite its abysmal failures in Iraq and Libya – retains a baffling legitimacy in official Washington. Russiagate has extended its shelf life.

    We can gauge the corrosive impact of the Democrats’ fixation on Russia by asking what they aren’t talking about when they talk about Russian hacking. For a start, they aren’t talking about interference of other sorts in the election, such as the Republican Party’s many means of disenfranchising minority voters. Nor are they talking about the trillion dollar defence budget that pre-empts the possibility of single-payer healthcare and other urgently needed social programmes; nor about the modernisation of the American nuclear arsenal which Obama began and Trump plans to accelerate, and which raises the risk of the ultimate environmental calamity, nuclear war – a threat made more serious than it has been in decades by America’s combative stance towards Russia. The prospect of impeaching Trump and removing him from office by convicting him of collusion with Russia has created an atmosphere of almost giddy anticipation among leading Democrats, allowing them to forget that the rest of the Republican Party is composed of many politicians far more skilful in Washington’s ways than their president will ever be.

    It is not the Democratic Party that is leading the search for alternatives to the wreckage created by Republican policies: a tax plan that will soak the poor and middle class to benefit the rich; a heedless pursuit of fossil fuels that is already resulting in the contamination of the water supply of the Dakota people; and continued support for police policies of militarisation and mass incarceration. It is local populations that are threatened by oil spills and police beatings, and that is where humane populism survives. A multitude of insurgent groups have begun to use the outrage against Trump as a lever to move the party in egalitarian directions: Justice Democrats, Black Lives Matter, Democratic Socialists of America, as well as a host of local and regional organisations. They recognise that there are far more urgent – and genuine – reasons to oppose Trump than vague allegations of collusion with Russia. They are posing an overdue challenge to the long con of neoliberalism, and the technocratic arrogance that led to Clinton’s defeat in Rust Belt states. Recognising that the current leadership will not bring about significant change, they are seeking funding from outside the DNC. This is the real resistance, as opposed to ‘#theresistance’.

    On certain important issues – such as broadening support for single-payer healthcare, promoting a higher minimum wage or protecting undocumented immigrants from the most flagrant forms of exploitation – these insurgents are winning wide support. Candidates like Paula Jean Swearengin, a coal miner’s daughter from West Virginia who is running in the Democratic primary for nomination to the US Senate, are challenging establishment Democrats who stand cheek by jowl with Republicans in their service to concentrated capital. Swearengin’s opponent is Joe Manchin, whom the Los Angeles Times has compared to Doug Jones, another ‘very conservative’ Democrat who recently won election to the US Senate in Alabama, narrowly defeating a Republican disgraced by accusations of sexual misconduct with 14-year-old girls. I can feel relieved at that result without joining in the collective Democratic ecstasy, which reveals the party’s persistent commitment to politics as usual. Democrat leaders have persuaded themselves (and much of their base) that all the republic needs is a restoration of the status quo ante Trump. They remain oblivious to popular impatience with familiar formulas. Jess King – a Mennonite woman, Bard College MBA and founder of a local non-profit who is running for Congress as a Justice Democrat in Lancaster, Pennsylvania – put it this way: ‘We see a changing political landscape right now that isn’t measured by traditional left to right politics anymore, but bottom to top. In Pennsylvania and many other places around the country we see a grassroots economic populism on the rise, pushing against the political establishment and status quo that have failed so many in our country.’

    Democratic insurgents are also developing a populist critique of the imperial hubris that has sponsored multiple failed crusades, extorted disproportionate sacrifice from the working class and provoked support for Trump, who presented himself (however misleadingly) as an opponent of open-ended interventionism. On foreign policy, the insurgents face an even more entrenched opposition than on domestic policy: a bipartisan consensus aflame with outrage at the threat to democracy supposedly posed by Russian hacking. Still, they may have found a tactical way forward, by focusing on the unequal burden borne by the poor and working class in the promotion and maintenance of American empire.

    This approach animates Autopsy: The Democratic Party in Crisis, a 33-page document whose authors include Norman Solomon, founder of the web-based insurgent lobby RootsAction.org. ‘The Democratic Party’s claims of fighting for “working families” have been undermined by its refusal to directly challenge corporate power, enabling Trump to masquerade as a champion of the people,’ Autopsy announces. But what sets this apart from most progressive critiques is the cogent connection it makes between domestic class politics and foreign policy. For those in the Rust Belt, military service has often seemed the only escape from the shambles created by neoliberal policies; yet the price of escape has been high. As Autopsy notes, ‘the wisdom of continual war’ – what Clinton calls ‘global leadership’ –

    was far clearer to the party’s standard bearer [in 2016] than it was to people in the US communities bearing the brunt of combat deaths, injuries and psychological traumas. After a decade and a half of non-stop warfare, research data from voting patterns suggest that the Clinton campaign’s hawkish stance was a political detriment in working-class communities hard-hit by American casualties from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Francis Shen of the University of Minnesota and Douglas Kriner of Boston University analysed election results in three key states – Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan – and found that ‘even controlling in a statistical model for many other alternative explanations, we find that there is a significant and meaningful relationship between a community’s rate of military sacrifice and its support for Trump.’ Clinton’s record of uncritical commitment to military intervention allowed Trump to have it both ways, playing to jingoist resentment while posing as an opponent of protracted and pointless war. Kriner and Shen conclude that Democrats may want to ‘re-examine their foreign policy posture if they hope to erase Trump’s electoral gains among constituencies exhausted and alienated by 15 years of war’. If the insurgent movements within the Democratic Party begin to formulate an intelligent foreign policy critique, a re-examination may finally occur. And the world may come into sharper focus as a place where American power, like American virtue, is limited. For this Democrat, that is an outcome devoutly to be wished. It’s a long shot, but there is something happening out there.

    #USA #cuture #politique


  • Un livre choc provoque la rupture entre Trump et Bannon
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/040118/un-livre-choc-provoque-la-rupture-entre-trump-et-bannon

    2018 commence à peine, et c’est à nouveau le chaos autour de #Donald_Trump. Un livre explosif raconte sa présidence erratique. Trump rompt en direct avec son âme damnée #Steve_Bannon. Les supposées malversations financières du clan présidentiel, cible probable de l’enquête du procureur spécial Robert Mueller, interrogent. Le tout à onze mois des élections de mi-mandat. Donald Trump et Steve Bannon à la Maison-Blanche, en janvier 2017 © Reuters

    #International #enquête_russe #Etats-Unis


  • Un livre choc documente la rupture entre Trump et Bannon
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/040118/un-livre-choc-documente-la-rupture-entre-trump-et-bannon

    2018 commence à peine, et c’est à nouveau le chaos autour de #Donald_Trump. Un livre explosif raconte sa présidence erratique. Trump rompt en direct avec son âme damnée #Steve_Bannon. Les supposées malversations financières du clan présidentiel, cible probable de l’enquête du procureur spécial Robert Mueller, interrogent. Le tout à onze mois des élections de mi-mandat. Donald Trump et Steve Bannon à la Maison-Blanche, en janvier 2017 © Reuters

    #International #enquête_russe #Etats-Unis