• ‘It’s an Act of Murder’: How Europe Outsources Suffering as Migrants Drown

    This short film, produced by The Times’s Opinion Video team and the research groups #Forensic_Architecture and #Forensic_Oceanography, reconstructs a tragedy at sea that left at least 20 migrants dead. Combining footage from more than 10 cameras, 3-D modeling and interviews with rescuers and survivors, the documentary shows Europe’s role in the migrant crisis at sea.

    On Nov. 6, 2017, at least 20 people trying to reach Europe from Libya drowned in the Mediterranean, foundering next to a sinking raft.

    Not far from the raft was a ship belonging to Sea-Watch, a German humanitarian organization. That ship had enough space on it for everyone who had been aboard the raft. It could have brought them all to the safety of Europe, where they might have had a chance at being granted asylum.

    Instead, 20 people drowned and 47 more were captured by the Libyan Coast Guard, which brought the migrants back to Libya, where they suffered abuse — including rape and torture.

    This confrontation at sea was not a simplistic case of Europe versus Africa, with human rights and rescue on one side and chaos and danger on the other. Rather it’s a case of Europe versus Europe: of volunteers struggling to save lives being undercut by European Union policies that outsource border control responsibilities to the Libyan Coast Guard — with the aim of stemming arrivals on European shores.

    While funding, equipping and directing the Libyan Coast Guard, European governments have stymied the activities of nongovernmental organizations like Sea-Watch, criminalizing them or impounding their ships, or turning away from ports ships carrying survivors.

    More than 14,000 people have died or gone missing while trying to cross the central Mediterranean since 2014. But unlike most of those deaths and drownings, the incident on Nov. 6, 2017, was extensively documented.

    Sea-Watch’s ship and rescue rafts were outfitted with nine cameras, documenting the entire scene in video and audio. The Libyans, too, filmed parts of the incident on their mobile phones.

    The research groups Forensic Architecture and Forensic Oceanography of Goldsmiths, University of London, of which three of us — Mr. Heller, Mr. Pezzani and Mr. Weizman — are a part, combined these video sources with radio recordings, vessel tracking data, witness testimonies and newly obtained official sources to produce a minute-by-minute reconstruction of the facts. Opinion Video at The New York Times built on this work to create the above short documentary, gathering further testimonials by some of the survivors and rescuers who were there.

    This investigation makes a few things clear: European governments are avoiding their legal and moral responsibilities to protect the human rights of people fleeing violence and economic desperation. More worrying, the Libyan Coast Guard partners that Europe is collaborating with are ready to blatantly violate those rights if it allows them to prevent migrants from crossing the sea.

    Stopping Migrants, Whatever the Cost

    To understand the cynicism of Europe’s policies in the Mediterranean, one must understand the legal context. According to a 2012 ruling by the European Court of Human Rights, migrants rescued by European civilian or military vessels must be taken to a safe port. Because of the chaotic political situation in Libya and well-documented human rights abuses in detention camps there, that means a European port, often in Italy or Malta.

    But when the Libyan Coast Guard intercepts migrants, even outside Libyan territorial waters, as it did on Nov. 6, the Libyans take them back to detention camps in Libya, which is not subject to European Court of Human Rights jurisdiction.

    For Italy — and Europe — this is an ideal situation. Europe is able to stop people from reaching its shores while washing its hands of any responsibility for their safety.

    This policy can be traced back to February 2017, when Italy and the United Nations-supported Libyan Government of National Accord signed a “memorandum of understanding” that provided a framework for collaboration on development, to fight against “illegal immigration,” human trafficking and the smuggling of contraband. This agreement defines clearly the aim, “to stem the illegal migrants’ flows,” and committed Italy to provide “technical and technological support to the Libyan institutions in charge of the fight against illegal immigration.”

    Libyan Coast Guard members have been trained by the European Union, and the Italian government donated or repaired several patrol boats and supported the establishment of a Libyan search-and-rescue zone. Libyan authorities have since attempted — in defiance of maritime law — to make that zone off-limits to nongovernmental organizations’ rescue vessels. Italian Navy ships, based in Tripoli, have coordinated Libyan Coast Guard efforts.

    Before these arrangements, Libyan actors were able to intercept and return very few migrants leaving from Libyan shores. Now the Libyan Coast Guard is an efficient partner, having intercepted some 20,000 people in 2017 alone.

    The Libyan Coast Guard is efficient when it comes to stopping migrants from reaching Europe. It’s not as good, however, at saving their lives, as the events of Nov. 6 show.

    A Deadly Policy in Action

    That morning the migrant raft had encountered worsening conditions after leaving Tripoli, Libya, over night. Someone onboard used a satellite phone to call the Italian Coast Guard for help.

    Because the Italians were required by law to alert nearby vessels of the sinking raft, they alerted Sea-Watch to its approximate location. But they also requested the intervention of their Libyan counterparts.

    The Libyan Coast Guard vessel that was sent to intervene on that morning, the Ras Jadir, was one of several that had been repaired by Italy and handed back to the Libyans in May of 2017. Eight of the 13 crew members onboard had received training from the European Union anti-smuggling naval program known as Operation Sophia.

    Even so, the Libyans brought the Ras Jadir next to the migrants’ raft, rather than deploying a smaller rescue vessel, as professional rescuers do. This offered no hope of rescuing those who had already fallen overboard and only caused more chaos, during which at least five people died.

    These deaths were not merely a result of a lack of professionalism. Some of the migrants who had been brought aboard the Ras Jadir were so afraid of their fate at the hands of the Libyans that they jumped back into the water to try to reach the European rescuers. As can be seen in the footage, members of the Libyan Coast Guard beat the remaining migrants.

    Sea-Watch’s crew was also attacked by the Libyan Coast Guard, who threatened them and threw hard objects at them to keep them away. This eruption of violence was the result of a clash between the goals of rescue and interception, with the migrants caught in the middle desperately struggling for their lives.

    Apart from those who died during this chaos, more than 15 people had already drowned in the time spent waiting for any rescue vessel to appear.

    There was, however, no shortage of potential rescuers in the area: A Portuguese surveillance plane had located the migrants’ raft after its distress call. An Italian Navy helicopter and a French frigate were nearby and eventually offered some support during the rescue.

    It’s possible that this French ship, deployed as part of Operation Sophia, could have reached the sinking vessel earlier, in time to save more lives — despite our requests, this information has not been disclosed to us. But it remained at a distance throughout the incident and while offering some support, notably refrained from taking migrants onboard who would then have had to have been disembarked on European soil. It’s an example of a hands-off approach that seeks to make Libyan intervention not only possible but also inevitable.

    A Legal Challenge

    On the basis of the forensic reconstruction, the Global Legal Action Network and the Association for Juridical Studies on Immigration, with the support of Yale Law School students, have filed a case against Italy at the European Court of Human Rights representing 17 survivors of this incident.

    Those working on the suit, who include two of us — Mr. Mann and Ms. Moreno-Lax — argue that even though Italian or European personnel did not physically intercept the migrants and bring them back to Libya, Italy exercised effective control over the Libyan Coast Guard through mutual agreements, support and on-the-ground coordination. Italy has entrusted the Libyans with a task that Rome knows full well would be illegal if undertaken directly: preventing migrants from seeking protection in Europe by impeding their flight and sending them back to a country where extreme violence and exploitation await.

    We hope this legal complaint will lead the European court to rule that countries cannot subcontract their legal and humanitarian obligations to dubious partners, and that if they do, they retain responsibility for the resulting violations. Such a precedent would force the entire European Union to make sure its cooperation with partners like Libya does not end up denying refugees the right to seek asylum.

    This case is especially important right now. In Italy’s elections in March, the far-right Lega party, which campaigned on radical anti-immigrant rhetoric, took nearly 20 percent of the vote. The party is now part of the governing coalition, of which its leader, Matteo Salvini, is the interior minister.

    His government has doubled down on animosity toward migrants. In June, Italy took the drastic step of turning away a humanitarian vessel from the country’s ports and has been systematically blocking rescued migrants from being disembarked since then, even when they had been assisted by the Italian Coast Guard.

    The Italian crackdown helps explain why seafarers off the Libyan coast have refrained from assisting migrants in distress, leaving them to drift for days. Under the new Italian government, a new batch of patrol boats has been handed over to the Libyan Coast Guard, and the rate of migrants being intercepted and brought back to Libya has increased. All this has made the crossing even more dangerous than before.

    Italy has been seeking to enact a practice that blatantly violates the spirit of the Geneva Convention on refugees, which enshrines the right to seek asylum and prohibits sending people back to countries in which their lives are at risk. A judgment by the European Court sanctioning Italy for this practice would help prevent the outsourcing of border control and human rights violations that may prevent the world’s most disempowered populations from seeking protection and dignity.

    The European Court of Human Rights cannot stand alone as a guardian of fundamental rights. Yet an insistence on its part to uphold the law would both reflect and bolster the movements seeking solidarity with migrants across Europe.

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/12/26/opinion/europe-migrant-crisis-mediterranean-libya.html
    #reconstruction #naufrage #Méditerranée #Charles_Heller #Lorenzo_Pezzani #asile #migrations #réfugiés #mourir_en_mer #ONG #sauvetage #Sea-Watch #gardes-côtes_libyens #Libye #pull-back #refoulement #externalisation #vidéo #responsabilité #Ras_Jadir #Operation_Sophia #CEDH #cour_européenne_des_droits_de_l'homme #justice #droits_humains #droit_à_la_vie

    ping @reka

    • È un omicidio con navi italiane” L’accusa del Nyt

      Video-denuncia contro Roma e l’Ue per un naufragio di un anno fa: botte dei libici ai migranti, 50 morti.

      Patate scagliate addosso ai soccorritori della Sea Watch invece di lanciare giubbotti e salvagente ai naufraghi che stavano annegando. E poi botte ai migranti riusciti a salire sulle motovedette per salvarsi la vita. Ecco i risultati dell’addestramento che l’Italia ha impartito ai libici per far fuori i migranti nel Mediterraneo. È un video pubblicato dal New York Times che parte da una delle più gravi tra le ultime stragi avvenute del Canale di Sicilia, con un commento intitolato: “‘È un omicidio’: come l’Europa esternalizza sofferenza mentre i migranti annegano”.

      Era il 6 novembre 2017 e le operazioni in mare erano gestite dalla guardia costiera libica, in accordo con l’allora ministro dell’Interno, Marco Minniti. Il dettaglio non è secondario, lo stesso video mostra la cerimonia di consegna delle motovedette made in Italy ai partner nordafricani. Una delle imbarcazioni, la 648, la ritroviamo proprio al centro dell’azione dove, quel giorno, cinquanta africani vennero inghiottiti dal mare. Al tempo era consentito alle imbarcazioni di soccorso pattugliare lo specchio di mare a cavallo tra le zone Sar (Search and rescue, ricerca e soccorso) di competenza. Al tempo i porti italiani erano aperti, ma il comportamento dei militari libici già al limite della crudeltà. Il video e le foto scattate dal personale della Sea Watch mostrano scene durissime. Un migrante lasciato annegare senza alcun tentativo da parte dei libici di salvarlo: il corpo disperato annaspa per poi sparire sott’acqua, quando il salvagente viene lanciato è tardi. Botte, calci e pugni a uomini appena saliti a bordo delle motovedette, di una violenza ingiustificabile. Il New York Times va giù duro e nel commento, oltre a stigmatizzare attacca i governi italiani. Dalla prova delle motovedette vendute per far fare ad altri il lavoro sporco, al nuovo governo definito “di ultradestra” che “ha completato la strategia”. Matteo Salvini però non viene nominato. L’Italia, sottolinea il Nyt, ha delegato alle autorità della Tripolitania il pattugliamento delle coste e il recupero di qualsiasi imbarcazione diretta a nord. Nulla di nuovo, visto che la Spagna, guidata dal socialista Sanchez e impegnata sul fronte occidentale con un’ondata migratoria senza precedenti, usa il Marocco per “bonificare” il tratto di mare vicino allo stretto di Gibilterra da gommoni e carrette. Gli organismi europei da una parte stimolano il blocco delle migrazioni verso il continente, eppure dall’altra lo condannano. Per l’episodio del 6 novembre 2017, infatti, la Corte europea dei diritti umani sta trattando il ricorso presentato dall’Asgi (Associazione studi giuridici sull’immigrazione) contro il respingimento collettivo. Sempre l’Asgi ha presentato due ricorsi analoghi per fatti del dicembre 2018 e gennaio 2018; infine altri due, uno sulla cessione delle motovedette e l’altro sull’implementazione dell’accordo Italia-Libia firmato da Minniti.

      https://www.ilfattoquotidiano.it/premium/articoli/e-un-omicidio-con-navi-italiane-laccusa-del-nyt

    • Comment l’Europe et la Libye laissent mourir les migrants en mer

      Il y a un peu plus d’un an, le 6 novembre 2017, une fragile embarcation sombre en mer avec à son bord 150 migrants partis de Tripoli pour tenter de rejoindre l’Europe. La plupart d’entre eux sont morts. Avec l’aide de Forensic Oceanography – une organisation créée en 2011 pour tenir le compte des morts de migrants en Méditerranée – et de Forensic Architecture – groupe de recherche enquêtant sur les violations des droits de l’homme –, le New York Times a retracé le déroulement de ce drame, dans une enquête vidéo extrêmement documentée.

      Depuis l’accord passé en février 2017 entre la Libye et l’Italie, confiant aux autorités libyennes le soin d’intercepter les migrants dans ses eaux territoriales, le travail des ONG intervenant en mer Méditerranée avec leurs bateaux de sauvetage est devenu extrêmement difficile. Ces dernières subissent les menaces constantes des gardes-côtes libyens, qui, malgré les subventions européennes et les formations qu’ils reçoivent, n’ont pas vraiment pour but de sauver les migrants de la noyade. Ainsi, en fermant les yeux sur les pratiques libyennes régulièrement dénoncées par les ONG, l’Europe contribue à aggraver la situation et précipite les migrants vers la noyade, s’attache à démontrer cette enquête vidéo publiée dans la section Opinions du New York Times. Un document traduit et sous-titré par Courrier international.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/video/enquete-comment-leurope-et-la-libye-laissent-mourir-les-migra

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=10&v=dcbh8yJclGI


  • #métaliste (qui va être un grand chantier, car il y a plein d’information sur seenthis, qu’il faudrait réorganiser) sur :
    #externalisation #contrôles_frontaliers #frontières #migrations #réfugiés

    Le r apport "Expanding the fortress" et des liens associés à la sortie de ce rapport :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/694887
    Lien avec les #droits_humains

    Et des liens vers des articles généraux sur l’externalisation des frontières de la part de l’ #UE (#EU) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/569305
    https://seenthis.net/messages/390549
    https://seenthis.net/messages/320101

    Le lien entre #fonds_fiduciaire_pour_l'Afrique et externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/707133
    #fonds_fiduciaire
    v. aussi plus de détail sur la métaliste migrations et développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

    –------------------------------------

    Le #post-Cotonou :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/681114
    #accord_de_Cotonou

    –----------------------------

    Externalisation des contrôles frontaliers en #Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/705401
    (lien avec #droits_humains)
    https://seenthis.net/messages/623809
    "Dossier Libia" —> un site d’information et dénonciation de ce qui se passe en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/742662
    Reportage en allemand, signalé par @_kg_ :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/744384
    Des #timbres produits par la poste libyenne :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/745453

    #Statistiques et #chiffres du nombre de personnes migrantes présentes en Libye (chiffres OIM) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/751596

    Sur les #centres_de_détention en Libye, voulus, soutenus et financés par l’UE ou des pays de l’UE :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/615857
    #torture #viols #abus_sexuels #centres_de_détention #détention
    Ici en #dessins :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/747869
    #dessin
    https://seenthis.net/messages/612089
    Et des mesures-sparadrap en lien avec l’#OMS cette fois-ci —> projet “Enhancing Diagnosis and Treatment for Migrants in detention centers in Libya” :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737102

    D’autres liens où l’on parle aussi des centres de détention en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/689187
    https://seenthis.net/messages/612089

    #Poursuites_judiciaires —> "Un demandeur d’asile va poursuivre le Royaume-Uni pour le financement de centres de détention libyens"
    https://seenthis.net/messages/746025

    Et l’excellent film de #Andrea_Segre "L’ordine delle cose" , qui montre les manoeuvres de l’Italie pour créer ces centres en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/677462

    Autour des #gardes-côtes_libyens et les #refoulements (#push-back, #pull-back) en Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/719759

    Les pull-back vers la Libye :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/730613
    –-> et centres de détention
    https://seenthis.net/messages/651505
    Le reconstruction d’un naufrage et d’un pull-back vers la Libye effectué par les gardes-côtes libyen. Reconstruction #vidéo par #Charles_Heller et #Lorenzo_Pezzani :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/747918

    Résistance de migrants sauvetés en Méditerranée, qui refusent d’être ramenés en Libye en refusant de descendre du navire ( #Nivin ) qui les a secourus :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/735627

    #évacuation de migrants/réfugiés depuis la Libye vers le #Niger :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737065
    #réinstallation
    –-> attention, il y a peut-être d’autres articles sur ce sujet dans les longs fils de discussions sur le Niger et/ou la Libye (à contrôler)

    L’aide de la #Suisse aux gardes-côtes libyens :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/623935

    Et quelques lignes sur le #traité_de_Benghazi , le fameux #pacte_d'amitié entre l’#Italie et la #Libye (2009)
    https://seenthis.net/messages/717799
    J’en parle aussi dans ce billet que j’ai écrit pour @visionscarto sur les films #Mare_chiuso et #Mare_deserto :
    Vaincre une mer déserte et fermée
    https://visionscarto.net/vaincre-une-mer-deserte-et-fermee
    –-> il y a certainement plus sur seenthis, mais je ne trouve pas pour l’instant... j’ajouterai au fur et à mesure

    –--------------------------------------

    Externalisation des contrôles frontaliers au #Niger (+ implication de l’#OIM (#IOM) et #Agadez ) :

    Mission #Eucap_Sahel et financement et création de #Compagnies_mobiles_de_contrôle_des_frontières (#CMCF), financé par #Pays-Bas et Allemagne financés par l’Allemagne :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733601

    Et des #camps_militaires :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/736433

    Autres liens sur le Niger :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/696283
    https://seenthis.net/messages/626183
    https://seenthis.net/messages/586729
    https://seenthis.net/messages/370536

    Conséquences de l’externalisation des politiques migratoires sur le #Niger, mais aussi le #Soudan et le #Tchad :
    https://asile.ch/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/multilateral-damage.pdf
    signalé ici :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/741956

    –-------------

    Externalisation des frontières au #Sénégal et en #Mauritanie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/740468
    https://seenthis.net/messages/668973
    https://seenthis.net/messages/608653
    https://seenthis.net/messages/320101

    –------------------------------------------

    Italie, Allemagne, France, Espagne

    Les efforts de l’ #Italie d’externaliser les contrôles frontaliers :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/600874
    https://seenthis.net/messages/595057

    L’Italie avec l’ #Allemagne :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/566194

    #France et ses tentatives d’externalisation les frontières (proposition de Macron notamment de créer des #hub, de faire du #tri et de la #catégorisation de migrants) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/704970
    https://seenthis.net/messages/618133
    https://seenthis.net/messages/677172

    L’#Espagne :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737099
    #modèle_espagnol
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737095
    v. aussi plus bas la partie consacrée au Maroc...

    –-----------------------------

    L’ #accord_UE-Turquie :
    https://seenthis.net/tag/accord_ue-turquie
    Et plus en général sur l’externalisation vers la #Tuquie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/427270
    https://seenthis.net/messages/419432
    https://seenthis.net/messages/679603

    Erdogan accuse les Européens de ne pas tenir leurs promesses d’aide financière...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/512196

    Et le #monitoring de l’accord (#observatoire) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/478621

    Sur la "#facilité" en faveur des réfugiés en Turquie, le rapport de la Cour des comptes européenne :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737085
    #aide_financière

    Un lien sur comment l’aide a été utilisée en faveur des #réfugiés_syriens à #Gaziantep :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/667241

    –---------------------------------

    L’externalisation en #Tunisie (accords avec l’Italie notamment) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/511895
    https://seenthis.net/messages/573526
    Et avec l’UE :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/737477

    –-------------------------

    Tag #réintégration dans les pays d’origine après #renvois (#expulsions) :
    https://seenthis.net/tag/r%C3%A9int%C3%A9gration

    –-------------------------------------

    La question des #regional_disembarkation_platforms :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/703288
    #plateformes_de_désembarquement #disembarkation_paltforms #plateformes_de_débarquement

    En 2004, on parlait plutôt de #centres_off-shore en #Afrique_du_Nord ...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/607615

    Tentatives d’externalisation des contrôles migratoires, mais aussi des #procédures_d'asile en #Afrique_du_Nord , mais aussi dans l’ #Europe_de_l'Est et #Balkans) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/701836
    Et au Niger :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/749456
    #externalisation_de_l'asile #délocalisation

    Et en #Bulgarie (ça date de 2016) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/529415

    #Serbie , toujours en 2016 :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/462817

    Les efforts d’externalisation au #Maroc :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/696321
    https://seenthis.net/messages/643905
    https://seenthis.net/messages/458929
    https://seenthis.net/messages/162299
    #Frontex

    #Bosnie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/743581
    Où l’#OIM est impliquée

    –------------------------------------

    Lien #coopération_au_développement, #aide_au_développement et #contrôles_migratoires :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/660235

    Pour la Suisse :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/564720
    https://seenthis.net/messages/719752
    https://seenthis.net/messages/721921
    –-> il y a certainement plus de liens sur seenthis, mais il faudrait faire une recherche plus approfondie...
    #développement #conditionnalité
    Sur cette question, il y a aussi des rapports, dont notamment celui-ci :
    Aid and Migration : externalisation of Europe’s responsibilities
    https://concordeurope.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/CONCORD_AidWatchPaper_Aid_Migration_2018_online.pdf?1dcbb3&1dcbb3

    –-------------------------------

    La rhétorique sur la #nouvelle_frontière_européenne , qui serait le #désert du #Sahara (et petit amusement cartographique de ma part) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/604039
    #cartographie #visualisation
    https://seenthis.net/messages/548137
    –-> dans ce lien il y a aussi des articles qui parlent de l’externalisation des frontières au #Soudan

    Plus spécifiquement #Soudan :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/519269

    –--------------------------------------

    Et du coup, les liens avec le tag #processus_de_Khartoum :
    https://seenthis.net/tag/processus_de_khartoum

    –----------------------------------------

    Les efforts d’externalisation des contrôles frontaliers en #Erythrée et #Ethiopie :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/729629
    https://seenthis.net/messages/493279
    https://seenthis.net/messages/387744

    Et le financement de l’Erythrée via des fonds d’aide au développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/405308
    https://seenthis.net/messages/366439

    L’Erythrée, après la levée des sanctions de l’ONU, devient un Etat avec lequel il est désormais possible de traiter (sic) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/721926

    ... Et autres #dictateurs
    https://seenthis.net/messages/318425
    #dictature

    –-----------------------------------

    La question des #carrier_sanctions infligées aux #compagnies_aériennes :
    https://seenthis.net/tag/carrier_sanctions

    –--------------------------

    Des choses sur la #pacific_solution de l’#Australie :
    https://seenthis.net/recherche?recherche=%23pacific_solution

    –---------------------------------

    L’atlas de Migreurop, qui traite de la question de l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/690134

    ping @isskein @reka


  • L’équation des #refoulements en Libye : depuis le début #2018 près de 15000 boat-people ont été reconduits en #Libye où sont enregistrés plus de 56000 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile. Parmi eux, en un an, 900 ont été réinstallés. Que deviennent les autres ?

    https://twitter.com/Migreurop/status/1053981625321771008

    #push-back #refoulement #statistiques #chiffres #Méditerranée #pull-back #réinstallation

    Source :
    Flash update Libya (UNHCR)

    Population Movements
    As of 11 October, the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) rescued/intercepted 14,156 refugees and migrants (9,801 men, 2,126 women and 1,373 children) at sea during 108 operations. So far in 2018, the LCG recovered 99 bodies from the sea. The number of individualsdis embarked in Libya has gradually increased over the past weeks when compared to the month of August (552 individuals in August, 1,265 individuals in September and 884 individuals so far in October). An increase in disembarkations may be expected as the sea iscurrently very calm.
    During the reporting period, 174 refugees and migrants (163 men, eight women and three children) disembarked in #Alkhums (97 km southwest of Tripoli) and #Zawia (45 km west of Tripoli). The group was comprised mainly of Bangladeshi and Sudanese nationals. UNHCR and its partner International Medical Corps (IMC) provided core-relief items (CRIs) and vital medical assistance both at the disembarkation points and in the detention centres to which individuals were subsequently transferred by the authorities. So far in 2018, UNHCR has registered 11,401 refugees and asylum-seekers, bringing the total of individuals registered to 56,045.

    UNHCR Response
    On 9 October, #UNHCR in coordination with the municipality of Benghazi, distributed water tanks, medical waste disposal bins and wheel chairs to 14 hospitals and clinics in Benghazi. This was part of UNHCR’s quick-impact projects (#QIPs). QIPs are small, rapidly implemented projects intended to help create conditions for peaceful coexistence between displaced persons and their hosting communities. QIPs also strengthen the resilience of these communities. So far in 2018, UNHCR implemented 83 QIPs across Libya.
    On 8 October, UNHC partner #CESVI began a three-day school bag distribution campaign at its social centre in Tripoli. The aim is to reach 1,000 children with bags in preparation for the new school year. Due to the liquidity crisis in Libya, the price of school materials has increased over the past years. With this distribution, UNHCR hopes to mitigate the financial impact that the start of the school year has on refugee families.
    UNHCR estimates that 5,893 individuals are detained in Libya, of whom 3,964 are of concern to UNHCR. On 7 October, UNHCR visited #Abu-Slim detention centre to deliver humanitarian assistance and address the concerns of refugees and asylum-seekers held in the facility. UNHCR distributed non-food items including blankets, hygiene kits, dignity kits, sleeping mats and water to all detained individuals. UNHCR carried out a Q&A session with refugees and migrants to discuss UNHCR’s activities and possible solutions for persons of concern. Security permitting, UNHCR will resume its registration activities in detention centres over the coming days, targeting all persons of concern.
    So far in 2018, UNHCR conducted 982 visits to detention centres and registered 3,600 refugees and asylum-seekers. As of 10 October, UNHCR distributed 15,282 core-relief items to refugees and migrants held in detention centres in Libya.
    Throughits partner #IMC, UNHCR continues to provide medical assistance in detention centres in Libya. So far in 2018, IMC provided 21,548 primary health care consultations at the detention centres and 231 medical referrals to public hospitals. As conditions in detention remain extremely dire, UNHCR continues to advocate for alternatives to detention in Libya and for solutions in third countries. Since 1 September 2017, 901 individuals have been submitted for resettlement to eight States (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland).

    http://reporting.unhcr.org/sites/default/files/UNHCR%20Libya%20Flash%20Update%20-%205-12OCT18.pdf
    #réinstallation #détention #centres_de_détention #HCR #gardes-côtes_libyens

    ping @_kg_ @isskein



  • Migrants in Libya : Pushed away, pulled back

    As EU policies drive migrants away, Libyan authorities push them into dire detention centres. For some who reach Europe, it is worth the risk

    http://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/news/migrants-libya-pushed-back-pulled-back-409483752
    #pull-back #push-back #Libye #externalisation
    #renvois #expulsions #retour_au_pays #prostitution #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #trafic_d'êtres_humains :

    Eight years ago, Joy was a teenager when she was offered a job as a nanny in London. In the event, she was flown by plane to Milan, and ordered to work off a nearly $60,000 debt as a sex worker.

    When Joy fled to what she thought was the safety of her home in southern Nigeria’s Edo State however, it turned out to be “hell”.

    “Returning was one of the worst things I could have done,” she said.
    Her local recruiters repeatedly threatened the lives of her family for cash. Joy’s uncle beat her, and sold her off to be married twice.

    Et qu’est-ce qu’elle fait Joy quelques années après ?

    Years later, she resolved to return to Italy for a better life, by land through Libya, with her eyes open. “Everyone knows the story about Libya,” she said. “We all know it is dangerous.”

    • Dopo la Libia, l’inferno è in Italia: le donne nigeriane di #Castel_Volturno

      A Castel Volturno le donne nigeriane arrivano dopo essere passate dalla Libia. Qui le aspetta la paura del «juju», la prostituzione nelle case chiuse, lo sfruttamento. Finché non finiscono di pagare il debito che hanno contratto per arrivare in Italia. Sara Manisera e Federica Mameli sono state a parlare con loro nelle «connection house» di Castel Volturno.

      http://openmigration.org/analisi/dopo-la-libia-linferno-e-in-italia-le-donne-nigeriane-di-castel-voltu

    • UNHCR expresses concern over lack of rescue capability in Mediterranean, but condones Libyan coast guard pull back operations

      While UNHCR rightly calls for a change in EU practices, it fails to acknowledge or address the serious problems with the Libyan coast guard’s pull back practices in Libyan territorial waters – practices enabled and funded by the EU. UNHCR’s latest statement on this subject condones EU-funded Libyan coast guard pull back practices.

      From Jeff Crisp (@JFCrisp): “A simple question for UNHCR and IOM: Should asylum seekers who leave Libya by boat have an opportunity to submit an application for refugee status elsewhere, rather than being summarily intercepted and forcibly returned to and detained in the country of departure? Because UNHCR’s global policy says: ‘persons rescued or intercepted at sea cannot be summarily turned back or otherwise returned to the country of departure, including in particular where to do so would deny them a fair opportunity to seek asylum.’”

      UNHCR’s statement: “UNHCR continues to be very concerned about the legal and logistical restrictions that have been placed on a number of NGOs wishing to conduct search and rescue (SAR) operations, including the Aquarius. These have had the cumulative effect of the Central Mediterranean currently having no NGO vessels conducting SAR. Should NGO rescue operations on the Mediterranean cease entirely we risk returning to the same dangerous context we saw after Italy’s Mare Nostrum naval operation ended in 2015 and hundreds of people died in an incident on the central Mediterranean Sea. UNHCR welcomes the rescue efforts of the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG), as without them more lives would have been lost. Nonetheless, with the LCG now having assumed primary responsibility for search and rescue coordination in an area that extends to around 100 miles, the LCG needs further support. Any vessel with the capability to assist search and rescue operations should be allowed to come to the aid of those in need. UNHCR reiterates that people rescued in international waters (i.e. beyond the 12 nautical miles of the territorial waters of Libya) should not be brought back to Libya where conditions are not safe. The largest proportion of deaths have been reported in crossings to Italy, which account for more than half of all deaths reported this year so far, despite Spain having become the primary destination of those newly arrived. More than 48, 000 people have arrived there by sea, compared to around 22,000 in Italy and 27,000 in Greece. There is an urgent need to break away from the current impasses and ad-hoc boat-by-boat approaches on where to dock rescued passengers. UNHCR reiterates that in recent months, together with IOM, we have offered a regional solution that would provide clarity and predictability on search and rescue operations.”

      https://migrantsatsea.org/2018/11/12/week-in-review-11-november-2018


  • Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop (envoyé par Pascaline Chappart) :

    Deux articles où il est question d’évacuation depuis les centres de détention libyens vers le #Niger, en vue d’une réinstallation en Europe...

    – « Un pont aérien pour les réfugiés », les Echos du 30/8/2017 : "Avramopoulos demande aussi le soutien des Etats-membres pour le plan de l’UNHCR de « procéder temporairement à une #évacuation d’urgence des groupes de migrants les plus vulnérables de la #Libye vers le #Niger et d’autres pays de la région ».

    – Le Monde, 22/9/2017 :Vincent Cochel, responsable de la situation en mer Méditerranée

    "Pour accélérer l’amélioration de la situation, nous oeuvrons à la création de centres ouverts de réception qui pourraient être installés en Libye. Il y a urgence compte tenu des conditions existantes
    dans les centres de détention. Le dossier avance, mais n’est pas bouclé. Ces centres nous permettront également d’évacuer en urgence certains réfugiés vers des pays tiers en vue de leur transfert dans des pays européens ou autres. Cependant, sans clarification rapide des intentions chiffrées des pays de réinstallation, nous ne pourrons pas évacuer ces réfugiés en danger vers des pays de transit susceptibles de les accueillir temporairement."

    –---------------------

    Migrants : « La France doit clarifier au plus tôt la hauteur de son engagement »

    Vincent Cochetel, responsable de la situation en mer Méditerranée pour l’Agence des Nations unies
    chargée des réfugiés, dénonce la faiblesse des réinstallations d’exilés en Europe.
    LE MONDE | 22.09.2017 à 11h19 | Propos recueillis par Maryline Baumard (/journaliste/maryline-baumard/)

    Après les annonces estivales d’Emmanuel Macron, qui propose d’ouvrir une voie légale d’accès en
    France pour éviter la traversée de la Méditerranée, Vincent Cochetel, l’émissaire spécial pour cette
    zone de l’Agence des Nations unies chargée des réfugiés (UNHCR), s’impatiente de l’absence
    d’engagement chiffré.
    Emmanuel Macron a annoncé en juillet que la France irait chercher des Africains sur les
    routes migratoires, avant leur arrivée en Libye, afin d’éviter qu’ils ne risquent la mort en mer.

    Le HCR se réjouit-il de cette initiative ?
    La réinstallation n’est pas la solution au problème migratoire, mais elle fait partie de l’approche
    globale… Ce message, qui consiste à aller chercher des réfugiés dans les pays voisins de zones de
    conflits et à leur offrir un avenir, une protection, a été plus ou moins entendu lorsqu’il s’agit des
    Syriens réfugiés au Liban, en Jordanie ou en Turquie, il ne l’était pas à ce jour pour les réfugiés
    africains.
    Nous nous réjouissons que la France organise des opérations avec notre soutien depuis le Tchad et
    le Niger. La situation est difficile sur ces deux zones, puisque le Tchad accueille un nombre
    important de réfugiés venus du Soudan (Darfour) ou de Centrafrique, et que le Niger reçoit ceux qui
    fuient les zones où sévit Boko Haram, mais aussi sur le Mali, où la situation actuelle nous inquiète.

    Quel rôle jouez-vous au Tchad et au Niger ?
    Nous gérons, avec les autorités, les camps de réfugiés dans les quinze pays qui longent la route
    migratoire des Africains que nous retrouvons ensuite en Libye. Les Etats y accordent une protection
    internationale et nous les assistons, ainsi que nos partenaires ONG, dans les services qu’ils offrent
    à ces populations fragilisées. Dans chaque pays, nous établissons une liste de personnes
    vulnérables qui nécessitent un transfert. Elle est de 83 500 au Tchad et de 10 500 au Niger, les deux
    pays dans lesquels la France projette de venir chercher des Africains pour les réinstaller. En plus,
    nous aimerions que la France et d’autres pays acceptent d’accueillir des réfugiés que nous voulons
    évacuer en urgence de Libye.

    Vous aimeriez que les pays européens en réinstallent 40 000, sélectionnés dans vos listes…
    La France vous a-t-elle fait part de quotas chiffrés d’Africains qu’elle souhaite accueillir ?
    Pas à ce jour. Aussi nous demandons au gouvernement français de clarifier au plus tôt la hauteur de
    son engagement. Le comptage des réinstallations déjà effectuées depuis ces zones est assez
    rapide. En 2015 et en 2016, aucun réfugié africain n’a été transféré depuis le Niger et un seul l’a été,
    vers la France, en 2017. Lorsque l’on s’intéresse au Tchad, 856 ont été réinstallés en 2015, 641
    en 2016 et 115 en 2017. Presque aucun vers l’Europe ; la plupart ont été accueillis au Canada ou
    aux Etats-Unis.

    Comment allez-vous travailler avec la France ?
    Nous commencerons par envoyer à l’Office français de protection des réfugiés et apatrides [Ofpra]
    une liste de dossiers de personnes vulnérables sélectionnées par nos soins comme devant de toute
    urgence rejoindre l’Europe. Leur cas sera d’abord analysé à Paris. L’Ofpra les étudiera du point de
    vue des critères de l’asile, et des spécialistes vérifieront les questions de sécurité et si toutes les
    conditions sont réunies. Ensuite, les équipes françaises de l’Ofpra entendront sur place les
    personnes sélectionnées. Ces entretiens pourront avoir lieu dans nos locaux avec éventuellement
    nos interprètes. Pendant que la France préparera leur accueil, une sensibilisation culturelle sur le
    pays leur sera prodiguée, afin qu’elles disposent d’emblée de quelques éléments de contexte.
    Emmanuel Macron a décidé d’intervenir au Niger et au Tchad, mais rêve dans le fond de
    travailler plus directement avec la Libye. Ce que fait ou tente de faire le HCR…
    Il faut que les Etats européens arrêtent de se bercer d’illusions sur les possibilités actuelles de
    travailler avec ce pays. Notre rôle à nous, agence de l’ONU, y reste malheureusement très limité.
    Même lorsque nous sommes présents dans les prisons officielles, où entre 7 000 et 9 000 migrants
    et demandeurs d’asile sont emprisonnés, sur 390 000 présents dans le pays. D’autres subissent des
    traitements inhumains dans des lieux de détention tenus par des trafiquants. Dans les prisons
    « officielles », nous n’avons pour l’instant l’autorisation de nous adresser qu’aux ressortissants de
    sept nationalités (Irakiens, Palestiniens, Somaliens, Syriens, Ethiopiens s’ils sont Oromos,
    Soudanais du Darfour et Erythréens). Ce qui signifie que nous n’avons jamais parlé à un Soudanais
    du Sud, à un Malien, à un Yéménite, etc.
    L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations a assisté cette année plus de 3 000 personnes
    arrivées en Libye afin de leur permettre de rentrer chez elles. Nous croyons que cette solution est
    très utile pour nombre d’entre elles. Il faut garder à l’esprit que 56 % des migrants en Libye disent
    avoir atteint leur destination finale. Ils espéraient y trouver du travail, ce qui ne s’est pas matérialisé
    pour beaucoup d’entre eux.
    Pour accélérer l’amélioration de la situation, nous oeuvrons à la création de centres ouverts de
    réception qui pourraient être installés en Libye. Il y a urgence compte tenu des conditions existantes
    dans les centres de détention. Le dossier avance, mais n’est pas bouclé. Ces centres nous
    permettront également d’évacuer en urgence certains réfugiés vers des pays tiers en vue de leur
    transfert dans des pays européens ou autres. Cependant, sans clarification rapide des intentions
    chiffrées des pays de réinstallation, nous ne pourrons pas évacuer ces réfugiés en danger vers des
    pays de transit susceptibles de les accueillir temporairement.

    Un pont aérien pour les réfugiés
    Les Echos, 30 août 2017
    https://www.lecho.be/economie-politique/europe-general/Un-pont-aerien-pour-les-refugies/9927215?ckc=1&ts=1507288383

    La Commission demande aux États membres de se montrer solidaires envers les Africains : jusqu’à 37.700 réfugiés pourraient rejoindre l’Europe en avion, en direct de Libye, d’Egypte, du Niger, d’Éthiopie et du Soudan.
    Dans la crise de la migration, l’attention européenne se porte de plus en plus vers le flux de migrants qui tentent la traversée vers l’Italie à partir de l’Afrique du Nord et de la corne de l’Afrique, via la Libye. Dans une lettre envoyée vendredi dernier à tous les ministres des États membres, le commissaire européen à la Migration, Dimitris Avramopoulos, demande un doublement des efforts de réinstallation, ce qui porterait à 40.000 le nombre de réfugiés accueillis en Europe.

    Le commissaire européen à la Migration demande un doublement des efforts de réinstallation.
    Le pont aérien ne devrait pas se limiter aux pays voisins de la Syrie. Avramopoulos demande également que l’on accueille les réfugiés qui ont besoin de la protection internationale le long de la route de l’Europe centrale. Il demande « que l’on concentre la réinstallation au départ de l’Egypte, la Libye, le Niger, l’Éthiopie et le Soudan ».
    C’est au Haut commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés, l’UNHCR, qu’il reviendra de définir le profil des migrants qui pourront être pris en considération pour une réinstallation en Europe. Avramopoulos demande aussi le soutien des Etats-membres pour le plan de l’UNHCR de « procéder temporairement à une évacuation d’urgence des groupes de migrants les plus vulnérables de la Libye vers le Niger et d’autres pays de la région ».
    Les États membres ont jusqu’à la mi-septembre pour annoncer leurs plans. Ils ne sont pas obligés de participer à ce pont aérien. Le cadre européen de réinstallation travaille sur base d’engagements volontaires. La Commission européenne offre cependant une aide financière non négligeable de 10.000 euros par réfugié, pour un budget total de 377 millions d’euros.

    « J’ai toujours défendu le principe de réinstallation. La Belgique est prête à faire sa part. Il y a cependant une condition cruciale. La migration sûre et légale, via la réinstallation ne pourra se faire que si l’on met fin à l’asile après une migration illégale. »
    Theo Francken Secrétaire d’État à la Migration

    Vers une nouvelle controverse sur la solidarité ?
    Au cours de l’été 2015, la Commission avait déjà lancé un cadre commun pour l’UE portant sur l’acheminement direct de 22.000 réfugiés, au départ des pays voisins de la Syrie. Objectif : éviter les traversées dangereuses vers la Grèce.
    Aujourd’hui, 17.000 réfugiés – dont plus de 7.800 Syriens acheminés à partir de la Turquie dans le cadre de la convention entre l’Europe et la Turquie – ont effectivement bénéficié du pont aérien vers l’Europe au départ des pays voisins de la Syrie.
    Les diplomates européens craignent que cette nouvelle proposition ne provoque une nouvelle controverse sur la solidarité dans le cadre de la crise de la migration. La concentration sur l’Afrique et la route centrale via la mer Méditerranée pourrait avoir du mal à passer. Car elle donne l’impression que l’Europe essaie de reproduire l’accord avec la Turquie, mais dans une Libye dangereuse, instable et imprévisible. Une solution que le président du parlement européen, Antonio Tajani, défend ouvertement.
    Par ailleurs, la route entre la Libye et l’Italie est surtout utilisée par des migrants économiques, qui ne sont en principe pas éligibles pour l’asile. C’est pourquoi les efforts européens de ces derniers mois se sont surtout concentrés sur le renvoi de ces migrants dans leur pays, et l’arrêt des flux migratoires.
    Malgré tout, l’Allemagne, la France, l’Italie et l’Espagne ont déjà répondu à l’appel. Lors du mini-sommet qui s’est tenu lundi à Paris, les chefs de gouvernement de ces quatre pays ont promis, non seulement un soutien supplémentaire aux pays du Sahel afin de fermer la route vers la Libye, mais aussi davantage de solidarité lors de la réinstallation en Europe des personnes ayant droit à l’asile.
    Theo Francken, secrétaire d’État à la Migration, soutient Avramopoulos. « J’ai toujours défendu le principe de réinstallation. La Belgique est prête à faire sa part. Il y a cependant une condition cruciale. La migration sûre et légale, via la réinstallation ne pourra se faire que si l’on met fin à l’asile après une migration illégale. »
    Source : L’Echo

    #réinstallation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #centres_de_transit