• Cuban asylum seekers in Greece ‘forcibly expelled’ to Turkey

    Dozens of Cuban nationals in legal limbo in Turkey after reporting violent and illegal expulsions from Greece.

    At least 30 Cubans, hoping to claim asylum in Europe, were forcibly expelled from Greece to Turkey towards the end of last year, according to interviews conducted by Al Jazeera and rights organisations.

    Al Jazeera spoke to two Cubans who also said that, during their expulsion from Greece, police officers and border guards subjected those they were expelling to #violence.

    Allegations made to Al Jazeera and rights organisations include accounts of forced undressing, beatings, detention without food or water, confiscation of passports, money and other personal belongings, refusal to register asylum claims, and forced water immersion prior to and during the expulsion process.

    Al Jazeera also viewed photos and testimonies of the asylum seekers taken by NGOs on the ground to verify those claims.

    Those expelled now say they are left in limbo in Turkey without identification or access to legal reparations, despite some of them having reported the forced expulsion to the Cuban consulate and Turkish authorities after their arrival.
    ‘Like a nightmare’

    Joel (name changed to protect identity), 38, a doctor from Havana looking to claim asylum in Spain, says he feared being killed during his expulsion from Greece.

    In a video call with Al Jazeera from Istanbul, Joel recounted the two-day ordeal.

    In the early hours of October 29 last year, Joel and two other Cubans crossed into Greece from North Macedonia on a 48-hour journey which had taken them from Havana to Moscow, then to Belgrade, then by bus and on foot across Serbia and North Macedonia.

    Later that day, Joel says all three were removed from a bus travelling from Thessaloniki to Athens by Greek police.

    He recalled being taken to three different detention centres where the trio, as well as other Cubans, Syrians, Afghans and Pakistanis had their belongings taken, and were forced to undress, searched, beaten and detained without food or water.

    “I told the officers I was a doctor from Cuba and was there to seek political asylum. They just looked at me and laughed,” he said.

    After spending the night in detention, the entire group was driven to the forest near the Turkish border.

    Joel recounts they were forced to walk in a line, led by gun-carrying officers wearing balaclavas.

    “I thought we were being taken to be killed,” he said, adding that as they arrived at the Evros River – which marks the border between Greece and Turkey – an officer hit a young man who was brought there fully naked.

    The officer then dragged the man to the river and pushed his head under water, pulling it out only when called out by other officers.

    The group, eight people at a time, was then loaded onto boats manned by plainclothes officers, taken halfway across the river before being made to swim the rest of the way into Turkey by the officers.

    In a testimony given to Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN), Joel said the officers in the boat said “When you get to the other side [of the river] you are free, and you can walk towards the light and find the closest village.”
    Stuck in limbo

    Another member of the group, Reniel, who preferred to give only his first name due to fears for his family in Cuba, said the experience was “like a nightmare”.

    The 25-year-old was working in the government tax department before he left Cuba.

    Like Joel, he was living with his family and said it was “impossible” to live an independent life or to exercise political expression in Cuba.

    “Now, I’m worried about being illegal in a country that I didn’t even choose to go to,” Reniel told Al Jazeera during a Skype interview.

    “If I leave [Turkey], which is what they want me to do because I’m not here with [documentation], I could still be punished for it.”

    Reniel said he reported the expulsion to the Cuban consulate in Turkey but claims he was told “the Greek government don’t deport any Cubans”, adding that Greek officers confiscated his passport and did not return it.

    In August 2021, Human Rights Watch reported that there was “mounting evidence that the Greek government has in recent months secretly expelled thousands of migrants trying to reach its shores”.

    HRW said it “reviewed credible footage and interviewed victims and witnesses” describing scenes where authorities forced “people onto small inflatable rescue rafts and sending them back to Turkish waters”.

    However, Greece’s Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis denied the allegations, telling CNN in an interview: “It has not happened. We’ve been the victims of a significant misinformation campaign.”

    ‘Absurd’ border practices

    The Cubans’ allegations are among numerous reports of a “violent campaign” of pushbacks and expulsions of asylum seekers by Greece, across both its land and sea borders.

    Natalie Gruber, spokesperson for Josoor, an organisation supporting survivors of pushbacks in Turkey, and BVMN member, said these latest alleged expulsions demonstrate the “absurd” nature of current border practices.

    “We can’t speak of pushbacks any more when a state systematically disappears people into another country they had never set foot in before,” said Gruber.

    “This practice constitutes grave violations of numerous laws, including arbitrary detention, violations of the principle of non-refoulement violence amounting to torture … [and yet] has become a pillar of the European border regime.”

    Joel and Reniel know of “at least 30″ Cubans in a similar situation in Turkey. Testimonies of seven Cubans taken by Josoor also revealed a similar number of Cubans in Turkey who say they were expelled by Greece.

    Corinne Linnecar, advocacy manager at Mobile Info Team, a refugee support organisation in Greece, explained that these practices are exacerbated by challenges in accessing asylum in Greece.

    “There is currently no access to asylum for the majority of people on mainland Greece, Crete and Rhodes,” said Linnecar.

    “This forces people to remain undocumented and destitute and leaves them at increased risk of being illegally and forcibly expelled to Turkey at the hands of Greek authorities.”

    Linnecar added that while asylum seekers who did not arrive via the island hotspots could previously register themselves through a government-run Skype system, this was suspended in late November last year with no clear information on a replacement system.

    “The only Reception and Identification Centre currently on mainland Greece is a closed site in the Evros region with a mandatory 25-day detention period.”

    A spokesperson for the Greek Migration Ministry told Al Jazeera that “all people arriving irregularly to Greece can apply for asylum”.

    “Asylum seekers should report to the existing reception centres operating at border points to register on arrival to Greek territory, as required by law,” the spokesperson added.

    The ministry said a “small number” of Cubans have arrived in Greece in recent months but said it “strongly denies any allegations that persons entering Greece have been expulse [sic] in any way”.
    ‘No freedom of expression’

    Despite their situation, Joel and Reniel said they would not return to Cuba, pointing to the economic instability and the political environment as reasons for leaving.

    “It’s impossible to find affordable rent to become independent,” said Reniel. “There is no freedom of expression … I couldn’t speak out publicly … I felt like I couldn’t really take it any more.”

    Joel said he expects he would be punished if he were to return to Cuba.

    Cuba has reportedly been facing its worst economic crisis since the fall of the Soviet Union, with the pandemic and US sanctions intensifying challenges.

    After the economy shrank almost 11 percent in 2020, and imports of food, medicines and consumer goods slumped, public outcry spilled over into rare protests in July.

    These were met with a subsequent government crackdown, in which at least one person was killed and more than 1,150 arrested.

    Charlie Martel, a visiting assistant professor at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, cited government “repression” and “friction” as reasons behind Cubans seeking asylum in Europe and the United States.

    Martel added that the Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy, which US President Joe Biden was forced to reinstate by a court order, along with the effects of a pandemic-related policy known as Title 42, has made access to asylum in the US increasingly dangerous and exclusionary.

    “Because of that, you’re seeing more asylum seekers, who have resources, resort to going to different places, or coming into the US in different ways,” he said.

    “These desperate people are going to continue to seek refuge in any way that they can.”

    For Reniel, he was just looking for “a better life”.

    “When you try to do something like this, leave your country and find a better life, sometimes you think they could catch us. But you never imagine that something like this would happen.”

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/1/10/like-a-nightmare-cubans-allege-expulsions-to-turkey
    #réfugiés_cubains #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Turquie #Grèce #refoulement #push-backs #limbe

    –-

    en 2014, Alberto et moi avions rencontré des réfugiés cubains en #Serbie :


    https://seenthis.net/messages/570326
    https://seenthis.net/messages/570326

  • Migrants : enquête sur le rôle de l’Europe dans le piège libyen

    Des données de vol obtenues par « Le Monde » révèlent comment l’agence européenne #Frontex encourage les #rapatriements de migrants vers la Libye, malgré les exactions qui y sont régulièrement dénoncées par l’ONU.

    300 kilomètres séparent la Libye de l’île de Lampedusa et de l’Europe. Une traversée de la #Méditerranée périlleuse, que des dizaines de milliers de migrants tentent chaque année. Depuis 2017, lorsqu’ils sont repérés en mer, une partie d’entre eux est rapatriée en Libye, où ils peuvent subir #tortures, #viols et #détentions_illégales. Des #exactions régulièrement dénoncées par les Nations unies.

    L’Union européenne a délégué à la Libye la responsabilité des #sauvetages_en_mer dans une large zone en Méditerranée, et apporte à Tripoli un #soutien_financier et opérationnel. Selon les images et documents collectés par Le Monde, cela n’empêche pas les garde-côtes libyens d’enfreindre régulièrement des règles élémentaires du #droit_international, voire de se rendre coupables de #violences graves.

    Surtout, l’enquête #vidéo du Monde révèle que, malgré son discours officiel, l’agence européenne de gardes-frontières Frontex semble encourager les #rapatriements de migrants en Libye, plutôt que sur les côtes européennes. Les données de vol du drone de Frontex montrent comment l’activité de l’agence européenne se concentre sur la zone où les migrants, une fois détectés, sont rapatriés en Libye. Entre le 1er juin et le 31 juillet 2021, le drone de Frontex a passé 86 % de son temps de vol opérationnel dans cette zone. Sur la même période, à peine plus de la moitié des situations de détresse localisées par l’ONG Alarm Phone y étaient enregistrées.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/video/2021/10/31/migrants-enquete-sur-le-role-de-l-europe-dans-le-piege-libyen_6100475_3210.h
    #responsabilité #Europe #UE #EU #Union_européenne #Libye #migrations #asile #réfugiés #pull-backs #pullbacks #push-backs #refoulements #frontières #gardes-côtes_libyens

    déjà signalé sur seenthis par @colporteur
    https://seenthis.net/messages/934958

  • Fossil fuel giant #Shell and EU maritime authorities accused of complicity in Mediterranean refugee ‘pullback’

    Banksy-funded rescue ship #Louise_Michel carries 31 refugees as Tunisian Navy sends 70 to its ‘unsafe’ country

    EUROPEAN maritime authorities and fossil fuel giant Shell were accused of complicity in the sending of about 70 refugees to an unsafe country today.

    Civilian rescuers on board the Louise Michel, a rescue ship part-funded by the elusive British artist Banksy, saved the lives of about 101 people within Malta‘s search-and-rescue (SAR) zone in the central Mediterranean on Monday night.

    It was the Seabird, a reconnaissance plane operated by rescuers Sea-Watch, that first spotted the refugees in distress, and passed their position onto the Louise Michael.

    The Louise Michel’s crew managed to bring 31 refugees aboard their vessel, but the remaining 70 or so others climbed onto the nearby Miskar offshore gas platform, which Shell operates on behalf of the Tunisian government.

    The Louise Michel warned on social media this morning that the refugees on the platform had been waiting there for over 14 hours and that the Maltese authorities, who are legally responsible for coordinating their rescue, were refusing to communicate.

    The Tunisian navy arrived on scene later in the afternoon and took the 70 refugees from the platform to Tunisia, a move Louise Michel and many of the other NGO refugee rescuers condemned as a “#pullback,” the unlawful return of refugees to an unsafe place.

    “We witnessed an illegal pullback of around 70 people by several Tunisian Navy vessels from the Shell platform,” a crew member aboard the Louise Michel told The Civil Fleet today.

    “We strongly condemn this violation of human rights and maritime law of which European authorities and Shell are complicit in.”

    Jacob Berkson, an activist with the distress hotline organisation Alarm Phone, described the Tunisian and Maltese authorities’ actions as an “egregious breach” of the refugee conventions.

    “It is to be hoped that they [the refugees] have not been returned to the hell of Libya, but nor can Tunisia be assumed to be a safe third country. It was on Malta to rescue these people,” Mr Berkman told The Civil Fleet today.

    “In any sane world, the Armed Forces of Malta would intervene swiftly and professionally to rescue people in distress, irrespective of why they took to sea in the first place.

    “Of course, in any sane world, it would be rare that people seeking refuge needed rescuing because they would be travelling on a well maintained, commercial vessel to a country of their choice.”

    Shell’s Tunisian arm said: “[We] can confirm that on January 3 2022 at 8pm (Tunis time), a boat carrying people reached our offshore platform. They were assisted and provided with water, food and dry clothes.

    “Shell had informed the Tunisian authorities and worked closely with them to ensure the safety of people on board the boat. They have since been safely transferred to the Tunisian navy vessel on January 4.”

    https://thecivilfleet.wordpress.com/2022/01/04/fossil-fuel-giant-shell-and-eu-maritime-authorities-accused

    #pull-backs #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Méditerranée #Shell #Plate-forme_pétrolière #plateforme_pétrolière #mer_Méditerranée #Tunisie #SAR

    j’ajoute aussi #push-backs #refoulements —> même si techniquement il s’agit de pull-backs, mais pour avoir plus de chances de le retrouver dans le futur...

  • L’#Europe, derrière murs et #barbelés

    A l’été 2021, la crise afghane a ravivé les divisions européennes. Entre devoir d’accueil et approche sécuritaire, l’UE n’arrive toujours pas à parler d’une même voix face aux demandeurs d’asile. Le déséquilibre est fort entre les pays d’arrivée, comme la Grèce ou l’Italie, aux centres d’accueil débordés, les pays de transit à l’Est, rétifs à l’idée même d’immigration, et les pays d’accueil au Nord et à l’Ouest de l’Europe, soucieux de ne pas froisser un électorat de plus en plus sensible sur ces questions. Résultat : plus de 30 ans après la chute du mur de Berlin et la fin du Rideau de fer, l’Europe n’a jamais érigé autant de murs à ses frontières.

    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/100627-116-A/europe-la-tentation-des-murs

    #murs #barrières_frontalières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #film #vidéo #reportage #histoire #chronologie #financement #financements #frontières_extérieures #refoulements #push-backs #Frontex #technologie #complexe_militaro-industriel

    On dit dans le reportage qu’il y aurait « plus de 1000 km d’infrastructure destinée à barrer la route aux migrants »

    La rhétorique de l’#afflux et de l’#invasion est insupportable dans cette vidéo.

  • Afghans fleeing the Taliban face death, deportation and push-backs in Turkey

    With financial support from the EU, Turkey has toughened up its migration policies – putting hundreds of thousands at risk.

    As the US continues withdrawing its troops from Afghanistan, and the Taliban increases its control in the country, around 1,000 Afghans have been arriving to Turkey’s eastern border with Iran every day.

    According to an aid provider for refugees in Eastern Turkey who wishes to remain anonymous, local authorities are exposing the arriving migrants to harsh controls as they struggle to process all those in need of safety. To avoid detection by state authorities and potential mistreatment, many migrants must rely on smugglers and use dangerous routes that can sometimes end in death.

    When walking in the #Seyrantepe cemetery in #Van, in eastern Turkey, one might stumble across a large area at the end, lined with headstones without names. The gravestones are marked either by numbers or nationalities. Most are Afghans who tried to cross from Iran to Turkey before attempting to travel to Istanbul and finally to the European Union.

    “The majority of refugees die during the smuggling accidents,” the local gravedigger, a Kurdish man in his late forties, explained while walking around the cemetery. “Smugglers put too many people in small fishing boats when trying to transport them across the Van Lake, which results in boat accidents and drownings.

    “Refugees are also driven very fast through army road checks, drivers lose control and kill the passengers,” he added.

    Residents say they find dozens of dead bodies in the mountains when the snow melts every spring. These are refugees who try to cross the border in the winter and either freeze to death, are attacked by wild animals or are shot by the Iranian army.

    Who crosses the Iran-Turkey border?

    Turkey’s eastern border with Iran has served as the main transit point for Afghans since the Soviet-Afghan War in the 1980s. The Afghans I met at this border were mostly Hazara Shia Muslims, LGBTIQ+ individuals and former soldiers or translators for the US Army. All were particularly vulnerable to the recent increase in Taliban control.

    I also met Iranian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Iraqi, Syrian and Nigerian nationals crossing Turkey’s eastern border in search of an alternative transit route to safety after Turkey’s southern border with Syria was sealed with a wall in 2018.

    Since refugees lack access to legal routes to safety, most move without authorisation and rely on smugglers. The Turkish Ministry of Interior estimates that almost half a million ‘illegal’ migrants entered Turkey prior to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019 and around 62,000 in 2021. However, it is likely that the real numbers are much higher due to the clandestine nature of this movement.

    Toughening up migration policies in Turkey

    Turkey hosts the largest refugee population in the world, with more than four million refugees. Since the country retains geographical limitation to the 1951 UN Refugee Convention, only people fleeing events in Europe can be given refugee status there. Yet, the majority of refugees in Turkey are Syrian nationals granted special status of temporary protection.

    Those who are non-Syrian and non-European, including Afghans, are not entitled to seek asylum in the country but must instead ask for international protection, and if successful, wait for a third country to resettle them, explains Mahmut Kaçan, a lawyer from the Bar Van Association.

    “I registered five years ago, but no one has even asked me for an interview to be resettled. We are losing hope to be resettled,” says Taimur, a refugee from Afghanistan currently residing in Van.

    Turkey has recently toughened up its migration policies, which numerous people I spoke to considered to be driven by the government’s fear that migrants will overstay in Turkey.

    My friend was crossing with a large group from Iran to Turkey. When the Iranian police saw them, they started shooting

    In 2018, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) gave its responsibility for determining a person’s international protection status in Turkey to the Directorate General Migration Management (DGMM), which acts under the Turkish Ministry of Interior. This centralization had a catastrophic impact on non-Syrian refugees in Turkey. The DGMM gave positive international protection status to only 5,449 applicants in 2019, compared to 72,961 successful applications in 2018 under UNHCR mandate: a 92.5% drop.

    At the same time, the number of removal centers, where people are accommodated before being deported, increased in Turkey from ten to 28 since the 2016 EU-Turkey Agreement. The European Commission gave €60m to Turkey for the management, reception and hosting of migrants, some of which was spent on the construction and refurbishment of these facilities. This boom of removal centers goes hand in hand with an increase in the number of deportations of Afghans from Turkey from 10,000 in 2017 to 33,000 in 2018 and 40,000 in 2019, according to an internal presentation allegedly from a Turkish government meeting, which was sent to the Afghanistan Analyst Network (AAN). While return flights mostly stopped in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ANN reports that still more than 9,000 Afghans were deported from Turkey during the last year.
    Navigating the local military conflict and push-backs

    Migration in eastern Turkey takes place under the shadow of Turkey’s fight against the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), a military struggle that has been ongoing since the 1980s.

    Although the fighting has calmed down over the past five years, a large Turkish military presence and military operations continue across the region, marked by killings and arrests of PKK suspects.

    Civilians are also subjected to military surveillance and anti-terror operations, including Kurdish people who are economically dependent on the smuggling of goods (e.g., tobacco, petrol, food) or refugees across the border.

    “You can be killed on the spot if you cross the border through a military area,” explained Muge, a member of the Hayatadestek (‘Support to Life’), a humanitarian organization helping disaster-affected communities and refugees in Turkey.

    The European Commission has criticised Turkish authorities for detaining, persecuting and convicting journalists, students, lawyers, opposition political parties and activists mostly on overly broad terrorism-related charges, which concern particularly populations in eastern Turkey. However, at the same time, the commission has dedicated extensive funds and support for military projects in eastern Turkey with the aim to stop onward ‘illegal’ migration to the European Union.

    These involve millions of euros for walls and the construction of barbed-wire fences, as well as delivery of surveillance vehicles, communication and surveillance masts, thermal cameras, and hardware and software equipment, as well as training of border patrols along the Iran-Turkey border.

    Outsourcing borders

    What this approach does is push the borders of the European Union much further away, and outsource anti-migration measures to authoritarian governments who apply local anti-terror policies to exclude border crossers.

    “My brother keeps trying to enter Turkey from Iran. He tried to cross six times recently but was beaten up by Turkish army each time, and then pushed back to Iran. The army was shooting at him,” Amir, another Afghan living in Van, told me.

    The experience of Amir’s brother is an example of ‘push-backs’: the illegal procedure by which people are forced back over a border without consideration of their individual circumstances. Push-backs by EU state authorities and Frontex, the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, have been reported to take place in Greece, Bulgaria, Croatia and other places along the EU’s physical borders.

    A soldier from the Turkish Gendarmerie General Command, who agreed to provide commentary as long as he remains anonymous, confirmed the regular practice of push-backs from Turkey to Iran. “The [national] police told the gendarmerie [serving at the Iran-Turkey border] not to take all migrants for registration, because it is a financial burden to accommodate them all in removal centers, feed them, and legally process all of them,” he explains. “So, the gendarmerie was told to push some migrants back.”

    People who are pushed back are often trapped in the rough mountainous terrain between Turkey and Iran and face harsh treatment by the Iranian state authorities, as Ali, an Afghan in his late twenties, recalls while drinking tea in a café in Van: “My friend was crossing with a large group of people from Iran to Turkey. When the Iranian police saw them, they started shooting. They killed 14 people. My friend was shot in his leg but survived.”

    While these tough border measures have been deployed to stop onward ‘illegal’ migration, they paradoxically push refugees to flee further from Turkey without authorization. “If we do not get resettled from Turkey in a few years, our family will try to cross into Europe by ourselves,” says Taimur while holding his young son on his lap in a small flat in Van.

    Those arriving in Eastern Turkey often do not stay long in the country for fear of push-backs and rapid deportations. Instead, they place their money and lives in the hands of more smugglers and wish to move on.

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/north-africa-west-asia/afghans-fleeing-taliban-face-death-deportation-and-push-backs-turkey

    #Iran #Turquie #frontières #décès #morts #cimetière #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #montagne #réfugiés_afghans #refoulements #push-backs

    ping @isskein

  • Exils sans fin - Chantages anti-migratoires le long de la route des Balkans

    Depuis plus de 20 ans, l’UE développe une coopération avec des pays non-membres (dits « tiers ») pour externaliser le contrôle de ses frontières. Identifiés comme des pays de départ puis comme des pays de transit des migrations à destination de l’UE, les pays des Balkans ont été rapidement intégrés au cœur de cette stratégie d’externalisation. Ce, particulièrement depuis la malnommée « crise migratoire » de l’année 2015 lors de laquelle près d’un million de personnes venues principalement du Moyen-Orient ont été compatibilisées le long de la route des Balkans, itinéraire reliant la Grèce à des pays de l’UE situés plus à l’Ouest, et notamment l’Allemagne.

    Prétendant résoudre une crise que l’UE a elle-même engendrée, les politiques migratoires européennes dans la région sont celles de pompiers pyromanes. Zone tampon ou zone de « sécurité migratoire », cela fait plusieurs décennies que la région des Balkans est utilisée par l’UE pour la sous-traitance du contrôle de ses frontières, au détriment tant de la population locale que des personnes exilées. Sommés de s’ériger en gardes-frontières et en véritables « #hotspots » au service de l’UE, les pays des Balkans sont aujourd’hui le théâtre d’une multitude de violations de droits et de #violences exercées à l’encontre des personnes exilées.

    Fruit d’un travail in situ réalisé entre janvier et avril 2021 pour le réseau Migreurop, le présent rapport documente ce processus d’externalisation des frontières européennes dans la région des Balkans. Il s’appuie sur des observations de terrain et plus d’une centaine d’entretiens réalisés avec des personnes exilées, des représentant·e·s d’ONG locales et internationales, des chercheurs et des chercheuses, des militant·e·s, des avocat·e·s, des journalistes, ainsi que des actrices et acteurs institutionnels.

    Le rapport se décompose en trois parties. La première examine la manière dont les dirigeant·e·s européen·ne·s instrumentalisent le processus d’adhésion des pays des Balkans à des fins de contrôle migratoire. La deuxième s’intéresse à la transformation de ces pays en véritables « chiens de garde » des frontières de l’UE, en accordant une attention particulière aux pratiques de #refoulements et aux violences comme outils normalisés de gestion des frontières. La troisième partie documente la mise en place de « l’approche hotspot » dans la région.

    https://migreurop.org/article3069.html
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #contrôles_frontaliers #zone_tampon #pays_tiers #push-backs #rapport #Migreurop #refoulements #violence

  • European Court of Human Rights: Bulgaria’s pushback practice violates human rights

    Bulgaria’s systematic expulsion of refugees and migrants to Turkey without an individual examination of the risk of torture, inhuman or degrading treatment violates the European Convention on Human Rights, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled today.

    In the case D v. Bulgaria, the Court unanimously found that the applicant, a Turkish journalist, was forcibly returned to Turkey. The Bulgarian authorities had failed to carry out an assessment of the risk he faced there, and deprived him of the possibility to challenge his removal, breaching articles 3 and 13 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the Court found. He was supported in the proceedings by the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights, The Center for Legal Aid - Voice in Bulgaria and Foundation PRO ASYL.

    “The ECtHR’s decision provides belated but important satisfaction for the applicant. It sets a strong counterpoint to Bulgaria’s longstanding practice of denying refugees protection from persecution and handing them straight back to their persecutors,” says attorney Carsten Gericke, D’s counsel. “This is a clear signal to Bulgaria that pushbacks, as carried out along the EU’s external borders, must come to an end and access to human rights and to asylum must be guaranteed.”

    After many years working as a journalist in Turkey, D was compelled to leave the country due to increasing state repression in the aftermath of the attempted coup d’état in July 2016. Together with eight other refugees from Turkey and Syria, he was apprehended in a truck at the Bulgarian-Romanian border on October 14, 2016. Despite expressing his fear of return to Turkey, at no point did the Bulgarian authorities assess the risk of torture, mistreatment and further political persecution faced by the applicant in Turkey. He was not allowed access to a lawyer or interpreter and was returned to Turkey within less than 24 hours.

    “This is a breakthrough decision for guaranteeing the right to asylum procedures and protecting asylum seekers from removal to the country where they face persecution,” adds Diana Radoslavova from the Center for Legal Aid - Voice in Bulgaria.

    Upon arrival in Turkey, D was immediately detained, and later, in December 2019, sentenced to seven and a half years of imprisonment for membership of a terrorist organization FETÖ. The verdict against him was largely based on the fact that he had the messenger application, ’Bylock’, on his cell phone. Following the Turkish government’s assertion that the app is used by the Gülen movement, which it declared a terrorist organization, Turkish courts have viewed the use of the app as sufficient proof of affiliation to the group.

    “The right to asylum is under attack. Today’s ruling has once again clarified that the protection from refoulement is absolute. The fight against pushbacks and violence at the EU’s borders continues - with new tailwind from Strasbourg,” says Karl Kopp from PRO ASYL.

    NGOs have consistently reported on pushbacks at the Bulgarian-Turkish border, documenting how Turkish nationals in particular are denied access to asylum. In 2018, the Council of Europe’s Special Representative on migration and refugees, Tomáš Boček, criticized the lack of respect for the principle of non-refoulement and urged for the individual examination of personal risk refugees/applicants might face when they are deported back to Turkey.

    https://www.ecchr.eu/pressemitteilung/european-court-of-human-rights-bulgarias-pushback-practice-violates-human-righ

    #CourEDH #CEDH #Bulgarie #push-backs #renvois #refoulements #Turquie #expulsions #justice #condamnation #risques #réfugiés_turques

    ping @isskein

  • À la frontière franco-espagnole, le renforcement des contrôles conduit les migrants à prendre toujours plus de #risques

    Au #Pays_basque, après que trois Algériens sont morts fauchés par un train à Saint-Jean-de-Luz/Ciboure le 12 octobre, associations et militants dénoncent le « #harcèlement » subi par les migrants tentant de traverser la frontière franco-espagnole. Face à l’inaction de l’État, des réseaux citoyens se mobilisent pour « sécuriser » leur parcours et éviter de nouveaux drames.

    Saint-Jean-de-Luz (Pyrénées-Atlantiques).– Attablés en terrasse d’un café, mardi 26 octobre, sous un ciel gris prêt à déverser son crachin, Line et Peio peinent toujours à y croire. « On n’imagine pas le niveau de fatigue, l’épuisement moral, l’état de détresse dans lequel ils devaient se trouver pour décider de se reposer là un moment », constatent-ils les sourcils froncés, comme pour marquer leur peine.

    Le 12 octobre dernier, trois migrants algériens étaient fauchés par un train, au petit matin, à 500 mètres de la gare de Saint-Jean-de-Luz/Ciboure. Un quatrième homme, blessé mais désormais hors de danger, a confirmé aux enquêteurs que le groupe avait privilégié la voie ferrée pour éviter les contrôles de police, puis s’était arrêté pour se reposer, avant de s’assoupir.

    Un cinquième homme, dont les documents d’identité avaient été retrouvés sur les lieux, avait pris la fuite avant d’être retrouvé deux jours plus tard à Bayonne.

    « Ceux qui partent de nuit tentent de passer la frontière vers 23 heures et arrivent ici à 3 ou 4 heures du matin. La #voie_ferrée est une voie logique quand on sait que les contrôles de police sont quasi quotidiens aux ronds-points entre #Hendaye et #Saint-Jean-de-Luz », souligne Line, qui préside l’association #Elkartasuna_Larruna (Solidarité autour de la Rhune, en basque) créée en 2018 pour accompagner et « sécuriser » l’arrivée importante de migrants subsahariens dans la région.

    Peio Etcheverry-Ainchart, qui a participé à la création de l’association, est depuis élu, dans l’opposition, à Saint-Jean-de-Luz. Pour lui, le drame reflète la réalité du quotidien des migrants au Pays basque. « Ils n’iraient pas sur la voie ferrée s’ils se sentaient en sécurité dans les transports ou sur les axes routiers », dénonce-t-il en pointant du doigt le manque d’action politique au niveau local.

    « Ils continueront à passer par là car ils n’ont pas le choix et ce genre de drame va se reproduire. La #responsabilité politique des élus de la majorité est immense, c’est une honte. » Trois cents personnes se sont réunies au lendemain du drame pour rendre hommage aux victimes, sans la présence du maire de Saint-Jean-de-Luz. « La ville refuse toutes nos demandes de subvention, peste Line. Pour la majorité, les migrants ne passent pas par ici et le centre d’accueil créé à #Bayonne, #Pausa, est suffisant. »

    Un manque de soutien, à la fois moral et financier, qui n’encourage pas, selon elle, les locaux à se mobiliser auprès de l’association, qui compte une trentaine de bénévoles. Son inquiétude ? « Que les gens s’habituent à ce que des jeunes meurent et que l’on n’en parle plus, comme à Calais ou à la frontière franco-italienne. Il faut faire de la résistance. »

    Samedi dernier, j’en ai récupéré deux tard le soir, épuisés et frigorifiés

    Guillaume, un « aidant »

    Ce mardi midi à Saint-Jean-de-Luz, un migrant marocain avance d’un pas sûr vers la halte routière, puis se met en retrait, en gardant un œil sur l’arrêt de bus. Dix minutes plus tard, le bus en direction de Bayonne s’arrête et le trentenaire court pour s’y engouffrer avant que les portes ne se referment.

    Guillaume, qui travaille dans le quartier de la gare, fait partie de ces « aidants » qui refusent de laisser porte close. « Samedi dernier, j’en ai récupéré deux tard le soir, qui étaient arrivés à Saint-Jean en fin d’après-midi. Ils étaient épuisés et frigorifiés. » Après les avoir accueillis et leur avoir offert à manger, il les achemine ensuite jusqu’à Pausa à 2 heures du matin, où il constate qu’il n’est pas le seul à avoir fait la navette.

    La semaine dernière, un chauffeur de bus a même appelé la police quand des migrants sont montés à bord

    Guillaume, un citoyen vivant à Saint-Jean-de-Luz

    « Il m’est arrivé de gérer 10 ou 40 personnes d’un coup. Des femmes avec des bébés, des enfants, des jeunes qui avaient marché des heures et me racontaient leur périple. J’allais parfois m’isoler pour pleurer avant de m’occuper d’eux », confie celui qui ne cache pas sa tristesse face à tant d’« inhumanité ». Chaque jour, rapporte-t-il, la police sillonne les alentours, procède à des #contrôles_au_faciès à l’arrêt de bus en direction de Bayonne et embarque les migrants, comme en témoigne cette vidéo publiée sur Facebook en août 2019 (https://www.facebook.com/100000553678281/posts/2871341412894286/?d=n).

    « La semaine dernière, un #chauffeur_de_bus a même appelé la #police quand des migrants sont montés à bord. Ça rappelle une époque à vomir. » Face à ce « harcèlement » et cette « pression folle », Guillaume n’est pas étonné que les Algériens aient pris le risque de longer la voie ferrée. « Les habitants et commerçants voient régulièrement des personnes passer par là. Les gens sont prêts à tout. »

    À la frontière franco-espagnole aussi, en gare de Hendaye, la police est partout. Un véhicule se gare, deux agents en rejoignent un autre, situé à l’entrée du « topo » (train régional qui relie Hendaye à la ville espagnole de Saint-Sébastien), qui leur tend des documents. Il leur remet un jeune homme, arabophone, qu’ils embarquent.

    « Ils vont le laisser de l’autre côté du pont. Ils font tout le temps ça, soupire Miren*, qui observe la scène sans pouvoir intervenir. Les policiers connaissent les horaires d’arrivée du topo et des trains venant d’#Irun (côté espagnol). Ils viennent donc dix minutes avant et se postent ici pour faire du contrôle au faciès. » Depuis près de trois ans, le réseau citoyen auquel elle appartient, Bidasoa Etorkinekin, accueille et accompagne les personnes en migration qui ont réussi à passer la frontière, en les acheminant jusqu’à Bayonne.

    La bénévole monte à bord de sa voiture en direction des entrepôts de la SNCF. Là, un pont flambant neuf, barricadé, apparaît. « Il a été fermé peu après son inauguration pour empêcher les migrants de passer. » Des #grilles ont été disposées, tel un château de cartes, d’autres ont été ajoutées sur les côtés. En contrebas, des promeneurs marchent le long de la baie.

    Miren observe le pont de Santiago et le petit chapiteau blanc marquant le #barrage_de_police à la frontière entre Hendaye et #Irun. « Par définition, un #pont est censé faire le lien, pas séparer... » Selon un militant, il y aurait à ce pont et au pont de #Behobia « quatre fois plus de forces de l’ordre » qu’avant. Chaque bus est arrêté et les passagers contrôlés. « C’est cela qui pousse les personnes à prendre toujours plus de risques », estime-t-il, à l’instar de #Yaya_Karamoko, mort noyé dans la Bidassoa en mai dernier.

    On ne peut pas en même temps organiser l’accueil des personnes à Bayonne et mettre des moyens énormes pour faire cette chasse aux sorcières

    Eñaut, responsable de la section nord du syndicat basque LAB

    Le 12 juin, à l’initiative du #LAB, syndicat socio-politique basque, une manifestation s’est tenue entre Irun et Hendaye pour dénoncer la « militarisation » de la frontière dans ce qui a « toujours été une terre d’accueil ». « Ça s’est inscrit dans une démarche de #désobéissance_civile et on a décidé de faire entrer six migrants parmi une centaine de manifestants, revendique Eñaut, responsable du Pays basque nord. On ne peut pas en même temps organiser l’accueil des personnes à Bayonne et mettre des moyens énormes pour faire cette #chasse_aux_sorcières, avec les morts que cela engendre. L’accident de Saint-Jean-de-Luz est le résultat d’une politique migratoire raciste. » L’organisation syndicale espère, en développant l’action sociale, sensibiliser toutes les branches de la société – patronat, salariés, État – à la question migratoire.

    Des citoyens mobilisés pour « sécuriser » le parcours des migrants

    À 22 heures mardi, côté espagnol, Maite, Arantza et Jaiona approchent lentement de l’arrêt de bus de la gare routière d’Irun. Toutes trois sont volontaires auprès du réseau citoyen #Gau_Txori (les « Oiseaux de nuit »). Depuis plus de trois ans, lorsque les cars se vident le soir, elles repèrent d’éventuels exilés désorientés en vue de les acheminer au centre d’accueil géré par la Cruz Roja (Croix-Rouge espagnole), situé à deux kilomètres de là. En journée, des marques de pas, dessinées sur le sol à intervalle régulier et accompagnées d’une croix rouge, doivent guider les migrants tout juste arrivés à Irun. Mais, à la nuit tombée, difficile de les distinguer sur le bitume et de s’orienter.

    « En hiver, c’est terrible, souffle Arantza. Cette gare est désolante. Il n’y a rien, pas même les horaires de bus. On leur vient en aide parce qu’on ne supporte pas l’injustice. On ne peut pas rester sans rien faire en sachant ce qu’il se passe. » Et Maite d’enchaîner : « Pour moi, tout le monde devrait pouvoir passer au nom de la liberté de la circulation. » « La semaine dernière, il y avait beaucoup de migrants dans les rues d’Irun. La Croix-Rouge était dépassée. Déjà, en temps normal, le centre ne peut accueillir que 100 personnes pour une durée maximale de trois jours. Quand on leur ramène des gens, il arrive que certains restent à la porte et qu’on doive les installer dans des tentes à l’extérieur », rapporte, blasée, Jaiona.

    À mesure qu’elles dénoncent les effets mortifères des politiques migratoires européennes, un bus s’arrête, puis un second. « Je crois que ce soir, on n’aura personne », sourit Arantza. Le trio se dirige vers le dernier bus, qui stationne en gare à 23 h 10. Un homme extirpe ses bagages et ceux d’une jeune fille des entrailles du car. Les bénévoles tournent les talons, pensant qu’ils sont ensemble. C’est Jaiona, restée en arrière-plan, qui comprend combien l’adolescente a le regard perdu, désespérée de voir les seules femmes présentes s’éloigner. « Cruz Roja ? », chuchote l’une des volontaires à l’oreille de Mariem, qui hoche la tête, apaisée de comprendre que ces inconnues sont là pour elle.

    Ni une ni deux, Maite la soulage d’un sac et lui indique le véhicule garé un peu plus loin. « No te preocupes, somos voluntarios » (« Ne t’inquiète pas, nous sommes des bénévoles »), lui dit Jaiona en espagnol. « On ne te veut aucun mal. On t’emmène à la Croix-Rouge et on attendra d’être sûres que tu aies une place avant de partir », ajoute Maite dans un français torturé.

    Visage juvénile, yeux en amande, Mariem n’a que 15 ans. Elle arrive de Madrid, un bonnet à pompon sur la tête, où elle a passé un mois après avoir été transférée par avion de Fuerteventura (îles Canaries) dans l’Espagne continentale, comme beaucoup d’autres ces dernières semaines, qui ont ensuite poursuivi leur route vers le nord. Les bénévoles toquent à la porte de la Cruz Roja, un agent prend en charge Mariem. Au-dehors, les phares de la voiture illuminent deux tentes servant d’abris à des exilés non admis.

    J’avais réussi à passer la frontière mais la police m’a arrêtée dans le #bus et m’a renvoyée en Espagne

    Fatima*, une exilée subsaharienne refoulée après avoir franchi la frontière

    Le lendemain matin, dès 9 heures, plusieurs exilés occupent les bancs de la place de la mairie à Irun. Chaque jour, entre 10 heures et midi, c’est ici que le réseau citoyen Irungo Harrera Sarea les accueille pour leur donner des conseils. « Qui veut rester en Espagne ici ? », demande Ion, l’un des membres du collectif. Aucune main ne se lève. Ion s’y attendait. Fatima*, la seule femme parmi les 10 exilés, a passé la nuit dehors, ignorant l’existence du centre d’accueil. « J’avais réussi à passer la frontière mais la police m’a arrêtée dans le bus et m’a renvoyée en Espagne », relate-t-elle, vêtue d’une tenue de sport, un sac de couchage déplié sur les genoux. Le « record », selon Ion, est détenu par un homme qui a tenté de passer à huit reprises et a été refoulé à chaque fois. « Il a fini par réussir. »

    Éviter de se déplacer en groupe, ne pas être trop repérable. « Vous êtes noirs », leur lance-t-il, pragmatique, les rappelant à une triste réalité : la frontière est une passoire pour quiconque a la peau suffisamment claire pour ne pas être contrôlé. « La migration n’est pas une honte, il n’y a pas de raison de la cacher », clame-t-il pour justifier le fait de s’être installés en plein centre-ville.

    Ion voit une majorité de Subsahariens. Peu de Marocains et d’Algériens, qui auraient « leurs propres réseaux d’entraide ». « On dit aux gens de ne pas traverser la Bidassoa ou longer la voie ferrée. On fait le sale boulot en les aidant à poursuivre leur chemin, ce qui arrange la municipalité d’Irun et le gouvernement basque car on les débarrasse des migrants, regrette-t-il. En voulant les empêcher de passer, les États ne font que garantir leur souffrance et nourrir les trafiquants. »

    L’un des exilés se lève et suit une bénévole, avant de s’infiltrer, à quelques mètres de là, dans un immeuble de la vieille ville. Il est invité par Karmele, une retraitée aux cheveux grisonnants, à entrer dans une pièce dont les murs sont fournis d’étagères à vêtements.

    Dans ce vestiaire solidaire, tout a été pensé pour faire vite et bien : Karmele scrute la morphologie du jeune homme, puis pioche dans l’une des rangées, où le linge, selon sa nature – doudounes, pulls, polaires, pantalons – est soigneusement plié. « Tu es long [grand], ça devrait t’aller, ça », dit-elle en lui tendant une veste. À sa droite, une affiche placardée sous des cartons étiquetés « bébé » vient rappeler aux Africaines qu’elles sont des « femmes de pouvoir ».

    Le groupe d’exilés retourne au centre d’accueil pour se reposer avant de tenter le passage dans la journée. Mariem, l’adolescente, a choisi de ne pas se rendre place de la mairie à 10 heures, influencée par des camarades du centre. « On m’a dit qu’un homme pouvait nous faire passer, qu’on le paierait à notre arrivée à Bayonne. Mais je suis à la frontière et il ne répond pas au téléphone. Il nous a dit plus tôt qu’il y avait trop de contrôles et qu’on ne pourrait pas passer pour l’instant », confie-t-elle, dépitée, en fin de matinée. Elle restera bloquée jusqu’en fin d’après-midi à Behobia, le deuxième pont, avant de se résoudre à retourner à la Cruz Roja pour la nuit.

    L’exil nous détruit, je me dis des fois qu’on aurait mieux fait de rester auprès des nôtres

    Mokhtar*, un migrant algérien

    Au même moment, sur le parking précédant le pont de Santiago, de jeunes Maghrébins tuent le temps, allongés dans l’herbe ou assis sur un banc. Tous ont des parcours de vie en pointillés, bousillés par « el ghorba » (« l’exil »), qui n’a pas eu pitié d’eux, passés par différents pays européens sans parvenir à s’établir. « Huit ans que je suis en Europe et je n’ai toujours pas les papiers », lâche Younes*, un jeune Marocain vivant depuis un mois dans un foyer à Irun. Mokhtar*, un harraga (migrant parti clandestinement depuis les côtes algériennes) originaire d’Oran, abonde : « L’exil nous détruit, je me dis des fois qu’on aurait mieux fait de rester auprès des nôtres. Mais aujourd’hui, c’est impossible de rentrer sans avoir construit quelque chose... » La notion « d’échec », le regard des autres seraient insoutenables.

    Chaque jour, Mokhtar et ses amis voient des dizaines de migrants tenter le passage du pont qui matérialise la frontière. « Les Algériens qui sont morts étaient passés par ici. Ils sont même restés un temps dans notre foyer. Avant qu’ils ne passent la frontière, je leur ai filé quatre cigarettes. Ils sont partis de nuit, en longeant les rails de train depuis cet endroit, pointe-t-il du doigt au loin. Paix à leur âme. Cette frontière est l’une des plus difficiles à franchir en Europe. » L’autre drame humain est celui des proches des victimes, ravagés par l’incertitude faute d’informations émanant des autorités françaises.
    Les proches des victimes plongés dans l’incertitude

    « Les familles ne sont pas prévenues, c’est de la torture. On a des certitudes sur deux personnes. La mère de l’un des garçons a appelé l’hôpital, le commissariat… Sans obtenir d’informations. Or elle n’a plus de nouvelles depuis le jour du drame et les amis qui l’ont connu sont sûrs d’eux », expliquait une militante vendredi 22 octobre. Selon le procureur de Bayonne, contacté cette semaine par Mediapart, les victimes ont depuis été identifiées, à la fois grâce à l’enquête ouverte mais aussi grâce aux proches qui se sont signalés.

    La mosquée d’Irun a également joué un rôle primordial pour remonter la trace des harragas décédés. « On a été plusieurs à participer, dont des associations. J’ai été en contact avec les familles des victimes et le consulat d’Algérie, qui a presque tout géré. Les corps ont été rapatriés en Algérie samedi 30 octobre, le rescapé tient le coup moralement », détaille Mohamed, un membre actif du lieu de culte. Dès le 18 octobre, la page Facebook Les Algériens en France dévoilait le nom de deux des trois victimes, Faisal Hamdouche, 23 ans, et Mohamed Kamal, 21 ans.

    À quelques mètres de Mokhtar, sur un banc, deux jeunes Syriens se sont vu notifier un refus d’entrée, au motif qu’ils n’avaient pas de documents d’identité : « Ça fait quatre fois qu’on essaie de passer et qu’on nous refoule », s’époumone l’aîné, 20 ans, quatre tickets de « topo » à la main. Son petit frère, âgé de 14 ans, ne cesse de l’interroger. « On ne va pas pouvoir passer ? » Leur mère et leur sœur, toutes deux réfugiées, les attendent à Paris depuis deux ans ; l’impatience les gagne.

    Jeudi midi, les Syriens, mais aussi le groupe d’exilés renseignés par Irungo Harrera Sarea, sont tous à Pausa, à Bayonne. Certains se reposent, d’autres se détendent dans la cour du lieu d’accueil, où le soleil cogne. « C’était un peu difficile mais on a réussi, confie Fofana, un jeune Ivoirien, devant le portail, quai de Lesseps. Ça me fait tellement bizarre de voir les gens circuler librement, alors que nous, on doit faire attention. Je préfère en rire plutôt qu’en pleurer. »

    Si les exilés ont le droit de sortir, ils ne doivent pas s’éloigner pour éviter d’être contrôlés par la police. « On attend le car pour aller à Paris ce soir », ajoute M., le Syrien, tandis que son petit frère se cache derrière le parcmètre pour jouer, à l’abri du soleil, sur un téléphone. Une dernière étape, qui comporte elle aussi son lot de risques : certains chauffeurs des cars « Macron » réclament un document d’identité à la montée, d’autres pas.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/311021/la-frontiere-franco-espagnole-le-renforcement-des-controles-conduit-les-mi

    #frontières #migrations #réfugiés #France #Espagne #Pyrénées #contrôles_frontaliers #frontières #délation #morts #morts_aux_frontières #mourir_aux_frontières #décès #militarisation_de_la_frontière #refoulements #push-backs #solidarité

    –—

    voir aussi :
    #métaliste sur les personnes en migration décédées à la frontière entre l’#Espagne et la #France, #Pays_basque :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/932889

  • Poland passes law allowing migrants to be pushed back at border

    Poland’s parliament on Thursday (14 October) passed a legal amendment allowing migrants to be pushed back at the border and for asylum claims made by those who entered illegally to be ignored.

    Lawmakers also gave the green light to a government plan to build a wall to prevent migrants from crossing the border from Belarus, a project estimated to cost €353 million.

    Thousands of migrants, most of them from the Middle East, have sought in recent months to cross from Belarus into Poland or fellow EU member states Latvia and Lithuania.

    Under the newly amended law, a foreigner stopped after crossing the Polish border illegally will be obliged to leave Polish territory and will be temporarily banned from entering the country for a period ranging from “six months to three years”.

    The Polish authorities will also have the right “to leave unexamined” an asylum application filed by a foreigner who is stopped immediately after illegally entering, unless they have arrived from a country where their “life and freedom are threatened”.

    Rights groups have already accused Poland of stopping migrants at the border and pushing them back into Belarus.

    Numerous NGOs have criticised Poland for imposing a state of emergency at the border, which prevents humanitarian organisations from helping migrants and prohibits access to all non-residents, including journalists.

    The law change came two days after a landmark ruling from Poland’s Constitutional Court challenged the primacy of European Union law — a key tenet of EU membership — by declaring important articles in the EU treaties “incompatible” with the Polish constitution.

    The ruling on a case brought by Poland’s right-wing populist government could threaten EU funding for Poland and is being seen as a possible first step to Poland leaving the European Union.

    Earlier Thursday Polish police said that another migrant had been found dead on the border with Belarus, bringing the number of people who have died along the European Union’s eastern border in recent months to seven.

    The European Union accuses Belarus of deliberately orchestrating the influx in retaliation against EU sanctions over the Moscow-backed regime’s crackdown on dissent.

    Last month the UN refugee agency and the International Organization for Migration said they were “shocked and dismayed” by the migrant deaths.

    “Groups of people have become stranded for weeks, unable to access any form of assistance, asylum or basic services,” they said in a statement.

    In August Christine Goyer, UNHCR representative in Poland, reminded Warsaw that “according to the 1951 Refugee Convention, to which Poland is signatory, people seeking asylum should never be penalised, even for irregular border crossing”.

    Polish PM berates EU

    In the meantime, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki accused EU institutions on Thursday of infringing on the rights of member states, as he prepared to present Warsaw’s position in a row over the rule of law next week before the European Parliament.

    “We are at a crucial moment, you could say at a crossroads in the EU’s history,” Morawiecki told the Polish parliament. “Democracy is being tested – how far will European nations retreat before this usurpation by some EU institutions.”

    Polish government spokesman Piotr Muller said Morawiecki would attend the European Parliament session in Strasbourg next Tuesday to present Poland’s position in the rule of law dispute.

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/poland-passes-law-allowing-migrants-to-be-pushed-back-at-border

    #Pologne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #refoulement #refoulements #push-backs #loi #amendement #Biélorussie #Mateusz_Morawiecki #Morawiecki

    –-
    voir aussi la métaliste sur la situation à la frontière entre la #Pologne et la #Biélorussie (2021) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/935860

    • Et il y a eu ce weekend une chasse aux migrants autour de la ville de Guben (Allemagne).
      « La ville de Guben est située dans la région de Basse-Lusace ; elle est traversée par la rivière Neisse et c’est la partie allemande de la ville historique ; l’autre partie est polonaise (Gubin). »

  • La frontière de l’Evros, un no man’s land grec ultra-militarisé où « personne n’a accès aux migrants »

    Échaudée par l’afflux de milliers de migrants venus de Turquie via la rivière Evros à l’extrême est du pays en mars 2020, la Grèce a hautement militarisé la zone. Des exilés continuent toutefois de traverser cette frontière greco-turque sous contrôle exclusif de l’armée. Ils ne reçoivent l’aide d’aucune ONG, d’aucun habitant, interdits dans la zone.

    C’est une rivière inapprochable à l’extrême pointe de l’Union européenne. Les 500 kilomètres de cours d’eau de l’Evros, frontière naturelle qui sépare la Grèce de la Turquie sur le continent, sont, depuis des années, sous contrôle exclusif de l’armée grecque.

    En longeant la frontière, la zone est déserte et fortement boisée. Des ronces, des buissons touffus, des arbres empêchent le tout-venant de s’approcher du secteur militarisé et du cours d’eau. « Il y a des caméras partout. Faites attention, ne vous avancez pas trop », prévient Tzamalidis Stavros, le chef du village de Kastanies, dans le nord du pays, en marchant le long d’une voie ferrée - en activité - pour nous montrer la frontière. Au loin, à environ deux kilomètres de là, des barbelés se dessinent. Malgré la distance, Tzamilidis Stavros reste vigilant. « Ils ont un équipement ultra-moderne. Ils vont nous repérer très vite ».

    Cette zone interdite d’accès n’est pourtant pas désertée par les migrants. Depuis de nombreuses années, les populations sur la route de l’exil traversent l’Evros depuis les rives turques pour entrer en Union européenne. Mais la crise migratoire de mars 2020, pendant laquelle des dizaines de milliers de migrants sont arrivés en Grèce via Kastanies après l’ouverture des frontières turques, a tout aggravé.

    https://gw.infomigrants.net/media/resize/my_image_big/37bd2ebd7dd3e2d0fec91247b63ec001a70a884f.jpeg

    En un an, la Grèce - et l’UE - ont investi des millions d’euros pour construire une forteresse frontalière : des murs de barbelés ont vu le jour le long de la rivière, des canons sonores ont été mis en place, des équipements militaires ultra-performants (drones, caméras…). Tout pour empêcher un nouvel afflux de migrants par l’Evros.

    « Nous avons aujourd’hui 850 militaires le long de l’Evros », déclare un garde-frontière de la région, en poste dans le village de Tychero. « Frontex est présent avec nous. Les barbelés posés récemment
    nous aident énormément ».

    « Black-out »

    Ces installations ont contribué à faire baisser le nombre de passages. « A Kastanies, avant, il y avait au moins cinq personnes par jour qui traversaient la frontière. Aujourd’hui, c’est fini. Presque plus personne ne passe », affirme le chef du village qui se dit « soulagé ». « La clôture a tout arrêté ». Mais à d’autres endroits, « là où il y a moins de patrouilles, moins de surveillance, moins de barbelés », des migrants continuent de passer, selon l’association Border violence, qui surveille les mouvements aux frontières européennes.

    Combien sont-ils ? La réponse semble impossible à obtenir. Les médias sont tenus à l’écart, le ministère des Affaires étrangères grec évoquant des raisons de « sécurité nationale ». Les autorités grecques ne communiquent pas, les garde-frontières déployés dans la région restent flous et renvoient la balle à leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques, et les associations sont absentes de la zone.

    C’est ce « black-out » de la zone qui inquiète les ONG. « Des migrants arrivent à venir jusqu’à Thessalonique et ils nous racontent leur traversée. Mais il faut 25 jours à pied depuis l’Evros jusqu’ici. Nous avons donc les infos avec trois semaines de retard », explique une militante de Border Violence, à Thessalonique.

    Les migrants arrêtés par les garde-frontières grecs dans la zone ne peuvent pas non plus témoigner des conditions de leur interpellation. Ils sont directement transférés dans le hotspot de Fylakio, le seul camp de la région situé à quelques km de la Turquie. Entouré de barbelés, Fylakio fait partie des sept centres fermés du pays où les migrants ne peuvent pas sortir. Et où les médias ne peuvent pas entrer.

    « J’ai traversé l’Evros il y a un mois et demi et je suis bloqué ici depuis », nous crie un jeune Syrien de 14 ans depuis le camp. « On a passé 9 jours dans la région d’Evros et nous avons été arrêtés avec un groupe de mon village, nous venons de Deir-Ezzor ». Nous n’en saurons pas plus, un militaire s’approche.
    Des milliers de pushbacks, selon les associations

    La principale préoccupation des associations comme Border violence – mais aussi du Haut commissariat de l’ONU aux réfugiés (HCR) – restent de savoir si les droits fondamentaux des demandeurs d’asile sont respectés à la frontière de l’Evros. « Là-bas, personne n’a accès aux migrants. La politique frontalière est devenue complètement dingue ! Nous, les militants, nous n’allons même pas dans la région ! On a peur d’être arrêté et mis en prison ».

    La semaine dernière, le ministre des Migrations, Notis Mtarakis a officiellement rejeté l’instauration d’un « mécanisme de surveillance » à ses frontières, réclamé par l’ONU et la Commission européenne, déclarant que cela « portait atteinte à la souveraineté du pays ».

    Margaritis Petritzikis, à la tête du HCR dans le hotspot de Fylakio, reconnaît que ce qu’il se passe dans l’Evros est opaque. « La frontière doit être mieux surveillée », explique-t-il, en faisant référence à demi mot aux pushbacks, ces renvois illégaux entre deux Etats voisins.

    Si les autorités grecques nient les pratiquer, ces pushbacks seraient nombreux et réguliers dans cette partie du pays. « Evidemment, qu’il y a des renvois vers la Turquie », assure un ancien policier à la retraite sous couvert d’anonymat qui nous reçoit dans sa maison à moins de 5 km de la Turquie. « J’ai moi-même conduit pendant des années des bateaux pour ramener des migrants vers la Turquie à la tombée de la nuit ».

    Selon Border violence, environ 4 000 personnes ont été refoulées illégalement depuis le début de l’année. « Il y en a certainement beaucoup plus, mais de nombreuses personnes ne parlent pas. Elles ont peur ».
    38 morts dans l’Evros depuis le début de l’année

    Au-delà des refoulements illégaux, la question des violences inquiète les associations. Selon le New York Times, des centres de détention secrets, appelés « black sites », seraient présents dans la région. Sans observateurs extérieurs, la zone suscite énormément de fantasmes. « Des migrants nous ont parlé de tortures dans ces centres cachés en Grèce, de chocs électriques, de simulacres de noyades. Nous ne pouvons pas vérifier », continue la militante de Border violence.

    Et comment recenser les victimes, celles et ceux qui se sont noyés en tentant la traversée ? Sans accès à la zone, « nous ne pouvons même pas parler de morts mais de personnes disparues », déplore-t-elle. « Nous considérons qu’au bout d’un mois sans nouvelles d’un migrant dans la zone, celui-ci est présumé décédé ».

    Selon Pavlos Pavlidis, un des médecins-légistes de l’hôpital d’Alexandropoulis, le chef-lieu de la région, déjà 38 personnes sont mortes cette année.

    « Beaucoup se sont noyés dans l’Evros, d’autres sont morts d’hypothermie. Surtout l’hiver. Ils traversent la rivière, ils sont trempés. Personne n’est là pour les aider, alors ils meurent de froid. Leurs corps sont parfois trouvés 20 jours plus tard par la police et amenés à l’hôpital », explique-t-il.

    Y a-t-il des victimes non recensées ? « Peut-être », répond-t-il. Mais sans maraudes, impossible de surveiller la zone et de venir en aide à des blessés potentiels. « C’est triste de mourir ainsi », conclut-il, « loin des siens et loin de tout ».

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/35496/la-frontiere-de-levros-un-no-mans-land-grec-ultramilitarise-ou-personn
    #Evros #région_de_l'Evros #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #militarisation_des_frontières
    #décès #morts #mourir_aux_frontières #morts_aux_frontières #statistiques #chiffres #2021
    #push-backs #refoulements #Pavlos_Pavlidis #Turquie #Grèce
    #murs #barbelés #barrières_frontalières #Kastanies #clôture #surveillance #fermeture_des_frontières #Fylakio #black_sites #torture

    C’est comme un déjà-vu pour moi... une répétition de ce qui se passait en 2012, quand j’étais sur place avec Alberto...
    Dans la région de l’Evros, un mur inutile sur la frontière greco-turque (2/4)
    https://visionscarto.net/evros-mur-inutile

    • Un médecin légiste grec veut redonner une identité aux migrants morts dans l’Evros

      Médecin légiste depuis les années 2000, Pavlos Pavlidis autopsie tous les corps de migrants trouvés dans la région de l’Evros, frontalière avec la Turquie. A l’hôpital d’Alexandropoulis où il travaille, il tente de collecter un maximum d’informations sur chacun d’eux - et garde dans des classeurs tous leurs effets personnels - pour leur redonner un nom et une dignité.

      Pavlos Pavlidis fume cigarette sur cigarette. Dans son bureau de l’hôpital d’Alexandropoulis, les cendriers sont pleins et l’odeur de tabac envahit toute la pièce. Le médecin légiste d’une cinquantaine d’années, lunettes sur le nez, n’a visiblement pas l’intention d’ouvrir les fenêtres. « On fume beaucoup ici », se contente-t-il de dire. Pavlos Pavlidis parle peu mais répond de manière méthodique.

      « Je travaille ici depuis l’an 2000. C’est cette année-là que j’ai commencé à recevoir les premiers corps de migrants non-identifiés », explique-t-il, le nez rivé sur son ordinateur. Alexandropoulis est le chef-lieu de la région de l’Evros, à quelques kilomètres seulement de la frontière turque. C’est là-bas, en tentant d’entrer en Union européenne via la rivière du même nom, que les migrants prennent le plus de risques.

      « Depuis le début de l’année, 38 corps sont arrivés à l’hôpital dans mon service, 34 étaient des hommes et 4 étaient des femmes », continue le légiste. « Beaucoup de ces personnes traversent l’Evros en hiver. L’eau monte, les courants sont forts, il y a énormément de branchages. Ils se noient », résume-t-il sobrement. « L’année dernière, ce sont 36 corps qui ont été amenés ici. Les chiffres de 2021 peuvent donc encore augmenter. L’hiver n’a même pas commencé. »

      Des corps retrouvés 20 jours après leur mort

      Au fond de la pièce, sur un grand écran, des corps de migrants défilent. Ils sont en état de décomposition avancé. Les regards se détournent rapidement. Pavlos Pavlidis s’excuse. Les corps abîmés sont son quotidien.

      « Je prends tout en photo. C’est mon métier. En ce qui concerne les migrants, les cadavres sont particulièrement détériorés parce qu’ils sont parfois retrouvés 20 jours après leur mort », explique-t-il. Densément boisée, la région de l’Evros, sous contrôle de l’armée, est désertée par les habitants. Sans civils dans les parages, « on ne retrouve pas tout de suite les victimes ». Et puis, il y a les noyés. « L’eau abîme tout. Elle déforme les visages très vite ».

      Tous les corps non-identifiés retrouvés à la frontière ou dans la région sont amenés dans le service de Pavlos Pavlidis. « Le protocole est toujours le même : la police m’appelle quand elle trouve un corps et envoie le cadavre à l’hôpital. Nous ne travaillons pas seuls, nous collaborons avec les autorités. Nous échangeons des données pour l’enquête : premières constatations, présence de documents sur le cadavre, heure de la découverte… »

      Les causes de décès de la plupart des corps qui finissent sous son scalpel sont souvent les mêmes : la noyade, donc, mais aussi l’hypothermie et les accidents de la route. « Ceux qui arrivent à faire la traversée de l’Evros en ressortent trempés. Ils se perdent ensuite dans les montagnes alentours. Ils se cachent des forces de l’ordre. Ils meurent de froid ».
      Cicatrices, tatouages…

      Sur sa table d’autopsie, Pavlos sait que le visage qu’il regarde n’a plus rien à voir avec la personne de son vivant. « Alors je photographie des éléments spécifiques, des cicatrices, des tatouages... » Le légiste répertorie tout ; les montres, les colliers, les portables, les bagues... « Je n’ai rien, je ne sais pas qui ils sont, d’où ils viennent. Ces indices ne leur rendent pas un nom mais les rendent unique. »

      Mettant peu d’affect dans son travail – « Je fais ce que j’ai à faire., c’est mon métier » – Pavlos Pavlidis cache sous sa froideur une impressionnante humanité. Loin de simplement autopsier des corps, le médecin s’acharne à vouloir leur rendre une identité.

      Il garde les cadavres plus longtemps que nécessaire : entre 6 mois et un an. « Cela donne du temps aux familles pour se manifester », explique-t-il. « Ils doivent chercher le disparu, trouver des indices et arriver jusqu’à Alexandropoulis. Je leur donne ce temps-là ». En ce moment, 25 corps patientent dans un conteneur réfrigéré de l’hôpital.

      Chaque semaine, il reçoit des mails de familles désespérées. Il prend le temps de répondre à chacun d’eux. « Docteur, je cherche mon frère qui s’est sûrement noyé dans l’Evros, le 22 aout 2021. Vous m’avez dit le 7 septembre qu’un seul corps avait été retrouvé. Y en a-t-il d’autres depuis ? », peut-on lire sur le mail de l’un d’eux, envoyé le 3 octobre. « Je vous remercie infiniment et vous supplie de m’aider à retrouver mon frère pour que nous puissions l’enterrer dignement ».

      « Je n’ai pas de données sur les corps retrouvés côté turc »

      Dans le meilleur des scénario, Pavlos Pavlidis obtient un nom. « Je peux rendre le corps à une famille ». Mais ce cas de figure reste rare.

      Qu’importe, à chaque corps, la même procédure s’enclenche : il stocke de l’ADN, classe chaque objet dans des enveloppes rangées dans des dossiers, selon un protocole précis. Il note chaque élément retrouvé dans un registre, recense tous les morts et actualise ses chiffres.

      Le médecin regrette le manque de coopération avec les autorités turques. « Je n’ai pas de chiffres précis puisque je n’ai pas le décompte des cadavres trouvés de l’autre côte de la frontière. Je n’ai que ceux trouvés du côté grec. Combien sont morts sur l’autre rive ? Je ne le saurai pas », déplore-t-il. Ces 20 dernières années, le médecin légiste dit avoir autopsié 500 personnes.

      Les corps non-identifiés et non réclamés sont envoyés dans un cimetière de migrants anonymes, dans un petit village à 50 km de là. Perdu dans les collines, il compte environ 200 tombes, toutes marquées d’une pierre blanche.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/35534/un-medecin-legiste-grec-veut-redonner-une-identite-aux-migrants-morts-

      –—

      Portrait de @albertocampiphoto de Pavlos Pavlidis accompagné de mon texte pour @vivre (c’était 2012) :

      Pavlos Pavlidis | Médecin et gardien des morts

      Pavlos Pavlidis nous accueille dans son bureau, au sous-sol de l’hôpital d’Alexandroupoli. Sa jeune assistante, Valeria, est également présente pour l’aider dans la traduction anglaise. Pavlidis est calme. Sa voix est rauque, modelée par la fumée de cigarettes.

      Il s’occupe de trouver la cause de la mort des personnes vivant dans la région de l’Evros, mais également de donner une identité aux cadavres de migrants récupérés dans le fleuve. Une cinquantaine par année, il nous avoue. Déjà 24 depuis le début de l’année, dont un dixième ont un nom et un prénom.

      Après seulement 2 minutes d’entretien, Pavlidis nous demande si on veut regarder les photos des cadavres. Il dit que c’est important que nous les voyions, pour que nous nous rendions compte de l’état dans lequel le corps se trouve. Il allume son vieil ordinateur et nous montre les photos. Il les fait défiler. Les cadavres se succèdent et nous comprenons vite les raisons de faire systématiquement une analyse ADN.

      Pavlidis, en nous montrant les images, nous informe sur la cause de la mort : « Cette dame s’est noyée », dit-il. « Cette dame est morte d’hypothermie ». Ceux qui meurent d’hypothermie sont plus facilement identifiables : « Cet homme était d’Erythrée et on a retrouvé son nom grâce à ses habits et à son visage ». Le visage était reconnaissable, le froid l’ayant conservé presque intact.

      « Celle-ci, c’est une femme noire ». Elle s’est noyée après l’hiver. Pavlidis ne peut en dire de plus. Nous voyons sur la photo qu’elle porte un bracelet. Nous lui posons des questions, sur ce bracelet. Alors il ouvre un tiroir. Il y a des enveloppes, sur les enveloppes la date écrite à la main de la découverte du corps et des détails qui pourraient être important pour donner à ce corps une identité. Dans les enveloppes, il y les objets personnels. Il n’y a que ces objets qui restent intacts. Le corps, lui, subit le passage du temps.

      Pavlidis nous montre ensuite un grigri. C’est un homme qui le portait. Il restera dans l’enveloppe encore longtemps ; jusqu’à ce qu’un cousin, une mère, un ami vienne frapper à la porte de Pavlidis pour dire que c’est peut-être le grigri de son cousin, de son fils, de son ami. Et alors l’ADN servira à effacer les doutes.

      Les cadavres, quand personne ne les réclame, restent dans les réfrigérateurs de l’hôpital pendant 3 mois. Puis, ils sont amenés dans le cimetière musulman du village de Sidiro, où un mufti s’occupe de les enterrer. Ils sont tous là, les corps sans nom, sur une colline proche du village. Ils sont 400, pour l’instant. 450, l’année prochaine. Le mufti prie pour eux, qu’ils soient chrétiens ou musulmans. La distinction est difficile à faire et le fait de les enterrer tous au même endroit permet à Pavlidis de savoir où ils sont. Et là, au moins, il y a quelqu’un qui s’occupe d’eux. Si un jour, la famille vient frapper à la porte du médecin, il saura où est le corps et, ensemble, ils pourront au moins lui donner un nom. Et le restituer à sa famille.

      https://asile.ch/2012/11/09/gardien-des-morts-dans-le-sous-sol-de-lhopital-dalexandropouli

      #identification #Pavlos_Pavlidis

    • http://Evros-news.gr reports that according to info from villagers at the 🇬🇷🇧🇬 border in the Rhodopi & Xanthi prefecture, army special forces (commandos) have been deployed specifically for migration control. They’ve reported in the past the same happens in Evros.

      https://twitter.com/lk2015r/status/1460326699661414408

      –-

      ΑΠΟΚΑΛΥΨΗ: Ειδικές δυνάμεις, μετά τον Έβρο, επιτηρούν τα ελληνοβουλγαρικά σύνορα για λαθρομετανάστες σε Ροδόπη, Ξάνθη

      Ειδικές Δυνάμεις (Καταδρομείς) μετά τον Έβρο, ανέλαβαν δράση στα ελληνοβουλγαρικά σύνορα για έλεγχο και αποτροπή της εισόδου λαθρομεταναστών και στους νομούς Ροδόπης και Ξάνθης, εδώ και λίγες ημέρες.

      Σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες που έφτασαν στο Evros-news.gr από κατοίκους των ορεινών περιοχών των δύο γειτονικών στον Έβρο νομών, οι οποίοι έχουν διαπιστώσει ότι υπάρχει παρουσία στρατιωτικών τμημάτων που ανήκουν στις Ειδικές Δυνάμεις και περιπολούν μέρα-νύχτα στην ελληνοβουλγαρική συνοριογραμμή, από τον έλεγχο που έχουν υποστεί κάθε ώρα της ημέρας αλλά και νύχτας. Είναι άλλωστε γνωστό, πως από εκεί, όπως και την αντίστοιχη του Έβρου, μπαίνει σημαντικός αριθμός λαθρομεταναστών, που με την βοήθεια Βούλγαρων διακινητών μπαίνουν στο έδαφος της γειτονικής χώρας από την Τουρκία και στη συνέχεια… βγαίνουν στην Ροδόπη ή την Ξάνθη, για να συνεχίσουν από εκεί προς Θεσσαλονίκη, Αθήνα.

      Όπως είχαμε ΑΠΟΚΑΛΥΨΕΙ τον περασμένο Αύγουστο, άνδρες των Ειδικών Δυνάμεων και συγκεκριμένα Καταδρομείς, ανέλαβαν τον έλεγχο της λαθρομετανάστευσης στα ελλην0οβουλγαρκά σύνορα του Έβρου, προκειμένου να “σφραγιστεί” από το Ορμένιο ως τον ορεινό όγκο του Σουφλίου στα όρια με το νομό Ροδόπης. Εγκαταστάθηκαν στο Επιτηρητικό Φυλάκιο 30 του Ορμενίου στο Τρίγωνο Ορεστιάδας και στο Σουφλί. Τόσο εκείνη η απόφαση όσο και η πρόσφατη για επέκταση της παρουσίας Ειδικών Δυνάμεων, πάρθηκε από τον Αρχηγό ΓΕΕΘΑ Αντιστράτηγο Κωνσταντίνο Φλώρο και ανέλαβε την υλοποίηση της το Δ’ Σώμα Στρατού.

      Στόχος είναι ο περιορισμός της εισόδου λαθρομεταναστών και μέσω Βουλγαρίας από τους τρεις νομούς της Θράκης, αφού εκεί δεν μπορεί να δημιουργηθεί φράχτης, όπως έχει γίνει στα δυο σημεία της ελληνοτουρκικής συνοριογραμμής, στις Καστανιές και τις Φέρες, αφού η Βουλγαρία είναι χώρα της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης και κάτι τέτοιο δεν επιτρέπεται. Επειδή όμως είναι γνωστό πως υπήρχαν παράπονα και αναφορές όχι μόνο κατοίκων αλλά και θεσμικών εκπροσώπων της Ροδόπης και της Ξάνθης για πρόβλημα στις ορεινές τους περιοχές όπου υπάρχουν τα σύνορα με την Βουλγαρία, πάρθηκε η συγκεκριμένη απόφαση προκειμένου να “σφραγιστούν” όσο είναι δυνατόν, οι περιοχές αυτές με την παρουσία των Ειδικών Δυνάμεων. Κι επειδή είναι γνωστό ότι υπήρχαν και παλαιότερα τμήματα τους στους δυο νομούς, να επισημάνουμε ότι οι Καταδρομείς που τοποθετήθηκαν πρόσφατα, προστέθηκαν στις υπάρχουσες δυνάμεις και έχουν μοναδικό αντικείμενο την επιτήρηση της ελληνοβουλγαρικής μεθορίου.

      https://t.co/jzXylBaGUW?amp=1

    • 114 of the 280 vehicles recently acquired by the police will be used for border control in Evros, including:
      80 police cars
      30 pick-up trucks
      4 SUVs
      (this is probably why they need a new police building in Alexandroupoli, parking is an issue)

      https://twitter.com/lk2015r/status/1464287124824506370

      Έρχονται στον Έβρο 114 νέα αστυνομικά οχήματα για την φύλαξη των συνόρων


      https://t.co/qajuhOwPWW?amp=1

  • A #Chypre, la #détresse de migrants syriens séparés de leurs enfants

    « Je suis dévastée, ma famille aussi ». Kawthar, une jeune Syrienne, berce son nourrisson dans un camp pour migrants à Chypre, où elle a été emmenée par les autorités après avoir été séparée en pleine mer de son mari et ses jeunes enfants.

    Avec des dizaines d’autres migrants syriens, Kawthar Raslan a quitté Beyrouth le 22 août sur une embarcation pour rallier clandestinement l’île méditerranéenne, située à quelque 160 kilomètres de là.

    Cette femme de 25 ans qui voyage avec son mari et ses deux enfants, âgés d’un et trois ans, est alors sur le point d’accoucher. A une dizaine de kilomètres des côtes chypriotes, l’embarcation est encerclée par des garde-côtes, venus renvoyer le bateau vers le Liban.

    Sur une vidéo filmée à bord et visionnée par l’AFP, on entend des passagers crier « Aidez-nous ! ».

    Voyant l’état de Kawthar, les garde-côtes l’emmènent avec eux mais laissent le reste de la famille dans l’embarcation, contrainte de repartir vers le Liban, où plus d’un million de Syriens ayant fui la guerre ont trouvé refuge.

    Le Liban étant plongé dans une grave crise économique, des centaines de Syriens ont tenté depuis un an la traversée vers Chypre. Mais ce pays de l’Union européenne, avec le plus grand nombre de primo-demandeurs d’asile par habitant, a signé en 2020 un accord avec le Liban pour renvoyer tout clandestin essayant d’atteindre l’île par bateau.

    – « Ni au Liban, ni en Syrie » -

    « J’ai failli mourir quand j’ai appris le renvoi de ma famille vers le Liban », raconte à l’AFP Kawthar, qui vit dans un préfabriqué dans le camp de Kofinou (sud).

    « Les (garde-côtes) savaient que mon mari et mes enfants m’accompagnaient et ils les ont empêchés de me suivre », dit la jeune femme, qui accouché le lendemain de son arrivée à Chypre. Son bébé dort paisiblement à côté d’elle dans un berceau.

    Originaire d’Idleb, dans le nord-ouest de la Syrie, Kawthar exhorte Chypre d’accepter sa demande de regroupement familial, affirmant ne pouvoir « vivre ni au Liban ni en Syrie ».

    Selon la loi chypriote, seuls les migrants ayant le statut de réfugié ont droit au regroupement familial. Mais, sur les quelque 7.700 demandeurs d’asile syriens arrivés sur l’île depuis 2018, moins de 2% ont obtenu ce statut, indique l’Agence de l’ONU pour les réfugiés (UNHCR).

    « Les enfants sont traumatisés, ils répètent sans fin :+Maman+ », confie le mari de Kawthar, Hassan al-Ali, rencontré par l’AFP à Aïn El-Tefaha, un village près de Beyrouth, où il loue une chambre.

    Et de se rappeler la tragique journée du 22 août, quand le bateau est resté immobilisé « des heures » lors de l’intervention des garde-côtes. « Il y avait un soleil de plomb, les enfants avaient très soif (...) Ma fille ne bougeait plus, je pensais qu’elle allait mourir », dit-il, la voix brisée par l’émotion.

    Issa Chamma, un autre Syrien dans l’embarcation, se trouve aussi à Kofinou. Comme Kawthar, il a été séparé de sa famille après avoir perdu connaissance sur le bateau.

    Originaire d’Alep, ce migrant de 37 ans qui souffre de problèmes pulmonaires affirme à l’AFP que sa femme et ses trois enfants, âgés de deux à onze ans, ont « passé deux jours en prison à leur retour à Beyrouth ».

    – « Des vies en danger » -

    Selon l’UNHCR, le refoulement des migrants en mer est contraire aux lois internationales. « Cette pratique doit cesser parce qu’elle met des vies en danger », souligne Emilia Strovolidou, porte-parole de l’UNHCR à Chypre, appelant les autorités à réunir les familles de Kawthar et de Issa.

    EuroMed Droits, un réseau de 65 organisations méditerranéennes de défense des droits humains, lancera d’ailleurs lundi une campagne pour sensibiliser sur cette affaire, appelant l’UE à « enquêter sur les violations commises par les forces frontalières chypriotes ».

    Le 21 septembre, lors d’une audience au Parlement chypriote, plusieurs députés ont critiqué la politique migratoire de leur pays : « Le gouvernement doit appliquer les lois internationales et réunir Kawthar avec sa famille maintenant », a dit à l’AFP la députée Alexandra Attalides, du Parti vert.

    Le ministre de l’Intérieur, Nicos Nouris, qui n’a pas répondu aux sollicitations de l’AFP, avait argué récemment que son pays était « en droit de refuser l’arrivée illégale de migrants ».

    En visite fin août à Nicosie, la Commissaire européenne aux Affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, a toutefois affirmé que cette opération de refoulement « pos(ait) question ».

    En attendant, Kawthar dit « penser constamment » à ses deux autres enfants : « Je ne fais que pleurer (...) Rien ne peut compenser leur absence ».

    https://information.tv5monde.com/info/chypre-la-detresse-de-migrants-syriens-separes-de-leurs-enfant

    #réfugiés_syriens #migrations #asile #réfugiés

    • Cyprus: no to #pushbacks, yes to family reunification!

      EuroMed Rights, KISA, Access Centre for Human Rights, the Lebanese Centre for Human Rights and 12 other partner organisations call on the Republic of Cyprus to immediately end the practice of pushbacks, to facilitate family reunification procedures and increases legal pathways and humanitarian corridors through the use of humanitarian visas. We also call on the Lebanese authorities to immediately halt all deportations of refugees to Syria. We also call upon the European Union to investigate the misconducts perpetrated by Cypriot police and border forces. 

      Another tragic story in the East Mediterranean

      On 22 August 2021, a boat left Lebanon for Cyprus with 69 refugees on board. The Access Centre for Human Rights and KISA interviewed witnesses and it is their testimony which this press statement relies upon. According to these witnesses, Cypriot coast guards forcefully stopped the boat by throwing an item on its engine and for several hours denied food and water to refugees – including a man with serious health problems, children and a pregnant woman close to her due date.  

      After the destruction of the boat’s engine, several refugees jumped into the sea to swim towards the Cypriot shore. Two of them tried for several hours to avoid the police speedboats that were trying to force them to return back to the boat. One of them was lost at sea and to this day is still missing.

      After the Cypriot coast guards pulled the immobilised boat far away from the coast, they transferred the pregnant woman to a police boat and she was taken to hospital. The police refused to take along with the woman her two children (aged 1.5 and 3 years old) and her husband. At the hospital doctors did not admit her since in their assessment she was not ready to give birth. The police then transferred her to a port and gave her a plastic chair. She spent the night laying down on wooden pallets at the port. The next morning, she was transferred back to hospital where she gave birth. 

      On the same day, 23 August, the Cypriot coastguards placed all the individuals on a boat and sent them back to Lebanon – this included the woman’s husband and children. Three other people on the boat were later deported from Lebanon to Syria where they were held in detention.  

      Violations in chain

      Since March 2020, under a controversial agreement with Lebanon which is still to be signed by the Lebanese Parliament, the Cypriot authorities have repeatedly resorted to pushing back boats to Lebanon and have denied individuals access to the asylum procedure. By refusing to offer basic care to refugees, denying  them entry and pushing  them back illegally to Lebanon, Cyprus is violating several articles of the European Convention on Human Rights and the 1951 Geneva Convention on the Status of Refugees, thus contributing to the chain refoulement of Syrian refugees to Syria, and putting them at risk of torture, ill-treatment, detention, enforced disappearance and death.  This practice must end immediately.

       Please direct any questions or requests for interview to: Maxence Salendre, Communication Team Coordinator – msa@euromedrights.net

      https://euromedrights.org/publication/cyprus-no-to-pushbacks-yes-to-family-reunification%e2%80%af%e2%80%af
      #push-backs #refoulement

  • #Refoulements_en_chaîne depuis l’#Autriche (2021)

    In a recent finding, the Styria Regional Administrative Court in Graz ruled that pushbacks are “partially methodically applied” in Austria, and that in the process, the 21-year-old complainant was subject to degrading treatment, violating his human dignity. The ruling further shed light on the practices of chain pushbacks happening from Italy and Austria, through Slovenia and Croatia, to BiH. The last chain pushback from Austria all the way to BiH was recorded by PRAB partners in early April 2021, while in 2020, 20 persons reported experiencing chain pushbacks from Austria and an additional 76 from Italy.

    Source: rapport “#Doors_Wide_Shut – Quarterly report on push-backs on the Western Balkan Route” (juin 2021)

    #push-backs #refoulements #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #Slovénie #Croatie #frontière_sud-alpine #Bosnie-Herzégovine #Alpes

    • MEPs slam Slovenian Presidency for their role in chain-pushbacks

      In the first week of September (2. 8. 2021), MEPs in the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs confronted Slovenian Interior Minister Aleš Hojs as he presented the priorities for Slovenian presidency of the Council of the European Union in Brussels. With evidence provided by BVMN and network members InfoKolpa and Are You Syrious, representatives of The Left in the European Parliament took the Presidency to task for its systemic policy of chain-pushbacks and flagrant abuse of the rule of law. Members also shamed the Slovenian Ministry of Interior for continuing to ignore a Supreme Court ruling which established Slovenia had violated the rights of a Cameroonian plaintiff and are obligated to allow him access to the Slovenian asylum system and to stop returning people to Croatia as there is overwhelming evidence of chain-refoulement and degrading treatment often amounting to tortute.

      Presenting the evidence

      Malin Björk, whose fact-finding trip to Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia was facilitated by Are You Syrious and Infokolpa, then handed over the Black Book of Pushbacks to Minister Hojs, a dossier of cases recorded by the Border Violence Monitoring Network which collates pushback violations from across the Balkans since 2017. The book has a concerningly large section on Slovenian chain pushbacks, sharing the voices of 1266 people documented by BVMN who had either been chain pushed back (via Croatia) to Bosnia-Herzegovina or Serbia. The cases speak of systemic gatekeeping of asylum, misuse of translation, the registering of minors as adults, and fast-tracked returns to Croatian police who would then carry out brutal pushbacks. All point to a high level of complicity by the Slovenian authorities in the brutalisation of people-on-the-move, a fact reinforced by the April ruling of the Slovenian Supreme Court.

      Yet this first hand evidence is in reality just the tip of the iceberg, and a recent open letter on the matter revealed how according to officially available data, over 27,000 returns of potential asylum seekers were carried out by Slovenian authorities in the recent years, resulting in chain refoulement via Croatia to non-EU countries such as Bosnia-Herzegovina.

      “I expect you as a responsible Minister, not only for your country, but for the EU Presidency to take part of this document and tell us what you will do to stop the illegality, impunity and the brutality.”

      More weak denials

      Interior Minister Hojs doubled down on his stance that Slovenia was managing its borders according to the Rule of Law, even despite his own national court ruling the complete opposite. In an unsurprising move, reminiscent of many Interior Ministers across the EU, Hojs levied accusations of fake news and dismissed the Black Book set before him as a fabrication. Referring to his short attempt to actually look at the evidence presented in the book Hojs stated: “How many lies can be concentrated on one half page, I immediately closed the book and did not touch it again”. With the Minister unwilling to leaf through the 244 pages dedicated to crimes carried out by Slovenia, the network welcome him to view the visual reconstruction of a pushback published last year which vividly captured the experience of those denied asylum access in Slovenia and then brutalised while being collectively expelled from Croatia.

      “I have read the Black Book already in parliament and have seen what they write about me and the Slovenian police. All lies.”

      – Minister Hojs Speaking to Slovenian TV

      The fact is that Minister Hojs is personally not mentioned in the Black Book, though his actions are documented on countless pages, implies that someone is indeed lying. Court judgements, the testimony of thousands of pushback victims, and hard video evidence all highlight the fragility of the Slovenian government’s “fake news” line. While already deeply concerning at a national level, the fact that this administration is also spearheading the EU Presidency shows the extent to which perpetrators of pushbacks have been enabled and empowered at the highest level in Brussels. As a recent webinar event hosted by InfoKolpa and BVMN asked: Can a country responsible for mass violations of Human Rights be an honest broker in the preparations of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum? Until the ruling by the Supreme Court is implemented and people-on-the-move have their mandated right to request asylum in Slovenia, this question will continue to be answered firmly with a “no”.

      Today, our MEPs talked to @aleshojs 🇸🇮 Minister of Home Affairs about the thousands of men, women and children who have been denied over the past years the right to seek asylum in Slovenia, and forcefully handed over to Croatian. @Border_Violence #StopPushbacks pic.twitter.com/XvNLvoCLhY

      — The Left in the European Parliament (@Left_EU) September 2, 2021

      MEP statement

      “I was in Velika Kladusa in Bosnia, I was astonished to meet many migrants and refugees that had been to Slovenia, but they had been told that the right to seek asylum did not exist in you country. One of the persons that I met there was from Cameroon and had escaped political persecution. Once he thought he was in safety in Slovenia he called the police himself to ask to be able to claim asylum. Instead he was as so many others, as thousand of others, handed over to the Croatian police who brutalised him and sent him back to Bosnia.

      This case is a little bit special, compared to the many thousands of others, because on 9th April this year the Slovenian Supreme Court itself ruled that Slovenian police had violated the principle of non-refoulement, the prohibition of collective expulsion and denied the him the right to seek international protection.

      You (Minister Hojs) have had meetings with Commissioner Johansson and you have said you will stand up for the right to seek asylum for asylum seekers. Now your own court has found that you fail in this case. So my questions are: Will you stand by your words and provide a humanitarian visa for this person so that he can come back to Slovenia to apply for asylum as he was supposed to have been granted two years ago? And the second is more structural of course, how will you ensure that people have the right to apply for asylum in Slovenia, that they are not brutally pushed back to Croatian police, who are then illegally pushing them back to Bosnia in a kind of chain pushback situation which is a shame, a shame, at European borders?”

      – Malin Björk MEP

      The case referred to is part of strategic litigation efforts led by network member InfoKolpa, which resulted in a landmark judgement issued on 16 July 2020 by the Slovenian Administrative Court. The findings prove that the Slovenian police force in August 2019 carried out an illegal collective expulsion of a member of a persecuted English-speaking minority from Cameroon who wanted to apply for asylum in the country. The verdict was confirmed on 9th April 2021 by the Slovenian Supreme Court, which ruled the following: the Slovenian police violated the principle of non-refoulement, the prohibition of collective expulsions and denied the asylum seeker access to the right to international protection. The state was ordered to ensure that the plaintiff is allowed to re-enter the country and ask for international protection, but no effort has been made by the authorities to respect the ruling of the court. The case is thus another confirmation of the Slovenian misconduct that persistently undermines the foundations of the rule of law, specifically international refugee law and international human rights law.

      We fear for Slovenia.

      https://www.borderviolence.eu/meps-slam-slovenian-presidency-for-their-role-in-chain-pushbacks

    • Briefly reviewing the topic of pushbacks at European borders, it is important to report on the case of a young refugee from Somalia who was prevented from seeking asylum in Austria and was expulsed, or more precisely, pushed back to Slovenia, contrary to international and European law. His case will soon be reviewed at the Provincial Administrative Court of Styria (https://www.index.hr/vijesti/clanak/migrant-tuzio-austriju-slucaj-bi-mogao-imati-posljedice-i-za-hrvatsku-policiju/2302310.aspx), and if he wins the case, it will be the second verdict that indicates systematic and sometimes chained pushbacks of refugees through Austria, Slovenia, and thus Croatia all the way to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      Reçu via la mailing-list Inicijativa Dobrodosli, du 16.09.2021

    • Violenze e respingimenti: la “stretta” della Slovenia sui migranti. Con l’aiuto dell’Italia

      Solo a settembre oltre 100 persone in transito sono state respinte a catena in Bosnia ed Erzegovina. Molte di loro sono state fermate a pochi chilometri dal confine italiano. I pattugliamenti misti della polizia italiana e slovena potrebbero spiegare l’aumento delle persone rintracciate. La denuncia del Border violence monitoring network

      Otto casi di respingimenti a catena dalla Slovenia alla Bosnia ed Erzegovina nel mese di settembre 2021. Più di cento persone coinvolte, in prevalenza cittadini afghani e pakistani, che denunciano violenze da parte della polizia slovena. Molte di loro (almeno 34) sono state fermate a “un passo” dal confine italiano: la “stretta” del governo di Lubiana sul controllo del territorio, in collaborazione con la polizia italiana, sembra dare i primi risultati.

      La denuncia arriva dalla rete Border violence monitoring network (Bvmn) che monitora il rispetto dei diritti delle persone in transito nei Paesi balcanici: “Non si hanno testimonianze dirette di poliziotti italiani coinvolti ma si presume che l’aumento nella sorveglianza del territorio e l’alto numero di persone arrestate nel nord della Slovenia sia una conseguenza dell’accordo tra Roma e Lubiana” spiega Simon Campbell, coordinatore delle attività della rete. Il ruolo dell’Italia resta così di primo piano nonostante le riammissioni al confine siano formalmente interrotte dal gennaio 2021.

      Nel report di Bvmn di settembre 2021 vengono ricostruite dettagliatamente numerose operazioni di respingimento che “partono” dal territorio sloveno. Intorno alle sette e trenta di sera del 7 settembre 2021 un gruppo di quattro cittadini afghani, tra cui un minore, viene fermato vicino alla città di Rodik, nel Nord-Ovest della Slovenia a circa cinque chilometri dal confine con l’Italia. Il gruppo di persone in transito viene bloccato da due agenti della polizia di frontiera slovena e trasferito in un centro per richiedenti asilo. Ma è solo un’illusione. Quarantotto ore dopo, il 9 settembre verso le 17, i quattro si ritroveranno a Gradina, nel Nord della Bosnia ed Erzegovina: nonostante abbiano espresso più volte la volontà di richiedere asilo le forze di polizia slovena le hanno consegnate a quelle croate che hanno provveduto a portarle nuovamente al di fuori dell’Ue. Una decina di giorni dopo, il 19 settembre, un gruppo di otto persone, di età compresa tra i 16 e i 21 anni, riesce a raggiungere la zona confinaria tra Slovenia e Italia ma durante l’attraversamento dell’autostrada A1, all’uscita di una zona boscosa, interviene la polizia. All’appello “mancano” due persone che camminavano più avanti e sono riuscite a raggiungere Trieste: le guardie di frontiera lo sanno. L’intervistato, un cittadino afghano di 21 anni, sospetta che “una sorta di videocamera con sensori li aveva ha individuati mentre camminavano nella foresta”. O forse uno dei 55 droni acquistati dal ministro dell’Interno sloveno per controllare il territorio di confine. A quel punto le forze speciali slovene chiedono rinforzi per rintracciare i “fuggitivi” e nel frattempo sequestrano scarpe, telefoni cellulari, power bank e soldi ai membri del gruppo identificati che dopo circa mezz’ora sono costretti a entrare nel retro di un furgone. “Non c’era ossigeno perché era sovraffollato e la polizia ha acceso l’aria condizionata a temperature elevate. Due persone sono svenute durante il viaggio” spiega il 21enne. Verso le 12 la polizia croata prende il controllo del furgone: il gruppo resta prigioniero nel veicolo, con le porte chiuse e senza cibo e acqua, per il resto della giornata. Alle due del mattino verranno rilasciati vicino a Bihać, nel cantone bosniaco di Una Sana.

      Sono solo due esempi delle numerose testimonianze raccolte dal Border violence. I numeri dei respingimenti a catena sono in forte aumento: da gennaio a agosto 2021 in totale erano state 143 le persone coinvolte, solo nel mese di settembre 104. Un dato importante che coinvolge anche l’Italia. Le operazioni di riammissione dall’Italia alla Slovenia sono formalmente interrotte -anche se la rete segnala due casi, uno a marzo e uno a maggio, di persone che nonostante avessero già raggiunto il territorio italiano sono state respinte a catena fino in Bosnia- ma il governo italiano fornisce supporto tecnico e operativo al governo sloveno per il controllo del territorio grazie a un’intesa di polizia tra Roma e Lubiana di cui non si conoscono i contenuti.

      Sono ripresi infatti nel mese di luglio 2021 i pattugliamenti misti al confine nelle zone di Gorizia e Trieste. “Al momento dobbiamo approfondire l’effettivo funzionamento dell’accordo: non abbiamo testimonianze dirette di poliziotti italiani coinvolti -continua Campbell-. Presumiamo però che l’alto livello di sorveglianza del territorio e il numero di persone che vengono catturate in quella zona dimostra che l’intesa sui pattugliamenti assume un ruolo importante nei respingimenti a catena verso la Bosnia”. Paese in cui la “malagestione” del fenomeno migratorio da parte del governo di Sarajevo si traduce in una sistematica violazione dei diritti delle persone in transito e in cui le forze di polizia sotto accusa del Consiglio d’Europa per i metodi violenti che utilizza. Elementi che il Viminale non può considerare solo come “collaterali” delle politiche con cui tenta di esternalizzare i confini.

      La particolarità dei respingimenti da parte delle autorità slovene è che sono realizzati alla luce del sole. “La caratteristica di queste operazioni consiste nel fatto che i migranti vengono consegnati ‘ufficialmente’ alle autorità croate dagli ufficiali sloveni ai valichi di frontiera sia stradali che ferroviari -spiegano gli attivisti-. Prendendo come esempio la Croazia la maggior parte dei gruppi vengono allontanati da agenti che eseguono le operazioni con maschere, in zone di confine remote”. In Slovenia, invece, spesso vengono rilasciate tracce di documenti firmati per giustificare l’attività di riammissione. “Nonostante questa procedura sia la Corte amministrativa che la Corte suprema slovena hanno ritenuto che queste pratiche violano la legge sull’asilo perché espongono le persone al rischio di tortura in Croazia”.

      Una violenza denunciata, a inizio ottobre 2021, da un’importate inchiesta giornalistica di cui abbiamo parlato anche su Altreconomia. I pushaback sloveni, a differenza di quelli “diretti” che si verificano in Croazia e in Bosnia ed Erzegovina, sono più elaborati perché “richiedono più passaggi e quindi possono durare più giorni”. “Siamo rimasti tre giorni in prigione. Non abbiamo potuto contattare nessun avvocato, non ci hanno fornito un traduttore. Ci hanno dato solo una bottiglia di acqua al giorno e del pane” racconta uno dei cittadini afghani intervistati. Oltre al cattivo trattamento in detenzione, diverse testimonianze parlano di “violenze e maltrattamenti anche all’interno delle stazioni di polizia slovene” e anche al di fuori, con perquisizioni violente: in una testimonianza raccolta dalla Ong No name kitchen, un cittadino afghano ha denunciato una “perquisizione intensiva dei genitali”. I maggiori controlli sul territorio sloveno, possibili anche grazie alla polizia italiana, rischiano così di far ricadere le persone in transito in una spirale di violenza e negazione dei diritti fondamentali.

      https://altreconomia.it/violenze-e-respingimenti-la-stretta-della-slovenia-sui-migranti-con-lai

    • “They were told by the officers that they would be taken to Serbia.... at 12am they were dropped at the Bosnia-Croatia border, near the town of Velika Kladuša”

      Date and time: September 24, 2021 00:00
      Location: Velika Kladuša, Bosnia and Herzegovina
      Coordinates: 45.1778695699, 16.025619131638
      Pushback from: Croatia, Slovenia
      Pushback to: Bosnia, Croatia
      Demographics: 11 person(s), age: 17-22 , from: Afghanistan, Pakistan
      Minors involved? No
      Violence used: kicking, insulting, theft of personal belongings
      Police involved: 2 Slovenian officers wearing blue uniforms, 2 Croatian officers wearing light blue uniforms, 2 police vans
      Taken to a police station?: yes
      Treatment at police station or other place of detention: detention, personal information taken, papers signed, denial of food/water, forced to pay fee
      Was the intention to ask for asylum expressed?: Yes
      Reported by: No Name Kitchen

      Original Report

      On 20th September 2021, 6 Afghan males between the ages of 17 and 22 attempted to cross the border from Slovenia into Italy near the city of Trieste. They had been traveling for 3 days from Serbia before reaching this point. They walked for 4 hours to the border with another group, but the weather was cold and raining so they decided to try taking a taxi instead. As they were hidden in the taxi they did not have enough space for their bags, and so during this ride they had no water or food.

      The two groups set off in two different taxis. The first made it across the border, but as the second one was approaching it after a 40-minute journey, a police car began chasing them. The driver of the taxi stopped on a small bridge and escaped on foot, but the men in the car were arrested by two Slovenian police officers. The officers have been described as one young man and one old man, both wearing blue short-sleeved tops. The men were then taken to a police station near the Italian border. Here they spent 1 night. The respondents remarked that they were treated well, that the police cooperated and did not try to scare them, and that they were given food, water, and blankets. However, it was cold, and a few of the group became ill. The police tried to interview them about their attempt across the border, but after receiving no response told them to rest and take their food.

      On the morning of 21 September, the group was all given a COVID test and taken to a quarantine facility. Here they spent 3 nights. Again, the respondent stated that they were treated well. They were allowed to use their mobile phones for 2 hours per day and were given good quality food and medical care from a nurse/doctor. The group stated that they intended to claim asylum except for one that was going to Germany because he had a brother there. They also filled out a form stating that they faced threat in Afghanistan. Communication was initially made in English, but a Pashtu-speaking interpreter from Pakistan was provided for the interview. One of the group, the 6th member, was allowed to stay in Slovenia as he was 17.

      On the morning of 24 September the group of 5, all Afghan males between the age of 18 and 22, were given all of their belongings and driven to a small checkpoint on the Croatian border. The checkpoint was described as a two-sided road with a container on each side. Here they were handed over to two Croatian officers, which the Slovenian officers spoke with. The Croatian officers have been described as one woman around 40-45 years old and one man around 50, with both wearing light blue short-sleeved shirts consistent with the uniform of the Croatian Granicna Policija (border police), and one wearing a jacket. Here the respondents remarked that the good treatment ended and that the Croatian officers began acting “insane”. They were driven to a police station near the Croatia-Slovenia border. Here their sim cards were all taken, meaning the group could not access their phones or location services anymore. In the station, there was also a group of 7 Pakistani men. Initially, the two groups were held in separate rooms, but when another detainee arrived at the station all 11 men were put in the same room. The respondents described the room as 2x2m, designed for 1 person, and smelling very bad.

      The two groups were kept in these conditions from 10 am-7 pm, with no food or water. They asked for these repeatedly and were eventually given something to eat after paying with their own money. One of the group of 5 was kicked twice for no apparent reason. The group stated their intention to claim asylum, and again filled out a form stating that they faced threat in Afghanistan. In response, the woman officer asked: “why did you leave Afghanistan? If there was war you should fight not leave”. The group remarked that they refused to engage, stating that “she doesn’t know politics, doesn’t know when someone should stay or leave, there is different reasons”.

      At around 8 pm all 11 men were given their belongings back, minus their sim cards. As the belongings were jumbled and all given at once, some things were lost or potentially stolen. They were then ordered to get in a van which was driven by the same two officers. The group of 5 asked to be returned to Serbia as they had contacts there and had spent time there. They also had Serbian refugee camp ID cards. They were told by the officers that they would be taken to Serbia. The officers then began driving slowly, stopping often and parking to pass the time. The groups asked for something to drink and gave money in return for cola and water. At 12am they were dropped at the Bosnia-Croatia border, near the town of Velika Kladuša.

      The group walked into Velika Kladuša. They spent all night outside with no blankets, sleeping bags, or comfortable places to sleep. The weather was freezing. They tried to enter a restaurant at 7am but were not allowed in. After 2 nights in the cold weather, the group of 5 decided to return to Serbia. The return cost between €500-600. They crossed the border into Serbia at a bridge, where the group remarked that there was no police in sight.

      https://www.borderviolence.eu/violence-reports/september-24-2021-0000-velika-kladusa-bosnia-and-herzegovina

    • Voir aussi le "report of the Council of Europe Committee for the Prevention of Torture on the situation in Croatia"

      The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) has published today the report on its ad hoc visit to Croatia from 10 to 14 August 2020. The report is made public pursuant to Rule 39 §3 (1) of the Rules of Procedure (2) of the CPT following written statements made by a senior Croatian official pertaining to the content of the report which were placed into the public domain. The Committee deemed such statements as a misrepresentation of the contents of the report, the professional integrity and modus operandi of the members of the CPT’s delegation. Consequently, the Committee decided to publish the report of the visit in full.

      In a report on Croatia published today, the CPT urges the Croatian authorities to take determined action to stop migrants being ill-treated by police officers and to ensure that cases of alleged ill-treatment are investigated effectively.

      The Committee carried out a rapid reaction visit to Croatia from 10 to 14 August 2020, and in particular along the border area to Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), to examine the treatment and safeguards afforded to migrants deprived of their liberty by the Croatian police. The CPT’s delegation also looked into the procedures applied to migrants in the context of their removal from Croatia as well as the effectiveness of oversight and accountability mechanisms in cases of alleged police misconduct during such operations. A visit to the Ježevo Reception Centre for Foreigners was also carried out.

      The report highlights that, for the first time since the CPT started visiting Croatia in 1998, there were manifest difficulties of cooperation. The CPT’s delegation was provided with incomplete information about places where migrants may be deprived of their liberty and it was obstructed by police officers in accessing documentation necessary for the delegation to carry out the Committee’s mandate.

      In addition to visiting police stations in Croatia, the CPT’s delegation also carried out many interviews across the Croatian border in the Una-Sana Canton of BiH, where it received numerous credible and concordant allegations of physical ill-treatment of migrants by Croatian police officers (notably members of the intervention police). The alleged ill-treatment consisted of slaps, kicks, blows with truncheons and other hard objects (e.g. butts/barrels of firearms, wooden sticks or tree branches) to various parts of the body. The alleged ill-treatment had been purportedly inflicted either at the time of the migrants’ “interception” and de facto deprivation of liberty inside Croatian territory (ranging from several to fifty kilometres or more from the border) and/or at the moment of their push-back across the border with BiH.

      In a significant number of cases, the persons interviewed displayed recent injuries on their bodies which were assessed by the delegation’s forensic medical doctors as being compatible with their allegations of having been ill-treated by Croatian police officers (by way of example, reference is made to the characteristic “tram-line” haematomas to the back of the body, highly consistent with infliction of blows from a truncheon or stick).

      The report also documents several accounts of migrants being subjected to other forms of severe ill-treatment by Croatian police officers such as migrants being forced to march through the forest to the border barefoot and being thrown into the Korana river which separates Croatia from BiH with their hands still zip-locked. Some migrants also alleged being pushed back into BiH wearing only their underwear and, in some cases, even naked. A number of persons also stated that when they had been apprehended and were lying face down on the ground certain Croatian police officers had discharged their weapons into the ground close to them.

      In acknowledging the significant challenges faced by the Croatian authorities in dealing with the large numbers of migrants entering the country, the CPT stresses the need for a concerted European approach. Nevertheless, despite these challenges, Croatia must meet its human rights obligations and treat migrants who enter the country through the border in a humane and dignified manner.

      The findings of the CPT’s delegation also show clearly that there are no effective accountability mechanisms in place to identify the perpetrators of alleged acts of ill-treatment. There is an absence of specific guidelines from the Croatian Police Directorate on documenting diversion operations and no independent police complaints body to undertake effective investigations into such alleged acts.

      As regards the establishment of an “independent border monitoring mechanism” by the Croatian authorities, the CPT sets out its minimum criteria for such mechanism to be effective and independent.

      In conclusion, nonetheless the CPT wishes to pursue a constructive dialogue and meaningful cooperation with the Croatian authorities, grounded on a mature acknowledgment, including at the highest political levels, of the gravity of the practice of ill-treatment of migrants by Croatian police officers and a commitment for such ill-treatment to cease.

      https://www.coe.int/en/web/cpt/-/council-of-europe-anti-torture-committee-publishes-report-on-its-2020-ad-hoc-vi

      Pour télécharger le rapport :
      https://rm.coe.int/1680a4c199

      #CPT #rapport

      –-

      Commentaire de Inicijativa Dobrodosli (mailing-list du 08.12.2021) :

      Jerko Bakotin writes for Novosti (https://www.portalnovosti.com/odbor-vijeca-europe-hrvatska-policija-sustavno-zlostavlja-migrante-i-) that this report is “perhaps the strongest evidence publicly available so far in support of previously hard-to-dispute facts. First, that Croatian police massively and illegally denies refugees and migrants the right to asylum and expels them from the depths of the territory, that is, conducts pushbacks. Second, that these pushbacks are not officially registered. Third, the pushbacks are done with knowledge, and certainly on the orders of superiors.” Civil society organizations point out (https://hr.n1info.com/vijesti/rh-sustavno-krsi-prava-izbjeglica-koristeci-metode-mucenja-a-zrtve-su-i-d) that the Croatian government is systematically working to cover up these practices, and there will be no change until all those who are responsible are removed and responsibility is taken. Unfortunately, it is likely that the Croatian political leadership will instead decide to shift the blame to refugees and declare international conspiracies against Croatia (https://www.telegram.hr/politika-kriminal/jednostavno-pitanje-za-bozinovica-i-milanovica-sudjeluje-li-i-vijece-europe). As a reaction to the published report, Amnesty International points out (https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2021/12/human-rights-body-has-condemned-croatian-authorities-for-border-violence) that due to the European Commission’s continued disregard for Croatia’s disrespect for European law, and their continued support in resources, it is really important to ask how much the Commission is complicit in human rights violations at the borders.

    • Another important report (https://welcome.cms.hr/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/Polugodisnje-izvjesce-nezavisnog-mehanizma-nadzora-postupanja-policijski) came out on Friday - in a working version that was later withdrawn from a slightly surprising address where it was published - on the website of the Croatian Institute of Public Health. It is the report of the Croatian "independent mechanism for monitoring the conduct of police officers of the Ministry of the Interior in the field of illegal migration and international protection”. Despite the tepid analysis of police treatment - which can be understood given the connection of members of the mechanism with the governing structures, as well as a very problematic proposal for further racial profiling and biometric monitoring of refugees using digital technologies, the report confirmed the existence of pushbacks in Croatia: “through surveillance, the mechanism found that the police carried out illegal pushbacks and did not record returns allowed under Article 13 of the Schengen Borders Code.” We look forward to the publication of the final version of the report.

      –-> via Inicijativa Dobrodosli (mailing-list du 08.12.2021)

  • #Doors_Wide_Shut – Quarterly report on push-backs on the Western Balkan Route

    As part of the #Protecting_Rights_at_Borders initiative funded by the European Programme for Integration and Migration (EPIM), the second quarterly report on unlawful push-backs carried out by authorities in Greece, North Macedonia, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungary, and Italy was published: https://helsinki.hu/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/07/PRAB-Report-April-to-June-2021.pdf

    A key finding is that the informal cooperation between states has prevented thousands of women, men and children from seeking protection in Europe this year, in often extremely violent and humiliating ways. Rights violations at borders are not an isolated issue. There is an overall trend, a so–called race to the bottom, with regards to respect for the fundamental rights of migrants, asylum–seekers and refugees. While governments deliberately do not respect and often directly violate migrants’, refugees’, and asylum seekers’ rights under human rights law, humanitarian organizations are often prevented from providing assistance in line with their humanitarian mandates.

    Country chapters were written by Associazione per gli Studi Giuridici sull’Immigrazione (ASGI), Diaconia Valdese (DV) and Danish Refugee Council (DRC) regarding Italy; the Hungarian Helsinki Committee regarding Hungary; DRC BiH for Bosnia-Herzegovina; Humanitarian Center for Integration and Tolerance (HCIT) regarding Serbia; Macedonian Young Lawyers Association (MYLA) regarding North-Macedonia, and the Greek Council for Refugees (GCR) and DRC Greece regarding Greece.

    The previous quarterly report is also available here: https://helsinki.hu/en/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/05/prab-report-january-may-2021-_final_10052021.pdf

    https://helsinki.hu/en/doors-wide-shut-quarterly-report-on-push-backs-on-the-western-balkan-route

    Dans le rapport on trouve une carte avec le nombre de refoulements entre janvier et juin 2021 :

    #push-backs #refoulements #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Grèce #Macédoine_du_Nord #Serbie #Bosnie-Herzégovine #Hongrie #Italie
    #rapport

  • Mediterranean carcerality and acts of escape

    In recent years, migrants seeking refuge in Europe have faced capture and containment in the Mediterranean – the result of experimentation by EU institutions and member states.

    About two years ago, in June 2019, a group of 75 people found themselves stranded in the central Mediterranean Sea. The migrant group had tried to escape from Libya in order to reach Europe but was adrift at sea after running out of fuel. Monitored by European aerial assets, they saw a vessel on the horizon slowly moving toward them. When they were eventually rescued by the Maridive 601, an offshore supply vessel, they did not know that it would become their floating prison for nearly three weeks. Malta and Italy refused to allocate a port of safety in Europe, and, at first, the Tunisian authorities were equally unwilling to allow them to land.

    Over 19 days, the supply vessel turned from a floating refuge into an offshore carceral space in which the situation for the rescued deteriorated over time. Food and water were scarce, untreated injuries worsened, scabies spread, as did the desperation on board. The 75 people, among them 64 Bangladeshi migrants and dozens of minors, staged a protest on board, chanting: “We don’t need food, we don’t want to stay here, we want to go to Europe.”

    Reaching Europe, however, seemed increasingly unlikely, with Italy and Malta rejecting any responsibility for their disembarkation. Instead, the Tunisian authorities, the Bangladeshi embassy, and the #International_Organisation_for_Migration (#IOM) arranged not only their landing in Tunisia, but also the removal of most of them to their countries of origin. Shortly after disembarkation in the harbour of Zarzis, dozens of the migrants were taken to the runways of Tunis airport and flown out.

    In a recently published article in the journal Political Geography, I have traced the story of this particular migrant group and their zig-zagging trajectories that led many from remote Bangladeshi villages, via Dubai, Istanbul or Alexandria, to Libya, and eventually onto a supply vessel off the Tunisian coast. Although their situation was certainly unique, it also exemplified the ways in which the Mediterranean has turned into a ‘carceral seascape’, a space where people precariously on the move are to be captured and contained in order to prevent them from reaching European shores.

    While forms of migrant capture and containment have, of course, a much longer history in the European context, the past ten years have seen particularly dramatic transformations in the central Mediterranean Sea. When the Arab Uprisings ‘re-opened’ this maritime corridor in and after 2011, crossings started to increase significantly – about 156,000 people crossed to Europe on average every year between 2014 and 2017. Since then, crossings have dropped sharply. The annual average between 2018 and 2020 was around 25,000 people – a figure resembling annual arrivals in the period before the Arab Uprisings.

    One significant reason for this steep decrease in arrivals is the refoulement industry that EU institutions and member states have created, together with third-country allies. The capture of people seeking to escape to Europe has become a cruel trade, of which a range of actors profit. Although ‘refouling’ people on the move – thus returning them to places where they are at risk of facing torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment – violates international human rights laws and refugee conventions, these practices have become systemic and largely normalised, not least as the COVID pandemic has come to serve as a suitable justification to deter potential ‘Corona-spreaders’ and keep them contained elsewhere.

    That migrants face capture and containment in the Mediterranean is the result of years of experimentation on part of EU institutions and member states. Especially since 2018, Europe has largely withdrawn maritime assets from the deadliest areas but reinforced its aerial presence instead, including through the recent deployment of drones. In this way, European assets do not face the ‘risk’ of being forced into rescue operations any longer but can still monitor the sea from above and guide North African, in particular Libyan, speed boats to chase after escaping migrant boats. In consequence, tens of thousands have faced violent returns to places they sought to flee from.

    Just in 2021 alone, about 16,000 people have been caught at sea and forcibly returned to Libya in this way, already more than in the whole of 2020. In mid-June, a ‘push-back by proxy’ occurred, when the merchant vessel Vos Triton handed over 170 migrants to a Libyan coastguard vessel that then returned them to Tripoli, where they were imprisoned in a camp known for its horrendous conditions.

    The refoulment industry, and Mediterranean carcerality more generally, are underpinned by a constant flow of finances, technologies, equipment, discourses, and know-how, which entangles European and Libyan actors to a degree that it might make more sense to think of them as a collective Euro-Libyan border force.

    To legitimise war-torn and politically divided Libya as a ‘competent’ sovereign actor, able to govern the maritime expanse outside its territorial waters, the European Commission funded, and the Italian coastguard implemented, a feasibility study in 2017 to assess “the Libyan capacity in the area of Search and Rescue” (SAR). Shortly after, the Libyan ‘unity government’ declared its extensive Libyan SAR zone, a zone over which it would hold ‘geographical competence’. When the Libyan authorities briefly suspended the establishment of its SAR zone, given its inability to operate a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC), an Italian navy vessel was stationed within Tripoli harbour, carrying out the functions of the Libyan MRCC.

    Since 2017, €57.2m from the EU Trust Fund for Africa has funded Libya’s ‘integrated border management’, on top of which hundreds of millions of euros were transferred by EU member states to Libyan authorities through bilateral agreements. Besides such financial support, EU member states have donated speed boats and surveillance technologies to control the Libyan SAR zone while officers from EU military project Operation Sophia and from European Border Agency Frontex have repeatedly provided training to the Libyan coastguards. When out to search for escaping migrants, the Libyan speed boats have relied on Europe’s ‘eyes in the sky’, the aerial assets of Frontex and EU member states. Migrant sightings from the sky would then be relayed to the Libyan assets at sea, also via WhatsApp chats in which Frontex personnel and Libyan officers exchange.

    Thinking of the Mediterranean as a carceral space highlights these myriad Euro-Libyan entanglements that often take place with impunity and little public scrutiny. It also shows how maritime carcerality is “often underscored by mobilities”. Indeed, systematic forms of migrant capture depend on the collaboration of a range of mobile actors at sea, on land, and in the sky. Despite their incessant movements and the fact that surveillance and interception operations are predominantly characterised as rescue operations, thousands of people have lost their lives at sea over recent years. Many have been left abandoned even in situations where their whereabouts were long known to European and North African authorities, often in cases when migrant boats were already adrift and thus unable to reach Europe on their own accord.

    At the same time, even in the violent and carceral Mediterranean Sea, a range of interventions have occurred that have prevented both deaths at sea and the smooth operation of the refoulment industry. NGO rescuers, activists, fishermen and, at times, merchant vessel crews have conducted mass rescues over recent years, despite being harassed, threatened and criminalised by Euro-Libyan authorities at every turn. Through their presence, they have documented and repeatedly ruptured the operations of the Euro-Libyan border force, shedding light on what is meant to remain hidden.

    Maybe most importantly, the Mediterranean’s carceral condition has not erased the possibility of migratory acts of escape. Indeed, tactics of border subversion adapt to changing carceral techniques, with many migrant boats seeking to cross the sea without being detected and to reach European coasts autonomously. As the UNHCR notes in reference to the maritime arrival of 34,000 people in Italy and Malta in 2020: “Only approximately 4,500 of those arriving by sea in 2020 had been rescued by authorities or NGOs on the high seas: the others were intercepted by the authorities close to shore or arrived undetected.”

    While most of those stuck on the Maridive supply vessel off Tunisia’s coast in 2019 were returned to countries of origin, some tried to cross again and eventually escaped Mediterranean carcerality. Despite Euro-North African attempts to capture and contain them, they moved on stubbornly, and landed their boats in Lampedusa.

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/mediterranean-carcerality-and-acts-escape

    #enfermement #Méditerranée #mer_Méditerranée #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #expérimentation #OIM #Tunisie #Zarzis #externalisation #migrerrance #carcéralité #refoulement #push-backs #Libye #Vos_Triton #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #carceral_space

    via @isskein

  • Deux demandeurs d’asile portent plainte contre Frontex après des renvois illégaux

    Refoulés en mer Egée, ils accusent l’agence européenne de complicité de violations des droits de l’homme. La #Cour_de_justice de l’UE est saisie de l’affaire dont « Libération » a pu consulter des documents.

    #Jeancy_Kimbenga parle d’une voix calme. Son débit est posé. Sous la pluie battante d’Istanbul, ce vendredi 21 mai, le jeune homme s’abrite dans un magasin dont on entend les jingles incessants dans son téléphone. « Il n’y a pas de réseau à l’hôtel », explique-t-il. Le demandeur d’asile congolais de 17 ans est toujours coincé en Turquie, pays où il a été contraint de s’établir après un périple migratoire tourmenté : une escale en Ethiopie, un changement d’avion puis direction la Turquie et les rivages de la mer Egée, l’eldorado pour de nombreux migrants qui rêvent d’Europe.

    Par trois fois, Jeancy, qui a fui son pays après avoir subi la torture de son propre oncle, un colonel de l’armée, a tenté de rallier les côtes grecques dans un canot pneumatique. Aujourd’hui, il vit à Istanbul dans l’attente de réunir la somme nécessaire à une nouvelle traversée. Le 28 novembre 2020, il a même touché au but : son petit bateau a accosté à #Kratigou, à 10 kilomètres au sud de #Mytilène, la principale ville de la petite île grecque de Lesbos. Là, Jeancy et ses camarades se sont cachés toute une nuit avant de sortir au petit matin.

    C’était compter sans les policiers grecs qui l’arrêtent, selon son récit à Libération, avant de l’emmener en mer où il est abandonné à la merci des flots dans un bateau gonflable. Un renvoi illégal, ou « pushback ». Quelques heures plus tard, le gamin et ses compagnons d’infortune sont interceptés par les gardes-côtes turques qui les ramènent en Turquie. Sur son téléphone, Jeancy garde précieusement les preuves de son cheminement en terre hellène : des vidéos, des photos, des localisations GPS qu’il a partagées immédiatement sur Whatsapp avec amis et membres d’ONGs : « Je me suis dit qu’il pourrait se passer quelque chose. Je n’avais pas confiance. »

    Première plainte de ce genre

    Ces éléments sont la base d’une plainte que le jeune homme a déposée le vendredi 21 mai 2021, devant la cour de justice de l’Union Européenne (CJUE) contre Frontex, aux côtés d’une demandeuse d’asile burundaise, elle aussi victime de deux pushbacks. C’est la première du genre. « Je veux porter cette voix pour que cela puisse cesser. C’est vraiment très grave ce qu’il se passe ». Ils exigent le retrait de Frontex de la région.

    Les deux exilés ont été épaulés pour l’occasion par Omer Shatz et Iftach Cohen, deux avocats spécialisés en droit international, qui avaient déjà intenté une action préliminaire contre la super agence de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes au nom de #Front-lex, structure créée spécialement pour ce contentieux. « C’est la première fois que Frontex est face au tribunal pour des violations des droits de l’homme, assure Omer Shatz : nous allons faire respecter le droit au frontière extérieure de l’union Européenne ».

    Dans un réquisitoire long d’une soixantaine de pages que Libération a pu consulter, l’équipe d’avocats (complétée par Loica Lambert et Mieke Van den Broeck pour l’ONG Progress Law Network, et soutenu par l’ONG Greek Helsinki Monitor) s’attarde sur les récits des violations des droits de l’homme ainsi que sur le manque de mécanismes de contrôle de l’agence européenne de garde-côtes. Aux frontières extérieures de l’UE, Frontex, censé être le garant du respect des traités, ne remplit pas son rôle. Selon Omer Shatz, c’est sous sa responsabilité que des violences, à l’instar des « pushbacks » subis par Jeancy, se déroulent : « Non seulement la Grèce n’aurait pas pu mettre en place cette politique sans Frontex. Mais qui plus est, légalement parlant, tout cela fait partie d’une opération conjointe entre l’agence et le gouvernement grec. »

    Contestation en interne

    Selon sa régulation interne (et son article 46), Frontex a pourtant l’obligation de faire cesser, séance tenante, toute action qui irait à l’encontre du respect des droits de l’homme. Dès lors, la demande des avocats est simple : Frontex doit retirer ses moyens (avions, bateaux, hélicoptères ou drones) qui patrouillent dans la zone. A la Cour de trancher. Du côté de la direction de l’agence, le leitmotiv est toujours le même. Le directeur français, Fabrice Leggeri, affirme tantôt que les agissements des Grecs ne sont pas établis. Tantôt qu’ils ne constituent pas une violation claire des droits de l’homme. Et ce en dépit des nombreuses preuves amassées tant par les médias que par des ONGs.

    De surcroît, les positions du directeur sont depuis peu contestées en interne. Des documents internes à Frontex, que Libération, ses partenaires du média d’investigation Lighthouse Reports et du Spiegel ont pu consulter, en attestent. Les preuves de ces renvois sont « solides » est-il écrit dans un rapport de Frontex, daté de janvier 2021 et rédigé par le bureau des droits fondamentaux, un organe interne de contrôle. « Cette note est une compilation de sources disponibles en ligne. Elle a été écrite avant même deux enquêtes internes, qui n’ont trouvé aucune preuve de violations des droits de l’homme lors d’activités de Frontex », oppose le porte-parole de l’agence, joint par Libération.

    La politique de l’agence est de plus en plus remise en question par ses propres employés. Le 30 octobre 2020, un bateau grec, avec une trentaine de migrants à son bord, vogue vers les eaux territoriales turques, sous les yeux de policiers suédois, en mission pour Frontex. « Ce qui m’a surpris, c’est que les garde-côtes grecs n’ont pas escorté le bateau vers le port, mais dans la direction opposée », explique l’une d’entre elles, interrogée dans le cadre d’une enquête interne le 8 décembre 2020, dans un procès-verbal consulté par Libération. « Avez-vous considéré cette manœuvre comme étant un pushback ? », relance l’enquêteur. La réponse est sans appel : « Oui, c’était un pushback. »

    https://www.liberation.fr/international/info-libe-deux-demandeurs-dasile-portent-plainte-contre-frontex-apres-des-pushbacks-20210525_X5OL2DRRZFCDNKRAFRL4EHJXF4/?redirected=1

    #CJUE #justice #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #push-backs #refoulements #Mer_Egée #Egée #Grèce

    –—

    Sur les push-backs en Mer Egée :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/882952

    Plus sur Front-Lex et ses actions légales :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/902069

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • — Communiqué de presse —

      Pour la première fois dans l’histoire de l’agence, une #action_légale pour violations des droits de l’Homme a été intentée contre FRONTEX auprès de la Cour de justice de l’UE.

      FRONTEX n’a pas mis fin à ses opérations en Grèce en dépit de violations graves, systématiques et étendues des droits fondamentaux garantis par le droit de l’UE.

      Les avocats #Omer_Shatz et #Iftach_Cohen de front-LEX, les avocats #Loica_Lambert et #Mieke_Van_den_Broeck du #Progress_Lawyers_Network, avec l’appui de Monsieur Panayote Dimitras et de Madame Leonie Scheffenbichler du Greek Helsinki Monitor, ainsi que Monsieur Gabriel Green de front-LEX ont intenté une action légale sans précédent contre l’agence Frontex devant la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne. L’affaire a été déposée au nom de deux demandeurs d’asile, un mineur non accompagné et une femme. Pendant qu’ils cherchaient asile sur le territoire de l’UE (Lesbos), les deux victimes ont été violemment encerclées, agressées, volées, enlevées, détenues et transférées vers la mer pour être expulsées collectivement et finalement abandonnées sur des radeaux, sans moteur, ni eau, ni nourriture. En plus des violences subies, les deux requérants ont été victimes d’autres opérations de « push-back » alors qu’ils cherchaient une protection dans l’UE.

      En dépit de faits avérés et de preuves manifestes quant à des violations graves et persistantes des droits fondamentaux, FRONTEX et son directeur exécutif Fabrice Leggeri n’ont pas mis fin aux activités de l’agence en Mer Égée, en infraction patente au droit européen, en particulier à la Charte des droits fondamentaux de l’UE, au Traité sur le fonctionnement de l’UE, et au règlement de l’agence Frontex elle-même. En accord avec les autorités politiques de la Grèce, Frontex a pour objectif d’arrêter la « migration » à tout prix. Ces attaques systématiques et étendues contre les demandeurs d’asile constituent une violation du droit d’asile, des interdictions de refoulement et d’expulsions collectives, et constituent également des crimes contre l’humanité, notamment la déportation. Pour la première fois depuis le début de ses opérations il y a 17 ans, l’agence FRONTEX est poursuivie en justice pour des violations des droits de l’Homme. Nous demandons des comptes à l’UE. Nous entendons rétablir le droit aux frontières de l’UE.

      Omer Shatz and Iftach Cohen de Front-LEX déclarent : « Nous avons visionné des vidéos montrant les pires crimes que l’humanité ait imaginés. Nous avons entendu le Directeur de Frontex affirmer devant le Parlement européen et devant la Commission de l’UE que ce que nous voyons dans ces vidéos ne correspond pas à la réalité. Néanmoins, 10 000 victimes l’attestent : ces crimes sont commis, quotidiennement, sur le territoire de l’UE, par une agence de l’UE. La Cour de justice de l’UE a la responsabilité de protéger la législation des droits fondamentaux de l’UE. À ce jour, la Cour n’a jamais examiné les pratiques de Frontex ni offert de recours à ses innombrables victimes. Nous faisons confiance à la Cour pour entendre les victimes, pour voir ce que tout le monde voit, pour demander des comptes à l’agence européenne des frontières et pour rétablir l’État de droit sur les espaces terrestres et maritimes de l’UE. »

      https://www.front-lex.eu/fr/2021/05/25/action-en-justice-contre-frontex-soumise

    • L’action légale de Front-lex contre Frontex jugée #recevable par la Cour Générale de l’UE

      en grec :
      Ιστορική δίκη κατά της Frontex

      Στο Δικαστήριο της Ε.Ε. εισάγεται προσφυγή ολλανδικής ΜΚΟ για λογαριασμό δύο προσφύγων που έπεσαν θύματα βίαιης συμπεριφοράς και επαναπροώθησης στη Λέσβο ● Παραδεκτή κρίθηκε η προσφυγή, « αδειάζοντας » τη Frontex που απαξίωνε τη νομική της υπόσταση ● Πρώτη φορά στα 17 χρόνια λειτουργίας της η Ευρωπαϊκή Συνοροφυλακή παραπέμπεται στο Ευρωδικαστήριο, σε μια υπόθεση που εκθέτει και την Ελλάδα και την πολιτική της κυβέρνησης

      Για πρώτη φορά στα 17 χρόνια λειτουργίας της, η FRONTEX παραπέμπεται στο Ευρωπαϊκό Δικαστήριο για προσβολή των ανθρωπίνων δικαιωμάτων, εξαιτίας της αποστολής της στην Ελλάδα. Η υπόθεση εκθέτει τη χώρα μας και την κυβέρνηση Μητσοτάκη για τις συστηματικές επαναπροωθήσεις προσφύγων στο Αιγαίο.

      Το Γενικό Δικαστήριο της Ε.Ε. έκρινε παραδεκτή υπόθεση που κατέθεσε ολλανδική ΜΚΟ εκ μέρους δύο αιτούντων άσυλο, οι οποίοι καταγγέλλουν ότι υπήρξαν θύματα βάναυσης συμπεριφοράς στη Λέσβο. Η εισαγωγή της προσφυγής στο Δικαστήριο « αδειάζει » την Frontex, εκπρόσωπος της οποίας, όταν είχε γίνει γνωστή η κατάθεση της προσφυγής, είχε κάνει λόγο για « ακτιβιστική ατζέντα που προσποιείται τη νομική υπόθεση, με σκοπό να υπονομεύσει την αποφασιστικότητα της Ε.Ε. να προστατεύσει τα σύνορά της ». Η « Εφ.Συν. » είχε γράψει αναλυτικά για την υπόθεση (31/5/2021 « Εμποδίζουν καταθέσεις για τις επαναπροωθήσεις της Frontex »).

      Η προσφυγή κατατέθηκε με την υποστήριξη της μη κερδοσκοπικής οργάνωσης νομικής βοήθειας Front-Lex, με έδρα το Αμστερνταμ, για λογαριασμό ενός ασυνόδευτου ανηλίκου και μιας γυναίκας. Καταγγέλλουν ότι, ενώ ζητούσαν άσυλο στο έδαφος της Ε.Ε., στη Λέσβο, συνελήφθησαν βίαια, κακοποιήθηκαν, ληστεύτηκαν, απήχθησαν, κρατήθηκαν, μεταφέρθηκαν βίαια πίσω στη θάλασσα, απελάθηκαν συλλογικά και τελικά εγκαταλείφθηκαν σε σχεδίες χωρίς πλοήγηση, φαγητό ή νερό. Οι αιτούντες άσυλο ήταν θύματα και άλλων επιχειρήσεων επαναπροώθησης στην προσπάθεια να βρουν προστασία στην Ε.Ε.

      Το Δικαστήριο καλείται να κρίνει ότι η παράλειψη της Frontex να ενεργήσει με τρόπο που προστατεύει τα θεμελιώδη δικαιώματα συνιστά παράβαση των Συνθηκών (άρθρο 265 της Συνθήκης για τη Λειτουργία της Ε.Ε.).

      Η προσφυγή τεκμηριώνεται σε τρεις νομικούς λόγους :

      ● Πρώτον, στην ύπαρξη σοβαρών και συνεχών παραβιάσεων θεμελιωδών δικαιωμάτων και παραβιάσεων υποχρεώσεων διεθνούς προστασίας στην περιοχή του Αιγαίου, σχετιζόμενων με τις δραστηριότητες της Frontex. Σύμφωνα με τους προσφεύγοντες, ο εκτελεστικός διευθυντής του Οργανισμού είχε την υποχρέωση να αναστείλει ή να τερματίσει τις εν λόγω δραστηριότητες, σύμφωνα με το άρθρο 46 του κανονισμού για την Ευρωπαϊκή Συνοριοφυλακή και Ακτοφυλακή. Κατά τους προσφεύγοντες, η « νέα τακτική » που εφαρμόζεται στο πλαίσιο των επιχειρήσεων ελέγχου των συνόρων στο Αιγαίο, η οποία εγκαινιάσθηκε τον Μάρτιο του 2020, ισοδυναμεί με πολιτική συστηματικής και εκτεταμένης επίθεσης, τόσο σε επίπεδο κράτους (Ελλάδα) όσο και σε επίπεδο οργανισμού (Frontex), εναντίον πολιτών οι οποίοι ζητούν άσυλο στην Ε.Ε., πράγμα που συνιστά, μεταξύ άλλων, προσβολή του δικαιώματος στη ζωή, παραβίαση της απαγόρευσης της συλλογικής απέλασης, παραβίαση της αρχής της μη επαναπροωθήσεως και προσβολή του δικαιώματος ασύλου. Η υποχρέωση της Frontex να εξετάσει την αναστολή ή τον τερματισμό της παρουσίας της στην Ελλάδα επισημάνθηκε και στο πρόσφατο πόρισμα του Ευρωκοινοβουλίου που εξέτασε τον ρόλο της Frontex στις επαναπροωθήσεις των ελληνικών αρχών, ενώ σχετικό αίτημα έχει υιοθετήσει και η Διεθνής Αμνηστία σε πρόσφατη σχετική έκθεσή της.

      ● Δεύτερον, οι προσφεύγοντες προβάλλουν ότι η Frontex δεν εκπλήρωσε τις υποχρεώσεις της βάσει του Χάρτη Θεμελιωδών Δικαιωμάτων όσον αφορά την πρόληψη και αποτροπή παραβιάσεων των δικαιωμάτων αυτών στην περιοχή του Αιγαίου, στο πλαίσιο της λειτουργίας της.

      ● Τρίτον, υποστηρίζουν ότι η παράλειψη της Frontex να ενεργήσει στο πλαίσιο του άρθρου 265 ΣΛΕΕ τους αφορά άμεσα και ατομικά, αφού η κατάστασή τους έχει ήδη επηρεαστεί πολλαπλώς από τη νέα πολιτική συστηματικών και εκτεταμένων πρακτικών, τόσο σε επίπεδο κράτους όσο και σε επίπεδο οργανισμού. Πρακτικών που περιλαμβάνουν απαγωγές από το έδαφος της Ε.Ε. και βίαιη επαναφορά στη θάλασσα, αναχαιτίσεις ή εγκατάλειψη στη θάλασσα σε επικίνδυνα σκάφη που θέτουν τη ζωή σε σοβαρό κίνδυνο, παράνομες επαναπροωθήσεις, συλλογικές απελάσεις και παρεμπόδιση της πρόσβασης στο άσυλο.

      « Οι δύο πρόσφυγες έχουν φτάσει στη Λέσβο περισσότερες από μία φορές, συναντήθηκαν με τοπικό πανεπιστημιακό, έχουν φωτογραφηθεί σε γνωστούς δρόμους του νησιού. Ωστόσο, οι ελληνικές δυνάμεις τούς απέλασαν βίαια από το νησί με επίβλεψη της Frontex, όπως ισχυρίζεται η Ελλάδα. Τα προσφεύγοντα άτομα δεν θα δικαιωθούν στην Ελλάδα, όπου δεν υπάρχει κράτος δικαίου. Αξίζουν να δικαιωθούν στην Ευρώπη, εάν η τελευταία θέλει να ισχυρίζεται ότι σέβεται το κράτος δικαίου », σχολίασαν ο Παναγιώτης Δημητράς και η Λεονί Σεφενμπίχλερ από το Ελληνικό Παρατηρητήριο των Συμφωνιών του Ελσίνκι, που συμμετέχει στην προσφυγή, όπως και η ομάδα Progress Lawyers Network.

      « Στην Ε.Ε. και στα σύνορά της, οι μετανάστες και οι άνθρωποι που τους βοηθούν διώκονται ποινικά άδικα. Ταυτόχρονα και στα ίδια σύνορα, η Frontex διαπράττει σοβαρές παραβιάσεις του διεθνούς και του ευρωπαϊκού δικαίου εδώ και χρόνια, αποφεύγοντας τη δίωξη. Είναι καιρός η Frontex να λογοδοτήσει για τα εγκλήματα που διαπράττει εναντίον ανθρώπων που ζητούν προστασία και που αναγκάζονται να διακινδυνεύσουν τη ζωή τους στη θάλασσα λόγω έλλειψης ασφαλών και νόμιμων διόδων μετανάστευσης », τόνισαν οι δικηγόροι Λόικα Λάμπερντ και Μίκε Βαν Ντεν Μπρουκ από το Progress Lawyers Network.

      https://www.efsyn.gr/kosmos/eyropi/303601_istoriki-diki-kata-tis-frontex

      Traduction reçue via la mailing-list Migreurop :

      L’action légale introduite par Front-lex contre Frontex a été jugée recevable par la Cour Générale de l’UE

      Pour la première fois en 17 ans d’existence, FRONTEX est déféré devant la Cour européenne pour violation des droits de l’homme pendant sa mission en Grèce. L’affaire expose la Grèce et le gouvernement Mitsotakis pour les refoulements systématiques des réfugiés en la mer Égée.

      Le Tribunal de l’UE a jugé recevable un dossier déposé par une ONG néerlandaise au nom de deux demandeurs d’asile, qui se plaignent d’avoir été victimes de comportements brutaux à Lesbos. Le dépôt de l’action en justice devant la Cour est un camouflet pour Frontex, dont le représentant, lors du dépôt de l’action en justice, avait déclaré qu’il s’agissait d’un "agenda activiste qui se prétend légal, afin de saper la détermination de l’UE" de protéger ses frontières ».

  • Push back of responsibility: Human Rights Violations as a Welcome Treatment at Europe’s Borders

    In a new report, DRC in partnership with six civil society organisations across six countries, have collected records of thousands of illegal pushbacks of migrants and refugees trying to cross Europe’s borders. Testimonies also reveal unofficial cooperation between authorities in different countries to transfer vulnerable people across borders to avoid responsibility.

    During only three months, authorities illegally prevented 2,162 men, women and children from seeking protection. The instances of illegal pushbacks were recorded from January to April 2021 at different border crossings in Italy, Greece, Serbia, Bosnia-and-Herzegovina, North Macedonia, and Hungary. More than a third of the documented pushbacks involved rights violations such as denial of access to asylum procedure, physical abuse and assault, theft, extortion and destruction of property, at the hands of national border police and law enforcement officials.

    Further, the report (https://drc.ngo/media/mnglzsro/prab-report-january-may-2021-_final_10052021.pdf) documents 176 cases of so-called “chain-pushbacks” where refugees and migrants were forcefully sent across multiple borders via informal cooperation between states to circumvent their responsibility and push unwanted groups outside of the EU. This could be from Italy or Austria through countries like Slovenia and Croatia to a third country such as Bosnia-and- Herzegovina.

    https://drc.ngo/about-us/for-the-media/press-releases/2021/5/prab-2-en
    #droits_humains #asile #migrations #réfugiés #responsabilité #frontières #push-backs #refoulements #rapport #DRC #statistiques #chiffres #2021 #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #frontière_sud-alpine #Italie #France #refoulements_en_chaîne

    Pour télécharger le rapport:
    https://drc.ngo/media/mnglzsro/prab-report-january-may-2021-_final_10052021.pdf

  • Revealed: 2,000 refugee deaths linked to illegal EU pushbacks

    A Guardian analysis finds EU countries used brutal tactics to stop nearly 40,000 asylum seekers crossing borders

    EU member states have used illegal operations to push back at least 40,000 asylum seekers from Europe’s borders during the pandemic, methods being linked to the death of more than 2,000 people, the Guardian can reveal.

    In one of the biggest mass expulsions in decades, European countries, supported by EU’s border agency #Frontex, has systematically pushed back refugees, including children fleeing from wars, in their thousands, using illegal tactics ranging from assault to brutality during detention or transportation.

    The Guardian’s analysis is based on reports released by UN agencies, combined with a database of incidents collected by non-governmental organisations. According to charities, with the onset of Covid-19, the regularity and brutality of pushback practices has grown.

    “Recent reports suggest an increase of deaths of migrants attempting to reach Europe and, at the same time, an increase of the collaboration between EU countries with non-EU countries such as Libya, which has led to the failure of several rescue operations,’’ said one of Italy’s leading human rights and immigration experts, Fulvio Vassallo Paleologo, professor of asylum law at the University of Palermo. ‘’In this context, deaths at sea since the beginning of the pandemic are directly or indirectly linked to the EU approach aimed at closing all doors to Europe and the increasing externalisation of migration control to countries such as Libya.’’

    The findings come as the EU’s anti-fraud watchdog, Olaf, has launched an investigation into Frontex (https://www.euronews.com/2021/01/20/eu-migration-chief-urges-frontex-to-clarify-pushback-allegations) over allegations of harassment, misconduct and unlawful operations aimed at stopping asylum seekers from reaching EU shores.

    According to the International Organization for Migration (https://migration.iom.int/europe?type=arrivals), in 2020 almost 100,000 immigrants arrived in Europe by sea and by land compared with nearly 130,000 in 2019 and 190,000 in 2017.

    Since January 2020, despite the drop in numbers, Italy, Malta, Greece, Croatia and Spain have accelerated their hardline migration agenda. Since the introduction of partial or complete border closures to halt the outbreak of coronavirus, these countries have paid non-EU states and enlisted private vessels to intercept boats in distress at sea and push back passengers into detention centres. There have been repeated reports of people being beaten, robbed, stripped naked at frontiers or left at sea.

    In 2020 Croatia, whose police patrol the EU’s longest external border, have intensified systemic violence and pushbacks of migrants to Bosnia. The Danish Refugee Council (DRC) recorded nearly 18,000 migrants pushed back by Croatia since the start of the pandemic. Over the last year and a half, the Guardian has collected testimonies of migrants who have allegedly been whipped, robbed, sexually abused and stripped naked (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/oct/21/croatian-police-accused-of-sickening-assaults-on-migrants-on-balkans-tr) by members of the Croatian police. Some migrants said they were spray-painted with red crosses on their heads by officers who said the treatment was the “cure against coronavirus” (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/28/they-made-crosses-on-our-heads-refugees-report-abuse-by-croatian-police).

    According to an annual report released on Tuesday by the Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN) (https://www.borderviolence.eu/annual-torture-report-2020), a coalition of 13 NGOs documenting illegal pushbacks in the western Balkans, abuse and disproportionate force was present in nearly 90% of testimonies in 2020 collected from Croatia, a 10% increase on 2019.

    In April, the Guardian revealed how a woman from Afghanistan was allegedly sexually abused (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/07/croatian-border-police-accused-of-sexually-assaulting-afghan-migrant) and held at knifepoint by a Croatian border police officer during a search of migrants on the border with Bosnia.

    “Despite the European Commission’s engagement with Croatian authorities in recent months, we have seen virtually no progress, neither on investigations of the actual reports, nor on the development of independent border monitoring mechanisms,” said Nicola Bay, DRC country director for Bosnia. “Every single pushback represents a violation of international and EU law – whether it involves violence or not.”

    Since January 2020, Greece has pushed back about 6,230 asylum seekers from its shores, according to data from BVMN. The report stated that in 89% of the pushbacks, “BVMN has observed the disproportionate and excessive use of force. This alarming number shows that the use of force in an abusive, and therefore illicit, way has become a normality […]

    “Extremely cruel examples of police violence documented in 2020 included prolonged excessive beatings (often on naked bodies), water immersion, the physical abuse of women and children, the use of metal rods to inflict injury.”

    In testimonies, people described how their hands were tied to the bars of cells and helmets put on their heads before beatings to avoid visible bruising.

    A lawsuit filed against the Greek state in April at the European court of human rights (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/26/greece-accused-of-shocking-pushback-against-refugees-at-sea) accused Athens of abandoning dozens of migrants in life rafts at sea, after some had been beaten. The case claims that Greek patrol boats towed migrants back to Turkish waters and abandoned them at sea without food, water, lifejackets or any means to call for help.

    BVMN said: “Whether it be using the Covid-19 pandemic and the national lockdown to serve as a cover for pushbacks, fashioning open-air prisons, or preventing boats from entering Greek waters by firing warning shots toward boats, the evidence indicates the persistent refusal to uphold democratic values, human rights and international and European law.”

    According to UNHCR data, since the start of the pandemic, Libyan authorities – with Italian support since 2017, when Rome ceded responsibility (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/23/mother-and-child-drown-after-being-abandoned-off-libya-says-ngo) for overseeing Mediterranean rescue operations to Libya – intercepted and pushed back to Tripoli about 15,500 asylum seekers. The controversial strategy has caused the forced return of thousands to Libyan detention centres where, according to first hand reports, they face torture. Hundreds have drowned when neither Libya nor Italy intervened.

    “In 2020 this practice continued, with an increasingly important role being played by Frontex planes, sighting boats at sea and communicating their position to the Libyan coastguard,” said Matteo de Bellis, migration researcher at Amnesty International. “So, while Italy at some point even used the pandemic as an excuse to declare that its ports were not safe for the disembarkation of people rescued at sea, it had no problem with the Libyan coastguard returning people to Tripoli. Even when this was under shelling or when hundreds were forcibly disappeared immediately after disembarkation.”

    In April, Italy and Libya were accused of deliberately ignoring a mayday call (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) from a migrant boat in distress in Libyan waters, as waves reached six metres. A few hours later, an NGO rescue boat discovered dozens of bodies (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) floating in the waves. That day 130 migrants were lost at sea.

    In April, in a joint investigation with the Italian Rai News and the newspaper Domani, the Guardian saw documents from Italian prosecutors detailing conversations between two commanders of the Libyan coastguard and an Italian coastguard officer in Rome. The transcripts appeared to expose the non-responsive behaviour (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/16/wiretaps-migrant-boats-italy-libya-coastguard-mediterranean) of the Libyan officers and their struggling to answer the distress calls which resulted in hundreds of deaths. At least five NGO boats remain blocked in Italian ports as authorities claim administrative reasons for holding them.

    “Push- and pull-back operations have become routine, as have forms of maritime abandonment where hundreds were left to drown,’’ said a spokesperson at Alarm Phone, a hotline service for migrants in distress at sea. ‘’We have documented so many shipwrecks that were never officially accounted for, and so we know that the real death toll is much higher. In many of the cases, European coastguards have refused to respond – they rather chose to let people drown or to intercept them back to the place they had risked their lives to escape from. Even if all European authorities try to reject responsibility, we know that the mass dying is a direct result of both their actions and inactions. These deaths are on Europe.’’

    Malta, which declared its ports closed early last year, citing the pandemic, has continued to push back hundreds of migrants using two strategies: enlisting private vessels to intercept asylum seekers and force them back to Libya or turning them away with directions to Italy (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/20/we-give-you-30-minutes-malta-turns-migrant-boat-away-with-directions-to).

    “Between 2014 and 2017, Malta was able to count on Italy to take responsibility for coordinating rescues and allowing disembarkations,” said De Bellis. “But when Italy and the EU withdrew their ships from the central Mediterranean, to leave it in Libya’s hands, they left Malta more exposed. In response, from early 2020 the Maltese government used tactics to avoid assisting refugees and migrants in danger at sea, including arranging unlawful pushbacks to Libya by private fishing boats, diverting boats rather than rescuing them, illegally detaining hundreds of people on ill-equipped ferries off Malta’s waters, and signing a new agreement with Libya to prevent people from reaching Malta.”

    Last May, a series of voice messages obtained by the Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/may/19/exclusive-12-die-as-malta-uses-private-ships-to-push-migrants-back-to-l) confirmed the Maltese government’s strategy to use private vessels, acting at the behest of its armed forces, to intercept crossings and return refugees to Libyan detention centres.

    In February 2020, the European court of human rights was accused of “completely ignoring the reality” after it ruled Spain did not violate the prohibition of collective expulsion (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/13/european-court-under-fire-backing-spain-express-deportations), as asylum applications could be made at the official border crossing point. Relying on this judgment, Spain’s constitutional court upheld “border rejections” provided certain safeguards apply.

    Last week, the bodies of 24 migrants from sub-Saharan Africa were found by Spain’s maritime rescue (https://apnews.com/article/atlantic-ocean-canary-islands-coronavirus-pandemic-africa-migration-5ab68371. They are believed to have died of dehydration while attempting to reach the Canary Islands. In 2020, according to the UNHCR, 788 migrants died trying to reach Spain (https://data2.unhcr.org/en/country/esp).

    Frontex said they couldn’t comment on the total figures without knowing the details of each case, but said various authorities took action to respond to the dinghy that sunk off the coast of Libya (https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/apr/25/a-mayday-call-a-dash-across-the-ocean-and-130-souls-lost-at-sea) in April, resulting in the deaths of 130 people.

    “The Italian rescue centre asked Frontex to fly over the area. It’s easy to forget, but the central Mediterranean is massive and it’s not easy or fast to get from one place to another, especially in poor weather. After reaching the area where the boat was suspected to be, they located it after some time and alerted all of the Maritime Rescue and Coordination Centres (MRCCs) in the area. They also issued a mayday call to all boats in the area (Ocean Viking was too far away to receive it).”

    He said the Italian MRCC, asked by the Libyan MRCC, dispatched three merchant vessels in the area to assist. Poor weather made this difficult. “In the meantime, the Frontex plane was running out of fuel and had to return to base. Another plane took off the next morning when the weather allowed, again with the same worries about the safety of the crew.

    “All authorities, certainly Frontex, did all that was humanly possible under the circumstances.”

    He added that, according to media reports, there was a Libyan coast guard vessel in the area, but it was engaged in another rescue operation.

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/may/05/revealed-2000-refugee-deaths-linked-to-eu-pushbacks

    #push-backs #refoulements #push-back #mourir_aux_frontières #morts_aux_frontières #décès #morts #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #responsabilité #Croatie #viols #Grèce #Italie #Libye

    ping @isskein

  • How Frontex Helps Haul Migrants Back To Libyan Torture Camps

    Refugees are being detained, tortured and killed at camps in Libya. Investigative reporting by DER SPIEGEL and its partners has uncovered how close the European Union’s border agency Frontex works together with the Libyan coast guard.

    At sunrise, Alek Musa was still in good spirits. On the morning of June 25, 2020, he crowded onto an inflatable boat with 69 other people seeking asylum. Most of the refugees were Sudanese like him. They had left the Libyan coastal city of Garabulli the night before. Their destination: the island of Lampedusa in Italy. Musa wanted to escape the horrors of Libya, where migrants like him are captured, tortured and killed by militias.

    The route across the central Mediterranean is one of the world’s most dangerous for migrants. Just last week, another 100 people died as they tried to reach Europe from Libya. Musa was confident, nonetheless. The sea was calm and there was plenty of fuel in the boat’s tank.

    But then, between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m., Musa saw a small white plane in the sky. He shared his story by phone. There is much to suggest that the aircraft was a patrol of the European border protection agency Frontex. Flight data shows that a Frontex pilot had been circling in the immediate vicinity of the boat at the time.

    However, it appears that Frontex officials didn’t instruct any of the nearby cargo ships to help the refugees – and neither did the sea rescue coordination centers. Instead, hours later, Musa spotted the Ras Al Jadar on the horizon, a Libyan coast guard vessel.

    With none of them wanting to be hauled back to Libya, the migrants panicked. "We tried to leave as quickly as possible,” says Musa, who won’t give his real name out of fear of retaliation.

    Musa claims the Libyans rammed the dinghy with their ship. And that four men had gone overboard. Images from an aircraft belonging to the private rescue organization Sea-Watch show people fighting for their lives in the water. At least two refugees are believed to have died in the operation. All the others were taken back to Libya.
    Frontex Has Turned the Libyans into Europe’s Interceptors

    The June 25 incident is emblematic of the Europeans’ policy in the Mediterranean: The EU member states ceased sea rescue operations entirely in 2019. Instead, they are harnessing the Libyan coast guard to keep people seeking protection out of Europe.

    The European Court of Human Rights ruled back in 2012 that refugees may not be brought back to Libya because they are threatened with torture and death there. But that’s exactly what Libyan border guards are doing. With the help of the Europeans, they are intercepting refugees and hauling them back to Libya. According to an internal EU document, 11,891 were intercepted and taken back ashore last year.

    The EU provides financing for the Libyan coast guard and has trained its members. To this day, though, it claims not to control their operations. “Frontex has never directly cooperated with the Libyan coast guard,” Fabrice Leggeri, the head of the border agency, told the European Parliament in March. He claimed that the Libyans alone were responsible for the controversial interceptions. Is that really the truth, though?

    Together with the media organization “Lighthouse Reports”, German public broadcaster ARD’s investigative magazine “Monitor” and the French daily “Libération”, DER SPIEGEL has investigated incidents in the central Mediterranean Sea over a period of months. The reporters collected position data from Frontex aircraft and cross-checked it with ship data and information from migrants and civilian rescue organizations. They examined confidential documents and spoke to survivors as well as nearly a dozen Libyan officers and Frontex staff.

    This research has exposed for the first time the extent of the cooperation between Frontex and the Libyan coast guard. Europe’s border protection agency is playing an active role in the interceptions conducted by the Libyans. The reporting showed that Frontex flew over migrant boats on at least 20 occasions since January 2020 before the Libyan coast guard hauled them back. At times, the Libyans drove deep in the Maltese Search and Rescue Zone, an area over which the Europeans have jurisdiction.

    Some 91 refugees died in the interceptions or are considered missing – in part because the system the Europeans have established causes significant delays in the interceptions. In most cases, merchant ships or even those of aid organizations were in the vicinity. They would have reached the migrant boats more quickly, but they apparently weren’t alerted. Civilian sea rescue organizations have complained for years that they are hardly ever provided with alerts from Frontex.

    The revelations present a problem for Frontex head Leggeri. He is already having to answer for his agency’s involvement in the illegal repatriation of migrants in the Aegean Sea that are referred to as pushbacks. Now it appears that Frontex is also bending the law in operations in the central Mediterranean.

    An operation in March cast light on how the Libyans operate on the high seas. The captain of the Libyan vessel Fezzan, a coast guard officer, agreed to allow a reporter with DER SPIEGEL to conduct a ride-along on the ship. During the trip, he held a crumpled piece of paper with the coordinates of the boats he was to intercept. He didn’t have any internet access on the ship – indeed, the private sea rescuers are better equipped.

    The morning of the trip, the crew of the Fezzan had already pulled around 200 migrants from the water. The Libyans decided to leave an unpowered wooden boat with another 200 people at sea because the Fezzan was already too full. The rescued people huddled on deck, their clothes soaked and their eyes filled with fear. "Stay seated!” the Libyan officers yelled.

    Sheik Omar, a 16-year-old boy from Gambia squatted at the bow. He explained how, after the death of his father, he struggled as a worker in Libya. Then he just wanted to get away from there. He had already attempted to reach Europe five times. "I’m afraid,” he said. "I don’t know where they’re taking me. It probably won’t be a good place.”

    The conditions in the Libyan detention camps are catastrophic. Some are officially under the control of the authorities, but various militias are actually calling the shots. Migrants are a good business for the groups, and refugees from sub-Saharan countries, especially, are imprisoned and extorted by the thousands.

    Mohammad Salim was aware of what awaited him in jail. He’s originally from Somalia and didn’t want to give his real name. Last June, he and around 90 other migrants tried to flee Libya by boat, but a Frontex airplane did a flyover above them early in the morning. Several merchant ships that could have taken them to Europe passed by. But then the Libyan coast guard arrived several hours later.

    Once back on land, the Somali was sent to the Abu Issa detention center, which is controlled by a notorious militia. “There was hardly anything to eat,” Salim reported by phone. On good days, he ate 18 pieces of maccaroni pasta. On other days, he sucked on toothpaste. The women had been forced by the guards to strip naked. Salim was only able to buy his freedom a month later, when his family had paid $1,200.

    The EU is well aware of the conditions in the Libyan refugee prisons. German diplomats reported "concentration camp-like conditions” in 2017. A February report from the EU’s External Action described widespread "sexual violence, abduction for ransom, forced labor and unlawful killings.” The report states that the perpetrators include "government officials, members of armed groups, smugglers, traffickers and members of criminal gangs.”

    Supplies for the business are provided by the Libyan coast guard, which is itself partly made up of militiamen.

    In response to a request for comment from DER SPIEGEL, Frontex asserted that it is the agency’s duty to inform all internationally recognized sea rescue coordination centers in the region about refugee boats, including the Joint Rescue Coordination Center (JRCC). The sea rescue coordination center reports to the Libyan Defense Ministry and is financed by the EU.

    According to official documents, the JRCC is located at the Tripoli airport. But members of the Libyan coast guard claim that the control center is only a small room at the Abu Sitta military base in Tripoli, with just two computers. They claim that it is actually officers with the Libyan coast guard who are on duty there. That the men there have no ability to monitor their stretch of coastline, meaning they would virtually be flying blind without the EU’s aerial surveillance. In the event of a shipping accident, they almost only notify their own colleagues, even though they currently only have two ships at their disposal. Even when their ships are closer, there are no efforts to inform NGOs or private shipping companies. Massoud Abdalsamad, the head of the JRCC and the commander of the coast guard even admits that, "The JRCC and the coast guard are one and the same, there is no difference.”

    WhatsApp Messages to the Coast Guard

    As such, experts are convinced that even the mere transfer of coordinates by Frontex to the JRCC is in violation of European law. "Frontex officials know that the Libyan coast guard is hauling refugees back to Libya and that people there face torture and inhumane treatment,” says Nora Markard, professor for international public law and international human rights at the University of Münster.

    In fact, it appears that Frontex employees are going one step further and sending the coordinates of the refugee boats directly to Libyan officers via WhatsApp. That claim has been made independently by three different members of the Libyan coast guard. DER SPIEGEL is in possession of screenshots indicating that the coast guard is regularly informed – and directly. One captain was sent a photo of a refugee boat taken by a Frontex plane. “This form of direct contact is a clear violation of European law,” says legal expert Markard.

    When confronted, Frontex no longer explicitly denied direct contact with the Libyan coast guard. The agency says it contacts everyone involved in emergency operations in order to save lives. And that form of emergency communication cannot be considered formal contact, a spokesman said.

    But officials at Frontex in Warsaw are conscious of the fact that their main objective is to help keep refugees from reaching Europe’s shores. They often watch on their screens in the situation center how boats capsize in the Mediterranean. It has already proven to be too much for some – they suffer from sleep disorders and psychological problems.

    https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/libya-how-frontex-helps-haul-migrants-back-to-libyan-torture-camps-a-d62c396

    #Libye #push-backs #refoulements #Frontex #complicité #milices #gardes-côtes_libyens #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #Ras_Al_Jadar #interception #Fezzan #Joint_Rescue_Coordination_Center (#JRCC) #WhatsApp #coordonnées_géographiques

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_ @i_s_

    • Frontex : l’agence européenne de garde-frontières au centre d’une nouvelle polémique

      Un consortium de médias européens, dont le magazine Der Spiegel et le journal Libération, a livré une nouvelle enquête accablante sur l’agence européenne des gardes-frontières. Frontex est accusée de refouler des bateaux de migrants en mer Méditerranée.

      Frontex, c’est quoi ?

      L’agence européenne des gardes-frontières et gardes-côtes a été créée en 2004 pour répondre à la demande d’aides des pays membres pour protéger les frontières extérieures de l’espace Schengen. Frontex a trois objectifs : réduire la vulnérabilité des frontières extérieures, garantir le bon fonctionnement et la sécurité aux frontières et maintenir les capacités du corps européen, recrutant chaque année près de 700 gardes-frontières et garde-côtes. Depuis la crise migratoire de 2015, le budget de l’agence, subventionné par l’Union Européen a explosé passant 142 à 460 millions d’euros en 2020.

      Nouvelles accusations

      Frontex est de nouveau au centre d’une polémique au sein de l’UE. En novembre 2020, et en janvier 2021 déjà, Der Spiegel avait fait part de plusieurs refoulements en mer de bateaux de demandeurs d’asile naviguant entre la Turquie et la Grèce et en Hongrie. Dans cette enquête le magazine allemand avait averti que les responsables de Frontex étaient"conscients des pratiques illégales des gardes-frontières grecs et impliqués dans les refoulements eux-mêmes" (https://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/eu-border-agency-frontex-complicit-in-greek-refugee-pushback-campaign-a-4b6c).

      A la fin de ce mois d’avril, de nouveaux éléments incriminants Frontex révélés par un consortium de médias vont dans le même sens : des agents de Frontex auraient donné aux gardes-côtes libyens les coordonnées de bateaux de réfugiés naviguant en mer Méditerranée pour qu’ils soient interceptés avant leurs arrivées sur le sol européen. C’est ce que l’on appelle un « pushback » : refouler illégalement des migrants après les avoir interceptés, violant le droit international et humanitaire. L’enquête des médias européens cite un responsable d’Amnesty International, Mateo de Bellis qui précise que « sans les informations de Frontex, les gardes-côtes libyens ne pourraient jamais intercepter autant de migrants ».

      Cet arrangement entre les autorités européennes et libyennes « constitue une violation manifeste du droit européen », a déclaré Nora Markard, experte en droit international de l’université de Münster, citée par Der Spiegel.

      Une politique migratoire trop stricte de l’UE ?

      En toile de fond, les détracteurs de Frontex visent également la ligne politique de l’UE en matière d’immigration, jugée trop stricte. Est-ce cela qui aurait généré le refoulement de ces bateaux ? La Commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, s’en défendait en janvier dernier, alors que Frontex était déjà accusé d’avoir violé le droit international et le droit humanitaire en refoulant six migrants en mer Egée. « Ce que nous protégeons, lorsque nous protégeons nos frontières, c’est l’Union européenne basée sur des valeurs et nous devons respecter nos engagements à ces valeurs tout en protégeant nos frontières (...) Et c’est une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons besoin de Frontex », expliquait la Commissaire à euronews.

      Pour Martin Martiniello, spécialiste migration à l’université de Liège, « l’idée de départ de l’Agence Frontex était de contrôler les frontières européennes avec l’espoir que cela soit accompagné d’une politique plus positive, plus proactive de l’immigration. Cet aspect-là ne s’est pas développé au cours des dernières années, mais on a construit cette notion de crise migratoire. Et cela renvoie une image d’une Europe assiégée, qui doit se débarrasser des migrants non souhaités. Ce genre de politique ne permet pas de rencontrer les défis globaux des déplacements de population à long terme ».

      Seulement trois jours avant la parution de l’enquête des médias européens incriminant Frontex, L’Union européenne avait avancé sa volonté d’accroître et de mieux encadrer les retours volontaires des personnes migrantes, tout en reconnaissant que cet axe politique migratoire était, depuis 2019, un échec. L’institution avait alors proposé à Frontex un nouveau mandat pour prendre en charge ces retours. Selon Martin Martiniello, « des montants de plus en plus élevés ont été proposés, pour financer Frontex. Même si le Parlement européen a refusé de voter ce budget, celui-ci comporte de la militarisation encore plus importante de l’espace méditerranéen, avec des drones et tout ce qui s’en suit. Et cela fait partie d’une politique européenne ».

      Les accusations de novembre et janvier derniers ont généré l’ouverture d’une enquête interne chez Frontex, mais aussi à l’Office européen de lutte antifraude (OLAF). Pour Catherine Woolard, directrice du Conseil européen des Réfugiés et Exilés (ECRE), « On voit tout le problème des structures de gouvernance de Frontex : ce sont les États membres qui font partie du conseil d’administration et de gestion de Frontex, et ces États membres ont fait une enquête préliminaire. Mais cette enquête ne peut pas être profonde et transparente, puisque ces États membres sont parties prenantes dans ce cas de figure ».

      Pour la directrice de l’ECRE, une enquête indépendante serait une solution pour comprendre et réparer les torts causés, et suggère une réforme du conseil d’administration de Frontex. « La décision du Parlement concernant le budget est importante. En plus des enquêtes internes, le Parlement a créé un groupe de travail pour reformer le scrutin au sein du conseil administratif de l’agence, ce qui est essentiel. Nous attendons le rapport de ce groupe de travail, qui permettra de rendre compte de la situation chez Frontex ».

      Certains députés européens ont demandé la démission du directeur exécutif de Frontex. « C’est un sujet sensible » souligne Catherine Woolard. « Dans le contexte de l’augmentation des ressources de Frontex, le recrutement d’agents de droits fondamentaux, ainsi que les mesures et mécanismes mentionnés, sont essentiels. Le Parlement européen insiste sur la création de ces postes et n’a toujours pas eu de réponse de la part du directeur de Frontex. Entretemps, l’agence a toujours l’obligation de faire un rapport sur les incidents où il y a une suspicion de violation du droit international et humanitaire ».

      https://www.levif.be/actualite/europe/frontex-l-agence-europeenne-de-garde-frontieres-au-centre-d-une-nouvelle-polemique/article-normal-1422403.html?cookie_check=1620307471

  • Europe’s Border Guards Are Illegally Expelling Refugees

    Border guards expelling Syrian refugees after they’ve already been granted asylum has shown the hollowness of European Union humanitarianism. An expansion of the EU-wide Frontex force will make things even worse.

    A young man known in public documents only as Fady has been fighting a battle far harder than anyone his age would normally imagine.

    He first came to Europe from Deir az-Zour, Syria, fleeing that country’s civil war. In 2015, German authorities recognized him as a legally protected refugee. Since then, Fady has used his German passport to look for his lost brother, who he believes to be stuck in Greece and who he wishes to bring to Germany.

    He has paid dearly for those wishes.

    According to information and quotes from Fady provided to Jacobin by the Global Legal Action Network (GLAN), which is representing him in front of international policymakers, Fady took a trip to Greece in November 2016, hoping to track down his brother. At that time just eleven years of age, his brother had fled recruitment by ISIS, and Fady hoped to find him in Greece.

    While searching for him at a bus station in that country’s Evros region, Fady says he was approached by police and asked about his ethnic origin. After responding that he was Syrian, he was taken into custody by the police, who drove him to an unknown location, despite his protestations that he was a documented German resident who was in the EU legally, with the papers to prove it. They allegedly took his ID, papers, and belongings away from him before handing him to a group of people he describes as “commandos,” who he told the Intercept spoke German and were armed, masked, and clad entirely in black.

    He said the commandos beat anyone who tried to speak to them as they took a group of detained people — some as young as one or two years old — across the river border with Turkey in a rubber boat. There they were dumped paperless, homeless, and stateless in a country that many of them had never resided in for more than a couple days. It took Fady three years to get back his papers and EU residency — a period during which he tried multiple times to get back into Greece in order to search for his brother. He has not found him.

    The ordeal to which Fady was subjected is the most extreme version of what is known as a “pushback” operation. In other forms, these operations can involve keeping people outside of the borders of the EU — denying them entry at sea, for example. GLAN is arguing in front of the United Nations Human Rights Council that the type of pushback operation Fady endured, in which identity papers are confiscated, goes beyond that, amounting to a forced disappearance, which is illegal under a clause of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which Greece is a signatory. (Turning away refugees in general is also illegal under international law, but GLAN hopes to add weight to the potential HRC ruling by having the actions acknowledged as forced disappearances.)
    Frontex

    Such operations, many immigrant rights groups allege, are often led by Frontex, the EU’s border security agency, which coordinates national governments’ anti-immigration operations and is the fastest-growing agency in the EU. Headquartered in Warsaw, the organization is slated to grow from a relatively small current workforce to a staff likely to include a potential ten thousand border guards by 2027, in addition to national governments’ forces.

    I wanted to get detailed statements from the German government, the Greek government, and the Frontex bureaucracy about Fady’s incident, so I sent each group a list of several detailed questions.

    A spokesperson for the German government’s press office declined to answer the questions, sending back a short statement that read, “Within the framework of Frontex operations, the German Federal Police supports the Greek authorities to protect the Greek border. The German officers comply with German, European and international law.”

    A Frontex representative also declined to answer specific questions, stating that “Frontex is not aware of any such incident. Frontex officers deployed at the Greek land borders have not been involved in any such incidents. In addition, two investigations have found no evidence of any participation by Frontex in any alleged violations of human rights at the Greek sea borders.”

    The Greek government is keeping its silence about whether it was involved in Fady’s kidnapping. Five emails sent to the Greek Ministry of Migration and Asylum over the course of two weeks went unanswered.

    Dr Valentina Azarova of the Manchester International Law Centre and GLAN noted that Frontex’s assurances that it is not involved in violent pushbacks alongside Greek border forces are based on faulty information, citing a “dysfunctional reporting system” that was in place at the time of the alleged incident and that is under scrutiny as part of a recent wave of probes.

    While she says that Frontex’s reporting system was supposed to have improved since 2019 reforms went into place — three years after Fady says he was abducted and expelled — the scope of the current probes to the fact that there’s still a long way to go.

    “Frontex’s reporting practice is irregular and opaque,” she told me. “When it does report, it misrepresents illegal expulsions as ‘prevention of departure’ [from Turkey].”
    Driven From Home

    That euphemistic band-aid — an alleged way of trying to reverse an immigration journey that has already happened without getting caught doing so — is emblematic of the problems of this EU agency. For it is tasked with treating only the symptoms of a condition that European countries are guilty of helping to perpetuate, rather than taking on the root causes forcing people onto the move.

    The effects are felt across much of the Global South. By pulling the financial and governmental levers that control the global economy, leaders in industrialized and postindustrial countries have created what Dr Michael Yates — an economist, writer, editor, and editorial director of Monthly Review Press — calls a “complex brew” of austerity, land theft, and political oppression.

    As an addition to this brew of factors, European countries are often either silently complicit or actively encouraging of weapons sales to nearby conflict zones. For example, German manufacturers Hensoldt and Rheinmetall supplied arms to Saudi Arabia via South Africa for its war against Yemen, skirting an export ban, with full knowledge of the German government. And the French industrial giant Airbus dodged an arms embargo on Libya by routing planes through Turkey. This behavior is a logical outgrowth of late-stage capitalism, as weapon sales are one of the more profitable sectors that a business can enter, and as bought-and-paid-for politicians are told to look the other way when misbehavior occurs.

    Together, these factors — the austerity, the land theft, the political oppression, and the encouragement of violent civil conflicts — form a neocolonialist zone of low opportunity that pushes people from the Global South to the Global North.

    Not least among these sources of pressure is the Syrian civil war from which Fady and his brother fled. That conflict has now been going on for more than a decade, involving at least a half-dozen major belligerents, along with other minor parties. It has killed hundreds of thousands of people.

    Any left-wingers in the United States who had held onto hopes that the new Biden administration might introduce a more pacifist stance on Syria — perhaps removing one party from the bloody, multifaceted tragedy playing out between the Tigris and the Mediterranean — were severely disappointed. Immediately after taking office, Biden prioritized bombing that country over fulfilling his $15 minimum wage pledge. And so, the weapon sales continue, the conflict continues, and the Syrian refugees continue trying to find better lives elsewhere.

    Increasingly, those who would help the refugees are finding themselves the targets of government actions. As a Jacobin essayist documented last month, Italy’s new, supposedly centrist government has made some of its first actions a series of moves against groups that assist migrants braving the Mediterranean. On March 1, a hundred officers raided homes and offices all around Italy, seizing activists’ computers, telephones, and files. The accused are, as the essayist argued, “targeted under suspicion of the crime of saving lives.”

    Greece isn’t doing much better. As Jacobin reported last year, at least a thousand asylum seekers have been subjected to pushbacks at the hands of the Greek border authorities.
    Answering to No One

    It’s not just Greece and Italy doing dirty deeds either. Frontex is staffing up, and it is not accountable to the European Court of Human Rights, which only has jurisdiction over member states — not over the EU’s own continent-wide agencies.

    This unaccountability has emboldened Frontex, to the point where it’s comfortable flying an entire plane full of would-be refugees out of Greece to be left — as with Fady — in Turkey. As Melanie Fink wrote for the blog of the European Journal of International Law, it is “notoriously difficult to hold Frontex to account for failures” to uphold its obligations under international law, thanks to the way the bureaucracy is set up.

    And that bureaucracy just gave itself the power to carry weapons, even though, as the Frontex Files investigative website published by German broadcaster ZDF puts it, “no legal regulations permit members of an EU agency to carry firearms.” In other words, the member states never voted on these powers arming Frontex — they are fully an outgrowth of the EU unilaterally deciding that it wants a paramilitary border force to call its own.

    Either by accident or by design, Frontex has by some accounts become an opaque group of European security forces, with no one to answer to. Here there is a great risk of mission creep — for instance, if its agents join other border forces in pursuing or persecuting migrants’ rights activists or labor leaders who speak out for underpaid refugees. As the ongoing probes have affirmed, Azarova says, the whole Frontex system has been set up to be “highly unaccountable.”

    Azarova explains that both Frontex and the European Commission rely on Greece to conduct border operations in accordance with EU law but have not even considered the suspension of their extensive technical and financial assistance to Greece’s abusive border operations. Since EU institutions have done little to redress the illegal expulsions at the EU’s borders, GLAN has taken Fady’s case to the UN.

    Fady says that what he likes about Germany is that his life and work are now here. “I like Germany’s nice people and how kind they are. My work is good, and life is safe here,” he said. He’s even started supporting Bayern Munich.

    But he hopes to go back to the border areas, bringing cameras to document what governments are doing there.

    The authorities can ignore him — or kidnap him once more. While that could damage his life all over again, it will make little difference for them, as their actions will remain almost entirely futile: as long as instability, inequality, and wars encouraged by the Global North push residents of the Global South out of their homes, even ten thousand militarized, unaccountable border guards will not be enough to stop the flow. The people will keep coming.

    https://jacobinmag.com/2021/05/europe-syrian-refugees-greece-germany-frontex

    #push-backs #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #refoulement #réfugiés_syriens #Evros #Thraces #Grèce #Turquie #frontière_terrestre #Frontex

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur les refoulements dans la région de l’Evros :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/914147

  • Annual Torture Report 2020

    Torture and pushbacks – an in depth analysis of practices in Greece and Croatia, and states participating in violent chain-pushbacks

    This special report analyses data from 286 first hand testimonies of violent pushbacks carried out by authorities in the Balkans, looking at the way practices of torture have become an established part of contemporary border policing. The report examines six typologies of violence and torture that have been identified during pushbacks from Croatia and Greece, and also during chain-pushbacks initiated by North Macedonia, Slovenia and Italy. Across the report, 30 victim testimonies of torture and inhuman treatment are presented which is further supplemented by a comprehensive legal analysis and overview of the States response to these allegations.

    The violations profiled include:

    - Excessive and disproportionate force
    - Electric discharge weapons
    - Forced undressing
    - Threats or violence with a firearm
    - Inhuman treatment inside a police vehicle
    - Inhuman treatment inside a detention facility

    –-

    Key Findings from Croatia:

    – In 2020, BVMN collected 124 pushback testimonies from Croatia, exposing the treatment of 1827 people
    - 87% of pushbacks carried out by Croatia authorities contained one or more forms of violence and abuse that we assert amounts to torture or inhuman treatment
    - Violent attacks by police officers against people-on-the-move lasting up to six hours
    - Unmuzzled police dogs being encouraged by officers to attack people who have been detained.
    - Food being rubbed into the open wounds of pushback victims
    - Forcing people naked, setting fire to their clothes and then pushing them back across borders in a complete state of undress

    Key Findings from Greece:

    – 89% of pushbacks carried out by Greek authorities contained one or more forms of violence and abuse that we assert amounts to torture or inhuman treatment
    - 52% of pushback groups subjected to torture or inhuman treatment by Greek authorities contained children and minors
    - Groups of up to 80 men, women and children all being forcibly stripped naked and detained within one room
    - People being detained and transported in freezer trucks
    - Brutal attacks by groups of Greek officers including incidents where they pin down and cut open the hands of people on the move or tied them to the bars of their detention cells and beat them.
    - Multiple cases where Greek officers beat and then threw people into the Evros with many incidents leading to people going missing, presumingly having drowned and died.

    https://www.borderviolence.eu/annual-torture-report-2020
    #rapport #2020 #Border_Violence_Monitoring-Network #BVMN
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #frontières #push-backs #refoulements #traitements_inhumains_et_dégradants #détention #centres_de_détention #armes #déshabillage_forcé #armes_à_feu #Croatie #Grèce #Evros #refoulements_en_chaîne #taser

    ping @isskein

  • Réfugiés : contourner la #Croatie par le « #triangle » #Serbie - #Roumanie - #Hongrie

    Une nouvelle route migratoire s’est ouverte dans les Balkans : en Serbie, de plus en plus d’exilés tentent de contourner les barbelés barrant la #Hongrie en faisant un crochet par la Roumanie, avant d’espérer rejoindre les pays riches de l’Union européenne. Un chemin plus long et pas moins risqué, conséquence des politiques sécuritaires imposées par les 27.

    Il est 18h30, le jour commence à baisser sur la plaine de #Voïvodine. Un groupe d’une cinquantaine de jeunes hommes, sacs sur le dos et duvets en bandoulière, marche d’un pas décidé le long de la petite route de campagne qui relie les villages serbes de #Majdan et de #Rabe. Deux frontières de l’Union européenne (UE) se trouvent à quelques kilomètres de là : celle de la Hongrie, barrée depuis la fin 2015 d’une immense clôture barbelée, et celle de la Roumanie, moins surveillée pour le moment.

    Tous s’apprêtent à tenter le « #game », ce « jeu » qui consiste à échapper à la police et à pénétrer dans l’UE, en passant par « le triangle ». Le triangle, c’est cette nouvelle route migratoire à trois côtés qui permet de rejoindre la Hongrie, l’entrée de l’espace Schengen, depuis la Serbie, en faisant un crochet par la Roumanie. « Nous avons été contraints de prendre de nouvelles dispositions devant les signes clairs de l’augmentation du nombre de personnes traversant illégalement depuis la Serbie », explique #Frontex, l’Agence européenne de protection des frontières. Aujourd’hui, 87 de ses fonctionnaires patrouillent au côté de la police roumaine.

    Depuis l’automne 2020, le nombre de passages par cet itinéraire, plus long, est en effet en forte hausse. Les #statistiques des passages illégaux étant impossibles à tenir, l’indicateur le plus parlant reste l’analyse des demandes d’asiles, qui ont explosé en Roumanie l’année dernière, passant de 2626 à 6156, soit une hausse de 137%, avec un pic brutal à partir du mois d’octobre. Selon les chiffres de l’Inspectoratul General pentru Imigrări, les services d’immigrations roumains, 92% de ces demandeurs d’asile étaient entrés depuis la Serbie.

    “La Roumanie et la Hongrie, c’est mieux que la Croatie.”

    Beaucoup de ceux qui espèrent passer par le « triangle » ont d’abord tenté leur chance via la Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Croatie avant de rebrousser chemin. « C’est difficile là-bas », raconte Ahmed, un Algérien d’une trentaine d’années, qui squatte une maison abandonnée de Majdan avec cinq de ses compatriotes. « Il y a des policiers qui patrouillent cagoulés. Ils te frappent et te prennent tout : ton argent, ton téléphone et tes vêtements. Je connais des gens qui ont dû être emmenés à l’hôpital. » Pour lui, pas de doutes, « la Roumanie et la Hongrie, c’est mieux ».

    La route du « triangle » a commencé à devenir plus fréquentée dès la fin de l’été 2020, au moment où la situation virait au chaos dans le canton bosnien d’#Una_Sana et que les violences de la police croate s’exacerbaient encore un peu plus. Quelques semaines plus tard, les multiples alertes des organisations humanitaires ont fini par faire réagir la Commission européenne. Ylva Johansson, la Commissaire suédoise en charge des affaires intérieures a même dénoncé des « traitements inhumains et dégradants » commis contre les exilés à la frontière croato-bosnienne, promettant une « discussion approfondie » avec les autorités de Zagreb. De son côté, le Conseil de l’Europe appelait les autorités croates à mettre fin aux actes de tortures contre les migrants et à punir les policiers responsables. Depuis, sur le terrain, rien n’a changé.

    Pire, l’incendie du camp de #Lipa, près de #Bihać, fin décembre, a encore aggravé la crise. Pendant que les autorités bosniennes se renvoyaient la balle et que des centaines de personnes grelottaient sans toit sous la neige, les arrivées se sont multipliées dans le Nord de la Serbie. « Rien que dans les villages de Majdan et Rabe, il y avait en permanence plus de 300 personnes cet hiver », estime Jeremy Ristord, le coordinateur de Médecins sans frontières (MSF) en Serbie. La plupart squattent les nombreuses maisons abandonnées. Dans cette zone frontalière, beaucoup d’habitants appartiennent aux minorités hongroise et roumaine, et Budapest comme Bucarest leur ont généreusement délivré des passeports après leur intégration dans l’UE. Munis de ces précieux sésames européens, les plus jeunes sont massivement partis chercher fortune ailleurs dès la fin des années 2000.

    Siri, un Palestinien dont la famille était réfugiée dans un camp de Syrie depuis les années 1960, squatte une masure défoncée à l’entrée de Rabe. En tout, ils sont neuf, dont trois filles. Cela fait de longs mois que le jeune homme de 27 ans est coincé en Serbie. Keffieh sur la tête, il tente de garder le sourire en racontant son interminable odyssée entamée voilà bientôt dix ans. Dès les premiers combats en 2011, il a fui avec sa famille vers la Jordanie, puis le Liban avant de se retrouver en Turquie. Finalement, il a pris la route des Balkans l’an dernier, avec l’espoir de rejoindre une partie des siens, installés en Allemagne, près de Stuttgart.

    “La police m’a arrêté, tabassé et on m’a renvoyé ici. Sans rien.”

    Il y a quelques jours, Siri à réussi à arriver jusqu’à #Szeged, dans le sud de la Hongrie, via la Roumanie. « La #police m’a arrêté, tabassé et on m’a renvoyé ici. Sans rien », souffle-t-il. À côté de lui, un téléphone crachote la mélodie de Get up, Stand up, l’hymne reggae de Bob Marley appelant les opprimés à se battre pour leurs droits. « On a de quoi s’acheter un peu de vivres et des cigarettes. On remplit des bidons d’eau pour nous laver dans ce qui reste de la salle de bains », raconte une des filles, assise sur un des matelas qui recouvrent le sol de la seule petite pièce habitable, chauffée par un poêle à bois décati.

    De rares organisations humanitaires viennent en aide à ces exilés massés aux portes de l’Union européennes. Basé à Belgrade, le petit collectif #Klikaktiv y passe chaque semaine, pour de l’assistance juridique et du soutien psychosocial. « Ils préfèrent être ici, tout près de la #frontière, plutôt que de rester dans les camps officiels du gouvernement serbe », explique Milica Švabić, la juriste de l’organisation. Malgré la précarité et l’#hostilité grandissante des populations locales. « Le discours a changé ces dernières années en Serbie. On ne parle plus de ’réfugiés’, mais de ’migrants’ venus islamiser la Serbie et l’Europe », regrette son collègue Vuk Vučković. Des #milices d’extrême-droite patrouillent même depuis un an pour « nettoyer » le pays de ces « détritus ».

    « La centaine d’habitants qui restent dans les villages de Rabe et de Majdan sont méfiants et plutôt rudes avec les réfugiés », confirme Abraham Rudolf. Ce sexagénaire à la retraite habite une modeste bâtisse à l’entrée de Majdan, adossée à une ruine squattée par des candidats à l’exil. « C’est vrai qu’ils ont fait beaucoup de #dégâts et qu’il n’y a personne pour dédommager. Ils brûlent les charpentes des toits pour se chauffer. Leurs conditions d’hygiène sont terribles. » Tant pis si de temps en temps, ils lui volent quelques légumes dans son potager. « Je me mets à leur place, il fait froid et ils ont faim. Au vrai, ils ne font de mal à personne et ils font même vivre l’épicerie du village. »

    Si le « triangle » reste a priori moins dangereux que l’itinéraire via la Croatie, les #violences_policières contre les sans papiers y sont pourtant monnaie courante. « Plus de 13 000 témoignages de #refoulements irréguliers depuis la Roumanie ont été recueillis durant l’année 2020 », avance l’ONG Save the Children.

    “C’est dur, mais on n’a pas le choix. Mon mari a déserté l’armée de Bachar. S’il rentre, il sera condamné à mort.”

    Ces violences répétées ont d’ailleurs conduit MSF à réévaluer sa mission en Serbie et à la concentrer sur une assistance à ces victimes. « Plus de 30% de nos consultations concernent des #traumatismes physiques », précise Jérémy Ristor. « Une moitié sont liés à des violences intentionnelles, dont l’immense majorité sont perpétrées lors des #push-backs. L’autre moitié sont liés à des #accidents : fractures, entorses ou plaies ouvertes. Ce sont les conséquences directes de la sécurisation des frontières de l’UE. »

    Hanan est tombée sur le dos en sautant de la clôture hongroise et n’a jamais été soignée. Depuis, cette Syrienne de 33 ans souffre dès qu’elle marche. Mais pas question pour elle de renoncer à son objectif : gagner l’Allemagne, avec son mari et leur neveu, dont les parents ont été tués dans les combats à Alep. « On a essayé toutes les routes », raconte l’ancienne étudiante en littérature anglaise, dans un français impeccable. « On a traversé deux fois le Danube vers la Roumanie. Ici, par le triangle, on a tenté douze fois et par les frontières de la Croatie et de la Hongrie, sept fois. » Cette fois encore, la police roumaine les a expulsés vers le poste-frontière de Rabe, officiellement fermé à cause du coronavirus. « C’est dur, mais on n’a pas le choix. Mon mari a déserté l’armée de Bachar avec son arme. S’il rentre, il sera condamné à mort. »

    Qu’importe la hauteur des murs placés sur leur route et la terrible #répression_policière, les exilés du nord de la Serbie finiront tôt ou tard par passer. Comme le déplore les humanitaires, la politique ultra-sécuritaire de l’UE ne fait qu’exacerber leur #vulnérabilité face aux trafiquants et leur précarité, tant pécuniaire que sanitaire. La seule question est celle du prix qu’ils auront à paieront pour réussir le « game ». Ces derniers mois, les prix se sont remis à flamber : entrer dans l’Union européenne via la Serbie se monnaierait jusqu’à 2000 euros.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Refugies-contourner-la-Croatie-par-le-triangle-Serbie-Roumanie-Ho
    #routes_migratoires #migrations #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #contournement #Bihac #frontières #the_game

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • ‘They can see us in the dark’: migrants grapple with hi-tech fortress EU

    A powerful battery of drones, thermal cameras and heartbeat detectors are being deployed to exclude asylum seekers

    Khaled has been playing “the game” for a year now. A former law student, he left Afghanistan in 2018, driven by precarious economic circumstances and fear for his security, as the Taliban were increasingly targeting Kabul.

    But when he reached Europe, he realised the chances at winning the game were stacked against him. Getting to Europe’s borders was easy compared with actually crossing into the EU, he says, and there were more than physical obstacles preventing him from getting to Germany, where his uncle and girlfriend live.

    On a cold December evening in the Serbian village of Horgoš, near the Hungarian border, where he had spent a month squatting in an abandoned farm building, he and six other Afghan asylum seekers were having dinner together – a raw onion and a loaf of bread they passed around – their faces lit up by the glow of a fire.

    The previous night, they had all had another go at “the game” – the name migrants give to crossing attempts. But almost immediately the Hungarian border police stopped them and pushed them back into Serbia. They believe the speed of the response can be explained by the use of thermal cameras and surveillance drones, which they had seen during previous attempts to cross.

    “They can see us in the dark – you just walk, and they find you,” said Khaled, adding that drones had been seen flying over their squat. “Sometimes they send them in this area to watch who is here.”

    Drones, thermal-vision cameras and devices that can detect a heartbeat are among the new technological tools being increasingly used by European police to stop migrants from crossing borders, or to push them back when they do.

    The often violent removal of migrants without giving them the opportunity to apply for asylum is illegal under EU law, which obliges authorities to process asylum requests whether or not migrants possess identification documents or entered the country legally.

    “Routes are getting harder and harder to navigate. Corridors [in the Balkans are] really intensively surveyed by these technologies,” says Simon Campbell, field coordinator for the Border Violence Monitoring Network (BVMN), a migrant rights group in the region.

    The militarisation of Europe’s borders has been increasing steadily since 2015, when the influx of migrants reached its peak. A populist turn in politics and fear whipped up around the issue have fuelled the use of new technologies. The EU has invested in fortifying borders, earmarking €34.9bn (£30bn) in funding for border and migration management for the 2021-27 budget, while sidelining the creation of safe passages and fair asylum processes.

    Osman, a Syrian refugee now living in Serbia, crossed several borders in the southern Balkans in 2014. “At the time, I didn’t see any type of technology,” he says, “but now there’s drones, thermal cameras and all sorts of other stuff.”

    When the Hungarian police caught him trying to cross the Serbian border before the pandemic hit last year, they boasted about the equipment they used – including what Osman recalls as “a huge drone with a big camera”. He says they told him: “We are watching you everywhere.”

    Upgrading of surveillance technology, as witnessed by Khaled and Osman, has coincided with increased funding for Frontex – the EU’s Border and Coast Guard Agency. Between 2005 and 2016, Frontex’s budget grew from €6.3m to €238.7m, and it now stands at €420.6m. Technology at the EU’s Balkan borders have been largely funded with EU money, with Frontex providing operational support.

    Between 2014 and 2017, with EU funding, Croatia bought 13 thermal-imaging devices for €117,338 that can detect people more than a mile away and vehicles from two miles away.

    In 2019, the Croatian interior ministry acquired four eRIS-III long-range drones for €2.3m. They identify people up to six miles away in daylight and just under two miles in darkness, they fly at 80mph and climb to an altitude of 3,500 metres (11,400ft), while transmitting real-time data. Croatia has infrared cameras that can detect people at up to six miles away and equipment that picks upheartbeats.

    Romania now has heartbeat detection devices, alongside 117 thermo-vision cameras. Last spring, it added 24 vehicles with thermo-vision capabilities to its border security force at a cost of more than €13m.

    Hungary’s investment in migration-management technology is shielded from public scrutiny by a 2017 legal amendment but its lack of transparency and practice of pushing migrants back have been criticised by other EU nations and the European court of justice, leading to Frontex suspending operations in Hungary in January.

    It means migrants can no longer use the cover of darkness for their crossing attempts. Around the fire in Horgoš, Khaled and his fellow asylum-seekers decide to try crossing instead in the early morning, when they believe thermal cameras are less effective.

    A 2021 report by BVMN claims that enhanced border control technologies have led to increased violence as police in the Balkans weaponise new equipment against people on the move. Technology used in pushing back migrants has “contributed to the ease with which racist and repressive procedures are carried out”, the report says.

    BVMN highlighted the 2019 case of an 18-year-old Algerian who reported being beaten and strangled with his own shirt by police while attempting a night crossing from Bosnia to Croatia. “You cannot cross the border during the night because when the police catch you in the night, they beat you a lot. They break you,” says the teenager, who reported seeing surveillance drones.

    Ali, 19, an Iranian asylum-seeker who lives in a migrant camp in Belgrade, says that the Croatian and Romanian police have been violent and ignored his appeals for asylum during his crossing attempts. “When they catch us, they don’t respect us, they insult us, they beat us,” says Ali. “We said ‘we want asylum’, but they weren’t listening.”

    BVMN’s website archives hundreds of reports of violence. In February last year, eight Romanian border officers beat two Iraqi families with batons, administering electric shocks to two men, one of whom was holding his 11-month-old child. They stole their money and destroyed their phones, before taking them back to Serbia, blasting ice-cold air in the police van until they reached their destination.

    “There’s been some very, very severe beatings lately,” says Campbell. “Since the spring of 2018, there has been excessive use of firearms, beatings with batons, Tasers and knives.”

    Responding to questions via email, Frontex denies any link between its increased funding of new technologies and the violent pushbacks in the Balkans. It attributes the rise in reports to other factors, such as increased illegal migration and the proliferation of mobile phones making it easier to record incidents.

    Petra Molnar, associate director of Refugee Law Lab, believes the over-emphasis on technologies can alienate and dehumanise migrants.

    “There’s this alluring solution to really complex problems,” she says. “It’s a lot easier to sell a bunch of drones or a lot of automated technology, instead of dealing with the drivers that force people to migrate … or making the process more humane.”

    Despite the increasingly sophisticated technologies that have been preventing them from crossing Europe’s borders, Khaled and his friends from the squat managed to cross into Hungary in late December. He is living in a camp in Germany and has begun the process of applying for asylum.

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/mar/26/eu-borders-migrants-hitech-surveillance-asylum-seekers

    #Balkans #complexe_militaro-industriel #route_des_Balkans #technologie #asile #migrations #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #caméras_thermiques #militarisation_des_frontières #drones #détecteurs_de_battements_de_coeur #Horgos #Horgoš #Serbie #the_game #game #surveillance_frontalière #Hongrie #Frontex #Croatie #Roumanie #nuit #violence #refoulements #push-backs #déshumanisation

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Turkey’s return policies to Syria & their impacts on migrants and refugees’ human rights

    –-> Chapitre 7 de ce rapport intitulé « Return Mania. Mapping Policies and Practices in the EuroMed Region » :

    https://euromedrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/EN_Chapter-7-Turkey_Report_Migration.pdf

    #renvois #expulsions #Turquie #réfugiés #asile #migrations #réfugiés_syriens #retour_au_pays #droits_humains #rapport #EuroMed_Rights

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur les « retours au pays » des réfugiés syriens :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/904710

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_