• The refugees crescent in 2014
    https://visionscarto.net/the-refugees-crescent

    Title: The refugees crescent (2017 revision) Keywords: #War #Conflicts #Borders #Refugees #United_Nations #Human_rights #Asylum #Asylum_seekers #Peace Sources: United Nations High Commissionner for Refugees (UNHCR); United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA); United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA); Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC); Internal Displacement Monitoring Center (IDMC); United States Center for (...) #Map_collection

  • Asyl im Dialog - der #Podcast der #Refugee_Law_Clinics Deutschland

    Episonden

    Flucht und Behinderung

    70 Jahre Genfer Flüchtlingskonvention

    Rechtswidrige Hausordnungen für Geflüchtete

    Wieso Menschen aus Eritrea fiehen

    Somalia - Frauen* auf der Flucht

    Alarmphone statt Küstenwache

    Warum Afghanistan nicht sicher ist

    Brutalität und Menschenrechte auf der Balkanroute

    Solidarität kindgerecht: Eine Wiese für alle

    Wenn der Klimanwandel zum Fluchtgrund wird

    Migrationssteuerung durch die EU in Westafrika

    Abschottung reloaded - die Zukunft der Hotspots durch den Nwe
    Pact der EU

    FRONTEX - Grenzschutz außer Kontrolle

    Flucht und Trauma

    Das Asylrecht aus Sicht eines Verwaltungsrichters

    Wenn JUMEN e.V. Familiennachzug durch strategische
    Prozessführung erkämpft

    Wieso das AsybLG ein Gestz für Menschen zweiter Klasse ist

    Wie hängen Flucht und Menschenhandel zusammen? Wie die EU ihre
    Verpflichtung zur Seenotrettung umgeht

    Die Härtefallkommission als Gandeninstanz

    Haft ohne Straftat - aus der Praxis einer Abschiebehaft

    Entrechtung von Geduldeten -die neue Duldung light

    Die griechischen Hospots

    Das Kirchenasyl als ultima ratio

    Zuständigkeiten im Asylverfahren

    Gestzgebung im Asylrecht seit 2015 - rechtsiwedrig und populistisch?

    Was machen Refugee Law Clinics?

    #podcast #audio #RLC #Germany #migration #refugees #EU #Frontex #migration_law #Duldung #trauma #gender #women* #handicap #children #family #asylum #Balkans #church_asylum #Greece #hotspot #Alarmphone #human_rights #Eritrea #Afghanistan

    ping @cdb_77

    https://www.podcast.de/podcast/778497/asyl-im-dialog-der-podcast-der-refugee-law-clinics-deutschland

  • Greece, ABR: The Greek government are building walls around the five mainland refugee camps

    The Greek government are building walls around the five mainland refugee camps, #Ritsona, #Polykastro, #Diavata, #Makakasa and #Nea_Kavala. Why this is necessary, and for what purpose, when the camps already are fenced in with barbed wire fences, is difficult to understand.
    “Closed controlled camps" ensuring that asylum seekers are cut off from the outside communities and services. A very dark period in Greece and in EU refugee Policy.
    Three meter high concrete walls, outside the already existing barbed wire fences, would makes this no different than a prison. Who are they claiming to protect with these extreme measures, refugees living inside from Greek right wing extremists, or people living outside from these “dangerous” men, women and children? We must remember that this is supposed to be a refugee camps, not high security prisons.
    EU agreed on financing these camps, on the condition that they should be open facilities, same goes for the new camps that are being constructed on the island. In reality people will be locked up in these prisons most of the day, only allowed to go out on specific times, under strict control, between 07.00-19.00. Remember that we are talking about families with children, and not criminals, so why are they being treated as such?
    While Greece are opening up, welcoming tourists from all over the world, they are locking up men, women and children seeking safety in Europe, in prisons behind barbed wire fences and concrete walls, out of sight, out of mind. When these new camps on the islands, financed by Europe are finished, they will also be fenced in by high concrete walls. Mark my words: nothing good will come of this!
    “From Malakasa, Nea Kavala, Polycastro and Diavata camps to the world!!
    “if you have find us silent against the walls,it doesn’t mean that we agree to live like prisoners,but in fact we are all afraid to be threaten,if we speak out and raise our voices!!”

    (https://twitter.com/parwana_amiri/status/1395593312460025858)

    https://www.facebook.com/AegeanBoatReport/posts/1088971624959274

    #murs #asile #migrations #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #Grèce #camps_fermés #barbelés

    • "Ø double military-grade walls
      Ø restricted entrance and exit times (8am-8pm: itself a questionable suggestion: why should people be banned from going outside at any time of day or night? Under what possible justification?)
      Ø a CCTV system and video monitors
      Ø drone flights over the ‘camps’
      Ø camera-monitored perimeter alarms
      Ø control gates with metal detectors and x-ray devices
      Ø a system to broadcast announcements from loudspeakers
      Ø a control centre for the camps at the ministry’s HQ
      And this will be paid for – a total bill of €33m – by the EU.
      As this cash is on top of the €250m the EU has already promised to build these camps – described, we must stress, as ‘closed’ repeatedly in the Greek governments’ ‘deliverability document’ even though the EU, and specifically its Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson who confirmed the €250m payment on her visit to the Aegean islands in March this year, promised the EU would not fund closed camps - it is absolutely vital that the Union is not misled into handing over millions of Euros for a programme designed to break international law and strip men, women and children of their fundamental human rights and protections.
      We must stress: these men, women and children have committed no crime. Even if they were suspected of having done so, they would be entitled to a trial before a jury before having their freedom taken away from them for – based on the current advised waiting period for asylum cases to be processed in Greece – up to five years.»

      ( text by Koraki : https://www.facebook.com/koraki.org)
      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223644448395917


      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223644448395917

      –—


      source : https://www.facebook.com/yorgos.konstantinou/posts/10223657767448885

      #caricature #dessin_de_presse by #Yorgos_Konstantinou

    • Pétition:

      EU: Build Schools, Not Walls

      We strongly stand against allocating European funds to build walls around Greek refugee camps.

      The ongoing fencing work at the Ritsona, Polykastro, Diavata, Malakasa and Nea Kavala camps must stop immediately.

      Greece, with the full support of the European Union, is turning refugee camps into de-facto prisons.

      Millions of euros allocated for building walls should be spent on education, psychological support and the improvement of hygienic conditions in the refugee camps.

      What happened?

      In January and February 2021, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) published two invitations to bid for the construction of fences in refugee camps in mainland Greece.

      However, the fences became concrete walls. In March the Greek Ministry of Migration and Asylum commissioned to build NATO type fences and introduce additional security measures.

      Nobody - including camp residents - was informed about it.

      The walls are a jeopardy for integration, safety and mental health

      Residents of refugee camps fled their country in search for safety. In Europe their (mental) health is worsening because of the horrific conditions in the camps.

      Building the walls after a year of strict lockdown will lead to a further deterioration in their mental state.

      Moreover, it will:
      – deepen divisions between people: it will make the interaction between refugees and the local community even more difficult, if not impossible.
      – make it even harder for journalists and NGO’s to monitor the situation in the camp
      – put the residents of the camps in danger in case of fire.

      As EU citizens we cannot allow that innocent people are being locked behind the walls, in the middle of nowhere. Being a refugee is not a crime.

      Seeking asylum is a human right.

      Democracy and freedom cannot be built with concrete walls.

      Building walls was always the beginning of dark periods in history.

      Crushing walls - is the source of hope, reconciliation and (what is a foundation of European idea) solidarity.

      No more walls in the EU!

      https://secure.avaaz.org/community_petitions/en/notis_mitarachi_the_minister_of_migration_of_greec_eu_build_schools_no

  • Glasgow protesters rejoice as men freed after immigration van standoff

    Hundreds of people surrounded vehicle men were held in and chanted ‘these are our neighbours, let them go’

    Campaigners have hailed a victory for Glaswegian solidarity and told the Home Office “you messed with the wrong city” as two men detained by UK Immigration Enforcement were released back into their community after a day of protest.

    Police Scotland intervened to free the men after a tense day-long standoff between immigration officials and hundreds of local residents, who surrounded their van in a residential street on the southside of Glasgow to stop the detention of the men during Eid al-Fitr.

    Staff from Immigration Enforcement are believed to have swooped on a property in Pollokshields early on Thursday morning and detained people.

    By mid-morning, a crowd of about 200 protesters surrounded the vehicle, preventing it from driving away, and chanting “these are our neighbours, let them go”, with one protester lying under the van to prevent it driving off.

    “I’m just overwhelmed by Glasgow’s solidarity for refugees and asylum seekers,” said Roza Salih, shouting to be heard over the jubilant shouts of “refugees are welcome here”. She added: “This is a victory for the community.”

    Salih, who had been at the protest since the morning, is a Kurdish refugee and co-founded the #Glasgow_Girls_campaign in 2005 with fellow pupils to prevent the deportation of a school friend and fight against dawn raids.

    Earlier Salih questioned why the widely condemned practice of dawn raids appeared to be recurring 15 years later in Glasgow , the only dispersal city for asylum seekers in Scotland. She also highlighted the jarring impact of carrying out such an action during Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim festival marking the end of Ramadan, in one of the most multicultural areas of the city and within the constituency of the first minister, Nicola Sturgeon.

    As cheering protesters escorted the men to the local mosque, Pinar Aksu, of Maryhill Integration Network said: “They messed with the wrong city.

    “This is a revolution of people coming together in solidarity for those who others have turned away from,” she said. Aksu described how hundreds more supporters had arrived at the scene as the afternoon progressed. “This is just the start. When there is another dawn #raid in Glasgow, the same thing will happen.”

    Aksu added: “For this to happen on Eid, which is meant to be a time of peaceful celebration, is horrifying. It is no coincidence that it is taking place when a new immigration bill is being prepared.

    “We also need answers from Police Scotland about their involvement. We have already written to the home secretary asking urgently to clarify whether the decisions to carry out immigration enforcement raids, including dawn raids, represents a change in the policy by the UK government.”

    Shortly after 5pm, Police Scotland released an updated statement, saying that Supt Mark Sutherland had decided to release the detained men “in order to protect the safety, public health and wellbeing of those involved in the detention and subsequent protest”. The force asked those at the scene to disperse from the area as soon as possible.

    A spokesperson said earlier: “Police Scotland does not assist in the removal of asylum seekers. Officers are at the scene to police the protest and to ensure public safety.”

    The second dawn raid in Glasgow within a month appears to show a further escalation of the UK’s hostile environment policy. While the SNP government has argued strongly for Scotland to have control over its own immigration policy, not least because of the country’s unique depopulation pressures, it remains reserved to Westminster.

    Sources told the Guardian the immigration status of the individuals detained was unclear.

    The protests took place as new MSPs were sworn in to what has been described as Holyrood’s most diverse ever parliament, taking their oaths in British Sign Language, Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Doric, Scots, Gaelic, Welsh and Orcadian, and after an election in which refugees had voting rights for the first time in Scotland.

    Politicians expressed their solidarity with the residents on social media.

    Following the men’s release, #Nicola_Sturgeon tweeted: “I am proud to represent a constituency and lead a country that welcomes and shows support to asylum seekers and refugees.”

    She added that the police had been “in an invidious position – they do not assist in the removal of asylum seekers but do have a duty to protect public safety. They act independently of ministers, but I support this decision.”

    Condemning the Home Office action, #Sturgeon added: “To act in this way, in the heart of a Muslim community as they celebrated Eid, and in an area experiencing a Covid outbreak was a health and safety risk.

    “Both as MSP and as FM, I will be demanding assurances from the UK government that they will never again create, through their actions, such a dangerous situation.”

    Wafa Shaheen, of the Scottish Refugee Council, told the Guardian: “To force people from their homes on the first day of Eid, with neighbours and families trying to honour the religious celebration in peace, shows – at best – a serious lack of cultural sensitivity and awareness on the Home Office’s part.

    “Regardless of the immigration status of those targeted today, this heavy-handed approach from the Home Office is unnecessary and avoidable. It is frightening, intimidating and disproportionate. The hundreds of people on the streets this morning in solidarity with those affected shows people in Scotland are sick of these raids and have had enough.”

    A Home Office spokesperson said: “The UK government is tackling illegal immigration and the harm it causes, often to the most vulnerable people, by removing those with no right to be in the UK. The operation in Glasgow was conducted in relation to suspected immigration offences and the two Indian nationals complied with officers at all times.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/may/13/glasgow-residents-surround-and-block-immigration-van-from-leaving-stree

    #Glasgow #Ecosse #solidarité #réfugiés #asile #migrations #résistance #refugees_welcome

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Police release men from immigration van blocking Glasgow street

      Two men who were being detained in an immigration van which was surrounded by protesters have been released.

      The move followed a standoff between police officers and protesters in Kenmure Street on Glasgow’s southside.

      Early on Thursday people surrounded the Home Office vehicle believed to contain two Indian immigrants who had been removed from a flat.

      Hundreds gathered in the area, with one man crawling under the van to prevent it from moving.

      The Home Office said the men had been detained over “suspected immigration offences”.

      Some of the protesters were heard shouting “let our neighbours go”.

      In a statement, Police Scotland said that Ch Supt Mark Sutherland had decided to have the men released.

      It said: "In order to protect the safety, public health and well-being of all people involved in the detention and subsequent protest in Kenmure Street, Pollokshields, today, Ch Supt Mark Sutherland has, following a suitable risk assessment, taken the operational decision to release the men detained by UK Immigration Enforcement back into their community meantime.

      “In order to facilitate this quickly and effectively, Police Scotland is asking members of the public to disperse from the street as soon as possible. Please take care when leaving the area and follow the directions of the officers on the street.”

      Earlier the force stressed that it did not assist in the removal of asylum seekers, and that officers were at the scene to police the protest and to ensure public safety.

      Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who is also the MSP for the area, said she disagreed fundamentally with Home Office immigration policy.

      She said: “This action was unacceptable. To act in this way, in the heart of a Muslim community as they celebrated Eid, and in an area experiencing a Covid outbreak was a health and safety risk.”

      She said she would be “demanding assurances” from the UK government that they would not create such a dangerous situation again.

      She added: “No assurances were given - and frankly no empathy shown - when I managed to speak to a junior minister earlier.”

      Nicola Sturgeon and her justice secretary, Humza Yousaf are seeking follow up talks with the Home Secretary, Priti Patel.

      They believe Immigration Enforcement has acted provocatively by trying to remove migrants from an ethnically diverse community during Eid.

      The resulting protests brought people together, against Covid rules, in part of Glasgow which is experiencing a spike in cases linked to the Indian variant.

      Police Scotland intervened on public health and public order grounds to require the release of the two Indian nationals being held by Immigration Enforcement.

      Their operational decision is fully supported by Scottish ministers and while the Home Office is always grateful for police assistance, releasing the men on bail is hardly the outcome they wanted.

      They will not have enjoyed being seen to back down in the face of public and political protest.

      Humza Yousaf, the Scottish government’s justice secretary, said: “the action they [the Home Office] have today is at best completely reckless, and at worst intended to provoke, on a day the UK government would have known the Scottish government and MSPs would be distracted by parliamentary process.”

      He added that the situation “should never have occurred”, and that “the UK government’s hostile environment is not welcome here.”

      In a statement, the Home Office said: "The UK government is tackling illegal immigration and the harm it causes, often to the most vulnerable people by removing those with no right to be in the UK.

      "The operation in Glasgow was conducted in relation to suspected immigration offences and the two Indian nationals complied with officers at all times.

      “The UK government continues to tackle illegal migration in all its forms and our New Plan for Immigration will speed up the removal of those who have entered the UK illegally.”

      The Sikhs in Scotland group said in a statement that it was “deeply concerned”, and urged the Home Office to “abandon forced removals and to adopt an immigration policy based on human rights, compassion and dignity”.

      Mohammad Asif, of the Afghan Human Rights Foundation, said hundreds of people were protesting.

      The 54-year-old added: “We’re here against the hostile environment created by the Tories and the British state.”
      Presentational grey line

      Incidents like Kenmure Street - at the centre of Scotland’s most ethnically diverse neighbourhood - will do nothing to persuade those who already believe the UK’s policy on immigration is unfair and inhumane.

      Despite the protest, the Home Office says it was a legitimate operation targeting those it suspected of immigration offences.

      And yet there could be more problems on the horizon. The Home Office has just ended its consultation on its New Plan for Immigration - a policy that will speed up deportations for those who have entered the country ’illegally’.

      Those in such a position will not be able to claim asylum and will instead be granted ’temporary protection’, a status that would come under periodic review.

      More than 70 charities and faith groups in Scotland have condemned such proposals.

      The Home Office is toughening its stance on immigration, but says its policies will make the system fairer for those most in need, while discouraging criminal activity like people trafficking.

      The Scottish government, and the protestors in Glasgow today, fundamentally disagree.

      https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-57100259

    • Τσιμεντένιο τείχος και στο καμπ της Νέας Καβάλας

      Τι γυρεύει ένα τσιμεντένιο τείχος γύρω από τα καμπ των προσφύγων ; Είναι ένα ερώτημα που έρχεται αυθόρμητα στο νου με αφορμή την ανέγερση τειχών στα Διαβατά και στη Νέα Καβάλα.

      Μετά το δημοσίευμα του alterthess για την ανέγερση ψηλού φράχτη στα Διαβατά, την μελέτη, τον διαγωνισμό και την κατασκευή της οποίας έχει αναλάβει ο ΔΟΜ, οι πληροφορίες για αντίστοιχους φράχτες στη Νέα Καβάλα επιβεβαιώνονται και μάλιστα με τον χειρότερο δυνατό ενδεχόμενο.

      Ενώ αρχικά οι πληροφορίες έκαναν λόγο για συρμάτινους φράχτες, στη Νέα Καβάλα, όπως δείχνουν και οι φωτογραφίες που δημοσιεύουμε σήμερα, ανεγείρεται τσιμεντένιο τείχος το οποίο θα περιβληθεί με σύρμα, καθιστώντας το « σπίτι » των 1.400 περίπου προσφύγων μια πραγματική φυλακή.

      Σαν να μην έφτανε ο αποκλεισμός τους από τον αστικό ιστό, από την εκπαίδευση και από βασικά δικαιώματα, τώρα θα πρέπει να ζουν σε τοπίο τραμπικής έμπνευσης που θα τους κρύβει και την οπτική επαφή με τον « έξω » κόσμο.

      Μάλιστα, σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες, οι πρόσφυγες δεν έχουν ενημερωθεί από τους αρμόδιους διοικητές των καμπ για την εξέλιξη αυτή, απλά συνειδητοποιούν καθημερινά -ακόμη και τις μέρες του Πάσχα- ότι υψώνονται νέα τείχη διαχωρισμού τους από την υπόλοιπη κοινωνία.

      Σύμφωνα με ρεπορτάζ του Δημήτρη Αγγελίδη από την Εφημερίδα των Συντακτών, εργασίες περίφραξης με τσιμεντένιο τείχος έχουν ξεκινήσει και στην Ριτσώνα ενώ στην προκήρυξη του ΔΟΜ αναφέρεται ότι αντίστοιχο τείχος θα φτιαχτεί και στο καμπ της Μαλακάσας.

      Βασικό μέλημα της κυβέρνησης είναι, όπως φαίνεται, αφενός να μετατρέψει τα προσφυγικά καμπ από ανοιχτού σε ουσιαστικά κλειστού τύπου, μετατρέποντας την έξοδο και την είσοδο των προσφύγων από τους καταυλισμούς σε μία πλήρως ελεγχόμενη διαδικασία. Αφετέρου, επιδιώκει να αποκλείσει τις αφίξεις οικογενειών προσφύγων που ολοένα και περισσότερες μένουν άστεγες λόγω της πολιτικής των εξώσεων που ακολουθεί η κυβέρνηση τους τελευταίους μήνες.

      Είναι, επίσης, αδιανόητο να ξοδεύονται εκατομμύρια ευρώ τα οποία θα μπορούσαν να δοθούν στη βελτίωση της στέγασης και φροντίδας των ανθρώπων αυτών σε σύρματα και τσιμέντα για καμπ που θα μοιάζουν με κέντρα κράτησης.

      Σταυρούλα Πουλημένη


      https://alterthess.gr/tsimentenio-teichos-kai-sto-kamp-tis-neas-kavalas

  • Sauvé, le refuge solidaire de #Briançon s’adapte à de nouveaux arrivants

    Alors qu’il risquait la fermeture, le refuge qui accueille les exilés venant par l’Italie va poursuivre son activité dans de nouveaux locaux. Des familles de plusieurs générations, mais aussi de jeunes Marocains, y font désormais étape.

    Briançon (Hautes-Alpes).– « De toute façon, nous n’aurions pas fermé », lâche Francis*, assis sur un fauteuil de la MJC de Briançon, les coudes sur les genoux et les mains croisées. Depuis quelques jours, le bénévole du refuge solidaire de la ville, qui accueille depuis 2017 les exilés traversant à pied la montagne à la frontière franco-italienne, arbore une mine ravie. Le refuge va déménager à l’été 2021 et pourra ainsi poursuivre sa mission, malgré l’absence de soutien des élus locaux.

    En août 2020, un courrier signé de la main d’Arnaud Murgia, président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (CCB) mais aussi maire Les Républicains de Briançon, leur apprenait que la convention mettant les locaux à leur disposition, tout près de la gare et du col de Montgenèvre, ne serait pas renouvelée (lire ici notre reportage).

    Un coup dur pour les bénévoles de l’association Refuges solidaires, mais aussi pour leurs soutiens, comme l’association Tous Migrants qui organise des maraudes en montagne afin de porter assistance aux exilés une fois qu’ils ont traversé la frontière et les achemine ensuite au refuge solidaire pour leur permettre d’être pris en charge avant qu’ils ne poursuivent leur route.

    « En cinq ans, il n’y a jamais eu de troubles à Briançon. C’est bien la preuve que quand on accueille, ça se passe bien », poursuit le bénévole. Mardi, Refuges solidaires a signé un compromis de vente pour de nouveaux locaux, d’une superficie de 1 600 mètres carrés, situés sur les hauteurs de la ville, près de l’hôpital. Il s’agira d’un « tiers lieu » où d’autres associations pourront s’établir en vue de créer une « plateforme de la solidarité ».

    Mais d’importants travaux de réaménagement doivent être réalisés dès la signature du bail, prévue début juin, dans ce qui était un ancien centre d’accueil pour demandeurs d’asile (Cada). Si Refuges solidaires n’a pu compter sur le soutien des élus locaux, de tous bords confondus – un autre lieu avait été trouvé mais le maire, « de gauche », s’y est opposé –, deux donateurs privés, à travers le fonds Riace et la Fondation Caritas, ont décidé de sauver le lieu.

    « Chacun a financé un tiers du projet. Le dernier tiers l’a été par une société civile immobilière locale, parce qu’on estimait qu’il était important que les locaux participent aussi », précise le bénévole, qui voit la liste de leurs soutiens s’allonger. La Fondation Abbé-Pierre finance désormais le poste de Pauline, coordinatrice du refuge.

    Ce vendredi 23 avril en fin d’après-midi, Francis quitte la MJC pour rejoindre le refuge, situé à deux pas. Il est « de permanence » pour la laverie et s’empresse de grimper les escaliers après avoir franchi la porte d’entrée, pour épauler les bénévoles qui s’activent déjà à la buanderie. Ici, plusieurs machines à laver tournent à plein régime.

    À l’extérieur, sur la terrasse, les habits propres prennent le soleil, couchés sur les murets. « Où est mon pantalon noir qui était là ? », demande, inquiet, un jeune Marocain dans son dialecte à une bénévole. « On ne peut même pas t’en prêter un, taquine son ami, tu ne rentrerais pas dedans ! » Très vite, la terrasse prend vie. Plusieurs exilés prennent place à la table qui offre une vue sur les montagnes.

    Avec une bénévole et plusieurs de ses amis, Ezzatollah, un Afghan âgé de 19 ans, joue au rami. Les cartes passent d’une main à l’autre, puis forment des suites de nombres fièrement exhibées sur la table, signe que la partie avance. Le sourire du jeune homme, bien que sincère, ne suffit pas à cacher son désarroi.

    « Hier soir, je n’étais pas très bien », avoue-t-il le lendemain matin devant le refuge. « L’Europe n’a pas été bonne avec moi. Les rares fois où j’appelle ma mère, elle me dit que j’ai mauvaise mine et m’appelle “old man” [vieil homme – ndlr]. » Arrivé au refuge cinq jours plus tôt avec un ami, il évite de près, et à quatre reprises, d’être arrêté par la police en traversant la montagne par le col de Montgenèvre.

    Ezzatollah est un ancien du camp de Moria à Lesbos (Grèce), qui a depuis brûlé dans un incendie (lire notre chronique). « J’y suis resté un an, j’étais dans la zone pour mineurs. » Il y perd deux amis, âgés d’à peine 12 et 13 ans, emportés par la violence qui y règne. « Un autre s’est suicidé, poursuit-il, les yeux pleins de larmes. Moi-même, j’ai voulu me tuer trois fois. » Depuis, il peine à trouver le sommeil le soir.

    Grèce, Macédoine, Serbie et Bosnie… Peu avant d’arriver en Italie, l’exilé afghan prend une décision radicale : il se brûle les deux index, espérant ainsi que les autorités ne pourront pas prendre ses empreintes et qu’il contournera le règlement Dublin qui contraint les migrants à demander l’asile dans le premier pays par lequel ils pénètrent dans l’Union européenne.

    « L’Europe a changé mon visage, mon corps, ma vie », constate-t-il le regard amer, observant les cicatrices sur ses doigts et ses jambes et les ampoules qui déforment ses pieds. Violenté en Grèce, il souffre depuis d’une ouïe altérée de l’oreille gauche. Originaires de Mazâr-é Charîf en Afghanistan, ses parents fuient la menace des talibans et se réfugient en Iran.

    Ezzatollah quitte le pays deux ans plus tôt, à la suite de problèmes familiaux qu’il ne détaillera pas. Sa sœur aînée organise son périple en secret. Aujourd’hui, il ne sait où aller. Rester en France ? Tenter sa chance en Allemagne ? Ou rejoindre le Royaume-Uni ? Il veut pouvoir étudier, travailler et se stabiliser « là où c’est le plus simple pour les réfugiés ».

    Ce samedi matin, il croise deux familles tout juste arrivées, installées dans la petite pièce commune qui jouxte le bureau d’accueil et l’infirmerie. Depuis quelques mois, les bénévoles du refuge constatent un changement de profil parmi les nouveaux arrivants : « Avant, on avait 95 % de jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont la moitié était des mineurs. Aujourd’hui, on a beaucoup de familles afghanes et iraniennes, sur plusieurs générations, avec des enfants en bas âge et des personnes âgées », relève Francis, lé bénévole.

    De quoi chambouler l’organisation et le quotidien du refuge, peu habitué à recevoir un tel public. Pour leur offrir davantage de confort, les bénévoles leur proposent d’être hébergées chez des familles solidaires ou dans une salle de la paroisse Sainte-Catherine. En fin de matinée, Ramin, 18 ans, sort du bureau d’accueil et retrouve ses parents, sa sœur, ainsi qu’une jeune femme seule prise sous leur aile en Bosnie. La famille est arrivée vendredi soir, sans l’aide de maraudeurs.

    Jeanine, une bénévole du refuge, leur propose de la suivre jusqu’à la paroisse. Une autre famille leur emboîte le pas. Elle s’est présentée au refuge au petit matin, avec deux enfants. Dix minutes plus tard, le groupe franchit la porte de la salle Sainte-Thérèse. La bénévole s’empare de plusieurs matelas qu’elle dispose au sol, puis prépare le linge de lit. Les femmes, frigorifiées, s’emmitouflent dans les couvertures qu’on leur tend. Et se murent dans le silence.

    Dans le jardin extérieur, Ramin souffle enfin. Il est éreinté. « Je suis si fatigué que je n’ai pas réussi à dormir hier soir, dit-il. On a marché dix heures pour traverser la frontière. À chaque étape difficile, dans la montagne, je devais aider mes proches un par un. On devait souvent se cacher pour ne pas être vus par la police. » Pour maximiser leurs chances, ils empruntent le chemin le plus ardu, là où la présence policière est moindre.

    « On ne peut rien construire dans notre pays, ni étudier ni travailler »

    Cheveux ébène, sourcils fournis, Ramin a la moitié du visage camouflé par un masque FFP2. Il est fier du tee-shirt qui recouvre ses épaules, aux couleurs de l’équipe de France de football, qui lui a été donné au refuge. « À Kaboul, j’étais parfumeur », sourit-il, ajoutant avoir dû partir à la suite de « problèmes personnels ». Son père, assis au soleil près de lui, l’écoute sans dire un mot. « On a d’abord été en Iran puis en Turquie et en Grèce. L’Organisation internationale pour les migrations [OIM] nous a acheminés à Thessalonique, dans un camp de migrants. »

    Ensemble, ils traversent les frontières macédonienne, serbe et bosnienne à pied, en bus ou en camion. « C’était très difficile à la frontière croate. Chaque jour, on tentait notre chance mais la police nous refoulait. Elle nous fouillait et volait nos téléphones, quand elle ne les cassait pas sous nos yeux. » Ils parviennent à franchir la frontière après 40 tentatives. « Ils ont pris nos empreintes là-bas, puis en Slovénie. »

    À Clavières (Italie), près de la frontière avec la France, la famille est arrêtée à deux reprises par la police. Le jeune homme explique aux agents que sa petite sœur, âgée de 16 ans, a un cancer du sein. Elle est affaiblie et essoufflée. « Ils m’ont dit : “OK, on a un docteur qui va l’examiner.” Mais en fait, ils n’ont rien fait pour elle, soupire Ramin. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi ils ferment les frontières. On est juste des êtres humains qui veulent se réfugier dans un lieu sûr et travailler. »

    La seconde famille, originaire du Kurdistan iranien, se repose jusqu’au lendemain. Samedi après-midi, Camille, infirmière et bénévole à Médecins du Monde, tient une permanence pour les exilés au refuge. « Effectivement, on a de plus en plus de familles et de bébés, confirme-t-elle. Je me souviens aussi d’un homme âgé d’une soixantaine d’années. »

    À 18 heures, Pauline et Laetitia, deux bénévoles, lancent la préparation du repas dans le réfectoire. Plusieurs exilés marocains mettent la main à la pâte : du rap marocain en arrière-plan, ils épluchent et coupent les légumes, remuent la pâte du gâteau au chocolat, débarrassent les tables, font la vaisselle et passent le balai. Depuis l’automne dernier, ils sont plus nombreux qu’avant.

    « On a dû s’adapter à ça aussi. En mars, on était vraiment surchargés », explique un autre bénévole. En témoignent les matelas empilés aux quatre coins de la salle à manger, prêts à être installés le soir, lorsque le repas est terminé. « On prend aussi en compte le ramadan. Ou bien on fait deux services, ou bien ils prennent leur assiette qu’ils mangent plus tard », complète Pauline.

    Peu avant l’heure du ftour (repas de la rupture du jeûne), c’est l’effervescence. Les effluves de hrira (soupe traditionnelle algérienne et marocaine) s’échappent des grosses marmites en cuisine. Les jeunes hommes ajoutent des épices avant de remuer. Ayoub, 24 ans, évoque son parcours. « J’ai quitté le Maroc parce que je ne voulais pas finir en prison comme plusieurs de mes amis », lance ce Sahraoui originaire de Guelmim.

    Étudiant durant quatre ans à l’université d’Agadir, Ayoub manifeste à maintes reprises pour revendiquer davantage de droits pour sa région natale. « Un ami militant a été tué par la police secrète. Très souvent, nos rassemblements étaient réprimés dans la violence. » La perspective du chômage, aussi, le pousse au départ. « Je ne voulais pas être une charge pour mes parents, qui ont déjà des problèmes de santé. Je suis donc parti par la Turquie, sans visa. » Il traverse ensuite l’Europe en passant par l’Albanie. Il emprunte « le triangle », une route récente qui implique un détour par la Roumanie.

    À table, les récits se suivent et se ressemblent. Certains des Marocains sont là depuis un, voire deux mois, bloqués par la pandémie qui a réduit les possibilités de transport, ou par manque de projets.

    Nabil*, qui préparait un peu plus tôt la hrira, se désole du chômage et de la corruption qui gangrènent le Maroc. « On ne peut rien construire dans notre pays, ni étudier ni travailler. » Et Hicham, les cheveux coiffés en arrière, d’enchaîner : « Je suis parti à cause de la pauvreté. Quand tu gagnes l’équivalent d’un ou deux euros par jour, qu’est-ce que tu veux faire ? »

    Ce diplômé en mécanique, devenu coiffeur à Oujda faute de travail stable, espère s’installer à Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis), qu’il surnomme « sa3douni » (« Aidez-moi ») pour plaisanter. Tous sont d’abord partis pour la Turquie par avion, sans visa, puis ont traversé la frontière avec la Grèce. « La Croatie, c’était l’horreur, souffle Hicham. La police te vole toutes tes affaires, te laisse en caleçon et te repousse vers la rivière. » Nabil acquiesce, encore effaré. « Parfois, ils te laissent avec les menottes. Beaucoup sont morts noyés dans cette rivière. »

    En Albanie et en Bosnie, tous évoquent des « gens bons et généreux ». Mais si c’était à refaire, même sans avoir à payer le trajet, ils ne referaient pas la route des Balkans. « C’est trop dur et trop long. On a tous passé en moyenne un an sur la route, à dormir dehors, dans la montagne, à marcher des centaines de kilomètres, à se cacher dans des camions », détaille Nabil avant d’évoquer le cas des sept hommes originaires d’Afrique du Nord retrouvés morts dans un conteneur au Paraguay, en octobre dernier, quatre mois après avoir quitté la Serbie.

    « On a pris cette route car par l’Espagne, c’est devenu quasi impossible, se justifie un autre. Ils ont serré les boulons et si on est arrêtés, c’est directement la prison. » En fin de soirée, certains jouent de la guitare, d’autres sirotent un thé. Hicham prépare ses affaires : demain, il rejoint la capitale pour une nouvelle vie.

    Dimanche matin, la seconde famille quitte la salle Sainte-Thérèse pour prendre le petit-déjeuner au refuge. Kazhal*, 10 ans, se régale de tartines et d’une clémentine qu’elle met à nu. Les cheveux gris, le père de famille, Omid*, se laisse aller à un peu d’autodérision : « Je crois que le trajet était trop long pour mon âge. Je ne suis pas habitué à marcher autant… »

    Cet architecte de profession, accompagné de ses deux enfants, a dû fuir l’Iran à la suite de menaces de mort. « Je n’ai pas eu le choix », assure-t-il, retenant le flot de larmes qui envahit soudain ses yeux noirs. Son neveu, âgé de 26 ans, Akoo*, l’accompagne, lui et ses enfants. « Mon père est activiste et je commençais à être en danger. Sans compter que je n’arrivais pas à trouver du travail à cause de ça. »

    Après avoir échoué à traverser par bateau depuis la Turquie, il part le premier, par la route des Balkans. « Mon voyage a duré deux mois et demi, dans la neige et le froid. » Lui aussi emprunte « le triangle » pour éviter la Croatie. En Autriche, il prévient la famille, restée en Turquie, que la route est « trop dangereuse ». Celle-ci parvient à faire la traversée par la mer jusqu’en Italie.

    « Le bateau bougeait beaucoup, les enfants étaient terrifiés et n’arrêtaient pas de pleurer », se souvient leur père, ajoutant que sept femmes étaient à bord. Akoo regarde sur son smartphone la carte GPS où de petits points rouges indiquent chacun de ses points de passage. « On s’est retrouvés à Oulx à 19 heures vendredi. On a marché de nuit, dans le noir, pour rejoindre Briançon par le col de Montgenèvre. On tenait chacun un enfant par la main. Ils étaient épuisés. On faisait des pauses toutes les dix minutes et on leur répétait qu’on y était presque. »

    Les statistiques anonymisées de l’association Refuges solidaires montrent une hausse des arrivées d’Afghans, d’Iraniens, de Marocains et d’Algériens en 2020 et jusqu’au 31 mars 2021. 429 femmes et enfants de moins de 13 ans sont passés par le refuge de Briançon en mars, soit le double par rapport à février et janvier 2021. Le refuge continuera d’accueillir jusqu’au déménagement l’été prochain.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/280421/sauve-le-refuge-solidaire-de-briancon-s-adapte-de-nouveaux-arrivants

    #refuge #asile #migrations #accueil #hébergement #hébergement_d'urgence #réfugiés #Hautes-Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #France #Briançonnais

    –—

    sur l’annonce de fermeture du Refuge :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/876342

    • UN LIEU DE SOLIDARITE OUVERT…

      L’association Refuges Solidaires, s’occupant de l’accueil des migrants, devait quitter le local actuellement occupé à Briançon pour des raisons de sécurité, le bâtiment n’étant plus aux normes et la Communauté de Communes du Briançonnais voulant récupérer le lieu pour y développer d’autres projets. Une dynamique est alors lancée pour trouver un autre lieu d’accueil solidaire pour recevoir dignement le flux des migrants… « Un beau projet » est né !

      Faire d’une difficulté une opportunité !

      Frédéric Meunier est le Président de l’association, Le Group’, basée à Villeurbanne (69), dont la mission est l’accompagnement du projet et de ses investisseurs. Depuis août 2020 une de ses équipes est mobilisée.

      L’initiative est lancée suite à la nécessité de libérer l’ancienne caserne des CRS à Briançon, mise à disposition par la Communauté de Communes du Briançonnais, investie par Refuges Solidaires pour y accueillir les migrants arrivant sur la ville depuis 2007. Profitant de l’occasion le projet a voulu s’élargir et y inclure l’accueil d’acteurs de l’économie sociale et solidaire, de l’environnement, de la culture… Ce lieu en devenir a enfin été trouvé et il se nommera : Les #Terrasses_Solidaires.

      Refuges Solidaires assure un accueil de transit, en moyenne un migrant reste 3 jours sur Briançon. Autour de cette dynamique de l’accueil, différents acteurs ses sont regroupés. Acteurs de l’Economie Sociale et Solidaire, telles les structures d’insertion ou des associations de solidarité locales, mais aussi de la Culture avec des associations organisant des festivals, et des acteurs médicaux avec Médecins du Monde et des médecins libéraux qui désireraient s’installer, et peut-être même quelques médias locaux.

      « Le Cahier des charges nous oblige à respecter les besoins de chacun, spécifie Frédéric Meunier. Des investisseurs sociaux vont se porter acquéreurs de ce lieu que le propriétaire désire vendre, pour 1 M€. C’est l’ancien sanatorium Les Terrasses, construit en 1949 qui accueillait avant le Centre d’Accueil de Demandeurs d’Asile, qui a depuis été transféré. »

      1 800 m², sur 2 bâtiments, sur les hauteurs de Briançon. Un tiers de cette surface, environ 500 m², sera dédié à l’accueil des migrants, le reste des partenaires se partageant la surface restante, notamment pour accueillir des bénévoles s’impliquant dans les domaines de la Culture ou de la rénovation de patrimoine ancien. Se rajoutera un espace coworking, avec tous les services prévus, Wifi, matériels, salle de réunion, open-space…

      Les investisseurs sociaux :
      Un tiers de la somme pour l’acquisition du bâtiment est pris en charge par des Briançonnais, majoritairement des privés et quelques associations, les deux autres tiers sont pris en charge par des fonds de dotation à caractère social : Riace France, reconnu d’intérêt collectif, et Caritas France. Seront également partenaires du projet pour la prise en charge du fonctionnement, au moins au départ : La Fondation Abbé Pierre, la Fondation de France, le Secours Catholique via Caritas, et Emmaüs. « Pour l’instant nous tablons sur un projet sans subventions, s’il y en a tant mieux, mais nous ne voulons pas que celles-ci puissent bloquer le projet, souligne Frédéric Meunier. Le temps d’amortissement de l’acquisition est évalué à 25 ans. »

      Bien que ce lieu ait accueilli du public jusqu’en 2020 il a besoin de rénovation et de mise aux normes. « La rénovation est estimée à un peu plus de 200 000 € et va donner lieu un 2ème appel de fonds, précise Frédéric Meunier. Un appel aux dons, défiscalisables, via Caritas. Les travaux vont être lancés très bientôt, 1ère quinzaine de mai, pour une première mise en sécurité et l’adaptation des lieux. Mais un an va environ s’écouler avant la finition de l’ensemble de la conformité. L’idée est aussi de travailler avec des entreprises locales sur 2021/2022. »

      Rappelons qu’un premier appel de fonds a été lancé pour l’acquisition de l’ancien sanatorium le 21 avril 2021 pour récolter environ le tiers du million d’Euros nécessaires et qu’en seulement une dizaine de jours + 250 000 € ont été récoltés. En 20 jours, qui est le délai légal de cet appel de fonds, il y a donc bon espoir que les 300 000 € soient atteints !

      Une ouverture prévue en juillet 2021 ! Une ouverture partielle qui concernera l’accueil des migrants et de 2 associations, celle s’occupant de l’accueil de bénévoles pour la restauration des Monuments Historiques et Fab Lab Low Tech.

      Emploi : Une association de gestion va être créée dans une quinzaine de jours qui va donner naissance à 1,5 équivalent temps plein. « Avec les économies d’échelle espérées par les associations réunies l’espoir est de créer 5 à 6 emplois non existants sur la dizaine existant déjà, explique Frédéric Meunier. Il y aura besoin de services autour de ce lieu, entretien, maintenance et restauration sur place, 2 personnes en cuisine sont d’ores et déjà prévues. »

      Un projet collectif pensé pour le territoire. « D’une difficulté d’accueil on a su créer une opportunité, s’enthousiasme Frédéric Meunier. Et si le flux migratoire se tarissait les locaux de Refuges Solidaires pourraient être mis à dispositions d’un accueil d’urgence ou pour des saisonniers mais en restant basé sur le monde de la solidarité. »

      Sera lancée par l’Université de Grenoble, le Master Urbanisme, une concertation de voisinage. Une dizaine d’étudiants s’y attèleront dès la fin du mois de mai. Ce projet veut travailler en bonne intelligence avec tous : pouvoirs publics, locaux, etc. Aujourd’hui les tensions ont su être apaisées par la convergence d’intérêts.

      https://www.alpes-et-midi.fr/article/lieu-solidarite-ouvert

  • Dans la nuit du col de #Montgenèvre, le cortège des migrants a repris sur les sentiers enneigés

    Chaque jour, plusieurs personnes arrivent à Briançon au terme d’une marche dangereuse et éprouvante. Un temps limitées par la crise sanitaire, les tentatives de passages ont repris.

    Karim balise l’itinéraire sur son téléphone portable. A voix basse, il glisse quelques indications aux autres et jette des regards inquiets par la fenêtre. Ils sont une dizaine au total – des Marocains, des Tunisiens, des Algériens, un Égyptien et un Palestinien –, tassés dans ce minuscule abri en bois, au milieu des massifs enneigés. Dehors, il fait nuit noire. La température est de – 5 degrés.

    Omar se roule une dernière cigarette. Rachid empoigne le sac de courses dans lequel il trimballe quelques affaires. Ce soir-là de mars, pour passer le col de Montgenèvre (Hautes-Alpes), frontière physique entre la France et l’Italie, il faut marcher une dizaine de kilomètres, pendant cinq heures, à plus de 1 800 mètres d’altitude.

    Plus ou moins volontairement, Karim hérite du rôle de guide. Dans la pénombre, son visage marqué apparaît. Le Tunisien de 43 ans est anxieux. Quelques heures plus tôt, lors d’une première tentative, le groupe a essuyé un échec. Ils ont croisé les forces de l’ordre qui les ont aussitôt renvoyés en Italie.

    Karim préfère s’écarter des itinéraires officiels fléchés pour les randonneurs. « C’est moins risqué comme ça », veut-il croire. Sur ces chemins toujours plus étroits et sinueux, le groupe avance en file indienne, silencieux et têtes baissées. On s’enfonce dans la #neige parfois jusqu’aux hanches, on glisse, on se contorsionne pour enjamber les branches d’arbre. Après plusieurs heures de marche, la #fatigue est là. Sur un long sentier en côte, un des membres du groupe s’arrête et relève la tête. Il contemple la nature brute qui se dessine dans la nuit. « Ça me rappelle les #montagnes de l’Atlas, au Maroc. Ma mère vient de là-bas », murmure-t-il.

    Couples âgés et nourrissons

    Plus tôt dans la soirée, le groupe a aperçu une famille afghane s’élancer sur ces mêmes chemins. Avec eux, il y avait « une vieille dame avec une cane », insiste Karim. Au Refuge solidaire de Briançon, où les exilés peuvent s’octroyer une pause une fois arrivés en France, deux couples afghans ont été accueillis ces dernières semaines. Les premiers époux avaient 77 et 74 ans, les seconds 73 et 69 ans.

    En #montagne, il est aussi devenu habituel de croiser des enfants en bas âge, parfois des nourrissons. L’un d’entre eux avait 12 jours. Un autre cas a ému l’eurodéputé Damien Carême (Europe Ecologie-Les Verts, EELV), qui accompagnait des maraudeurs, mi-février : celui d’une femme enceinte, afghane aussi, sommée de rebrousser chemin par les forces de l’ordre françaises. Elle accouchera en Italie quelques heures plus tard.

    Un temps ralenties par la crise sanitaire, les tentatives de passage à la frontière ont repris. En janvier et février, 394 personnes sont arrivées au #Refuge_solidaire, dont 31 femmes et 46 enfants de moins de 13 ans.

    « #Harcèlement_policier »

    La première fois que des migrants se sont risqués sur ces routes montagneuses, c’était en 2017. Avant, « personne n’imaginait que quiconque puisse passer dans ces reliefs tout à fait improbables du point de vue de la sécurité », constatait Martine Clavel, préfète des Hautes-Alpes, lors d’une conférence de presse en février.

    « Au départ, on voyait surtout des jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest, se souvient Alain Mouchet, bénévole au Refuge solidaire, qui a accueilli plus de 12 000 personnes depuis son ouverture en juillet 2017. A partir d’octobre 2019, la population a changé. On a désormais beaucoup de gens qui arrivent du Maghreb et beaucoup de familles qui viennent d’Afghanistan et d’Iran. »

    D’après les chiffres de la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes, parmi les hommes qui tentaient le passage en 2019, les nationalités les plus représentées étaient les Guinéens, les Sénégalais et les Maliens. En 2020, les trois premières nationalités sont les Afghans, suivis des Iraniens et des Tunisiens.

    Lors des #maraudes, « on constate des #hypothermies, des #gelures, des #entorses, des #luxations. On doit parfois envoyer les gens à l’hôpital », explique Pamela Palvadeau, coordinatrice des programmes à la frontière franco-italienne pour Médecins du monde (MDM). Avec des personnes âgées, des femmes enceintes ou des enfants, « les #risques sont encore plus importants », complète Philippe de Botton, médecin et président de MDM. Ces dernières semaines, les associations ont dénoncé un « harcèlement policier » à leur égard et une frontière « de plus en plus militarisée ».

    Ceux qui arrivent aujourd’hui à Briançon ont déjà un long chemin d’exil derrière eux. « Ils viennent par la route des Balkans, un trajet particulièrement douloureux lors duquel ils subissent des exactions monstrueuses, notamment en Bosnie et en Croatie », souligne encore Philippe de Botton. Avant de se lancer à l’assaut des #Alpes, la plupart ont déjà traversé une dizaine de pays sur le continent européen et autant de frontières ultra-sécurisées, souvent à pied et dans des conditions de dénuement extrême.

    Passage par le détroit de Gibraltar « trop compliqué »

    Le lendemain de sa traversée avec Karim, Omar s’installe à une table du Refuge. Pendant deux heures, ce Palestinien de 27 ans qui vivait en Syrie raconte son histoire, celle d’une interminable traversée de l’Europe qu’il a débuté il y a « un an et six mois » pour rejoindre son frère, réfugié en Allemagne. Omar parle d’abord de la Turquie, où il s’est ruiné en donnant de l’argent à des passeurs et à des gens qui lui promettaient des faux papiers pour voyager en avion. Il parle ensuite de cette marche de quatre jours pendant laquelle il a tenté de traverser la Macédoine du Nord. Puis de cette nuit où il a dormi dans un camion avec trente ou quarante personnes pour passer en Serbie. Omar évoque enfin ces refoulements incessants à chaque frontière et ne compte plus les cas de #violences_policières.

    Hamza, lui, a 24 ans, et vient de Tétouan, dans le nord du Maroc. Son projet est d’aller en Espagne, à Barcelone, « pour travailler ». C’est pourtant la route des Balkans qu’il a décidé de suivre plutôt que de tenter la traversée au niveau du détroit de Gibraltar. « C’est devenu trop compliqué là-bas, ça ne marche plus », dit-il. Son voyage a donc débuté par la Turquie, « il y a un an ». Le pays lui avait au départ délivré un visa.

    Sur son téléphone portable, Hamza a gardé précieusement toute une série de photos et de vidéos qui mettent en images son récit. On le voit par exemple sur un bateau pneumatique en train de traverser le Danube pour passer de la Serbie à la Croatie. Ou lors de longues marches – dont une de « vingt et un jours » en Grèce – entouré d’autres jeunes hommes, parfois d’enfants, dans un état d’épuisement total. Hamza raconte ces fois où il n’avait ni à boire ni à manger pendant plusieurs jours.

    Lors de leur traversée des Alpes, la veille, certains dans le groupe se connaissaient déjà. En Croatie, Omar a par exemple rencontré Ahmed, un Egyptien de 30 ans qui souhaite pouvoir travailler en France. S’il se retrouve dans cette situation aujourd’hui, c’est à cause « d’un patron croate qui travaille dans le bâtiment », dit-il. « Il m’a fait venir d’Egypte pour m’exploiter dans un réseau de traite d’êtres humains. » Alors Ahmed s’est sauvé.

    Après le dîner, ce dernier nous glisse qu’une famille afghane qu’il avait « rencontrée dans un camp en Croatie » doit faire son arrivée au Refuge dans la soirée. Vers 23 heures, un couple et leur fils de 3 ans apparaissent effectivement sur le pas de la porte, en tenue de ski. Le petit Mohamed est dans les bras de son père. Il a de grands yeux noirs, un visage rond et des cheveux bruns qui lui tombent devant les yeux.

    Avec son bonnet blanc sur la tête et ses boots bleu marine aux pieds, Mohamed court vers un matelas où quelques jouets ont été posés. A ceux qui l’appellent, il ne répond plus vraiment et se défoule nerveusement sur le cheval en plastique qu’il a dans les mains. Des passages de frontière dans ces conditions extrêmes, Mohamed en a déjà vécu une dizaine.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2021/03/28/dans-la-nuit-du-col-de-montgenevre-le-cortege-des-migrants-a-repris-sur-les-

    #asile #migrations #frontières #France #Italie #Briançon #Hautes-Alpes #Briançonnais #frontière_sud-alpine

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • #Refugia : a Utopian solution to the crisis of mass displacement

    And still they come. An apparently endless flotilla of rubber dinghies filled with migrants and refugees making their way across the Mediterranean to Europe. As the numbers and visibility of this migration have gathered pace, even mainstream politicians have expressed their alarm. Antonio Tajani, president of the European Parliament, has talked of an exodus of biblical proportions. Solutions designed for a few thousand people will not work as a strategy for millions, he warned.

    In responsible political circles, let alone in the more feverish popular media, there is an increasing recognition that the three conventional “durable solutions” to displacement – local integration, resettlement and return – cannot meet the scale and speed of the movement of people. The international institutional architecture seems unequal to the task. In 2016, there were no fewer than seven international summits to address the refugee and migrant “crisis”. What is talked about is often a reboot of what has demonstrably failed before.

    Emerging, sometimes from unexpected places, have come a number of imaginative solutions. For example, the proposal to create a separate “refugee nation” was first promoted by a Californian businessman, Jason Buzi. Egyptian telecoms billionaire Naguib Sawiris has also sought to buy an island from Greece or Italy to house those crossing the Mediterranean. The most elaborately worked-out island solution is to create a “Europe-in-Africa” city-state on the Tunisian Plateau – a thin strip of seabed that sits between Tunisia and Italy within the Mediterranean. The concept has been modelled in detail by Theo Deutinger, a respected Dutch architect.

    Other proposals have centred on the creation of “refugee cities” or zones. Drawing from the example of a special economic zone in Jordan near the Za’atari refugee camp, where refugees have been allowed to work rather than languish, migration expert Alex Betts and economist Paul Collier have made the simple but daring point that many refugees can be turned into assets rather than liabilities if the legalities forbidding asylum-seekers seeking paid jobs are set aside.
    Refugia and the Sesame Pass

    My colleague Nicholas Van Hear and I have reviewed most of these proposals and advanced an even more radical plan. Our vision is to create a set of loosely-connected self-governing units we call “Refugia”, brought into being mainly by refugees and displaced people themselves, with some support from sympathisers. Though scattered like an archipelago, Refugia will nonetheless link together many refugee communities – in conflict areas, in neighbouring or transit countries, and in more distant countries of settlement. We are happy to accept the label “utopian” for our scheme, but ours is a more pragmatic idea, a “realistic utopianism” to use a term developed by the philosopher John Rawls.

    We see Refugia as the outcome of a tacit grand bargain – among richer states and emerging countries, nearby countries affected by conflict and, crucially, refugees themselves. After discussions with representatives of Refugia, new constituent zones will be licensed by the nation states within whose territories they lie.

    Refugee camps, hostels, farming communities, self-built housing estates or suburbs of a town might all join Refugia. Though subject to the host states’ laws, zones are created from below. They are self-governing and eventually self-supporting. The upshot is that Refugians hold dual affinities: as well as an affiliation to Refugia they can be long-term residents of the states that license their territories. They can move among different parts of Refugia, and, where negotiated, between sovereign nations.

    Refugians will be issued with a “Sesame Pass”, a super-smart, biometric card that opens up and connects all the nodes and zones of Refugia. This will provide those who have it with a collective identity, the right to vote for a transnational parliament, legal status, entitlements and the facilitation of work, financial transfers and enhanced mobility. The Sesame Pass could also be developed as a machine-readable currency, which will allow tax collection or the administration of a basic income grant for all Refugians.

    There is some sense in which an embryonic form of Refugia already exists. As the length of time in refugee camps has lengthened and more refugees have been accommodated in or near cities, organic urban settlements have developed. A good example is Camp Domiz, a Syrian refugee camp in northern Iraq that has been badged a “Refugee republic”, as its inhabitants have set up community centres, shops and mosques.

    The displaced in control of their future

    In our vision, Refugia is essentially self-organised and self-managed. It does not require political or cultural conformity, rather it subscribes to the principles and deeds of solidarity and mutual aid. But it is absolutely possible that desperation might drive the European Union to come up with a radical blueprint for a dystopian form of Refugia, which does not fit these principles.

    In September 2016, Hungary’s right-wing prime minister Victor Orban suggested that the EU should build a “refugee city” in North Africa. Not only was this explicitly about repression enforced by military might, Orban also declared that “those who came [to Europe] illegally must be rounded up and shipped out”.

    While we must be on the guard for forms of Refugia that are nakedly about subjugation, new territorial units initiated from above should not be discarded in principle. There is no reason why, where these proposals comply with Refugia’s democratic and tolerant values, they should not be incorporated as nodes within the wider idea.

    Precisely because they have been disempowered by their traumatic experiences, those who have been displaced do not need things done to them and may even resist things being done for them. Ideally, Refugians will be in charge of as much of Refugia as is practically possible. This is the promise of the many small initiatives and inventive new solutions in this utopian vision of what could be possible.

    https://theconversation.com/refugia-a-utopian-solution-to-the-crisis-of-mass-displacement-81136
    Je mets ici pour archivage... mais ce projet imaginé par des profs émerites est très douteux !

    #utopie ou, plutôt... #distopie ?!?

    #solution (sic) #alternative (sic) #Jason_Buzi #nation_réfugiée #nation_de_réfugiés #refugee_nation #Naguib_Sawiris #île #Europe-in-Africa #Theo_Deutinger #auto-gouvernance #utopie_réaliste #revenu_de_base #camps_de_réfugiés #Domiz #solidarité #entraide #réseau

    #Sesame_Pass #Nicholas_Van_Hear

    –—
    Le site web de #Refugee_Republic :


    https://refugeerepublic.submarinechannel.com

    Une vidéo introductive :
    https://vimeo.com/113100941

    déjà signalé en 2015 par @fil :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/427762

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • ‘Living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty’

    DURING the first week of 2021, Katrin Glatz-Brubakk treated a refugee who had tried to drown himself.

    His arms, already covered with scars, were sliced open with fresh cuts.

    He told her: “I can’t live in this camp any more. I’m tired of being afraid all the time, I don’t want to live any more.”

    He is 11 years old. Glatz-Brubakk, a child psychologist at Doctors Without Borders’ (MSF) mental health clinic in Lesbos, tells me he is the third child she’s seen for suicidal thoughts and attempts so far this year.

    At the time we spoke, it was only two weeks into the new year.

    The boy is one of thousands of children living in the new Mavrovouni (also known as Kara Tepe) refugee camp on the Greek island, built after a fire destroyed the former Moria camp in September.

    MSF has warned of a mental health “emergency” among children at the site, where 7,100 refugees are enduring the coldest months of the year in flimsy tents without heating or running water.

    Situated by the coast on a former military firing range, the new site, dubbed Moria 2.0, is completely exposed to the elements with tents repeatedly collapsing and flooding.

    This week winds of up to 100km/h battered the camp and temperatures dropped to zero. Due to lockdown measures residents can only leave once a week, meaning there is no escape, not even temporarily, from life in the camp.
    Camp conditions causing children to break down, not their past traumas

    It is these appalling conditions which are causing children to break down to the point where some are even losing the will to live, Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    While the 11-year-old boy she treated earlier this year had suffered traumas in his past, the psychologist says he was a resilient child and had been managing well for a long time.

    “But he has been there in Moria now for one year and three months and now he is acutely suicidal.”

    This is also the case for the majority of children who come to the clinic.

    “On our referral form, when children are referred to us we have a question: ‘When did this problem start?’ and approximately 90 per cent of cases it says when they came to Moria.”

    Glatz-Brubakk tells me she’s seen children who are severely depressed, have stopped talking and playing and others who are self-harming.

    Last year MSF noted 50 cases of suicidal thoughts and attempts among children on the island, the youngest of whom was an eight-year-old girl who tried to hang herself.

    It’s difficult to imagine children so young even thinking about taking their lives.

    But in the camp, where there are no activities, no school, where tents collapse in the night, and storms remind children of the war they fled from, more and more little ones are being driven into despair.

    “It is living in this constant nightmare of insecurity and uncertainty that is causing children to break down,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “They don’t think it’s going to get better. ‘I haven’t slept for too long, I’ve been worrying every minute of every day for the last year or two’ — when you get to that point of exhaustion, falling asleep and never waking up again is more tempting than being alive.”

    Children play in the mud in the Moria 2 camp [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Mental health crisis worsening

    While there has always been a mental health crisis on the island, Glatz-Brubakk says the problem has worsened since the fire reduced Moria to ashes five months ago.

    The blaze “retraumatised” many of the children and triggered a spike in mental health emergencies in the clinic.

    But the main difference, she notes, is that many people have now lost any remnant of hope they may have been clinging to.

    Following the fire, the European Union pledged there would be “no more Morias,” and many refugees believed they would finally be moved off the island.

    But it quickly transpired that this was not going to be the case.

    While a total of 5,000 people, including all the unaccompanied minors, have been transferred from Lesbos — according to the Greek government — more than 7,000 remain in Moria 2.0, where conditions have been described as worse than the previous camp.

    “They’ve lost hope that they will ever be treated with dignity, that they will ever have their human rights, that they will be able to have a normal life,” Glatz-Brubakk says.

    “Living in a mud hole as they are now takes away all your feeling of being human, really.”

    Yasser, an 18-year-old refugee from Afghanistan and Moria 2.0 resident, tells me he’s also seen the heavy toll on adults’ mental health.

    “In this camp they are not the same people as they were in the previous camp,” he says. “They changed. They have a different feeling when you look in their eyes.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No improvements to Moria 2.0

    The feelings of abandonment, uncertainty and despair have also been exacerbated by failures to make improvements to the camp, which is run by the Greek government.

    It’s been five months since the new camp was built yet there is still no running water or mains electricity.

    Instead bottled water is trucked in and generators provide energy for around 12 hours a day.

    Residents and grassroots NGOs have taken it upon themselves to dig trenches to mitigate the risk of flooding, and shore up their tents to protect them from collapse. But parts of the camp still flood.

    “When it rains even for one or two hours it comes like a lake,” says Yasser, who lives in a tent with his four younger siblings and parents.

    Humidity inside the tents also leaves clothes and blankets perpetually damp with no opportunity to get them dry again.

    Despite temperatures dropping to zero this week, residents of the camp still have no form of heating, except blankets and sleeping bags.

    The camp management have not only been unforgivably slow to improve the camp, but have also frustrated NGOs’ attempts to make changes.

    Sonia Nandzik, co-founder of ReFOCUS Media Labs, an organisation which teaches asylum-seekers to become citizen journalists, tells me that plans by NGOs to provide low-energy heated blankets for residents back in December were rejected.

    Camp management decided small heaters would be a better option. “But they are still not there,” Nandzik tells me.

    “Now they are afraid that the power fuses will not take it and there will be a fire. So there is very little planning, this is a big problem,” she says.

    UNHCR says it has purchased 950 heaters, which will be distributed once the electricity network at the site has been upgraded. But this all feels too little, too late.

    Other initiatives suggested by NGOs like building tents for activities and schools have also been rejected.

    The Greek government, which officially runs the camp, has repeatedly insisted that conditions there are far better than Moria.

    Just this week Greek migration ministry secretary Manos Logothetis claimed that “no-one is in danger from the weather in the temporary camp.”

    While the government claims the site is temporary, which may explain why it has little will to improve it, the 7,100 people stuck there — of whom 33 per cent are children — have no idea how long they will be kept in Moria 2.0 and must suffer the failures and delays of ministers in the meantime.

    “I would say it’s becoming normal,” Yasser says, when asked if he expected to be in the “temporary” camp five months after the fire.

    “I know that it’s not good to feel these situations as normal but for me it’s just getting normal because it’s something I see every day.”

    Yasser is one of Nandzik’s citizen journalism students. Over the past few months, she says she’s seen the mental health of her students who live in the camp worsen.

    “They are starting to get more and more depressed, that sometimes they do not show up for classes for several days,” she says, referring to the ReFOCUS’s media skills lessons which now take place online.

    One of her students recently stopped eating and sleeping because of depression.

    Nandzik took him to an NGO providing psychosocial support, but they had to reject his case.

    With only a few mental health actors on the island, most only have capacity to take the most extreme cases, she says.

    “So we managed to find a psychologist for him that speaks Farsi but in LA because we were seriously worried about him that if we didn’t act now it is going to go to those more severe cases.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    No escape or respite

    What makes matters far worse is that asylum-seekers have no escape or respite from the camp. Residents can only leave the camp for a period of four hours once per week, and only for a limited number of reasons.

    A heavy police presence enforces the strict lockdown, supposedly implemented to stop the spread of Covid-19.

    While the officers have significantly reduced the horrific violence that often broke out in Moria camp, their presence adds to the feeling of imprisonment for residents.

    “The Moria was a hell but since people have moved into this new camp, the control of the place has increased so if you have a walk, it feels like I have entered a prison,” Nazanin Furoghi, a 27-year-old Afghan refugee, tells me.

    “It wouldn’t be exaggerating if I say that I feel I am walking in a dead area. There is no joy, no hope — at least for me it is like this. Even if before I enter the camp I am happy, after I am feeling so sad.”

    Furoghi was moved out of the former Moria camp with her family to a flat in the nearby town of Mytilene earlier last year. She now works in the new camp as a cultural mediator.

    Furoghi explains to me that when she was living in Moria, she would go out with friends, attend classes and teach at a school for refugee children at a nearby community centre from morning until the evening.

    Families would often bring food to the olive groves outside the camp and have picnics.

    Those rare moments can make all the difference, they can make you feel human.

    “But people here, they don’t have any kind of activities inside the camp,” she explains.“There is not any free environment around the camp, it’s just the sea and the beach and it’s very windy and it’s not even possible to have a simple walk.”

    Parents she speaks to tell her that their children have become increasingly aggressive and depressed. With little else to do and no safe place to play, kids have taken to chasing cars and trucks through the camp.

    Their dangerous new game is testament to children’s resilience, their ability to play against all odds. But Nazanin finds the sight incredibly sad.

    “This is not the way children should have to play or have fun,” she says, adding that the unhygienic conditions in the camp also mean the kids often catch skin diseases.

    The mud also has other hidden dangers. Following tests, the government confirmed last month that there are dangerous levels of lead contamination in the soil, due to residue from bullets from when the site was used as a shooting range. Children and pregnant women are the most at risk from the negative impacts of lead exposure.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    The cruelty of containment

    Asylum-seekers living in camps on the Aegean islands have been put under varying degrees of lockdown since the outbreak in March.

    Recent research has shown the devastating impact of these restrictions on mental health. A report by the International Rescue Committee, published in December, found that self-harm among people living in camps on Chios, Lesbos and Samos increased by 66 per cent following restrictions in March.

    One in three were also said to have contemplated suicide. The deteriorating mental health crisis on the islands is also rooted in the EU and Greek government’s failed “hot-spot” policies, the report found.

    Asylum-seekers who arrive on the Aegean islands face months if not years waiting for their cases to be processed.

    Passing this time in squalid conditions wears down people’s hopes, leading to despair and the development of psychiatric problems.

    “Most people entered the camp as a healthy person, but after a year-and-a-half people have turned into a patient with lots of mental health problems and suicidal attempts,” Foroghi says.

    “So people have come here getting one thing, but they have lost many things.”

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Long-term impacts

    Traumatised children are not only unable to heal in such conditions, but are also unable to develop the key skills they need in adult life, Glatz-Brubakk says.

    This is because living in a state of constant fear and uncertainty puts a child’s brain into “alert mode.”

    “If they stay long enough in this alert mode their development of the normal functions of the brain like planning, structure, regulating feeling, going into healthy relationships will be impaired — and the more trauma and the longer they are in these unsafe conditions, the bigger the impact,” she says.

    Yasser tells me if he could speak to the Prime Minister of Greece, his message would be a warning of the scars the camp has inflicted on them.

    “You can keep them in the camp and be happy on moving them out but the things that won’t change are what happened to them,” he says.

    “What will become their personality, especially children, who got impacted by the camp so much? What doesn’t change is what I felt, what I experienced there.”

    Glatz-Brubakk estimates that the majority of the 2,300 children in the camp need professional mental health support.

    But MSF can only treat 300 patients a year. And even with support, living in conditions that create ongoing trauma means they cannot start healing.

    [Pic: Mare Liberum]

    Calls to evacuate the camps

    This is why human rights groups and NGOs have stressed that the immediate evacuation of the island is the only solution. In a letter to the Greek ombudsman this week, Legal Centre Lesvos argues that the conditions at the temporary site “reach the level of inhuman and degrading treatment,” and amount to “an attack on “vulnerable’ migrants’ non-derogable right to life.”

    Oxfam and the Greek Council for Refugees have called for the European Union to share responsibility for refugees and take in individuals stranded on the islands.

    But there seems to be little will on behalf of the Greek government or the EU to transfer people out of the camp, which ministers claimed would only be in use up until Easter.

    For now at least it seems those with the power to implement change are happy to continue with the failed hot-spot policy despite the devastating impact on asylum-seekers.

    “At days I truly despair because I see the suffering of the kids, and when you once held hands with an eight, nine, 10-year-old child who doesn’t want to live you never forget that,” Glatz-Brubakk tells me.

    “And it’s a choice to keep children in these horrible conditions and that makes it a lot worse than working in a place hit by a natural catastrophe or things you can’t control. It’s painful to see that the children are paying the consequences of that political choice.”

    #Greece #Kara_Tepe #Mavrovouni #Moria #mental_health #children #suicide #trauma #camp #refugee #MSF

    https://thecivilfleet.wordpress.com/2021/02/21/living-in-this-constant-nightmare-of-insecurity-and-uncerta

  • Senza stringhe

    La libertà di movimento è riconosciuta dalla nostra Costituzione; se questa sia un diritto naturale oppure no, bisogna allora riflettere su cosa effettivamente sia un diritto naturale. Tuttavia, essa è una parte imprescindibile della vita umana e coloro che migrano, ieri come oggi, hanno uno stimolo ben superiore all’appartenenza territoriale. Ogni giorno, ci sono due scenari paralleli e possibili che avvengono tra le montagne italo-francesi: coloro che raggiungono la meta e coloro che vengono respinti; il terzo scenario, fatale e tragico, è solamente intuibile.
    Eppure la frontiera è stata militarizzata ma qui continuano a passare: nonostante tutto, c’è porosità e c’è un passaggio. Prima che arrivasse il turismo privilegiato, l’alta valle compresa tra Bardonecchia, Oulx e Claviere ha da sempre vissuto la propria evoluzione dapprima con il Sentiero dei Mandarini e successivamente con la realizzazione della ferrovia cambiando la geografia del posto. Le frontiere diventano incomprensibili senza aver chiara l’origine dei vari cammini: la rotta balcanica, il Mar Mediterraneo centrale, i mercati del lavoro forzato e le richieste europee. Le frontiere si modellano, si ripetono e si diversificano ma presentano tutte una caratteristica isomorfa: la politica del consenso interno oltre che strutturale. In una valle come questa, caratterizzata dagli inverni rigidi e nevosi, dal 2015 non si arresta il tentativo di attraversare il confine tra i due stati sia per una necessità di viaggio, di orizzonte retorico, di ricongiungimento familiare ma soprattutto, dopo aver attraversando territori difficili o mari impossibili, per mesi o anni, non è di certo la montagna a fermare la mobilità che non segue logiche di tipo locale. Le mete finali, a volte, non sono precise ma vengono costruite in itinere e secondo la propria possibilità economica; per viaggiare hanno speso capitali enormi con la consapevolezza della restituzione alle reti di parentato, di vicinato e tutte quelle possibili.
    La valle si presenta frammentata geograficamente e ciò aumenta le difficoltà per raccogliere dei dati precisi in quanto le modalità di respingimento sono molto eterogenee, ci sono diversi valichi di frontiera: ci sono respingimenti che avvengono al Frejus e ci sono respingimenti che avvengono a Montgenèvre. Di notte, le persone respinte vengono portate al Rifugio Solidale di Oulx, sia dalla Croce Rossa sia dalla Polizia di stato italiana. Durante il giorno, invece, la Polizia di stato italiana riporta le persone in Italia e le lascia tra le strade di Oulx o a Bardonecchia. Dall’altra parte, ad Ovest del Monginevro, a Briançon è presente il Refuge Solidarie: solo con la collaborazione tra le associazioni italo-francesi si può avere una stima di quante sono state le persone accolte e dunque quante persone hanno raggiunto la meta intermedia, la Francia. Avere dei dati più precisi potrebbe essere utile per stimolare un intervento più strutturato da parte delle istituzioni perché in questo momento sul territorio sono presenti soprattutto le associazioni e ONG o individui singoli che stanno gestendo questa situazione, che stanno cercando di tamponare questa emergenza che neanche dovrebbe avere questo titolo.

    Non sono migranti ma frontiere in cammino.

    https://www.leggiscomodo.org/senza-stringhe

    #migrations #frontières #Italie #montagne #Alpes #Hautes-Alpes #reportage #photo-reportage #photographie #Briançon #Oulx #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #militarisation_des_frontières #porosité #passage #fermeture_des_frontières #Claviere #Bardonecchia #chemin_de_fer #Sentiero_dei_Mandarini #Frejus #refoulements #push-backs #jour #nuit #Refuge_solidaire #casa_cantonniera #froid #hiver #Busson #PAF #maraude #solidarité #maraudes #Médecins_du_monde #no-tav
    #ressources_pédagogiques

    ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721#message886920

  • „Wohin ?“-Podcast (Audio)

    https://youtu.be/vBL7lwdLUhc

    Dieser Podcast ist das Ergebnis eines mehrmonatigen Prozesses, der durch Corona immer wieder flexibel angepasst werden musste. Endlich haben wir nun eine Form gefunden, um in die Welt zu bringen, was uns beschäftigt und bewegt: Die Situation geflüchteter Menschen in Europa nicht aus dem Blick zu verlieren, von unseren Begegnungen zu erzählen, zu verweilen, nachzudenken. Wütend zu sein und traurig, anzumahnen und trotz allem Hoffnung – wie einen Vogel – in die Welt ziehen zu lassen.

    Ergänzend zum Podcast empfehlen wir den ca. achtminütigen, spontanen Probenmitschnitt (Video) des kompletten Zyklus‘ von Erna Woll vom 18.10.2020, der kurz vor dem 2. Lockdown unter corona-gerechten Bedingungen entstand: https://youtu.be/qgpWBsk0enc

    Spendenaufruf
    Sie können spenden an:

    MedEquali Deutschland e.V.
    https://medequali.de
    IBAN: DE05 4306 0967 1046 4829 00
    GLS Bank eG

    Cölber Arbeitskreis Flüchtlinge
    https://facebook.com/CAFCoelbe
    Zahlungszweck: Weihnachtsspende
    IBAN: DE12 5335 0000 0038 0007 64
    Sparkasse Marburg-Biedenkopf

    Mitwirkende
    Konzeption und Idee: Johanna Bank, Mareike Hilbrig, Lydia Katzenberger, Friederike Monninger, Kim Siekmann
    Autorinnen und Sprecherinnen: Mareike Hilbrig, Lydia Katzenberger, Friederike Monninger
    Schnitt: Johanna Bank
    Marburger Vokalensemble:
    Sopran: Friederike Monninger, Kim Siekmann, Gertrud Monninger-Wolff
    Alt: Claudia Heidl, Lotte Jacobs, Lydia Katzenberger
    Tenor: Jakob Huelsmann, Manuel Wagner
    Bass: Matthias Rutt, Jörg Schlimmermann, Matthias Vogt
    Leitung: Mareike Hilbrig
    Klavier: Claudia Meinardus-Brehm
    Frauenkammerchor Marburg, Leitung: Mareike Hilbrig
    Tonaufnahme: Frank Wagner

    Dank

    Danke an Kurt Bunke und dem Cölber Arbeitskreis Flüchtlinge e.V. für die große Unterstützung dieses Projekts.
    Danke an den Frauenkammerchor Marburg und Claudia Meinardus-Brehm für die Bereitstellung der Aufnahmen des Konzertmitschnitts vom März 2020.
    Danke an Henrike Monninger für die Gestaltung des Designs.
    Danke ans Archiv Frau und Musik für die Unterstützung bei der Veröffentlichung. Alle Musikstücke des Podcasts stammen aus der Feder von Komponistinnen (nur beim Hilde-Domin-Kanon ist die komponierende Person unbekannt). Erna Wolls Zyklus war auch Gegenstand der digitalen Chorprobe bei den „Digitalen Chorfachtagen“ des Archivs im Herbst 2020, die ebenfalls auf dem Archiv-Youtube-Kanal zu finden ist.
    Gefördert wurde das „Wohin?“-Projekt vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst.

    Weiterführende Links
    https://medequali.de
    https://facebook.com/CAFCoelbe
    https://archiv-frau-musik.de
    https://frauen-kammerchor-marburg.de
    https://mittelhessischer-landbote.de

    Kontakt: Mareike Hilbrig, Email-Adresse: Frauen-Kammerchor-Marburg@web.de

    Musik

    Maria Teresa D’Agnesi Pinottini (1729-1795), Sonata prima per il Cembalo (Ausschnitte)
    Klavier: Claudia Meinardus-Brehm, März 2020

    Erna Woll (1917 - 2005), Wohin ich immer reise (Ausschnitte aus dem Chorzyklus)
    Text: Mascha Kaléko (1907 – 1975)
    Probenmitschnitt vom 18.10.2020 mit dem Marburger Vokalensemble
    Aufnahme: Frank Wagner
    I.
    Wohin ich immer reise, ich fahr nach Nirgendland.
    Die Koffer voll von Sehnsucht, die Hände voll von Tand.
    So einsam wie der Wüstenwind, so heimatlos wie Sand:
    Wohin ich immer reise, ich komm nach Nirgendland.

    Die Wälder sind verschwunden, die Häuser sind verbrannt.
    Hab keinen mehr gefunden, hat keiner mich erkannt.
    Und als der fremde Vogel schrie, bin ich davongerannt.
    Wohin ich immer reise, ich komm nach Nirgendland.

    II.
    Jage die Ängste fort und die Angst vor den Ängsten.
    Für die paar Jahre wird wohl alles noch reichen.
    Das Brot im Kasten und der Anzug im Schrank.

    Sage nicht mein. Es ist dir alles geliehen.
    Lebe auf Zeit und sieh, wie wenig du brauchst.
    Richte dich ein und halte den Koffer bereit.

    III.
    (...)
    So weht wohl auch die Landschaft unsres Lebens
    an uns vorbei zu einem andern Stern
    und ist im Nahekommen uns schon fern...
    „Lieb Heimatland, lieb Heimatland, lieb Heimatland ade...“

    Abbie Betinis (*1980), Be like the bird
    Text: Victor Hugo
    Solo: Kim Siekmann, Nov. 2020

    Be like the bird that, pausing in her flight a while on boughs too slight, feels them give way beneath her, and sings and sings, knowing she hath wings.

    Anonymus, Nicht müde werden
    Text: Hilde Domin (1909 – 2006)
    Solo: Matthias Vogt, Nov. 2020

    Nicht müde werden, sondern dem Wunder leise wie einem Vogel die Hand hinhalten.

    Susan LaBarr (*1981), Hope is the thing with Feathers
    Text: Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886)
    Konzertmitschnitt: Frauenkammerchor Marburg, März 2020

    Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul
    and sings the tune without the words and never stops at all.
    And sweetest in the gale is heard and sore must be the storm
    that could abash the little bird that kept so many warm.

    I’ve heard it in the chillest land and on the strangest sea,
    yet never in extremity it asked a crumb of me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch

    #podcast #audio #migration #Europe #covid-19 #refugee #music #art #choir #song #testimony

    ping @cdb_77

  • Thousands of #refugees in #mental_health crisis after years on #Greek islands

    One in three on Aegean isles have contemplated suicide amid EU containment policies, report reveals

    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/b1b9c9d90a1caa8f531cc8964d98aa5f334fc711/0_212_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?width=605&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=22c1d9db8c2a5087

    Years of entrapment on Aegean islands has resulted in a mental health crisis for thousands of refugees, with one in three contemplating suicide, a report compiled by psychosocial support experts has revealed.

    Containment policies pursued by the EU have also spurred ever more people to attempt to end their lives, according to the report released by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) on Thursday.

    “Research reveals consistent accounts of severe mental health conditions,” says the report, citing data collated over the past two and a half years on Lesbos, Samos and Chios.

    Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and self-harm “among people of all ages and backgrounds” have emerged as byproducts of the hopelessness and despair on Europe’s eastern borderlands, it says.

    “As many as three out of four of the people the IRC has assisted through its mental health programme on the three islands reported experiencing symptoms such as sleeping problems, depression and anxiety,” its authors wrote.

    “One in three reported suicidal thoughts, while one in five reported having made attempts to take their lives.”

    In a year upended by coronavirus and disastrous fires on Lesbos – about 13,000 asylum seekers were temporarily displaced after the destruction of Moria, the island’s infamous holding centre – psychologists concluded that the humanitarian situation on the outposts had worsened considerably.

    The mental health toll had been aggravated by lockdown measures that had kept men, women and children confined to facilities for much of 2020, they said.

    Previously, residents in Moria, Europe’s biggest refugee camp before its destruction, had participated in football games outside the facility and other group activities.

    Noting that the restrictions were stricter for refugees and migrants than those applied elsewhere in Greece, IRC support teams found a marked deterioration in the mental wellbeing of people in the camps since rolling lockdowns were enforced in March.

    “Research demonstrates how the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic further exacerbated the suffering of already vulnerable asylum seekers and exposed the many flaws in Europe’s asylum and reception system,” the report says.

    Over the year there has been a rise in the proportion of people disclosing psychotic symptoms, from one in seven to one in four. Disclosures of self-harm have increased by 66%.

    The IRC, founded by Albert Einstein in 1933 and now led by the former British foreign secretary David Miliband, said the findings offered more evidence of the persistent political and policy failures at Greek and EU level.

    Five years after authorities scrambled to establish reception and identification centres, or hotspots, on the frontline isles at the start of the refugee crisis, about 15,000 men, women and children remain stranded in the installations.

    Describing conditions in the camps as dangerous and inhumane, the IRC said residents were still denied access to sufficient water, sanitation, shelter and vital services such as healthcare, education and legal assistance to process asylum claims.

    On Lesbos, the island most often targeted by traffickers working along the Turkish coast, government figures this week showed an estimated 7,319 men, women and children registered in a temporary camp erected in response to an emergency that has been blamed on arsonists.

    Three months after the fires, more than 5,000 people have been transferred to the mainland, according to Greek authorities.

    Of that number, more than 800 were relocated to the EU, including 523 children who had made the journey to Europe alone and were also held in Moria.

    Many had hoped the new camp would be a vast improvement on Moria, whose appalling conditions and severe overcrowding earned it global notoriety as a humanitarian disaster.

    But the new facility, located on a former firing range within metres of the sea, has drawn condemnation from locals and NGOs.

    “The winds hit it, the rains hit it and there’s no shade, which is why this place is unsuitable for any camp to be,” the island’s mayor, Stratis Kitilis, said.

    “It’s right next door to all the warehouses, transport companies and supermarkets that keep Lesbos going. No one wants it there.”

    This month the EU announced it was working with Athens’ centre-right administration to replace the installation with a modern structure that will open next September. New reception and identification centres will also be built on Samos, Kos and Lesbos. “They say it’ll be nothing like Moria and will be more of a transfer stop, but late next year is a very long time,” said Kitilis.

    Kiki Michailidou, the psychologist in charge of the IRC’s psychosocial support programmes on Lesbos, agreed that the conditions were far from dignified.

    As winter approached, camp residents were resorting to ever more desperate measures to keep warm, she said, while also being forced to stand in long queues for food and communal toilets.

    With camp managers moving families into giant tents, social distancing remains elusive. “A lot of people fear the unknown again,” Michailidou said.

    “Moria was terrible but it was also a familiar place, somewhere they called their home. After the fires they lost their point of reference and that has had a significant impact on their mental health too.”

    The IRC report calls for European policymakers to learn from past failings. While the EU’s new pact on asylum and migration is a step in the right direction, it says, it still falls short of the bloc managing migration in a humane and effective way.

    Echoing that sentiment, Michailidou said: “After the fires we saw what could happen. There were transfers to the mainland and children were relocated to other parts of Europe. That’s proof that where there’s political will and coordinated action, the lives of people in these camps can be transformed.”

    #suicide #island #migration #EU

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/dec/17/thousands-refugees-mental-crisis-years-greek-islands

  • Dans les Alpes, migrants et bénévoles face à une police aux frontières renforcée

    En novembre, Emmanuel Macron a doublé les effectifs de la police aux frontières "contre la menace terroriste". Des renforts auxquels se heurtent quotidiennement associations et exilés.

    C’est pour notre “protection commune”, assure Emmanuel Macron. Dans la foulée des attentats terroristes de Conflans-Sainte-Honorine et de Nice, le président de la République annonçait le 5 novembre rien de moins qu’un doublement des effectifs de la police aux frontières.

    À Montgenèvre (Hautes-Alpes), par exemple, une soixantaine de policiers, de gendarmes réservistes et même de militaires de l’opération Sentinelle sont arrivés en renfort ces dernières semaines, selon la préfecture.

    Comme vous pouvez le voir dans notre reportage vidéo ci-dessus, cette forte présence policière n’est pas sans conséquence sur les dizaines d’exilés, dont de nombreux demandeurs d’asile, qui tentent chaque jour de franchir au péril de leur vie ce point montagneux de la frontière franco-italienne, ni sur les associations qui leur portent assistance.

    Samedi 5 décembre, notre caméra a pu suivre sur le terrain l’association Tous migrants, dont deux bénévoles ont récemment été interpellés lors d’une maraude et convoqués devant le tribunal de Gap pour “aide à l’entrée” d’un couple d’Afghans.

    "On sait que des policiers ont bien conscience que ce qu’on leur demande de faire est inhumain."
    #Michel_Rousseau, association Tous migrants

    Signe supplémentaire que ce “#délit_de_solidarité” persiste, deux bénévoles ont une fois de plus été interpellés lors de notre reportage, alors qu’ils portaient assistance à une dizaine de migrants afghans, iraniens et maliens côté français. Soupçonnés “d’aide à l’entrée sur le territoire de personne en situation irrégulière”, ils ont reçu une convocation pour une audition libre 48 heures plus tard.

    Selon nos informations, les deux maraudeurs n’ont finalement fait l’objet d’aucune poursuite, mais ont vu leurs empreintes et photos récoltées par les autorités. Depuis notre tournage, quatre autres maraudeurs ont encore été convoqués par la police, pour un total de six bénévoles auditionnés en à peine une semaine.
    Des rétentions au cadre légal flou

    Avant leur renvoi aux autorités italiennes, les migrants interpellés en montagne sont emmenés dans des bâtiments préfabriqués (type Algeco) situés derrière le poste-frontière de Montgenèvre, comme vous pouvez le voir également dans notre reportage en tête d’article.

    Utilisé aussi à Menton, ce type de lieu de rétention sans cadre légal précis est dénoncé en justice par des associations et ONG. Ces derniers y réclament le droit de pouvoir y accéder pour porter une assistance aux demandeurs d’asile, comme dans les centres de rétention ou les zones d’attente (ZA) des aéroports internationaux.

    “On est dans un État de droit. Quand il y a privation de libertés, il y a une base légale et les gens maintenus ont des droits prévus par la loi. Et là, il n’y a rien”, regrette Gérard Sadik, responsable de la commission Asile de La Cimade.

    En ce qui concerne Menton, le tribunal administratif de Nice a d’ailleurs suspendu le 30 novembre dernier une décision du préfet des Alpes-Maritimes “refusant l’accès aux constructions modulaires attenantes au poste de la police aux frontières aux représentantes de l’association nationale d’assistance aux frontières pour les étrangers (Anafé) et de l’association Médecins du Monde”. En outre, la justice évoque plusieurs manquements aux droits des demandeurs d’asile :

    “Le juge relève que quotidiennement, de nombreuses personnes sont retenues dans ces locaux munis de système de fermeture et de surveillance vidéo, dans des conditions précaires, pour de nombreuses heures, notamment la nuit lorsque le poste de police italien est fermé, qu’elles sont mises dans l’impossibilité de partir librement de ces locaux et d’obtenir au cours de la période de ‘maintien’ une assistance médicale, juridique ou administrative des associations.”

    Une “fabrique des indésirables”

    Contactée par Le HuffPost, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes évoque sobrement des “locaux de mise à l’abri proposés sans contrainte”, le temps de procéder à des “vérifications” et “aménagés dans l’unique objectif de préserver tant leur dignité, en proposant un lieu de repos (avec chauffage, couvertures, mobiliers, nourriture), que leur vie, afin de ne pas soumettre ces personnes non admises à un retour par leurs propres moyens”.

    À notre micro, Michel Rousseau, Briançonnais et bénévole de la première heure de Tous migrants, y voit plutôt une “fabrique des indésirables”. Tout en ajoutant : “Mais on ne veut pas être dans la caricature. On sait que des policiers ont bien conscience que ce qu’on leur demande de faire est inhumain. On compte sur eux pour que les droits fondamentaux triomphent”.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/dans-les-alpes-migrants-et-benevoles-face-a-une-police-aux-frontieres
    #vidéo #Tous_Migrants #maraudes #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Hautes-Alpes #Briançon #France #Italie #frontières #militarisation_des_frontières #solidarité #maraudes_solidaires #hiver #vidéo

    • (reportage de 2018, je mets ici pour archivage)

      Migrants, l’odyssée des marcheurs de l’extrême – Episode 1 : Mamadou

      Face à l’afflux des passages de la frontière, une solidarité montagnarde s’est installée dans le Briançonnais. Le but ? Secourir les migrants en difficulté. Radio Parleur vous propose une série de cinq reportages dédiés au passage des migrants à travers les Hautes-Alpes. Dans ce premier épisode, place à l’histoire de Mamadou, qui a traversé la frontière italo-française en passant par le col de l’Échelle, un soir de mars.

      Depuis le début de l’année, près de 2 000 réfugiés ou exilés, migrants, seraient arrivés en France, en traversant la frontière avec l’Italie. En passant par les Alpes, les cols alentours, et dans des conditions extrêmes, au péril de leur vie. Mamadou commence son odyssée en 2010, loin, très loin des Alpes. Fils d’un père boucher, il quitte son pays, le Mali, suite aux attaques menées par les touaregs qui combattent pour le contrôle du nord du pays.
      Du Mali à la Place des Fêtes, à Paris

      En 2011, alors que plusieurs de ses amis viennent de mourir dans un attentat sur un marché, il prend la décision de fuir. Passé par l’Algérie, il arrive finalement en Libye et monte dans un canot pneumatique à Tripoli. Sauvé de la noyade par les gardes-côtes italiens, on lui délivre à Naples un titre de séjour et un passeport Schengen.

      Il décide alors de rejoindre son oncle, qui travaille à Paris. Les petits boulots s’enchainent : boucher durant deux ans, puis vendeur pendant un an sur les marchés de Place des Fêtes et de Daumesnil, dans les 20ème et 12ème arrondissements parisiens.
      Repasser par l’Italie pour faire renouveler son titre de séjour

      A l’hiver 2016, Mamadou est obligé de retourner en Italie pour faire renouveler ses titres de séjour. On lui en accorde un, d’une durée de cinq ans, mais son passeport, lui, n’est pas encore prêt. À cause de son travail, Mamadou doit pourtant rentrer à Paris et ne peut attendre. Il décide de prendre le train à Milan, avant de se faire contrôler en gare de Modane, dix kilomètres après la frontière.

      Là, les policiers français lui expliquent que, sans son passeport, ils sont obligés de lui refuser l’entrée en France. Mamadou a beau leur assurer que sa demande est en cours et qu’il doit retourner travailler à Paris, d’où il vient, les agents lui répondent que ce n’est pas leur problème. Il est arrêté, ainsi qu’Ousmane, un autre exilé de 17 ans qui l’accompagne. Les deux garçons, migrants à ce moment-là, sont reconduits, en traversant la frontière, en Italie.
      Migrants : l’odyssée dramatique des marcheurs de l’extrême – Episode 1

      « Je ne savais pas que la neige pouvait brûler »

      À la gare de Bardonecchia, les deux jeunes gens ne connaissent personne. Mais ils sont déterminés à passer la frontière, comme d’autres migrants. Mamadou se renseigne sur l’itinéraire à prendre pour rejoindre la France auprès d’un italien. Celui-ci lui indique une route qui passe par le col de l’Échelle. Celui-ci culmine à 1762 mètres d’altitude.

      Le col de l’Échelle est fermé à la circulation l’hiver. En fonction de l’enneigement, cette fermeture peut durer de décembre jusqu’à mai. Nous sommes le 5 mars, il est 16h : il fait froid et il neige. Bien que peu couverts, en jean et en baskets, les deux jeunes décident néanmoins de franchir la montagne à pied.

      https://radioparleur.net/2018/06/04/migrants-solidaires-frontiere-episode-1

      #audio #son #podcast

    • Migrants, l’odyssée des marcheurs de l’extrême – Épisode 2 : Une #solidarité en actes

      Des milliers de réfugié·es ou d’exilé·es arrivent en France en provenance d’Italie. Ils et elles traversent la frontière par les cols des Alpes, dans des conditions extrêmes, avec un risque mortel. Face à cet afflux et à ces dangers, une solidarité montagnarde s’est installée dans le Briançonnais dans le but de secourir les migrant·es en difficulté. Dans ce deuxième épisode, Radio Parleur vous propose de découvrir trois portraits d’accueillant·es : un membre d’association, un pisteur en montagne ou une simple habitante de la #vallée_de_la_Clarée.

      Face aux risques que courent les migrants pour traverser la frontière, des habitant·es du Briançonnais, de #Névache et de #Montgenèvre se mobilisent par solidarité. Tout·es craignent de retrouver des cadavres au printemps et de voir la montagne se transformer en un gigantesque cimetière à ciel ouvert avec la fonte des neiges. Le 25 mai 2019, du côté italien du col de l’Échelle, un promeneur a découvert le corps d’« un homme à la peau sombre » inanimé, près d’un torrent. Le corps, en état de décomposition avancée, n’a pas pu être identifié, selon le journal italien La Stampa.

      Secourir les migrant·es en difficulté, par solidarité

      Bravant le froid et les contrôles accrus de la PAF (Police Aux Frontières), les bénévoles continuent. Épuisé·es et en colère face à un État qui, selon elleux, les laisse seul·es gérer l’urgence. C’est une armée de volontaires : ancien·nes militant·es, syndicalistes, anarchistes et libertaires, catholiques à la fibre sociale, mais aussi simples habitant·es de la vallée. Certain·es ne s’étaient jamais engagé·es par solidarité jusque-là. Mais tous et toutes ont prit le relais d’un État jugé déficient.

      Bruno Jonnard habite à Névache, la plus haute commune de la vallée de la Clarée, depuis maintenant quinze ans. Artisan l’été, il travaille comme dameur et pisteur l’hiver. Il assure des interventions comme pompier volontaire. Avec ses 361 habitant·es, Névache est le village le plus proche du col de l’Échelle. Un col dangereux et difficile d’accès par où passent les migrant·es qui franchissent la frontière franco-italienne.

      Murielle* habite à Montgenèvre où elle dirige un commerce. A quelques centaines de mètre, le col du même nom, et surtout la frontière franco-italienne. Mais aussi le poste de la Police Aux Frontières (PAF) d’où partent les patrouilles qui surveillent ce second point de passage pour les migrant·es.

      Michel Rousseau habite à Briançon. Ancien syndicaliste aujourd’hui à la retraite, il est le porte-parole de l’association Tous Migrants. L’association, sans étiquette politique, religieuse ou institutionnelle, créée en 2015, exprime l’indignation collective face au drame humanitaire vécu par les migrants en Europe. C’est aussi dans le chef-lieu de la vallée de la Clarée, que se situe le refuge solidaire de l’association pour les migrant·es.

      https://radioparleur.net/2018/06/05/montagnes-solidarite-migrants-marcheurs-odyssee-episode-2

    • Migrants, l’odyssée des marcheurs de l’extrême – Episode 3 : #Maraude en montagne

      Face à l’afflux des passages de la frontière, une solidarité montagnarde s’est installée dans le Briançonnais. Le but ? Secourir les migrants en difficulté. Radio Parleur vous propose une série de cinq reportages dédiés au passage des migrants à travers les Hautes-Alpes. Dans ce troisième épisode, Radio Parleur vous propose de partir au cœur d’une maraude en haute-montagne, avec Vincent et Emily*, bénévoles à l’association #Tous_Migrants.

      Dans les Hautes-Alpes, les migrants qui souhaitent rejoindre la France traversent régulièrement la frontière franco-italienne par la montagne. Ils passent par les cols de l’Echelle, à 1762 mètres d’altitude, et de Montgenèvre, à 1850 mètres d’altitude. Les conditions y sont extrêmement difficiles : températures qui descendent parfois en dessous de moins 20 degrés, passages par des zones difficiles d’accès et le plus souvent de nuit, avec les patrouilles de la #Police_Aux_Frontières (#PAF) et de la #Police_Nationale.

      Secourir les migrants en difficulté dans la montagne

      C’est pourquoi des professionnels de la montagne, des bénévoles, ou parfois de simples habitants de la région, s’organisent. Ils effectuent chaque soir des maraudes en altitude pour secourir les migrants en difficulté. Commençant autour de 21h, elles finissent tard dans la nuit. « Ça fait partie de la culture montagnarde : on ne laisse personne en difficulté sur le côté du chemin, là-haut », assure Vincent, habitant et pizzaiolo qui participe à la maraude.

      Parfois, ce sont jusqu’à douze ou quinze personnes par soir, qui tentent de passer. Il faut ensuite redescendre et parvenir jusqu’au #Refuge_Solidaire installé à Briançon. Là, suite à un accord avec la communauté de communes et la gendarmerie nationale, les migrant·e·s ne sont pas inquiété·e·s tant qu’ils ne s’éloignent pas du refuge installé dans une ancienne caserne de #CRS.

      https://radioparleur.net/2018/06/08/episode-3-maraude-montagne-migrants-detresse-solidaires

      Pour écouter le #podcast :
      https://podcast.ausha.co/radio-parleur/migrants-l-odyssee-des-marcheurs-de-l-extreme-episode-3-maraude-en-mon

      #maraudes

    • Dans les Alpes, les associations d’aide aux migrants se disent « harcelées » par la Police aux frontières

      L’association Tous Migrants qui vient en aide aux exilés qui traversent les Alpes pour rejoindre la France, s’inquiète du #harcèlement_policier dont elle se dit victime. Arrêtés pendant les #maraudes en montagne, à Briançon, les membres de l’association se plaignent des très nombreuses #amendes qu’ils reçoivent, disent-ils, pour non-respect du couvre-feu. Et s’inquiètent du sort des migrants interceptés par la Police aux frontières.

      « La situation est ubuesque ». C’est avec ces mots qu’Agnès Antoine, membre de Tous migrants, dans la ville de Briançon, au pied des Alpes françaises, évoque les maraudes de son association. « Il fait -15 degrés, les exilés risquent leur vie pour traverser la montagne et arriver en France et au lieu de les aider, nous sommes harcelés ». L’association reproche aux forces de l’ordre et aux membres de la Police aux frontières (PAF) de les entraver dans leur #aide_humanitaire.

      « Depuis le 6 janvier, nous avons déjà récolté une trentaine d’amendes pendant nos maraudes de soirées pour non-respect du #couvre-feu », explique-t-elle. Les associations sont pourtant autorisées à prolonger leurs activités au-delà de 20h avec une #attestation. Les bénévoles assurent que les forces de l’ordre n’en ont que faire.


      https://twitter.com/LoupBureau/status/1351629698565103625
      « Respect des règles »

      « Les #contrôles_arbitraires, notifications d’amendes, #auditions_libres et autres pressions envers les citoyens et citoyennes qui chaque soir essaient de porter assistance aux exilé(e)s se sont multipliés », peut-on lire dans un communiqué publié par Tous Migrants et Médecins du monde. « La nuit du 8 janvier 2021, j’ai été contrôlé quatre fois par deux équipes de gendarmes alors que je maraudais dans Montgenèvre. Cette même soirée, j’ai été notifié de trois amendes alors que j’étais en possession de mon ordre de mission et de mon attestation dérogatoire de déplacement délivrés par l’association Tous Migrants », ajoutent les auteurs du texte.

      Contactée par InfoMigrants, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes se défend de harcèlement et de contrôles abusifs. « Les services chargés du contrôle aux frontières agissent dans le respect des règles de droit et des personnes qu’elles contrôlent », explique-t-elle dans un communiqué. « Concernant les maraudes exercées pendant le couvre-feu, les salariés et bénévoles peuvent se déplacer entre 18h et 6h pour l’aide aux personnes précaires en présentant une attestation professionnelle fournie par l’association. Il appartient à l’autorité de police verbalisatrice d’apprécier la validité des documents qui lui sont présentés. »


      https://twitter.com/DamienCAREME/status/1337458498146222082

      « La PAF nous demande de venir chercher des migrants dans leurs locaux »

      Pour Agnès Antoine, le comportement de la police est surtout incompréhensible. « Ils nous harcèlent et dans le même temps, ils nous demandent de les aider, de venir chercher des migrants quand ils sont dans les locaux de la PAF. Parce qu’ils ne savent pas quoi faire d’eux. C’est vraiment dingue ».

      Dernier exemple en date, dans la nuit du vendredi 15 janvier au samedi 16 janvier. Vingt-deux migrants, Iraniens et Afghans, dont des enfants et un nouveau-né, sont interceptés par la police dans la montagne puis emmenés dans les locaux de la PAF. Selon Tous Migrants, « toutes les personnes arrêtées ont reçu des OQTF et des IRTF délivrées par la préfète ». Après les avoir interrogés, la PAF a appelé l’association. « Ils nous ont demandé de venir pour nous en occuper », soupire-t-elle.
      De plus en plus de familles parmi les exilés

      L’association reproche également aux forces de l’ordre de bafouer les droits des migrants. « L’État militarise la frontière, traque les exilé(e)s et les reconduit quasi systématiquement en Italie sans même vérifier s’ils souhaitent demander l’asile en France », écrivent-ils encore dans leur communiqué.

      Selon Tous Migrants, le profil des exilés traversant les Alpes a changé ces derniers mois. Auparavant, les personnes secourues étaient majoritairement des hommes, en provenance d’Afrique de l’Ouest « qui remontaient l’Italie depuis le sud avant de traverser les Alpes ». Aujourd’hui, les migrants sont davantage des familles venues du Moyen-Orient. « Elles arrivent de Slovénie, passent par Trieste (dans le nord de l’Italie), et arrivent aux Alpes », explique Agnès Antoine. « Ce sont beaucoup de familles avec des femmes enceintes, des enfants et même des bébés en bas âge ».

      Depuis le mois de septembre 2020, les maraudes ont permis de porter assistance à 196 personnes, écrivent les bénévoles de l’association.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/29725/dans-les-alpes-les-associations-d-aide-aux-migrants-se-disent-harcelee

    • « A la frontière franco-italienne, l’Etat commet des violations quotidiennes des droits humains »

      Au nom de la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière, la #militarisation_de_la_montagne n’est qu’un geste vain de l’Etat, alertent l’anthropologue #Didier_Fassin et le médecin #Alfred_Spira.

      Tribune. Toutes les #nuits, dans les Hautes-Alpes, au col de Montgenèvre, des hommes, des femmes et des enfants en provenance du Moyen-Orient, d’Afrique subsaharienne ou du Maghreb tentent de passer à pied d’Italie en France, dans la neige et le froid. Toutes les nuits, puissamment équipés, des agents de la police aux frontières et des gendarmes dépêchés sur place s’efforcent de les en empêcher et de les reconduire de l’autre côté de la frontière. Toutes les nuits, des bénévoles font des #maraudes pour porter assistance à ceux qui, une fois sur le territoire français, essaient d’échapper à leur arrestation.

      Cette étrange dramaturgie se reproduit depuis quatre ans, et, si les hivers sont particulièrement dangereux, certains des accidents les plus tragiques se sont produits en #été : il n’est pas de période sûre pour les exilés qui se perdent ou se blessent dans cette voie par laquelle ils espèrent obtenir la protection de la France ou poursuivre plus loin leur périple. Ajoutons à ce tableau la présence de deux compagnies de policiers et de gendarmes chargés du secours en haute montagne qui, en conformité avec leur noble mission, sont parfois paradoxalement conduits à intervenir pour aider des exilés qui fuient leurs collègues.

      Leur action se fait au nom du contrôle de l’immigration, et le président de la République a récemment ordonné un doublement des forces de l’ordre qui gardent les frontières.

      Mais cette impressionnante mobilisation se révèle à la fois disproportionnée et inefficace, comme le reconnaît un haut fonctionnaire préfectoral. Disproportionnée, car elle ne concerne que 2 000 à 3 000 passages par an. Inefficace, car celles et ceux qui sont reconduits retentent inlassablement leur chance jusqu’à ce qu’ils réussissent.

      La véritable conséquence du déploiement de ce dispositif est de contraindre les exilés à emprunter des chemins de plus en plus périlleux, sources de #chutes, de #blessures et de #gelures. Plusieurs #décès ont été enregistrés, des #amputations ont dû être réalisées. La militarisation de la montagne n’est ainsi qu’un geste vain de l’Etat, dont le principal résultat est la #mise_en_danger des exilés, souvent des familles.

      « #Délit_de_solidarité »

      Geste d’ailleurs d’autant plus vain qu’il est difficile d’imaginer que des personnes qui ont quitté un pays où ils n’étaient pas en sécurité pourraient y retourner. Les uns ont fait des milliers de kilomètres sur la route des Balkans, y ont été enfermés dans des camps infâmes sur des îles grecques ou ont subi les violences des policiers et des miliciens croates.

      Les autres ont franchi le Sahara où ils ont été dépouillés de leurs biens par des gangs avant d’arriver en Libye, où ils ont été détenus, torturés et libérés contre rançon, puis de traverser la Méditerranée sur des embarcations précaires et surchargées. Il est difficile d’imaginer que ces exilés puissent renoncer à cet ultime obstacle, fût-il rendu hasardeux par l’action de la police et de la gendarmerie.

      C’est pourquoi l’activité des maraudeurs est cruciale. Les premiers d’entre eux, il y a quatre ans, étaient des habitants de la région pour lesquels il était impensable de laisser des personnes mourir en montagne sans assistance. « #Pas_en_notre_nom » était leur cri de ralliement et l’intitulé de leur association, qui est devenue un peu plus tard Tous Migrants, récompensée en 2019 par un prix des droits de l’homme remis par la garde des sceaux. Très vite, ils ont été rejoints par des #bénévoles venus de toute la France et même de plus loin, certains étant des professionnels de santé intervenant au nom de #Médecins_du_monde.

      Ces maraudeurs qui essaient de mettre à l’#abri les exilés ayant franchi la frontière dans des conditions extrêmes ont à leur tour été réprimés. Bien que censuré par le Conseil constitutionnel en 2018, au nom du principe supérieur de fraternité, le « délit de solidarité » continue à donner lieu à des #interpellations et parfois à des #poursuites.

      Nous avons nous-mêmes récemment été, en tant que médecins, les témoins de ces pratiques. L’un de nous a fait l’objet, avec son accompagnateur, d’un long contrôle d’identité et de véhicule qui les a empêchés de porter secours, quelques mètres plus loin, à une dizaine de personnes transies, dont une femme âgée qui paraissait présenter des troubles cardiaques. Alors qu’ils insistaient devant le poste de police sur les risques encourus par cette personne et rappelaient la condamnation de la police aux frontières pour refus de laisser les organisations humanitaires pénétrer leurs locaux pour dispenser une assistance médicale et juridique, ils se sont fait vigoureusement éconduire.

      Double contradiction

      Un autre a pu, quelques jours plus tard, mettre à l’abri deux adultes avec quatre enfants qui venaient de franchir la frontière par − 15 °C ; il s’est alors rendu compte que deux fillettes étaient sans leurs parents qui avaient, eux, été interpellés ; revenu au poste-frontière pour solliciter la libération du père et de la mère au nom de l’#intérêt_supérieur_des_enfants de ne pas être séparés de leur famille, il n’a obtenu celle-ci qu’au prix d’une audition par un officier de police judiciaire, après avoir été fallacieusement accusé d’#aide_à_l’entrée_irrégulière_sur_le_territoire, #délit puni de cinq ans d’emprisonnement et de 30 000 euros d’amende.

      Dans les jours qui ont suivi ces deux épisodes, tous les maraudeurs ont fait l’objet d’un #harcèlement non justifié des #forces_de_l’ordre, avec jusqu’à six contrôles et trois #contraventions par personne certains soirs.

      Tous les policiers et les gendarmes n’adhèrent pas à ces pratiques. Certains vont jusqu’à féliciter les maraudeurs pour leurs actions. Ils sont d’autant plus légitimes à le faire qu’au nom de la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière le gouvernement viole les #droits_humains, lorsque ses agents insultent, volent et frappent des exilés, comme des décisions judiciaires l’ont établi, et qu’il enfreint la législation lorsque les exilés ne sont pas autorisés à demander l’asile à la frontière. Parfois, les mineurs non accompagnés se voient refoulés, ce que condamne la justice.

      On aboutit à cette double contradiction : garant de la loi, l’Etat y contrevient au moment même où il sanctionne celles et ceux venus lui demander sa protection ; promoteur des valeurs de la République, il punit celles et ceux qui se réclament de la fraternité. Ces violations des droits humains et ces infractions à la législation contribuent à la crise humanitaire, sécuritaire et sanitaire, contre laquelle le devoir éthique de tout citoyen est d’agir, comme nous le faisons, pacifiquement et dans le strict respect de la loi.

      Didier Fassin est professeur à l’Institut d’études avancées de Princeton et titulaire de la chaire annuelle « santé publique » au Collège de France ; Alfred Spira est professeur honoraire de santé publique à la faculté de médecine de Paris-Saclay et membre de l’Académie nationale de médecine. Tous deux sont occasionnellement maraudeurs bénévoles pour l’association Médecins du monde.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2021/01/28/a-la-frontiere-franco-italienne-l-etat-commet-des-violations-quotidiennes-de
      #nuit #hiver #efficacité #proportionnalité #inefficacité

  • Semer le trouble. #Soulèvements, #subversions, #refuges

    On étouffe. La situation n’est pas tenable. Nous courons à la catastrophe. L’effet de sidération paralyse les velléités d’action. Ce contre quoi nous avons des raisons de nous insurger semble se fondre dans un même mouvement global, une lame de fond irrépressible. Quels moyens possédons-nous pour semer le trouble dans la mécanique des rapports de domination ? Ce numéro fait appel à notre expérience collective des techniques de lutte et enquête sur les foyers de résistance qui s’élaborent et opposent aux gouvernementalités de nouvelles priorités, d’autres perspectives. Les collectifs travaillent leurs outils autant que leurs convictions ; ils suspendent le temps, par adaptation ou détournement de choses et de dispositifs. Comment la « mésentente », qui vient troubler l’idylle consensuelle de la politique, se trouve-t-elle instruite et équipée par les gestes et les instruments propres aux mouvements de lutte ?
    Ce numéro est élaboré dans le contexte de la mobilisation contre des réformes qui mettent en danger la vitalité de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche. Par cette matérialisation, en revue, d’un désaccord têtu, Techniques&Culture propose un répertoire non exhaustif des actions qui sèment et cultivent le trouble.

    https://journals.openedition.org/tc/14102

    Sommaire :

    Annabel Vallard, Sandrine Ruhlmann et Gil Bartholeyns
    Faire lutte

    Matthieu Duperrex et Mikaëla Le Meur
    Matières à friction et techniques de lutte [Texte intégral]
    –—
    Voies du #soulèvement

    François Jarrige
    #Sabotage, un essai d’archéologie au xixe siècle

    Maxime Boidy
    Qu’est-ce qu’un #bloc en politique ?

    Violaine Chevrier
    Occuper et marquer l’#espace. Des « #cortèges_de_tête » aux #Gilets_jaunes à #Marseille

    –—
    Fragments de lutte

    Başak Ertür
    La #barricade

    Lucille Gallardo
    Simuler et politiser la mort : le #die-in

    Claire Richard
    Les #Young_Lords et l’offensive des #poubelles

    Thomas Billet, Leny Dourado et Agnès Jeanjean
    La #colère des #blouses_blanches

    Sandra Revolon
    #Game_of_Thrones

    Magdalena Inés Pérez Balbi
    « Que le pays soit leur prison ». Les #escraches contre les génocidaires en #Argentine

    Yann Philippe Tastevin
    Le pneu au piquet

    –—

    #Arts de la subversion

    Catherine Flood
    #Disobedient_Objects. Exposition indisciplinée

    Umberto Cao
    « Résistances électriques » Le mouvement “Luz y Fuerza del Pueblo” au #Chiapas (Mexique)

    Lucie Dupré
    Faire lutte de tout arbre

    Thomas Golsenne
    Politiques de la #craftification

    –—

    Fragments de lutte

    Zoé Carle
    Affiche-action ! La longue histoire des luttes contre le #logement_indigne à Marseille

    Élisabeth Lebovici
    « Je suis… Et vous… »

    Jean-Paul Fourmentraux
    La #sous-veillance, Paolo Cirio

    Nicolas Nova et Félicien Goguey
    Le #black_fax et ses dérivés

    Pierre-Olivier Dittmar
    Du mur de post-it à l’ex-voto. Les signes publics des #émotions_politiques

    Mikaëla Le Meur
    À cause de #Macron. La #désobéissance en kit

    Georges Favraud
    Du #conflit public à la force des intériorités. Stratégies taoïstes de la lutte

    –—

    Refuges et pratiques réparatrices

    Perrine Poupin
    Prendre soin des manifestants. Les #street-medics dans le mouvement des Gilets jaunes

    Joanne Clavel et Camille Noûs
    #Planetary_Dance d’#Anna_Halprin. Étoile d’une constellation kinesthésique et écologique

    Madeleine Sallustio
    #Moissons conviviales. Chercher l’#autonomie en #collectif_néo-paysan

    Raphaële Bertho et Jürgen Nefzger
    Jürgen Nefzger, activiste visuel sur le terrain de la tradition paysagère

    –---
    Fragments de lutte
    Sandrine Ruhlmann
    Composer pour résister ou exister en #Mongolie

    Sébastien Galliot
    Plein le dos. Un réseau militant de chair et de papier

    Soheil Hajmirbaba et Le consortium Où Atterrir ?
    S’orienter dans la description de nos terrains de vie

    Irène Hirt et Caroline Desbiens
    Exister sur la mappemonde. Cartographies autochtones

    Edgar Tasia
    Le #Gamarada. Dispositif de #résilience, incubateur de #résistance

    Florent Grouazel
    Les subsistances

    #revue #résistance #lutte #luttes

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • Techniques & Culture 74. Semer le trouble

      Si la situation n’est pas tenable, et si nous courons à la catastrophe, comment lutter contre la marche des choses ? Quels outils, quels moyens possédons-nous pour semer le trouble dans la mécanique des rapports de domination ? Ce numéro fait appel à notre expérience collective des formes de lutte, enquêtant sur les foyers de résistance, même circonscrits, même temporaires, qui s’élaborent et opposent aux gouvernementalités de nouvelles priorités, d’autres perspectives.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es7Yxc1KKQI&feature=youtu.be

  • Pourquoi les migrants iraniens transitent par les Alpes

    De plus en plus d’Iraniens franchissent de nuit la frontière franco-italienne. La plupart tentent ensuite de rejoindre le Royaume-Uni ou l’Allemagne.

    Il est 21 heures à Montgenèvre en cette mi-octobre, et la station de ski des Hautes-Alpes est plongée dans l’obscurité. C’est ici, à 1 800 mètres d’altitude, que les migrants traversent la frontière franco-italienne. Il faut environ huit heures de marche pour rallier Briançon (Hautes-Alpes) depuis #Clavière, le dernier village côté italien. Entre les deux, le col de Montgenèvre, l’obscurité et la police aux frontières (PAF) qui patrouille. Ces dernières années, plusieurs migrants sont morts de froid en tentant le passage. À l’approche de l’hiver, plusieurs militants et bénévoles de l’ONG Médecins du Monde ont donc repris les maraudes. Leur objectif : récupérer les migrants après la frontière et les ramener au Refuge solidaire de Briançon, une quinzaine de kilomètres plus bas, avant de se faire attraper par la police.

    François*, 32 ans, est moniteur de ski saisonnier et bénévole au refuge. Caché derrière des arbres, il guette la pénombre à la recherche d’un signe de vie quand deux silhouettes apparaissent derrière un buisson. Ils s’appellent Azad* et Hedi et sont iraniens. « How much ? » nous questionnent-ils avant de comprendre que François n’est pas passeur mais bénévole. Ils finissent par le suivre. Arman a 28 ans, a étudié le génie civil en Iran puis travaillé dans une pharmacie. Mais son père est opposant politique au régime : « Il a insisté pour que je quitte le pays », raconte-t-il. « Il a donné 18 000 euros à un réseau de passeurs pour me faire arriver en Angleterre. » Cette nuit, Azad et Hedi dormiront au chaud et en sécurité au refuge solidaire. Demain, ils repartiront en train en direction de Dunkerque, pour tenter de passer au Royaume-Uni.
    Une jeunesse sans débouchés

    Ces derniers mois, les bénévoles du Refuge solidaire ont noté un changement de population. Les Guinéens, Ivoiriens et Maliens qui étaient majoritaires en 2017 ont laissé leur place aux Afghans et Iraniens. En 2017, ils n’étaient que 3, en 2018, ils étaient 55, et depuis début 2020, 357 Iraniens sont passés par le refuge, soit 23 % des arrivées, selon les statistiques transmises par le Refuge solidaire. L’Ofpra enregistre la même évolution concernant les nouvelles demandes d’asile iraniennes : 349 en 2017, 510 en 2018 et 443 en 2019. La plupart des nouveaux venus sont diplômés, comme Peshro, 26 ans, diplômé d’une licence en économie, et Peshawa, 29 ans, rencontrés au Refuge solidaire. Les deux frères viennent de la province kurde au nord-ouest de l’Iran : « On n’avait pas de travail, pas d’argent », explique Peshro.

    Depuis que les États-Unis ont rétabli les sanctions économiques contre l’Iran en 2018, la situation est devenue très dure pour la population. En juin 2020, le rial, la monnaie locale, avait perdu la moitié de sa valeur par rapport à mai 2018. Au-delà des difficultés économiques, les émeutes sanglantes survenues entre 2017 et 2019 pour protester contre la corruption du régime, et la répression qui s’abat sur les minorités ethniques (kurdes, arabes) et religieuses (derviche, bahaï) expliquent cette hausse des départs. Environ 200 000 Iraniens quitteraient chaque année le pays, selon Nader Vahabi, principalement pour la Turquie qui ne requiert pas de visa.

    Une fois en Turquie, ils traversent l’Europe, en passant par la Grèce et les Balkans ou directement en bateau jusqu’en Italie. Comme beaucoup, Azad rêve d’Angleterre, perçue comme la terre promise pour les immigrés. Là-bas, ils retrouvent leur seconde langue, les contrôles d’identité n’existent pas et le marché du travail est plus flexible qu’ailleurs. D’après l’Observatoire des migrations de l’université d’Oxford, en 2019, le Royaume-Uni a enregistré environ 45 000 premières demandes d’asiles, un record, avec une majorité d’Iraniens, Irakiens et Pakistanais. Mais la traversée de la Manche est toujours aussi périlleuse. Le 27 octobre, toute une famille iranienne a trouvé la mort au large de Dunkerque, lorsque l’embarcation sur laquelle elle se trouvait a chaviré. Il s’agit du pire drame migratoire survenu dans l’histoire de La Manche.

    https://www.lepoint.fr/societe/pourquoi-les-migrants-iraniens-transitent-par-les-alpes-15-11-2020-2401095_2

    #Alpes #montagne #Hautes-Alpes #refuge_solidaire #Briançon #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_iraniens #Iran #Montgenèvre #France #frontières #Italie #réfugiés_afghans

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les Hautes-Alpes :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721#message886920

    via @isskein

  • Pour que le Briançonnais reste un territoire solidaire avec les exilés - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/09/21/pour-que-le-brianconnais-reste-un-territoire-solidaire-avec-les-exiles_18

    fermeture du « Refuge solidaire » et du local des maraudeurs ou comment le nouveau maire de Briançon, Arnaud Murgia, prépare les drames de cet hiver...
    La pétition : https://www.change.org/p/pour-que-le-brian%C3%A7onnais-reste-un-territoire-solidaire-avec-les-exil%C3

    #Briançon #migrants #migrations #refuge_solidaire #ville-refuge #solidarité #asile

  • Migrants: le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression #pacte #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration #new_pact #nouveau_pacte #pacte_sur_la_migration_et_l'asile

    –---

    Documents officiels en lien avec le pacte:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/879881

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

    • Relocation, solidarity mandatory for EU migration policy: #Johansson

      In an interview with ANSA and other European media outlets, EU Commissioner for Home Affairs #Ylva_Johansson explained the new migration and asylum pact due to be unveiled on September 23, stressing that nobody will find ideal solutions but rather a well-balanced compromise that will ’’improve the situation’’.

      European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson has explained in an interview with a group of European journalists, including ANSA, a new pact on asylum and migration to be presented on September 23. She touched on rules for countries of first entry, a new mechanism of mandatory solidarity, fast repatriations and refugee relocation.

      The Swedish commissioner said that no one will find ideal solutions in the European Commission’s new asylum and migration proposal but rather a good compromise that “will improve the situation”.

      She said the debate to change the asylum regulation known as Dublin needs to be played down in order to find an agreement. Johansson said an earlier 2016 reform plan would be withdrawn as it ’’caused the majority’’ of conflicts among countries.

      A new proposal that will replace the current one and amend the existing Dublin regulation will be presented, she explained.

      The current regulation will not be completely abolished but rules regarding frontline countries will change. Under the new proposal, migrants can still be sent back to the country responsible for their asylum request, explained the commissioner, adding that amendments will be made but the country of first entry will ’’remain important’’.

      ’’Voluntary solidarity is not enough," there has to be a “mandatory solidarity mechanism,” Johansson noted.

      Countries will need to help according to their size and possibilities. A member state needs to show solidarity ’’in accordance with the capacity and size’’ of its economy. There will be no easy way out with the possibility of ’’just sending some blankets’’ - efforts must be proportional to the size and capabilities of member states, she said.
      Relocations are a divisive theme

      Relocations will be made in a way that ’’can be possible to accept for all member states’’, the commissioner explained. The issue of mandatory quotas is extremely divisive, she went on to say. ’’The sentence of the European Court of Justice has established that they can be made’’.

      However, the theme is extremely divisive. Many of those who arrive in Europe are not eligible for international protection and must be repatriated, she said, wondering if it is a good idea to relocate those who need to be repatriated.

      “We are looking for a way to bring the necessary aid to countries under pressure.”

      “Relocation is an important part, but also” it must be done “in a way that can be possible to accept for all member states,” she noted.

      Moreover, Johansson said the system will not be too rigid as the union should prepare for different scenarios.
      Faster repatriations

      Repatriations will be a key part of the plan, with faster bureaucratic procedures, she said. The 2016 reform proposal was made following the 2015 migration crisis, when two million people, 90% of whom were refugees, reached the EU irregularly. For this reason, the plan focused on relocations, she explained.

      Now the situation is completely different: last year 2.4 million stay permits were issued, the majority for reasons connected to family, work or education. Just 140,000 people migrated irregularly and only one-third were refugees while two-thirds will need to be repatriated.

      For this reason, stressed the commissioner, the new plan will focus on repatriation. Faster procedures are necessary, she noted. When people stay in a country for years it is very hard to organize repatriations, especially voluntary ones. So the objective is for a negative asylum decision “to come together with a return decision.”

      Also, the permanence in hosting centers should be of short duration. Speaking about a fire at the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where more than 12,000 asylum seekers have been stranded for years, the commissioner said the situation was the ’’result of lack of European policy on asylum and migration."

      “We shall have no more Morias’’, she noted, calling for well-managed hosting centers along with limits to permanence.

      A win-win collaboration will instead be planned with third countries, she said. ’’The external aspect is very important. We have to work on good partnerships with third countries, supporting them and finding win-win solutions for readmissions and for the fight against traffickers. We have to develop legal pathways to come to the EU, in particular with resettlements, a policy that needs to be strengthened.”

      The commissioner then rejected the idea of opening hosting centers in third countries, an idea for example proposed by Denmark.

      “It is not the direction I intend to take. We will not export the right to asylum.”

      The commissioner said she was very concerned by reports of refoulements. Her objective, she concluded, is to “include in the pact a monitoring mechanism. The right to asylum must be defended.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27447/relocation-solidarity-mandatory-for-eu-migration-policy-johansson

      #relocalisation #solidarité_obligatoire #solidarité_volontaire #pays_de_première_entrée #renvois #expulsions #réinstallations #voies_légales

    • Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « #pacte »

      La Commission européenne, assurant vouloir « abolir » le règlement de Dublin et son principe du premier pays d’entrée, doit présenter ce mercredi un « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile ». Qui ne bouleverserait rien.

      C’est une belle victoire pour Viktor Orbán, le Premier ministre hongrois, et ses partenaires d’Europe centrale et orientale aussi peu enclins que lui à accueillir des étrangers sur leur sol. La Commission européenne renonce définitivement à leur imposer d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile en cas d’afflux dans un pays de la « ligne de front » (Grèce, Italie, Malte, Espagne). Certes, le volumineux paquet de textes qu’elle propose ce mercredi (10 projets de règlements et trois recommandations, soit plusieurs centaines de pages), pompeusement baptisé « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile », prévoit qu’ils devront, par « solidarité », assurer les refoulements vers les pays d’origine des déboutés du droit d’asile, mais cela ne devrait pas les gêner outre mesure. Car, sur le fond, la Commission prend acte de la volonté des Vingt-Sept de transformer l’Europe en forteresse.
      Sale boulot

      La crise de 2015 les a durablement traumatisés. A l’époque, la Turquie, par lassitude d’accueillir sur son sol plusieurs millions de réfugiés syriens et des centaines de milliers de migrants économiques dans l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, ouvre ses frontières. La Grèce est vite submergée et plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes traversent les Balkans afin de trouver refuge, notamment en Allemagne et en Suède, parmi les pays les plus généreux en matière d’asile.

      Passé les premiers moments de panique, les Européens réagissent de plusieurs manières. La Hongrie fait le sale boulot en fermant brutalement sa frontière. L’Allemagne, elle, accepte d’accueillir un million de demandeurs d’asile, mais négocie avec Ankara un accord pour qu’il referme ses frontières, accord ensuite endossé par l’UE qui lui verse en échange 6 milliards d’euros destinés aux camps de réfugiés. Enfin, l’Union adopte un règlement destiné à relocaliser sur une base obligatoire une partie des migrants dans les autres pays européens afin qu’ils instruisent les demandes d’asile, dans le but de soulager la Grèce et l’Italie, pays de premier accueil. Ce dernier volet est un échec, les pays d’Europe de l’Est, qui ont voté contre, refusent d’accueillir le moindre migrant, et leurs partenaires de l’Ouest ne font guère mieux : sur 160 000 personnes qui auraient dû être relocalisées, un objectif rapidement revu à 98 000, moins de 35 000 l’ont été à la fin 2017, date de la fin de ce dispositif.

      Depuis, l’Union a considérablement durci les contrôles, notamment en créant un corps de 10 000 gardes-frontières européens et en renforçant les moyens de Frontex, l’agence chargée de gérer ses frontières extérieures. En février-mars, la tentative d’Ankara de faire pression sur les Européens dans le conflit syrien en rouvrant partiellement ses frontières a fait long feu : la Grèce a employé les grands moyens, y compris violents, pour stopper ce flux sous les applaudissements de ses partenaires… Autant dire que l’ambiance n’est pas à l’ouverture des frontières et à l’accueil des persécutés.
      « Usine à gaz »

      Mais la crise migratoire de 2015 a laissé des « divisions nombreuses et profondes entre les Etats membres - certaines des cicatrices qu’elle a laissées sont toujours visibles aujourd’hui », comme l’a reconnu Ursula von der Leyen, la présidente de la Commission, dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union du 16 septembre. Afin de tourner la page, la Commission propose donc de laisser tomber la réforme de 2016 (dite de Dublin IV) prévoyant de pérenniser la relocalisation autoritaire des migrants, désormais jugée par une haute fonctionnaire de l’exécutif « totalement irréaliste ».

      Mais la réforme qu’elle propose, une véritable « usine à gaz », n’est qu’un « rapiéçage » de l’existant, comme l’explique Yves Pascouau, spécialiste de l’immigration et responsable des programmes européens de l’association Res Publica. Ainsi, alors que Von der Leyen a annoncé sa volonté « d’abolir » le règlement de Dublin III, il n’en est rien : le pays responsable du traitement d’une demande d’asile reste, par principe, comme c’est le cas depuis 1990, le pays de première entrée.

      S’il y a une crise, la Commission pourra déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité » afin de soulager un pays de la ligne de front : dans ce cas, les Vingt-Sept devront accueillir un certain nombre de migrants (en fonction de leur richesse et de leur population), sauf s’ils préfèrent « parrainer un retour ». En clair, prendre en charge le refoulement des déboutés de l’asile (avec l’aide financière et logistique de l’Union) en sachant que ces personnes resteront à leur charge jusqu’à ce qu’ils y parviennent. Ça, c’est pour faire simple, car il y a plusieurs niveaux de crise, des exceptions, des sanctions, des délais et l’on en passe…

      Autre nouveauté : les demandes d’asile devront être traitées par principe à la frontière, dans des camps de rétention, pour les nationalités dont le taux de reconnaissance du statut de réfugié est inférieur à 20% dans l’Union, et ce, en moins de trois mois, avec refoulement à la clé en cas de refus. « Cette réforme pose un principe clair, explique un eurocrate. Personne ne sera obligé d’accueillir un étranger dont il ne veut pas. »

      Dans cet ensemble très sévère, une bonne nouvelle : les sauvetages en mer ne devraient plus être criminalisés. On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65% de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs. On ne se refait pas.


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/22/droit-d-asile-bruxelles-rate-son-pacte_1800264

      –—

      Graphique ajouté au fil de discussion sur les statistiques de la #relocalisation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/605713

    • Le pacte européen sur l’asile et les migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire »

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la nouvelle Commission européenne a présenté les grandes lignes d’orientation de sa politique migratoire à venir. Alors que cinq ans plutôt, en 2015, se déroulait la mal nommée « crise migratoire » aux frontières européennes, le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migration de l’UE ne tire aucune leçon du passé. Le nouveau pacte de l’Union Européenne nous propose inlassablement les mêmes recettes alors que les preuves de leur inefficacité, leur coût et des violences qu’elles procurent sont nombreuses et irréfutables. Le CNCD-11.11.11, son homologue néerlandophone et les membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à un changement de cap.

      Le nouveau Pacte repose sur des propositions législatives et des recommandations non contraignantes. Ses priorités sont claires mais pas neuves. Freiner les arrivées, limiter l’accueil par le « tri » des personnes et augmenter les retours. Cette stratégie pourtant maintes fois décriée par les ONG et le milieu académique a certes réussi à diminuer les arrivées en Europe, mais n’a offert aucune solution durable pour les personnes migrantes. Depuis les années 2000, l’externalisation de la gestion des questions migratoires a montré son inefficacité (situation humanitaires dans les hotspots, plus de 20.000 décès en Méditerranée depuis 2014 et processus d’encampement aux frontières de l’UE) et son coût exponentiel (coût élevé du contrôle, de la détention-expulsion et de l’aide au développement détournée). Elle a augmenté le taux de violences sur les routes de l’exil et a enfreint le droit international en toute impunité (non accès au droit d’asile notamment via les refoulements).

      "ll est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée"

      La proposition de mettre en place un mécanisme solidaire européen contraignant est à saluer, mais celui-ci doit être au service de l’accueil et non couplé au retour. La possibilité pour les États européens de choisir à la carte soit la relocalisation, le « parrainage » du retour des déboutés ou autre contribution financière n’est pas équitable. La répartition solidaire de l’accueil doit être permanente et ne pas être actionnée uniquement en cas « d’afflux massif » aux frontières d’un État membre comme le recommande la Commission. Il est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée. Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés.

      Le focus doit être mis sur les alternatives à la détention et non sur l’usage systématique de l’enfermement aux frontières, comme le veut la Commission. Le droit de demander l’asile et d’avoir accès à une procédure de qualité doit être accessible à tous et toutes et rester un droit individuel. Or, la proposition de la Commission de détenir (12 semaines maximum) en vue de screener (5 jours de tests divers et de recoupement de données via EURODAC) puis trier les personnes migrantes à la frontière en fonction du taux de reconnaissance de protection accordé en moyenne à leur pays d’origine (en dessous de 20%) ou de leur niveau de vulnérabilité est contraire à la Convention de Genève.

      "La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix."

      La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix, comme le préconise la Commission.

      La meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences sur les routes de l’exil reste la mise en place de plus de voies légales et sûres de migration (réinstallation, visas de travail, d’études, le regroupement familial…). Les ONG regrettent que la Commission reporte à 2021 les propositions sur la migration légale. Le pacte s’intéresse à juste titre à la criminalisation des ONG de sauvetage et des citoyens qui fournissent une aide humanitaire aux migrants. Toutefois, les propositions visant à y mettre fin sont insuffisantes. Les ONG se réjouissent de l’annonce par la Commission d’un mécanisme de surveillance des droits humains aux frontières extérieures. Au cours de l’année écoulée, on a signalé de plus en plus souvent des retours violents par la Croatie, la Grèce, Malte et Chypre. Toutefois, il n’est pas encore suffisamment clair si les propositions de la Commission peuvent effectivement traiter et sanctionner les refoulements.

      Au lendemain de l’incendie du hotspot à Moria, symbole par excellence de l’échec des politiques migratoires européennes, l’UE s’enfonce dans un déni total, meurtrier, en vue de concilier les divergences entre ses États membres. Les futures discussions autour du Pacte au sein du parlement UE et du Conseil UE seront cruciales. Les ONG membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le Parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à promouvoir des ajustements fermes allant vers plus de justice migratoire.

      https://www.cncd.be/Le-pacte-europeen-sur-l-asile-et

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum. A Critical ‘First Look’ Analysis

      Where does it come from?

      The New Migration Pact was built on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme that the Commission tried to push in 2016. And the least that one can say, is that it shows! The whole migration plan has been decisively shaped by this initial failure. Though the Pact has some merits, the very fact that it takes as its starting point the radical demands made by the most nationalist governments in Europe leads to sacrificing migrants’ rights on the altar of a cohesive and integrated European migration policy.

      Back in 2016, the vigorous manoeuvring of the Commission to find a way out of the European asylum dead-end resulted in a bittersweet victory for the European institution. Though the Commission was able to find a qualified majority of member states willing to support a fair distribution of the asylum seekers among member states through a relocation scheme, this new regulation remained dead letter. Several eastern European states flatly refused to implement the plan, other member states seized this opportunity to defect on their obligations and the whole migration policy quickly unravelled. Since then, Europe is left with a dysfunctional Dublin agreement exacerbating the tensions between member states and 27 loosely connected national asylum regimes. On the latter point, at least, there is a consensus. Everyone agrees that the EU’s migration regime is broken and urgently needs to be fixed.

      Obviously, the Commission was not keen to go through a new round of political humiliation. Having been accused of “bureaucratic hubris” the first time around, the commissioners Schinas and Johansson decided not to repeat the same mistake. They toured the European capitals and listened to every side of the entrenched migration debate before drafting their Migration Pact. The intention is in the right place and it reflects the complexity of having to accommodate 27 distinct democratic debates in one single political space. Nevertheless, if one peers a bit more extensively through the content of the New Plan, it is complicated not to get the feelings that the Visegrad countries are currently the key players shaping the European migration and asylum policies. After all, their staunch opposition to a collective reception scheme sparked the political process and provided the starting point to the general discussion. As a result, it is no surprise that the New Pact tilts firmly towards an ever more restrictive approach to migration, beefs up the coercive powers of both member states and European agencies and raises many concerns with regards to the respect of the migrants’ fundamental rights.
      What is in this New Pact on Migration and Asylum?

      Does the Pact concede too much ground to the demands of the most xenophobic European governments? To answer that question, let us go back to the bizarre metaphor used by the commissioner Schinas. During his press conference, he insisted on comparing the New Pact on Migration and Asylum to a house built on solid foundations (i.e. the lengthy and inclusive consultation process) and made of 3 floors: first, some renewed partnerships with the sending and transit states, second, some more effective border procedures, and third, a revamped mandatory – but flexible ! – solidarity scheme. It is tempting to carry on with the metaphor and to say that this house may appear comfortable from the inside but that it remains tightly shut to anyone knocking on its door from the outside. For, a careful examination reveals that each of the three “floors” (policy packages, actually) lays the emphasis on a repressive approach to migration aimed at deterring would-be asylum seekers from attempting to reach the European shores.
      The “new partnerships” with sending and transit countries, a “change in paradigm”?

      Let us add that there is little that is actually “new” in this New Migration Pact. For instance, the first policy package, that is, the suggestion that the EU should renew its partnerships with sending and transit countries is, as a matter of fact, an old tune in the Brussels bubble. The Commission may boast that it marks a “change of paradigm”, one fails to see how this would be any different from the previous European diplomatic efforts. Since migration and asylum are increasingly considered as toxic topics (for, they would be the main factors behind the rise of nationalism and its corollary, Euroscepticism), the European Union is willing to externalize this issue, seemingly at all costs. The results, however, have been mixed in the past. To the Commission’s own admission, only a third of the migrants whose asylum claims have been rejected are effectively returned. Besides the facts that returns are costly, extremely coercive, and administratively complicated to organize, the main reason for this low rate of successful returns is that sending countries refuse to cooperate in the readmission procedures. Neighbouring countries have excellent reasons not to respond positively to the Union’s demands. For some, remittances sent by their diaspora are an economic lifeline. Others just do not want to appear complicit of repressive European practices on their domestic political scene. Furthermore, many African countries are growing discontent with the forceful way the European Union uses its asymmetrical relation of power in bilateral negotiations to dictate to those sovereign states the migration policies they should adopt, making for instance its development aid conditional on the implementation of stricter border controls. The Commission may rhetorically claim to foster “mutually beneficial” international relation with its neighbouring countries, the emphasis on the externalization of migration control in the EU’s diplomatic agenda nevertheless bears some of the hallmarks of neo-colonialism. As such, it is a source of deep resentment in sending and transit states. It would therefore be a grave mistake for the EU to overlook the fact that some short-term gains in terms of migration management may result in long-term losses with regards to Europe’s image across the world.

      Furthermore, considering the current political situation, one should not primarily be worried about the failed partnerships with neighbouring countries, it is rather the successful ones that ought to give us pause and raise concerns. For, based on the existing evidence, the EU will sign a deal with any state as long as it effectively restrains and contains migration flows towards the European shores. Being an authoritarian state with a documented history of human right violations (Turkey) or an embattled government fighting a civil war (Lybia) does not disqualify you as a partner of the European Union in its effort to manage migration flows. It is not only morally debatable for the EU to delegate its asylum responsibilities to unreliable third countries, it is also doubtful that an increase in diplomatic pressure on neighbouring countries will bring major political results. It will further damage the perception of the EU in neighbouring countries without bringing significant restriction to migration flows.
      Streamlining border procedures? Or eroding migrants’ rights?

      The second policy package is no more inviting. It tackles the issue of the migrants who, in spite of those partnerships and the hurdles thrown their way by sending and transit countries, would nevertheless reach Europe irregularly. On this issue, the Commission faced the daunting task of having to square a political circle, since it had to find some common ground in a debate bitterly divided between conflicting worldviews (roughly, between liberal and nationalist perspectives on the individual freedom of movement) and competing interests (between overburdened Mediterranean member states and Eastern member states adamant that asylum seekers would endanger their national cohesion). The Commission thus looked for the lowest common denominator in terms of migration management preferences amongst the distinct member states. The result is a two-tier border procedure aiming to fast-track and streamline the processing of asylum claims, allowing for more expeditious returns of irregular migrants. The goal is to prevent any bottleneck in the processing of the claims and to avoid the (currently near constant) overcrowding of reception facilities in the frontline states. Once again, there is little that is actually new in this proposal. It amounts to a generalization of the process currently in place in the infamous hotspots scattered on the Greek isles. According to the Pact, screening procedures would be carried out in reception centres created across Europe. A far cry from the slogan “no more Moria” since one may legitimately suspect that those reception centres will, at the first hiccup in the procedure, turn into tomorrow’s asylum camps.

      According to this procedure, newly arrived migrants would be submitted within 5 days to a pre-screening procedure and subsequently triaged into two categories. Migrants with a low chance of seeing their asylum claim recognized (because they would come from a country with a low recognition rate or a country belonging to the list of the safe third countries, for instance) would be redirected towards an accelerated procedure. The end goal would be to return them, if applicable, within twelve weeks. The other migrants would be subjected to the standard assessment of their asylum claim. It goes without saying that this proposal has been swiftly and unanimously condemned by all human rights organizations. It does not take a specialized lawyer to see that this two-tiered procedure could have devastating consequences for the “fast-tracked” asylum seekers left with no legal recourse against the initial decision to submit them to this sped up procedure (rather than the standard one) as well as reduced opportunities to defend their asylum claim or, if need be, to contest their return. No matter how often the Commission repeats that it will preserve all the legal safeguards required to protect migrants’ rights, it remains wildly unconvincing. Furthermore, the Pact may confuse speed and haste. The schedule is tight on paper (five days for the pre-screening, twelve weeks for the assessment of the asylum claim), it may well prove unrealistic to meet those deadlines in real-life conditions. The Commission also overlooks the fact that accelerated procedures tend to be sloppy, thus leading to juridical appeals and further legal wrangling and eventually amounting to processes far longer than expected.
      Integrating the returns, not the reception

      The Commission talked up the new Pact as being “balanced” and “humane”. Since the two first policy packages focus, first, on preventing would-be migrants from leaving their countries and, second, on facilitating and accelerating their returns, one would expect the third policy package to move away from the restriction of movement and to complement those measures with a reception plan tailored to the needs of refugees. And here comes the major disappointment with the New Pact and, perhaps, the clearest indication that the Pact is first and foremost designed to please the migration hardliners. It does include a solidarity scheme meant to alleviate the burden of frontline countries, to distribute more fairly the responsibilities amongst member states and to ensure that refugees are properly hosted. But this solidarity scheme is far from being robust enough to deliver on those promises. Let us unpack it briefly to understand why it is likely to fail. The solidarity scheme is mandatory. All member states will be under the obligation to take part. But there is a catch! Member states’ contribution to this collective effort can take many shapes and forms and it will be up to the member states to decide how they want to participate. They get to choose whether they want to relocate some refugees on their national soil, to provide some financial and/or logistical assistance, or to “sponsor” (it is the actual term used by the Commission) some returns.

      No one expected the Commission to reintroduce a compulsory relocation scheme in its Pact. Eastern European countries had drawn an obvious red line and it would have been either naïve or foolish to taunt them with that kind of policy proposal. But this so-called “flexible mandatory solidarity” relies on such a watered-down understanding of the solidarity principle that it results in a weak and misguided political instrument unsuited to solve the problem at hand. First, the flexible solidarity mechanism is too indeterminate to prove efficient. According to the current proposal, member states would have to shoulder a fair share of the reception burden (calculated on their respective population and GDP) but would be left to decide for themselves which form this contribution would take. The obvious flaw with the policy proposal is that, if all member states decline to relocate some refugees (which is a plausible scenario), Mediterranean states would still be left alone when it comes to dealing with the most immediate consequences of migration flows. They would receive much more financial, operational, and logistical support than it currently is the case – but they would be managing on their own the overcrowded reception centres. The Commission suggests that it would oversee the national pledges in terms of relocation and that it would impose some corrections if the collective pledges fall short of a predefined target. But it remains to be seen whether the Commission will have the political clout to impose some relocations to member states refusing them. One could not be blamed for being highly sceptical.

      Second, it is noteworthy that the Commission fails to integrate the reception of refugees since member states are de facto granted an opt-out on hosting refugees. What is integrated is rather the return policy, once more a repressive instrument. And it is the member states with the worst record in terms of migrants’ rights violations that are the most likely to be tasked with the delicate mission of returning them home. As a commentator was quipping on Twitter, it would be like asking a bully to walk his victim home (what could possibly go wrong?). The attempt to build an intra-European consensus is obviously pursued at the expense of the refugees. The incentive structure built into the flexible solidarity scheme offers an excellent illustration of this. If a member state declines to relocate any refugee and offers instead to ‘sponsor’ some returns, it has to honour that pledge within a limited period of time (the Pact suggests a six month timeframe). If it fails to do so, it becomes responsible for the relocation and the return of those migrants, leading to a situation in which some migrants may end up in a country where they do not want to be and that does not want them to be there. Hardly an optimal outcome…
      Conclusion

      The Pact represents a genuine attempt to design a multi-faceted and comprehensive migration policy, covering most aspects of a complex issue. The dysfunctions of the Schengen area and the question of the legal pathways to Europe have been relegated to a later discussion and one may wonder whether they should not have been included in the Pact to balance out its restrictive inclination. And, in all fairness, the Pact does throw a few bones to the more cosmopolitan-minded European citizens. For instance, it reminds the member states that maritime search and rescue operations are legal and should not be impeded, or it shortens (from five to three years) the waiting period for refugees to benefit from the freedom of movement. But those few welcome additions are vastly outweighed by the fact that migration hardliners dominated the agenda-setting in the early stage of the policy-making exercise and have thus been able to frame decisively the political discussion. The end result is a policy package leaning heavily towards some repressive instruments and particularly careless when it comes to safeguarding migrants’ rights.

      The New Pact was first drafted on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme. Back then, the Commission publicly made amends and revised its approach to the issue. Sadly, the New Pact was presented to the European public when the ashes of the Moria camp were still lukewarm. One can only hope that the member states will learn from that mistake too.

      https://blog.novamigra.eu/2020/09/24/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-a-critical-first-look-analysis

    • #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration : un “nouveau départ” pour violer les droits humains

      La Commission européenne a publié aujourd’hui son « Nouveau Pacte sur l’Asile et la Migration » qui propose un nouveau cadre règlementaire et législatif. Avec ce plan, l’UE devient de facto un « leader du voyage retour » pour les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s en Méditerranée. EuroMed Droits craint que ce pacte ne détériore encore davantage la situation actuelle pour au moins trois raisons.

      Le pacte se concentre de manière obsessionnelle sur la politique de retours à travers un système de « sponsoring » : des pays européens tels que l’Autriche, la Pologne, la Hongrie ou la République tchèque – qui refusent d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s – pourront « sponsoriser » et organiser la déportation vers les pays de départ de ces réfugié.e.s. Au lieu de favoriser l’intégration, le pacte adopte une politique de retour à tout prix, même lorsque les demandeurs.ses d’asile peuvent être victimes de discrimination, persécution ou torture dans leur pays de retour. A ce jour, il n’existe aucun mécanisme permettant de surveiller ce qui arrive aux migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s une fois déporté.e.s.

      Le pacte proposé renforce la sous-traitance de la gestion des frontières. En termes concrets, l’UE renforce la coopération avec les pays non-européens afin qu’ils ferment leurs frontières et empêchent les personnes de partir. Cette coopération est sujette à l’imposition de conditions par l’UE. Une telle décision européenne se traduit par une hausse du nombre de refoulements dans la région méditerranéenne et une coopération renforcée avec des pays qui ont un piètre bilan en matière de droits humains et qui ne possèdent pas de cadre efficace pour la protection des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées.

      Le pacte vise enfin à étendre les mécanismes de tri des demandeurs.ses d’asile et des migrant.e.s dans les pays d’arrivée. Ce modèle de tri – similaire à celui utilisé dans les zones de transit aéroportuaires – accentue les difficultés de pays tels que l’Espagne, l’Italie, Malte, la Grèce ou Chypre qui accueillent déjà la majorité des migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s. Placer ces personnes dans des camps revient à mettre en place un système illégal d’incarcération automatique dès l’arrivée. Cela accroîtra la violence psychologique à laquelle les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s sont déjà soumis. Selon ce nouveau système, ces personnes seront identifié.e.s sous cinq jours et toute demande d’asile devra être traitée en douze semaines. Cette accélération de la procédure risque d’intensifier la détention et de diviser les arrivant.e.s entre demandeurs.ses d’asile et migrant.e.s économiques. Cela s’effectuerait de manière discriminatoire, sans analyse détaillée de chaque demande d’asile ni possibilité réelle de faire appel. Celles et ceux qui seront éligibles à la protection internationale seront relocalisé.e.s au sein des États membres qui acceptent de les recevoir. Les autres risqueront d’être déportés immédiatement.

      « En choisissant de sous-traiter davantage encore la gestion des frontières et d’accentuer la politique de retours, ce nouveau pacte conclut la transformation de la politique européenne en une approche pleinement sécuritaire. Pire encore, le pacte assimile la politique de “retour sponsorisé” à une forme de solidarité. Au-delà des déclarations officielles, cela démontre la volonté de l’Union européenne de criminaliser et de déshumaniser les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, Président d’EuroMed Droits.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-nouveau-depart-pour-violer-les-droits

    • Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum

      This Policy Insight examines the new Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the principles and commitments enshrined in the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees (UN GCR) and the EU Treaties. It finds that from a legal viewpoint the ‘Pact’ is not really a Pact at all, if understood as an agreement concluded between relevant EU institutional parties. Rather, it is the European Commission’s policy guide for the duration of the current 9th legislature.

      The analysis shows that the Pact has intergovernmental aspects, in both name and fundamentals. It does not pursue a genuine Migration and Asylum Union. The Pact encourages an artificial need for consensus building or de facto unanimity among all EU member states’ governments in fields where the EU Treaties call for qualified majority voting (QMV) with the European Parliament as co-legislator. The Pact does not abolish the first irregular entry rule characterising the EU Dublin Regulation. It adopts a notion of interstate solidarity that leads to asymmetric responsibilities, where member states are given the flexibility to evade participating in the relocation of asylum seekers. The Pact also runs the risk of catapulting some contested member states practices’ and priorities about localisation, speed and de-territorialisation into EU policy.

      This Policy Insight argues that the Pact’s priority of setting up an independent monitoring mechanism of border procedures’ compliance with fundamental rights is a welcome step towards the better safeguarding of the rule of law. The EU inter-institutional negotiations on the Pact’s initiatives should be timely and robust in enforcing member states’ obligations under the current EU legal standards relating to asylum and borders, namely the prevention of detention and expedited expulsions, and the effective access by all individuals to dignified treatment and effective remedies. Trust and legitimacy of EU asylum and migration policy can only follow if international (human rights and refugee protection) commitments and EU Treaty principles are put first.

      https://www.ceps.eu/ceps-publications/whose-pact

    • First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals

      This week the EU Commission published its new package of proposals on asylum and (non-EU) migration – consisting of proposals for legislation, some ‘soft law’, attempts to relaunch talks on stalled proposals and plans for future measures. The following is an explanation of the new proposals (not attempting to cover every detail) with some first thoughts. Overall, while it is possible that the new package will lead to agreement on revised asylum laws, this will come at the cost of risking reduced human rights standards.

      Background

      Since 1999, the EU has aimed to create a ‘Common European Asylum System’. A first phase of legislation was passed between 2003 and 2005, followed by a second phase between 2010 and 2013. Currently the legislation consists of: a) the Qualification Directive, which defines when people are entitled to refugee status (based on the UN Refugee Convention) or subsidiary protection status, and what rights they have; b) the Dublin III Regulation, which allocates responsibility for an asylum seeker between Member States; c) the Eurodac Regulation, which facilitates the Dublin system by setting up a database of fingerprints of asylum seekers and people who cross the external border without authorisation; d) the Asylum Procedures Directive, which sets out the procedural rules governing asylum applications, such as personal interviews and appeals; e) the Reception Conditions Directive, which sets out standards on the living conditions of asylum-seekers, such as rules on housing and welfare; and f) the Asylum Agency Regulation, which set up an EU agency (EASO) to support Member States’ processing of asylum applications.

      The EU also has legislation on other aspects of migration: (short-term) visas, border controls, irregular migration, and legal migration – much of which has connections with the asylum legislation, and all of which is covered by this week’s package. For visas, the main legislation is the visa list Regulation (setting out which non-EU countries’ citizens are subject to a short-term visa requirement, or exempt from it) and the visa code (defining the criteria to obtain a short-term Schengen visa, allowing travel between all Schengen states). The visa code was amended last year, as discussed here.

      For border controls, the main legislation is the Schengen Borders Code, setting out the rules on crossing external borders and the circumstances in which Schengen states can reinstate controls on internal borders, along with the Frontex Regulation, setting up an EU border agency to assist Member States. On the most recent version of the Frontex Regulation, see discussion here and here.

      For irregular migration, the main legislation is the Return Directive. The Commission proposed to amend it in 2018 – on which, see analysis here and here.

      For legal migration, the main legislation on admission of non-EU workers is the single permit Directive (setting out a common process and rights for workers, but not regulating admission); the Blue Card Directive (on highly paid migrants, discussed here); the seasonal workers’ Directive (discussed here); and the Directive on intra-corporate transferees (discussed here). The EU also has legislation on: non-EU students, researchers and trainees (overview here); non-EU family reunion (see summary of the legislation and case law here) and on long-term resident non-EU citizens (overview – in the context of UK citizens after Brexit – here). In 2016, the Commission proposed to revise the Blue Card Directive (see discussion here).

      The UK, Ireland and Denmark have opted out of most of these laws, except some asylum law applies to the UK and Ireland, and Denmark is covered by the Schengen and Dublin rules. So are the non-EU countries associated with Schengen and Dublin (Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). There are also a number of further databases of non-EU citizens as well as Eurodac: the EU has never met a non-EU migrant who personal data it didn’t want to store and process.

      The Refugee ‘Crisis’

      The EU’s response to the perceived refugee ‘crisis’ was both short-term and long-term. In the short term, in 2015 the EU adopted temporary laws (discussed here) relocating some asylum seekers in principle from Italy and Greece to other Member States. A legal challenge to one of these laws failed (as discussed here), but in practice Member States accepted few relocations anyway. Earlier this year, the CJEU ruled that several Member States had breached their obligations under the laws (discussed here), but by then it was a moot point.

      Longer term, the Commission proposed overhauls of the law in 2016: a) a Qualification Regulation further harmonising the law on refugee and subsidiary protection status; b) a revised Dublin Regulation, which would have set up a system of relocation of asylum seekers for future crises; c) a revised Eurodac Regulation, to take much more data from asylum seekers and other migrants; d) an Asylum Procedures Regulation, further harmonising the procedural law on asylum applications; e) a revised Reception Conditions Directive; f) a revised Asylum Agency Regulation, giving the agency more powers; and g) a new Resettlement Regulation, setting out a framework of admitting refugees directly from non-EU countries. (See my comments on some of these proposals, from back in 2016)

      However, these proposals proved unsuccessful – which is the main reason for this week’s attempt to relaunch the process. In particular, an EU Council note from February 2019 summarises the diverse problems that befell each proposal. While the EU Council Presidency and the European Parliament reached agreement on the proposals on qualification, reception conditions and resettlement in June 2018, Member States refused to support the Presidency’s deal and the European Parliament refused to renegotiate (see, for instance, the Council documents on the proposals on qualification and resettlement; see also my comments on an earlier stage of the talks, when the Council had agreed its negotiation position on the qualification regulation).

      On the asylum agency, the EP and Council agreed on the revised law in 2017, but the Commission proposed an amendment in 2018 to give the agency more powers; the Council could not agree on this. On Eurodac, the EP and Council only partly agreed on a text. On the procedures Regulation, the Council largely agreed its position, except on border procedures; on Dublin there was never much prospect of agreement because of the controversy over relocating asylum seekers. (For either proposal, a difficult negotiation with the European Parliament lay ahead).

      In other areas too, the legislative process was difficult: the Council and EP gave up negotiating amendments to the Blue Card Directive (see the last attempt at a compromise here, and the Council negotiation mandate here), and the EP has not yet agreed a position on the Returns Directive (the Council has a negotiating position, but again it leaves out the difficult issue of border procedures; there is a draft EP position from February). Having said that, the EU has been able to agree legislation giving more powers to Frontex, as well as new laws on EU migration databases, in the last few years.

      The attempted relaunch

      The Commission’s new Pact on asylum and immigration (see also the roadmap on its implementation, the Q and As, and the staff working paper) does not restart the whole process from scratch. On qualification, reception conditions, resettlement, the asylum agency, the returns Directive and the Blue Card Directive, it invites the Council and Parliament to resume negotiations. But it tries to unblock the talks as a whole by tabling two amended legislative proposals and three new legislative proposals, focussing on the issues of border procedures and relocation of asylum seekers.

      Screening at the border

      This revised proposals start with a new proposal for screening asylum seekers at the border, which would apply to all non-EU citizens who cross an external border without authorisation, who apply for asylum while being checked at the border (without meeting the conditions for legal entry), or who are disembarked after a search and rescue operation. During the screening, these non-EU citizens are not allowed to enter the territory of a Member State, unless it becomes clear that they meet the criteria for entry. The screening at the border should take no longer than 5 days, with an extra 5 days in the event of a huge influx. (It would also be possible to apply the proposed law to those on the territory who evaded border checks; for them the deadline to complete the screening is 3 days).

      Screening has six elements, as further detailed in the proposal: a health check, an identity check, registration in a database, a security check, filling out a debriefing form, and deciding on what happens next. At the end of the screening, the migrant is channelled either into the expulsion process (if no asylum claim has been made, and if the migrant does not meet the conditions for entry) or, if an asylum claim is made, into the asylum process – with an indication of whether the claim should be fast-tracked or not. It’s also possible that an asylum seeker would be relocated to another Member State. The screening is carried out by national officials, possibly with support from EU agencies.

      To ensure human rights protection, there must be independent monitoring to address allegations of non-compliance with human rights. These allegations might concern breaches of EU or international law, national law on detention, access to the asylum procedure, or non-refoulement (the ban on sending people to an unsafe country). Migrants must be informed about the process and relevant EU immigration and data protection law. There is no provision for judicial review of the outcome of the screening process, although there would be review as part of the next step (asylum or return).

      Asylum procedures

      The revised proposal for an asylum procedures Regulation would leave in place most of the Commission’s 2016 proposal to amend the law, adding some specific further proposed amendments, which either link back to the screening proposal or aim to fast-track decisions and expulsions more generally.

      On the first point, the usual rules on informing asylum applicants and registering their application would not apply until after the end of the screening. A border procedure may apply following the screening process, but Member States must apply the border procedure in cases where an asylum seeker used false documents, is a perceived national security threat, or falls within the new ground for fast-tracking cases (on which, see below). The latter obligation is subject to exceptions where a Member State has reported that a non-EU country is not cooperating on readmission; the process for dealing with that issue set out under the 2019 amendments to the visa code will then apply. Also, the border process cannot apply to unaccompanied minors or children under 12, unless they are a supposed national security risk. Further exceptions apply where the asylum seeker is vulnerable or has medical needs, the application is not inadmissible or cannot be fast-tracked, or detention conditions cannot be guaranteed. A Member State might apply the Dublin process to determine which Member State is responsible for the asylum claim during the border process. The whole border process (including any appeal) must last no more than 12 weeks, and can only be used to declare applications inadmissible or apply the new ground for fast-tracking them.

      There would also be a new border expulsion procedure, where an asylum application covered by the border procedure was rejected. This is subject to its own 12-week deadline, starting from the point when the migrant is no longer allowed to remain. Much of the Return Directive would apply – but not the provisions on the time period for voluntary departure, remedies and the grounds for detention. Instead, the border expulsion procedure would have its own stricter rules on these issues.

      As regards general fast-tracking, in order to speed up the expulsion process for unsuccessful applications, a rejection of an asylum application would have to either incorporate an expulsion decision or entail a simultaneous separate expulsion decision. Appeals against expulsion decisions would then be subject to the same rules as appeals against asylum decisions. If the asylum seeker comes from a country with a refugee recognition rate below 20%, his or her application must be fast-tracked (this would even apply to unaccompanied minors) – unless circumstances in that country have changed, or the asylum seeker comes from a group for whom the low recognition rate is not representative (for instance, the recognition rate might be higher for LGBT asylum-seekers from that country). Many more appeals would be subject to a one-week time limit for the rejected asylum seeker to appeal, and there could be only one level of appeal against decisions taken within a border procedure.

      Eurodac

      The revised proposal for Eurodac would build upon the 2016 proposal, which was already far-reaching: extending Eurodac to include not only fingerprints, but also photos and other personal data; reducing the age of those covered by Eurodac from 14 to 6; removing the time limits and the limits on use of the fingerprints taken from persons who had crossed the border irregularly; and creating a new obligation to collect data of all irregular migrants over age 6 (currently fingerprint data for this group cannot be stored, but can simply be checked, as an option, against the data on asylum seekers and irregular border crossers). The 2020 proposal additionally provides for interoperability with other EU migration databases, taking of personal data during the screening process, including more data on the migration status of each person, and expressly applying the law to those disembarked after a search and rescue operation.

      Dublin rules on asylum responsibility

      A new proposal for asylum management would replace the Dublin regulation (meaning that the Commission has withdrawn its 2016 proposal to replace that Regulation). The 2016 proposal would have created a ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry, requiring that State to examine first whether many of the grounds for removing an asylum-seeker to a non-EU country apply before considering whether another Member State might be responsible for the application (because the asylum seeker’s family live there, for instance). It would also have imposed obligations directly on asylum-seekers to cooperate with the process, rather than only regulate relations between Member States. These obligations would have been enforced by punishing asylum seekers who disobeyed: removing their reception conditions (apart from emergency health care); fast-tracking their substantive asylum applications; refusing to consider new evidence from them; and continuing the asylum application process in their absence.

      It would no longer be possible for asylum seekers to provide additional evidence of family links, with a view to being in the same country as a family member. Overturning a CJEU judgment (see further discussion here), unaccompanied minors would no longer have been able to make applications in multiple Member States (in the absence of a family member in any of them). However, the definition of family members would have been widened, to include siblings and families formed in a transit country. Responsibility for an asylum seeker based on the first Member State of irregular entry (a commonly applied criterion) would have applied indefinitely, rather than expire one year after entry as it does under the current rules. The ‘Sangatte clause’ (responsibility after five months of living in a second Member State, if the ‘irregular entry’ criterion no longer applies) would be dropped. The ‘sovereignty clause’, which played a key part in the 2015-16 refugee ‘crisis’ (it lets a Member State take responsibility for any application even if the Dublin rules do not require it, cf Germany accepting responsibility for Syrian asylum seekers) would have been sharply curtailed. Time limits for detention during the transfer process would be reduced. Remedies for asylum seekers would have been curtailed: they would only have seven days to appeal against a transfer; courts would have fifteen days to decide (although they could have stayed on the territory throughout); and the grounds of review would have been curtailed.

      Finally, the 2016 proposal would have tackled the vexed issue of disproportionate allocation of responsibility for asylum seekers by setting up an automated system determining how many asylum seekers each Member State ‘should’ have based on their size and GDP. If a Member State were responsible for excessive numbers of applicants, Member States which were receiving fewer numbers would have to take more to help out. If they refused, they would have to pay €250,000 per applicant.

      The 2020 proposal drops some of the controversial proposals from 2016, including the ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry (the current rule, giving Member States an option to decide if a non-EU country is responsible for the application on narrower grounds than in the 2016 proposal, would still apply). Also, the sovereignty clause would now remain unchanged.

      However, the 2020 proposal also retains parts of the 2016 proposal: the redefinition of ‘family member’ (which could be more significant now that the bottleneck is removed, unless Member States choose to apply the relevant rules on non-EU countries’ responsibility during the border procedure already); obligations for asylum seekers (redrafted slightly); some of the punishments for non-compliant asylum-seekers (the cut-off for considering evidence would stay, as would the loss of benefits except for those necessary to ensure a basic standard of living: see the CJEU case law in CIMADE and Haqbin); dropping the provision on evidence of family links; changing the rules on responsibility for unaccompanied minors; retaining part of the changes to the irregular entry criterion (it would now cease to apply after three years; the Sangatte clause would still be dropped; it would apply after search and rescue but not apply in the event of relocation); curtailing judicial review (the grounds would still be limited; the time limit to appeal would be 14 days; courts would not have a strict deadline to decide; suspensive effect would not apply in all cases); and the reduced time limits for detention.

      The wholly new features of the 2020 proposal are: some vague provisions about crisis management; responsibility for an asylum application for the Member State which issued a visa or residence document which expired in the last three years (the current rule is responsibility if the visa expired less than six months ago, and the residence permit expired less than a year ago); responsibility for an asylum application for a Member State in which a non-EU citizen obtained a diploma; and the possibility for refugees or persons with subsidiary protection status to obtain EU long-term resident status after three years, rather than five.

      However, the most significant feature of the new proposal is likely to be its attempt to solve the underlying issue of disproportionate allocation of asylum seekers. Rather than a mechanical approach to reallocating responsibility, the 2020 proposal now provides for a menu of ‘solidarity contributions’: relocation of asylum seekers; relocation of refugees; ‘return sponsorship’; or support for ‘capacity building’ in the Member State (or a non-EU country) facing migratory pressure. There are separate rules for search and rescue disembarkations, on the one hand, and more general migratory pressures on the other. Once the Commission determines that the latter situation exists, other Member States have to choose from the menu to offer some assistance. Ultimately the Commission will adopt a decision deciding what the contributions will be. Note that ‘return sponsorship’ comes with a ticking clock: if the persons concerned are not expelled within eight months, the sponsoring Member State must accept them on its territory.

      Crisis management

      The issue of managing asylum issues in a crisis has been carved out of the Dublin proposal into a separate proposal, which would repeal an EU law from 2001 that set up a framework for offering ‘temporary protection’ in a crisis. Note that Member States have never used the 2001 law in practice.

      Compared to the 2001 law, the new proposal is integrated into the EU asylum legislation that has been adopted or proposed in the meantime. It similarly applies in the event of a ‘mass influx’ that prevents the effective functioning of the asylum system. It would apply the ‘solidarity’ process set out in the proposal to replace the Dublin rules (ie relocation of asylum seekers and other measures), with certain exceptions and shorter time limits to apply that process.

      The proposal focusses on providing for possible exceptions to the usual asylum rules. In particular, during a crisis, the Commission could authorise a Member State to apply temporary derogations from the rules on border asylum procedures (extending the time limit, using the procedure to fast-track more cases), border return procedures (again extending the time limit, more easily justifying detention), or the time limit to register asylum applicants. Member States could also determine that due to force majeure, it was not possible to observe the normal time limits for registering asylum applications, applying the Dublin process for responsibility for asylum applications, or offering ‘solidarity’ to other Member States.

      Finally, the new proposal, like the 2001 law, would create a potential for a form of separate ‘temporary protection’ status for the persons concerned. A Member State could suspend the consideration of asylum applications from people coming from the country facing a crisis for up to a year, in the meantime giving them status equivalent to ‘subsidiary protection’ status in the EU qualification law. After that point it would have to resume consideration of the applications. It would need the Commission’s approval, whereas the 2001 law left it to the Council to determine a situation of ‘mass influx’ and provided for the possible extension of the special rules for up to three years.

      Other measures

      The Commission has also adopted four soft law measures. These comprise: a Recommendation on asylum crisis management; a Recommendation on resettlement and humanitarian admission; a Recommendation on cooperation between Member States on private search and rescue operations; and guidance on the applicability of EU law on smuggling of migrants – notably concluding that it cannot apply where (as in the case of law of the sea) there is an obligation to rescue.

      On other issues, the Commission plan is to use current legislation – in particular the recent amendment to the visa code, which provides for sticks to make visas more difficult to get for citizens of countries which don’t cooperate on readmission of people, and carrots to make visas easier to get for citizens of countries which do cooperate on readmission. In some areas, such as the Schengen system, there will be further strategies and plans in the near future; it is not clear if this will lead to more proposed legislation.

      However, on legal migration, the plan is to go further than relaunching the amendment of the Blue Card Directive, as the Commission is also planning to propose amendments to the single permit and long-term residence laws referred to above – leading respectively to more harmonisation of the law on admission of non-EU workers and enhanced possibilities for long-term resident non-EU citizens to move between Member States (nb the latter plan is separate from this week’s proposal to amend this law as regards refugees and people with subsidiary protection already). Both these plans are relevant to British citizens moving to the EU after the post-Brexit transition period – and the latter is also relevant to British citizens covered by the withdrawal agreement.

      Comments

      This week’s plan is less a complete restart of EU law in this area than an attempt to relaunch discussions on a blocked set of amendments to that law, which moreover focusses on a limited set of issues. Will it ‘work’? There are two different ways to answer that question.

      First, will it unlock the institutional blockage? Here it should be kept in mind that the European Parliament and the Council had largely agreed on several of the 2016 proposals already; they would have been adopted in 2018 already had not the Council treated all the proposals as a package, and not gone back on agreements which the Council Presidency reached with the European Parliament. It is always open to the Council to get at least some of these proposals adopted quickly by reversing these approaches.

      On the blocked proposals, the Commission has targeted the key issues of border procedures and allocation of asylum-seekers. If the former leads to more quick removals of unsuccessful applicants, the latter issue is no longer so pressing. But it is not clear if the Member States will agree to anything on border procedures, or whether such an agreement will result in more expulsions anyway – because the latter depends on the willingness of non-EU countries, which the EU cannot legislate for (and does not even address in this most recent package). And because it is uncertain whether they will result in more expulsions, Member States will be wary of agreeing to anything which either results in more obligations to accept asylum-seekers on their territory, or leaves them with the same number as before.

      The idea of ‘return sponsorship’ – which reads like a grotesque parody of individuals sponsoring children in developing countries via charities – may not be appealing except to those countries like France, which have the capacity to twist arms in developing countries to accept returns. Member States might be able to agree on a replacement for the temporary protection Directive on the basis that they will never use that replacement either. And Commission threats to use infringement proceedings to enforce the law might not worry Member States who recall that the CJEU ruled on their failure to relocate asylum-seekers after the relocation law had already expired, and that the Court will soon rule on Hungary’s expulsion of the Central European University after it has already left.

      As to whether the proposals will ‘work’ in terms of managing asylum flows fairly and compatibly with human rights, it is striking how much they depend upon curtailing appeal rights, even though appeals are often successful. The proposed limitation of appeal rights will also be maintained in the Dublin system; and while the proposed ‘bottleneck’ of deciding on removals to non-EU countries before applying the Dublin system has been removed, a variation on this process may well apply in the border procedures process instead. There is no new review of the assessment of the safety of non-EU countries – which is questionable in light of the many reports of abuse in Libya. While the EU is not proposing, as the wildest headbangers would want, to turn people back or refuse applications without consideration, the question is whether the fast-track consideration of applications and then appeals will constitute merely a Potemkin village of procedural rights that mean nothing in practice.

      Increased detention is already a feature of the amendments proposed earlier: the reception conditions proposal would add a new ground for detention; the return Directive proposal would inevitably increase detention due to curtailing voluntary departure (as discussed here). Unfortunately the Commission’s claim in its new communication that its 2018 proposal is ‘promoting’ voluntary return is therefore simply false. Trump-style falsehoods have no place in the discussion of EU immigration or asylum law.

      The latest Eurodac proposal would not do much compared to the 2016 proposal – but then, the 2016 proposal would already constitute an enormous increase in the amount of data collected and shared by that system.

      Some elements of the package are more positive. The possibility for refugees and people with subsidiary protection to get EU long-term residence status earlier would be an important step toward making asylum ‘valid throughout the Union’, as referred to in the Treaties. The wider definition of family members, and the retention of the full sovereignty clause, may lead to some fairer results under the Dublin system. Future plans to improve the long-term residents’ Directive are long overdue. The Commission’s sound legal assessment that no one should be prosecuted for acting on their obligations to rescue people in distress at sea is welcome. The quasi-agreed text of the reception conditions Directive explicitly rules out Trump-style separate detention of children.

      No proposals from the EU can solve the underlying political issue: a chunk of public opinion is hostile to more migration, whether in frontline Member States, other Member States, or transit countries outside the EU. The politics is bound to affect what Member States and non-EU countries alike are willing to agree to. And for the same reason, even if a set of amendments to the system is ultimately agreed, there will likely be continuing issues of implementation, especially illegal pushbacks and refusals to accept relocation.

      https://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/09/first-analysis-of-eus-new-asylum.html?spref=fb

    • Pacte européen sur les migrations et l’asile : Le rendez-vous manqué de l’UE

      Le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile présenté par la Commission ce 23 septembre, loin de tirer les leçons de l’échec et du coût humain intolérable des politiques menées depuis 30 ans, s’inscrit dans la continuité des logiques déjà largement éprouvées, fondées sur une approche répressive et sécuritaire au service de l’endiguement et des expulsions et au détriment d’une politique d’accueil qui s’attache à garantir et à protéger la dignité et les droits fondamentaux.

      Des « nouveaux » camps européens aux frontières pour filtrer les personnes arrivées sur le territoire européen et expulser le plus grand nombre

      En réaction au drame des incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, la commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, affirmait le 17 septembre devant les députés européens qu’« il n’y aurait pas d’autres Moria » mais de « véritables centres d’accueil » aux frontières européennes.

      Si le nouveau pacte prévoie effectivement la création de « nouveaux » camps conjuguée à une « nouvelle » procédure accélérée aux frontières, ces derniers s’apparentent largement à l’approche hotspot mise en œuvre par l’Union européenne (UE) depuis 2015 afin d’organiser la sélection des personnes qu’elle souhaite accueillir et l’expulsion, depuis la frontière, de tous celles qu’elle considère « indésirables ».

      Le pacte prévoie ainsi la mise en place « d’un contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire pour toutes les personnes qui se présentent aux frontières extérieures ou après un débarquement, à la suite d’une opération de recherche et de sauvetage ». Il s’agira, pour les pays situés à la frontière extérieure de l’UE, de procéder – dans un délai de 5 jours et avec l’appui des agences européennes (l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes – Frontex et le Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile – EASO) – à des contrôles d’identité (prise d’empreintes et enregistrement dans les bases de données européennes) doublés de contrôles sécuritaires et sanitaires afin de procéder à un tri préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire, permettant d’orienter ensuite les personne vers :

      Une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière pour celles possédant une nationalité pour laquelle le taux de reconnaissance d’une protection internationale, à l’échelle de l’UE, est inférieure à 20%
      Une procédure d’asile normale pour celles considérées comme éligibles à une protection.
      Une procédure d’expulsion immédiate, depuis la frontière, pour toute celles qui auront été rejetées par ce dispositif de tri, dans un délai de 12 semaines.

      Pendant cette procédure de filtrage à la frontière, les personnes seraient considérées comme n’étant pas encore entrées sur le territoire européen ce qui permettrait aux Etats de déroger aux conventions de droit international qui s’y appliquent.

      Un premier projet pilote est notamment prévu à Lesbos, conjointement avec les autorités grecques, pour installer un nouveau camp sur l’île avec l’appui d’une Task Force européenne, directement placée sous le contrôle de la direction générale des affaires intérieure de la Commission européenne (DG HOME).

      Difficile de voir où se trouve l’innovation dans la proposition présentée par la Commission. Si ce n’est que les États européens souhaitent pousser encore plus loin à la fois la logique de filtrage à ces frontières ainsi que la sous-traitance de leur contrôle. Depuis l’été 2018, l’Union européenne défend la création de « centres contrôlés au sein de l’UE » d’une part et de « plateformes de débarquement dans les pays tiers » d’autre part. L’UE, à travers ce nouveau mécanisme, vise à organiser l’expulsion rapide des migrants qui sont parvenus, souvent au péril de leur vie, à pénétrer sur son territoire. Pour ce faire, la coopération accrue avec les gardes-frontières des États non européens et l’appui opérationnel de l’agence Frontex sont encore et toujours privilégiés.
      Un « nouvel écosystème en matière de retour »

      L’obsession européenne pour l’amélioration du « taux de retour » se retrouve au cœur de ce nouveau pacte, en repoussant toujours plus les limites en matière de coopération extérieure et d’enfermement des personnes étrangères jugées indésirables et en augmentant de façon inédite ses moyens opérationnels.

      Selon l’expression de Margaritis Schinas, commissaire grec en charge de la « promotion du mode de vie européen », la nouvelle procédure accélérée aux frontières s’accompagnera d’« un nouvel écosystème européen en matière de retour ». Il sera piloté par un « nouveau coordinateur de l’UE chargé des retours » ainsi qu’un « réseau de haut niveau coordonnant les actions nationales » avec le soutien de l’agence Frontex, qui devrait devenir « le bras opérationnel de la politique de retour européenne ».

      Rappelons que Frontex a vu ses moyens décuplés ces dernières années, notamment en vue d’expulser plus de personnes migrantes. Celle-ci a encore vu ses moyens renforcés depuis l’entrée en vigueur de son nouveau règlement le 4 décembre 2019 dont la Commission souhaite accélérer la mise en œuvre effective. Au-delà d’une augmentation de ses effectifs et de la possibilité d’acquérir son propre matériel, l’agence bénéficie désormais de pouvoirs étendus pour identifier les personnes « expulsables » du territoire européen, obtenir les documents de voyage nécessaires à la mise en œuvre de leurs expulsions ainsi que pour coordonner des opérations d’expulsion au service des Etats membres.

      La Commission souhaite également faire aboutir, d’ici le second trimestre 2021, le projet de révision de la directive européenne « Retour », qui constitue un recul sans précédent du cadre de protection des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : L’expulsion au cœur des politiques migratoires européennes, 22 mai 2019
      Des « partenariats sur-mesure » avec les pays d’origine et de transit

      La Commission étend encore redoubler d’efforts afin d’inciter les Etats non européens à participer activement à empêcher les départs vers l’Europe ainsi qu’à collaborer davantage en matière de retour et de réadmission en utilisant l’ensemble des instruments politiques à sa disposition. Ces dernières années ont vu se multiplier les instruments européens de coopération formelle (à travers la signature, entre autres, d’accords de réadmission bilatéraux ou multilatéraux) et informelle (à l’instar de la tristement célèbre déclaration entre l’UE et la Turquie de mars 2016) à tel point qu’il est devenu impossible, pour les États ciblés, de coopérer avec l’UE dans un domaine spécifique sans que les objectifs européens en matière migratoire ne soient aussi imposés.

      L’exécutif européen a enfin souligné sa volonté de d’exploiter les possibilités offertes par le nouveau règlement sur les visas Schengen, entré en vigueur en février 2020. Celui-ci prévoie d’évaluer, chaque année, le degré de coopération des Etats non européens en matière de réadmission. Le résultat de cette évaluation permettra d’adopter une décision de facilitation de visa pour les « bon élèves » ou à l’inverse, d’imposer des mesures de restrictions de visas aux « mauvais élèves ». Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Expulsions contre visas : le droit à la mobilité marchandé, 2 février 2020.

      Conduite au seul prisme des intérêts européens, cette politique renforce le caractère historiquement déséquilibré des relations de « coopération » et entraîne en outre des conséquences désastreuses sur les droits des personnes migrantes, notamment celui de quitter tout pays, y compris le leur. Sous couvert d’aider ces pays à « se développer », les mesures « incitatives » européennes ne restent qu’un moyen de poursuivre ses objectifs et d’imposer sa vision des migrations. En coopérant davantage avec les pays d’origine et de transit, parmi lesquelles des dictatures et autres régimes autoritaires, l’UE renforce l’externalisation de ses politiques migratoires, sous-traitant la gestion des exilées aux Etats extérieurs à l’UE, tout en se déresponsabilisant des violations des droits perpétrées hors de ses frontières.
      Solidarité à la carte, entre relocalisation et expulsion

      Le constat d’échec du système Dublin – machine infernale de l’asile européen – conjugué à la volonté de parvenir à trouver un consensus suite aux profonds désaccords qui avaient mené les négociations sur Dublin IV dans l’impasse, la Commission souhaite remplacer l’actuel règlement de Dublin par un nouveau règlement sur la gestion de l’asile et de l’immigration, liant étroitement les procédures d’asile aux procédures d’expulsion.

      Les quotas de relocalisation contraignants utilisés par le passé, à l’instar du mécanisme de relocalisation mis en place entre 2015 et 2017 qui fut un échec tant du point de vue du nombre de relocalisations (seulement 25 000 relocalisations sur les 160 000 prévues) que du refus de plusieurs Etats d’y participer, semblent être abandonnés.

      Le nouveau pacte propose donc un nouveau mécanisme de solidarité, certes obligatoire mais flexible dans ses modalités. Ainsi les Etats membres devront choisir, selon une clé de répartition définie :

      Soit de participer à l’effort de relocalisation des personnes identifiées comme éligibles à la protection internationale depuis les frontières extérieures pour prendre en charge l’examen de leur demande d’asile.
      Soit de participer au nouveau concept de « parrainage des retours » inventé par la Commission européenne. Concrètement, il s’agit d’être « solidaire autrement », en s’engageant activement dans la politique de retour européenne par la mise en œuvre des expulsions des personnes que l’UE et ses Etats membres souhaitent éloigner du territoire, avec la possibilité de concentrer leurs efforts sur les nationalités pour lesquelles leurs perspectives de faire aboutir l’expulsion est la plus élevée.

      De nouvelles règles pour les « situations de crise et de force majeure »

      Le pacte prévoie d’abroger la directive européenne relative à des normes minimales pour l’octroi d’une protection temporaire en cas d’afflux massif de personnes déplacées, au profit d’un nouveau règlement européen relatif aux « situations de crise et de force majeure ». L’UE et ses Etats membres ont régulièrement essuyé les critiques des acteurs de la société civile pour n’avoir jamais activé la procédure prévue par la directive de 2001, notamment dans le cadre de situation exceptionnelle telle que la crise de l’accueil des personnes arrivées aux frontières sud de l’UE en 2015.

      Le nouveau règlement prévoie notamment qu’en cas de « situation de crise ou de force majeure » les Etats membres pourraient déroger aux règles qui s’appliquent en matière d’asile, en suspendant notamment l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant un durée d’un mois maximum. Cette mesure entérine des pratiques contraires au droit international et européen, à l’instar de ce qu’a fait la Grèce début mars 2020 afin de refouler toutes les personnes qui tenteraient de pénétrer le territoire européen depuis la Turquie voisine. Voir notre précédente actualité sur le sujet : Frontière Grèce-Turquie : de l’approche hotspot au scandale de la guerre aux migrant·e ·s, 3 mars 2020

      Cette proposition représente un recul sans précédent du droit d’asile aux frontières et fait craindre de multiples violations du principe de non refoulement consacré par la Convention de Genève.

      Bien loin d’engager un changement de cap des politiques migratoires européennes, le nouveau pacte européen migrations et asile ne semble n’être qu’un nouveau cadre de plus pour poursuivre une approche des mouvements migratoires qui, de longue date, s’est construite autour de la volonté d’empêcher les arrivées aux frontières et d’organiser un tri parmi les personnes qui auraient réussi à braver les obstacles pour atteindre le territoire européen, entre celles considérées éligibles à la demande d’asile et toutes les autres qui devraient être expulsées.

      De notre point de vue, cela signifie surtout que des milliers de personnes continueront à être privées de liberté et à subir les dispositifs répressifs des Etats membres de l’Union européenne. Les conséquences néfastes sur la dignité humaine et les droits fondamentaux de cette approche sont flagrantes, les personnes exilées et leurs soutiens y sont confrontées tous les jours.

      Encore une fois, des moyens très importants sont consacrés à financer l’érection de barrières physiques, juridiques et technologiques ainsi que la construction de camps sur les routes migratoires tandis qu’ils pourraient utilement être redéployés pour accueillir dignement et permettre un accès inconditionnel au territoire européen pour les personnes bloquées à ses frontières extérieures afin d’examiner avec attention et impartialité leurs situations et assurer le respect effectif des droits de tou∙te∙s.

      Nous appelons à un changement radical des politiques migratoires, pour une Europe qui encourage les solidarités, fondée sur la protection des droits humains et la dignité humaine afin d’assurer la protection des personnes et non pas leur exclusion.

      https://www.lacimade.org/pacte-europeen-sur-les-migrations-et-lasile-le-rendez-vous-manque-de-lue

    • EU’s new migrant ‘pact’ is as squalid as its refugee camps

      Governments need to share responsibility for asylum seekers, beyond merely ejecting the unwanted

      One month after fires swept through Europe’s largest, most squalid refugee camp, the EU’s migration policies present a picture as desolate as the blackened ruins of Moria on the Greek island of Lesbos. The latest effort at overhauling these policies is a European Commission “pact on asylum and migration”, which is not a pact at all. Its proposals sharply divide the EU’s 27 governments.

      In an attempt to appease central and eastern European countries hostile to admitting asylum-seekers, the commission suggests, in an Orwellian turn of phrase, that they should operate “relocation and return sponsorships”, dispatching people refused entry to their places of origin. This sort of task is normally reserved for nightclub bouncers.

      The grim irony is that Hungary and Poland, two countries that would presumably be asked to take charge of such expulsions, are the subject of EU disciplinary proceedings due to alleged violations of the rule of law. It remains a mystery how, if the commission proposal moves forward, the EU will succeed in binding Hungary and Poland into a common asylum policy and bend them into accepting EU definitions of the rule of law.

      Perhaps the best thing to be said of the commission’s plan is that, unlike the UK government, EU policymakers are not toying with hare-brained schemes of sending asylum-seekers to Ascension Island in the south Atlantic. Such options are the imagined privilege of a former imperial power not divested of all its far-flung possessions.

      Yet the commission’s initiative still reeks of wishful thinking. It foresees a process in which authorities swiftly check the identities, security status and health of irregular migrants, before returning them home, placing them in the asylum system or putting them in temporary facilities. This will supposedly decongest EU border zones, as governments will agree how to relocate new arrivals. But it is precisely the lack of such agreement since 2015 that led to Moria’s disgraceful conditions.

      The commission should not be held responsible for governments failing to shoulder their responsibilities. It is also justified in emphasising the need for a strong EU frontier. This is a precondition for free movement inside the bloc, vital for a flourishing single market.

      True, the Schengen system of border-free internal travel is curtailed at present because of the pandemic, not to mention restrictions introduced in some countries after the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis. But no government wants to abandon Schengen. Where they fall out with each other is over the housing of refugees and migrants.

      Europe’s overcrowded, unhygienic refugee camps, and the paralysis that grips EU policies, are all the more shameful in that governments no longer face a border emergency. Some 60,800 irregular migrants crossed into the EU between January and August, 14 per cent less than the same period in 2019, according to the EU border agency.

      By contrast, there were 1.8m illegal border crossings in 2015, a different order of magnitude. Refugees from conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria made desperate voyages across the Mediterranean, with thousands drowning in ramshackle boats. Some countries, led by Germany and Sweden, were extremely generous in opening their doors to refugees. Others were not.

      The roots of today’s problems lie in the measures devised to address that crisis, above all a 2016 accord with Turkey. Irregular migrants were kept on Moria and other Greek islands, designated “hotspots”, in the expectation that failed asylum applicants would be smoothly returned to Turkey, its coffers replenished by billions of euros in EU assistance. In practice, few went back to Turkey and the understaffed, underfunded “hotspots” became places of tension between refugees and locals.

      Unable to agree on a relocation scheme among themselves, EU governments lapsed into a de facto policy of deterrence of irregular migrants. The pandemic provided an excuse for Italy and Malta to close their ports to people rescued at sea. Visiting the Greek-Turkish border in March, Ursula von der Leyen, the commission president, declared: “I thank Greece for being our European aspida [shield].”

      The legitimacy of EU refugee policies depends on adherence to international law, as well the bloc’s own rules. Its practical success requires all governments to share a responsibility for asylum-seekers that goes beyond ejecting unwanted individuals. Otherwise the EU will fall into the familiar trap of cobbling together unsatisfactory half-measures that guarantee more trouble in the future.

      https://www.ft.com/content/c50c6b9c-75a8-40b1-900d-a228faa382dc?segmentid=acee4131-99c2-09d3-a635-873e61754

    • The EU’s pact against migration, Part One

      The EU Commission’s proposal for a ‘New Pact for Migration and Asylum’ offers no prospect of ending the enduring mobility conflict, opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The ’New Pact for Migration and Asylum’, announced by the European Commission in July 2019, was finally presented on September 23, 2020. The Pact was eagerly anticipated as it was described as a “fresh start on migration in Europe”, acknowledging not only that Dublin had failed, but also that the negotiations between European member states as to what system might replace it had reached a standstill.

      The fire in Moria that left more than 13.000 people stranded in the streets of Lesvos island offered a glaring symbol of the failure of the current EU policy. The public outcry it caused and expressions of solidarity it crystallised across Europe pressured the Commission to respond through the publication of its Pact.

      Considering the trajectory of EU migration policies over the last decades, the particular position of the Commission within the European power structure and the current political conjuncture of strong anti-migration positions in Europe, we did not expect the Commission’s proposal to address the mobility conflict underlying its migration policy crisis in a constructive way. And indeed, the Pact’s main promise is to manage the diverging positions of member states through a new mechanism of “flexible solidarity” between member states in sharing the “burden” of migrants who have arrived on European territory. Perpetuating the trajectory of the last decades, it however remains premised on keeping most migrants from the global South out at all cost. The “New Pact” then is effectively a pact between European states against migrants. The Pact, which will be examined and possibly adopted by the European Parliament and Council in the coming months, confirms the impasse to which three decades of European migration and asylum policy have led, and an absence of any political imagination worthy of the name.
      The EU’s migration regime’s failed architecture

      The current architecture of the European border regime is based on two main and intertwined pillars: the Schengen Implementing Convention (SIC, or Schengen II) and the Dublin Convention, both signed in 1990, and gradually enforced in the following years.[1]

      Created outside the EC/EU context, they became the central rationalities of the emerging European border and migration regime after their incorporation into EU law through the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997/99). Schengen instituted the EU’s territory as an area of free movement for its citizens and, as a direct consequence, reinforced the exclusion of citizens of the global South and pushed control towards its external borders.

      However this profound transformation of European borders left unchanged the unbalanced systemic relations between Europe and the Global South, within which migrants’ movements are embedded. As a result, this policy shift did not stop migrants from reaching the EU but rather illegalised their mobility, forcing them to resort to precarious migration strategies and generating an easily exploitable labour force that has become a large-scale and permanent feature of EU economies.

      The more than 40,000 migrant deaths recorded at the EU’s borders by NGOs since the end of the 1980s are the lethal outcomes of this enduring mobility conflict opposing the movements of illegalised migrants to the EU’s restrictive migration policies.

      The second pillar of the EU’s migration architecture, the Dublin Convention, addressed asylum seekers and their allocation between member-states. To prevent them from filing applications in several EU countries – derogatively referred to as “asylum shopping” – the 2003 Dublin regulation states that the asylum seekers’ first country of entry into the EU is responsible for processing their claims. Dublin thus created an uneven European geography of (ir)responsibility that allowed the member states not directly situated at the intersection of European borders and routes of migration to abnegate their responsibility to provide shelter and protection, and placed a heavier “burden” on the shoulders of states located at the EU’s external borders.

      This unbalanced architecture, around which the entire Common European Asylum System (CEAS) was constructed, would begin to wobble as soon as the number of people arriving on the EU’s shores rose, leading to crisis-driven policy responses to prevent the migration regime from collapsing under the pressure of migrants’ refusal to be assigned to a country that was not of their choosing, and conflicts between member states.

      As a result, the development of a European border, migration and asylum policy has been driven by crisis and is inherently reactive. This pattern particularly holds for the last decade, when the large-scale movements of migrants to Europe in the wake of the Arab Uprisings in 2011 put the EU migration regime into permanent crisis mode and prompted hasty reforms. As of 2011, Italy allowed Tunisians to move on, leading to the re-introduction of border controls by states such as France, while the same year the 2011 European Court of Human Rights’ judgement brought Dublin deportations to Greece to a halt because of the appalling reception and living conditions there. The increasing refusal by asylum seekers to surrender their fingerprints – the core means of implementing Dublin – as of 2013 further destabilized the migration regime.

      The instability only grew when in April 2015, more then 1,200 people died in two consecutive shipwrecks, forcing the Commission to publish its ‘European Agenda for Migration’ in May 2015. The 2015 agenda announced the creation of the hotspot system in the hope of re-stabilising the European migration regime through a targeted intervention of European agencies at Europe’s borders. Essentially, the hotspot approach offered a deal to EU member states: comprehensive registration in Europeanised structures (the hotspots) by so-called “front-line states” – thus re-imposing Dublin – in exchange for relocation of part of the registered migrants to other EU countries – thereby alleviating front-line states of part of their “burden”.

      This plan however collapsed before it could ever work, as it was immediately followed by the large-scale summer arrivals of 2015 as migrants trekked across Europe’s borders. It was simultaneously boycotted by several member states who refused relocations and continue to lead the charge in fomenting an explicit anti-migration agenda in the EU. While border controls were soon reintroduced, relocations never materialised in a meaningful manner in the years that followed.

      With the Dublin regime effectively paralysed and the EU unable to agree on a new mechanism for the distribution of asylum seekers within Europe, the EU resorted to the decades-old policies that had shaped the European border and migration regime since its inception: keeping migrants out at all cost through border control implemented by member states, European agencies or outsourced to third countries.

      Considering the profound crisis the turbulent movements of migrants had plunged the EU into in the summer of 2015, no measure was deemed excessive in achieving this exclusionary end: neither the tacit acceptance of violent expulsions and push-backs by Spain and Greece, nor the outsourcing of border control to Libyan torturers, nor the shameless collaboration with dictatorial regimes such as Turkey.

      Under the guise of “tackling the root causes of migration”, development aid was diverted and used to impose border externalisation and deportation agreements. But the external dimension of the EU’s migration regime has proven just as unstable as its internal one – as the re-opening of borders by Turkey in March 2020 demonstrates. The movements of illegalised migrants towards the EU could never be entirely contained and those who reached the shores of Europe were increasingly relegated to infrastructures of detention. Even if keeping thousands of migrants stranded in the hell of Moria may not have been part of the initial hotspot plan, it certainly has been the outcome of the EU’s internal blockages and ultimately effective in shoring up the EU’s strategy of deterrence.

      The “New Pact” perpetuating the EU’s failed policy of closure

      Today the “New Pact”, promised for Spring 2020 and apparently forgotten at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, has been revived in a hurry to address the destruction of Moria hotspot. While detailed analysis of the regulations that it proposes are beyond the scope of this article,[2] the broad intentions of the Pact’s rationale are clear.

      Despite all its humane and humanitarian rhetoric and some language critically addressing the manifest absence of the rule of law at the border of Europe, the Commission’s pact is a pact against migration. Taking stock of the continued impasse in terms of internal distribution of migrants, it re-affirms the EU’s central objective of reducing, massively the number of asylum seekers to be admitted to Europe. It promises to do so by continuing to erect chains of externalised border control along migrants’ entire trajectories (what it refers to as the “whole-of-route approach”).

      Those who do arrive should be swiftly screened and sorted in an infrastructure of detention along the borders of Europe. The lucky few who will succeed in fitting their lives into the shrinking boxes of asylum law are to be relocated to other EU countries in function of a mechanism of distribution based on population size and wealth of member states.

      Whether this will indeed undo the imbalances of the Dublin regime remains an open question[3], nevertheless, this relocation key is one of the few positive steps offered by the Pact since it comes closer to migrants’ own “relocation key” but still falls short of granting asylum seekers the freedom to choose their country of protection and residence.[4] The majority of rejected asylum seekers – which may be determined on the basis of an extended understanding of the “safe third country” notion – is to be funnelled towards deportations operated by the EU states refusing relocation. The Commission hopes deportations will be made smoother after a newly appointed “EU Return Coordinator” will have bullied countries of origin into accepting their nationals using the carrot of development aid and the stick of visa sanctions. The Commission seems to believe that with fewer expected arrivals and fewer migrants ending up staying in Europe, and with its mechanism of “flexible solidarity” allowing for a selective participation in relocations or returns depending on the taste of its member states, it can both bridge the gap between member states’ interests and push for a deeper Europeanisation of the policy field in which its own role will become more central.

      Thus, the EU Commission’s attempt to square the circle of member states’ conflicting interests has resulted in a European pact against migration, which perpetuates the promises of the EU’s (anti-)migration policy over the last three decades: externalisation, enhanced borders, accelerated asylum procedures, detention and deportations to prevent and deter migrants from the global South. It seeks to strike yet another deal between European member states, without consulting – and at the expense of – migrants themselves. Because most of the policy means contained in the pact are not new, and have always failed to durably end illegalised migration – instead they have created a large precaritised population at the heart of Europe – we do not see how they would work today. Migrants will continue to arrive, and many will remain stranded in front-line states or other EU states as they await deportation. As such, the outcome of the pact (if it is agreed upon) is likely a perpetuation and generalisation of the hotspot system, the very system whose untenability – glaringly demonstrated by Moria’s fire – prompted the presentation of the New Pact in the first place. Even if the Commission’s “no more Morias” rhetoric would like to persuade us of the opposite,[5] the ruins of Moria point to the past as well as the potential future of the CEAS if the Commission has its way.

      We are dismayed at the loss of yet another opportunity for Europe to fundamentally re-orient its policy of closure, one which is profoundly at odds with the reality of large-scale displacement in an unequal and interconnected world. We are dismayed at the prospect of more suffering and more political crises that can only be the outcome of this continued policy failure. Clearly, an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with the movements of migration is called for. One which actually aims to de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict. One which starts from the reality of the movements of migrants and offers a frame for it to unfold rather than seeks to suppress and deny it.

      Notes and references

      [1] We have offered an extensive analysis of the following argument in previous articles. See in particular : Bernd Kasparek. 2016. “Complementing Schengen: The Dublin System and the European Border and Migration Regime”. In Migration Policy and Practice, edited by Harald Bauder and Christian Matheis, 59–78. Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship. Houndmills & New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani. 2016. “Ebbing and Flowing: The EU’s Shifting Practices of (Non-)Assistance and Bordering in a Time of Crisis”. Near Futures Online. No 1. Available here.

      [2] For first analyses see Steve Peers. 2020. “First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals”, EU Law Analysis, 25 September 2020; Sergio Carrera. 2020. “Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum”, CEPS, September 2020.

      [3] Carrera, ibid.

      [4] For a discussion of migration of migrants’ own relocation key, see Philipp Lutz, David Kaufmann and Anna Stütz. 2020. “Humanitarian Protection as a European Public Good: The Strategic Role of States and Refugees”, Journal of Common Market Studies 2020 Volume 58. Number 3. pp. 757–775. To compare the actual asylum applications across Europe over the last years with different relocations keys, see the tool developed by Etienne Piguet.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/the-eus-pact-against-migration-part-one

      #whole-of-route_approach #relocalisation #clé_de_relocalisation #relocation_key #pays-tiers_sûrs #EU_Return_Coordinator #solidarité_flexible #externalisation #new_pact

    • Towards a European pact with migrants, Part Two

      We call for a new Pact that addresses the reality of migrants’ movements, the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.

      In Part One, we analysed the EU’s new Pact against migration. Here, we call for an entirely different approach to how Europe engages with migration, one which offers a legal frame for migration to unfold, and addresses the systemic conditions leading people to flee their homes as well as the root causes of Europe’s racism.Let us imagine for a moment that the EU Commission truly wanted, and was in a position, to reorient the EU’s migration policy in a direction that might actually de-escalate and transform the enduring mobility conflict: what might its pact with migrants look like?

      The EU’s pact with migrants might start from three fundamental premises. First, it would recognize that any policy that is entirely at odds with social practices is bound to generate conflict, and ultimately fail. A migration policy must start from the social reality of migration and provide a frame for it to unfold. Second, the pact would acknowledge that no conflict can be brought to an end unilaterally. Any process of conflict transformation must bring together the conflicting parties, and seek to address their needs, interests and values so that they no longer clash with each other. In particular, migrants from the global South must be included in the definition of the policies that concern them. Third, it would recognise, as Tendayi Achiume has put it, that migrants from the global South are no strangers to Europe.[1] They have long been included in the expansive webs of empire. Migration and borders are embedded in these unequal relations, and no end to the mobility conflict can be achieved without fundamentally transforming them. Based on these premises, the EU’s pact with migrants might contain the following four core measures:
      Global justice and conflict prevention

      Instead of claiming to tackle the “root causes” of migration by diverting and instrumentalising development aid towards border control, the EU’s pact with migrants would end all European political and economic relations that contribute to the crises leading to mass displacement. The EU would end all support to dictatorial regimes, would ban all weapon exports, terminate all destabilising military interventions. It would cancel unfair trade agreements and the debts of countries of the global South. It would end its massive carbon emissions that contribute to the climate crisis. Through these means, the EU would not claim to end migration perceived as a “problem” for Europe, but it would contribute to allowing more people to live a dignified life wherever they are and decrease forced migration, which certainly is a problem for migrants. A true commitment to global justice and conflict prevention and resolution is necessary if Europe wishes to limit the factors that lead too many people onto the harsh paths of exile in their countries and regions, a small proportion of whom reach European shores.
      Tackling the “root causes” of European racism

      While the EU’s so-called “global approach” to migration has in fact been one-sided, focused exclusively on migration as “the problem” rather then the processes that drive the EU’s policies of exclusion, the EU’s pact with migrants would boldly tackle the “root causes” of racism and xenophobia in Europe. Bold policies designed to address the EU’s colonial past and present and the racial imaginaries it has unleashed would be proposed, a positive vision for living in common in diverse societies affirmed, and a more inclusive and fair economic system would be established in Europe to decrease the resentment of European populations which has been skilfully channelled against migrants and racialised people.
      Universal freedom of movement

      By tackling the causes of large-scale displacement and of exclusionary migration policies, the EU would be able to de-escalate the mobility conflict, and could thus propose a policy granting all migrants legal pathways to access and stay in Europe. As an immediate outcome of the institution of right to international mobility, migrants would no longer resort to smugglers and risk their lives crossing the sea – and thus no longer be in need of being rescued. Using safe and legal means of travel would also, in the time of Covid-19 pandemic, allow migrants to adopt all sanitary measures that are necessary to protect migrants and those they encounter. No longer policed through military means, migration could appear as a normal process that does not generate fear. Frontex, the European border agency, would be defunded, and concentrate its limited activities on detecting actual threats to the EU rather then constructing vulnerable populations as “risks”. In a world that would be less unequal and in which people would have the possibly to lead a dignified life wherever they are, universal freedom of movement would not lead to an “invasion” of Europe. Circulatory movement rather then permanent settlement would be frequent. Migrants’ legal status would no longer allow employers to push working conditions down. A European asylum system would continue to exist, to grant protection and support to those in need. The vestiges of the EU’s hotspots and detention centres might be turned into ministries of welcome, which would register and redirect people to the place of their choice. Registration would thus be a mere certification of having taken the first step towards European citizenship, transforming the latter into a truly post-national institution, a far horizon which current EU treaties only hint at.
      Democratizing borders

      Considering that all European migration policies to date have been fundamentally undemocratic – in that they were imposed on a group of people – migrants – who had no say in the legislative and political process defining the laws that govern their movement – the pact would instead be the outcome of considerable consultative process with migrants and the organisations that support them, as well the states of the global South. The pact, following from Étienne Balibar’s suggestion, would in turn propose to permanently democratise borders by instituting “a multilateral, negotiated control of their working by the populations themselves (including, of course, migrant populations),” within “new representative institutions” that “are not merely ‘territorial’ and certainly not purely national.”[2] In such a pact, the original promise of Europe as a post-national project would finally be revived.

      Such a policy orientation may of course appear as nothing more then a fantasy. And yet it appears evident to us that the direction we suggest is the only realistic one. European citizens and policy makers alike must realise that the question is not whether migrants will exercise their freedom to cross borders, but at what human and political cost. As a result, it is far more realistic to address the processes within which the mobility conflict is embedded, than seeking to ban human mobility. As the Black Lives Matter’s slogan “No justice no peace!” resonating in the streets of the world over recent months reminds us, without mobility justice, [3] their can be no end to mobility conflict.
      The challenges ahead for migrant solidarity movements

      Our policy proposals are perfectly realistic in relation to migrants’ movements and the processes shaping them, yet we are well aware that they are not on the agenda of neoliberal and nationalist Europe. If the EU Commission has squandered yet another opportunity to reorient the EU’s migration policy, it is simply that this Europe, governed by these member states and politicians, has lost the capacity to offer bold visions of democracy, freedom and justice for itself and the world. As such, we have little hope for a fundamental reorientation of the EU’s policies. The bleak prospect is of the perpetuation of the mobility conflict, and the human suffering and political crises it generates.

      What are those who seek to support migrants to do in this context?

      We must start by a sobering note addressed to the movement we are part of: the fire of Moria is not only a symptom and symbol of the failures of the EU’s migration policies and member states, but also of our own strategies. After all, since the hotspots were proposed in 2015 we have tirelessly denounced them, and documented the horrendous living conditions they have created. NGOs have litigated against them, but efforts have been turned down by a European Court of Human Rights that appears increasingly reluctant to position itself on migration-related issues and is thereby contributing to the perpetuation of grave violations by states.

      And despite the extraordinary mobilisation of civil society in alliance with municipalities across Europe who have declared themselves ready to welcome migrants, relocations never materialised on any significant scale. After five years of tireless mobilization, the hotspots still stand, with thousands of asylum seekers trapped in them.

      While the conditions leading to the fire are still being clarified, it appears that the migrants held hostage in Moria took it into their own hands to try to get rid of the camp through the desperate act of burning it to the ground. As such, while we denounce the EU’s policies, our movements are urgently in need of re-evaluating their own modes of action, and re-imagining them more effectively.

      We have no lessons to give, as we share these shortcomings. But we believe that some of the directions we have suggested in our utopian Pact with migrants can guide migrant solidarity movements as well , as they may be implemented from the bottom-up in the present and help reopen our political imagination.

      The freedom to move is not, or not only, a distant utopia, that may be instituted by states in some distant future. It can also be seen as a right and freedom that illegalised migrants seize on a day-to-day basis as they cross borders without authorisation, and persist in living where they choose.

      Freedom of movement can serve as a useful compass to direct and evaluate our practices of contestation and support. Litigation remains an important tool to counter the multiple forms of violence and violations that migrants face along their trajectories, even as we acknowledge that national and international courts are far from immune to the anti-migrant atmosphere within states. Forging infrastructures of support for migrants in the course of their mobility (such as the WatchTheMed Alarm Phone and the civilian rescue fleet) – and their stay (such as the many citizen platforms for housing )– is and will continue to be essential.

      While states seek to implement what they call an “integrated border management” that seeks to manage migrants’ unruly mobilities before, at, and after borders, we can think of our own networks as forming a fragmented yet interconnected “integrated border solidarity” along the migrants’ entire trajectory. The criminalisation of our acts of solidarity by states is proof that we are effective in disrupting the violence of borders.

      Solidarity cities have formed important nodes in these chains, as municipalities do have the capacity to enable migrants to live in dignity in urban spaces, and limit the reach of their security forces for example. Their dissonant voices of welcome have been important in demonstrating that segments of the European population, which are far from negligible, refuse to be complicit with the EU’s policies of closure and are ready to embody an open relation of solidarity with migrants and beyond. However we must also acknowledge that the prerogative of granting access to European states remains in the hands of central administrations, not in those of municipalities, and thus the readiness to welcome migrants has not allowed the latter to actually seek sanctuary.

      While humanitarian and humanist calls for welcome are important, we too need to locate migration and borders in a broader political and economic context – that of the past and present of empire – so that they can be understood as questions of (in)justice. Echoing the words of the late Edouard Glissant, as activists focusing on illegalised migration we should never forget that “to have to force one’s way across borders as a result of one’s misery is as scandalous as what founds that misery”.[4] As a result of this framing, many more alliances can be forged today between migrant solidarity movements and the global justice and climate justice movements, as well as anti-racist, anti-fascist, feminist and decolonial movements. Through such alliances, we may be better equipped to support migrants throughout their entire trajectories, and transform the conditions that constrain them today.

      Ultimately, to navigate its way out of its own impasses, it seems to us that migrant solidarity movements must address four major questions.

      First, what migration policy do we want? The predictable limits of the EU’s pact against migration may be an opportunity to forge our own alternative agenda.

      Second, how can we not only oppose the implementation of restrictive policies but shape the policy process itself so as to transform the field on which we struggle? Opposing the EU’s anti-migrant pact over the coming months may allow us to conduct new experiments.

      Third, as long as policies that deny basic principles of equality, freedom, justice, and our very common humanity, are still in place, how can we lead actions that disrupt them effectively? For example, what are the forms of nongovernmental evacuations that might support migrants in accessing Europe, and moving across its internal borders?

      Fourth, how can struggles around migration and borders be part of the forging of a more equal, free, just and sustainable world for all?

      The next months during which the EU’s Pact against migration will be discussed in front of the European Parliament and Council will see an uphill battle for all those who still believe in the possibility of a Europe of openness and solidarity. While we have no illusions as to the policy outcome, this is an opportunity we must seize, not only to claim that another Europe and another world is possible, but to start building them from below.

      Notes and references

      [1] Tendayi Achiume. 2019, “The Postcolonial Case for Rethinking Borders.” Dissent 66.3: pp.27-32.

      [2] Etienne Balibar. 2004. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship. Princeton: University Press, p. 108 and 117.

      [3] Mimi Sheller. 2018. Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes. London: Verso.

      [4] Edouard Glissant. 2006. “Il n’est frontière qu’on n’outrepasse”. Le Monde diplomatique, October 2006.

      https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/can-europe-make-it/towards-pact-migrants-part-two

    • Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile : Afin de garantir un nouveau départ et d’éviter de reproduire les erreurs passées, certains éléments à risque doivent être reconsidérés et les aspects positifs étendus.

      L’engagement en faveur d’une approche plus humaine de la protection et l’accent mis sur les aspects positifs et bénéfiques de la migration avec lesquels la Commission européenne a lancé le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile sont les bienvenus. Cependant, les propositions formulées reflètent très peu cette rhétorique et ces ambitions. Au lieu de rompre avec les erreurs de la précédente approche de l’Union européenne (UE) et d’offrir un nouveau départ, le Pacte continue de se focaliser sur l’externalisation, la dissuasion, la rétention et le retour.

      Cette première analyse des propositions, réalisée par la société civile, a été guidée par les questions suivantes :

      Les propositions formulées sont-elles en mesure de garantir, en droit et en pratique, le respect des normes internationales et européennes ?
      Participeront-elles à un partage plus juste des responsabilités en matière d’asile au niveau de l’UE et de l’international ?
      Seront-elles susceptibles de fonctionner en pratique ?

      Au lieu d’un partage automatique des responsabilités, le Pacte introduit un système de Dublin, qui n’en porte pas le nom, plus complexe et un mécanisme de « parrainage au retour »

      Le Pacte sur la migration et l’asile a manqué l’occasion de réformer en profondeur le système de Dublin : le principe de responsabilité du premier pays d’arrivée pour examiner les demandes d’asile est, en pratique, maintenu. De plus, le Pacte propose un système complexe introduisant diverses formes de solidarité.

      Certains ajouts positifs dans les critères de détermination de l’Etat membre responsable de la demande d’asile sont à relever, par exemple, l’élargissement de la définition des membres de famille afin d’inclure les frères et sœurs, ainsi qu’un large éventail de membres de famille dans le cas des mineurs non accompagnés et la délivrance d’un diplôme ou d’une autre qualification par un Etat membre. Cependant, au regard de la pratique actuelle des Etats membres, il sera difficile de s’éloigner du principe du premier pays d’entrée comme l’option de départ en faveur des nouvelles considérations prioritaires, notamment le regroupement familial.

      Dans le cas d’un nombre élevé de personnes arrivées sur le territoire (« pression migratoire ») ou débarquées suite à des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage, la solidarité entre Etats membres est requise. Les processus qui en découlent comprennent une série d’évaluations, d’engagements et de rapports devant être rédigés par les États membres. Si la réponse collective est insuffisante, la Commission européenne peut prendre des mesures correctives. Au lieu de promouvoir un mécanisme de soutien pour un partage prévisible des responsabilités, ces dispositions tendent plutôt à créer des formes de négociations entre États membres qui nous sont toutes devenues trop familières. La complexité des propositions soulève des doutes quant à leur application réelle en pratique.

      Les États membres sont autorisés à choisir le « parrainage de retour » à la place de la relocalisation de personnes sur leur territoire, ce qui indique une attention égale portée au retour et à la protection. Au lieu d’apporter un soutien aux Etats membres en charge d’un plus grand nombre de demandes de protection, cette proposition soulève de nombreuses préoccupations juridiques et relatives au respect des droits de l’homme, en particulier si le transfert vers l’Etat dit « parrain » se fait après l’expiration du délai de 8 mois. Qui sera en charge de veiller au traitement des demandeurs d’asile déboutés à leur arrivée dans des Etats qui n’acceptent pas la relocalisation ?

      Le Pacte propose d’étendre l’utilisation de la procédure à la frontière, y compris un recours accru à la rétention

      A défaut de rééquilibrer la responsabilité entre les États membres de l’UE, la proposition de règlement sur les procédures communes exacerbe la pression sur les États situés aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et sur les pays des Balkans occidentaux. La Commission propose de rendre, dans certains cas, les procédures d’asile et de retour à la frontière obligatoires. Cela s’appliquerait notamment aux ressortissants de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 20%. Ces procédures seraient facultatives lorsque les Etats membres appliquent les concepts de pays tiers sûr ou pays d’origine sûr. Toutefois, la Commission a précédemment proposé que ceux-ci deviennent obligatoires pour l’ensemble des Etats membres. Les associations réitèrent leurs inquiétudes quant à l’utilisation de ces deux concepts qui ont été largement débattus entre 2016 et 2019. Leur application obligatoire ne doit plus être proposée.

      La proposition de procédure à la frontière repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – notamment sur le fait que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’est pas éligible à un statut de protection et que l’examen des demandes de protection peut être effectué facilement et rapidement. Ni l’une ni l’autre ne sont correctes. En effet, en prenant en considération à la fois les décisions de première et de seconde instance dans toute l’UE il apparaît que la plupart des demandeurs d’asile dans l’UE au cours des trois dernières années ont obtenu un statut de protection. En outre, le Pacte ne doit pas persévérer dans cette approche erronée selon laquelle les procédures d’asile peuvent être conduites rapidement à travers la réduction de garanties et l’introduction d’un système de tri. La durée moyenne de la procédure d’asile aux Pays-Bas, souvent qualifiée d’ « élève modèle » pour cette pratique, dépasse un an et peut atteindre deux années jusqu’à ce qu’une décision soit prise.

      La proposition engendrerait deux niveaux de standards dans les procédures d’asile, largement déterminés par le pays d’origine de la personne concernée. Cela porte atteinte au droit individuel à l’asile et signifierait qu’un nombre accru de personnes seront soumises à une procédure de deuxième catégorie. Proposer aux Etats membres d’émettre une décision d’asile et d’éloignement de manière simultanée, sans introduire de garanties visant à ce que les principes de non-refoulement, d’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, et de protection de la vie privée et familiale ne soient examinés, porte atteinte aux obligations qui découlent du droit international. La proposition formulée par la Commission supprime également l’effet suspensif automatique du recours, c’est-à-dire le droit de rester sur le territoire dans l’attente d’une décision finale rendue dans le cadre d’une procédure à la frontière.

      L’idée selon laquelle les personnes soumises à des procédures à la frontière sont considérées comme n’étant pas formellement entrées sur le territoire de l’État membre est trompeuse et contredit la récente jurisprudence de l’UE, sans pour autant modifier les droits de l’individu en vertu du droit européen et international.

      La proposition prive également les personnes de la possibilité d’accéder à des permis de séjour pour des motifs autres que l’asile et impliquera très probablement une privation de liberté pouvant atteindre jusqu’à 6 mois aux frontières de l’UE, c’est-à-dire un maximum de douze semaines dans le cadre de la procédure d’asile à la frontière et douze semaines supplémentaires en cas de procédure de retour à la frontière. En outre, les réformes suppriment le principe selon lequel la rétention ne doit être appliquée qu’en dernier recours dans le cadre des procédures aux frontières. En s’appuyant sur des restrictions plus systématiques des mouvements dans le cadre des procédures à la frontière, la proposition restreindra l’accès de l’individu aux services de base fournis par des acteurs qui ne pourront peut-être pas opérer à la frontière, y compris pour l’assistance et la représentation juridiques. Avec cette approche, on peut s’attendre aux mêmes échecs rencontrés dans la mise en œuvre des « hotspot » sur les îles grecques.

      La reconnaissance de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant comme élément primordial dans toutes les procédures pour les États membres est positive. Cependant, la Commission diminue les garanties de protection des enfants en n’exemptant que les mineurs non accompagnés ou âgés de moins de douze ans des procédures aux frontières. Ceci est en contradiction avec la définition internationale de l’enfant qui concerne toutes les personnes jusqu’à l’âge de dix-huit ans, telle qu’inscrite dans la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant ratifiée par tous les États membres de l’UE.

      Dans les situations de crise, les États membres sont autorisés à déroger à d’importantes garanties qui soumettront davantage de personnes à des procédures d’asile de qualité inférieure

      La crainte d’iniquité procédurale est d’autant plus visible dans les situations où un État membre peut prétendre être confronté à une « situation exceptionnelle d’afflux massif » ou au risque d’une telle situation.

      Dans ces cas, le champ d’application de la procédure obligatoire aux frontières est considérablement étendu à toutes les personnes en provenance de pays dont le taux moyen de protection de l’UE est inférieur à 75%. La procédure d’asile à la frontière et la procédure de retour à la frontière peuvent être prolongées de huit semaines supplémentaires, soit cinq mois chacune, ce qui porte à dix mois la durée maximale de privation de liberté. En outre, les États membres peuvent suspendre l’enregistrement des demandes d’asile pendant quatre semaines et jusqu’à un maximum de trois mois. Par conséquent, si aucune demande n’est enregistrée pendant plusieurs semaines, les personnes sont susceptibles d’être exposées à un risque accru de rétention et de refoulement, et leurs droits relatifs à un accueil digne et à des services de base peuvent être gravement affectés.

      Cette mesure permet aux États membres de déroger à leur responsabilité de garantir un accès à l’asile et un examen efficace et équitable de l’ensemble des demandes d’asile, ce qui augmente ainsi le risque de refoulement. Dans certains cas extrêmes, notamment lorsque les États membres agissent en violation flagrante et persistante des obligations du droit de l’UE, le processus de demande d’autorisation à la Commission européenne pourrait être considéré comme une amélioration, étant donné qu’actuellement la loi est ignorée, sans consultation et ce malgré les critiques de la Commission européenne. Toutefois, cela ne peut être le point de départ de l’évaluation de cette proposition de la législation européenne. L’impact à grande échelle de cette dérogation offre la possibilité à ce qu’une grande majorité des personnes arrivant dans l’UE soient soumises à une procédure de second ordre.

      Pré-filtrage à la frontière : risques et opportunités

      La Commission propose un processus de « pré-filtrage à l’entrée » pour toutes les personnes qui arrivent de manière irrégulière aux frontières de l’UE, y compris à la suite d’un débarquement dans le cadre des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage. Le processus de pré-filtrage comprend des contrôles de sécurité, de santé et de vulnérabilité, ainsi que l’enregistrement des empreintes digitales, mais il conduit également à des décisions impactant l’accès à l’asile, notamment en déterminant si une personne doit être sujette à une procédure d’asile accélérée à la frontière, de relocalisation ou de retour. Ce processus peut durer jusqu’à 10 jours et doit être effectué au plus près possible de la frontière. Le lieu où les personnes seront placées et l’accès aux conditions matérielles d’accueil demeurent flous. Le filtrage peut également être appliqué aux personnes se trouvant sur le territoire d’un État membre, ce qui pourrait conduire à une augmentation de pratiques discriminatoires. Des questions se posent également concernant les droits des personnes soumises au filtrage, tels que l’accès à l’information, , l’accès à un avocat et au droit de contester la décision prise dans ce contexte ; les motifs de refus d’entrée ; la confidentialité et la protection des données collectées. Etant donné que les États membres peuvent facilement se décharger de leurs responsabilités en matière de dépistage médical et de vulnérabilité, il n’est pas certain que certains besoins seront effectivement détectés et pris en considération.

      Une initiative à saluer est la proposition d’instaurer un mécanisme indépendant des droits fondamentaux à la frontière. Afin qu’il garantisse une véritable responsabilité face aux violations des droits à la frontière, y compris contre les éloignements et les refoulements récurrents dans un grand nombre d’États membres, ce mécanisme doit être étendu au-delà de la procédure de pré-filtrage, être indépendant des autorités nationales et impliquer des organisations telles que les associations non gouvernementales.

      La proposition fait de la question du retour et de l’expulsion une priorité

      L’objectif principal du Pacte est clair : augmenter de façon significative le nombre de personnes renvoyées ou expulsées de l’UE. La création du poste de Coordinateur en charge des retours au sein de la Commission européenne et d’un directeur exécutif adjoint aux retours au sein de Frontex en sont la preuve, tandis qu’aucune nomination n’est prévue au sujet de la protection de garanties ou de la relocalisation. Le retour est considéré comme un élément admis dans la politique migratoire et le soutien pour des retours dignes, en privilégiant les retours volontaires, l’accès à une assistance au retour et l’aide à la réintégration, sont essentiels. Cependant, l’investissement dans le retour n’est pas une réponse adaptée au non-respect systématique des normes d’asile dans les États membres de l’UE.

      Rien de nouveau sur l’action extérieure : des propositions irréalistes qui risquent de continuer d’affaiblir les droits de l’homme

      La tension entre l’engagement rhétorique pour des partenariats mutuellement bénéfiques et la focalisation visant à placer la migration au cœur des relations entre l’UE et les pays tiers se poursuit. Les tentatives d’externaliser la responsabilité de l’asile et de détourner l’aide au développement, les mécanismes de visa et d’autres outils pour inciter les pays tiers à coopérer sur la gestion migratoire et les accords de réadmission sont maintenues. Cela ne représente pas seulement un risque allant à l’encontre de l’engagement de l’UE pour ses principes de développement, mais cela affaiblit également sa posture internationale en générant de la méfiance et de l’hostilité depuis et à l’encontre des pays tiers. De plus, l’usage d’accords informels et la coopération sécuritaire sur la gestion migratoire avec des pays tels que la Libye ou la Turquie risquent de favoriser les violations des droits de l’homme, d’encourager les gouvernements répressifs et de créer une plus grande instabilité.

      Un manque d’ambition pour des voies légales et sûres vers l’Europe

      L’opportunité pour l’UE d’indiquer qu’elle est prête à contribuer au partage des responsabilités pour la protection au niveau international dans un esprit de partenariat avec les pays qui accueillent la plus grande majorité des réfugiés est manquée. Au lieu de proposer un objectif ambitieux de réinstallation de réfugiés, la Commission européenne a seulement invité les Etats membres à faire plus et a converti les engagements de 2020 en un mécanisme biennal, ce qui résulte en la perte d’une année de réinstallation européenne.

      La reconnaissance du besoin de faciliter la migration de main-d’œuvre à travers différents niveaux de compétences est à saluer, mais l’importance de cette migration dans les économies et les sociétés européennes ne se reflète pas dans les ressources, les propositions et les actions allouées.

      Le soutien aux activités de recherche et de sauvetage et aux actions de solidarité doit être renforcé

      La tragédie humanitaire dans la mer Méditerranée nécessite encore une réponse y compris à travers un soutien financier et des capacités de recherches et de sauvetage. Cet enjeu ainsi que celui du débarquement sont pris en compte dans toutes les propositions, reconnaissant ainsi la crise humanitaire actuelle. Cependant, au lieu de répondre aux comportements et aux dispositions règlementaires des gouvernements qui obstruent les activités de secours et le travail des défendeurs des droits, la Commission européenne suggère que les standards de sécurité sur les navires et les niveaux de communication avec les acteurs privés doivent être surveillés. Les acteurs privés sont également requis d’adhérer non seulement aux régimes légaux, mais aussi aux politiques et pratiques relatives à « la gestion migratoire » qui peuvent potentiellement interférer avec les obligations de recherches et de sauvetage.

      Bien que la publication de lignes directrices pour prévenir la criminalisation de l’action humanitaire soit la bienvenue, celles-ci se limitent aux actes mandatés par la loi avec une attention spécifique aux opérations de sauvetage et de secours. Cette approche risque d’omettre les activités humanitaires telles que la distribution de nourriture, d’abris, ou d’information sur le territoire ou assurés par des organisations non mandatées par le cadre légal qui sont également sujettes à ladite criminalisation et à des restrictions.

      Des signes encourageants pour l’inclusion

      Les changements proposés pour permettre aux réfugiés d’accéder à une résidence de long-terme après trois ans et le renforcement du droit de se déplacer et de travailler dans d’autres Etats membres sont positifs. De plus, la révision du Plan d’action pour l’inclusion et l’intégration et la mise en place d’un groupe d’experts pour collecter l’avis des migrants afin de façonner la politique européenne sont les bienvenues.

      La voie à suivre

      La présentation des propositions de la Commission est le commencement de ce qui promet d’être une autre longue période conflictuelle de négociations sur les politiques européennes d’asile et de migration. Alors que ces négociations sont en cours, il est important de rappeler qu’il existe déjà un régime d’asile européen et que les Etats membres ont des obligations dans le cadre du droit européen et international.

      Cela requiert une action immédiate de la part des décideurs politiques européens, y compris de la part des Etats membres, de :

      Mettre en œuvre les standards existants en lien avec les conditions matérielles d’accueil et les procédures d’asile, d’enquêter sur leur non-respect et de prendre les mesures disciplinaires nécessaires ;
      Sauver des vies en mer, et de garantir des capacités de sauvetage et de secours, permettant un débarquement et une relocalisation rapide ;
      Continuer de s’accorder sur des arrangements ad-hoc de solidarité pour alléger la pression sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures de l’UE et encourager les Etats membres à avoir recours à la relocalisation.

      Concernant les prochaines négociations sur le Pacte, nous recommandons aux co-législateurs de :

      Rejeter l’application obligatoire de la procédure d’asile ou de retour à la frontière : ces procédures aux standards abaissés réduisent les garanties des demandeurs d’asile et augmentent le recours à la rétention. Elles exacerbent le manque de solidarité actuel sur l’asile dans l’UE en plaçant plus de responsabilité sur les Etats membres aux frontières extérieures. L’expérience des hotspots et d’autres initiatives similaires démontrent que l’ajout de procédures ou d’étapes dans l’asile peut créer des charges administratives et des coûts significatifs, et entraîner une plus grande inefficacité ;
      Se diriger vers la fin de la privation de liberté de migrants, et interdire la rétention de mineurs conformément à la Convention internationale des droits de l’enfant, et de dédier suffisamment de ressources pour des solutions non privatives de libertés appropriées pour les mineurs et leurs familles ;
      Réajuster les propositions de réforme afin de se concentrer sur le maintien et l’amélioration des standards des droits de l’homme et de l’asile en Europe, plutôt que sur le retour ;
      Œuvrer à ce que les propositions réforment fondamentalement la façon dont la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile en UE est organisée, en adressant les problèmes liés au principe de pays de première entrée, afin de créer un véritable mécanisme de solidarité ;
      Limiter les possibilités pour les Etats membres de déroger à leurs responsabilités d’enregistrer les demandes d’asile ou d’examiner les demandes, afin d’éviter de créer des incitations à opérer en mode gestion de crise et à diminuer les standards de l’asile ;
      Augmenter les garanties pendant la procédure de pré-filtrage pour assurer le droit à l’information, l’accès à une aide et une représentation juridique, la détection et la prise en charge des vulnérabilités et des besoins de santé, et une réponse aux préoccupations liées à l’enregistrement et à la protection des données ;
      Garantir que le mécanisme de suivi des droits fondamentaux aux frontières dispose d’une portée large afin de couvrir toutes les violations des droits fondamentaux à la frontière, qu’il soit véritablement indépendant des autorités nationales et dispose de ressources adéquates et qu’il contribue à la responsabilisation ;
      S’opposer aux tentatives d’utiliser l’aide au développement, au commerce, aux investissements, aux mécanismes de visas, à la coopération sécuritaire et autres politiques et financements pour faire pression sur les pays tiers dans leur coopération étroitement définie par des objectifs européens de contrôle migratoire ;
      Evaluer l’impact à long-terme des politiques migratoires d’externalisation sur la paix, le respect des droits et le développement durable et garantir que la politique extérieure migratoire ne contribue pas à la violation de droits de l’homme et prenne en compte les enjeux de conflits ;
      Développer significativement les voies légales et sûres vers l’UE en mettant en œuvre rapidement les engagements actuels de réinstallation, en proposant de nouveaux objectifs ambitieux et en augmentant les opportunités de voies d’accès à la protection ainsi qu’à la migration de main-d’œuvre et universitaire en UE ;
      Renforcer les exceptions à la criminalisation lorsqu’il s’agit d’actions humanitaires et autres activités indépendantes de la société civile et enlever les obstacles auxquels font face les acteurs de la société civile fournissant une assistance vitale et humanitaire sur terre et en mer ;
      Mettre en place une opération de recherche et de sauvetage en mer Méditerranée financée et coordonnée par l’UE ;
      S’appuyer sur les propositions prometteuses pour soutenir l’inclusion à travers l’accès à la résidence à long-terme et les droits associés et la mise en œuvre du Plan d’action sur l’intégration et l’inclusion au niveau européen, national et local.

      https://www.forumrefugies.org/s-informer/positions/europe/774-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-l-asile-afin-de-garantir-un-no

    • Nouveau Pacte européen  : les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s traité.e.s comme des « # colis à trier  »

      Le jour même de la Conférence des Ministres européens de l’Intérieur, EuroMed Droits présente son analyse détaillée du nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration, publié le 23 septembre dernier (https://euromedrights.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Analysis-of-Asylum-and-Migration-Pact_Final_Clickable.pdf).

      On peut résumer les plus de 500 pages de documents comme suit  : le nouveau Pacte européen sur l’asile et la migration déshumanise les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s, les traitant comme des «  #colis à trier  » et les empêchant de se déplacer en Europe. Ce Pacte soulève de nombreuses questions en matière de respect des droits humains, dont certaines sont à souligner en particulier  :

      L’UE détourne le concept de solidarité. Le Pacte vise clairement à «  rétablir la confiance mutuelle entre les États membres  », donnant ainsi la priorité à la #cohésion:interne de l’UE au détriment des droits des migrant.e.s et des réfugié.e.s. La proposition laisse le choix aux États membres de contribuer – en les mettant sur un pied d’égalité – à la #réinstallation, au #rapatriement, au soutien à l’accueil ou à l’#externalisation des frontières. La #solidarité envers les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s et leurs droits fondamentaux sont totalement ignorés.

      Le pacte promeut une gestion «  sécuritaire  » de la migration. Selon la nouvelle proposition, les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s seront placé.e.s en #détention et privé.e.s de liberté à leur arrivée. La procédure envisagée pour accélérer la procédure de demande d’asile ne pourra se faire qu’au détriment des lois sur l’asile et des droits des demandeur.se.s. Il est fort probable que la #procédure se déroulera de manière arbitraire et discriminatoire, en fonction de la nationalité du/de la demandeur.se, de son taux de reconnaissance et du fait que le pays dont il/elle provient est «  sûr  », ce qui est un concept douteux.

      L’idée clé qui sous-tend cette vision est simple  : externaliser autant que possible la gestion des frontières en coopérant avec des pays tiers. L’objectif est de faciliter le retour et la réadmission des migrant.e.s dans le pays d’où ils/elles sont parti.es. Pour ce faire, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes (Frontex) verrait ses pouvoirs renforcés et un poste de coordinateur.trice européen.ne pour les retours serait créé. Le pacte risque de facto de fournir un cadre juridique aux pratiques illégales telles que les refoulements, les détentions arbitraires et les mesures visant à réduire davantage la capacité en matière d’asile. Des pratiques déjà en place dans certains États membres.

      Le Pacte présente quelques aspects «  positifs  », par exemple en matière de protection des enfants ou de regroupement familial, qui serait facilité. Mais ces bonnes intentions, qui doivent être mises en pratique, sont noyées dans un océan de mesures répressives et sécuritaires.

      EuroMed Droits appelle les Etats membres de l’UE à réfléchir en termes de mise en œuvre pratique (ou non) de ces mesures. Non seulement elles violent les droits humains, mais elles sont impraticables sur le terrain  : la responsabilité de l’évaluation des demandes d’asile reste au premier pays d’arrivée, sans vraiment remettre en cause le Règlement de Dublin. Cela signifie que des pays comme l’Italie, Malte, l’Espagne, la Grèce et Chypre continueront à subir une «  pression  » excessive, ce qui les encouragera à poursuivre leurs politiques de refoulement et d’expulsion. Enfin, le Pacte ne répond pas à la problématique urgente des «  hotspots  » et des camps de réfugié.e.s comme en Italie ou en Grèce et dans les zones de transit à l’instar de la Hongrie. Au contraire, cela renforce ce modèle dangereux en le présentant comme un exemple à exporter dans toute l’Europe, alors que des exemples récents ont démontré l’impossibilité de gérer ces camps de manière humaine.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/nouveau-pacte-europeen%e2%80%af-les-migrant-e-s-et-refugie-e-s-traite

      #paquets_de_la_poste #paquets #poste #tri #pays_sûrs

    • A “Fresh Start” or One More Clunker? Dublin and Solidarity in the New Pact

      In ongoing discussions on the reform of the CEAS, solidarity is a key theme. It stands front and center in the New Pact on Migration and Asylum: after reassuring us of the “human and humane approach” taken, the opening quote stresses that Member States must be able to “rely on the solidarity of our whole European Union”.

      In describing the need for reform, the Commission does not mince its words: “[t]here is currently no effective solidarity mechanism in place, and no efficient rule on responsibility”. It’s a remarkable statement: barely one year ago, the Commission maintained that “[t]he EU [had] shown tangible and rapid support to Member States under most pressure” throughout the crisis. Be that as it may, we are promised a “fresh start”. Thus, President Von der Leyen has announced on the occasion of the 2020 State of the Union Address that “we will abolish the Dublin Regulation”, the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal (examined here) has been withdrawn, and the Pact proposes a “new solidarity mechanism” connected to “robust and fair management of the external borders” and capped by a new “governance framework”.

      Before you buy the shiny new package, you are advised to consult the fine print however. Yes, the Commission proposes to abolish the Dublin III Regulation and withdraws the Dublin IV Proposal. But the Proposal for an Asylum and Migration Management Regulation (hereafter “the Migration Management Proposal”) reproduces word-for-word the Dublin III Regulation, subject to amendments drawn … from the Dublin IV Proposal! As for the “governance framework” outlined in Articles 3-7 of the Migration Management Proposal, it’s a hodgepodge of purely declamatory provisions (e.g. Art. 3-4), of restatements of pre-existing obligations (Art. 5), of legal bases authorizing procedures that require none (Art. 7). The one new item is a yearly monitoring exercise centered on an “European Asylum and Migration Management Strategy” (Art. 6), which seems as likely to make a difference as the “Mechanism for Early Warning, Preparedness and Crisis Management”, introduced with much fanfare with the Dublin III Regulation and then left in the drawer before, during and after the 2015/16 crisis.

      Leaving the provisions just mentioned for future commentaries – fearless interpreters might still find legal substance in there – this contribution focuses on four points: the proposed amendments to Dublin, the interface between Dublin and procedures at the border, the new solidarity mechanism, and proposals concerning force majeure. Caveat emptor! It is a jungle of extremely detailed and sometimes obscure provisions. While this post is longer than usual – warm thanks to the lenient editors! – do not expect an exhaustive summary, nor firm conclusions on every point.
      Dublin, the Undying

      To borrow from Mark Twain, reports of the death of the Dublin system have been once more greatly exaggerated. As noted, Part III of the Migration Management Proposal (Articles 8-44) is for all intents and purposes an amended version of the Dublin III Regulation, and most of the amendments are lifted from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal.

      A first group of amendments concerns the responsibility criteria. Some expand the possibilities to allocate applicants based on their “meaningful links” with Member States: Article 2(g) expands the family definition to include siblings, opening new possibilities for reunification; Article 19(4) enlarges the criterion based on previous legal abode (i.e. expired residence documents); in a tip of the hat to the Wikstroem Report, commented here, Article 20 introduces a new criterion based on prior education in a Member State.

      These are welcome changes, but all that glitters is not gold. The Commission advertises “streamlined” evidentiary requirements to facilitate family reunification. These would be necessary indeed: evidentiary issues have long undermined the application of the family criteria. Unfortunately, the Commission is not proposing anything new: Article 30(6) of the Migration Management Proposal corresponds in essence to Article 22(5) of the Dublin III Regulation.

      Besides, while the Commission proposes to expand the general definition of family, the opposite is true of the specific definition of family applicable to “dependent persons”. Under Article 16 of the Dublin III Regulation, applicants who e.g. suffer from severe disabilities are to be kept or brought together with a care-giving parent, child or sibling residing in a Member State. Due to fears of sham marriages, spouses have been excluded and this is legally untenable and inhumane, but instead of tackling the problem the Commission proposes in Article 24 to worsen it by excluding siblings. The end result is paradoxical: persons needing family support the most will be deprived – for no apparent reason other than imaginary fears of “abuses” – of the benefits of enlarged reunification possibilities. “[H]uman and humane”, indeed.

      The fight against secondary movements inspires most of the other amendments to the criteria. In particular, Article 21 of the Proposal maintains and extends the much-contested criterion of irregular entry while clarifying that it applies also to persons disembarked after a search and rescue (SAR) operation. The Commission also proposes that unaccompanied children be transferred to the first Member State where they applied if no family criterion is applicable (Article 15(5)). This would overturn the MA judgment of the ECJ whereby in such cases the asylum claim must be examined in the State where the child last applied and is present. It’s not a technical fine point: while the case-law of the ECJ is calculated to spare children the trauma of a transfer, the proposed amendment would subject them again to the rigours of Dublin.

      Again to discourage secondary movements, the Commission proposes – as in 2016 – a second group of amendments: new obligations for the applicants (Articles 9-10). Applicants must in principle apply in the Member State of first entry, remain in that State for the duration of the Dublin procedure and, post-transfer, remain in the State responsible. Moving to the “wrong” State entails losing the benefits of the Reception Conditions Directive, subject to “the need to ensure a standard of living in accordance with” the Charter. It is debatable whether this is a much lesser standard of reception. More importantly: as reception conditions in line with the Directive are seldom guaranteed in several frontline Member States, the prospect of being treated “in accordance with the Charter” elsewhere will hardly dissuade applicants from moving on.

      The 2016 Proposal foresaw, as further punishment, the mandatory application of accelerated procedures to “secondary movers”. This rule disappears from the Migration Management Proposal, but as Daniel Thym points out in his forthcoming contribution on secondary movements, it remains in Article 40(1)(g) of the 2016 Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation. Furthermore, the Commission proposes deleting Article 18(2) of the Dublin III Regulation, i.e. the guarantee that persons transferred back to a State that has meanwhile discontinued or rejected their application will have their case reopened, or a remedy available. This is a dangerous invitation to Member States to reintroduce “discontinuation” practices that the Commission itself once condemned as incompatible with effective access to status determination.

      To facilitate responsibility-determination, the Proposal further obliges applicants to submit relevant information before or at the Dublin interview. Late submissions are not to be considered. Fairness would demand that justified delays be excused. Besides, it is also proposed to repeal Article 7(3) of the Dublin III Regulation, whereby authorities must take into account evidence of family ties even if produced late in the process. All in all, then, the Proposal would make proof of family ties harder, not easier as the Commission claims.

      A final group of amendments concern the details of the Dublin procedure, and might prove the most important in practice.

      Some “streamline” the process, e.g. with shorter deadlines (e.g. Article 29(1)) and a simplified take back procedure (Article 31). Controversially, the Commission proposes again to reduce the scope of appeals against transfers to issues of ill-treatment and misapplication of the family criteria (Article 33). This may perhaps prove acceptable to the ECJ in light of its old Abdullahi case-law. However, it contravenes Article 13 ECHR, which demands an effective remedy for the violation of any Convention right.
      Other procedural amendments aim to make it harder for applicants to evade transfers. At present, if a transferee absconds for 18 months, the transfer is cancelled and the transferring State becomes responsible. Article 35(2) of the Proposal allows the transferring State to “stop the clock” if the applicant absconds, and to resume the transfer as soon as he reappears.
      A number of amendments make responsibility more “stable” once assigned, although not as “permanent” as the 2016 Proposal would have made it. Under Article 27 of the Proposal, the responsibility of a State will only cease if the applicant has left the Dublin area in compliance with a return decision. More importantly, under Article 26 the responsible State will have to take back even persons to whom it has granted protection. This would be a significant extension of the scope of the Dublin system, and would “lock” applicants in the responsible State even more firmly and more durably. Perhaps by way of compensation, the Commission proposes that beneficiaries of international protection obtain “long-term status” – and thus mobility rights – after three years of residence instead of five. However, given that it is “very difficult in practice” to exercise such rights, the compensation seems more theoretical than effective and a far cry from a system of free movement capable of offsetting the rigidities of Dublin.

      These are, in short, the key amendments foreseen. While it’s easy enough to comment on each individually, it is more difficult to forecast their aggregate impact. Will they – to paraphrase the Commission – “improv[e] the chances of integration” and reduce “unauthorised movements” (recital 13), and help closing “the existing implementation gap”? Probably not, as none of them is a game-changer.

      Taken together, however, they might well aggravate current distributive imbalances. Dublin “locks in” the responsibilities of the States that receive most applications – traditional destinations such as Germany or border States such as Italy – leaving the other Member States undisturbed. Apart from possible distributive impacts of the revised criteria and of the now obligations imposed on applicants, first application States will certainly be disadvantaged combination by shortened deadlines, security screenings (see below), streamlined take backs, and “stable” responsibility extending to beneficiaries of protection. Under the “new Dublin rules” – sorry for the oxymoron! – effective solidarity will become more necessary than ever.
      Border procedures and Dublin

      Building on the current hotspot approach, the Proposals for a Screening Regulation and for an Asylum Procedures Regulation outline a new(ish) “pre-entry” phase. This will be examined in a forthcoming post by Lyra Jakuleviciene, but the interface with infra-EU allocation deserves mention here.

      In a nutshell, persons irregularly crossing the border will be screened for the purpose of identification, health and security checks, and registration in Eurodac. Protection applicants may then be channelled to “border procedures” in a broad range of situations. This will be mandatory if the applicant: (a) attempts to mislead the authorities; (b) can be considered, based on “serious reasons”, “a danger to the national security or public order of the Member States”; (c) comes from a State whose nationals have a low Union-wide recognition rate (Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal).

      The purpose of the border procedure is to assess applications “without authorising the applicant’s entry into the Member State’s territory” (here, p.4). Therefore, it might have seemed logical that applicants subjected to it be excluded from the Dublin system – as is the case, ordinarily, for relocations (see below). Not so: under Article 41(7) of the Proposal, Member States may apply Dublin in the context of border procedures. This weakens the idea of “seamless procedures at the border” somewhat but – from the standpoint of both applicants and border States – it is better than a watertight exclusion: applicants may still benefit from “meaningful link” criteria, and border States are not “stuck with the caseload”. I would normally have qualms about giving Member States discretion in choosing whether Dublin rules apply. But as it happens, Member States who receive an asylum application already enjoy that discretion under the so-called “sovereignty clause”. Nota bene: in exercising that discretion, Member States apply EU Law and must observe the Charter, and the same principle must certainly apply under the proposed Article 41(7).

      The only true exclusion from the Dublin system is set out in Article 8(4) of the Migration Management Proposal. Under this provision, Member States must carry out a security check of all applicants as part of the pre-entry screening and/or after the application is filed. If “there are reasonable grounds to consider the applicant a danger to national security or public order” of the determining State, the other criteria are bypassed and that State becomes responsible. Attentive readers will note that the wording of Article 8(4) differs from that of Article 41(3) of the Asylum Procedure Proposal (e.g. “serious grounds” vs “reasonable grounds”). It is therefore unclear whether the security grounds to “screen out” an applicant from Dublin are coextensive with the security grounds making a border procedure mandatory. Be that as it may, a broad application of Article 8(4) would be undesirable, as it would entail a large-scale exclusion from the guarantees that applicants derive from the Dublin system. The risk is moderate however: by applying Article 8(4) widely, Member States would be increasing their own share of responsibilities under the system. As twenty-five years of Dublin practice indicate, this is unlikely to happen.
      “Mandatory” and “flexible” solidarity under the new mechanism

      So far, the Migration Management Proposal does not look significantly different from the 2016 Dublin IV Proposal, which did not itself fundamentally alter existing rules, and which went down in flames in inter- and intra-institutional negotiations. Any hopes of a “fresh start”, then, are left for the new solidarity mechanism.

      Unfortunately, solidarity is a difficult subject for the EU: financial support has hitherto been a mere fraction of Member State expenditure in the field; operational cooperation has proved useful but cannot tackle all the relevant aspects of the unequal distribution of responsibilities among Member States; relocations have proved extremely beneficial for thousands of applicants, but are intrinsically complex operations and have also proven politically divisive – an aspect which has severely undermined their application and further condemned them to be small scale affairs relative to the needs on the ground. The same goes a fortiori for ad hoc initiatives – such as those that followed SAR operations over the last two years– which furthermore lack the predictability that is necessary for sharing responsibilities effectively. To reiterate what the Commission stated, there is currently “no effective solidarity mechanism in place”.

      Perhaps most importantly, the EU has hitherto been incapable of accurately gauging the distributive asymmetries on the ground, to articulate a clear doctrine guiding the key determinations of “how much solidarity” and “what kind(s) of solidarity”, and to define commensurate redistributive targets on this basis (see here, p.34 and 116).

      Alas, the opportunity to elaborate a solidarity doctrine for the EU has been completely missed. Conceptually, the New Pact does not go much farther than platitudes such as “[s]olidarity implies that all Member States should contribute”. As Daniel Thym aptly observed, “pragmatism” is the driving force behind the Proposal: the Commission starts from a familiar basis – relocations – and tweaks it in ways designed to convince stakeholders that solidarity becomes both “compulsory” and “flexible”. It’s a complicated arrangement and I will only describe it in broad strokes, leaving the crucial dimensions of financial solidarity and operational cooperation to forthcoming posts by Iris Goldner Lang and Lilian Tsourdi.

      The mechanism operates according to three “modes”. In its basic mode, it is to replace ad hoc solidarity initiatives following SAR disembarkations (Articles 47-49 of the Migration Management Proposal):

      The Commission determines, in its yearly Migration Management Report, whether a State is faced with “recurring arrivals” following SAR operations and determines the needs in terms of relocations and other contributions (capacity building, operational support proper, cooperation with third States).
      The Member States are “invited” to notify the “contributions they intend to make”. If offers are sufficient, the Commission combines them and formally adopts a “solidarity pool”. If not, it adopts an implementing act summarizing relocation targets for each Member State and other contributions as offered by them. Member States may react by offering other contributions instead of relocations, provided that this is “proportional” – one wonders how the Commission will tally e.g. training programs for Libyan coastguards with relocation places.
      If the relocations offered fall 30% short of the target indicated by the Commission, a “critical mass correction mechanism” will apply: each Member States will be obliged to meet at least 50% of the quota of relocations indicated by the Commission. However, and this is the new idea offered by the Commission to bring relocation-skeptics onboard, Member States may discharge their duties by offering “return sponsorships” instead of relocations: the “sponsor” Member State commits to support the benefitting Member State to return a person and, if the return is not carried out within eight months, to accept her on its territory.

      If I understand correctly the fuzzy provision I have just summarized – Article 48(2) – it all boils down to “half-compulsory” solidarity: Member States are obliged to cover at least 50% of the relocation needs set by the Commission through relocations or sponsorships, and the rest with other contributions.

      After the “solidarity pool” is established and the benefitting Member State requests its activation, relocations can start:

      The eligible persons are those who applied for protection in the benefitting State, with the exclusion of those that are subject to border procedures (Article 45(1)(a)).Also excluded are those whom Dublin criteria based on “meaningful links” – family, abode, diplomas – assign to the benefitting State (Article 57(3)). These rules suggest that the benefitting State must carry out identification, screening for border procedures and a first (reduced?) Dublin procedure before it can declare an applicant eligible for relocation.
      Persons eligible for return sponsorship are “illegally staying third-country nationals” (Article 45(1)(b)).
      The eligible persons are identified, placed on a list, and matched to Member States based on “meaningful links”. The transfer can only be refused by the State of relocation on security grounds (Article 57(2)(6) and (7)), and otherwise follows the modalities of Dublin transfers in almost all respects (e.g. deadlines, notification, appeals). However, contrary to what happens under Dublin, missing the deadline for transfer does not entail that the relocation is cancelled it (see Article 57(10)).
      After the transfer, applicants will be directly admitted to the asylum procedure in the State of relocation only if it has been previously established that the benefitting State would have been responsible under criteria other than those based on “meaningful links” (Article 58(3)). In all the other cases, the State of relocation will run a Dublin procedure and, if necessary, transfer again the applicant to the State responsible (see Article 58(2)). As for persons subjected to return sponsorship, the State of relocation will pick up the application of the Return Directive where the benefitting State left off (or so I read Article 58(5)!).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is under “migratory pressure”, at the request of the concerned State or of its own motion (Article 50), the mechanism operates as described above except for one main point: beneficiaries of protection also become eligible for relocation (Article 51(3)). Thankfully, they must consent thereto and are automatically granted the same status in the relocation State (see Articles 57(3) and 58(4)).

      If the Commission concludes that a Member State is confronted to a “crisis”, rules change further (see Article 2 of the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation):

      Applicants subject to the border procedure and persons “having entered irregularly” also become eligible for relocation. These persons may then undergo a border procedure post-relocation (see Article 41(1) and (8) of the Proposal for an Asylum Procedures Regulation).
      Persons subject to return sponsorship are transferred to the sponsor State if their removal does not occur within four – instead of eight – months.
      Other contributions are excluded from the palette of contributions available to the other Member States (Article 2(1)): it has to be relocation or return sponsorship.
      The procedure is faster, with shorter deadlines.

      It is an understatement to say that the mechanism is complex, and your faithful scribe still has much to digest. For the time being, I would make four general comments.

      First, it is not self-evident that this is a good “insurance scheme” for its intended beneficiaries. As noted, the system only guarantees that 50% of the relocation needs of a State will be met. Furthermore, there are hidden costs: in “SAR” and “pressure” modes, the benefitting State has to screen the applicant, register the application, and assess whether border procedures or (some) Dublin criteria apply before it can channel the applicant to relocation. It is unclear whether a 500 lump sum is enough to offset the costs (see Article 79 of the Migration Management Proposal). Besides, in a crisis situation, these preliminary steps might make relocation impractical – think of the Greek registration backlog in 2015/6. Perhaps, extending relocation to persons “having entered irregularly” when the mechanism is in “crisis mode” is meant precisely to take care of this. Similar observations apply to return sponsorship. Under Article 55(4) of the Migration Management Proposal, the support offered by the sponsor to the benefitting State can be rather low key (e.g. “counselling”) and there seems to be no guarantee that the benefitting State will be effectively relieved of the political, administrative and financial costs associated to return. Moving from costs to risks, it is clear that the benefitting State bears all the risks of non implementation – in other words, if the system grinds to a halt or breaks down, it will be Moria all over again. In light of past experience, one can only agree with Thomas Gammelthoft-Hansen that it’s a “big gamble”. Other aspects examined below – the vast margins of discretion left to the Commission, and the easy backdoor opened by the force majeure provisions – do not help either to create predictability.
      Second, as just noted the mechanism gives the Commission practically unlimited discretion at all critical junctures. The Commission will determine whether a Member States is confronted to “recurring arrivals”, “pressure” or a “crisis”. It will do so under definitions so open-textured, and criteria so numerous, that it will be basically the master of its determinations (Article 50 of the Migration Management Proposal). The Commission will determine unilaterally relocation and operational solidarity needs. Finally, the Commission will determine – we do not know how – if “other contributions” are proportional to relocation needs. Other than in the most clear-cut situations, there is no way that anyone can predict how the system will be applied.
      Third: the mechanism reflects a powerful fixation with and unshakable faith in heavy bureaucracy. Protection applicants may undergo up to three “responsibility determination” procedures and two transfers before finally landing in an asylum procedure: Dublin “screening” in the first State, matching, relocation, full Dublin procedure in the relocation State, then transfer. And this is a system that should not “compromise the objective of the rapid processing of applications”(recital 34)! Decidedly, the idea that in order to improve the CEAS it is above all necessary to suppress unnecessary delays and coercion (see here, p.9) has not made a strong impression on the minds of the drafters. The same remark applies mutatis mutandis to return sponsorships: whatever the benefits in terms of solidarity, one wonders if it is very cost-effective or humane to drag a person from State to State so that they can each try their hand at expelling her.
      Lastly and relatedly, applicants and other persons otherwise concerned by the relocation system are given no voice. They can be “matched”, transferred, re-transferred, but subject to few exceptions their aspirations and intentions remain legally irrelevant. In this regard, the “New Pact” is as old school as it gets: it sticks strictly to the “no choice” taboo on which Dublin is built. What little recognition of applicants’ actorness had been made in the Wikstroem Report is gone. Objectifying migrants is not only incompatible with the claim that the approach taken is “human and humane”. It might prove fatal to the administrative efficiency so cherished by the Commission. Indeed, failure to engage applicants is arguably the key factor in the dismal performance of the Dublin system (here, p.112). Why should it be any different under this solidarity mechanism?

      Framing Force Majeure (or inviting defection?)

      In addition to addressing “crisis” situations, the Proposal for a Migration and Asylum Crisis Regulation includes separate provisions on force majeure.

      Thereunder, any Member State may unilaterally declare that it is faced with a situation making it “impossible” to comply with selected CEAS rules, and thus obtain the right – subject to a mere notification – to derogate from them. Member States may obtain in this way longer Dublin deadlines, or even be exempted from the obligation to accept transfers and be liberated from responsibilities if the suspension goes on more than a year (Article 8). Furthermore, States may obtain a six-months suspension of their duties under the solidarity mechanism (Article 9).

      The inclusion of this proposal in the Pact – possibly an attempt to further placate Member States averse to European solidarity? – beggars belief. Legally speaking, the whole idea is redundant: under the case-law of the ECJ, Member States may derogate from any rule of EU Law if confronted to force majeure. However, putting this black on white amounts to inviting (and legalizing) defection. The only conceivable object of rules of this kind would have been to subject force majeure derogations to prior authorization by the Commission – but there is nothing of the kind in the Proposal. The end result is paradoxical: while Member States are (in theory!) subject to Commission supervision when they conclude arrangements facilitating the implementation of Dublin rules, a mere notification will be enough to authorize them to unilaterally tear a hole in the fabric of “solidarity” and “responsibility” so painstakingly – if not felicitously – woven in the Pact.
      Concluding comments

      We should have taken Commissioner Ylva Johansson at her word when she said that there would be no “Hoorays” for the new proposals. Past the avalanche of adjectives, promises and fancy administrative monikers hurled at the reader – “faster, seamless migration processes”; “prevent the recurrence of events such as those seen in Moria”; “critical mass correction mechanism” – one cannot fail to see that the “fresh start” is essentially an exercise in repackaging.

      On responsibility-allocation and solidarity, the basic idea is one that the Commission incessantly returns to since 2007 (here, p. 10): keep Dublin and “correct” it through solidarity schemes. I do sympathize to an extent: realizing a fair balance of responsibilities by “sharing people” has always seemed to me impracticable and undesirable. Still, one would have expected that the abject failure of the Dublin system, the collapse of mutual trust in the CEAS, the meagre results obtained in the field of solidarity – per the Commission’s own appraisal – would have pushed it to bring something new to the table.

      Instead, what we have is a slightly milder version of the Dublin IV Proposal – the ultimate “clunker” in the history of Commission proposals – and an ultra-bureaucratic mechanism for relocation, with the dubious addition of return sponsorships and force majeure provisions. The basic tenets of infra-EU allocation remain the same – “no choice”, first entry – and none of the structural flaws that doomed current schemes to failure is fundamentally tackled (here, p.107): solidarity is beefed-up but appears too unreliable and fuzzy to generate trust; there are interesting steps on “genuine links”, but otherwise no sustained attempt to positively engage applicants; administrative complexity and coercive transfers reign on.

      Pragmatism, to quote again Daniel Thym’s excellent introductory post, is no sin. It is even expected of the Commission. This, however, is a study in path-dependency. By defending the status quo, wrapping it in shiny new paper, and making limited concessions to key policy actors, the Commission may perhaps carry its proposals through. However, without substantial corrections, the “new” Pact is unlikely to save the CEAS or even to prevent new Morias.

      http://eumigrationlawblog.eu/a-fresh-start-or-one-more-clunker-dublin-and-solidarity-in-the-ne

      #Francesco_Maiani

      #force_majeure

    • European Refugee Policy: What’s Gone Wrong and How to Make It Better

      In 2015 and 2016, more than 1 million refugees made their way to the European Union, the largest number of them originating from Syria. Since that time, refugee arrivals have continued, although at a much slower pace and involving people from a wider range of countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East.

      The EU’s response to these developments has had five main characteristics.

      First, a serious lack of preparedness and long-term planning. Despite the massive material and intelligence resources at its disposal, the EU was caught completely unaware by the mass influx of refugees five years ago and has been playing catch-up ever since. While the emergency is now well and truly over, EU member states continue to talk as if still in the grip of an unmanageable “refugee crisis.”

      Second, the EU’s refugee policy has become progressively based on a strategy known as “externalization,” whereby responsibility for migration control is shifted to unstable states outside Europe. This has been epitomized by the deals that the EU has done with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan, and Turkey, all of which have agreed to halt the onward movement of refugees in exchange for aid and other rewards, including support to the security services.

      Third, asylum has become increasingly criminalized, as demonstrated by the growing number of EU citizens and civil society groups that have been prosecuted for their roles in aiding refugees. At the same time, some frontline member states have engaged in a systematic attempt to delegitimize the NGO search-and-rescue organizations operating in the Mediterranean and to obstruct their life-saving activities.

      The fourth characteristic of EU countries’ recent policies has been a readiness to inflict or be complicit in a range of abuses that challenge the principles of both human rights and international refugee law. This can be seen in the violence perpetrated against asylum seekers by the military and militia groups in Croatia and Hungary, the terrible conditions found in Greek refugee camps such as Moria on the island of Lesvos, and, most egregiously of all, EU support to the Libyan Coastguard that enables it to intercept refugees at sea and to return them to abusive detention centers on land.

      Fifth and finally, the past five years have witnessed a serious absence of solidarity within the EU. Frontline states such as Greece and Italy have been left to bear a disproportionate share of the responsibility for new refugee arrivals. Efforts to relocate asylum seekers and resettle refugees throughout the EU have had disappointing results. And countries in the eastern part of the EU have consistently fought against the European Commission in its efforts to forge a more cooperative and coordinated approach to the refugee issue.

      The most recent attempt to formulate such an approach is to be found in the EU Pact on Migration and Asylum, which the Commission proposed in September 2020.

      It would be wrong to entirely dismiss the Pact, as it contains some positive elements. These include, for example, a commitment to establish legal pathways to asylum in Europe for people who are in need of protection, and EU support for member states that wish to establish community-sponsored refugee resettlement programs.

      In other respects, however, the Pact has a number of important, serious flaws. It has already been questioned by those countries that are least willing to admit refugees and continue to resist the role of Brussels in this policy domain. The Pact also makes hardly any reference to the Global Compacts on Refugees and Migration—a strange omission given the enormous amount of time and effort that the UN has devoted to those initiatives, both of which were triggered by the European emergency of 2015-16.

      At an operational level, the Pact endorses and reinforces the EU’s externalization agenda and envisages a much more aggressive role for Frontex, the EU’s border control agency. At the same time, it empowers member states to refuse entry to asylum seekers on the basis of very vague criteria. As a result, individuals may be more vulnerable to human smugglers and traffickers. There is also a strong likelihood that new refugee camps will spring up on the fringes of Europe, with their residents living in substandard conditions.

      Finally, the Pact places enormous emphasis on the involuntary return of asylum seekers to their countries of origin. It even envisages that a hardline state such as Hungary could contribute to the implementation of the Pact by organizing and funding such deportations. This constitutes an extremely dangerous new twist on the notions of solidarity and responsibility sharing, which form the basis of the international refugee regime.

      If the proposed Pact is not fit for purpose, then what might a more constructive EU refugee policy look like?

      It would in the first instance focus on the restoration of both EU and NGO search-and-rescue efforts in the Mediterranean and establish more predictable disembarkation and refugee distribution mechanisms. It would also mean the withdrawal of EU support for the Libyan Coastguard, the closure of that country’s detention centers, and a substantial improvement of the living conditions experienced by refugees in Europe’s frontline states—changes that should take place with or without a Pact.

      Indeed, the EU should redeploy the massive amount of resources that it currently devotes to the externalization process, so as to strengthen the protection capacity of asylum and transit countries on the periphery of Europe. A progressive approach on the part of the EU would involve the establishment of not only faster but also fair asylum procedures, with appropriate long-term solutions being found for new arrivals, whether or not they qualify for refugee status.

      These changes would help to ensure that those searching for safety have timely and adequate opportunities to access their most basic rights.

      https://www.refugeesinternational.org/reports/2020/11/5/european-refugee-policy-whats-gone-wrong-and-how-to-make-it-b

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum: Turning European Union Territory into a non-Territory

      Externalization policies in 2020: where is the European Union territory?

      In spite of the Commission’s rhetoric stressing the novel elements of the Pact on Migration and Asylum (hereinafter: the Pact – summarized and discussed in general here), there are good reasons to argue that the Pact develops and consolidates, among others, the existing trends on externalization policies of migration control (see Guild et al). Furthermore, it tries to create new avenues for a ‘smarter’ system of management of immigration, by additionally controlling access to the European Union territory for third country nationals (TCNs), and by creating different categories of migrants, which are then subject to different legal regimes which find application in the European Union territory.

      The consolidation of existing trends concerns the externalization of migration management practices, resort to technologies in developing migration control systems (further development of Eurodac, completion of the path toward full interoperability between IT systems), and also the strengthening of the role of the European Union executive level, via increased joint management involving European Union agencies: these are all policies that find in the Pact’s consolidation.

      This brief will focus on externalization (practices), a concept which is finding a new declination in the Pact: indeed, the Pact and several of the measures proposed, read together, are aiming at ‘disentangling’ the territory of the EU, from a set of rights which are related with the presence of the migrant or of the asylum seeker on the territory of a Member State of the EU, and from the relation between territory and access to a jurisdiction, which is necessary to enforce rights which otherwise remain on paper.

      Interestingly, this process of separation, of splitting between territory-law/rights-jurisdiction takes place not outside, but within the EU, and this is the new declination of externalization which one can find in the measures proposed in the Pact, namely with the proposal for a Screening Regulation and the amended proposal for a Procedure Regulation. It is no accident that other commentators have interpreted it as a consolidation of ‘fortress Europe’. In other words, this externalization process takes place within the EU and aims at making the external borders more effective also for the TCNs who are already in the territory of the EU.

      The proposal for a pre-entry screening regulation

      A first instrument which has a pivotal role in the consolidation of the externalization trend is the proposed Regulation for a screening of third country nationals (hereinafter: Proposal Screening Regulation), which will be applicable to migrants crossing the external borders without authorization. The aim of the screening, according to the Commission, is to ‘accelerate the process of determining the status of a person and what type of procedure should apply’. More precisely, the screening ‘should help ensure that the third country nationals concerned are referred to the appropriate procedures at the earliest stage possible’ and also to avoid absconding after entrance in the territory in order to reach a different state than the one of arrival (recital 8, preamble of proposal). The screening should contribute as well to curb secondary movements, which is a policy target highly relevant for many northern and central European Union states.

      In the new design, the screening procedure becomes the ‘standard’ for all TCNs who crossed the border in irregular manner, and also for persons who are disembarked following a search and rescue (SAR) operation, and for those who apply for international protection at the external border crossing points or in transit zones. With the screening Regulation, all these categories of persons shall not be allowed to enter the territory of the State during the screening (Arts 3 and 4 of the proposal).

      Consequently, different categories of migrants, including asylum seekers which are by definition vulnerable persons, are to be kept in locations situated at or in proximity to the external borders, for a time (up to 5 days, which can become 10 at maximum), defined in the Regulation, but which must be respected by national administrations. There is here an implicit equation between all these categories, and the common denominator of this operation is that all these persons have crossed the border in an unauthorized manner.

      It is yet unclear how the situation of migrants during the screening is to be organized in practical terms, transit zones, hotspot or others, and if this can qualify as detention, in legal terms. The Court of Justice has ruled recently on Hungarian transit zones (see analysis by Luisa Marin), by deciding that Röszke transit zone qualified as ‘detention’, and it can be argued that the parameters clarified in that decision could find application also to the case of migrants during the screening phase. If the situation of TCNs during the screening can be considered detention, which is then the legal basis? The Reception Conditions Directive or the Return Directive? If the national administrations struggle to meet the tight deadlines provided for the screening system, these questions will become more urgent, next to the very practical issue of the actual accommodation for this procedure, which in general does not allow for access to the territory.

      On the one side, Article 14(7) of the proposal provides a guarantee, indicating that the screening should end also if the checks are not completed within the deadlines; on the other side, the remaining question is: to which procedure is the applicant sent and how is the next phase then determined? The relevant procedure following the screening here seems to be determined in a very approximate way, and this begs the question on the extent to which rights can be protected in this context. Furthermore, the right to have access to a lawyer is not provided for in the screening phase. Given the relevance of this screening phase, also fundamental rights should be monitored, and the mechanism put in place at Article 7, leaves much to the discretion of the Member States, and the involvement of the Fundamental Rights Agency, with guidance and support upon request of the MS can be too little to ensure fundamental rights are not jeopardized by national administrations.

      This screening phase, which has the purpose to make sure, among other things, that states ‘do their job’ as to collecting information and consequently feeding the EU information systems, might therefore have important effects on the merits of the individual case, since border procedures are to be seen as fast-track, time is limited and procedural guarantees are also sacrificed in this context. In the case the screening ends with a refusal of entry, there is a substantive effect of the screening, which is conducted without legal assistance and without access to a legal remedy. And if this is not a decision in itself, but it ends up in a de-briefing form, this form might give substance to the next stage of the procedure, which, in the case of asylum, should be an individualized and accurate assessment of one’s individual circumstances.

      Overall, it should be stressed that the screening itself does not end up in a formal decision, it nevertheless represents an important phase since it defines what comes after, i.e., the type of procedure following the screening. It must be observed therefore, that the respect of some procedural rights is of paramount importance. At the same time, it is important that communication in a language TCNs can understand is effective, since the screening might end in a de-briefing form, where one or more nationalities are indicated. Considering that one of the options is the refusal of entry (Art. 14(1) screening proposal; confirmed by the recital 40 of the Proposal Procedure Regulation, as amended in 2020), and the others are either access to asylum or expulsion, one should require that the screening provides for procedural guarantees.

      Furthermore, the screening should point to any element which might be relevant to refer the TCNs into the accelerated examination procedure or the border procedure. In other words, the screening must indicate in the de-briefing form the options that protect asylum applicants less than others (Article 14(3) of the proposal). It does not operate in the other way: a TCN who has applied for asylum and comes from a country with a high recognition rate is not excluded from the screening (see blog post by Jakuleviciene).

      The legislation creates therefore avenues for disentangling, splitting the relation between physical presence of an asylum applicant on a territory and the set of laws and fundamental rights associated to it, namely a protective legal order, access to rights and to a jurisdiction enforcing those rights. It creates a sort of ‘lighter’ legal order, a lower density system, which facilitates the exit of the applicant from the territory of the EU, creating a sort of shift from a Europe of rights to the Europe of borders, confinement and expulsions.

      The proposal for new border procedures: an attempt to create a lower density territory?

      Another crucial piece in this process of establishing a stronger border fence and streamline procedures at the border, creating a ‘seamless link between asylum and return’, in the words of the Commission, is constituted by the reform of the border procedures, with an amendment of the 2016 proposal for the Regulation procedure (hereinafter: Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation).

      Though border procedures are already present in the current Regulation of 2013, they are now developed into a “border procedure for asylum and return”, and a more developed accelerated procedure, which, next to the normal asylum procedure, comes after the screening phase.

      The new border procedure becomes obligatory (according to Art. 41(3) of the Amended Proposal Procedure Regulation) for applicants who arrive irregularly at the external border or after disembarkation and another of these grounds apply:

      – they represent a risk to national security or public order;

      – the applicant has provided false information or documents or by withholding relevant information or document;

      – the applicant comes from a non-EU country for which the share of positive decisions in the total number of asylum decisions is below 20 percent.

      This last criterion is especially problematic, since it transcends the criterion of the safe third country and it undermines the principle that every asylum application requires a complex and individualized assessment of the particular personal circumstances of the applicant, by introducing presumptive elements in a procedure which gives fewer guarantees.

      During the border procedure, the TCN is not granted access to the EU. The expansion of the new border procedures poses also the problem of the organization of the facilities necessary for the new procedures, which must be a location at or close to the external borders, in other words, where migrants are apprehended or disembarked.

      Tellingly enough, the Commission’s explanatory memorandum describes as guarantees in the asylum border procedure all the situations in which the border procedure shall not be applied, for example, because the necessary support cannot be provided or for medical reasons, or where the ‘conditions for detention (…) cannot be met and the border procedure cannot be applied without detention’.

      Also here the question remains on how to qualify their stay during the procedure, because the Commission aims at limiting resort to detention. The situation could be considered de facto a detention, and its compatibility with the criteria laid down by the Court of Justice in the Hungarian transit zones case is questionable.

      Another aspect which must be analyzed is the system of guarantees after the decision in a border procedure. If an application is rejected in an asylum border procedure, the “return procedure” applies immediately. Member States must limit to one instance the right to effective remedy against the decision, as posited in Article 53(9). The right to an effective remedy is therefore limited, according to Art. 53 of the Proposed Regulation, and the right to remain, a ‘light’ right to remain one could say, is also narrowly constructed, in the case of border procedures, to the first remedy against the negative decision (Art. 54(3) read together with Art. 54(4) and 54(5)). Furthermore, EU law allows Member States to limit the right to remain in case of subsequent applications and provides that there is no right to remain in the case of subsequent appeals (Art. 54(6) and (7)). More in general, this proposal extends the circumstances where the applicant does not have an automatic right to remain and this represents an aspect which affects significantly and in a factual manner the capacity to challenge a negative decision in a border procedure.

      Overall, it can be argued that the asylum border procedure is a procedure where guarantees are limited, because the access to the jurisdiction is taking place in fast-track procedures, access to legal remedies is also reduced to the very minimum. Access to the territory of the Member State is therefore deprived of its typical meaning, in the sense that it does not imply access to a system which is protecting rights with procedures which offer guarantees and are therefore also time-consuming. Here, efficiency should govern a process where the access to a jurisdiction is lighter, is ‘less dense’ than otherwise. To conclude, this externalization of migration control policies takes place ‘inside’ the European Union territory, and it aims at prolonging the effects of containment policies because they make access to the EU territory less meaningful, in legal terms: the presence of the person in the territory of the EU does not entail full access to the rights related to the presence on the territory.

      Solidarity in cooperating with third countries? The “return sponsorship” and its territorial puzzle

      Chapter 6 of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum proposes, among other things, to create a conditionality between cooperation on readmission with third countries and the issuance of visas to their nationals. This conditionality was legally established in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code Regulation. The revision (discussed here) states that, given their “politically sensitive nature and their horizontal implications for the Member States and the Union”, such provisions will be triggered once implementing powers are conferred to the Council (following a proposal from the Commission).

      What do these measures entail? We know that they can be applied in bulk or separately. Firstly, EU consulates in third countries will not have the usual leeway to waive some documents required to apply for visas (Art. 14(6), visa code). Secondly, visa applicants from uncooperative third countries will pay higher visa fees (Art. 16(1) visa code). Thirdly, visa fees to diplomatic and service passports will not be waived (Art. 16(5)b visa code). Fourthly, time to take a decision on the visa application will be longer than 15 days (Art. 23(1) visa code). Fifthly, the issuance of multi-entry visas (MEVs) from 6 months to 5 years is suspended (Art. 24(2) visa code). In other words, these coercive measures are not aimed at suspending visas. They are designed to make the procedure for obtaining a visa more lengthy, more costly, and limited in terms of access to MEVs.

      Moreover, it is important to stress that the revision of the Visa Code Regulation mentions that the Union will strike a balance between “migration and security concerns, economic considerations and general external relations”. Consequently, measures (be they restrictive or not) will result from an assessment that goes well beyond migration management issues. The assessment will not be based exclusively on the so-called “return rate” that has been presented as a compass used to reward or blame third countries’ cooperation on readmission. Other indicators or criteria, based on data provided by the Member States, will be equally examined by the Commission. These other indicators pertain to “the overall relations” between the Union and its Member States, on the one hand, and a given third country, on the other. This broad category is not defined in the 2019 revision of the Visa Code, nor do we know what it precisely refers to.

      What do we know about this linkage? The idea of linking cooperation on readmission with visa policy is not new. It was first introduced at a bilateral level by some member states. For example, fifteen years ago, cooperation on redocumentation, including the swift delivery of laissez-passers by the consular authorities of countries of origin, was at the centre of bilateral talks between France and North African countries. In September 2005, the French Ministry of the Interior proposed to “sanction uncooperative countries [especially Morocco, Tunisia and Algeria] by limiting the number of short-term visas that France delivers to their nationals.” Sanctions turned out to be unsuccessful not only because of the diplomatic tensions they generated – they were met with strong criticisms and reaction on the part of North African countries – but also because the ratio between the number of laissez-passers requested by the French authorities and the number of laissez-passers delivered by North African countries’ authorities remained unchanged.

      At the EU level, the idea to link readmission with visa policy has been in the pipeline for many years. Let’s remember that, in October 2002, in its Community Return Policy, the European Commission reflected on the positive incentives that could be used in order to ensure third countries’ constant cooperation on readmission. The Commission observed in its communication that, actually, “there is little that can be offered in return. In particular visa concessions or the lifting of visa requirements can be a realistic option in exceptional cases only; in most cases it is not.” Therefore, the Commission set out to propose additional incentives (e.g. trade expansion, technical/financial assistance, additional development aid).

      In a similar vein, in September 2015, after years of negotiations and failed attempt to cooperate on readmission with Southern countries, the Commission remarked that the possibility to use Visa Facilitation Agreements as an incentive to cooperate on readmission is limited in the South “as the EU is unlikely to offer visa facilitation to certain third countries which generate many irregular migrants and thus pose a migratory risk. And even when the EU does offer the parallel negotiation of a visa facilitation agreement, this may not be sufficient if the facilitations offered are not sufficiently attractive.”

      More recently, in March 2018, in its Impact Assessment accompanying the proposal for an amendment of the Common Visa Code, the Commission itself recognised that “better cooperation on readmission with reluctant third countries cannot be obtained through visa policy measures alone.” It also added that “there is no hard evidence on how visa leverage can translate into better cooperation of third countries on readmission.”

      Against this backdrop, why has so much emphasis been put on the link between cooperation on readmission and visa policy in the revised Visa Code Regulation and later in the New Pact? The Commission itself recognised that this conditionality might not constitute a sufficient incentive to ensure the cooperation on readmission.

      To reply to this question, we need first to question the oft-cited reference to third countries’ “reluctance”[n1] to cooperate on readmission in order to understand that, cooperation on readmission is inextricably based on unbalanced reciprocities. Moreover, migration, be it regular or irregular, continues to be viewed as a safety valve to relieve pressure on unemployment and poverty in countries of origin. Readmission has asymmetric costs and benefits having economic social and political implications for countries of origin. Apart from being unpopular in Southern countries, readmission is humiliating, stigmatizing, violent and traumatic for migrants,[n2] making their process of reintegration extremely difficult, if not impossible, especially when countries of origin have often no interest in promoting reintegration programmes addressed to their nationals expelled from Europe.

      Importantly, the conclusion of a bilateral agreement does not automatically lead to its full implementation in the field of readmission, for the latter is contingent on an array of factors that codify the bilateral interactions between two contracting parties. Today, more than 320 bilateral agreements linked to readmission have been concluded between the 27 EU Member States and third countries at a global level. Using an oxymoron, it is possible to argue that, over the past decades, various EU member states have learned that, if bilateral cooperation on readmission constitutes a central priority in their external relations (this is the official rhetoric), readmission remains peripheral to other strategic issue-areas which are detailed below. Finally, unlike some third countries in the Balkans or Eastern Europe, Southern third countries have no prospect of acceding to the EU bloc, let alone having a visa-free regime, at least in the foreseeable future. This basic difference makes any attempt to compare the responsiveness of the Balkan countries to cooperation on readmission with Southern non-EU countries’ impossible, if not spurious.

      Today, patterns of interdependence between the North and the South of the Mediterranean are very much consolidated. Over the last decades, Member States, especially Spain, France, Italy and Greece, have learned that bringing pressure to bear on uncooperative third countries needs to be evaluated cautiously lest other issues of high politics be jeopardized. Readmission cannot be isolated from a broader framework of interactions including other strategic, if not more crucial, issue-areas, such as police cooperation on the fight against international terrorism, border control, energy security and other diplomatic and geopolitical concerns. Nor can bilateral cooperation on readmission be viewed as an end in itself, for it has often been grafted onto a broader framework of interactions.

      This point leads to a final remark regarding “return sponsorship” which is detailed in Art. 55 of the proposal for a regulation on asylum and migration management. In a nutshell, the idea of the European Commission consists in a commitment from a “sponsoring Member State” to assist another Member State (the benefitting Member State) in the readmission of a third-country national. This mechanism foresees that each Member State is expected to indicate the nationalities for which they are willing to provide support in the field of readmission. The sponsoring Member State offers an assistance by mobilizing its network of bilateral cooperation on readmission, or by opening a dialogue with the authorities of a given third country where the third-country national will be deported. If, after eight months, attempts are unsuccessful, the third-country national is transferred to the sponsoring Member State. Note that, in application of Council Directive 2001/40 on mutual recognition of expulsion decisions, the sponsoring Member State may or may not recognize the expulsion decision of the benefitting Member State, just because Member States continue to interpret the Geneva Convention in different ways and also because they have different grounds for subsidiary protection.

      Viewed from a non-EU perspective, namely from the point of view of third countries, this mechanism might raise some questions of competence and relevance. Which consular authorities will undertake the identification process of the third country national with a view to eventually delivering a travel document? Are we talking about the third country’s consular authorities located in the territory of the benefitting Member State or in the sponsoring Member State’s? In a similar vein, why would a bilateral agreement linked to readmission – concluded with a given ‘sponsoring’ Member State – be applicable to a ‘benefitting’ Member State (with which no bilateral agreement or arrangement has been signed)? Such territorially bounded contingencies will invariably be problematic, at a certain stage, from the viewpoint of third countries. Additionally, in acting as a sponsoring Member State, one is entitled to wonder why an EU Member State might decide to expose itself to increased tensions with a given third country while putting at risk a broader framework of interactions.

      As the graph shows, not all the EU Member States are equally engaged in bilateral cooperation on readmission with third countries. Moreover, a geographical distribution of available data demonstrates that more than 70 per cent of the total number of bilateral agreements linked to readmission (be they formal or informal[n3]) concluded with African countries are covered by France, Italy and Spain. Over the last decades, these three Member States have developed their respective networks of cooperation on readmission with a number of countries in Africa and in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

      Given the existence of these consolidated networks, the extent to which the “return sponsorship” proposed in the Pact will add value to their current undertakings is objectively questionable. Rather, if the “return sponsorship” mechanism is adopted, these three Member States might be deemed to act as sponsoring Member States when it comes to the expulsion of irregular migrants (located in other EU Member States) to Africa and the MENA region. More concretely, the propensity of, for example, Austria to sponsor Italy in expelling from Italy a foreign national coming from the MENA region or from Africa is predictably low. Austria’s current networks of cooperation on readmission with MENA and African countries would never add value to Italy’s consolidated networks of cooperation on readmission with these third countries. Moreover, it is unlikely that Italy will be proactively “sponsoring” other Member States’ expulsion decisions, without jeopardising its bilateral relations with other strategic third countries located in the MENA region or in Africa, to use the same example. These considerations concretely demonstrate that the European Commission’s call for “solidarity and fair sharing of responsibility”, on which its “return sponsorship” mechanism is premised, is contingent on the existence of a federative Union able to act as a unitary supranational body in domestic and foreign affairs. This federation does not exist in political terms.

      Beyond these practical aspects, it is important to realise that the cobweb of bilateral agreements linked to readmission has expanded as a result of tremendously complex bilateral dynamics that go well beyond the mere management of international migration. These remarks are crucial to understanding that we need to reflect properly on the conditionality pattern that has driven the external action of the EU, especially in a regional context where patterns of interdependence among state actors have gained so much relevance over the last two decades. Moreover, given the clear consensus on the weak correlation between cooperation on readmission and visa policy (the European Commission being no exception to this consensus), linking the two might not be the adequate response to ensure third countries’ cooperation on readmission, especially when the latter are in position to capitalize on their strategic position with regard to some EU Member States.

      Conclusions

      This brief reflection has highlighted a trend which is taking shape in the Pact and in some of the measures proposed by the Commission in its 2020 package of reforms. It has been shown that the proposals for a pre-entry screening and the 2020 amended proposal for enhanced border procedures are creating something we could label as a ‘lower density’ European Union territory, because the new procedures and arrangements have the purpose of restricting and limiting access to rights and to jurisdiction. This would happen on the territory of a Member State, but in a place at or close to the external borders, with a view to confining migration and third country nationals to an area where the territory of a state, and therefore, the European territory, is less … ‘territorial’ than it should be: legally speaking, it is a ‘lower density’ territory.

      The “seamless link between asylum and return” the Commission aims to create with the new border procedures can be described as sliding doors through which the third country national can enter or leave immediately, depending on how the established fast-track system qualifies her situation.

      However, the paradox highlighted with the “return sponsorship” mechanism shows that readmission agreements or arrangements are no panacea, for the vested interests of third countries must also be taken into consideration when it comes to cooperation on readmission. In this respect, it is telling that the Commission never consulted third states on the new return sponsorship mechanism, as if their territories were not concerned by this mechanism, which is far from being the case. For this reason, it is legitimate to imagine that the main rationale for the return sponsorship mechanism may be another one, and it may be merely domestic. In other words, the return sponsorship, which transforms itself into a form of relocation after eight months if the third country national is not expelled from the EU territory, subtly takes non-frontline European Union states out of their comfort-zone and engage them in cooperating on expulsions. If they fail to do so, namely if the third-country national is not expelled after eight months, non-frontline European Union states are as it were ‘forcibly’ engaged in a ‘solidarity practice’ that is conducive to relocation.

      Given the disappointing past experience of the 2015 relocations, it is impossible to predict whether this mechanism will work or not. However, once one enters sliding doors, the danger is to remain stuck in uncertainty, in a European Union ‘no man’s land’ which is nothing but another by-product of the fortress Europe machinery.

      http://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/11/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum.html

    • Le nouveau Pacte européen sur la migration et l’asile

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la Commission européenne a présenté son très attendu nouveau Pacte sur la migration et l’asile.

      Alors que l’Union européenne (UE) traverse une crise politique majeure depuis 2015 et que les solutions apportées ont démontré leur insuffisance en matière de solidarité entre États membres, leur violence à l’égard des exilés et leur coût exorbitant, la Commission européenne ne semble pas tirer les leçons du passé.

      Au menu du Pacte : un renforcement toujours accru des contrôles aux frontières, des procédures expéditives aux frontières de l’UE avec, à la clé, la détention généralisée pour les nouveaux arrivants, la poursuite de l’externalisation et un focus sur les expulsions. Il n’y a donc pas de changement de stratégie.

      Le Règlement Dublin, injuste et inefficace, est loin d’être aboli. Le nouveau système mis en place changera certes de nom, mais reprendra le critère tant décrié du “premier pays d’entrée” dans l’UE pour déterminer le pays responsable du traitement de la demande d’asile. Quant à un mécanisme permanent de solidarité pour les États davantage confrontés à l’arrivée des exilés, à l’instar des quotas de relocalisations de 2015-2017 – relocalisations qui furent un échec complet -, la Commission propose une solidarité permanente et obligatoire mais… à la carte, où les États qui ne veulent pas accueillir de migrants peuvent choisir à la place de “parrainer” leur retour, ou de fournir un soutien opérationnel aux États en difficulté. La solidarité n’est donc cyniquement pas envisagée pour l’accueil, mais bien pour le renvoi des migrants.

      Pourtant, l’UE fait face à beaucoup moins d’arrivées de migrants sur son territoire qu’en 2015 (1,5 million d’arrivées en 2015, 140.00 en 2019)

      Fin 2019, l’UE accueillait 2,6 millions de réfugiés, soit l’équivalent de 0,6% de sa population. À défaut de voies légales et sûres, les personnes exilées continuent de fuir la guerre, la violence, ou de rechercher une vie meilleure et doivent emprunter des routes périlleuses pour rejoindre le territoire de l’UE : on dénombre plus de 20.000 décès depuis 2014. Une fois arrivées ici, elles peuvent encore être détenues et subir des mauvais traitements, comme c’était le cas dans le camp qui a brûlé à Moria. Lorsqu’elles poursuivent leur route migratoire au sein de l’UE, elles ne peuvent choisir le pays où elles demanderont l’asile et elles font face à la loterie de l’asile…

      Loin d’un “nouveau départ” avec ce nouveau Pacte, la Commission propose les mêmes recettes et rate une opportunité de mettre en œuvre une tout autre politique, qui soit réellement solidaire, équitable pour les États membres et respectueuse des droits fondamentaux des personnes migrantes, avec l’établissement de voies légales et sûres, des procédures d’asile harmonisées et un accueil de qualité, ou encore la recherche de solutions durables pour les personnes en situation irrégulière.

      Dans cette brève analyse, nous revenons sur certaines des mesures phares telles qu’elles ont été présentées par la Commission européenne et qui feront l’objet de discussions dans les prochains mois avec le Parlement européen et le Conseil européen. Nous expliquerons également en quoi ces mesures n’ont rien d’innovant, sont un échec de la politique migratoire européenne, et pourquoi elles sont dangereuses pour les personnes migrantes.

      https://www.cire.be/publication/le-nouveau-pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-et-lasile

      Pour télécharger l’analyse :
      https://www.cire.be/wp-admin/admin-ajax.php?juwpfisadmin=false&action=wpfd&task=file.download&wpfd_category_

    • New pact on migration and asylum. Perspective on the ’other side’ of the EU border

      At the end of September 2020, and after camp Moria on Lesvos burned down leaving over 13,000 people in an even more precarious situation than they were before, the European Commission (EC) introduced a proposal for the New Pact on Migration and Asylum. So far, the proposal has not been met with enthusiasm by neither member states or human rights organisations.

      Based on first-hand field research interviews with civil society and other experts in the Balkan region, this report provides a unique perspective of the New Pact on Migration and Asylum from ‘the other side’ of the EU’s borders.

      #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #rapport #Refugee_rights #militarisation

    • Impakter | Un « nouveau » pacte sur l’asile et les migrations ?

      Le média en ligne Impakter propose un article d’analyse du Pacte sur l’asile et les migrations de l’Union européenne. Publié le 23 septembre 2020, le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions. L’article pointe l’aspect critique du projet, et notamment des concepts clés tels que : « processus de pré-selection », « le processus accélérée » et le « pacte de retour ». L’article donne la parole à plusieurs expertises et offre ainsi une meilleure compréhension de ce que concrètement ce pacte implique pour les personnes migrantes.

      L’article de #Charlie_Westbrook “A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?” a été publié le 11 février dans le magazine en ligne Impakter (sous licence Creative Commons). Nous vous en proposons un court résumé traduisant les lignes directrices de l’argumentaire, en français ci-dessous. Pour lire l’intégralité du texte en anglais, vous pouvez vous rendre sur le site de Impakter.

      –---

      Le “Nouveau pacte sur la migration et l’asile”, a été publié le 23 septembre, faisant suite à l’incendie du camp surpeuplé de Moria. Le pacte a été annoncé comme un “nouveau départ”. En réalité, le pacte n’est pas du tout un nouveau départ, mais la même politique avec un ensemble de nouvelles propositions sur lesquelles les États membres de l’UE devront maintenant se mettre d’accord – une entreprise qui a déjà connu des difficultés.

      Les universitaires, les militants et les organisations de défense des droits de l’homme de l’UE soulignent les préoccupations éthiques et pratiques que suscitent nombre des propositions suggérées par la Commission, ainsi que la rhétorique axée sur le retour qui les anime. Charlie Westbrook la journaliste, a contacté Kirsty Evans, coordinatrice de terrain et des campagnes pour Europe Must Act, qui m’a fait part de ses réactions au nouveau Pacte.

      Cet essai vise à présenter le plus clairement possible les problèmes liés à ce nouveau pacte, en mettant en évidence les principales préoccupations des experts et des ONG. Ces préoccupations concernent les problèmes potentiels liés au processus de présélection, au processus accéléré (ou “fast-track”) et au mécanisme de parrainage des retours.

      Le processus de présélection

      La nouvelle proposition est d’instaurer une procédure de contrôle préalable à l’entrée sur le territoire européen. L’ONG Human Rights Watch, dénonce la suggestion trompeuse du pacte selon laquelle les personnes soumises à la procédure frontalière ne sont pas considérées comme ayant formellement pénétré sur le territoire. Ce processus concerne toute personne extra-européenne qui franchirait la frontière de manière irrégulière. Ce manque de différenciation du type de besoin inquiète l’affirme l’avocate et professeur Lyra Jakulevičienė, car cela signifie que la politique d’externalisation sera plus forte que jamais. Ce nouveau règlement brouille la distinction entre les personnes demandant une protection internationale et les autres migrants “en plaçant les deux groupes de personnes sous le même régime juridique au lieu de les différencier clairement, car leurs chances de rester dans l’UE sont très différentes”. Ce processus d’externalisation, cependant, “se déroule “à l’intérieur” du territoire de l’Union européenne, et vise à prolonger les effets des politiques d’endiguement parce qu’elles rendent l’accès au territoire de l’UE moins significatif”, comme l’expliquent Jean-Pierre Cassarino, chercheur principal à la chaire de la politique européenne de voisinage du Collège d’Europe, et Luisa Marin, professeur adjoint de droit européen. En d’autres termes, les personnes en quête de protection n’auront pas pleinement accès aux droits européens en arrivant sur le territoire de l’UE. Il faudra d’abord déterminer ce qu’elles “sont”. En outre, les recherches universitaires montrent que les processus d’externalisation “entraînent le contournement des normes fondamentales, vont à l’encontre de la bonne gouvernance, créent l’immobilité et contribuent à la crise du régime mondial des réfugiés, qui ne parvient pas à assurer la protection”. Les principales inquiétudes de ces deux expert·es sont les suivantes : la rapidité de prise de décision (pas plus de 5 jours), l’absence d’assistance juridique, Etat membre est le seul garant du respect des droits fondamentaux et si cette période de pré-sélection sera mise en œuvre comme une détention.

      Selon Jakulevičienė, la proposition apporte “un grand potentiel” pour créer davantage de camps de style “Moria”. Il est difficile de voir en quoi cela profiterait à qui que ce soit.

      Procédure accélérée

      Si un demandeur est orienté vers le système accéléré, une décision sera prise dans un délai de 12 semaines – une durée qui fait craindre que le système accéléré n’aboutisse à un retour injuste des demandeurs. En 2010, Human Rights Watch a publié un rapport de fond détaillant comment les procédures d’asile accélérées étaient inadaptées aux demandes complexes et comment elles affectaient négativement les femmes demandeurs d’asile en particulier.
      Les personnes seront dirigées vers la procédure accélérée si : l’identité a été cachée ou que de faux documents ont été utilisés, si elle représente un danger pour la sécurité nationale, ou si elle est ressortissante d’un pays pour lesquels moins de 20% des demandes ont abouti à l’octroi d’une protection internationale.

      Comme l’exprime le rapport de Human Rights Watch (HRW), “la procédure à la frontière proposée repose sur deux hypothèses erronées – que la majorité des personnes arrivant en Europe n’ont pas besoin de protection et que l’évaluation des demandes d’asile peut être faite facilement et rapidement”.

      Essentiellement, comme l’écrivent Cassarino et Marin, “elle porte atteinte au principe selon lequel toute demande d’asile nécessite une évaluation complexe et individualisée de la situation personnelle particulière du demandeur”.

      Tout comme Jakulevičienė, Kirsty Evans s’inquiète de la manière dont le pacte va alimenter une rhétorique préjudiciable, en faisant valoir que “le langage de l’accélération fait appel à la “protection” de la rhétorique nationale évidente dans la politique et les médias en se concentrant sur le retour des personnes sur leur propre territoire”.

      Un pacte pour le retour

      Désormais, lorsqu’une demande d’asile est rejetée, la décision de retour sera rendue en même temps.

      Le raisonnement présenté par la Commission pour proposer des procédures plus rapides et plus intégrées est que des procédures inefficaces causent des difficultés excessives – y compris pour ceux qui ont obtenu le droit de rester.

      Les procédures restructurées peuvent en effet profiter à certains. Cependant, il existe un risque sérieux qu’elles aient un impact négatif sur le droit d’asile des personnes soumises à la procédure accélérée – sachant qu’en cas de rejet, il n’existe qu’un seul droit de recours.

      La proposition selon laquelle l’UE traitera désormais les retours dans leur ensemble, et non plus seulement dans un seul État membre, illustre bien l’importance que l’UE accorde aux retours. À cette fin, l’UE propose la création d’un nouveau poste de coordinateur européen des retours qui s’occupera des retours et des réadmissions.

      Décrite comme “la plus sinistre des nouvelles propositions”, et assimilée à “une grotesque parodie de personnes parrainant des enfants dans les pays en développement par l’intermédiaire d’organisations caritatives”, l’option du parrainage de retour est également un signe fort de l’approche par concession de la Commission.

      Pour M. Evans, le fait d’autoriser les pays à opter pour le “retour” comme moyen de “gérer la migration” semble être une validation du comportement illégal des États membres, comme les récentes expulsions massives en Grèce. Alors, qu’est-ce que le parrainage de retour ? Eh bien, selon les termes de l’UE, le parrainage du retour est une option de solidarité dans laquelle l’État membre “s’engage à renvoyer les migrants en situation irrégulière sans droit de séjour au nom d’un autre État membre, en le faisant directement à partir du territoire de l’État membre bénéficiaire”.

      Les États membres préciseront les nationalités qu’ils “parraineront” en fonction, vraisemblablement, des relations préexistantes de l’État membre de l’UE avec un État non membre de l’UE. Lorsque la demande d’un individu est rejetée, l’État membre qui en est responsable s’appuiera sur ses relations avec le pays tiers pour négocier le retour du demandeur.

      En outre, en supposant que les réadmissions soient réussies, le parrainage des retours fonctionne sur la base de l’hypothèse qu’il existe un pays tiers sûr. C’est sur cette base que les demandes sont rejetées. La manière dont cela affectera le principe de non-refoulement est la principale préoccupation des organisations des droits de l’homme et des experts politiques, et c’est une préoccupation qui découle d’expériences antérieures. Après tout, la coopération avec des pays tiers jusqu’à présent – à savoir l’accord Turquie-UE et l’accord Espagne-Maroc – a suscité de nombreuses critiques sur le coût des droits de l’homme.

      Mais en plus des préoccupations relatives aux droits de l’homme, des questions sont soulevées sur les implications ou même les aspects pratiques de l’”incitation” des pays tiers à se conformer, l’image de l’UE en tant que champion des droits de l’homme étant déjà corrodée aux yeux de la communauté internationale.

      Il s’agira notamment d’utiliser la délivrance du code des visas comme méthode d’incitation. Pour les pays qui ne coopèrent pas à la réadmission, les visas seront plus difficiles à obtenir. La proposition visant à pénaliser les pays qui appliquent des restrictions en matière de visas n’est pas nouvelle et n’a pas conduit à une amélioration des relations diplomatiques. Guild fait valoir que cette approche est injuste pour les demandeurs de visa des pays “non coopérants” et qu’elle risque également de susciter des sentiments d’injustice chez les voisins du pays tiers.

      L’analyse de Guild est que le nouveau pacte est diplomatiquement faible. Au-delà du financement, il offre “peu d’attention aux intérêts des pays tiers”. Il faut reconnaître, après tout, que la réadmission a des coûts et des avantages asymétriques pour les pays qui les acceptent, surtout si l’on considère que la migration, comme le soulignent Cassarino et Marin, “continue d’être considérée comme une soupape de sécurité pour soulager la pression sur le chômage et la pauvreté dans les pays d’origine”.

      https://asile.ch/2021/03/02/impakter-un-nouveau-pacte-sur-lasile-et-les-migrations

      L’article original :
      A “New” Pact on Migration and Asylum ?
      https://impakter.com/a-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum

    • The EU Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees. International Experiences on Containment and Mobility and their Impacts on Trust and Rights

      In September 2020, the European Commission published what it described as a New Pact on Migration and Asylum (emphasis added) that lays down a multi-annual policy agenda on issues that have been central to debate about the future of European integration. This book critically examines the new Pact as part of a Forum organized by the Horizon 2020 project ASILE – Global Asylum Governance and the EU’s Role.

      ASILE studies interactions between emerging international protection systems and the United Nations Global Compact for Refugees (UN GCR), with particular focus on the European Union’s role and the UN GCR’s implementation dynamics. It brings together a new international network of scholars from 13 institutions examining the characteristics of international and country specific asylum governance instruments and arrangements applicable to people seeking international protection. It studies the compatibility of these governance instruments’ with international protection and human rights, and the UN GCR’s call for global solidarity and responsibility sharing.

      https://www.asileproject.eu/the-eu-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-in-light-of-the-united-nations-glob

  • Giorgos Tsiakalos: “In Europe, a racist policy is being implemented”

    EU policy can rightly be called “Black lives don’t matter in the Mediterranean”

    In June 2020, recognized refugee families, most of which had just arrived in Athens from the Moria camp on the island of Lesvos, were unable to find housing and remained homeless for days, sleeping in Athens’ Victoria Square. June 1, 2020, marked the implementation of the Greek law which terminates the provision of shelter for 11,237 refugees and beneficiaries via the ESTIA housing program.

    “They arrived at Victoria Square, as others had come before them about five years ago. Back then we had said we were caught off guard. Now what do we say? I was there today”, wrote George Tsiakalos, Professor of Pedagogy at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, in a Facebook post dated June 14.

    George Tsiakalos, along with his wife, Sigrid Maria Muschik, have been providing support to these families not only in recent months, but continuously − since the early days of what became known as the “refugee crisis”.

    https://wearesolomon.com/mag/q-and-a/giorgos-tsiakalos-in-europe-a-racist-policy-is-being-implemented/?mc_cid=a5016dd865&mc_eid=3444239cea

    #greece #refugees #migrants #Moria #camps #Europe #Migration #borders #housing

  • #Briançon : « L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique »

    Le nouveau maire a décidé de mettre l’association d’aide aux migrants à la porte de ses locaux. Dans la ville, la mobilisation citoyenne s’organise

    #Arnaud_Murgia, élu maire de Briançon en juin, avait promis de « redresser » sa ville. Il vient, au-delà même de ce qu’il affichait dans son programme, de s’attaquer brutalement aux structures associatives clefs du mouvement citoyen d’accueil des migrants qui transitent en nombre par la vallée haut-alpine depuis quatre ans, après avoir traversé la montagne à pied depuis l’Italie voisine.

    A 35 ans, Arnaud Murgia, ex-président départemental des Républicains et toujours conseiller départemental, a également pris la tête de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (CCB) cet été. C’est en tant que président de la CCB qu’il a décidé de mettre l’association Refuges solidaires à la porte des locaux dont elle disposait par convention depuis sa création en juillet 2017. Par un courrier daté du 26 août, il a annoncé à Refuges solidaires qu’il ne renouvellerait pas la convention, arrivée à son terme. Et « mis en demeure » l’association de « libérer » le bâtiment situé près de la gare de Briançon pour « graves négligences dans la gestion des locaux et de leurs occupants ». Ultimatum au 28 octobre. Il a renouvelé sa mise en demeure par un courrier le 11 septembre, ajoutant à ses griefs l’alerte Covid pesant sur le refuge, qui l’oblige à ne plus accueillir de nouveaux migrants jusqu’au 19 septembre en vertu d’un arrêté préfectoral.
    « Autoritarisme mêlé d’idées xénophobes »

    Un peu abasourdis, les responsables de Refuges solidaires n’avaient pas révélé l’information, dans l’attente d’une rencontre avec le maire qui leur aurait peut être permis une négociation. Peine perdue : Arnaud Murgia les a enfin reçus lundi, pour la première fois depuis son élection, mais il n’a fait que réitérer son ultimatum. Refuges solidaires s’est donc résolu à monter publiquement au créneau. « M. Murgia a dégainé sans discuter, avec une méconnaissance totale de ce que nous faisons, gronde Philippe Wyon, l’un des administrateurs. Cette fin de non-recevoir est un refus de prise en compte de l’accueil humanitaire des exilés, autant que de la paix sociale que nous apportons aux Briançonnais. C’est irresponsable ! » La coordinatrice du refuge, Pauline Rey, s’insurge : « Il vient casser une dynamique qui a parfaitement marché depuis trois ans : nous avons accueilli, nourri, soigné, réconforté près de 11 000 personnes. Il est illusoire d’imaginer que sans nous, le flux d’exilés va se tarir ! D’autant qu’il est reparti à la hausse, avec 350 personnes sur le seul mois d’août, avec de plus en plus de familles, notamment iraniennes et afghanes, avec des bébés parfois… Cet hiver, où iront-ils ? »

    Il faut avoir vu les bénévoles, au cœur des nuits d’hiver, prendre en charge avec une énergie et une efficacité admirables les naufragés de la montagne épuisés, frigorifiés, gelés parfois, pour comprendre ce qu’elle redoute. Les migrants, après avoir emprunté de sentiers d’altitude pour échapper à la police, arrivent à grand-peine à Briançon ou sont redescendus parfois par les maraudeurs montagnards ou ceux de Médecins du monde qui les secourent après leur passage de la frontière. L’association Tous migrants, qui soutient ces maraudeurs, est elle aussi dans le collimateur d’Arnaud Murgia : il lui a sèchement signifié qu’il récupérerait les deux préfabriqués où elle entrepose le matériel de secours en montagne le 30 décembre, là encore sans la moindre discussion. L’un des porte-parole de Tous migrants, Michel Rousseau, fustige « une forme d’autoritarisme mêlée d’idées xénophobes : le maire désigne les exilés comme des indésirables et associe nos associations au désordre. Ses décisions vont en réalité semer la zizanie, puisque nous évitons aux exilés d’utiliser des moyens problématiques pour s’abriter et se nourrir. Ce mouvement a permis aux Briançonnais de donner le meilleur d’eux-mêmes. C’est une expérience très riche pour le territoire, nous n’avons pas l’intention que cela s’arrête ».

    La conseillère municipale d’opposition Aurélie Poyau (liste citoyenne, d’union de la gauche et écologistes), adjointe au maire sortant, l’assure : « Il va y avoir une mobilisation citoyenne, j’en suis persuadée. J’ose aussi espérer que des élus communautaires demanderont des discussions entre collectivités, associations, ONG et Etat pour que des décisions éclairées soient prises, afin de pérenniser l’accueil digne de ces personnes de passage chez nous. Depuis la création du refuge, il n’y a pas eu le moindre problème entre elles et la population. L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique. »
    « Peine profonde »

    Ce mardi, au refuge, en application de l’arrêté préfectoral pris après la découverte de trois cas positif au Covid, Hamed, migrant algérien, se réveille après sa troisième nuit passée dans un duvet, sur des palettes de bois devant le bâtiment et confie : « Il faut essayer de ne pas fermer ce lieu, c’est très important, on a de bons repas, on reprend de l’énergie. C’est rare, ce genre d’endroit. » Y., jeune Iranien, est lui bien plus frais : arrivé la veille après vingt heures de marche dans la montagne, il a passé la nuit chez un couple de sexagénaires de Briançon qui ont répondu à l’appel d’urgence de Refuges solidaires. Il montre fièrement la photo rayonnante prise avec eux au petit-déjeuner. Nathalie, bénévole fidèle du refuge, soupire : « J’ai une peine profonde, je ne comprends pas la décision du maire, ni un tel manque d’humanité. Nous faisons le maximum sur le sanitaire, en collaboration avec l’hôpital, avec MDM, il n’y a jamais eu de problème ici. Hier, j’ai dû refuser l’entrée à onze jeunes, dont un blessé. Même si une partie a trouvé refuge chez des habitants solidaires, cela m’a été très douloureux. »

    Arnaud Murgia nous a pour sa part annoncé ce mardi soir qu’il ne souhaitait pas « s’exprimer publiquement, en accord avec les associations, pour ne pas créer de polémiques qui pénaliseraient une issue amiable »… Issue dont il n’a pourtant pas esquissé le moindre contour la veille face aux solidaires.

    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2020/09/16/briancon-l-expulsion-de-refuges-solidaires-est-une-vraie-catastrophe-pour

    #refuge_solidaire #expulsion #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #Hautes-Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #Refuges_solidaires #mise_en_demeure #Murgia

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • A Briançon, le nouveau maire LR veut fermer le refuge solidaire des migrants

      Depuis trois ans, ce lieu emblématique accueille de façon inconditionnelle et temporaire les personnes exilées franchissant la frontière franco-italienne par la montagne. Mais l’élection d’un nouveau maire Les Républicains, Arnaud Murgia, risque de tout changer.

      Briançon (Hautes-Alpes).– La nouvelle est tombée lundi, tel un coup de massue, après un rendez-vous très attendu avec la nouvelle municipalité. « Le maire nous a confirmé que nous allions devoir fermer, sans nous proposer aucune alternative », soupire Philippe, l’un des référents du refuge solidaire de Briançon. En 2017, l’association Refuges solidaires avait récupéré un ancien bâtiment inoccupé pour en faire un lieu unique à Briançon, tout près du col de Montgenèvre et de la gare, qui permet d’offrir une pause précieuse aux exilés dans leur parcours migratoire.

      Fin août, l’équipe du refuge découvrait avec effarement, dans un courrier signé de la main du président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais, qui n’est autre qu’Arnaud Murgia, également maire de Briançon (Les Républicains), que la convention leur mettant les lieux à disposition ne serait pas renouvelée.

      Philippe avait pourtant pris les devants en juillet en adressant un courrier à Arnaud Murgia, en vue d’une rencontre et d’une éventuelle visite du refuge. « La seule réponse que nous avons eue a été ce courrier recommandé mettant fin à la convention », déplore-t-il, plein de lassitude.

      Contacté, le maire n’a pas souhaité s’exprimer mais évoque une question de sécurité dans son courrier, la jauge de 15 personnes accueillies n’étant pas respectée. « Il est en discussion avec les associations concernées afin de gérer au mieux cet épineux problème, et cela dans le plus grand respect des personnes en situation difficile », a indiqué son cabinet.

      Interrogée sur l’accueil d’urgence des exilés à l’avenir, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes préfère ne pas « commenter la décision d’une collectivité portant sur l’affectation d’un bâtiment dont elle a la gestion ». « Dans les Hautes-Alpes comme pour tout point d’entrée sur le territoire national, les services de l’État et les forces de sécurité intérieure s’assurent que toute personne souhaitant entrer en France bénéficie du droit de séjourner sur notre territoire. »

      Sur le parking de la MJC de Briançon, mercredi dernier, Pauline se disait déjà inquiète. « Sur le plan humain, il ne peut pas laisser les gens à la rue comme ça, lâche-t-elle, en référence au maire. Il a une responsabilité ! » Cette ancienne bénévole de l’association, désormais salariée, se souvient des prémices du refuge.

      « Je revois les exilés dormir à même le sol devant la MJC. On a investi ces locaux inoccupés parce qu’il y avait un réel besoin d’accueil d’urgence sur la ville. » Trois ans plus tard et avec un total de 10 000 personnes accueillies, le besoin n’a jamais été aussi fort. L’équipe évoque même une « courbe exponentielle » depuis le mois de juin, graphique à l’appui. 106 personnes en juin, 216 en juillet, 355 en août.

      Une quarantaine de personnes est hébergée au refuge ce jour-là, pour une durée moyenne de deux à trois jours. La façade des locaux laisse apparaître le graffiti d’un poing levé en l’air qui arrache des fils barbelés. Pauline s’engouffre dans les locaux et passe par la salle commune, dont les murs sont décorés de dessins, drapeaux et mots de remerciement.

      De grands thermos trônent sur une table près du cabinet médical (tenu en partenariat avec Médecins du monde) et les exilés vont et viennent pour se servir un thé chaud. À droite, un bureau sert à Céline, la deuxième salariée chargée de l’accueil des migrants à leur arrivée.

      Prénom, nationalité, date d’arrivée, problèmes médicaux… « Nous avons des fiches confidentielles, que nous détruisons au bout d’un moment et qui nous servent à faire des statistiques anonymes que nous rendons publiques », précise Céline, tout en demandant à deux exilés de patienter dans un anglais courant. Durant leur séjour, la jeune femme leur vient en aide pour trouver les billets de train les moins chers ou pour leur procurer des recharges téléphoniques.

      « Depuis plusieurs mois, le profil des exilés a beaucoup changé, note Philippe. On a 90 % d’Afghans et d’Iraniens, alors que notre public était auparavant composé de jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest. » Désormais, ce sont aussi des familles, avec des enfants en bas âge, qui viennent chercher refuge en France en passant par la dangereuse route des Balkans.

      Dehors, dans la cour, deux petites filles jouent à se courir après, riant aux éclats. Selon Céline, l’aînée n’avait que huit mois quand ses parents sont partis. La deuxième est née sur la route.

      « Récemment, je suis tombée sur une famille afghane avec un garçon âgé de trois ans lors d’une maraude au col de Montgenèvre. Quand j’ai félicité l’enfant parce qu’il marchait vite, presque aussi vite que moi, il m’a répondu : “Ben oui, sinon la police va nous arrêter” », raconte Stéphanie Besson, coprésidente de l’association Tous migrants, qui vient de fêter ses cinq ans.

      L’auteure de Trouver refuge : histoires vécues par-delà les frontières n’a retrouvé le sourire que lorsqu’elle l’a aperçu, dans la cour devant le refuge, en train de s’amuser sur un mini-tracteur. « Il a retrouvé toute son innocence l’espace d’un instant. C’est pour ça que ce lieu est essentiel : la population qui passe par la montagne aujourd’hui est bien plus vulnérable. »

      Vers 16 heures, Pauline s’enfonce dans les couloirs en direction du réfectoire, où des biologistes vêtus d’une blouse blanche, dont le visage est encombré d’une charlotte et d’un masque, testent les résidents à tour de rôle. Un migrant a été positif au Covid-19 quelques jours plus tôt et la préfecture, dans un arrêté, a exigé la fermeture du refuge pour la journée du 10 septembre.

      Deux longues rangées de tables occupent la pièce, avec, d’un côté, un espace cuisine aménagé, de l’autre, une porte de secours donnant sur l’école Oronce fine. Là aussi, les murs ont servi de cimaises à de nombreux exilés souhaitant laisser une trace de leur passage au refuge. Dans un coin de la salle, des dizaines de matelas forment une pile et prennent la place des tables et des chaises, le soir venu, lorsque l’affluence est trop importante.

      « On a dû aménager deux dortoirs en plus de ceux du premier étage pour répondre aux besoins actuels », souligne Pauline, qui préfère ne laisser entrer personne d’autre que les exilés dans les chambres pour respecter leur intimité. Vers 17 heures, Samia se lève de sa chaise et commence à couper des concombres qu’elle laisse tomber dans un grand saladier.

      Cela fait trois ans que cette trentenaire a pris la route avec sa sœur depuis l’Afghanistan. « Au départ, on était avec notre frère, mais il a été arrêté en Turquie et renvoyé chez nous. On a décidé de poursuivre notre chemin malgré tout », chuchote-t-elle, ajoutant que c’est particulièrement dur et dangereux pour les femmes seules. Son regard semble triste et contraste avec son sourire.

      Évoquant des problèmes personnels mais aussi la présence des talibans, les sœurs expliquent avoir dû quitter leur pays dans l’espoir d’une vie meilleure en Europe. « Le refuge est une vraie chance pour nous. On a pu se reposer, dormir en toute sécurité et manger à notre faim. Chaque jour, je remercie les personnes qui s’en occupent », confie-t-elle en dari, l’un des dialectes afghans.

      Samia ne peut s’empêcher de comparer avec la Croatie, où de nombreux exilés décrivent les violences subies de la part de la police. « Ils ont frappé une des femmes qui était avec nous, ont cassé nos téléphones et ont brûlé une partie de nos affaires », raconte-t-elle.

      Ici, depuis des années, la police n’approche pas du refuge ni même de la gare, respectant dans une sorte d’accord informel la tranquillité des lieux et des exilés. « Je n’avais encore jamais vu de policiers aux alentours mais, récemment, deux agents de la PAF [police aux frontières] ont raccompagné une petite fille qui s’était perdue et ont filmé l’intérieur du refuge avec leur smartphone », assure Céline.

      À 18 heures, le repas est servi. Les parents convoquent les enfants, qui rappliquent en courant et s’installent sur une chaise. La fumée de la bolognaise s’échappe des assiettes, tandis qu’un joli brouhaha s’empare de la pièce. « Le dîner est servi tôt car on tient compte des exilés qui prennent le train du soir pour Paris, à 20 heures », explique Pauline.

      Paul*, 25 ans, en fait partie. C’est la deuxième fois qu’il vient au refuge, mais il a fait trois fois le tour de la ville de nuit pour pouvoir le retrouver. « J’avais une photo de la façade mais impossible de me rappeler l’emplacement », sourit-il. L’Ivoirien aspire à « une vie tranquille » qui lui permettrait de réaliser tous « les projets qu’il a en tête ».

      Le lendemain, une affiche collée à la porte d’entrée du refuge indique qu’un arrêté préfectoral impose la fermeture des lieux pour la journée. Aucun nouvel arrivant ne peut entrer.

      Pour Stéphanie Besson, la fermeture définitive du refuge aurait de lourdes conséquences sur les migrants et l’image de la ville. « Briançon est un exemple de fraternité. La responsabilité de ceux qui mettront fin à ce jeu de la fraternité avec des mesures politiques sera immense. »

      Parmi les bénévoles de Tous migrants, des professeurs, des agriculteurs, des banquiers et des retraités … « On a des soutiens partout, en France comme à l’étranger. Mais il ne faut pas croire qu’on tire une satisfaction de nos actions. Faire des maraudes une routine me brise, c’est une honte pour la France », poursuit cette accompagnatrice en montagne.

      Si elle se dit inquiète pour les cinq années à venir, c’est surtout pour l’énergie que les acteurs du tissu associatif vont devoir dépenser pour continuer à défendre les droits des exilés. L’association vient d’apprendre que le local qui sert à entreposer le matériel des maraudeurs, mis à disposition par la ville, va leur être retiré pour permettre l’extension de la cour de l’école Oronce fine.

      Contactée, l’inspectrice de l’Éducation nationale n’a pas confirmé ce projet d’agrandissement de l’établissement. « On a aussi une crainte pour la “maisonnette”, qui appartient à la ville, et qui loge les demandeurs d’asile sans hébergement », souffle Stéphanie.

      « Tout s’enchaîne, ça n’arrête pas depuis un mois », lâche Agnès Antoine, bénévole à Tous migrants. Cela fait plusieurs années que la militante accueille des exilés chez elle, souvent après leur passage au refuge solidaire, en plus de ses trois grands enfants.

      Depuis trois ans, Agnès héberge un adolescent guinéen inscrit au lycée, en passe d’obtenir son titre de séjour. « Il a 18 ans aujourd’hui et a obtenu les félicitations au dernier trimestre », lance-t-elle fièrement, ajoutant que c’est aussi cela qui l’encourage à poursuivre son engagement.

      Pour elle, Arnaud Murgia est dans un positionnement politique clair : « le rejet des exilés » et « la fermeture des frontières » pour empêcher tout passage par le col de Montgenèvre. « C’est illusoire ! Les migrants sont et seront toujours là, ils emprunteront des parcours plus dangereux pour y arriver et se retrouveront à la rue sans le refuge, qui remplit un rôle social indéniable. »

      Dans la vallée de Serre Chevalier, à l’abri des regards, un projet de tourisme solidaire est porté par le collectif d’architectes Quatorze. Il faut longer la rivière Guisane, au milieu des chalets touristiques de cette station et des montagnes, pour apercevoir la maison Bessoulie, au village du Bez. À l’intérieur, Laure et David s’activent pour tenir les délais, entre démolition, récup’ et réaménagement des lieux.

      « L’idée est de créer un refuge pour de l’accueil à moyen et long terme, où des exilés pourraient se former tout en côtoyant des touristes », développe Laure. Au rez-de-chaussée de cette ancienne auberge de jeunesse, une cuisine et une grande salle commune sont rénovées. Ici, divers ateliers (cuisine du monde, low tech, découverte des routes de l’exil) seront proposés.

      À l’étage, un autre espace commun est aménagé. « Il y a aussi la salle de bains et le futur studio du volontaire en service civique. » Un premier dortoir pour deux prend forme, près des chambres réservées aux saisonniers. « On va repeindre le lambris et mettre du parquet flottant », indique la jeune architecte.

      Deux autres dortoirs, l’un pour trois, l’autre pour quatre, sont prévus au deuxième étage, pour une capacité d’accueil de neuf personnes exilées. À chaque fois, un espace de travail est prévu pour elles. « Elles seront accompagnées par un gestionnaire présent à l’année, chargé de les suivre dans leur formation et leur insertion. »

      « C’est un projet qui donne du sens à notre travail », poursuit David en passant une main dans sa longue barbe. Peu sensible aux questions migratoires au départ, il découvre ces problématiques sur le tas. « On a une conscience architecturale et on compte tout faire pour offrir les meilleures conditions d’accueil aux exilés qui viendront. » Reste à déterminer les critères de sélection pour le public qui sera accueilli à la maison Bessoulie à compter de janvier 2021.

      Pour l’heure, le maire de la commune, comme le voisinage, ignore la finalité du projet. « Il est ami avec Arnaud Murgia, alors ça nous inquiète. Comme il y a une station là-bas, il pourrait être tenté de “protéger” le tourisme classique », confie Philippe, du refuge solidaire. Mais le bâtiment appartient à la Fédération unie des auberges de jeunesse (Fuaj) et non à la ville, ce qui est déjà une petite victoire pour les acteurs locaux. « Le moyen et long terme est un échelon manquant sur le territoire, on encourage donc tous cette démarche », relève Stéphanie Besson.

      Aurélie Poyau, élue de l’opposition, veut croire que le maire de Briançon saura prendre la meilleure décision pour ne pas entacher l’image de la ville. « En trois ans, il n’y a jamais eu aucun problème lié à la présence des migrants. Arnaud Murgia n’a pas la connaissance de cet accueil propre à la solidarité montagnarde, de son histoire. Il doit s’intéresser à cet élan », note-t-elle.

      Son optimisme reste relatif. Deux jours plus tôt, l’élue a pris connaissance d’un courrier adressé par la ville aux commerçants du marché de Briançon leur rappelant que la mendicité était interdite. « Personne ne mendie. On sait que ça vise les bénévoles des associations d’aide aux migrants, qui récupèrent des invendus en fin de marché. Mais c’est du don, et voilà comment on joue sur les peurs avec le poids des mots ! »

      Vendredi, avant la réunion avec le maire, un arrêté préfectoral est déjà venu prolonger la fermeture du refuge jusqu’au 19 septembre, après que deux nouvelles personnes ont été testées positives au Covid-19. Une décision que respecte Philippe, même s’il ne lâchera rien par la suite, au risque d’aller jusqu’à l’expulsion. Est-elle évitable ?

      « Évidemment, les cas Covid sont un argument de plus pour le maire, qui mélange tout. Mais nous lui avons signifié que nous n’arrêterons pas d’accueillir les personnes exilées de passage dans le Briançonnais, même après le délai de deux mois qu’il nous a imposé pour quitter les lieux », prévient Philippe. « On va organiser une riposte juridique et faire pression sur l’État pour qu’il prenne ses responsabilités », conclut Agnès.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/160920/briancon-le-nouveau-maire-lr-veut-fermer-le-refuge-solidaire-des-migrants?

      @sinehebdo : c’est l’article que tu as signalé, mais avec tout le texte, j’efface donc ton signalement pour ne pas avoir de doublons

    • Lettre d’information Tous Migrants. Septembre 2020

      Edito :

      Aylan. Moria. Qu’avons-nous fait en cinq ans ?

      Un petit garçon en exil, échoué mort sur une plage de la rive nord de la Méditerranée. Le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe ravagé par les flammes, laissant 12.000 personnes vulnérables sans abri.

      Cinq ans presque jour pour jour sont passés entre ces deux « occasions », terribles, données à nos dirigeants, et à nous, citoyens européens, de réveiller l’Europe endormie et indigne de ses principes fondateurs. De mettre partout en acte la fraternité et la solidarité, en mer, en montagne, aux frontières, dans nos territoires. Et pourtant, si l’on en juge par la situation dans le Briançonnais, la fraternité et la solidarité ne semblent jamais avoir été aussi menacées qu’à présent...

      Dénoncer, informer, alerter, protéger. Il y a cinq ans, le 5 septembre 2015, se mettait en route le mouvement Tous Migrants. C’était une première manifestation place de l’Europe à Briançon, sous la bannière Pas en notre nom. Il n’y avait pas encore d’exilés dans nos montagnes (10.000 depuis sont passés par nos chemins), mais des morts par centaines en Méditerranée... Que de chemin parcouru depuis 2015, des dizaines d’initiatives par an ont été menées par des centaines de bénévoles, des relais médiatiques dans le monde entier, que de rencontres riches avec les exilés, les solidaires, les journalistes, les autres associations...

      Mais hormis quelques avancées juridiques fortes de symboles - tels la consécration du principe de fraternité par le Conseil Constitutionnel, ou l’innocentement de Pierre, maraudeur solidaire -, force est de constater que la situation des droits fondamentaux des exilés n’a guère progressé. L’actualité internationale, nationale et locale nous en livre chaque jour la preuve glaçante, de Lesbos à Malte, de Calais à Gap et Briançon. Triste ironie du sort, cinq ans après la naissance de Tous Migrants, presque jour pour jour, le nouveau maire à peine élu à Briançon s’est mis en tête de faire fermer le lieu d’accueil d’urgence et d’entraver les maraudes... Quelles drôles d’idées. Comme des relents d’Histoire.

      Comment, dès lors, ne pas se sentir des Sisyphe*, consumés de l’intérieur par un sentiment tout à la fois d’injustice, d’impuissance, voire d’absurdité ? En se rappelant simplement qu’en cinq ans, la mobilisation citoyenne n’a pas faibli. Que Tous Migrants a reçu l’année dernière la mention spéciale du Prix des Droits de l’Homme. Que nous sommes nombreux à rester indignés.

      Alors, tant qu’il y aura des hommes et des femmes qui passeront la frontière franco-italienne, au péril de leur vie à cause de lois illégitimes, nous poursuivrons le combat. Pour eux, pour leurs enfants... pour les nôtres.

      Marie Dorléans, cofondatrice de Tous Migrants

      Reçue via mail, le 16.09.2020

    • Briançon bientôt comme #Vintimille ?

      Le nombre de migrants à la rue à Vintimille représente une situation inhabituelle ces dernières années. Elle résulte, en grande partie, de la fermeture fin juillet d’un camp humanitaire situé en périphérie de la ville et géré par la Croix-Rouge italienne. Cette fermeture décrétée par la préfecture d’Imperia a été un coup dur pour les migrants qui pouvaient, depuis 2016, y faire étape. Les différents bâtiments de ce camp de transit pouvaient accueillir quelque 300 personnes - mais en avait accueillis jusqu’à 750 au plus fort de la crise migratoire. Des sanitaires, des lits, un accès aux soins ainsi qu’à une aide juridique pour ceux qui souhaitaient déposer une demande d’asile en Italie : autant de services qui font désormais partie du passé.

      « On ne comprend pas », lâche simplement Maurizio Marmo. « Depuis deux ans, les choses s’étaient calmées dans la ville. Il n’y avait pas de polémique, pas de controverse. Personne ne réclamait la fermeture de ce camp. Maintenant, voilà le résultat. Tout le monde est perdant, la ville comme les migrants. »

      https://seenthis.net/messages/876523

    • Aide aux migrants : les bénévoles de Briançon inquiets pour leurs locaux

      C’est un non-renouvellement de convention qui inquiète les bénévoles venant en aide aux migrants dans le Briançonnais. Celui de l’occupation de deux préfabriqués, situés derrière le Refuge solidaire, par l’association Tous migrants. Ceux-ci servent à entreposer du matériel pour les maraudeurs – des personnes qui apportent leur aide aux réfugiés passant la frontière italo-française à pied dans les montagnes – et à préparer leurs missions.

      La Ville de Briançon, propriétaire des locaux, n’a pas souhaité renouveler cette convention, provoquant l’ire de certains maraudeurs.


      https://twitter.com/nos_pas/status/1298504847273197569

      Le maire de Briançon Arnaud Murgia se défend, lui, de vouloir engager des travaux d’agrandissement de la cour de l’école Oronce-Fine. “La Ville de Briançon a acquis le terrain attenant à la caserne de CRS voilà déjà plusieurs années afin de réaliser l’agrandissement et la remise à neuf de la cour de l’école municipale d’Oronce-Fine”, fait-il savoir par son cabinet.

      Une inquiétude qui peut s’ajouter à celle des bénévoles du Refuge solidaire. Car la convention liant l’association gérant le lieu d’hébergement temporaire de la rue Pasteur, signée avec la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (présidée par Arnaud Murgia), est caduque depuis le mois de juin dernier.

      https://www.ledauphine.com/politique/2020/08/28/hautes-alpes-briancon-aide-aux-migrants-les-benevoles-inquiets-pour-leur

      #solidarité_montagnarde

    • Refuge solidaire : lettre ouverte d’un citoyen au maire de Briançon

      « Pensez-vous que les soldats africains avaient le droit de mourir pour sauver nos ascendants et que les jeunes migrants africains, descendants des premiers, auraient le devoir de mourir parce que la gratitude n’est pas un bien d’héritage ? »
      C’est l’une des questions que pose au maire de Briançon un citoyen ayant séjourné à Briançon cet été. Une lettre pétrie d’esprit et d’humanité à lire ICI (https://tousmigrants.weebly.com/uploads/7/3/4/6/73468541/lettre_ouverte_au_maire_de_briancon.pdf) :

      Qui est l’auteur ?

      Habitant de Leyr, petit village de Meurthe-et-Moselle, Léon a hébergé avec sa compagne un jeune migrant venu du Mali. On le voit en photo sur la lettre, devant la tombe d’un soldat originaire de sa région et qui porte son nom. Avec ce jeune exilé, un collectif de citoyens a installé dans le village une stèle à la mémoire des soldats africains morts pour la France mais aussi une deuxième plaque à la mémoire des jeunes migrants disparus en mer en tentant de rejoindre notre pays.

      https://tousmigrants.weebly.com/sinformer/refuge-solidaire-lettre-ouverte-dun-citoyen-au-maire-de-brianco

    • Nouvelles...

      Depuis une semaine maintenant, nous avons pu ouvrir une ligne de communication avec la Communauté de Communes du Briançonnais via la création d’une commission composée d’élus et de représentants du Refuge.

      Suite à cette négociation, nous avons obtenus un engagement écrit du Président de la Communauté de Communes sur le fait qu’il n’y aura pas d’expulsion avant six mois.
      Ainsi, nous allons pouvoir rester dans les locaux tout l’hiver.

      Nous préparons déjà le printemps en étudiant plusieurs solutions de replis pérennes grâce à l’aide d’ONG et de partenaires.

      Email du Conseil d’aministration du Refuge solidaire, 20.10.2020

    • REFUGE SOLIDAIRE DE BRIANCON - Une mobilisation fructueuse

      Vous avez été près de 40 000 à signer la pétition « Pour que le Briançonnais reste un territoire solidaire avec les exilés » et nous vous en remercions vivement.

      Grâce à chacune de vos voix, devant cette mobilisation massive, le maire de Briançon et président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais est revenu sur sa décision de faire évacuer le Refuge Solidaire au 28 octobre 2020.
      Suite à la création d’une commission composée d’élus et de représentants du Refuge, il s’est engagé par écrit à renoncer à toute expulsion avant six mois et a fait remplir la cuve à fioul de la chaudière. Les locaux continueront donc d’accueillir des exilés tout l’hiver.
      C’est une première victoire de la mobilisation !
      En vue du printemps, des solutions de repli pérennes, avec l’aide d’ONG et de partenaires, sont à l’étude.

      Le local maraudes - où est entreposé le matériel de secours en montagne aux exilés franchissant la frontière - reste quant à lui toujours menacé de fermeture en décembre 2020. Tous Migrants et Médecins du Monde viennent d’adresser au maire de Briançon un courrier commun demandant le maintien de ce lieu.

      Nous ne manquerons pas de vous tenir informés des futures avancées et des actions à venir sur le thème « Briançon Ville Refuge », avec en projet une grande fête de l’hospitalité.

      Merci encore pour votre précieux soutien.

      Solidairement,

      L’équipe Tous Migrants

      Reçu via la mailing-list Tous Migrants, le 23.10.2020

    • Comme nous vous l’indiquions dans notre dernière lettre du 23 octobre 2020 (https://mailchi.mp/2503c7e27ddc/22cytn8udh-3869114), la mobilisation pour la défense du Refuge Solidaire de Briançon a porté ses fruits. Vous avez été près de 40 000 à signer la pétition « Pour que le Briançonnais reste un territoire solidaire avec les exilés » (https://www.change.org/p/pour-que-le-brian%C3%A7onnais-reste-un-territoire-solidaire-avec-les-exil%C3. Devant cette mobilisation massive, le maire de Briançon et président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais est revenu sur sa décision de faire évacuer le Refuge Solidaire au 28 octobre 2020. Il s’est engagé par écrit à renoncer à toute expulsion avant six mois et a fait remplir la cuve à fioul de la chaudière. Les locaux continueront donc d’accueillir des exilés tout l’hiver.
      C’est une première victoire de la mobilisation !
      En vue du printemps, des solutions de repli pérennes, avec l’aide d’ONG et de partenaires, sont à l’étude.

      Reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 30.11.2020

  • Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • Every house a sanctuary. Fighting displacement on all fronts in #Sunset_Park, #Brooklyn

    The right to housing has been a key focus for both immigrant rights and anti-gentrification activists in the United States. In this update, I highlight the ways in which these come together in the neighborhood of Sunset Park, Brooklyn, New York. In 2019, the neighborhood was specifically targeted in a series of raids by the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement resulting in a rapid mobilization of existing anti-gentrification networks to protect those vulnerable. I argue that this mobilization and its success highlights contradictions in liberal, pro-immigrant rights discourses that ignore the increasing threat of gentrification in “sanctuary cities.” Recognizing and exploiting this contradiction provides a way forward for thinking about secure housing as a requirement for sanctuary.


    https://radicalhousingjournal.org/2020/every-house-a-sanctuary
    #sanctuary_city #logement #gentrification #résistance #luttes #migrations #villes-refuge #refuge #droit_au_logement #USA #convergence_des_luttes #Etats-Unis

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • The #Milky_Way

    Les Alpes occidentales entre l’Italie et la France ont été au fur et à mesure des siècles une frontière naturelle, ainsi qu’un lieu de passage et de rencontre. Ses cols constituent une terre de connexion, de médiation entre peuples et cultures différents. L’histoire plus récente nous raconte que ces deux cents dernières années, c’étaient les Italiens qui traversaient clandestinement la frontière pour aller chercher du travail en France alors qu’aujourd’hui c’est une route utilisée notamment par des migrants d’origine africaine.
    Les politiques récentes de fermeture des frontières internes européennes ont poussé les personnes migrantes à rechercher des sentiers moins battus pour quitter l’Italie et continuer leur voyage au-delà de la frontière française, des sentiers de haute montagne comme ceux qui longent le domaine skiable « La voie lactée », à la frontière entre Claviere (IT) et Montgenèvre (FR).
    De jour, les pistes de ski sont un lieu d’amusement, de sport et de détente ; de nuit, elles se transforment en un théâtre de la peur, du danger et des violations des droits humains : les migrants, peu préparés et mal équipés, s’aventurent sur les sentiers en défiant l’obscurité, le froid et les contrôles des autorités françaises et en risquant leur vie.
    The Milky Way est un film choral qui retrace des histoires d’activistes, habitants des montagnes tout en proposant la reconstruction historique de l’émigration italienne des années 50 dans une graphic novel animée. Il raconte aussi les histoires des migrants mis à l’abri par des personnes solidaires des deux côtés de la frontière et met en lumière l’humanité qui refait surface quand le danger imminent réactive la solidarité, se basant sur la conviction que personne ne doit être laissé seul. Personne ne se sauve tout seul.

    https://www.milkywaydoc.com/lle-film/?lang=fr

    Trailer :
    https://vimeo.com/387650575

    #film #documentaire #film_documentaire
    #migrations #réfugiés #asile #montagne #frontière #frontières #frontière_sud-alpine #France #Alpes #Italie #clandestins #décès #morts #secours #passeurs #migrants_italiens #Bardonecchia #Col_de_l'Echelle #solidarité #Moncenisio #Montcenis #Claviere #Clavière #quand_eux_c'était_nous #histoire #colle_della_rho #Briançon #Refuge_solidaire #Briançon #maraudeur #maraudes #Névache #traque #chasse_à_l'homme #Col_de_la_Roue

    –---

    Citation :

    « La montagne partage les eaux et unit les gens »

    –---

    Citation, #Davide_Rostan, à partir de la minute 26’20 :

    Siamo al Lago del Moncenisio, questo è un colle di passaggio sin dall’Antichità. E’ un luogo importante per la nostra storia perché in qualche modo simboleggia il fatto che le popolazioni hanno attraversato questi confini dai tempi antichissimi, che è lo stesso tragitto che oggi molti migranti vogliono fare. L’anno scorso riuscivano più spesso dal Monginevro a scendere con l’autobus o in macchina con delle persone che portavano aiuto per evitare che rimanessero al freddo. Il Monginevro è il colle più facile, passa la strada, è aperta tutto l’anno. Le persone che arrivano scendono con il treno a #Oulx, prendono l’autobus, arrivano a Claviere e lì si avviano a piedi. Quest’anno i controlli sono aumentati, quindi molto spesso chi arriva a Claviere poi si deve fare una quindicina di chilometri fino a Briançon e sicuramente questo mette a rischio la loro vita, perché in qualche modo per non farsi fermare attraversano il valico di notte, non possono stare sull’autobus, sono costretti a camminare in mezzo alla neve. Una persona è morta proprio tentando da Bardonecchia di andare a scavalcare il Colle della Rho, questo ragazzo è stato ritrovato l’anno scorso in fondo a un burrone dove probabilmente era finito a causa di una slavina. Altri invece sono morti dopo aver scavalcato il colle del Monginevro, alcune rincorse dalla polizia sono finite nel fiume, altre si sono perse nei boschi sono morti di sfinimento o per il freddo. E tutto questo purtroppo è dovuto semplicemente alle nostre leggi.

    ping @isskein

  • Entretien avec Françoise Vergès | Radio Informal
    http://www.rybn.org/radioinformal/antivirus

    À propos d’inégalités invisibilisées, de normalité du confinement, de vulnérabilités et de racisme, de solidarité et d’auto-organisation comme contre-pouvoir, d’intersectionalité des luttes, de la métaphore du bateau négrier. Durée : 57 min. Source : Pi-node

    www.rybn.org/radioinformal/antivirus/audio/ANTIVIRUS18-FrancoiseVerges.mp3

  • Dans les #Alpes, face au #coronavirus, mettre les migrant·es à l’abri

    Alors que les #Hautes-Alpes regorgent d’#infrastructures_touristiques inutilisées pendant la période de #confinement, aucune #mise_à_l’abri préventive n’a été décidée pour les 120 personnes précaires du département. Malgré tout, les associations s’organisent et ripostent.

    Depuis le début de l’épidémie de coronavirus, les migrant·es ne viennent plus, après avoir traversé le col de Montgenèvre à pied de nuit, toquer à la porte du #Refuge_solidaire de #Briançon (Hautes-Alpes). De chaque côté de la frontière, les populations sont confinées, coronavirus oblige. Les #maraudes, qui venaient en aide aux exilé·es dans la #montagne, sont suspendues. Depuis le début du confinement, le Refuge, qui fourmillait de bénévoles venu·es donner un coup de main, est désormais fermé au public et quasiment autogéré par les 14 migrants accueillis.

    « On fait en sorte qu’il y ait le moins de #bénévoles possible qui passent, explique Pauline, coordinatrice du Refuge. On a peur de leur transmettre le #virus. Si quelqu’un l’attrape, on peut être sûr que tout le refuge sera infecté. » Les exilé·es ont compris les enjeux sanitaires, mais, dans un lieu de vie collectif, le respect des #mesures_barrières et de la #distanciation_sociale est difficile.

    Limiter le risque de contamination grâce à l’#hébergement_préventif

    Si le problème se pose à Briançon, où 14 personnes sont accueillies dans le Refuge solidaire et 15 autres dans le squat #Chez_Marcel, à Gap (Hautes-Alpes), la situation est plus grave encore. Là-bas, une soixantaine de personnes vivent au #squat du #Cesaï dans des conditions de #promiscuité et d’hygiène « déplorables » selon les associations. « Toutes les fontaines de la ville de #Gap sont fermées, constate Carla Melki, qui gère la crise sanitaire du coronavirus dans les Hautes-Alpes pour Médecins du monde. Une mesure dont souffrent les migrants : « C’est impossible pour les personnes précaires de se doucher, ou même de se laver les mains. » Après des demandes insistantes, des #douches ont été ouvertes trois fois par semaine « pour un minimum de #dignité ». Les conditions d’habitat précaires sont loin de permettre les mesures de protection qu’impose l’urgence sanitaire.

    « On pourrait limiter le risque contamination de ces publics précaires en leur offrant un hébergement préventif, regrette Carla Melki. Dans les Hautes-Alpes, on parle de 120 personnes à héberger. Dans un département où il y a d’énormes infrastructures touristiques qui ne sont plus utilisées, la possibilité de mettre à l’abri paraît plutôt facile. »

    « Ce qu’on déplore toujours c’est la prévention »

    À l’absence de possibilité de confinement correct pour les personnes démunies, s’ajoute un #accès_aux_soins rendu plus difficile par la fermeture des Permanences d’accès aux soins (Pass). Elles permettaient aux personnes sans couverture maladie de bénéficier d’une offre de #santé. Leur personnel soignant a été redéployé dans les services hospitaliers surchargés. « On fait face à une #crise_sanitaire. On comprend que les hôpitaux centrent leurs forces sur les urgences et les tensions qui risquent d’arriver dans les prochains jours », estime Carla Melki.

    Pour pallier ce manque, Médecins du monde, financé par l’Agence régionale de santé (ARS), a mis en place une #unité_mobile #Santé_précarité. Elle prend en charge les publics fragiles, notamment les migrants, dans le cadre de l’#épidémie de coronavirus. « On va vers les personnes dans les lieux d’accueil, comme le Refuge solidaire, Chez Marcel ou le Cesaï à Gap », détaille Carla Melki. Là, l’équipe effectue un travail de #prévention et d’#information autour de la #Covid-19, ainsi qu’une #veille_sanitaire. « Dans les #Hautes-Alpes, le dispositif mis en place me semble adapté, conclut-elle. Ce qu’on déplore toujours, c’est la prévention. Il vaut mieux prévenir que guérir. C’est là-dessus qu’on aimerait voir un pas en avant de la préfecture. »

    https://radioparleur.net/2020/04/03/urgence-sanitaire-mise-a-labri-migrants-coronavirus-dans-les-hautes-al
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #tourisme #précarisation #frontière_sud-alpine

    ping @thomas_lacroix @karine4 @isskein