• Arrestation de Jawid, réfugié afghan, par les autorités vaudoises (#Suisse)

    Le canton de #Vaud continue de renvoyer des réfugié·es afghan·es !
    Jeudi matin 4 novembre, notre ami Jawid a été arrêté par la police vaudoise. Originaire d’Afghanistan, il a fui son pays de naissance en quête de protection en Europe. Il a d’abord atterri en #Suède, avant d’atteindre il y a une année la Suisse, pour y rejoindre sa sœur qui y vit. Mais voilà, qui dit Suède dit accords #Dublin, et les autorités ont décidé que c’est dans ce pays qu’il doit rester, alors même que la Suède n’accorde que très difficilement l’asile aux personnes afghanes.

    Nous ne savons à l’heure actuelle pas où est Jawid, s’il est déjà dans un avion pour la Suède ou encore emprisonné en Suisse.

    Ce que nous savons en revanche, c’est que les autorités vaudoises, en particulier Philippe Leuba, en charge de l’asile, ne reculent devant aucune hypocrisie dans la question des refugié·es afghan·es. Le 20 octobre 2021, Philippe Leuba se gargarisait dans la presse de son geste humanitaire en faveur de vingt cyclistes afghanes, exfiltrées et arrivées en Suisse pour obtenir l’asile. La préparation de l’arrestation de Jawid se faisait en parallèle.

    Comble de l’ironie, les député·es du Grand Conseil ont voté le 12 octobre 2021 une résolution (21_RES_14) demandant au Conseil d’Etat de soutenir les personnes réfugiées afghanes. Pour notre part, mardi 2 novembre, nous avons déposé une pétition munie de 823 signatures demandant aux autorités vaudoises de tout faire pour faciliter l’accueil des réfugié·es afghan·es, y compris de suspendre tous les renvois prévus. Mais apparemment le Conseil d’Etat et l’administration vaudoise restent de marbre.

    Nous sommes inquiètes pour Jawid, fragilisé par des années de procédures et de pression (comme il l’explique dans son témoignage en pièce jointe) et demandons la suspension immédiate de son renvoi, ou son retour en Suisse. Les autorités helvétiques doivent lui accorder la protection à laquelle il a droit et arrêter de persécuter les réfugié·es afghan·es dont le sort émeut tout le monde sans pour autant donner lieu à un accueil digne de ce nom.

    Collectif Droit de rester, Lausanne, 4 novembre 2021

    ----

    Témoignage de Jawid Y. : débouté, #Non-entrée_en_matière Dublin, à l’#aide_d’urgence depuis le 10 juin 2021. En Suisse depuis le 1er octobre 2020, il est menacé de renvoi Dublin en Suède, d’où il est menacé de renvoi en Afghanistan car il a été débouté en Suède où il avait demandé l’asile à son arrive en Europe. Quand il a quitté l’Afghanistan mi-2015, il avait 21 ans. Aujourd’hui il a 27 ans.

    « I want to be free ! »

    I want to live like a normal person, I want to have the same rights, I want to study, I want to work.

    I want to speak to my family (in Tadjikistan now) and not lie to them.

    Since 6 years I’m lying to them because I don’t want to tell them what I’m going through.

    It would destroy them. My mom would be destroyed if she knew what I’m going through.

    I say that I’m fine, that I’m waiting for my asylum answer, that I’m ok, that I have French courses…

    My dream is to have a normal life. I don’t demand anything else, just to have a normal life. I don’t want to live in a refugee camp anymore.

    I just want to do things that I want.

    I don’t want every night security guards knock on my door and check if I’m here.

    I don’t want to be forced to go to SPOP and EVAM offices every day, or every two days…and to wait there for the white paper and to get 9.- CHF per day to survive here.

    My dream in Afghanistan was to get a diploma in IT ingeniring. I was studying IT in Kaboul Technic University and I liked it. I studied 2 and ½ years at this University.

    But I was forced to live my country very quickly.

    I even could not say good-bye to my family before leaving Kaboul because they live in the countryside.

    During all this years in Sweden, I was studying.

    I studied hard Swedish language. I passed the Swedish test in 1 and 1/2 year. Usually people need 4 to 5 years to succeed with this Swedish test.
    I went to school in Sweden.

    I was just ready to start University there.

    I had every possibility to enter to University…expect the permit.

    Now I don’t have the energy anymore to study.

    I want to stop.

    I question myself. Is this life really fair to stress myself…and to try to survive here…

    I don’t have hope anymore.

    I even committed suicide while in Bex.

    I see the doctor once a week and I see the psychologist from the hospital every day in Bex. It’s boring to see them, to talk to them, knowing that nothing will change.

    And the doctor, what they can do? When they ask me how I am feeling, I answer: « Well, I’m pissed of like all the other days ».

    I asked them not to come on Friday. But they say “No”, because their boss took the decision that the doctor have to see me every day.

    I don’t see any light. For me, my life is like walking in a dark room and I don’t know when I’ll crash the wall.

    (AF, récit récolté le 4.10.21, Lausanne, pour DDR)

    Message reçu via la mailing-list du collectif Droit de rester pour tou.te.s Lausanne, 04.11.2021

    #renvois #expulsions #réfugiés_afghans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #renvois_Dublin #NEM

  • A German Court Has Recognised Not All EU Countries Are Safe For Refugees

    A court in the German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia has ruled in favour of two asylum seekers, one from Somalia and the other Mali, whose asylum applications had been rejected because they came into the EU via Italy. The court has decided that, because they could expect inhumane or degrading treatment if sent back to Italy, their asylum claims should be heard in Germany.

    The ruling is significant, as it shakes up some of how asylum processing happens in the EU.

    Under perhaps one of the more well-known EU migration laws, the Dublin regulation, member states are allowed to send people back to the first EU country they were registered in. It’s a complicated process, and not without criticism. Asylum seekers and their advocates don’t like it because it denies agency to an asylum seeker who in theory has the right to claim asylum in the country of their choice (or, more specifically, is not obliged to do so in the first “safe” country they land in). “Frontline” states on the EU border such as Italy, Greece and Hungary don’t like the regulation either, because it unfairly places the burden for humanitarian accommodation on them, while Northern member states can admit people as and when they want to.

    Germany previously suspended its participation in the process during the political crisis around migration to Europe in 2015 and 2016, at a time when around a million refugees made their way to Germany. The regulation has since come back however, and continues to cause confusion and misery for many refugees.

    Now, with this ruling, the North Rhine-Westphalia court has thrown an obstacle in the way of this process. Both men had had their asylum applications rejected by regional courts because they were already registered in Italy (technically speaking, the Somali man had already been recognised as a refugee in Italy, while the Malian man had yet to receive any protection). For both men, however, a removal back to Italy would have meant likely destitution, as neither had much prospect of finding housing, support or employment. Their asylum claims, therefore, should be heard in Germany.

    The ruling acknowledges something many refugee advocates have been saying for a long time. Just because an asylum seeker or refugee finds herself in a country that is relatively safer than the region they came from, that does not mean they are in fact free from danger, poverty or destitution just because they are in any given EU state.

    This is a relevant issue in a number of countries, not just Italy and Germany. Greece, for instance, is considered by many people to be an unsafe country for some refugees, as the Greek authorities have been observed abusing refugees as well as forcing them further back into dangerous regions, violating the international principle of non-refoulement.

    The conversation is salient in the U.K. as well, at a time when prominent anti-immigrant voices are decrying people crossing the English channel from “safe” France in order to claim asylum. The U.K. human rights advocate Daniel Sohege has repeatedly pointed out all the reasons a refugee may not feel safe in France, even though the average Brit might:


    https://twitter.com/stand_for_all/status/1292467258221002756
    The U.K. has in any case withdrawn from the Dublin system, but the government is actively pursuing measures to prevent more people arriving in the U.K., including a controversial bill to make it illegal to seek asylum when arriving by “irregular” means (i.e., arriving without already having an entry permit).

    The court in the German case has ruled out a further appeal, though the government could still lodge a complaint against the ruling to be heard at the federal level.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/freylindsay/2021/07/30/a-german-court-has-recognised-not-all-eu-countries-are-safe-for-refugees
    #Dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #COI #Italie #renvois_Dublin #pays_sûr #France

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • Forced return to Italy unlawful, German court rules

      A German court has decided that two African asylum seekers may not be returned to Italy where they had first sought protection, due to the hardship they would face there. It’s not the first time that German courts have ruled against such forced returns within Europe.

      The Higher Administrative Court (OVG) of the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) has prohibited the forced returns of two asylum seekers from Somalia and Mali to Italy out of concern over the prevailing living conditions they’d have to endure in Italy.

      There was a “serious danger” that the two men, one Somali and one Malian, would not be able to meet their “fundamental needs” like accommodation and food, the court in the city of Münster said on Thursday (July 29).

      According to the judges, the Somali had already been recognized as a refugee in Italy. The Malian had applied for asylum in Italy before traveling onwards to Germany.

      As a result, Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) had rejected both their asylum applications as inadmissable and ordered a return to Italy. The men then filed two separate claims against the BAMF decision.
      ’Inhumane and humiliating treatment’

      In its ruling, the court cited the prevailing Italian system for refugees, which stipulates that accommodation and provision is only granted to particularly vulnerable people like the sick or families with children in reception facilities.

      No access to accommodation and work for a longer period of time, however, would mean that the two men would end up in a situation of extreme material hardship, independent of their will and their personal choices, the court said.

      As a result, the two men would face “the serious danger of inhumane and humiliating treatment” in a member state of the European Union, the court argued further. The ruling could not be appealed, the judges said. However, the authorities can file a complaint against this decision at Germany’s federal administrative court.
      Similar decisions

      This week’s ruling is not the first time a German court prevented asylum seekers from being forcibly returned to another EU country.

      In April, a court in the state of Lower Saxony ruled that two sisters from Syria who received protection status in Greece cannot be deported from Germany. The court said the human rights of the women would be put at risk if they were returned to Greece.

      In a similar case, a court in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) in January found that two refugees threatened with deportation to Greece would be at serious risk of inhumane and degrading treatment if they were to be sent back.

      A slightly different case took place back in 2019, when a Munich court decided that Germany must take back a refugee who was stopped on the border and deported to Greece. The court argued that proper procedure under German law had not been followed.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/33990/forced-return-to-italy-unlawful-german-court-rules

  • Renvois : la pratique des autorités migratoires suisses menace les #droits_humains

    Le #Tribunal_administratif_fédéral prononce encore et toujours le renvoi de personnes vers des « #Etats_tiers_sûrs » ou des « #Etats_d'origine_sûrs » sans procéder à un examen suffisant de la situation des droits humains dans ces pays et à une évalutation minutieuse des #risques encourus par les personnes concernées. Aussi s’accumulent les #mesures_conservatoires (#interim_measures) à l’encontre de la Suisse, sur la base desquelles les comités onusiens suspendent provisoirement les menaces de renvoi. Conclusion : les #critères_d’examen des autorités suisses sont inadéquats du point de vue des droits humains.

    Une femme seule avec des enfants fuit un pays en guerre civile pour se rendre en #Bulgarie, où elle obtient le statut de réfugiée. Sur place, elle est victime de #violence_domestique. Ne recevant pas de protection de la part des autorités bulgares, elle se réfugie en Suisse avec ses enfants. Le Secrétariat d’État aux migrations (SEM) rejette sa demande d’asile, invoquant qu’elle peut retourner en Bulgarie car il s’agit d’un « État tiers sûr ». Le Tribunal administratif fédéral confirme la décision du SEM*.

    Selon la loi sur l’asile (LAsi), une demande d’asile n’est généralement pas accordée si la personne requérante peut retourner dans un « État tiers sûr » dans lequel elle résidait avant de déposer sa demande en Suisse (art. 31a LAsi). En Suisse, les États de l’UE et de l’AELE sont considérés comme des pays tiers sûrs, car ils ont ratifié la Convention de Genève sur les réfugiés et la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme, qu’ils mettent en œuvre dans la pratique selon le Secrétariat d’État aux migrations. Le Conseil fédéral peut également désigner d’autres pays comme « États tiers sûrs » si ceux-ci disposent d’un mécanisme de protection efficace contre le renvoi des personnes concernées permettant de respecter le #principe_de_non-refoulement. Enfin, sont également considérés comme des « États d’origine sûrs » les pays dans lesquels les requérant·e·s d’asile sont à l’abri de toute persécution (art. 6a al. 2 let. a et b LAsi).

    Avec le soutien de l’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfugiés (OSAR), la mère requérante d’asile et ses enfants déposent une plainte individuelle auprès du Comité des droits de l’enfant de l’ONU. Le Comité demande instamment à la Suisse de ne pas rapatrier la famille afin d’éviter que les enfants ne subissent un préjudice irréparable du fait des violations de leurs droits humains ; il ne peut en effet pas exclure que la famille se retrouve en danger en Bulgarie. Selon Adriana Romer, juriste et spécialiste pour l’Europe au sein de l’OSAR, cette affirmation est claire : « La référence générale au respect par un État de ses obligations en vertu du #droit_international n’est pas suffisante, surtout dans le cas d’un pays comme la Bulgarie. S’il y a des indications de possibles violations des droits humains, une évaluation et un examen minutieux sont nécessaires dans chaque cas individuel ».

    Le cas d’une demandeuse d’asile qui a fui un camp de réfugié·e·s grec pour se réfugier en Suisse illustre bien la problématique. Selon le Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF), elle n’a pas fait valoir de circonstances qui remettraient en cause la #Grèce en tant qu’« État tiers sûr » (arrêt du TAF E-1657/2020 du 26 mai 2020). Les #viols qu’elle a subis à plusieurs reprises dans le camp de réfugié·e·s et l’absence de soutien psychologique sur place n’ont pas été pris en compte. Le Comité de l’ONU pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des #femmes (#CEDEF) est finalement intervenu un mois plus tard. C’est un sort similaire qu’a connu un requérant ayant survécu à la #torture, reconnu comme réfugié en Grèce. Bien que celui-ci ait dû vivre dans la rue et n’ait pas eu accès aux #soins_médicaux en Grèce, l’Office fédéral des migrations et le Tribunal administratif fédéral ont décidé que la « présomption d’ État tiers sûr » s’appliquait à la Grèce dans cette affaire (arrêt du TAF E-2714/2020 du 9 juin 2020). Là encore, le Comité contre la torture de l’ONU est intervenu et a empêché le renvoi. Pour Stephanie Motz, avocate zurichoise qui a plaidé dans les trois cas, deux fois avec l’association AsyLex et une fois avec l’avocate Fanny de Weck : « La situation dans les pays tiers n’est que sommairement examinée par le SEM et l’établissement des faits n’est pas suffisant pour être conforme au droit. En outre, il est fréquent que le Tribunal administratif fédéral n’examine pas en profondeur la situation des droits humains dans ces États, mais se contente de formuler des affirmations générales. En conséquence, les comités onusiens interviennent de plus en plus dans ces procédures ».

    Les critères d’évaluation peu rigoureux des autorités suisses concernent également les transferts au titre du #Règlement_de_Dublin, par lequel les requérant·e·s d’asile sont renvoyé·e·s vers l’État membre dans lequel ils et elles ont déposé leur première demande d’asile. À la fin de l’année dernière, le Comité contre la torture de l’ONU a dû interrompre temporairement un rapatriement Dublin de la Suisse vers la Pologne (arrêt du TAF F-3666/2020 du 23 juillet 2020).

    Enfin, le Comité pour l’élimination de la #discrimination_raciale de l’ONU (#CERD) est également intervenu au début de cette année lorsque la Suisse a voulu expulser un couple de #Roms vers le nord de la #Macédoine (arrêt du TAF E-3257/2017 du 30 juillet 2020, cons.10.2). Le couple était exposé à de sérieux risques et n’était pas protégé de manière adéquate par les autorités de #Macédoine_du_Nord. Le Tribunal administratif fédéral ayant désigné la Macédoine du Nord comme un « État d’origine sûr », le couple a, avec le soutien du Réseau de solidarité Berne, déposé une plainte individuelle auprès du CERD et peut rester en Suisse à titre provisoire.

    Plusieurs années peuvent s’écouler avant que les comités de l’ONU statuent définitivement sur les cas présentés. Dans trois de ceux-ci, le SEM a entre temps accepté les demandes d’asile. Dans les deux autres cas, grâce aux mesures conservatoires, les recourant·e·s sont également protégé·e·s pendant que le Comité examine le risque concret de violations des droits humains.

    En qualifiant un grand nombre de pays de « sûrs » de manière générale, les autorités suisses font courir de graves risques aux demandeur·euse·s d’asile. Les droits humains peuvent également être violés dans des #pays_démocratiques. Les nombreuses interventions des comités de l’ONU le montrent clairement : la pratique suisse n’est pas suffisante pour respecter les droits humains.

    *Pour la protection de la famille concernée, la référence correspondante n’est pas publiée.

    https://www.humanrights.ch/fr/qui-sommes-nous/autorite-migratoires-mesures-conservatoires
    #renvois #expulsions #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Suisse #TAF #SEM #justice #ONU #Dublin #renvois_Dublin

  • The two sides of TUI : crisis-hit holiday giant turned deportation specialist

    2020 was a rough year for the tourism industry, with businesses worldwide cancelling holidays and laying off staff. Yet one company has been weathering the storm with particular ruthlessness: the Anglo-German giant TUI.

    TUI (Touristik Union International) has been called the world’s biggest holiday company. While its core business is selling full-package holidays to British and German families, 2020 saw it taking on a new sideline: running deportation charter flights for the UK Home Office. In this report we look at how:

    - TUI has become the main airline carrying out charter deportation flights for the UK Home Office. In November 2020 alone it conducted nine mass deportations to 19 destinations as part of Operation Sillath, and its deportation flights continue in 2021.
    - TUI lost over €3 billion last year. But the money was made up in bailouts from the German government, totalling over €4 billion.
    – TUI’s top owner is oligarch Alexey Mordashov, Russia’s fourth richest billionaire who made his fortune in the “Katastroika” of post-Soviet asset sell-offs. His family holding company made over €100 million in dividends from TUI in 2019.
    – In 2020, TUI cut 23,000 jobs, or 32% of its global workforce. But it carried on paying out fat salaries to its bosses – the executive board waived just 5% of their basic pay, with CEO Fritz Joussen pocketing €1.7 million.
    – Other cost-cutting measures included delaying payments of over €50m owed to hotels in Greece and Spain.
    - TUI is accused of using its tourist industry muscle to pressure the Greek government into dropping COVID quarantine requirements last Summer, just before the tourist influx contributed to a “second wave” of infections.
    – It is also accused of pressuring hotels in the Canary Islands to stop hosting migrants arriving on wooden boats, fearing it would damage the islands’ image in the eyes of TUI customers.

    TUI: from heavy industry to holiday giant

    Calling itself the ‘world’s leading tourism group’, TUI has 277 direct and indirect subsidiaries. The parent company is TUI AG, listed on the London Stock Exchange and based in Hannover and Berlin.

    TUI describes itself as a ‘vertically-integrated’ tourism business. That means it covers all aspects of a holiday: it can take care of bookings, provide the planes to get there, accommodate guests in hotels and cruises, and connect them with ‘experiences’ such as museum vists, performances and excursions. Recent company strategy buzz highlights the use of digitalisation – ‘driving customers’ into buying more services via its apps and online platforms. Where it can’t do everything in-house, TUI also uses other airlines and works extensively with independent hotels.

    TUI’s major assets are:

    - Hotels. By September 2020 the company ran over 400 hotels, the most profitable of which is the RIU chain, a company jointly owned by the Mallorca-based RIU family.
    - Cruises. TUI owns three cruise companies – TUI Cruises, Hapag-Lloyd Cruises and Marella Cruises – which between them operate 17 vessels.
    - Airlines. TUI has five airlines with a total fleet of 137 aircraft. 56 of these are operated by its biggest airline, the British company TUI Airways. Collectively, the airlines under the group are the seventh largest in Europe.

    TUI also runs the TUI Care Foundation, its vehicle for green PR, based in the Hague.

    The company has a long history dating back to 1923 – though it is barely recognisable from its earlier embodiment as the energy, mining and metalworking group Preussag, originally set up by the German state of Prussia. Described by some as the “heavy industrial arm” of the Nazi economy, Preussag was just one of many German industrial firms which benefited from forced labour under the Third Reich. It transformed itself into a tourism business only in 1997, and completed a long string of acquisitions to become the behemoth it is today – including acquiring leading British travel agents Thomson in 2000 and First Choice Holidays in 2007.

    TUI holidaymakers are mostly families from the UK and Germany, with an average ticket for a family of four costing €3,500 . The top five destinations as of Easter 2019 were, in order: Spain, Greece, Egypt, Turkey, and Cape Verde.

    The UK branch – including TUI Airways, which is responsible for the deportations – is run out of Wigmore House, next to Luton Airport in Bedfordshire. The UK managing director is Andrew “Andy” Flintham. Flintham has been with TUI for over 15 years, and previously worked for British Airways and Ford.

    Dawn Wilson is the managing director of TUI Airways. and head of airline operations on the TUI aviation board, overseeing all five of TUI’s airlines. Wilson is also a director of TUI UK. Originally from Cleethorpes, Wilson’s career in the industry began as cabin crew in the 80s, before rising up the ranks of Britannia Airways. Britannia’s parent company Thomson was acquired by TUI in 2000.
    TUI’s crisis measures: mass job losses, deportations, and more

    Before the pandemic TUI was a success story, drawing 23 million people a year to sun, sea, snow or sights. In 2019, TUI was riding high following the collapse of its key UK competitor, Thomas Cook. It branched out by adding 21 more aircraft to its fleet and picking up a number of its rival’s former contracts, notably in Turkey. TUI’s extensive work in Turkey has recently made it a target of the Boycott Turkey campaign in solidarity with the Kurdish people. The one bum note had been the grounding of its Boeing 737 MAX airliners, after two crashes involving the aircraft forced the worldwide withdrawal of these planes. Despite that, the company made close to €19 billion in revenues in 2019, and a profit of over €500 million. Most of that profit was handed straight to shareholders, with over €400 million in dividends. (See: Annual Report 2019). And the future looked good, with record bookings for 2020.

    Then came COVID-19. By the end of the 2020 financial year, travel closures had resulted in losses of €3 billion for TUI, and a net debt of €4.2bn. To stay afloat, the company has managed to pull in handouts from the German state, as well as backing from its largest shareholder, the Russian oligarch Alexei Mordashov. It has also turned to a number of controversial business practices: from mass job losses to becoming Brexit Britain’s main deportation profiteer.

    Here we look at some of what TUI got up to in the last year.
    Government bailouts

    Had it been left to the free market, TUI might well have gone bust. Fortunately for TUI’s investors, the German government rode to the rescue. In total, the state – working together with some banks and private investors – has provided TUI with €4.8bn in bailout funds to see it through COVID-19.

    The vast bulk of this money, €4.3 billion to date, has come from German taxpayers. TUI received a €1.8 rescue loan from state development bank KsF in April 2020, followed by another €1.2 billion package in August. The third bailout, agreed in December 2020, totalled €1.8 billion. €1.3 billion of this was more government money – from the German Economic Support Fund (WSF) as well as KsF.

    While some was a straight loan, portions came as a “silent participation” convertible into shares in the company – that is, the state has the option to become a major TUI shareholder. The deal also involved the government having two seats on TUI’s supervisory board. The German state is now intimately involved in TUI’s business.

    The other €500m was raised by issuing new shares to private investors. TUI’s largest owner, Alexey Mordashov, agreed to take any of these not bought by others – potentially increasing his stake in the company from 25% to as much as 36% (see below).
    Slashing jobs

    Alongside bail-outs, another key part of TUI’s response to the COVID crisis has been to hit the staff. Back in May 2020 there was widespread media coverage when TUI announced it would make 8,000 job cuts globally. Then in July 2020, the company announced it would close 166 of its 516 travel agencies in the UK and Ireland at a cost of 900 jobs.

    But these announcements turned out to be just the beginning. In the 2020 Annual Report, published in December 2020, TUI quietly announced that it had in fact cut 23,143 jobs – that is 32% of its total staff.

    Particularly hard hit were hotel staff, whose numbers fell by over 13,000, 46% of the total. The workforce of TUI’s excursions and activities division, TUI Musement, was cut in half with almost 5,000 job losses (Annual Report, p88). And these figures do not include staff for TUI Cruises (JV), a joint venture company whose employees are mainly hired through agencies on temporary contracts.

    Home Office deportation airline of choice

    TUI is not known to have been previously involved in deportations from the UK, Germany or any other country. But since August 2020, its UK subsidiary TUI Airways has suddenly become the UK’s top deportation airline. It carried out the vast majority of mass deportation charter flights from the UK between August and December 2020, and continues to do so in January 2021.

    This included many of the rush of pre-Brexit “Operation Sillath” deportations to European countries before the New Year – where the Home Office pushed to expel as many refugees as possible under the Dublin Regulation before it crashed out of this EU agreement. But it also works further afield: TUI carried out all charter deportations from the UK in November, including one to Ghana and Nigeria.

    Because of this, TUI looked a likely candidate to be operating the so-called ‘Jamaica 50’ flight on 2 December, and was one of a number of possible airlines targeted by a social media campaign. However, the company eventually clarified it would not be doing the flight – Privilege Style, whom Corporate Watch recently reported on, turned out to be the operator. It is unclear whether or not TUI had originally been booked and pulled out after succumbing to public pressure.
    No hospitality in the Canary Islands

    The company’s disregard for the lives of refugees is not limited to deportation deals. In the Canary Islands, a local mayor revealed that TUI (along with British airline Jet2) had warned hotels not to provide emergency shelter to migrants, threatening it would not ‘send tourists’ if they did.

    Record numbers of African migrants arrived on wooden boats to the islands in 2020, and some have been accomodated in the hotels at the state’s expense. Nearly 2,170 migrants died trying to reach Spain that year, the majority en-route to the Canaries. The islands had seen a dramatic fall in holidaymakers due to the pandemic, and many hotel rooms would have sat empty, making TUI’s threats all the more callous.
    Pushing back against Greek COVID-19 measures

    TUI has been pressing destination countries to reopen to tourists following the first wave of the Coronavirus pandemic. This has become a particular issue in Greece, now the company‘s number one destination where TUI has been accused of exerting pressure on the government to relax anti-COVID measures last Summer.

    According to a report in German newspaper BILD (see also report in English here), TUI threatened to cancel all its trips to the country unless the government dropped quarantine regulations for tourists. The threat was reportedly made in negotiations with the Greek tourism minister, who then rushed to call the Prime Minister, who backed down and rewrote the Government’s COVID-19 plans.

    Greece had been viewed as a rare success story of the pandemic, with the virus having largely been contained for months – until early August, a few weeks after it welcomed back tourists. Some have blamed the country’s “second wave” of COVID-19 infections on the government’s “gamble of opening up to tourists”.

    Leaving hotels in the lurch

    Despite having pushed destination countries to increase their COVID-19 exposure risks by encouraging tourism, the company then refused to pay hoteliers in Greece and Spain millions of euros owed to them for the summer season. Contractual changes introduced by TUI forced hotels to wait until March 2021 for three-quarters of the money owed. In Greece, where the company works with over 2,000 hotels, the sum owed is said to be around €50m, with individual hotels reportedly owed hundreds of thousands of euros. This money is essential to many businesses’ survival through the low season.

    TUI’s actions are perhaps all the more galling in light of the enormous government bailouts the company received. In the company’s 2020 Annual Report, amid sweeping redundancies and failure to pay hoteliers, CEO Fritz Joussen had the arrogance to claim that “TUI plays a stabilising role in Southern Europe, and in Northern Africa too, with investment, infrastructure and jobs.”
    Rolling in it: who gains

    The supposed rationale for government COVID bail-outs, in Germany as elsewhere, is to keep the economy turning and secure jobs. But that can’t mean much to the third of its work force TUI has sacked. If not the workers, who does benefit from Germany funneling cash into the holiday giant?

    TUI’s bailout deals with the German government forbade it from paying a dividend to shareholders in 2020. Although in previous years the company operated a very high dividend policy indeed: in 2018 it handed over €381 million, or 47% of its total profit, to its shareholders. They did even better in 2019, pocketing €423 million – or no less than 80% of company profits. They will no doubt be hoping that the money will roll in again once COVID-19 travel restrictions are lifted.

    Meanwhile, it appears that the crisis barely touched TUI’s executives and directors. According to the 2020 Annual Report (page 130), the company’s executives agreed to a “voluntary waiver of 30% of their fixed remuneration for the months of April and May 2020”. That is: just a portion of their salary, for just two months. This added up to a drop of just 5% in executive salaries over the year compared with 2019.

    Again: this was during a year where 32% of TUI staff were laid off, and the company lost over €3 billion.

    In a further great show of sacrifice, the Annual Report explains that “none of the members of the Executive Board has made use of their right to reimbursement of holiday trips which they are entitled to according to their service agreements.” TUI is infamous for granting its executives paid holidays “without any limitation as to type of holiday, category or price” as an executive perk (page 126).

    After his 5% pay cut, CEO Fritz Joussen still made €1,709,600 last year: a basic salary of €1.08 million, plus another €628,000 in “pension contributions and service costs” including a chauffeur driven car allowance.

    The next highest paid was none other than “labour director” Dr Elke Eller with €1.04 million. The other four members of the executive board all received over €800,000.

    The top dogs

    Who are these handsomely paid titans of the holiday industry? TUI’s CEO is Friedrich “Fritz” Joussen, based in Germany. Originally hired by TUI as a consultant, Joussen has a background in the German mobile phone industry and was head of Vodafone Germany. The slick CEO can regularly be found giving presentations about the TUI ‘ecosystem’ and the importance of digitisation. Besides his salary, Joussen also benefits from a considerable shareholding accrued through annual bonuses.

    Overseeing Joussen’s executive team is the Supervisory Board, chaired by the Walrus-moustachioed Dr. Dieter Zetsche, or ‘Dr. Z’, who made his fortune in the management of Daimler AG (the car giant that also owns Mercedes–Benz, and formerly, Chrysler ). Since leaving that company in 2019, Zetsche has reportedly been enjoying a Daimler pension package of at least €4,250 a day. TUI topped him up with a small fee of €389,500 for his board duties in 2020 (Annual Report p140).

    With his notable moustache, Dr. Z is a stand-out character in the mostly drab world of German corporate executives, known for fronting one of Daimler’s US ad campaigns in a “buffoon tycoon” character. At the height of the Refugee Summer of 2015, Dr. Dieter Zetsche abruptly interrupted his Frankfurt Motor Show speech on the future of the car industry to discuss the desperate situation facing Syrian refugees.

    He said at the time: “Anybody who knows the past isn’t allowed to turn refugees away. Anybody who sees the present can’t turn them away. Anybody who thinks about the future will not turn them away.” Five years later, with TUI the UK’s top deportation profiteer, this sentiment seems to have been forgotten.

    Another key figure on the Supervisory Board is Deputy Chair Peter Long. Long is a veteran of the travel industry, having been CEO of First Choice, which subsequently merged with TUI. He is credited with pioneering Turkey as an industry destination.

    Long is a controversial figure who has previously been accused of ‘overboarding’, i.e. sitting on the directors’ boards of too many companies. Described as a “serial part timer”, he was executive chairman of Countrywide PLC, the UK’s largest estate agency group, but stepped down in late November 2020 after apparently ruffling shareholders’ feathers over a move that would have given control of the company to a private equity firm. In 2018, Countrywide was forced to abandon attempts to give bosses – including himself – shares worth more than £20m. Long also previously stepped down as chairman of Royal Mail after similarly losing shareholder support over enormous executive pay packages. In his former role as as head of TUI Travel, he was among the UK’s top five highest earning CEOs, with a salary of £13.3 million for the year 2014 -15.

    The man with the money: Alexey Mordashov

    But all the above are paupers compared to TUI’s most powerful board member and top shareholder: Alexey Mordashov, a Russian oligarch who is reportedly the country’s fourth richest billionaire, with a fortune of over $23 billion. His family holding company is TUI’s main owner with up to 36% of company shares.

    Mordashov’s stake in TUI is held through a Cyprus-registered holding company called Unifirm.

    In 2019, Mordashov transferred 65% of his shares in Unifirm to KN-Holding, a Russian company owned jointly by his two sons, Kirill and Nikita, then aged 18 and 19. However, Russian media report that after the younger son Nikita was kicked out of university in 2020, he was sent to the army, and his shares transferred to Kirill.

    It may not be massive money to Mordashov, but his family company have certainly done well out of TUI. In 2019 TUI paid out €423 million in dividends to its shareholders, no less than 80% of total profits. At the time Unifirm owned one quarter (24.95%) of TUI. That means the Mordashovs will have received over €100 million on their investment in TUI just in that one year.

    “Steel king” Alexey Mordashov’s rise to the height of the global mega-rich began with a typical post-Soviet privatisation story. Born in 1965, the son of steel workers, he studied economics and accountancy and by 1992 was finance director of a steel plant in his hometown of Cherepovets. In the early and mid-1990s, the great Russian “Katastroika” sell-off of state assets saw steel mill and other workers handed shares in the former collective enterprises. In the midst of an economic collapse, workers sold on their shares to pay food and heating bills, while the likes of Mordashov built up massive asset portfolios quick and cheap. In the next privatisation phase, the budding oligarchs were handed whole industries through rigged auctions.

    Mordashov turned his steel plant holdings into a company called Severstal, now among the world’s largest steel firms. He then expanded Severstal into Severgroup, a conglomerate with holdings in everything from airports to goldmines (Nordgold) to supermarkets (Lenta), to mobile phone networks (Tele2 Russia), as well as the local hockey team Severstal Cherepovets. Vladimir Lukin, Mordashov’s legal adviser at Severgroup, is also a member of the TUI Supervisory Board.

    Business media paint Mordashov as less flamboyant than your average oligarch. His new megayacht Nord, built in Germany and registered in the Cayman Islands, is only 142 metres long – 20 metres shorter than Roman Abramovitch’s Eclipse.

    In December 2020, TUI declared that Unifirm owned 25% of its shares. But the number will have increased in TUI’s third bail-out deal in January: as well as more money from the German government and its banks, Unifirm agreed to inject more cash into the company in return for boosting its ownership, buying up new shares to a maximum of 36%. The exact current holding has not yet been announced.

    TUI’s increasing control by Mordashov was approved by the German financial regulator Bafin, which stepped in to exempt him from a rule that would have required Unifirm to bid for a full majority of the shares once it held more than 30%.
    Other shareholders

    Unifirm is the only shareholder with over 10% of TUI shares. Some way behind, Egyptian hotel-owning businessman called Hamed El Chiaty has a stake of just over 5%, via the Cyprus-based DH Deutsche Holdings. But most of TUI’s shares are owned in smaller chunks by the usual suspects: the global investment funds and banks that own the majority of the world’s assets.

    In December 2020 these funds each had over 1%: UK investor Standard Life Aberdeen; giant US-based fund Vanguard; Canada’s state pension system; and Norges Bank, which manages the oil-rich national wealth fund of Norway. Two other major investment funds, Pioneer and BlackRock, had around 0.5% each. (NB: these numbers may have changed after the new January share sale.)

    TUI can’t take its reputation for granted

    A company of TUI’s size backed by the German government and a Russian billionaire may seem impervious to criticism. On the other hand, unlike more specialist charter airlines, it is very much a public facing business, relying above all on the custom of North European families. The endless stream of negative reviews left by disgruntled customers following cancelled TUI holidays in 2020 have already tarnished its image.

    In a sign of just how worried the company may be about its reputation, it put out a tender in the autumn for a new PR agency to take care of “relaunching the brand into the post-Covid world”. This was ultimately awarded to the US firm Leo Burnett. If outrage at the UK’s deportation push keeps up, TUI might well need to pay attention to online campaigns or demonstrations at its travel agents.

    Another vulnerability the company has itself identified is political instability in destination countries, as evidenced by TUI’s nervousness over migrant arrivals in the Canary Islands. Here too, its image is being harmed by actions such as exerting pressure on the Greek government to relax COVID measures, and its treatment of independent hotels. TUI cannot take public support for granted in top destinations such as Greece and Spain, where campaigning at its resorts could play a role in shifting company policy.

    https://corporatewatch.org/the-two-sides-of-tui-crisis-hit-holiday-giant-turned-deportation-spe

    #renvois #expulsions #tourisme #TUI #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Allemagne #privatisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #business #UK #Angleterre #Touristik_Union_International #compagnie_aérienne #avions #Operation_Sillath #Alexey_Mordashov #Fritz_Joussen #Canaries #îles_Canaries #Preussag #Wigmore_House #Flintham #Andrew_Flintham #Andy_Flintham #Dawn_Wilson #pandémie #coronavirus #covid-19 #KsF #German_Economic_Support_Fund (#WSF) #chômage #licenciements #TUI_Musement #charter #Dublin #renvois_Dublin #Ghana #Nigeria #Jamaica_50 #Jet2 #hôtels #Elke_Eller #Dieter_Zetsche #Peter_Long #Severstal #Severgroup #Nordgold #Lenta #Tele2_Russia #Unifirm #Hamed_El_Chiaty #DH_Deutsche_Holdings #multinationales #Standard_Life_Aberdeen #Vanguard #Norges_Bank #Pioneer #BlackRock #Leo_Burnett

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka

  • La justice allemande interdit les renvois vers la Grèce

    Un tribunal régional refuse de transférer des réfugiés parvenus en Allemagne, contrairement à ce que prévoit l’accord de Dublin. Il craint des #traitements_dégradants.

    La justice allemande a décidé que les réfugiés ayant obtenu l’asile en Grèce ne devaient pas être renvoyés là-bas en raison du « risque sérieux de #traitement_inhumain_et_dégradant », selon une décision rendue publique ce mardi.

    Le haut tribunal administratif de Münster, dans l’Etat régional de Rhénanie du Nord-Westphalie, a estimé que les demandes d’asile en Allemagne de personnes déjà reconnues comme réfugiées en Grèce ne pouvaient pas être rejetées au motif qu’elles seraient irrecevables.

    Les juges ont justifié leur décision prise le 21 janvier par les risques actuellement encourus si elles étaient renvoyées en Grèce.

    La Cour avait été chargée de statuer sur le recours en appel de deux plaignants, l’un Palestinien de Syrie et l’autre érythréen, qui avaient obtenu une protection internationale en Grèce.

    Les deux avaient ensuite vu leur demande d’asile en Allemagne rejetée mais selon les deux jugements, ces personnes sont menacées « de misère matérielle extrême » si elles sont renvoyées vers Athènes.

    Elles ne pourraient être accueillies ni dans un centre d’hébergement pour migrants, ni dans des appartements ou des structures d’accueil de sans-abri qui manquent de place, selon la même source.

    « En raison de la situation actuelle sur le marché du travail et de la situation économique, les plaignants ne trouveraient pas de travail en cas de retour en Grèce », poursuivent les juges.
    Accueil catastrophique

    Les organisations de défense des droits humains et des droits des réfugiés dénoncent régulièrement les conditions d’accueil catastrophiques des demandeurs d’asile en Grèce, en particulier dans les camps insalubres sur les îles de la mer Egée.

    Et même une fois reconnus comme réfugiés, certains continuent de survivre dans des conditions très difficiles, parfois sans accès à un logement ou à un travail.

    La Grèce est l’un des principaux points d’entrée dans l’Union européenne des réfugiés souvent originaires du Moyen-Orient et d’Afghanistan qui fuient les conflits ou la pauvreté.

    https://www.tdg.ch/la-justice-allemande-interdit-les-renvois-vers-la-grece-553304674396
    #Dublin #règlement_dublin #renvois #expulsions #renvois_Dublin #justice #interdiction #2021

    –---

    En mars 2016, la commission européenne avait pris la décision de reprendre les renvois Dublin vers la Grèce...
    https://seenthis.net/messages/549554

    ... qu’une décision de justice avait interdit en #2011 suite à la décision de la #CourEDH (#Cour_européenne_des_droits_de_l’homme) en lien avec la sentence "#M.S.S. v. Belgium and Greece", reconnaissant des défaillances “systémiques” dans l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile et dans les procédures de détermination du besoin de protection.
    https://seenthis.net/messages/779987
    #Belgique

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • ’We don’t know what to do’: asylum seekers flown to Spain by Home Office

    The 11 Syrians said they were sitting outside #Madrid airport with no food, water or support

    Eleven Syrian asylum seekers have been abandoned outside the airport in Madrid where a Home Office charter flight deposited them, the Guardian has learned.

    The men, ranging in age from 18-45, said they had been sitting in temperatures of 32 degrees since their flight landed in the Spanish capital at around 10am on Thursday morning.

    The asylum seekers said many of them were removed from the UK without their identity documents.

    One man told the Guardian he has three brothers in the UK, while another said he had two. Family ties in the UK are part of the claim to remain that the Home Office considers under rules known as the Dublin regulation, whereby one European country can return asylum seekers to the first European country they are known to have passed through.

    The men said they had used the same solicitor to try to halt their removal from the UK to Spain, and had paid him thousands of pounds between them, but their enforced removal was not halted.

    They said they all came from the same area in the south of Syria.

    One man said he had worked as a farmer before the conflict in Syria began, and that he had left his wife and four children, hoping to bring them to join him if he was granted refugee status in a safe country.

    Syrian refugee claims are generally accepted in many European countries but the Home Office sent the 11 men back to Spain because all had been fingerprinted by the police there.

    “I spent two years after fleeing Syria trying to reach safety,” said one 45-year-old. “I spent about four months in Calais trying to cross by small boat and finally succeeded in April.”

    He said he had taught himself to speak English on YouTube.

    “I was so happy when I reached the UK but the way I have been treated by the UK has destroyed me. I was held in an underground jail for a year and a half in Syria and when the Home Office arrested me and put me in Brook House detention centre near Gatwick airport it brought back all the memories of that time.”

    He said everyone was told to go quietly to the plane and that if they did not behave, the escorts would use force against them. “Many of the men were crying on the plane,” he said.

    None of them know what they can do now.

    “We don’t know what to do. We are sitting a few hundred yards away from the airport. We have no food, no water, we don’t know where we can go. We are homeless and hopeless,” he said.

    Three brothers from Yemen who were due to be put on Thursday’s flight were granted a last-minute reprieve. A Guardian reader who read about their case and who lives in Spain offered to help them. She is now trying to identify support for the 11 asylum seekers left outside the airport.

    A spokesperson for the Spanish ministry of the interior said they were aware of the case, and that anyone could request international protection in Spain at any time.

    But the Syrian asylum seekers said there were no English or Arabic interpreters at the airport and that they had to leave the building.

    Home Office sources said that the UK is under no obligation to monitor the treatment of asylum seekers who have returned to the EU member state responsible for their claim.

    A Home Office spokesperson said: “Under the Dublin III process, the time and place of the arrival of today’s flight had been carefully worked through between the UK and Spain by mutual agreement – formal requests were made of Spain in advance and they accepted responsibility for the claimants in accordance with the Regulations. Any suggestion that the Home Office has not complied with our obligations is incorrect.

    “A travel or identity document is not required for that country to process an individual as the details of those being returned are shared and agreed in advance.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/sep/03/we-dont-know-what-to-do-asylum-seekers-flown-to-spain-by-home-office

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #UK #Angleterre #Dublin #renvois_Dublin #Espagne #réfugiés_syriens #aéroport #migrerrance #SDF #sans-abris

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • ECRE | Application du règlement Dublin III en 2019 et durant le COVID-19
    https://asile.ch/2020/09/04/ecre-application-du-reglement-dublin-iii-en-2019-et-durant-le-covid-19

    La Suisse et l’Allemagne ont continué à transférer des personnes en vertu du règlement Dublin III pendant le pic de pandémie du Coronavirus en Europe. Cette information est issue du rapport d’ECRE sur la mise en œuvre du règlement Dublin III. Il montre que les règles de l’Union européenne en matière d’attribution des responsabilités ne […]

  • L’#Allemagne suspend les « #transferts_Dublin »

    A cause de la pandémie de coronavirus, Berlin a mis en pause les renvois de demandeurs d’asile vers d’autres pays européens. En revanche, les expulsions vers des pays tiers sont toujours possibles.

    Le ministre allemand de l’Intérieur a affirmé cette semaine que les renvois vers d’autres pays de l’UE dans le cadre du règlement de Dublin n’auront plus lieu « jusqu’à nouvel ordre ».

    Un porte-parole a assuré sur la chaîne publique allemande ARD que la Commission européenne été les Etats membres de l’UE seraient informés très prochainement de cette décision. Néanmoins, selon l’ARD, les expulsions vers des pays tiers peuvent toujours avoir lieu.

    L’Office fédéral des migrations et des réfugiés (BAMF) avait déjà informé auparavant les tribunaux administratifs allemands que « l’Office suspend tous les transferts Dublin jusqu’à nouvel ordre ». Ceux-ci seraient intenables en raison des restrictions de voyage et des fermetures dues au Covid-19.

    Le BAMF précise que cette suspension ne veut pas dire que les Etats qui adhèrent au règlement de Dublin (les membres de l’UE, l’Islande, la Norvège, la Suisse et le Lichtenstein) ne seront plus dans l’obligation d’assumer leurs responsabilités en matière de droit d’asile dans l’avenir.

    Les #expulsions ne s’arrêtent pas

    Les autorités allemandes avaient suspendu fin février les renvois vers l’Italie, le pays actuellement le plus durement touché par la pandémie. Une partie du monde politique et des ONG de défense des migrants comme Pro Asyl ont appelé le gouvernement à Berlin à étendre ce moratoire à toutes les expulsions de demandeurs d’asile.

    Pour le député de gauche Ulla Jelpke, « les expulsions vers des pays tiers doivent être suspendus tout comme les transferts Dublin d’autant que les systèmes de soins sont très fragiles dans beaucoup de pays d’origine. »

    Pour le moment, le ministère allemand de l’Intérieur n’a toujours pas annoncé un moratoire complet des expulsions. Il note au contraire que beaucoup de pays refusent eux-aussi l’entrée d’étrangers sur leur territoire ou limitent les possibilités d’entrée à un très petit nombre de personnes. L’Allemagne va donc pour l’instant continuer à procéder aux expulsions vers les pays « où celles-ci sont encore possibles dans le contexte actuel ». De plus, le ministère rappelle que « les expulsions dépendent de la capacité des Etats fédérés allemands à les mener et de l’état de santé des étrangers concernées ».

    Que va-t-il arriver au règlement de Dublin ?

    Il est encore peu clair si le règlement de Dublin va être totalement suspendu son. Si c’était le cas, explique la ARD, des personnes pourront demander l’asile en Allemagne dans le futur même s’ils sont arrivés par un autre pays européen.

    La procédure actuelle prévoit qu’une personne doit faire sa demande d’asile dans le premier pays par lequel il est entré en Europe.

    En 2019, l’Allemagne a procédé à plus de 8.400 renvois dans le cadre de la procédure Dublin. La majorité des expulsés étaient des Albanais, des Nigérians et des Géorgiens.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/23716/l-allemagne-suspend-les-transferts-dublin
    #Dublin #règlement_Dublin #renvois_Dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #coronavirus

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur les procédures d’asile en lien avec le coronavirus :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/834052

    ping @karine4

  • #Métaliste autour de l’éventuelle #suspension (ou non) de la #procédure_d'asile en raison de la #crise_sanitaire... mais aussi d’autres éléments en lien avec la procédure d’asile, dont le #règlement_Dublin

    #coronavirus #covid-19 #asile #migrations #réfugiés #auditions #renvois_Dublin

    ping @thomas_lacroix @karine4 @isskein

    –---

    A mettre en lien avec la question de la #rétention - #détention_administrative :

    https://seenthis.net/messages/835410

  • #Coronavirus : l’Italie ne reprend provisoirement plus de requérants d’asile de Suisse

    En raison de la propagation du coronavirus, les autorités italiennes ont décidé de ne plus reprendre jusqu’à nouvel ordre de requérants d’asile dans le cadre du système Dublin. Les #transferts qui avaient déjà été planifiés sont donc reportés.

    Le Secrétariat d’État aux migrations (SEM) a été informé de cette mesure par le ministère italien de l’Intérieur. Elle concerne tous les pays européens qui souhaitent transférer en Italie des requérants d’asile dont la demande relève, conformément au règlement Dublin, de sa compétence. La décision a été prise en raison de la propagation du coronavirus dans plusieurs régions de la péninsule. La suspension des transferts Dublin doit permettre de préparer et de mettre en œuvre d’autres mesures dans le domaine de la santé.

    Compte tenu de cette décision, le SEM doit donc reporter les transferts qui avaient déjà été programmés. Plusieurs vols devant embarquer un total de dix requérants ces prochains jours ont ainsi dû être annulés. Les personnes concernées demeureront provisoirement dans les centres d’asile de la Confédération ou dans des structures cantonales.

    https://www.admin.ch/gov/fr/accueil/documentation/communiques.msg-id-78264.html
    #Italie #Dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #renvois_Dublin #suspension #report

  • Trapped in Dublin

    ECRE’s study (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2020/842813/EPRS_STU(2020)842813_EN.pdf) on the implementation of the Dublin Regulation III, has just been published by the Europpean Parliament Research Service which commissioned it.

    Drawing largely on statistics from the Asylum Information Database (AIDA) database, managed by ECRE and fed by national experts from across Europe, and on ongoing Dublin-related litigation, the study uses the European Commission’s own Better Regulation toolbox. The Better Regulation framework is designed to evaluate any piece of Regulation against the criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, coherence and EU added value.

    There are no surprises:

    Assessing the data shows that Dublin III is not effective legislation as it does not meet its own objectives of allowing rapid access to the procedure and ending multiple applications. The hierarchy of criteria it lays down is not fully respected. It appears inefficient – financial costs are significant and probably disproportionate. Notable are the large investments in transfers that do not happen and the inefficient sending of different people in different directions. The human costs of the system are considerable – people left in limbo, people forcibly transferred, the use of detention. The relevance and EU added value of the Regulation in its current form should be questioned. The coherence of the Dublin Regulation is weak in three ways: internal coherence is lacking due to the differing interpretations of key articles across the Member States+; coherence with the rest of the asylum acquis is not perfect; and coherence with fundamental rights is weak due to flaws in drafting and implementation.

    So far, so already well known.

    None of this is news: everybody knows that Dublin is flawed. Indeed, in this week’s hearing at the European Parliament, speaker after speaker stood up to condemn Dublin, including all the Member States present. Even the Member States that drove the Dublin system and whose interests it is supposed to serve (loosely known as the northern Member States), now condemn it openly: it is important to hear Germany argue in a public event that the responsibility sharing rules are unfair and that both trust among states and compliance across the Common European Asylum System is not possible without a fundamental reform of Dublin.

    More disturbing is the view from the persons subject to Dublin, with Shaza Alrihawi from the Global Refugee-led Network describing the depression and despair resulting from being left in limbo while EU countries use Dublin to divest themselves of responsibility. One of the main objectives of Dublin is to give rapid access to an asylum procedure but here was yet another case of someone ready to contribute and to move on with their life who was delayed by Dublin. It is no surprise that “to Dublin” has become a verb in many European languages – “dubliner” or “dublinare”, and a noun: “I Dublinati” – in all cases with a strong negative connotation, reflecting the fear that people understandably have of being “dublinated”.

    With this picture indicating an unsatisfactory situation, what happens now?

    Probably not much. While there is agreement that Dublin III is flawed there is profound disagreement on what should replace it. But the perpetual debate on alternatives to Dublin needs to continue. Dysfunctional legislation which fails the Commission’s own Better Regulation assessment on every score cannot be allowed to sit and fester.

    All jurisdictions have redundant and dysfunctional legislation on their statute books; within the EU legal order, Dublin III is not the only example. Nonetheless, the damage it does is profound so it requires attention. ECRE’s study concludes that the problems exist at the levels of design and implementation. As well as the unfair underlying principles, the design leaves too much room for policy choices on implementation – precisely the problem that regulations as legal instruments are supposed to avoid. Member States’ policy choices on implementation are currently (and perhaps forever) shaped by efforts to minimise responsibility. This means that a focus on implementation alone is not the answer; changes should cover design and implementation.

    The starting point for reform has to be a fundamental overhaul, tackling the responsibility allocation principles. While the original Dublin IV proposal did not do this, there are multiple alternatives, including the European Parliament’s response to Dublin IV and the Commission’s own alternatives developed but not launched in 2016 and before.

    Of course, Dublin IV also had the other flaws, including introducing inadmissibility procedures pre-Dublin and reduction of standards in other ways. Moving forward now means it is necessary to de-link procedural changes and the responsibility-sharing piece.

    Unfortunately, the negotiations, especially between the Member States, are currently stuck in a cul-de-sac that focuses on exactly this kind of unwelcome deal. The discussion can be over-simplified as follows: “WE will offer you some ‘solidarity’ – possibly even a reform of Dublin – but only if, in exchange, YOU agree to manage mandatory or expanded border procedures of some description”. These might be expanded use of current optional asylum procedures at the border; it might be other types of rapid procedures or processes to make decisions about people arriving at or transferred to borders. In any case, the effect on the access to asylum and people’s rights will be highly detrimental, as ECRE has described at length. But they also won’t be acceptable to the “you” in this scenario, the Member States at the external borders.

    There is no logical or legal reason to link the procedural piece and responsibility allocation so closely. And why link responsibility allocation and procedures and not responsibility allocation and reception, for instance? Or responsibility allocation and national/EU resources? This derives from the intrusion of a different agenda: the disproportionate focus on onward movement, also known as (the) “secondary” movement (obsession).

    If responsibility allocation is unfair, then it should be reformed in and of itself, not in exchange for something. The cry will then go out that it is not fair because the MS perceived to “benefit” from the reform will get something for nothing. Well no: any reform could – and should – be accompanied with strict insistence on compliance with the rest of the asylum acquis. The well-documented implementation gaps at the levels of reception, registration, decision-making and procedural guarantees should be priority.

    Recent remarks by Commissioner Schinas (https://euobserver.com/migration/147511) present nothing new and among many uncertainties concerning the fate of the 2016 reforms is whether or not a “package approach” will be maintained by either or both the co-legislators – and whether indeed that is desirable. One bad scenario is that everything is reformed except Dublin. There are provisional inter-institutional agreements on five files, with the Commission suggesting that they move forward. ECRE’s view is that the changes contained in the agreements on these files would reduce protection standards and not add value; other assessments are that protection standards have been improved. Either way, there are strong voices in both the EP and among the MS who don’t want to go ahead without an agreement on Dublin. Which is not wrong – allocation of responsibility is essential in a partially harmonised system: with common legal provisions but without centralised decision-making, responsibility allocation is the gateway to access rights and obligations flowing from the other pieces of legislation. Thus, to pass other reforms without tackling Dublin seems rather pointless.

    While certainly not the best option, the best bet (if one had to place money on something) would be that nothing changes for the core legislation of the CEAS. For that reason, ECRE’s study also lists extensive recommendations for rights-based compliance with Dublin III.

    For example, effectiveness would be improved through better respect for the hierarchy of responsibility criteria, the letter of the law: prioritise family unity through policy choices, better practice on evidential standards, and greater use of Articles 16 and 17. Minimise the focus on transfers based on take-back requests, especially when they are doomed to fail. To know from the start that a transfer is doomed to fail yet to persist with it is an example of a particularly inhumane political dysfunction. Effectiveness also requires better reporting to deal with the multiple information gaps identified, and clarity on key provisions, including through guidance from the Commission.

    Solidarity among Member States could be fostered through use of Article 33 in challenging situations, which allows for preventive actions by the Commission and by Member States, and along with the Temporary Protection Directive, provides better options than some of the new contingency plans under discussion. The use of Article 17, 1 and 2, provides a legal basis for the temporary responsibility-sharing mechanisms which are needed in the absence of deeper reform.

    In perhaps the most crucial area, fundamental rights compliance could be significantly improved: avoid coercive transfers; implement CJEU and ECtHR jurisprudence on reasons for suspension of transfers – there is no need to show systemic deficiencies (CK, Jawo); make a policy decision to suspend transfers to the EU countries where conditions are not adequate and human rights violations are commonplace, rather than waiting for the courts to block the transfer. Resources and political attention could focus on the rights currently neglected: the right to family life, the best interests of the child, right to information, alternatives to detention. Evaluating implementation should be done against the Charter of Fundamental Rights and should always include the people directly affected.

    Even with flawed legislation, there are decisions on policy and resource allocation to be made that could make for better compliance and, in this case, compliance in a way that generates less suffering.

    https://www.ecre.org/weekly-editorial-trapped-in-dublin

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Dublin #Dublin_III #Better_Regulation #efficacité #demandes_multiples (le fameux #shopping_de_l'asile) #accélération_des_procédures #coût #transferts_Dublin #renvois_Dublin #coûts_humains #rétention #limbe #détention_administrative #renvois_forcés #cohérence #droits_humains #dépression #désespoir #santé_mentale #responsabilité #Dublin_IV #procédure_d'asile #frontières #frontière #mouvements_secondaires #unité_familiale #inhumanité #solidarité #Temporary_Protection_Directive #protection_temporaire #droits #intérêt_supérieur_de_l'enfant

    –—

    Commentaire de Aldo Brina à qui je fais aveuglement confiance :

    Les éditos de #Catherine_Woollard, secrétaire générale de l’#ECRE, sont souvent bons… mais celui-ci, qui porte sur Dublin, gagne à être lu et largement diffusé

    ping @karine4 @isskein

    • #Résolution du Parlement européen du 17 décembre 2020 sur la mise en œuvre du règlement #Dublin_III (2019/2206(INI))

      Extrait :

      Les procédures de transfert ont fortement augmenté en 2016-2017 et génèrent des coûts humains, matériels et financiers considérables ; déplore toutefois que les transferts n’aient été effectués que dans 11 % des cas, ce qui aggrave encore la surcharge souvent importante des régimes d’asile et confirme le manque d’efficacité du règlement ; juge essentiels les efforts visant à garantir l’accès à l’information et des procédures rapides pour le regroupement familial et les transferts de demandeurs d’asile

      https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-9-2020-0361_FR.html

      #statistiques #chiffres

  • #TAF | Les transferts Dublin vers l’Italie soumis à des conditions plus strictes

    Dans sa #jurisprudence récente, le Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) avait déjà constaté, s’agissant de la prise en charge des familles transférées vers l’Italie dans le cadre du #règlement_Dublin, que les assurances données par les autorités italiennes suite à l’entrée en vigueur du #décret_Salvini étaient trop générales. L’arrêt E-962/2019 confirme et concrétise cette jurisprudence : le transfert des familles en Italie doit être suspendu, tant et aussi longtemps que les autorités italiennes n’ont pas fourni des garanties plus concrètes et précises sur les conditions actuelles de leur prise en charge. Le TAF étend en outre son analyse aux personnes souffrant de graves problèmes de santé et nécessitant une prise en charge immédiate à leur arrivée en Italie. Pour ces dernières, les autorités suisses doivent désormais obtenir de leurs homologues italiennes des garanties formelles que les personnes concernées auront accès, dès leur arrivée en Italie, à des soins médicaux et à un hébergement adapté.

    Le communiqué du Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) que nous reproduisons ci-dessous a été diffusé le 17 janvier 2020. Il correspond à l’arrêt daté du même jour : E-962 2019 : https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/E-962_2019.pdf

    En septembre 2019, l’OSAR alertait sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie “Italie, une prise en charge toujours insuffisante“ : https://asile.ch/2019/09/27/osar-italie-une-prise-en-charge-toujours-insuffisante

    Le blog Le temps des réfugiés rédigé par Jasmine Caye a repris l’information le 24 septembre en y apportant d’autres liens utiles dans le billet “Pourquoi la Suisse doit stopper les transferts Dublin vers l’Italie” : https://blogs.letemps.ch/jasmine-caye/category/migrants-et-refugies

    Vous trouverez ici le feuillet de présentation “Dublin. Comment ça marche ? ” (https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/DUBLIN_commentcamarche.pdf) réalisé par Vivre Ensemble en 2018, qui rappelle le fonctionnement des accords de Dublin.

    https://asile.ch/2020/01/20/taf-les-transferts-dublin-vers-litalie-soumis-a-des-conditions-plus-strictes
    #justice #Suisse #Dublin #renvois_Dublin #Italie #asile #migrations #réfugiés

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • L’asile selon Dublin III : les renvois vers l’Italie sont problématiques

      La Suisse renvoie régulièrement des requérant-e-s d’asile vers l’Italie conformément au règlement Dublin entré en vigueur en décembre 2008 (Dublin III depuis 2013). Pourtant, les conditions de survie dans ce pays dit sûr sont extrêmement précaires pour les requérant-e-s d’asile. Divers rapports et appels d’organisations de la société civile dénoncent les conditions d’accueil en Italie ainsi que le formalisme excessif des renvois par la Suisse. L’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfugié-e-s (OSAR) a effectué une nouvelle enquête de terrain et sorti un rapport courant 2016 sur les conditions d’accueils en Italie et l’application par la Suisse des accords Dublin. Selon l’OSAR les « rapports [précédents paru en 2009 et 2013] n’ont pas provoqué jusqu’ici une remise en question fondamentale de la pratique de transferts en Italie au sein des autorités suisses compétentes en matière d’asile. Les autorités et les tribunaux ont trop peu tenu compte des constats résultants du rapport de 2013 ». L’OSAR souligne que « L’Italie ne dispose toujours pas d’un système d’accueil cohérent, global et durable ; l’accueil y est basé sur des mesures d’urgence à court terme et est fortement fragmenté ».
      Conditions déplorables et absence de protection en Italie

      En Italie, les requérant-e-s d’asile - mais aussi les réfugié-e-s reconnu-e-s ! - n’ont aucune garantie de pouvoir être hébergé-e-s et bon nombre se retrouvent à la rue après leur renvoi. Malgré une augmentation de leurs capacités d’accueil, celles-ci sont totalement surchargées, si bien que la grande majorité des requérant-e-s se retrouve ainsi à dormir dans des parcs ou des maisons vides, ne survivant qu’à l’aide d’organisations caritatives. En hiver, leur situation devient dramatique.

      Selon Caritas Rome, la situation est encore plus précaire pour les « renvoyé-e-s » les plus vulnérables, comme les mineur-e-s, les femmes enceintes, les malades ou les personnes traumatisées. Malgré un statut prioritaire, les centres d’hébergement ne sont pas toujours capables de les recevoir, la liste d’attente étant très longue. Elles se retrouvent donc trop souvent sans protection, sans aide à l’intégration ni accès assuré à l’alimentation ou aux soins médicaux les plus basiques.

      Europe, un flipper géant ?

      Si l’ancien Office fédéral des migrations (ODM, maintenant SEM) estimait en avril 2009 pouvoir tirer un bilan positif des accords de Dublin, les Observatoires du droit d’asile et des étrangers en Suisse étaient critiques : « Nos observations sont claires, avait écrit l’ODAE romand : des personnes qui fuient de graves persécutions ne trouvent désormais plus en Europe de terre d’asile, mais sont renvoyées de pays en pays, comme des caisses de marchandise. De plus, les renvois s’effectuent la plupart du temps vers des pays du sud de l’Europe dont la politique d’asile est défaillante. »

      La création en 2015 des « centres de crise- Hotspots » accélère encore ces processus. En effet, Amnesty dénonce les méthodes violentes utilisées notamment pour la prise d’empreintes ainsi que l’évaluation précipitée des personnes venant d’arriver, ce qui risque de les priver de la possibilité de demander l’asile ainsi que des protections auxquelles elles ont droit. L’association souligne que « l’accent mis par l’Europe sur une augmentation des expulsions, qu’importe si cela implique des accords avec des gouvernements bien connus pour leurs violations des droits humains, a pour conséquence le renvoi de personnes vers des endroits où elles risquent d’être exposées à la torture ou à d’autres graves violations des droits humains. »

      Ainsi, l’Italie a été condamnée à plusieurs reprises par la Cour européenne des droits de l’Homme pour ne pas avoir respecté le principe de non-refoulement. Le bon fonctionnement dont se vante le SEM qualifie en fait une gestion purement administrative de flux, une gestion qui ne semble pas se soucier de la vie des êtres humains.
      Stop aux renvois vers l’Italie

      Face à cette situation, plusieurs organisations de la société civile attendent de la Suisse qu’elle renonce aux renvois Dublin vers l’Italie, notamment pour les personnes vulnérables. L’OSAR notamment, dénonce « le Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (SEM) ne renonce à des transferts en Italie que dans des cas exceptionnels. Le Tribunal administratif fédéral (TAF) se rallie largement à cette pratique, de sorte qu’il n’existe guère non plus de perspectives au niveau judiciaire ». Amnesty relève que de « telles pratiques contreviennent aux Conventions des Nations unies relatives aux droits de l’enfant et aux droits des personnes handicapées, et au droit humain à la famille. […] Dans le cas des mineurs, les autorités suisses ont le devoir de respecter l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant dans chaque décision, que l’enfant soit ou non accompagné d’un adulte. »
      Application aveugle

      Ceci fait ressortir l’usage excessif et l’application aveugle que la Suisse fait des accords Dublin (voir notre article sur le sujet). La Suisse a la possibilité, au travers de la clause de souveraineté de mener elle-même la procédure d’asile et de renvoi lorsque l’Etat Dublin compétent n’offre pas de garantie quant au respect des conventions mentionnées. Indépendamment de cette possibilité, la Suisse a le devoir, selon l’art. 3 par. 2 Dublin III de poursuivre la procédure d’asile dans un autre Etat membre ou en Suisse « lorsqu’il est impossible de transférer un demandeur vers l’État membre initialement désigné comme responsable parce qu’il y a de sérieuses raisons de croire qu’il existe dans cet État membre des défaillances systémiques dans la procédure d’asile et les conditions d’accueil des demandeurs, qui entraînent un risque de traitement inhumain ou dégradant au sens de l’article 4 de la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne ».
      Arrêt Tarakhel

      Par ailleurs, l’arrêt Tarakhel de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme en 2014 (voir notre article) implique que la Suisse se doit d’analyser au cas par cas la situation des requérant-e-s en cas de renvoi vers l’Italie, d’autant plus lorsque des enfants sont parmi eux. Le renvoi ne pourra alors avoir lieu que lorsque le premier pays d’accueil, en l’occurrence l’Italie, pourra garantir que les requérant-e-s d’asile puissent être accueilli-e-s dans le respect des droits de l’enfant et de la dignité humaine.

      Suisse des records

      Malgré l’arrêt de la CrEDH et la marge de manœuvre dont dispose la Suisse, elle reste le pays effectuant le plus de renvois Dublin vers l’Italie. Le rapport de l’OSAR fait état qu’en 2015 sur 24’990 demandes, 11’073 émanaient de la Suisse seule. Cependant, l’Italie n’a reconnu sa responsabilité que dans 4’886 de ces cas. Cela signifie qu’une majorité des demandes de transferts de la Suisse ont été adressées à tort à l’Italie. De plus, la Suisse n’a accueilli à ce jour que 112 demandeurs/ demandeuses d’asile en provenance de l’Italie au travers du programme de relocalisation, chiffre minime en comparaison des renvois effectués et montrant une fois encore un grave défaut de solidarité.

      Autres pays dans le colimateur

      Suite à une large mobilisation et un arrêt de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme en janvier 2011, les renvois vers la Grèce, autre pays largement dénoncé pour ses conditions d’accueil, dans le cadre des accords Dublin ont été suspendus en août 2011 par le Tribunal administratif fédéral, jusqu’à ce que la Grèce respecte à nouveau les standards communs (voir notre article sur le sujet). La société civile appelle depuis presque dix ans à une même décision pour les renvois vers l’Italie. Les renvois vers d’autres pays tels que la Hongrie sont de plus fortement dénoncés.

      https://www.humanrights.ch/fr/droits-humains-suisse/interieure/asile/loi/lasile-selon-dublin-ii-renvois-vers-litalie-grece-problematiques?force=1

    • Les personnes requérantes d’asile en Italie menacées de violations des droits humains

      Les personnes requérantes d’asile en Italie font face à des conditions de vie misérables. Le Tribunal administratif fédéral a ainsi dernièrement demandé au Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (SEM) de se pencher de manière plus approfondie sur la situation en Italie. Comme en atteste un rapport publié récemment par l’Organisation suisse d’aide aux réfugiés (OSAR), les personnes requérantes d’asile renvoyées en Italie dans le cadre d’une procédure Dublin ont rarement accès à un hébergement adéquat et leurs droits fondamentaux ne sont pas garantis. C’est pourquoi l’OSAR recommande de renoncer aux transferts vers l’Italie. 21.01.2020

      Bien que le nombre de personnes réfugiées traversant la Méditerranée centrale pour rejoindre l’Italie ne cesse de baisser, les conditions de vie des personnes requérantes d’asile dans le pays ont connu une détérioration majeure. En effet, le système d’accueil a fait l’objet de réductions financières massives et d’un durcissement de la législation. Dans son dernier rapport sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie (https://www.osar.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/200121-italy-reception-conditions-en.pdf), l’OSAR apporte des preuves détaillées des effets dramatiques sur les personnes requérantes d’asile des changements législatifs introduits en octobre 2018 par l’ancien ministre de l’Intérieur Matteo Salvini.

      Le quatrième rapport de l’OSAR sur les conditions d’accueil en Italie s’appuie notamment sur une mission d’enquête à l’automne 2019 et sur de nombreux entretiens menés avec des expert-e-s, des employé-e-s des autorités italiennes, ainsi qu’avec le personnel du HCR et d’organisations non gouvernementales en Italie.

      L’OSAR a ainsi constaté qu’il n’existait plus d’hébergements adéquats, en particulier pour les personnes requérantes d’asile vulnérables, telles que les familles avec des enfants en bas âge ou les victimes de la traite des êtres humains. En outre, les personnes qui ont déjà été hébergées en Italie avant de poursuivre leur route vers un autre pays perdent leur droit à une place d’hébergement et donc à toutes les prestations de l’État. Elles risquent ainsi fortement de subir des violations des droits humains.

      Le système social italien repose sur la solidarité familiale. Or, les personnes requérantes d’asile n’ont pas de famille sur place pour les soutenir. Elles se retrouvent ainsi souvent dans une situation de grande précarité, même si elles bénéficient d’un statut de protection, et sont exposées à un risque d’exploitation et de dénuement matériel extrême.
      Adapter la pratique Dublin

      La Suisse a adopté une application très stricte des règles Dublin. Elle renvoie ainsi systématiquement les personnes requérantes d’asile dans le pays où elles ont pour la première fois foulé le sol européen, à savoir l’Italie pour la plupart. Bien que le règlement Dublin III prévoie explicitement une clause de prise en charge volontaire, la Suisse n’en fait que peu usage. A la lumière des récentes constatations qu’elle a faites sur place, l’OSAR recommande de renoncer aux transferts vers l’Italie. Elle demande en particulier aux autorités suisses de ne pas transférer de personnes vulnérables en Italie et d’examiner leurs demandes d’asile en Suisse.

      Le Tribunal administratif fédéral ainsi que plusieurs tribunaux allemands ont partiellement reconnu la situation problématique en Italie dans leur jurisprudence actuelle et ont approuvé plusieurs recours. Dans divers arrêts de l’année dernière, le Tribunal administratif fédéral a demandé au SEM d’évaluer de manière plus approfondie la situation en Italie. Les tribunaux se sont appuyés, entre autres, sur divers rapports de l’OSAR. Dans son rapport de suivi de décembre 2018 (https://www.refugeecouncil.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/monitoreringsrapport-2018.pdf), l’OSAR a documenté les conditions d’accueil exécrables auxquelles sont confrontées les personnes requérantes d’asile vulnérables en Italie. Les renseignements fournis par l’OSAR en mai 2019 (https://www.fluechtlingshilfe.ch/assets/herkunftslaender/dublin/italien/190508-auskunft-italien.pdf) donnaient déjà un survol des principaux changements législatifs en Italie. Le rapport complet qui est publié aujourd’hui montre l’impact de ces changements tant au niveau juridique que pratique. Il souligne la nécessité pour les autorités suisses de clarifier davantage la situation en Italie et d’adapter leur pratique.

      https://www.osar.ch/medias/communiques-de-presse/2020/les-personnes-requerantes-dasile-en-italie-menacees-de-violations-des-droits-hu

  • Unzureichende medizinische Versorgung in AHE

    Darmstadt, 3.1.2020

    Seit dem 9. Dezember 2019 ist Mohamed B., 32 Jahre, in der
    Abschiebehafteinrichtung Darmstadt-Eberstadt inhaftiert. Er ist aufgrund politischer Verfolgung aus seinem Heimatland Guinea geflohen. Dort setzte er sich in der Oppositionspartei UFDG für Demokratie und Korruptionsbekämpfung ein. Nun soll er spätestens Anfang Februar diesen Jahres wegen des Dublin-Systems nach Italien abgeschoben werden.

    B. leidet schon seit längerer Zeit an starker Wassereinlagerung in seinen Füßen sowie an Herz- und Nierenschmerzen. Die Beschwerden haben sich seit seiner Inhaftierung deutlich verschlechtert. Er kann aktuell nicht mehr beschwerdefrei gehen und muss die meiste Zeit im Bett liegen. Seiner Aussage nach, war sogar mindestens ein diensthabender Beamter über den stark geschwollenen Zustand seiner Füße erstaunt. Dennoch hatte er seit dem 20. Dezember keine ärztliche Visite mehr erhalten - trotz wiederholtem Erbittens dieser, sowie mehrfacher Versprechungen einer solchen für den nächsten Tag durch verschiedene Beamt*innen.

    Auch wir vom Bündnis Community 4 All haben am 30.12.19 sowohl das Gefängnispersonal, als auch die Sozialarbeiterin, die Seelsorger und den Beirat der AHE über den kritischen Gesundheitszustand informiert. Dennoch ist diesbezüglich nichts passiert. Im Gegenteil wurde ihm seitens des Gefängnispersonals mitgeteilt, er habe „keinen Anspruch auf eine ärztliche Untersuchung und sollte nur die Medikamente nehmen“.

    Laut B. sind dies 10-12 Tabletten täglich, die enorme
    gesundheitsbeeinträchtigende Nebenwirkungen, wie Unwohlsein, Schlaflosigkeit, Kopf-, Bauch- und Gelenkschmerzen, hätten.
    Erst während des Verfassens dieser Pressemitteilung, bekam er nach nun exakt zwei Wochen, eine ärztliche Behandlung. Er sagte hiernach, dass sich die behandelnde Ärztin auch sehr überrascht über den Zustand seiner Füße zeigte, allerdings keine weitere Behandlung veranlasste, während er weiterhin stark leide.

    Wir als Community 4 All halten es für absolut unrechtmäßig und
    menschenverachtend, dass Menschen in dieser Stadt offenbar einen völlig unzureichenden Zugang zu medizinischer Versorgung haben und fordern deutlich diese allen Gefangenen umgehend zu gewährleisten – auch zwischen den Jahren!

    Dieser aktuelle Vorfall zeigt erneut in aller Deutlichkeit, dass die Institution Abschiebegefängnis eine Blackbox ohne öffentliche Kontrolle ist, in der solche Vorfälle vorprogrammiert sind.

    Alle Abschiebegefängnisse ersatzlos schließen!

    Flucht ist kein Verbrechen!

    Originalstatement von Mohamed B. - 2.1.20:

    Mon nom est Mohamed B., je suis née le ../../1987 à Conakry/Guinée. Je suis diplômé en sciences de l’éducation depuis 2012 à l’institut supérieur des sciences et l’éducation de Guinée( ISSEG) et j’ai exercé la fonction d’enseignant dans mon pays. Actuellement je suis demandeur d’asile en République Fédérale d’Allemagne.

    En effet, j’ai fui mon pays le 21/04/2018 à cause des persécutions politiques mais aussi pour la cause des enseignants, j’ai été torturé et reçu des menaces de mort en laissant derrière moi un enfant qui avait 1 an dans ce combat.

    A l’aide de notre parti politique UFDG présidé par Elhadj Cellou Dalein Diallo, je me suis retrouvé en République fédérale d’Allemagne le 08/08/2018 sans papier en passant par l’Italie. Après 3 mois de demande d’asile ici, j’ai été confronter à un problème de Dublin de l’Italie alors qu’en passant dans ce pays je n’ai effectué aucune demande d’asyle, et ma condition de santé ne me permettait de rester de vivre sur la route. J’ai tout fait pour contester cette desicion du Bureau d’immigration en le payant 500 € mais ça n’a pas marché. J’ai été expulsé pour l’Italie malgré toute mes consultations.

    L’importance dans tout ça est que j’ai commencé à parler la langue allemande après 4 mois d’école mais surtout avec mes propres efforts.

    Après mon expulsion, l’Italie m’a déjà confirmé que je n’ai pas de … là-bas. Je me suis retourné en ici et en raccourci c’était toujours la même chose. Actuellement je suis dans un centre d’expulsion (Abschiebungshafte Darmstadt) Marienburgstr. 78 / 64297 Darmstadt. Ça fait presque un mois de puis que je suis là et
    dans une condition déplorable. Je suis malade, ma condition de santé est très critique : j’ai un problème de cœur, et tout mes deux pieds sont enflés que je ne n’arrive même pas à marcher, je ne ressens que la douleur. Ça fait 3 semaines que je prends régulièrement les médicaments, je prends 10 à 12 comprimés par jour qui ne font que me doper et me créer d’autres problèmes de santé : le malaise, l’insomnie, maux de tête, maux de ventre,
    douleur articulaire.

    Cela fait 2 semaines je réclame une visite médicale et même le médecin de ce centre ne vient pas. D’ailleurs d’après les agents de garde, quand on l’appelle elle dit que « je n’ai pas droit à une visite médicale, et que je dois seulement prendre des médicaments » qui
    créent d’autres problèmes à ma santé.

    Je me sens aujourd’hui triste, abandonné, ridiculisé, minimisé que je considère dans cette prison comme une sorte de torture. Je suis démunis de mes droit de l’homme ici tandis que la République Fédérale d’Allemagne est un pays de droit et de la liberté.
    Même s’ils doivent m’expulser de ce pays mais que ça soit que je me trouve en bonne état de santé. Je n’ai pas peur de l’expulsion, des dizaines de personnes sont morts devant dans les manifestations alors je ne crains en rien, c’est seulement ma santé qui est la plus importante.

    Alors j’appelle à votre aide pour que je retrouve ma santé et continuer mes procédures de demande d’asile dans de bonnes conditions.

    Merci pour votre bonne compréhension et je vous remercie.

    Source: via HFR Mailing list —>

    Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,

    anbei eine aktuelle Pressemitteilung zu einem Fall von unzureichender medizinischer Versorgung in der Abschiebungshafteinrichtung Darmstadt unseres Bündnisses ‚Community4All – Solidarische Gemeinschaften statt
    Abschiebegefängnis’. Wir senden Ihnen unsere PM aus aktuellem Anlass, mit der Bitte um zeitnahe Veröffentlichung.

    Angehängt sind neben der PM ein Statement des Betroffenen im Original (Französisch, sowie als Übersetzung).

    #Allemagne #Darmstadt #Community4All #asyle #migration #détention #centre_d'expulsion #santé #accès_aux_soins

  • The Swiss Federal Administrative suspended the return of asylum seeker to Croatia according to Dublin due to police violence taking place at the Croatian-Bosnian border. The asylum- seeker experienced violent pushbacks from the Croatian border 18 times, which left him with physical and psychological consequences. This ruling confirmed all the testimonies of refugees and numerous reports from both international and local organizations, institutions and the media that warned about this continuing practice of the Croatian police.

    Reçu via la newsletter de Inicijativa Dobrodosli, le 26.08.2019

    #suspension #Dublin #asile #renvois_Dublin #Suisse #migrations #réfugiés #expulsion #Croatie #violences_policières #frontières #violent_border #violence #Bosnie #push-back #push-backs #refoulement #police

    –------

    Source:
    Švicarski sud suspendirao vraćanje izbjeglice zbog prijetnje ponavljanja pushback-a

    Švicarski Federalni upravni sud suspendirao vraćanje po Dublinu zbog policijskog nasilja nad izbjeglicama.

    Švicarski Federalni upravni sud suspendirao je vraćanje tražitelja azila prema Dublinu u Hrvatsku zbog policijskog nasilja koje se događa na hrvatsko-bosanskoj granici. Tražitelj je 18 puta iskusio nasilne pushbackove s hrvatske granice što je na njemu ostavilo fizičke i psihičke posljedice. Ovom presudom potvrđena su sva svjedočanstva izbjeglica i mnogobrojni izvještaji kako međunarodnih tako lokalnih organizacija, institucija i medija koje već godinama upozoravaju na kontinuiranu praksu hrvatske policije.

    https://www.cms.hr/hr/azil-i-integracijske-politike/svicarski-sud-suspendirao-vracanje-izbjeglice-zbog-prijetnje-ponavljanja-pushbac

    ping @i_s_ @isskein

  • Italy receives more asylum seekers from Germany than from Libya

    Italy has a migration problem, just not the one it thinks it does.

    To illustrate the challenges facing the country, Interior Minister Matteo Salvini continues to point south, at people coming by boat across the Mediterranean.

    But in reality, in part because of the government’s hard-line approach, the number of people arriving by sea has plummeted, from over 180,000 at its peak in 2016 to a little over 3,000 so far this year.

    Instead, the greatest influx of people seeking asylum is now coming from the north — from other European countries, who are sending migrants back to Italy in accordance with the EU’s so-called Dublin regulation.

    The regulation states that a migrant’s country of arrival is responsible for fingerprinting and registering them, handling their asylum claims, hosting them if they are granted some form of protection and sending them back to their countries of origin if they are not.

    Salvini is right to call for binding commitments instead of ad hoc promises, but refusing to cooperate in the search for them might not be the wisest approach.

    If migrants travel onward — to Germany, for example — the new country has the right to send them back to where they first arrived in the European Union. In 2018, Italy accepted more than 6,300 Dublin transfers — the highest figure ever. That’s almost twice as many people as arrived by boat so far this year.

    Last year, Germany alone sent 2,292 asylum seekers back to Italy, a number that can be expected to rise this year. By comparison, less than 1,200 migrants have arrived by boat from Libya in the first seven months of 2019; the total for the year is expected to be about 1,900.

    And yet, despite the growing number of asylum seekers arriving from other EU countries, Italy is receiving far fewer than it would if the Dublin rules were working as planned.

    Over the past few years, as migration roiled Italian politics, Rome accepted only a fraction of the people it was requested to take back. Since 2013, Italy has received more than 220,000 transfer requests from European countries and accepted just 25,000. In 2018 alone, France and Germany asked Italy to take back more than 50,000 people.

    Rome has fought the Dublin system for years, arguing it’s “unfair” and pushing for the rules to be revised — without much success. Successive Italian governments have called for new mechanisms that would distribute migrants across European countries more equitably, lifting the burden for registering and managing migrants off border countries. The most recent attempt, in 2015, fell apart almost as soon as it launched, when some EU countries refused to take part and others took in only a small share of what they promised.

    The truth is that, under Dublin, Italy is doing just fine.

    The system is highly dysfunctional. Once migrants move to another EU country from their original point of arrival — often Italy, Greece, Spain, or Malta — it is very hard to send them back.

    Between 2013 and 2018, just 15 percent of those found in a different country from the one responsible for processing their asylum request were in fact returned.

    Why don’t these transfers happen? Officials will usually blame the migrants themselves, who sometimes disappear before a transfer can be carried out. In reality, political reasons play a large part. The country responsible for taking charge of a migrant can put up a myriad of tiny technical obstacles to block the transfer. And if the transfer does not happen within six months’ time, responsibility shifts to the country where the migrant is currently located.

    This is why EU countries where migrants actually want to live — like Germany, Sweden, Austria and the Benelux countries — end up receiving the most migrants, processing their asylum requests and dealing with failed asylum seekers, in spite of the Dublin rules.

    A cynic might suspect that this is also why successive Italian governments, and now Salvini, have shown so little interest in actually reforming the system despite continuously requesting “solidarity” from other EU countries.

    At a meeting in Paris earlier this week, several EU interior ministers agreed to form a “coalition of the willing” to redistribute migrants that disembark in Italy and Malta.

    Italy didn’t attend, arguing that such promises would be as empty as they proved to be in 2015 when governments failed to come to an agreement on reforming Dublin. It also objected to the fact that the deal would require Italy and Malta to allow all migrants rescued in the Central Mediterranean to be disembarked and registered in their countries.

    Salvini is right to call for binding commitments instead of ad hoc promises, but refusing to cooperate in the search for them might not be the wisest approach.

    The solution a handful of EU ministers came up with on Monday is a step in the right direction — and it’s along the lines of what Italy has been calling for.

    If Rome continues to play a blocking role in the reform of the Dublin system, its neighbors might decide they’re better off focusing their efforts on making sure the regulation is properly applied.

    https://www.politico.eu/article/italy-migration-refugees-receives-more-asylum-seekers-from-germany-than-fro
    #renvois #renvois_Dublin #Dublin #règlement_dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #fact-checking #afflux #préjugés #Méditerranée #Libye #invasion #Allemagne #statistiques #chiffres #arrivées #mer #terre #France
    (et la #Suisse, par contre, perd la palme de championne des renvois Dublin vers l’Italie :
    https://asile.ch/2014/11/16/jean-francois-mabut-la-suisse-championne-du-refoulement)

    ping @isskein
    @karine4 : tu as vu les statistisques pour les renvois France-Italie ?

  • I migranti rispediti in Italia dalla Svizzera: “Legati e picchiati, volevano toglierci la bimba”

    Non hanno nessuna intenzione di dimenticare, né paura di denunciare. E allora eccoli qui #Joelson e #Tatiana, mano nella mano, la piccola #Leora in braccio, nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito dalla Ong Laici Terzo Mondo, a raccontare il loro ritorno in Italia da «dublinanti», l’agghiacciante brutalità con la quale sono stati rispediti in Italia dalla Svizzera, il Paese con il quale proprio ieri, in visita presso il centro federale d’asilo di Chiasso, il ...


    https://rep.repubblica.it/pwa/generale/2019/06/21/news/_legati_e_picchiati_volevano_anche_toglierci_la_bimba_-229346010
    #dublinés #Italie #Suisse #asile #migrations #réfugiés #violence #Dublin #règlement_dublin #renvois_Dublin
    #paywall

    • Famiglia del Camerun denuncia il trattamento della polizia

      Manette e catene. Cappuccio e casco. Il ricordo di quei momenti ancora li terrorizza. Joelson e Tatiana, 25 anni lui originario del Camerun, 23 lei originaria della Costa d’Avorio, non dimenticheranno mai quelle ore di qualche mese, quando sono stati prelevati dal loro appartamento di #Albinen e, via Zurigo, riportati in Italia, a Napoli. L’hanno raccontato alla Repubblica, che li ha incontrati nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli durante una serie di servizi sui migranti che da Berlino vengono rimandati in Italia. «Ci hanno messo le manette alle mani e le catene ai piedi». E lo ripete al Caffè la responsabile del centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito da una Ong, Renata Molino, che più volte ha sentito la loro testimonianza. «Sapevano di non poter restare in Svizzera, sapevano del regolamento di Dublino, avevano già firmato le carte per il trasferimento. Erano pronti, insomma. Perché quindi tanta violenza, continuano a chiedersi». Una violenza che coglie di sorpresa la polizia vallesana: «Non ci risulta un rimpatrio da Albinen a Zurigo di una famiglia di origine africana - dice al Caffè il portavoce Markus Rieder -. Questo è un piccolissimo villaggio. Solitamente bisogna prendere queste dichiarazioni con le pinze. Approfondiremo comunque il caso e nei prossimi giorni daremo maggiori dettagli sulla vicenda. Vogliamo anche noi capire come sono andati i fatti».
      Fatti che, stando alle parole di Joelson e Tatiana, fanno rabbrividire. E che riaccendono le polemiche attorno ai rimpatri forzati. «Sono qui da noi da qualche mese e sin dal primo giorno hanno raccontato questa storia, le stesse parole ogni volta - sottolinea Renata Molino -. Abbiamo un mediatore culturale che viene dal Camerun, il Paese del marito, quindi è difficile che le loro parole siano state distorte». Resta il dubbio che, forse, non si tratti di Albinen, ma di un altro paese, magari lì vicino, sempre nella Svizzera francese, vista la loro origine e la lingua comune. Ma poco importa.
      E Tatiana racconta: «Quel giorno ero casa da sola con la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, all’epoca aveva pochi mesi. Mio marito era fuori. Suona il campanello, sono dei poliziotti mi dicono che c’è un aereo pronto per noi. Cerco di andare verso mia figlia. Me lo impediscono, mi afferrano per le braccia, mi ammanettano e mi incatenano. E mi picchiano, perché grido».
      Ad un certo punto le avrebbero chiesto di spogliarsi per una perquisizione corporale. «Mi strappano gli abiti, mi toccano ovunque». Nel frattempo rientra Joelson. «Picchiano e strattonano anche lui. Ma lo saprò solo dopo, quando ci rivedremo all’aeroporto. Senza nostra figlia, che non sappiamo dov’è». Tatiana si ribella. La situazione precipita. «Mi mettono - ha raccontato la donna - un casco nero sul cappuccio, un nastro sulla bocca, poi ci fanno salire sull’aereo e ci legano al sedile». Poi la piccola arriva in braccio a una poliziotta. «Li supplico di darmela. ‘No è nata in Svizzera e qui resta’, dicono le guardie». Si scatena l’inferno. Marito e moglie si rivoltano, gridano, protestano. Sino a quando il pilota esce dalla cabina e dice che così non parte. La piccola, sempre nella versione dei profughi, viene portata a bordo e messa in fondo all’aereo, dove resterà sino alla fine del viaggio. A Napoli la coppia viene slegata, la bimba riconsegnata. «Mai avremmo pensato di subire tanta violenza anche in Europa, già l’abbiamo patita nei nostri Paesi».

      http://www.caffe.ch/stories/Attualit%C3%A0/63300_ci_hanno_rimpatriati_legati_e_bendati
      #Naples

    • "Schiacciata nel casco cercavo la mia Leora"

      «Proprio così! Sì, come su questa foto. Ci hanno legati al sedile dell’aereo e poi ci hanno messo in testa quello, sì, una specie di casco. Tanto che mi è rimasta la bocca aperta e non riuscivo più a chiuderla, le mie guance erano completamente schiacciate dentro». Non cambia versione neanche di una virgola Tatiana, rispetto a quanto abbiamo pubblicato la scorsa domenica. Anzi. Via WhatsApp, con un audio in francese, in settimana ha risposto al cronista del Caffè che le ha fatto avere le immagini sulle modalità di un rinvio forzato, fasce, ferma braccia e casco da pugile. E ribadisce, immagine dopo immagine, la violenza con cui, dice, è avvenuto il loro rimpatrio.
      Tatiana, 23 anni, originaria della Costa d’Avorio, il marito Joelson, 25 anni, del Camerun, e la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, qualche mese fa sono stati prelevati dall’appartamento dove vivevano da circa un anno e portati all’aeroporto. «Ci hanno rispediti legati e bendati da Zurigo a Napoli», aveva raccontato la coppia a Repubblica, che per prima ha pubblicato la loro storia, e le loro parole le aveva confermate al Caffè Renata Molino, la responsabile del centro profughi di Napoli, dove sono tuttora ospitati, e che sin dal primo giorno ha ascoltato la drammatica testimonianza della loro partenza.
      La famiglia di profughi viveva ad #Arwangen, non ad Albinen, come erroneamente scritto. Nel piccolo comune del canton Berna, nella regione dell’Emmental-Alta Argovia, esiste infatti un centro migranti gestito dall’Esercito della Salvezza. «Probabilmente si sono confusi, oppure non si sono capiti con il mediatore culturale che sin dal primo giorno ha raccolto le loro voci», spiega Renata Molino. Ma tutto ciò, ovviamente, che siano stati prelevati da Albinen o da Aarwangen, non cambia la sostanza del loro racconto.
      Joelson e Tatiana hanno raccontato di essere stati portati via dal loro alloggio di Arwangen in manette e catene. «Non era necessario perché sapevamo di non poter restare in Svizzera, ci avevano spiegato del regolamento di Dublino, avevamo già firmato anche le carte per il trasferimento», ha più volte ripetuto Tatiana che ancora oggi si continua a chiedere il motivo di tanta violenza. «Ad un certo punto ci hanno messo in testa una specie di casco - riprende nel suo audio WhatsApp -. Improvvisamente mi sono trovata il viso schiacciato, riuscivo a vedere solo da un buco. Ero molto spaventata». A contribuire alla disperazione, la figlia che continuava a piangeva in fondo all’aereo, dove è stata lasciata per tutto il viaggio. Mentre Tatiana si ribellava, voleva andare da lei". Ad un certo punto la donna inizia a dimenarsi, vuole sua figlia, è preoccupata perché non riesce a vederla. «Sbattevo i piedi per terra e muovevo la testa. Allora mi hanno bloccato con la forza, mi tenevano il collo e mi tiravano i capelli. Ma cosa potevo fare? Ero fissata con le fasce al sedile e non potevo quasi muovermi».

      http://caffe.ch/stories/cronaca/63308_schiacciata_nel_casco_cercavo_la_mia_leora

    • "Ci hanno rimpatriati...legati e bendati"

      Manette e catene. Cappuccio e casco. Il ricordo di quei momenti ancora li terrorizza. Joelson e Tatiana, 25 anni lui originario del Camerun, 23 lei originaria della Costa d’Avorio, non dimenticheranno mai quelle ore di qualche mese, quando sono stati prelevati dal loro appartamento di Albinen e, via Zurigo, riportati in Italia, a Napoli. L’hanno raccontato alla Repubblica, che li ha incontrati nel centro di accoglienza di Napoli durante una serie di servizi sui migranti che da Berlino vengono rimandati in Italia. «Ci hanno messo le manette alle mani e le catene ai piedi». E lo ripete al Caffè la responsabile del centro di accoglienza di Napoli gestito da una Ong, Renata Molino, che più volte ha sentito la loro testimonianza. «Sapevano di non poter restare in Svizzera, sapevano del regolamento di Dublino, avevano già firmato le carte per il trasferimento. Erano pronti, insomma. Perché quindi tanta violenza, continuano a chiedersi». Una violenza che coglie di sorpresa la polizia vallesana: «Non ci risulta un rimpatrio da Albinen a Zurigo di una famiglia di origine africana - dice al Caffè il portavoce Markus Rieder -. Questo è un piccolissimo villaggio. Solitamente bisogna prendere queste dichiarazioni con le pinze. Approfondiremo comunque il caso e nei prossimi giorni daremo maggiori dettagli sulla vicenda. Vogliamo anche noi capire come sono andati i fatti».
      Fatti che, stando alle parole di Joelson e Tatiana, fanno rabbrividire. E che riaccendono le polemiche attorno ai rimpatri forzati. «Sono qui da noi da qualche mese e sin dal primo giorno hanno raccontato questa storia, le stesse parole ogni volta - sottolinea Renata Molino -. Abbiamo un mediatore culturale che viene dal Camerun, il Paese del marito, quindi è difficile che le loro parole siano state distorte». Resta il dubbio che, forse, non si tratti di Albinen, ma di un altro paese, magari lì vicino, sempre nella Svizzera francese, vista la loro origine e la lingua comune. Ma poco importa.
      E Tatiana racconta: «Quel giorno ero casa da sola con la piccola Leora, nata in Svizzera, all’epoca aveva pochi mesi. Mio marito era fuori. Suona il campanello, sono dei poliziotti mi dicono che c’è un aereo pronto per noi. Cerco di andare verso mia figlia. Me lo impediscono, mi afferrano per le braccia, mi ammanettano e mi incatenano. E mi picchiano, perché grido».
      Ad un certo punto le avrebbero chiesto di spogliarsi per una perquisizione corporale. «Mi strappano gli abiti, mi toccano ovunque». Nel frattempo rientra Joelson. «Picchiano e strattonano anche lui. Ma lo saprò solo dopo, quando ci rivedremo all’aeroporto. Senza nostra figlia, che non sappiamo dov’è». Tatiana si ribella. La situazione precipita. «Mi mettono - ha raccontato la donna - un casco nero sul cappuccio, un nastro sulla bocca, poi ci fanno salire sull’aereo e ci legano al sedile». Poi la piccola arriva in braccio a una poliziotta. «Li supplico di darmela. ‘No è nata in Svizzera e qui resta’, dicono le guardie». Si scatena l’inferno. Marito e moglie si rivoltano, gridano, protestano. Sino a quando il pilota esce dalla cabina e dice che così non parte. La piccola, sempre nella versione dei profughi, viene portata a bordo e messa in fondo all’aereo, dove resterà sino alla fine del viaggio. A Napoli la coppia viene slegata, la bimba riconsegnata. «Mai avremmo pensato di subire tanta violenza anche in Europa, già l’abbiamo patita nei nostri Paesi».

      http://www.caffe.ch/stories/cronaca/63300_ci_hanno_rimpatriati_legati_e_bendati

  • Application du règlement Dublin en #France en #2018

    Plus de 45 000 saisines

    Selon les statistiques d’Eurostat, 45 358 saisines d’un autre Etat ont été effectuées par la France en 2018 contre 41 620 en 2017, 25 963 en 2016 et 11 657 en 2015.

    Les procédures de reprises en charge représentent 74% des saisines soit quatre points supplémentaires par rapport à 2017. La majorité d’entre elles visent des demandeurs qui ont une demande en cours dans un autre État-membre. L’Italie est de loin le premier pays saisi avec15 428 saisines avec un changement notable puisque 71% sont des reprises en charge. L’Allemagne est le deuxième pays saisi avec 8694 saisines (8688s en 2017) dont 93% sont des reprises en charge. A noter que près de 21% des saisines vers ce pays sont faites sur le fondement d’une demande d’asile rejetée. Ce chiffre est en légère hausse mais il bat en brèche le discours du ministre de l’intérieur qui indique que la majorité des personnes Dublinées en provenance d’Allemagne sont déboutées. Troisième pays l’Espagne avec 5 309 saisines dont 81% de prise en charge en raison d’un visa, d’une entrée irrégulière (à Ceuta et à Mellila) ou d’un séjour régulier. La Suède et l’Autriche suivent avec un nombre très inférieur (1 807 et 1 805 saisines).

    29 000 accords des Etats-membres

    29 259 réponses favorables ont été obtenues (29 713 en 2017) soit 65% d’accords. Pour certains pays, le taux de refus est anormalement élevé comme pour la Hongrie (90%) ou la Bulgarie (76%).

    3 500 #transferts

    3 533 transferts ont été effectués en 2018 (2 633 en 2017 contre 1 293 transferts en 2016 et 525 en 2015). Cela représente 12% des accords et 8% des saisines,

    L’Italie est de nouveau le premier pays concerné avec 1 6 47 transferts (soit 13% des accords (implicites pour la plupart et 11% des saisines), suivie de l’Allemagne (783 contre 869 en 2017, 9% des accords) puis vient l’Espagne avec 262 transferts (8% des accords). La grande majorité des transferts s’effectue dans un délai de six mois.

    L’expiration du délai de transfert est la principale raison qui conduit la France à se déclarer responsable avec 6 744 décisions (ce qui ne correspond aux statistiques du ministère (23 650). L’application de la clause discrétionnaire ou celle des défaillances d’un Etat représente 2 000 demandes.

    A l’inverse, des personnes sont transférées vers la France (on parle de transfert entrants) . En 2018, il était au nombre de 1 837 contre 1 636 en 2017 principalement en provenance d’Allemagne, du Benelux, de Suisse, d’Autriche et de Suède.

    Au niveau européen, environ 22 000 personnes ont été transférées vers un autre Etat-membre soit 13% des saisines. A noter qu’après l’Allemagne, c’est la Grèce qui est le pays qui transfère le plus (principalement en Allemagne)

    https://www.lacimade.org/application-du-reglement-dublin-en-france-en-2018
    #Dublin #règlement_dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #renvois #renvois_dublin

  • Statistical Data of the Greek Dublin Unit (7.6.2013 -31.01.2019)

    http://asylo.gov.gr/en/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Dublin-stats_January19EN.pdf
    Ici le tableau pour le incoming requests and transferts (donc, du point de vue de la Grèce, les demandes faites de la part d’autres Etats membres pour la reprise en charge de demandeurs d’asile en Grèce)


    #statistiques #chiffres #Dublin #Grèce #renvois #renvois_Dublin #expulsions

    On voit que la #Suisse est la « championne » des renvois (avec la plus grande efficacité) : 17 renvois « réussi » pour 405 requêtes.
    Mais que les pays qui demandent le plus grand nombre de reprises en charge sont l’#Allemagne et la #Hongrie.
    –-> Sur la période 2013-2018 !

    ping @karine4 @isskein @reka @i_s_

  • La #Suisse renvoie à nouveau des réfugiés vers des #zones_de_guerre

    La Suisse a repris en mars dernier les renvois de réfugiés politiques vers des zones de guerre, indique dimanche le SonntagsBlick. Le journal se réfère à un document interne du Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations.

    « Après une suspension de presque deux ans, le premier #rapatriement sous #escorte_policière a eu lieu en mars 2019 », est-il écrit dans le document publié par l’hebdomadaire alémanique.

    En novembre dernier, le Secrétariat d’Etat aux migrations (#SEM) a également expulsé un demandeur d’asile en #Somalie - une première depuis des années. Le SEM indique dans le même document que la Suisse figure parmi les pays européens les plus efficaces en matière d’exécution des expulsions : elle atteint une moyenne de 56% des requérants d’asile déboutés renvoyés dans leur pays d’origine, alors que ce taux est de 36% au sein de l’Union européenne.
    Retour des Erythréens encore « inacceptable »

    L’opération de contrôle des Erythréens admis provisoirement - lancée par la conseillère fédérale Simonetta Sommaruga lorsqu’elle était encore en charge de la Justice - n’a pratiquement rien changé à leur situation, écrit par ailleurs la SonntagsZeitung : sur les 2400 dossiers examinés par le SEM, seuls quatorze ont abouti à un retrait du droit de rester. « Il y a plusieurs facteurs qui rendent un ordre de retour inacceptable », déclare un porte-parole du SEM dans le journal. Parmi eux, l’#intégration avancée des réfugiés en Suisse garantit le droit de rester, explique-t-il.

    Réfugiés « voyageurs » renvoyés

    La NZZ am Sonntag relate pour sa part que le SEM a retiré l’asile politique l’année dernière à 40 réfugiés reconnus, parce qu’ils avaient voyagé dans leur pays d’origine. La plupart d’entre eux venaient du #Vietnam. Il y a également eu quelques cas avec l’Erythrée et l’Irak. Les autorités suisses avaient été mises au courant de ces voyages par les #compagnies_aériennes, qui ont l’obligation de fournir des données sur leurs passagers.

    https://www.rts.ch/info/suisse/10381705-la-suisse-renvoie-a-nouveau-des-refugies-vers-des-zones-de-guerre.html
    #efficacité #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #guerres #machine_à_expulsions #statistiques #chiffres #UE #EU #Europe #Erythrée #réfugiés_érythréens #voyage_au_pays #machine_à_expulser

    • La Suisse bat des #records en matière de renvois

      La Suisse transfère nettement plus de personnes vers d’autres Etats-Dublin que ce qu’elle n’en reçoit. Parfois aussi vers des Etats dont la situation de sécurité est précaire, comme l’#Afghanistan et la #Somalie.

      La Suisse a renvoyé près de 57% des demandeurs d’asile. Dans l’Union européenne, cette valeur s’élève à 37%. Aucun autre pays n’a signé autant d’accord de réadmission que la Suisse, soit 66, a rappelé à Keystone-ATS Daniel Bach, porte-parole du SEM, revenant sur une information du SonntagsBlick. De plus, elle met en oeuvre de manière conséquente l’accord de Dublin, comme le montre un document de l’office, daté du 11 avril.

      Cet accord fonctionne très bien pour la Suisse, peut-on y lire. Elle transfère sensiblement plus de personnes vers d’autres Etats-Dublin que ce qu’elle n’en reçoit. Les renvois vers des Etats dont la situation de sécurité est précaire, comme l’Afghanistan et la Somalie, sont rares, précise le document. L’hebdomadaire alémanique en conclut que la Suisse renvoie « à nouveau vers des régions de guerre ». Ce que contredit le SEM.

      La Suisse s’efforce d’exécuter, individuellement, des renvois légaux vers ces pays, précise le document du SEM. Et de lister un vol extraordinaire vers l’Irak en 2017, un renvoi sous escorte policière vers la Somalie en 2018 et vers l’Afghanistan en mars 2019.

      L’Afghanistan n’est pas considéré entièrement comme zone de guerre. Certaines régions, comme la capitale Kaboul, sont considérées comme raisonnables pour un renvoi, d’autres non. Cette évaluation n’a pas changé, selon le porte-parole. La même chose vaut pour la Somalie. Le SEM enquête sur les dangers de persécution au cas par cas.

      La Suisse suit une double stratégie en matière de renvoi. Elle participe à la politique européenne et aux mesures et instruments communs d’une part. D’autre part, elle mise sur la collaboration bilatérale avec les différents pays de provenance, par exemple en concluant des accords de migration.

      https://www.letemps.ch/suisse/suisse-bat-records-matiere-renvois
      #renvois_Dublin #Dublin #accords_de_réadmission

    • Schweiz schafft wieder in Kriegsgebiete aus

      Reisen nach Somalia und Afghanistan sind lebensgefährlich. Doch die Schweiz schafft in diese Länder aus. Sie ist darin Europameister.

      Der Trip nach Afghanistan war ein totaler Flop. Die ­Behörden am Hauptstadt-Flughafen von Kabul hatten sich quergestellt und die Schweizer Polizisten gezwungen, den Asylbewerber, den die Ordnungshüter eigentlich in seine Heimat zurückschaffen wollten, wieder mitzunehmen. Nach dieser gescheiterten Ausschaffung im September 2017 versuchte die Schweiz nie wieder, einen abgewiesenen Asylbewerber gegen seinen Willen nach Afghanistan abzuschieben.

      Erst vor wenigen Wochen änderte sich das: «Nach fast zweijähriger Blockade konnte im März 2019 erstmals wieder eine polizeilich begleitete Rückführung durchgeführt werden», so das Staatssekretariat für Migration (SEM) in einem internen Papier, das SonntagsBlick vorliegt.

      Ausschaffungen sind lebensgefährlich

      Die Entwicklung war ganz nach dem Geschmack der neuen Chefin: «Dank intensiver Verhandlungen» sei die «zwangsweise Rückkehr nach Afghanistan» wieder möglich, lobte Karin Keller-Sutter jüngst bei einer Rede anlässlich ihrer ersten 
100 Tage als Bundesrätin.

      Afghanistan, das sich im Krieg mit Taliban und Islamischem Staat (IS) befindet, gilt als Herkunftsland mit prekärster Sicherheitslage. Ausschaffungen dorthin sind höchst umstritten – anders gesagt: lebensgefährlich.

      Auch der Hinweis des Aussendepartements lässt keinen Zweifel: «Von Reisen nach Afghanistan und von Aufenthalten jeder Art wird abgeraten.» Diese Woche entschied der Basler Grosse Rat aus humanitären Gründen, dass ein junger Afghane nicht nach Österreich abgeschoben werden darf – weil er von dort in seine umkämpfte Heimat weitergereicht worden wäre.
      Erste Rückführung nach Somalia

      Noch einen Erfolg vermeldet das SEM: Auch nach Somalia war im November wieder die polizeiliche Rückführung eines Asylbewerbers gelungen – zum ersten Mal seit Jahren.

      Somalia fällt in die gleiche Kategorie wie Afghanistan, in die Kategorie Lebensgefahr. «Solange sich die Lage vor Ort nicht nachhaltig verbessert, sollte die Schweiz vollständig auf Rückführungen nach Afghanistan und Somalia verzichten», warnt Peter Meier von der Schweizerischen Flüchtlingshilfe.

      Das SEM hält dagegen: Wer rückgeführt werde, sei weder persönlich verfolgt, noch bestünden völkerrechtliche, humanitäre oder technische Hindernisse. Ob es sich bei den Abgeschobenen um sogenannte Gefährder handelt – also um potenzielle Terroristen und ­Intensivstraftäter – oder lediglich um harmlose Flüchtlinge, lässt das SEM offen.
      56 Prozent werden zurückgeschafft

      Was die beiden Einzelfälle andeuten, gilt gemäss aktuellster Asylstatistiken generell: Wir sind Abschiebe-Europameister! «Die Schweiz zählt auf europäischer Ebene zu den effizientesten Ländern beim Wegweisungsvollzug», rühmt sich das SEM im besagten internen Papier. In Zahlen: 56 Prozent der abgewiesenen Asylbewerber werden in ihr Herkunftsland zurückgeschafft. Der EU-Durchschnitt liegt bei 36 Prozent.

      Die Schweiz beteiligt sich nämlich nicht nur an der europäischen Rückkehrpolitik, sondern hat auch direkte Abkommen mit 64 Staaten getroffen; dieses Jahr kamen Äthiopien und Bangladesch hinzu: «Dem SEM ist kein Staat bekannt, der mehr Abkommen abgeschlossen hätte.»

      Zwar ist die Schweiz stolz auf ihre humanitäre Tradition, aber nicht minder stolz, wenn sie in Sachen Ausschaffung kreative Lösungen findet. Zum Beispiel: Weil Marokko keine Sonderflüge mit gefesselten Landsleuten akzeptiert, verfrachtet die Schweiz abgewiesene Marokkaner aufs Schiff – «als fast einziger Staat Europas», wie das SEM betont. Oder diese Lösung: Während die grosse EU mit Nigeria seit Jahren erfolglos an einem Abkommen herumdoktert, hat die kleine Schweiz seit 2011 ihre Schäfchen im Trockenen. Das SEM nennt seinen Deal mit Nigeria «ein Musterbeispiel» für die nationale Migrationspolitik.
      Weniger als 4000 Ausreisepflichtige

      Entsprechend gering sind die Pendenzen im Vollzug. Zwar führen ­Algerien, Äthiopien und Eritrea die Liste der Staaten an, bei denen Abschiebungen weiterhin auf Blockaden stossen. Aber weniger als 4000 Personen fielen Ende 2018 in die Kategorie abgewiesener Asylbewerber, die sich weigern auszureisen oder deren Heimatland sich bei Ausschaffungen querstellt. 2012 waren es beinahe doppelt so viele. Nun sind es so wenige wie seit zehn Jahren nicht mehr.

      Zum Vergleich: Deutschland meldete im gleichen Zeitraum mehr als 200’000 ausreisepflichtige Personen. Diese Woche beschloss die Bundesregierung weitere Gesetze für eine schnellere Abschiebung.

      Hinter dem Bild einer effizienten Schweizer Abschiebungsmaschinerie verbirgt sich ein unmenschliches Geschäft: Es geht um zerstörte Leben, verlorene Hoffnung, um Ängste, Verzweiflung und Not. Rückführungen sind keine Flugreisen, sondern eine schmutzige Angelegenheit – Spucke, Blut und Tränen inklusive. Bei Sonderflügen wird unter Anwendung von Gewalt gefesselt, es kommt zu Verletzungen bei Asylbewerbern wie Polizisten. Selten hört man davon.
      Gezielte Abschreckung

      Die Schweiz verfolge eine Vollzugspraxis, die auf Abschreckung ziele und nicht vor Zwangsausschaffungen in Länder mit prekärer Sicherheits- und Menschenrechtslage haltmache, kritisiert Peter Meier von der Flüchtlingshilfe: «Das Justizdepartement gibt dabei dem ­innenpolitischen Druck nach.»

      Gemeint ist die SVP, die seit Jahren vom Asylchaos spricht. Das Dublin-System, das regeln soll, welcher Staat für die Prüfung eines Asylgesuchs zuständig ist, funktioniere nicht, so einer der Vorwürfe. «Selbst jene, die bereits in einem anderen Land registriert wurden, können oft nicht zurückgeschickt werden», heisst es im Positionspapier der SVP zur Asylpolitik.

      Das SEM sieht auch das anders: «Für kaum ein europäisches Land funktioniert Dublin so gut wie für die Schweiz», heisst es in dem internen Papier. Man überstelle deutlich mehr Personen an Dublin-Staaten, als man selbst von dort aufnehme. Die neusten Zahlen bestätigen das: 1760 Asylbewerber wurden im letzten Jahr in andere Dublin-Staaten überstellt. Nur 885 Menschen nahm die Schweiz von ihnen auf.

      «Ausnahmen gibt es selbst bei 
besonders verletzlichen Personen kaum», kritisiert die Flüchtlings­hilfe; die Dublin-Praxis sei äusserst restriktiv.

      Das Schweizer Abschiebewesen hat offenbar viele Seiten, vor allem aber ist es gnadenlos effizient.

      https://www.blick.ch/news/politik/erste-abschiebungen-seit-jahren-nach-afghanistan-und-somalia-schweiz-schafft-w

  • le Conseil d’Etat de #Bâle refuse d’exécuter un renvoi Dublin

    le Conseil d’Etat du canton de Bâle vient de prendre une position très forte : ils refusent d’exécuter le renvoi d’un jeune demandeur d’asile afghan qui devrait, selon décision du SEM confirmée par un arrêt du TAF, être renvoyé vers l’Autriche à cause du règlement du Dublin. Auparavant le Grand Conseil avait été saisi d’une #pétition et les 2/3 du Parlement ont soutenu les conclusions de la pétition. Le porte-parole du gouvernement dit : « Le Conseil d’Etat juge que l’accord de Schengen-Dublin n’est [dans ce cas] pas applicable. »

    Le canton s’expose ainsi aux réprimandes du #SEM, qui peut user de #sanctions financières (l’article évoque un montant de 128’000 francs de manque à gagner pour le canton dans l’hypothèse où le requérant obtiendrait une admission provisoire au terme de la procédure d’asile en Suisse).

    C’est un acte fort posé par le Conseil d’Etat bâlois, qui montre la voie du courage politique face aux décisions absurdes d’un règlement inhumain. Le gouvernement le fait avec toutes les pincettes nécessaires (« ce cas est particulier », « nous suivons le vote du Grand Conseil », etc.), mais il le fait et publiquement. Puisse cet acte inspirer d’autres cantons humanistes, qui auraient tout intérêt à s’opposer collectivement au SEM sur ce genre de cas.

    #Suisse #asile #migrations #réfugiés #NEM #renvois_Dublin #Dublin #règlement_Dublin #résistance

    Source : reçu par email d’un ami... qui lui-même cite cette source :
    Basler Regierung verweigert Ausschaffung

    Die Exekutive folgt einer Petition des Grossen Rates und will einen jungen Afghanen nicht ausweisen. Damit widersetzt sie sich einem Entscheid des Bundesverwaltungsgerichts.

    https://www.bazonline.ch/basel/stadt/basler-regierung-verweigert-ausschaffung/story/19616376

  • Hiding rejected asylum seekers - a legal and moral dilemma

    There’s a growing movement in Germany of people sheltering rejected asylum seekers who are at risk of being deported. They call it humane and an act of civil disobedience. But some critics warn that ’citizens’ asylum’ is illegal and may not help anyone in the long run.

    Hossein* was in his twenties when he decided to become a Christian. After this was discovered by the authorities in his native Iran, he was arrested and harassed, Hossein says. He managed to escape to Turkey, continued to Italy and finally arrived in Germany, where he ended up in a town in the Barnim district on the Polish border.

    When Hossein learned that German authorities were going to send him back to Italy, he panicked. “They put me in jail there and took my savings away from me. There was no way I wanted to go back there,” he told dpa. He took an overdose of sleeping pills.

    Social worker Anna Claßen says they picked Hossein up from the hospital and took him to a private home where he remains, hidden from German authorities and safe from the threat of deportation.

    Claßen belongs to one of a growing number of “citizens’ asylum” groups across the country. There are similar collectives in #Berlin, #Hanover, #Göttingen, #Hildesheim, #Nürnberg-Fürth, #Osnabrück, and #Cologne. The refugee advocacy group, Pro Asyl, says there are a lot more initiatives that are never publicized because of fears there will be legal consequences.

    Risks to asylum seekers

    Anyone who refuses to comply with a deportation order and hides is liable to prosecution for remaining in the country illegally, warns Karl-Heinz Schröter, Brandenburg’s interior minister.

    So far, this hasn’t happened to anyone sheltered by the Barnim Citizens’ Asylum group that took in Hossein, its members say. However, the activist group #Solidarity_City also warns that asylum seekers could find themselves in pre-deportation detention sooner if they are discovered trying to evade deportation.

    Is it illegal to hide asylum seekers?

    According to Minister Schröter, there is no question that those who help asylum seekers to hide are breaking the law. The federal interior ministry also issued the warning this week: “arbitrarily preventing #Dublin transfers or returns from being carried out is unacceptable.”

    Under the Dublin regulation, asylum seekers have to register and remain in the country through which they first entered Europe. If they travel irregularly to another European country, they may be transferred back to the arrival country.

    Others have suggested that a person offering protection to the asylum seeker may not be committing any offense. The Constitution guarantees the individual’s right to freedom of opinion and expression, a spokesperson for the state government in Lower Saxony points out. As long as they are not violent, citizens can’t be prosecuted for exercising their right to prevent deportations, the spokesperson said.

    In Bavaria, Pro Asyl, the Refugee Council and local activists regularly try to forewarn people facing imminent deportation. So far they have not been acting illegally, but that could change under a proposed new law to make deportations easier, the “#Geordnete_Rückkehr_Gesetz”, or Orderly Returns Act.

    Solidarity City says their activities “CAN lead to police proceedings or a court case,” and suggest that members should also be prepared to pay a small fine. They add that it is not an offense to offer accommodation to a person who has a valid “#Duldung” or “Tolerated Stay” status. If this isn’t the case, they suggest people considering offering protection to a deportee should seek advice on the extent of the risk they are taking.

    Civil disobedience

    Solidarity City say citizens’ asylum is an act of civil disobedience similar to blockading nuclear reactors or stopping Nazi parades. They also see themselves as an extension of the Church asylum system, which is largely tolerated by the German government.

    The government disagrees: “(Church asylum) was developed in accordance with the principle of the rule of law,” a federal interior ministry spokesperson said.

    Pastor Katharina Falkenhagen, whose Frankfurt parish has given protection to many asylum seekers threatened with deportation, doubts that asylum seekers benefit from citizen asylum. “The legal consequences for the supporters are not pleasant – preliminary legal proceedings, financial penalties,” Falkenhagen told dpa.

    Church asylum is more like a pause button to stop a deportation from going ahead at short notice, according to Bernd Mesovic, spokesperson for Pro Asyl. The church also has a “special moral role,” he adds.

    Supporters of citizens’ asylum say they are also fulfilling a moral obligation in preventing deportations. For Daniel Kurth, the head of the Barnim district authority, this exposes a dilemma: “If we start to use morality as a way of overriding existing law, we will find ourselves in a very difficult situation.”

    *Hossein is an assumed name

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/16116/hiding-rejected-asylum-seekers-a-legal-and-moral-dilemma

    #Allemagne #sans-papiers #asile #migrations #réfugiés #cachette #cacher #dilemme #résistance #désobéissance_civile #délit_de_solidarité #solidarité #Eglise #renvois #expulsions #renvois_Dublin #règlement_Dublin #Hannover #Köln
    ping @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

    • Geordnete-Rückkehr-Gesetz (Orderly Returns Act)

      Presseerklärung
      17. April 2019
      Unsicherheit, Entrechtung, Haft

      PRO ASYL warnt vor Wirkung des »Geordnete-Rückkehr-Gesetzes«
      PRO ASYL appelliert an die Bundesregierung, das ins Kabinett eingebrachte »Geordnete-Rückkehr-Gesetz« nicht im Hau-Ruckverfahren durchzupeitschen. »Es gibt keine Rechtfertigung für derart weitreichende Eingriffe«, sagte Günter Burkhardt, Geschäftsführer von PRO ASYL. »Das Gesetz zielt auf Entrechtung, mehr Haft und einem Verdrängen aus Deutschland durch Entzug von Sozialleistungen!« Das Gesetz baut somit systematisch die Rechte geflüchteter Menschen ab. Es schadet der Integration durch jahrelange Unsicherheit aufgrund der Verlängerung der Frist für Widerrufsverfahren auf fünf Jahre. Mit der Einführung einer neuen Duldungsart, einer »Duldung light«, werden die betroffenen Menschen stigmatisiert und der Weg in ein Bleiberecht stark erschwert. Außerdem wird das Gesetz zur Verunsicherung der Zivilgesellschaft aufgrund der weiterhin bestehenden Gefahr der Kriminalisierung führen. Denn in der Flüchtlingsarbeit Tätige könnten durch die Weitergabe von bestimmten Informationen im Rahmen einer Beratung der »Beihilfe zum Geheimnisverrat« bezichtigt werden.

      Zu Kernpunkten der Kritik im Einzelnen:

      Extreme Kürzungen im Asylbewerberleistungsgesetz

      Für in anderen EU-Mitgliedstaaten anerkannte, ausreisepflichtige Flüchtlinge sollen Leistungen nach zwei Wochen komplett gestrichen werden. Die Rückkehr in Staaten wie Italien, Griechenland und Bulgarien soll mit Hunger und Obdachlosigkeit durchgesetzt werden, obwohl ein solcher Leistungsausschluss dem Grundgesetz widerspricht.

      Massive Ausweitung der Abschiebungshaft

      Im Abschiebungshaftrecht soll eine Beweislastumkehr eingeführt werden, wodurch die Inhaftnahme vereinfach werden soll. Eine solch krasse Verschiebung zu Ungunsten der Betroffenen, die nicht einmal eine/n Anwalt/Anwältin gestellt bekommen, steht nicht in Einklang mit dem Grundsatz, dass jede Inhaftierung nur als letztes Mittel angewendet werden soll. Dass Abschiebungshaft nun sogar in normalen Gefängnissen durchgeführt werden soll, bricht europäisches Recht.

      Bedrohung der Zivilgesellschaft

      Indem der gesamte Ablauf der Abschiebung – inklusive Botschafts- oder Arzttermine – unverhältnismäßigerweise als »Geheimnis« deklariert wird, könnten in der Flüchtlingsarbeit Tätige, die z.B. über den Termin bei einer Botschaft informieren, der Beihilfe zum Geheimnisverrat bezichtigt werden. Allein die Möglichkeit einer Anklage wird zu starker Verunsicherung bei den Menschen führen, die sich für schutzsuchende Menschen engagieren. Im §353b StGB sind nämlich nur PressevertreterInnen von der Beihilfe zum Geheimnisverrat ausgenommen, nicht aber zivilgesellschaftliche Akteure. Die Veränderungen des Referentenentwurfes im Zuge der Koalitionsverhandlungen haben die Bedrohung der Zivilgesellschaft nicht beseitigt.

      Anerkannte Flüchtlinge auf Jahre in Unsicherheit

      Für die Widerrufs- und Rücknahmeverfahren von in 2015 bis 2017 Anerkannten soll das BAMF statt wie bisher drei nun bis zu fünf Jahre Zeit haben. Dabei betreffen die Verfahren vor allem Flüchtlinge aus Syrien, Irak und Eritrea. In diesen Ländern hat sich die Lage aber eben nicht nachhaltig und grundlegend verbessert – was der Grund wäre, eine Anerkennung zu widerrufen. Der Integrationsprozess der betroffenen Flüchtlinge wird durch eine solche Unsicherheit fahrlässig blockiert.

      Einführung einer prekären Duldung light

      Durch die neue Duldung für Personen mit »ungeklärter Identität« werden die betroffenen Menschen pauschal mit Arbeitsverbot und Wohnsitzauflage belegt. Außerdem gilt die Zeit in dieser Duldung light nicht als Vorduldungszeit für Bleiberechtsregelungen. Dies könnte vor allem minderjährigen Flüchtlingen trotz guter Integration den Weg in ein Bleiberecht verbauen, da sie vier Jahre vor dem 21. Geburtstag geduldet sein müssen. Die Definition der Passbeschaffungspflicht ist zudem so offen gehalten, dass die Grenzen der Zumutbarkeit nicht erkennbar sind – so könnte eine Vielzahl an Personen unter die Duldung light fallen, da von ihnen immer neue Handlungen verlangt werden können, auch wenn diese im Endeffekt nicht zu Passbeschaffung führen.

      Die neue Welle von Gesetzesverschärfungen ist nicht nachvollziehbar. Seit 2015 gab es über 20 neue Gesetze, die noch nicht ausreichend evaluiert wurden. Öffentlich wird behauptet, man wolle mit den Gesetzesverschärfungen vor allem das Verhalten sogenannter »Identitätstäuscher« sanktionieren. Dabei sind aktuell bereits folgende Sanktionen für geduldete Menschen, die das Abschiebungshindernis angeblich selbst zu vertreten haben, möglich: Arbeitsverbot (§ 60a Abs. 6 AufenthG), Residenzpflicht (§ 61 Abs. 1c AufenthG), Ausschluss von der Aufenthaltserlaubnis (§ 25 Abs. 5 AufenthG) sowie Leistungskürzungen (§ 1a Abs. 3 AsylbLG). Bezüglich der Gründe für gescheiterte Abschiebeversuche musste die Bundesregierung selbst eingestehen, dass sie diese in den meisten Fällen nicht einmal kennt – trotzdem sollen auch hier gesetzliche Maßnahmen ergriffen werden.

      Die vollständige Stellungnahme von PRO ASYL zum »Geordnete-Rückkehr-Gesetz« im Rahmen der Verbändeanhörung finden Sie hier.

      Zudem haben weitere Verbände im Rahmen der Verbändeanhörung die Regelungen des »Geordnete-Rückkehr-Gesetzes« kritisiert:

      Gemeinsame Stellungnahme der EKD und des Kommissariats der Deutschen Bischöfe:

      »Nach § 1a Abs. 7 AsylbLG-E erhalten Ausländer, die eine Asylgestattung besitzen oder vollziehbar ausreisepflichtig sind, auch wenn eine Abschiebungsandrohung noch nicht oder nicht mehr vollziehbar ist und deren Asylantrag aufgrund der Dublin III-VO als unzulässig abgelehnt wurde, nur noch Leistungen zur Deckung ihres Bedarfs an Ernährung und Unterkunft einschließlich Heizung sowie Körper- und Gesundheitspflege. Die Kirchen halten eine derartige Regelung für europa- und verfassungsrechtlich bedenklich. […] Die von § 1a Abs. 7 AsylbLG-E Betroffenen haben demnach keine Möglichkeit, den Einschränkungen der Leistungen durch ihr eigenes Verhalten zu entgehen. Ein derartiges Vorgehen scheint den Kirchen auch nicht mit dem Urteil des Bundesverfassungsgerichts (BVerfG) vom 18. Juli 201211 vereinbar zu sein, wonach die Menschenwürde nicht migrationspolitisch relativierbar ist.«

      Der Paritätische Gesamtverband:

      »Die Ausweitung der Gründe, die für eine Fluchtgefahr sprechen bei gleichzeitiger Umkehr der Beweislast zulasten der Ausreisepflichtigen droht in der Praxis zu zahlreichen Verstößen gegen Art. 2 Abs. 2 GG zu führen. Die Freiheit der Person aber ist ein besonders hohes Rechtsgut, in das nur aus wichtigen Gründen eingegriffen werden darf. Dabei spielt der Grundsatz der Verhältnismäßigkeit eine besondere Rolle: Haft darf stets nur das letzte Mittel, also „ultima ratio“ sein.«

      Das Deutsche Rote Kreuz:

      »Nach dem vorliegenden Gesetzentwurf müssen Beratende nunmehr befürchten, sich der Beihilfe oder Anstiftung zum Geheimnisverrat strafbar zu machen. Die Arbeit der Beratungsstellen wird damit wesentlich erschwert. Sucht eine Beraterin um Auskunft bei einer Ausländerbehörde zum konkreten Verfahrensstand eines Ratsuchenden, könnte sie damit zu einer Straftat anstiften, wenn der Mitarbeitende in der Ausländerbehörde Informationen zu Terminen bei Botschaften und Amtsärzten mitteilt und die Beraterin diese dem Ratsuchenden zum Zwecke der umfassenden Sachverhaltsaufklärung weitergibt.«

      Der Jesuitische Flüchtlingsdienst:

      »Die Regelung des §60b geht fälschlicherweise davon aus, dass das Fehlen von Identitätsnachweisen in der Regel dem betreffenden Ausländer anzulasten sei. In unserer alltäglichen Beratungspraxis machen wir jedoch immer wieder die Erfahrung, dass die Probleme vor allem bei den Auslandsvertretungen bestimmter Herkunftsstaaten liegen. So erklärt die Botschaft des Libanon beispielsweise regelmäßig in Fällen von Palästinensern aus dem Libanon, dass Identitätsdokumente erst dann ausgestellt würden, wenn die zuständige Ausländerbehörde schriftlich erkläre, dass dem betreffenden Ausländer ein Aufenthaltstitel erteilt werden soll. Wenn die Ausländerbehörde dies aber verweigert, ist es dem Ausländer nicht möglich, die Botschaft zu einer anderen Verhaltensweise zu zwingen. Gerade auf diese und ähnliche Fälle nimmt der vorgesehene § 60b überhaupt keine Rücksicht.«

      http://go.proasyl.de/nl/o56x/lyuqt.html?m=AMMAADYFCcwAAcVQ1_gAAGWo4wEAAAAAEhMAFqrwAAS0dQBctrCzTuXcNcsL

  • Aide d’urgence | Le défi des soins aux déboutés de l’asile. Soigner la personne et sa dignité
    https://asile.ch/2019/04/16/aide-durgence-le-defi-des-soins-aux-deboutes-de-lasile-soigner-la-personne-et-

    L’aide psychologique aux personnes migrantes repose à la fois sur la nécessité de soins, mais également de réinscription dans un monde de liens et de sens. La guerre, l’exil, la migration par les pertes et les changements qu’ils occasionnent affectent le bien-être des personnes qui doivent se reconstruire et donner un sens à leur existence. […]

    • #soins #santé #santé_mentale #déboutés #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Suisse #aide_d'urgence

      #Jean-Claude_Métraux, pédopsychiatre et cofondateur d’Appartenances, parle d’un triple deuil à surmonter : deuil de Soi (perte de celui que j’étais, que je voulais devenir), deuil de Toi (perte de mon environnement objets et personnes), deuil de sens (perte de mes appartenances). Si les ressources propres à l’individu et à son entourage sont essentielles à l’accomplissement de cette tâche, l’environnement social l’est également. Ainsi, les durcissements successifs de la loi sur l’asile dont la finalité est de rendre la Suisse moins attractive, de même que le discours ambiant à l’égard des demandeurs d’asile qui en découle, ont un impact énorme sur les possibilités de surmonter ces deuils. Précarité et exclusion sociale deviennent trop souvent les conséquences d’une telle politique. L’équilibre psychique déjà en pleine reconstruction est alors malheureusement très durement touché.

      On pourrait dire, et c’est souvent perçu de cette façon par les personnes qui le vivent, qu’il s’agit d’un modèle qui produit de la désaffiliation sociale. Le fait d’être mis hors du jeu social entraîne le sentiment que le droit d’exister est retiré.

      v. aussi
      Entre asile et renvoi, la femme qui ne tenait plus debout

      Nous sommes de plus en plus confrontés à des situations de #renvoi dans le cadre des accords de #Dublin. Les autorités, parfois l’opinion publique, semblent considérer que ces renvois ne devraient pas poser de problème. Nous constatons qu’ils peuvent répéter un #traumatisme et amener à des symptômes ou #troubles_psychiatriques graves chez des personnes pour qui, la plupart du temps, on ne retrouve pas d’antécédents psychiatriques. A travers une vignette clinique et dans un climat d’urgence et d’injonction à l’agir, nous avons voulu montrer l’importance de préserver une réflexion psychopathologique et d’éviter certains pièges contre-transférentiels. Ces questions, avant tout cliniques mais également éthiques, sont abordées à travers le travail en équipe dans un centre de crise à Genève.

      https://www.cairn.info/revue-psychotherapies-2016-3-page-173.htm?contenu=resume
      #renvois_Dublin

  • HELP! Palestinian in hungerstrike for 27 days is threatend of deportation with police escort on 09/04/2019!

    A true Palestinians hunt has been set up by Belgian authorities since the beginning of 2019. Dozens of Palestinians have been arrested and detained in closed centres since January.
    Most of them had introduced an asylum request and were staying in open centres for refugees. The Office des Etrangers (OE), the Belgian Immigration Office, sent them an interview notice and once there, gave them a “26quater annexe” (decision against a residence permit with an order to leave the territory (OQT). Then the OE immediately arrested and detained them in closed centers in order to deport them. Many of the Palestiniane refuse this decision and started a hunger strike.


    http://www.gettingthevoiceout.org/help-palestinian-in-hungerstrike-for-27-days-is-threatend-of-dep
    #renvois #expulsions #Espagne #renvois_Dublin #règlement_Dublin #inhumanité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_palestiniens #Belgique #grève_de_la_faim #détention_administrative #rétention #OQTF #résistance