• The strange case of Portugal’s returnees

    White settler returnees to Portugal in #1975, and the history of decolonization, can help us understand the complicated category of refugee.

    The year is 1975, and the footage comes from the Portuguese Red Cross. The ambivalence is there from the start. Who, or maybe what, are these people? The clip title calls them “returnees from Angola.” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wzd9_gh646U

    ) At Lisbon airport, they descend the gangway of a US-operated civil airplane called “Freedom.” Clothes, sunglasses, hairstyles, and sideburns: no doubt, these are the 1970s. The plane carries the inscription “holiday liner,” but these people are not on vacation. A man clings tight to his transistor radio, a prized possession brought from far away Luanda. Inside the terminal, hundreds of returnees stand in groups, sit on their luggage, or camp on the floor. White people, black people, brown people. Men, women, children, all ages. We see them filing paperwork, we see volunteers handing them sandwiches and donated clothes, we see a message board through which those who have lost track of their loved ones try to reunite. These people look like refugees (http://tracosdememoria.letras.ulisboa.pt/pt/arquivo/documentos-escritos/retornados-no-aeroporto-de-lisboa-1975). Or maybe they don’t?

    Returnees or retornados is the term commonly assigned to more than half-a-million people, the vast majority of them white settlers from Angola and Mozambique, most of whom arrived in Lisbon during the course of 1975, the year that these colonies acquired their independence from Portugal. The returnees often hastily fled the colonies they had called home because they disapproved of the one party, black majority state after independence, and resented the threat to their racial and social privilege; because they dreaded the generalized violence of civil war and the breakdown of basic infrastructures and services in the newly independent states; because they feared specific threats to their property, livelihood, and personal safety; or because their lifeworld was waning before their eyes as everyone else from their communities left in what often resembled a fit of collective panic.

    Challenged by this influx from the colonies at a time of extreme political instability and economic turmoil in Portugal, the authorities created the legal category of returnees for those migrants who held Portuguese citizenship and seemed unable to “integrate” by their own means into Portuguese society. Whoever qualified as a returnee before the law was entitled to the help of the newly created state agency, Institute for the Support of the Return of the Nationals (IARN). As the main character of an excellent 2011 novel by Dulce Maria Cardoso on the returnees states:

    In almost every answer there was one word we had never heard before, the I.A.R.N., the I.A.R.N., the I.A.R.N. The I.A.R.N. had paid our air fares, the I.A.R.N. would put us up in hotels, the I.A.R.N. would pay for the transport to the hotels, the I.A.R.N. would give us food, the I.A.R.N. would give us money, the I.A.R.N. would help us, the I.A.R.N. would advise us, the I.A.R.N. would give us further information. I had never heard a single word repeated so many times, the I.A.R.N. seemed to be more important and generous than God.

    The legal category “returnee” policed the access to this manna-from-welfare heaven, but the label also had a more symbolic dimension: calling those arriving from Angola and Mozambique “returnees” implied an orderly movement, and possibly a voluntary migration; it also suggested that they came back to a place where they naturally fit, to the core of a Portuguese nation that they had always been a part of. In this sense, the term was also meant to appeal to the solidarity of the resident population with the newcomers: in times of dire public finances, the government hoped to legitimize its considerable spending on behalf of these “brothers” from the nation’s (former) overseas territories.

    Many migrants, however, rebutted the label attached to them. While they were happy to receive the aid offered by state bureaucracies and NGOs like the Portuguese Red Cross, they insisted that they were refugees (refugiados), not returnees. One in three of them, as they pointed out, had been born in Africa. Far from returning to Portugal, they were coming for the first time, and often did not feel welcome there. Most felt that they had not freely decided to leave, that their departure had been chaotic, that they had had no choice but to give up their prosperous and happy lives in the tropics. (At the time, they never publicly reflected on the fact that theirs was the happiness of a settler minority, and that prosperity was premised on the exploitation of the colonized.) Many were convinced they would return to their homelands one day, and many of them proudly identified as “Angolans” or “Africans” rather than as Portuguese. All in all, they claimed that they had been forcibly uprooted, and that now they were discriminated against and living precariously in the receiving society—in short, that they shared the predicaments we typically associate with the condition of the refugee.

    Some of them wrote to the UNHCR, demanding the agency should help them as refugees. The UNHCR, however, declined. In 1976, High Commissioner Prince Aga Khan referred to the 1951 Refugee Convention, explaining that his mandate applied “only to persons outside the country of their nationality,” and that since “the repatriated individuals, in their majority, hold Portuguese nationality, [they] do not fall under my mandate.” The UNHCR thus supported the returnee label the Portuguese authorities had created, although high-ranking officials within the organization were in fact critical of this decision—in the transitory moment of decolonization, when the old imperial borders gave way to the new borders of African nation-states, it was not always easy to see who would count as a refugee even by the terms of the 1951 Convention.

    In short, the strange case of Portugal’s returnees—much like that of the pieds-noirs, French settlers “repatriated” from Algeria—points to the ambiguities of the “refugee.” In refugee studies and migration history, the term defines certain groups of people we study. In international law, the category bestows certain rights on specific individuals. As a claim-making concept, finally, “the refugee” is a tool that various actors—migrants, governments, international organizations, NGOs—use to voice demands and to mobilize, to justify their politics, or to interpret their experiences. What are we to make of this overlap? While practitioners of the refugee regime will have different priorities, I think that migration scholars should treat the “refugee” historically. We need to critically analyze who is using the term in which ways in any given situation. As an actor’s category, “refugee” is not an abstract concept detached from time and place, context, and motivations. Rather, it is historically specific, as its meanings change over time; it is relational, because it is defined against the backdrop of other terms and phenomena; and it is strategic, because it is supposed to do something for the people who use the term. The refugee concept is thus intrinsically political.

    Does analyzing “the refugee” as an actor’s category mean that we must abandon it as an analytical tool altogether? Certainly not. We should continue to research “refugees” as a historically contested category of people. While there will always be a tension between the normative and analytical dimensions, historicizing claims to being a “refugee” can actually strengthen the concept’s analytical purchase: it can complicate our understanding of forced migrations and open our eyes to the wide range of degrees of voluntariness or force involved in any migration decision. It can help us to think the state of being a refugee not as an absolute, but as a gradual, relational, and contextualized category. In the case of the returnees, and independently from what either the migrants or the Portuguese government or the UNHCR argued, such an approach will allow us to analyze the migrants as “privileged refugees.”

    Let me explain: For all the pressures that pushed some of them to leave their homes, for all the losses they endured, and for all the hardships that marked their integration into Portuguese society, the returnees, a privileged minority in a settler colony, also had a relatively privileged experience of (forced) migration and reintegration when colonialism ended. This becomes clear when comparing their experience to the roughly 20,000 Africans that, at the same time as the returnees, made it to Portugal but who, unlike them, were neither accepted as citizens nor entitled to comprehensive welfare—regardless of the fact that they had grown up being told that they were an integral part of a multi-continental Portuguese nation, and despite the fact that they were fleeing the same collapsing empire as the returnees were. Furthermore, we must bear in mind that in Angola and Mozambique, hundreds of thousands of Africans were forcibly displaced first by Portugal’s brutal colonial wars (1961-1974), then during the civil wars after independence (1975-2002 in Angola, 1977-1992 in Mozambique). Unlike the returnees, most of these forced migrants never had the opportunity to seek refuge in the safe haven of Portugal. Ultimately, the returnees’ experience can therefore only be fully understood when it is put into the broader context of these African refugee flows, induced as they were by the violent demise of settler colonialism in the process of decolonization.

    So, what were these people in the YouTube clip, then? Returnees? Or African refugees? I hope that by now you will agree that … well … it’s complicated.

    https://africasacountry.com/2020/12/the-strange-case-of-portugals-returnees

    #Portugal #colonialisme #catégorisation #réfugiés #asile #décolonisation #Angola #réfugiés_portugais #histoire #rapatriés #rapatriés_portugais #Mozambique #indépendance #nationalisme #retour_volontaire #discriminations #retour_forcé #retour #nationalité

    Et un nouveau mot pour la liste de @sinehebdo :
    #retornados
    #terminologie #vocabulaire #mots

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • « #Retour ». Banalité d’un mot, #brutalité d’une politique

    Au catalogue des euphémismes dont aiment à user les institutions européennes pour camoufler le caractère répressif de la politique migratoire, le terme « retour » figure en bonne place. En langage bureaucratique européen, « retour » veut dire « #expulsion ». Mais, alors qu’expulser une personne étrangère suppose l’intervention d’une autorité pour la contraindre à quitter le territoire où elle est considérée comme indésirable, l’utilisation du mot « retour » donne l’illusion que cette personne serait l’actrice de son départ. Preuve que le mot est inapproprié, le discours européen a été obligé de lui adjoindre un qualificatif pour distinguer ceux des retours qu’il considère comme imposés – il parle alors de « retours forcés » – de ceux qu’il prétend librement consentis, qu’il nomme, toujours abusivement, « retours volontaires ». Il ajoute ici le mensonge à l’euphémisme : dans la grande majorité des cas, les conditions dans lesquelles sont organisés les « retours volontaires » n’en font en réalité qu’un autre habillage de l’expulsion [1].

    C’est sur cette double fiction que s’est construite la directive européenne relative aux normes et procédures communes applicables dans les États membres au retour des ressortissants des pays tiers en séjour irrégulier, communément appelée directive « Retour », adoptée en 2008.

    Cette directive a clos un cycle normatif, constitué d’une dizaine de règlements et de directives, dont l’objet était de définir des règles communes dans les trois domaines censés asseoir la politique d’asile et d’immigration de l’Union européenne (UE), ainsi qu’il en avait été décidé au sommet européen de Tampere en 1999 : l’intégration des immigrés en situation régulière, la protection des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés, et la gestion des frontières pour lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière. Très vite, surtout après le 11 septembre 2001 qui a favorisé l’amalgame entre immigration irrégulière et terrorisme, il est clairement apparu que les États membres accordaient la priorité au dernier volet, en traitant la question migratoire sous un angle principalement sécuritaire, avec l’adoption d’une série de mesures qui s’articulent autour de deux objectifs : protéger les frontières et éloigner les indésirables.

    Dès 2001, une directive sur la « reconnaissance mutuelle des décisions d’éloignement » prises dans les différents États membres est adoptée pour faciliter l’expulsion d’un étranger par les autorités d’un autre pays que celui qui l’a ordonnée. En 2002, un « Programme d’action en matière de retour » est élaboré, qui vise à organiser « des retours efficaces, en temps voulu et durables » de plusieurs façons. Parmi celles-ci, figure la coopération opérationnelle entre États membres et avec les pays tiers concernés : il s’agit d’améliorer les outils de mesure, les statistiques et les échanges d’informations entre fonctionnaires et de rationaliser les procédures, les ressources humaines et les moyens matériels afin de faciliter les expulsions. Dans la foulée, l’agence Frontex est créée en 2004. Si, dans ses premières années d’existence, elle a surtout fait parler d’elle pour ses opérations de surveillance des frontières extérieures, notamment maritimes, dès l’origine, elle comptait parmi ses tâches celle de « fournir aux États membres l’appui nécessaire pour organiser des opérations de retour conjointes ».

    Mais un autre volet du « Programme d’action » de 2002 prévoit aussi l’élaboration de normes communes applicables au renvoi des étrangers. Il faudra attendre plusieurs années pour que ce projet se transforme en proposition, puis devienne la directive « Retour ».

    Officiellement, comme précisé dans la première proposition présentée par la Commission européenne en septembre 2005, celle-ci vise à « définir des règles communes claires, transparentes et équitables en matière de retour, d’éloignement, de recours à des mesures coercitives, de garde temporaire et de réadmission, qui prennent pleinement en compte le respect des droits de l’homme et des libertés fondamentales des intéressés [2] ». On relèvera que, bien qu’il s’agisse du principal objet de la directive, il n’est pas fait allusion à l’expulsion, ici appelée « retour » ou « éloignement », non plus qu’à l’enfermement, pourtant pierre angulaire de la mise en œuvre des expulsions : la Commission européenne préfère pudiquement parler de « droit de garde ». La fiction continue.

    Bien loin des principes proclamés (des règles communes transparentes et équitables, dans le respect des droits fondamentaux), la directive de 2008, qualifiée de « directive de la honte » par les associations qui l’ont combattue, consacre au contraire un nivellement par le bas des pratiques des différents États membres. C’est notamment le cas en matière de détention, autorisée jusqu’à 18 mois, mais également sur le plan des garanties procédurales. Au demeurant, l’usage des « mesures coercitives » au cours des expulsions entraîne régulièrement des dérives inquiétantes [3].

    Pour quel résultat ? Pour les observateurs qui en constatent chaque jour les conséquences sur les droits des personnes, dont ce numéro de Plein droit donne quelques illustrations, le bilan de la politique d’expulsion de l’UE est négatif. Au regard des objectifs qu’elle prétend atteindre (nombre d’« éloignements effectifs »), elle semble toujours très en-deçà des attentes. Dans son premier rapport d’évaluation de la directive, rendu public en 2014 [4], la Commission européenne révèle qu’elle a été saisie de « cas flagrants de détention dans des conditions inhumaines », reconnaissant par là que de graves violations des droits étaient commises et restaient impunies au niveau national. Pour autant, déplorant « l’écart considérable entre le nombre de personnes qui s’étaient vu notifier une décision de retour et celles qui avaient effectivement quitté l’UE » (environ le quart), elle n’en conclut pas moins à la nécessité de défendre et d’encourager la poursuite du dispositif, en proposant de « promouvoir des pratiques plus cohérentes et compatibles avec les droits fondamentaux ».

    Elle invite en particulier à un « recours proportionné à des mesures coercitives d’expulsion, des moyens de recours effectif, des garanties dans l’attente du retour, des conditions de rétention humaines et dignes, de même que la protection des personnes vulnérables ». Elle porte une attention particulière aux opérations de retour conjointes menées par l’agence Frontex, annonçant que chacune d’entre elles ferait l’objet de contrôles « indépendants ». Vœu pieux lorsque l’on sait les conditions dans lesquelles sont organisés ces charters d’expulsion [5].

    Si, dans son bilan de 2014, la Commission se félicite que la directive « Retour » ait « contribué à la convergence – et d’une manière générale à une réduction – des durées de rétention maximales dans l’ensemble de l’Union », ajoutant qu’elle constate « une tendance soutenue en faveur d’une plus large mise en œuvre de solutions alternatives à la rétention dans les États membres [6] », la réalité est tout autre. Les États membres, dont la France, continuent en réalité à recourir largement à la rétention en abusant de la marge d’appréciation dont ils disposent quant à la définition du risque de fuite (voir infra). Quant aux garanties procédurales, le Rapporteur spécial des Nations unies pour les droits de l’Homme des personnes migrantes, François Crépeau, s’alarmait déjà en 2013 du fait que le droit au recours effectif reste très fortement limité [7].
    « Frontières intelligentes » contre le « return shopping »

    Un an et demi plus tard, le contexte n’est plus le même. En pleine crise de l’accueil des personnes exilées en Europe, la Commission adopte, en septembre 2015, à l’invitation du Conseil européen, un « Plan d’action de l’UE en matière de retour » [8]. Le ton adopté par la Commission se durcit. Si le retour dit « volontaire » figure toujours comme une voie à privilégier, les conditions de sa mise en œuvre par les États membres doivent être révisées et harmonisées, afin d’éviter qu’elles ne constituent un facteur d’attraction vers les pays où elles sont plus favorables. La rétention doit en principe rester une mesure de dernier ressort mais elle ne doit pas pour autant cesser « tant qu’une perspective raisonnable d’éloignement existe ». Devront s’y ajouter d’autres projets mis sur la table des négociations par la Commission, tel le programme des « frontières intelligentes » de l’UE et la création d’un système d’entrée/sortie des ressortissants de pays tiers qui franchissent les frontières extérieures de l’Union.

    En mars 2017, les mesures proposées dans ce premier plan d’action font l’objet d’un bilan mitigé [9]. Selon la Commission, les taux de retour effectif restent faibles : de 41,8 % en 2014, il s’élève à 42,5 % en 2015. Le ton est alors donné : tous les instruments juridiques, opérationnels, financiers et pratiques disponibles devront être mis au service de la politique de retour.

    Un « Groupe de haut niveau » est créé afin d’étudier les possibilités d’interopérabilité de différents fichiers, existants et à venir, que les agents chargés de l’immigration et des frontières devront pouvoir consulter. Les législations nationales devront être adaptées afin que la décision du refus de séjour ou de rejet d’une demande d’asile, et l’obligation de quitter le territoire soient notifiées dans une seule et même décision, avec une durée de validité illimitée.

    Quant aux garanties procédurales, que la Commission semblait avoir à cœur de préserver lors de sa communication de mars 2014, elles passent au second plan, les États membres étant surtout invités à « éviter toute utilisation abusive des droits et des procédures ».

    Tout comme l’action déployée par l’UE à l’égard de pays tiers pour qu’ils s’engagent à accepter sur leur sol les personnes expulsées depuis l’un des États membres, la « dimension intérieure » de la politique de retour se dévoile dans ce qu’elle a de plus contraignant.

    Un an plus tard, encouragée par les conclusions du Conseil européen du 28 juin 2018 [10], la Commission passera à la vitesse encore supérieure en présentant, dès le 12 septembre, sa proposition de « refonte » de la directive « Retour » [11], identifiant en préambule les deux difficultés auxquelles se heurte toujours, selon elle, la politique de retour [12].

    La première tiendrait à l’insuffisant développement des accords de coopération avec les pays d’origine, alors pourtant qu’ils permettent d’accroître les retours ou les réadmissions dans ces pays au moyen « d’arrangements juridiquement non contraignants ». L’appel à recourir beaucoup plus largement à ce type d’accords irait de pair avec la nécessité « de renforcer le recours à la politique des visas de l’UE en tant qu’outil permettant de faire progresser la coopération avec les pays tiers en matière de retour et de réadmission ». La Commission escompte ainsi « améliorer sensiblement l’effet de levier de l’UE dans ses relations avec les pays d’origine ». On ne saurait mieux dire que la politique européenne des visas n’est pas seulement un moyen de contrôle migratoire à distance : les marchandages auxquels elle donne lieu peuvent aussi s’avérer payants pour assurer le retour de celles et ceux qui, au péril de leur vie, contournent les barrières administratives qu’elle leur oppose.

    La seconde difficulté, au cœur des préoccupations motivant la refonte de la directive, tient à trois obstacles que rencontreraient les États membres dans la mise en œuvre des décisions d’éloignement. D’une part, « des pratiques qui varient d’un État membre à l’autre » et notamment « l’absence de cohérence entre les définitions et interprétations du risque de fuite et du recours à la rétention », ces approches hétérogènes « donnant lieu à la fuite de migrants en situation irrégulière et à des mouvements secondaires » ; d’autre part, « le manque de coopération » de la part des personnes en instance d’éloignement. Enfin, le manque d’équipement des États membres, qui empêche les autorités compétentes « d’échanger rapidement les informations nécessaires en vue de procéder aux retours ».
    Dimension coercitive

    Pour lever ces difficultés, les efforts porteront plus particulièrement sur quatre dispositifs renforçant considérablement la dimension coercitive de la directive de 2008, dont trois sont entièrement nouveaux.

    Il s’agit d’abord de soumettre les personnes en instance d’éloignement à une « obligation de coopérer » à la procédure. La formule révèle les faux semblants du dispositif : la collaboration de ces personnes à leur propre expulsion ne sera obtenue que sous la menace d’un ensemble de sanctions dissuasives. Elles devront fournir toutes les informations et documents justifiant de leur identité, de leurs lieux de résidence antérieurs, ainsi que de leur itinéraire de voyage et pays de transit, et « rester présentes et disponibles » tout au long de la procédure d’éloignement. Tout manquement à ces obligations pourra caractériser le « refus de coopérer » d’où se déduira un « risque de fuite », avec les conséquences qui s’y attacheront ipso facto. Il s’agira d’abord de la privation du délai de départ « volontaire » qui assortit en principe les décisions d’éloignement. Surtout, ce risque de fuite ouvrira la voie à un placement en rétention que l’administration ne sera pas tenue de justifier plus avant. L’alternative à la maigre carotte du départ volontaire sera donc le gros bâton de l’enfermement.

    Assurer « un recours plus efficace à la rétention à l’appui de l’exécution des retours » (il faut comprendre : utiliser massivement la rétention) constitue précisément le deuxième moyen, pour la Commission, d’accroître significativement le nombre d’éloignements. C’est bien l’objectif vers lequel convergent toutes les modifications apportées à la directive de 2008 : caractère dorénavant non limitatif des motifs de placement en rétention énoncés dans la directive, élargissement des critères du risque de fuite justifiant la rétention, apparition d’un motif spécifique visant « les ressortissants qui constituent un danger pour l’ordre public, la sécurité publique ou la sécurité nationale », sorte de fourre-tout laissé à la discrétion des administrations. À quoi s’ajoute l’obligation faite aux États membres de prévoir une durée totale de rétention qui ne puisse être inférieure à 3 mois [13]. Cette évolution vers le « tout détention » est résumée dans la suppression d’un seul mot de l’exposé des motifs, révisé, de la directive : il n’est plus recommandé que le recours à la rétention soit « limité ». Il devra seulement rester « subordonné au respect du principe de proportionnalité en ce qui concerne les moyens utilisés et les objectifs poursuivis ».

    Manifestement convaincue par avance que ni la « coopération » des personnes, même contrainte, ni même un recours débridé à l’enfermement ne suffiront, la Commission œuvre également pour doter la politique de retour des technologies de surveillance de masse, en s’appuyant sur un double principe : garantir la traçabilité des personnes migrantes dans chaque État membre tout en élevant au niveau supranational l’architecture et la maîtrise des outils dédiés à leur contrôle. Chaque État membre devra créer un « système national de gestion des retours », autrement dit un fichier destiné à recueillir et traiter toutes les informations nominatives et personnelles « nécessaires à la mise en œuvre des dispositions de la directive ». Mais, au prétexte ambigu d’en « réduire de manière significative la charge administrative », ces systèmes nationaux devront être reliés non seulement au système d’information Schengen mais aussi à une « plateforme intégrée de gestion des retours » dont l’agence Frontex doit être dotée entre-temps. Si l’initiative des procédures d’éloignement reste une prérogative des États membres, l’Union apparaît bien décidée à en prendre la gestion en mains, quitte à s’affranchir des principes régissant la protection des données personnelles pourvu que l’efficacité de la politique de retour soit au rendez-vous.

    L’accroissement significatif, à partir de l’année 2015, du nombre d’exilé·es qui se sont présenté·es aux frontières de l’Union motive un troisième dispositif, emblématique de l’obsession qui inspire le projet de directive révisée. L’objectif est d’« établir une nouvelle procédure pour le retour rapide des demandeurs d’une protection internationale déboutés à la suite d’une procédure d’asile à la frontière ». Le mécanisme proposé pour l’atteindre est brutal : la personne qui a été maintenue contre son gré à la frontière pendant l’examen de sa demande d’asile doit, après en avoir été déboutée, y être retenue jusqu’à son éloignement effectif et pendant une période maximale de 4 mois. Et pour garantir la rapidité de cet éloignement, il est prévu qu’aucun délai de départ volontaire ne soit accordé, que le délai de recours contre la décision d’éloignement fondée sur le rejet de la demande de protection ne pourra pas excéder 48 heures et que ce recours ne sera suspensif que dans certaines hypothèses et sous certaines conditions. Dans le monde idéal de la Commission, les hotspots et autres dispositifs de tri installés aux frontières de l’Union ne sont pas seulement le point d’arrivée de tous les exilé·es en quête de protection : ils doivent être également le point de départ de l’immense majorité à laquelle cette protection est refusée.

    https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6434
    #renvois #expulsions #migrations #asile #réfugiés #déboutés #sans-papiers #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire #euphémisme #retour_forcé #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #Plein_Droit

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour

  • À Fukushima, l’entêtement du gouvernement à rouvrir la zone d’exclusion
    https://theconversation.com/a-fukushima-lentetement-du-gouvernement-a-rouvrir-la-zone-dexclusio

    La position de l’AIEA concernant le retour des populations à résider dans la zone n’est pas plus rationnelle. Elle fait preuve ici de contradictions manifestes : elle autorise le gouvernement à la réouverture de sites, dont le taux de contamination est égal ou en deçà de 20 msv/an, ce qui représente 20 fois la norme internationale fixée par… l’AIEA et les organismes associés.

    Le 8 juin, le préfet de Fukushima M. Uchibori a soutenu publiquement cette décision en spécifiant que la réouverture n’engendrait aucun problème tant que les habitants ne revenaient pas habiter dans ces zones – alors même que les réfugiés verront leurs subventions coupées, cette mesure les contraignant, pour une partie au retour.

    Dans la plus grande incohérence, les habitants sont donc contraints sous la pression des institutions nationales et internationales de gestion du nucléaire, à retourner vivre dans des territoires encore inhabitables selon les normes de sécurité fixées par ces mêmes institutions.

    Cette position est en outre singulièrement problématique, en ce qu’elle annihile tout filet protecteur public, tout en imposant la responsabilité de la gestion de l’accident aux citoyens. Les organisations dirigeantes nationales et internationales imposent à leurs administrés d’assumer les conséquences des diverses catastrophes, détournant ainsi la définition du contrat social, pourtant au fondement de nos systèmes démocratiques.

    Tant dans la gestion des désastres naturels qu’industriels, il apparaît que la protection des habitants par les pouvoirs publics n’apparaît plus ni comme une obligation, ni comme une priorité .

  • Entre expulsion et retour volontaire, la frontière est fine

    Une nouvelle sémantique s’est construite au sein de l’Union européenne : celle du « retour volontaire » des migrants irréguliers. Découvrez sur le blog « Dialogues économiques » l’analyse du politologue #Jean-Pierre_Cassarino, qui travaille depuis de longues années sur la #migration_de_retour et met en garde contre l’utilisation abusive du terme « #retour » dans le discours politique.

    À l’heure des fake news et des décodex, les mots prennent des tournures ambivalentes. Langue de bois et autres artefacts langagiers construisent, au-delà des mots, des murs. Des murs qui n’ont plus d’oreilles et brouillent notre compréhension. Derrière cet appel incessant au « retour », résonnent les mots de Patrick Chamoiseau : « Ils organisent le fait que l’on n’arrive jamais1 ».

    Contrôles aux frontières, centres de détention, identification par empreintes digitales ou encore quotas d’expulsions ont fleuri dans tous les pays européens. Ces dispositifs ont germé sur le terreau fertile des discours sur le « retour » des migrants, diffusés dans les États membres et au sein de l’Union européenne.

    Avec la première vague migratoire venue des Balkans, cette nouvelle terminologie s’est affirmée au cours des années 1990 au point de devenir hégémonique aujourd’hui. Basée sur la dichotomie entre « #retour_volontaire » et « #retour_forcé », elle a été accréditée par l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM). Elle prend corps dans divers mécanismes comme « l’#aide_au_retour_volontaire » en France qui propose aux migrants irréguliers de retourner dans leur pays moyennant #compensation_financière.

    À travers une multitude d’entretiens réalisés en Algérie, au Maroc et en Tunisie avec des migrants expulsés ou ayant décidé de rentrer de leur propre chef, Jean-Pierre Cassarino, enseignant au Collège d’Europe et titulaire de la Chaire « Études migratoires » à l’IMéRA (Marseille), en résidence à l’IMéRA et enseignant au Collège d’Europe (Varsovie) revient sur l’utilisation trompeuse de ces catégories.

    La #novlangue du retour forcé/retour volontaire

    Dans 1984, George Orwell construisait une véritable novlangue où toutes les nuances étaient supprimées au profit de dichotomies qui annihilent la réflexion sur la complexité d’une situation. C’est oui, c’est non ; c’est blanc, c’est noir ; c’est simple. Toute connotation péjorative est supprimée et remplacée par la négation des concepts positifs. Le « mauvais » devient « non-bon ». Dans le livre d’Orwell, cette pensée binaire nie la critique vis-à-vis de l’État et tue dans l’œuf tout débat.

    Aujourd’hui, les instances internationales et européennes produisent un #discours_dichotomique où le retour volontaire se distingue du retour forcé. En 2005, le Conseil de l’Europe, écrit dans ses « Vingt principes directeurs sur le retour forcé » : « Le retour volontaire est préférable au retour forcé et présente beaucoup moins de #risques d’atteintes aux #droits_de_l’homme. C’est pourquoi il est recommandé aux pays d’accueil de l’encourager, notamment en accordant aux personnes à éloigner un délai suffisant pour qu’elles se conforment de leur plein gré à la décision d’éloignement et quittent le territoire national, en leur offrant une #aide_matérielle telle que des #primes ou la prise en charge des frais de transport, en leur fournissant des informations détaillées dans une langue qui leur est compréhensible sur les programmes existants de retour volontaire, en particulier ceux de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM)2. »

    Pour Jean-Pierre Cassarino, la #coercition s’applique pourtant dans les deux cas. L’Allemagne par exemple, considère l’Afghanistan comme un pays sûr. Elle a signé un accord avec ce dernier pour le « retour » volontaire et forcé des Afghans en situation irrégulière. Mais « les migrants qui ont été expulsés d’#Allemagne ont été forcés d’accepter le retour volontaire », explique Jean-Pierre Cassarino. Un des interrogés afghans témoigne ainsi : « On m’a demandé de signer et j’étais en détention, je ne voulais plus rester enfermé, j’avais peur ». Dans ce cas, parler de « retour volontaire » affirme un aspect positif. C’est un mécanisme politique plus facilement accepté par le public.

    Pour l’OIM, le retour volontaire concerne la personne qui signe une #déclaration dans laquelle elle accepte de retourner dans son pays. Dans ce cas et en règle générale, on lui offre le billet de retour. À l’inverse, dans le cas du retour forcé, la personne est contrainte, par ordre de la préfecture, de quitter le territoire. Elle est souvent accompagnée d’une #escorte de #rapatriement qui est coûteuse pour le gouvernement. Le retour volontaire n’est pas qu’une question sémantique, c’est aussi une question financière. On estime entre 10 000 et 15 000 euros une #reconduite_forcée à la frontière contre 2 000 à 4 000 pour un retour volontaire3. Dans tous les cas, dans cette dichotomie, la décision individuelle du migrant compte de moins en moins.

    Que se cache-t-il derrière le mot retour ?

    Peut-on utiliser le même mot pour un #migrant_rapatrié dans un pays en guerre, pour celui qui est renvoyé parce qu’illicite et pour celui qui décide, de sa propre initiative, de revenir au pays ? Difficile de nier l’aspect pluriel du retour migratoire.

    Jean-Pierre Cassarino explique comment la terminologie du « retour » s’assimile à l’#expulsion, par #manipulation_politique. Il se réfère à Albert Camus. Dans L’homme révolté, Camus plaide pour la #clarté_terminologique, parce qu’il ne faut pas « pactiser avec la propagande ». « Si une personne est expulsée de son pays elle n’est pas ‘retournée’ au pays. Les chercheurs travaillent de fait sur l’expulsion quand ils parlent de retour. »

    « Éjecté volontaire » ou « déplacé poétique », écrit l’écrivain Patrick Chamoiseau pour faire contrepoids.

    Retour pour le développement ?

    L’ampleur qu’a pu prendre « le retour » dans les instances internationales repose aussi sur la promotion du #développement dans les pays d’origine. Jean-Pierre Cassarino et son équipe de chercheurs ont interrogé 700 migrants tunisiens de retour en questionnant l’influence de l’expérience migratoire sur l’#entreprenariat. En mars 2014, un partenariat avait été signé entre la Tunisie et l’Union européenne pour faciliter l’acquisition de #compétences aux jeunes Tunisiens afin de leur permettre, une fois rentrés, de « développer des activités économiques rentables ».

    Qu’en est-il dans les faits ? Les migrants qui se sont insérés facilement dans le marché du travail avaient achevé leur séjour migratoire par eux-mêmes en affirmant leur souhait de revenir au pays. Qu’ils aient fini leurs études, qu’ils veuillent créer leur entreprise ou qu’ils aient atteint leurs objectifs en France, tous ont pu réunir les opportunités, le temps et les ressources nécessaires pour construire un projet de retour. Ici le « retour volontaire » prend tout son sens. Jean-Pierre Cassarino parle de cycle migratoire « complet ».

    Mais tous les migrants n’ont pas eu cette chance. La décision relève parfois d’un choix par défaut. Une socialisation difficile, des problèmes familiaux ou la précarité peuvent pousser la personne à rentrer à contrecœur. Pire, l’expérience migratoire peut être brutalement interrompue par une obligation à quitter le territoire. Pour ces migrants qui ne peuvent achever leur cycle (qu’il soit incomplet ou interrompu), de sérieuses difficultés se présentent sur la route du retour. Ils ont beaucoup plus de mal à s’insérer dans le monde professionnel.

    En approchant le retour par la complétude des #cycles_migratoires, Jean Pierre Cassarino montre qu’il n’y a pas qu’une façon de revenir et que la durée du séjour a des conséquences sur le développement dans le pays d’origine. C’est un appel à repenser les usages politiques et sémantiques du « retour » ; à remettre en question des notions qui s’inscrivent dans les inconscients collectifs. C’est un rappel à ce que Václav Havel écrit dans Quelques mots sur la parole : « Et voilà justement de quelle manière diabolique les mots peuvent nous trahir, si nous ne faisons pas constamment preuve de prudence en les utilisant ».

    Références :
    – Cassarino, Jean-Pierre (2014) « A Reappraisal of the EU’s Expanding Readmission System », The International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs, 49:4, p. 130-145.
    – Cassarino, Jean-Pierre (2015) « Relire le lien entre migration de retour et entrepreneuriat, à la lumière de l’exemple tunisien », Méditerranée, n° 124, p. 67-72.

    https://lejournal.cnrs.fr/nos-blogs/dialogues-economiques-leco-a-portee-de-main/entre-expulsion-et-retour-volontaire-la
    #expulsion #retour_volontaire #mots #sémantique #vocabulaire #migrations #asile #réfugiés #dichotomie #prix #coût

    Autres mots, @sinehebdo ?
    #migration_de_retour
    #migrant_rapatrié
    « #éjecté_volontaire »
    « #déplacé_poétique »

    ping @_kg_ @karine4

  • Un tiers des rapatriements par Frontex provenait de la Belgique en 2019

    Environ un tiers de l’ensemble des rapatriements via Frontex provenait de Belgique.

    De tous les pays membres de l’Union européenne, la Belgique est celui qui a fait le plus appel l’an dernier au soutien de l’agence européenne de gardes-frontières et de gardes-côtes Frontex pour renvoyer dans leur pays d’origine des personnes en séjour illégal, ressort-il de chiffres livrés mercredi par le cabinet de la ministre en charge de l’Asile et de la Migration, Maggie De Block (Open Vld).

    Selon le cabinet de la ministre libérale flamande, en 2019, la Belgique a pu compter sur environ 2,5 millions d’euros de l’Union européenne pour les vols de 1.540 personnes qui devaient quitter le territoire. 233 ont été accompagnées jusqu’à leur pays d’origine et 1.279 ont pu monter à bord sans escorte. 28 sont parties volontairement. L’an dernier, Frontex a été utilisé dans le cadre du #retour_volontaire, tant en Belgique que dans l’Union européenne.

    Retour forcé, la clé de voûte

    « Le #retour_forcé reste la clé de voûte de notre politique de l’asile et de la migration ferme et humaine », a commenté Mme De Block dans ce contexte. Selon la ministre, en 2020, l’Office des Étrangers continue à miser de manière ciblée sur le retour forcé des #criminels_illégaux, des demandeurs d’asile déboutés et des #transmigrants. Il produira encore des efforts supplémentaires. Cette semaine, quarante places en centres fermés ont rouvert pour la détention de groupes cibles prioritaires, comme des criminels illégaux, des récidivistes causant des troubles et des illégaux en transit via la Belgique. Dans les centres fermés, leur expulsion continue à être préparée.

    Les quarante places avaient été libérées à la suite de la décision en décembre de la ministre De Block et de son collègue Pieter De Crem, ministre de l’Intérieur, d’"optimaliser l’approche de la transmigration". Pour les #illégaux_en_transit, 160 places restent prévues dans les centres fermés.

    En outre, la Belgique continue à miser sur des #accords avec les pays d’origine pour collaborer au retour. Ainsi, un accord de retour a été conclu en 2019 avec le Rwanda et des discussions sont en cours avec la Turquie (avec l’UE), l’Angola, le Kirghizistan, le Tadjikistan et le Vietnam (via le Benelux) et avec l’Algérie, le Niger et le Sénégal.

    https://www.levif.be/actualite/belgique/un-tiers-des-rapatriements-par-frontex-provenait-de-la-belgique-en-2019/article-news-1239993.html
    #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Frontex #Belgique #statistiques #chiffres #2019 #machine_à_expulser

    @sinehebdo
    Trois mots en plus ? ça foisonne dans cet article où le choix des mots est fort discutable...
    #criminels_illégaux #transmigrants #illégaux_en_transit
    #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire