• Nigerians returned from Europe face stigma and growing hardship

    ‘There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids.’

    The EU is doubling down on reducing migration from Africa, funding both voluntary return programmes for those stranded along migration routes before they reach Europe while also doing its best to increase the number of rejected asylum seekers it is deporting.

    The two approaches serve the same purpose for Brussels, but the amount of support provided by the EU and international aid groups for people to get back on their feet is radically different depending on whether they are voluntary returnees or deportees.

    For now, the coronavirus pandemic has slowed voluntary return programmes and significantly reduced the number of people being deported from EU countries, such as Germany. Once travel restrictions are lifted, however, the EU will likely resume its focus on both policies.

    The EU has made Nigeria one of five priority countries in Africa in its efforts to reduce the flow of migrants and asylum seekers. This has involved pouring hundreds of millions of euros into projects in Nigeria to address the “root causes” of migration and funding a “voluntary return” programme run by the UN’s migration agency, IOM.

    Since its launch in 2017, more than 80,000 people, including 16,800 Nigerians, have been repatriated to 23 African countries after getting stuck or having a change of heart while travelling along often-dangerous migration routes connecting sub-Saharan Africa to North Africa.

    Many of the Nigerians who have opted for IOM-facilitated repatriation were stuck in detention centres or exploitative labour situations in Libya. Over the same time period, around 8,400 Nigerians have been deported from Europe, according to official figures.

    Back in their home country, little distinction is made between voluntary returnees and deportees. Both are often socially stigmatised and rejected by their communities. Having a family member reach Europe and be able to send remittances back home is often a vital lifeline for people living in impoverished communities. Returning – regardless of how it happens – is seen as failure.

    In addition to stigmatisation, returnees face daily economic struggles, a situation that has only become worse with the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on Nigeria’s already struggling economy.

    Despite facing common challenges, deportees are largely left to their own devices, while voluntary returnees have access to an EU-funded support system that includes a small three-months salary, training opportunities, controversial “empowerment” and personal development sessions, and funds to help them start businesses – even if these programmes often don’t necessarily end up being effective.
    ‘It’s a well-oiled mechanism’

    Many of the voluntary returnee and deportation flights land in Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest city and main hub for international travel. On a hot and humid day in February, before countries imposed curfews and sealed their borders due to coronavirus, two of these flights arrived within several hours of each other at the city’s hulking airport.

    First, a group of about 45 people in winter clothes walked through the back gate of the cargo airport looking out of place and disoriented. Deportees told TNH they had been taken into immigration custody by German police the day before and forced onto a flight in Frankfurt. Officials from the Nigerian Immigration Service, the country’s border police, said they are usually told to prepare to receive deportees after the planes have already left from Europe.

    Out in the parking lot, a woman fainted under the hot sun. When she recovered, she said she was pregnant and didn’t know where she would sleep that night. A man began shouting angrily about how he had been treated in Europe, where he had lived for 16 years. Police officers soon arrived to disperse the deportees. Without money or phones, many didn’t know where to go or what to do.

    Several hours later, a plane carrying 116 voluntary returnees from Libya touched down at the airport’s commercial terminal. In a huge hangar, dozens of officials guided the returnees through an efficient, well-organised process.

    The voluntary returnees queued patiently to be screened by police, state health officials, and IOM personnel who diligently filled out forms. Officials from Nigeria’s anti-people trafficking agency also screened the female returnees to determine if they had fallen victim to an illegal network that has entrapped tens of thousands of Nigerian women in situations of forced sex work in Europe and in transit countries such as Libya and Niger.

    “It’s a well-oiled mechanism. Each agency knows its role,” Alexander Oturu, a programme manager at Nigeria’s National Commission for Refugees, Migrants & Internally Displaced Persons, which oversees the reception of returnees, told The New Humanitarian.

    Voluntary returnees are put up in a hotel for one night and then helped to travel back to their home regions or temporarily hosted in government shelters, and later they have access to IOM’s reintegration programming.

    Initially, there wasn’t enough funding for the programmes. But now almost 10,000 of the around 16,600 returnees have been able to access this support, out of which about 4,500 have set up small businesses – mostly shops and repair services – according to IOM programme coordinator Abrham Tamrat Desta.

    The main goal is to “address the push factors, so that upon returning, these people don’t face the same situation they fled from”, Desta said. “This is crucial, as our data show that 97 percent of returnees left for economic reasons.”
    COVID-19 making things worse

    Six hours drive south of Lagos is Benin City, the capital of Edo State.

    An overwhelming number of the people who set out for Europe come from this region. It is also where the majority of European migration-related funding ends up materialising, in the form of job creation programmes, awareness raising campaigns about the risks of irregular migration, and efforts to dismantle powerful trafficking networks.

    Progress* is one of the beneficiaries. When TNH met her she was full of smiles, but at 26 years old, she has already been through a lot. After being trafficked at 17 and forced into sex work in Libya, she had a child whose father later died in a shipwreck trying to reach Europe. Progress returned to Nigeria, but couldn’t escape the debt her traffickers expected her to pay. Seeing little choice, she left her child with her sister and returned to Libya.

    Multiple attempts to escape spiralling violence in the country ended in failure. Once, she was pulled out of the water by Libyan fishermen after nearly drowning. Almost 200 other people died in that wreck. On two other occasions, the boat she was in was intercepted and she was dragged back to shore by the EU-supported Libyan Coast Guard.

    After the second attempt, she registered for the IOM voluntary return programme. “I was hoping to get back home immediately, but Libyans put me in prison and obliged me to pay to be released and take the flight,” she said.

    Back in Benin City, she took part in a business training programme run by IOM. She couldn’t provide the paperwork needed to launch her business and finally found support from Pathfinders Justice Initiative – one of the many local NGOs that has benefited from EU funding in recent years.

    She eventually opened a hairdressing boutique, but coronavirus containment measures forced her to close up just as she was starting to build a regular clientele. Unable to provide for her son, now seven years old, she has been forced to send him back to live with her sister.

    Progress isn’t the only returnee struggling due to the impact of the pandemic. Mobility restrictions and the shuttering of non-essential activities – due to remain until early August at least – have “exacerbated returnees’ existing psychosocial vulnerabilities”, an IOM spokesperson said.

    The Edo State Task Force to Combat Human Trafficking, set up by the local government to coordinate prosecutions and welfare initiatives, is trying to ease the difficulties people are facing by distributing food items. As of early June, the task force said it had reached 1,000 of the more than 5,000 people who have returned to the state since 2017.
    ‘Sent here to die’

    Jennifer, 39, lives in an unfinished two-storey building also in Benin City. When TNH visited, her three-year-old son, Prince, stood paralysed and crying, and her six-year-old son, Emmanuel, ran and hid on the appartment’s small balcony. “It’s the German police,” Jennifer said. “The kids are afraid of white men now.”

    Jennifer, who preferred that only her first name is published, left Edo State in 1999. Like many others, she was lied to by traffickers, who tell young Nigerian women they will send them to Europe to get an education or find employment but who end up forcing them into sex work and debt bondage.

    It took a decade of being moved around Europe by trafficking rings before Jennifer was able to pay off her debt. She got a residency permit and settled down in Italy for a period of time. In 2016, jobless and looking to get away from an unstable relationship, she moved to Germany and applied for asylum.

    Her application was not accepted, but deportation proceedings against her were put on hold. That is until June 2019, when 15 policemen showed up at her apartment. “They told me I had five minutes to check on my things and took away my phone,” Jennifer said.

    The next day she was on a flight to Nigeria with Prince and Emmanuel. When they landed, “the Nigerian Immigration Service threw us out of the gate of the airport in Lagos, 20 years after my departure”. she said.

    Nine months after being deported, Jennifer is surviving on small donations coming from volunteers in Germany. It’s the only aid she has received. “There’s no job here, and even my family is ashamed to see me, coming back empty-handed with two kids,” she said.

    Jennifer, like other deportees TNH spoke to, was aware of the support system in place for people who return through IOM, but felt completely excluded from it. The deportation and lack of support has taken a heavy psychological toll, and Jennifer said she has contemplated suicide. “I was sent here to die,” she said.
    ‘The vicious circle of trafficking’

    Without a solid economic foundation, there’s always a risk that people will once again fall victim to traffickers or see no other choice but to leave on their own again in search of opportunity.

    “When support is absent or slow to materialise – and this has happened also for Libyan returnees – women have been pushed again in the hands of traffickers,” said Ruth Evon Odahosa, from the Pathfinders Justice Initiative.

    IOM said its mandate does not include deportees, and various Nigerian government agencies expressed frustration to TNH about the lack of European interest in the topic. “These deportations are implemented inhumanely,” said Margaret Ngozi Ukegbu, a zonal director for the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons.

    The German development agency, GIZ, which runs several migration-related programmes in Nigeria, said their programming does not distinguish between returnees and deportees, but the agency would not disclose figures on how many deportees had benefited from its services.

    Despite the amount of money being spent by the EU, voluntary returnees often struggle to get back on their feet. They have psychological needs stemming from their journeys that go unmet, and the businesses started with IOM seed money frequently aren’t sustainable in the long term.

    “It’s crucial that, upon returning home, migrants can get access to skills acquisition programmes, regardless of the way they returned, so that they can make a new start and avoid falling back in the vicious circle of trafficking,” Maria Grazie Giammarinaro, the former UN’s special rapporteur on trafficking in persons, told TNH.

    * Name changed at request of interviewee.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2020/07/28/Nigeria-migrants-return-Europe

    #stigmatisation #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #réfugiés_nigérians #réintegration #retour_volontaire #IOM #OIM #chiffres #statistiques #trafic_d'êtres_humains

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour @isskein @karine4

  • #IOM using #Facebook #advertisment to reach potential #return_migrants

    Mail received by a friend with Pakistani citizenship:

    “I am adding a screenshot of advertising on Facebook by German government which suggest me to ’ If I would like to return my home country and don’t know how then I can contact there’ Advertising is in Urdu which means they already know who they are showing this advertisement. This is interesting that they use my personal data and target me as a refugee I guess. [...]
    Screenshot is attached and the link where the advertisement leads is below.”

    https://www.online-antragsmodul.de/OAM/MIRA/Default.aspx

    #Germany #migration #return_migration #explusion #social_media #social_networks #data_privacy

    ping @cdb_77 @rhoumour @deka

    • Menschenrechtsverletzungen bei Rückkehrprogrammen

      Immer wieder gibt es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen bei den Rückkehrprogrammen der IOM. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international belegt die Vorwürfe.

      Die EU lagert seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setzt innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, damit Migrantinnen und Migranten erst gar nicht Europas Außengrenzen erreichen. Eine neue Studie von Brot für die Welt und medico international weist nach, dass die EU dabei Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in den Transitländern Libyen, Niger und Algerien in Kauf nimmt.

      Die EU-Kommission hatte 2015 den Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika aufgelegt. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM), ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm für Migrantinnen und Migranten durchzuführen.Tatsächlich aber gibt es immer wieder Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen.In ihrer Studie kann die Autorin Jill Alpes nun belegen, dass die Teilnahme an den Rückkehrprogrammen oftmals unfreiwillig erfolgt und teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie der Rückführung zustimmen.

      Zusammenfassung der Studie

      Eine neue von Brot für die Welt und medico international herausgegebene Studie untersuchtbestehende Rückkehrprogramme für Migrantinnen und Migranten in Libyen und Niger entlang der Frage: Sind die Programme tatsächlich geeignete Instrumente zum Schutz der Menschen? Oder werden sie nach ihrer Rückkehr neuen Gefahren ausgesetzt?

      Im November 2017 alarmierte ein Beitrag des Nachrichtensenders CNN die Öffentlichkeit. Die Reporter berichteten über sklavenähnliche und zutiefst menschenunwürdige Verhältnisse in libyschen Internierungslagern. Europäische und afrikanische Regierungen, die zur gleichen Zeit ihr Gipfeltreffen in Abidjan abhielten, sahen sich daraufhin gezwungen, geeignete Schritte zum Schutz und zur Rettung der internierten Migranten und Flüchtlinge zu präsentieren.

      Doch statt eine Evakuierung der Menschen in sichere europäische Länder zu organisieren oder in Erwägung zu ziehen, die Unterstützung der für Menschenrechtsverletzungen verantwortlichen libyschen Küstenwache zu beenden, wurde die Rückführung von Flüchtlingen und Migranten aus Libyen in ihre Herkunftsländer beschlossen. Eine gemeinsame Taskforce aus Europäischer Union, Afrikanischer Union und Vereinten Nationen beauftragte die Internationale Organisation für Migration (IOM) damit, ein humanitäres Rückkehrprogramm aus Libyen durchzuführen.

      Doch in ihrer Studie kann nun die Autorin Jill Alpes belegen, dass es bei der Umsetzung der Rückkehrprogramme teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien kommt. So legen Berichte von Betroffenen nahe, dass die Beteiligung an den Rückkehrprogrammen keineswegs immer freiwillig erfolgt, wie von IOM behauptet, sondern teils erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt wird, damit sie ihrer eigenen Rückführung zustimmen. Vielfach erscheint ihnen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland angesichts in Libyen drohender Folter und Gewalt als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als eine geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. In Niger akzeptierten interviewte Migrantinnen und Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch die algerischen Behörden. Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert, bzw. genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten.

      Auch die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen, für die u.a. über den EU Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) erhebliche finanzielle Mittel aufgewendet werden, bewertet die Autorin kritisch. Libyen allein hat seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen. Offizielle Zahlen bestätigen, dass nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhält. Viele scheitern bereits daran, die Kosten für den Transport zum Büro der IOM aufzubringen, um dort Unterstützung zu beantragen. Empfängerinnen und Empfänger von Reintegrationshilfen kritisieren, dass die angebotenen Hilfsmaßnahmen, bspw. Seminare zur Unternehmensgründung, häufig an ihrem eigentlichen Bedarf vorbeigingen und dem formulierten Ziel, nämlich nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln, nicht ausreichend gerecht werden würden.

      Um tatsächlich zum Schutz von Migrantinnen und Migranten in Nord- und Westafrika beizutragen, zeigt die Autorin politische Handlungsempfehlungen auf. Eine Neuausrichtung der Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik müsse sich orientieren an Schadensvermeidung und -verhinderung, Befähigung der Menschen, ihre Rechte einzufordern, Unterstützung der Entwicklung von Selbstschutzkapazitäten und bedarfsgerechter Hilfe.

      Konkret:

      Die Europäische Union und die EU-Mitgliedstaaten müssen die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen. Stattdessen sollten sie für proaktive Such- und Rettungsaktionen im zentralen Mittelmeer sorgen, Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren schaffen, die Rechte von Migrantinnen, Migranten und Flüchtlingen in der migrations-politischen Zusammenarbeit mit Libyen schützen und sich zu einer globalen Teilung der Verantwortung und zur Förderung regulärer Migrationswege verpflichten.
      Die derzeitige Abschiebepraxis von Staatsangehörigen aus Subsahara-Ländern von Algerien nach Niger stellt eine eklatante Verletzung des Völkerrechts dar und macht Migrantinnen und Migranten extrem verwundbar. Internationale Organisationen, die Europäische Union und die Regierung von Niger müssen eine entschlossene und öffentliche Haltung gegen diese Praktiken einnehmen und die potentiell negativen Auswirkungen der in Niger verfügbaren Rückkehrprogramme auf die Abschiebepraxis aus Algerien kritisch untersuchen.
      Rückkehrprogramme müssen den Rechten von Menschen, die vor oder während ihrer Migration intern vertrieben, gefoltert oder Opfer von Menschenhandel geworden sind, mehr Aufmerksamkeit schenken. Opfer von Menschenhandel und Folter sollten Zugang zu einem Asylverfahren oder einem Umsiedlungsmechanismus in ein Drittland als Alternative zur Rückkehr in die Herkunftsländer haben.
      Humanitäre Akteure (und ihre Geldgeber) sollten die Begünstigten von Programmen ausschließlich auf der Grundlage humanitärer Bedürfnisse definieren und sich nicht von Logiken des Migrationsmanagements beeinflussen lassen. Nur ein kleiner Teil der afrikanischen Migrationsbewegungen hat Europa zum Ziel. Der Entwicklungsbeitrag von Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrern ist dann am stärksten, wenn sich die Migrantinnen und Migranten freiwillig zu einer Rückkehr entschlossen haben.
      Gelder der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten nur dann für Rückkehr- und Reintegrationsprogramme verwendet werden, wenn eine positive Verbindung zu Entwicklung hergestellt werden kann. Die entwicklungspolitischen Auswirkungen der Reintegrationshilfe müssen untersucht und mit dem Nutzen und den Auswirkungen der Rücküberweisungen von Migrantinnen und Migranten verglichen werden.

      https://www.medico.de/menschenrechtsverletzungen-bei-rueckkehrprogrammen-17805

    • Paying for migrants to go back home: how the EU’s Voluntary Return scheme is failing the desperate

      By the time James boarded a flight from Libya to Nigeria at the end of 2018, he had survived a Mediterranean shipwreck, travelled through a half dozen African states, been shot and spent two years being abused and tortured in Libya’s brutal detention centres.

      In 2020, back home in Benin City, Edo State, James has been evicted from his house after failing to cover his rent and sleeps on the floor of his barbershop.

      He has been shunned by his family and friends for his failure to reach Europe.

      “There’s no happiness that you are back. No one seems to care about you [...]. You came back empty-handed,” he told Euronews.

      James was one of around 81,000 African migrants returned to their home nation with the aid of the UN’s International Organization for Migration (IOM) and paid for by the European Union, as part of the €357 million Joint Initiative. As well as a seat on a flight out of Libya and a number of other transit nations, migrants are also promised cash, support and counselling to allow them to reintegrate in their home countries once they return.

      But a Euronews investigation across seven African nations has revealed massive failings in the programme, considered to be the EU’s flagship response to stopping migrants trying to get to Europe.

      Dozens of migrants that have been through the programme told Euronews that once they returned, no support was forthcoming. Even those who did receive financial support - like James - said it was insufficient.

      Many are considering making a new break for Europe as soon as the chance arises.

      “I feel I don’t belong here,” James said. “If the opportunity comes, I’m taking it. I’m leaving the country.”

      Of the 81,000 migrants returned since 2017, almost 33,000 were flown back from Libya, many of whom have suffered detention, abuse and violence at the hands of people smugglers, militias and criminal gangs. Conditions are so bad in the north African country that the programme is called Voluntary Humanitarian Return (VHR), rather than the Assisted Voluntary Return (AVR) programme elsewhere in Africa.

      Mohi, 24, who spent three years in Libya, accepted the offer of a flight back home in 2019. But, once there, his reintegration package never materialised. “Nothing has been provided to us, they keep telling us tomorrow,” he told Euronews from north Darfur, Sudan.

      Mohi is not alone. IOM’s own statistics on returnees to Sudan reveal that only 766 out of over 2,600 have received economic support. It blames high rates of inflation and a shortage of both goods and cash in the market.

      But Kwaku Arhin-Sam, who evaluates development projects as director of the Friedensau Institute for Evaluation, estimates that half of the IOM reintegration programmes fail.

      “Most people are lost after a few days”, he said.
      Two-thirds of migrants don’t complete the reintegration programmes

      The IOM itself lowers this estimate even further: the UN agency told Euronews that so far only one-third of the migrants who have started reintegration assistance have completed the process. A spokesperson said that as the joint initiative is a voluntary process, “migrants can decide to pull out at any time, or not to join at all”.

      He said that reintegrating migrants once they return home goes far beyond the organisation’s mandate, and “requires strong leadership from national authorities”, as well as “active contributions at all levels of society”.

      Between May 2017 and February 2019, IOM had helped over 12,000 people return to Nigeria. Of them, 9,000 were “reachable” when they returned home, 5,000 received business training and 4,300 received “reintegration aid”. If access to counselling or health services is included, IOM Nigeria says, a total of 7,000 out of 12,000 returnees - or 58% - received reintegration support.

      But the number of people classified as having completed the reintegration assistance programme was just 1,289, and research by Jill Alpes, a migration expert and research associate at the Nijmegen Centre for Border Research, found that surveys to check the effectiveness of these packages were conducted with only 136 returnees.

      Meanwhile, a Harvard study on Nigerian returnees from Libya estimates that 61.3% of the respondents were not working after their return, and an additional 16.8% only worked for a short period of time, not long enough to generate a stable source of income. Upon return, the vast majority of returnees, 98.3%, were not in any form of regular education.

      The European Commissioner for home affairs, Ylva Johansson, admitted to Euronews that “this is one area where we need improvements.” Johansson said it was too early to say what those improvements might be but maintained the EU have a good relationship with the IOM.

      Sandrine, Rachel and Berline, from Cameroon, agreed to board an IOM flight from Misrata, Libya, to Yaounde, Cameroon’s capital in September 2018.

      In Libya, they say they suffered violence and sexual abuse and had already risked their lives in the attempt at crossing the Mediterranean. On that occasion, they were intercepted by the Libyan coastguard and sent back to Libya.

      Once back home, Berline and Rachel say they received no money or support from IOM. Sandrine was given around 900,000 cfa francs (€1,373.20) to pay for her children’s education and start a small business - but it didn’t last long.

      “I was selling chicken by the roadside in Yaounde, but the project didn’t go well and I left it,” she said.

      Sandrine, from Cameroon, recalled giving birth in a Tripoli detention centre to the sound of gunfire.

      All three said that they had no idea where they would sleep when they returned to Cameroon, and they had no money to even call their families to inform them of their journey.

      “We left the country, and when we came back we found the same situation, sometimes even worse. That’s why people decide to leave again,” Berline says.

      In November 2019, fewer than half of the 3,514 Cameroonian migrants who received some form of counselling from IOM were reported as “effectively integrated”.

      Seydou, a Malian returnee, received money from IOM to pay his rent for three months and the medical bills for his sick wife. He was also provided with business training and given a motorbike taxi.

      But in Mali he takes home around €15 per day, compared to the more than €1,300 he was able to send home when he was working illegally in Algeria, which financed the construction of a house for his brother in the village.

      He is currently trying to arrange a visa that would enable him to join another of his brothers in France.

      Seydou is one of the few lucky Malians, though. .Alpes’ forthcoming research, published by Brot für die Welt (the relief agency of the Protestant Churches in Germany) and Medico International, found that only 10% of migrants returned to Mali up to January 2019 had received any kind of support from IOM.

      IOM, meanwhile, claims that 14,879 Malians have begun the reintegration process - but the figure does not reveal how many people completed it.
      The stigma of return

      In some cases the money migrants receive is used to fund another attempt to reach Europe.

      In one case, a dozen people who had reached Europe and been sent home were discovered among the survivors of a 2019 shipwreck of a boat headed to the Canary Islands. “They had returned and they had decided to take the route again,” said Laura Lungarotti, IOM chief mission in Mauritania.

      Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the IOM, told Euronews that it could not prevent individuals from attempting to reach Europe again once they had been returned.

      “It is however in the hands of people to decide whether or not they migrate and in its different programme IOM doesn’t plan to prevent people from re-migrating”, she said.

      What is the IOM?

      From 2016, the IOM rebranded itself as the UN Migration Agency, and its budget has ballooned from US$242.2 million (€213 million) in 1998 to exceed US$2 billion (€1.7 billion) for the first time in the autumn of 2019 - an eightfold increase. Though not part of the UN, the IOM is now a “related organisation”, with a relationship similar to that of a private contractor.

      The EU and its member states collectively are the largest contributors to IOM’s budget, accounting for nearly half of its operational funding.

      IOM has been keen to highlight cases of when its voluntary return programme has been successful on its website, including that of Khadeejah Shaeban, a Sudanese returnee from Libya who was able to set up a tailoring shop.

      https://www.euronews.com/2020/06/19/paying-for-migrants-to-go-back-home-how-the-eu-s-voluntary-return-scheme-i

    • Abschottung statt Entwicklung

      Brot für die Welt und medico international kritisieren das EU-Programm zur Rückführung von Flüchtlingen in ihre Heimatländer und fordern eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik.

      Fünf Jahre nachdem die EU den EU-Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds (EUTF) in Afrika ins Leben rief, ziehen Brot für die Welt und medico international in einer aktuellen Studie eine kritische Zwischenbilanz. Im Zentrum der Untersuchung steht die 2016 mit Mitteln des EUTF ins Leben gerufene Gemeinsame Initiative der EU und der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) für den Schutz und die Wiedereingliederung von Migranten. Ziel des Programms war es insbesondere in Libyen gestrandeten Flüchtlingen eine Rückkehr in ihre Heimatländer zu ermöglichen.
      Insgesamt erfolgreich

      Das zuständige Auswärtige Amt bewertet die EU-IOM Initiative gegenüber dem SWR insgesamt als erfolgreich. Brot für die Welt und medico international kommen in ihrer aktuellen Studie aber zu einem anderen Ergebnis. Demnach ginge es bei der „freiwilligen Rückkehr“ vor allem darum, dass weniger Flüchtlinge und Migranten aus Afrika nach Europa kommen: „Migrationswege zu schließen und Menschen in ihre Herkunftsländer zurückzuschicken, lindert jedoch keine Not und hat daher nichts mit Entwicklungszusammenarbeit zu tun. Häufig werden hierdurch sogar neue und größere Probleme für die betroffenen Menschen und Gesellschaften geschaffen, wie die Studie von Jill Alpes zeigt“, erklärt medico international gegenüber dem SWR.

      Drei Monate lang suchte die Migrations-Expertin Jill Alpes im Niger, Nigeria und Mali nach Rückkehrern. Sie sprach auch mit den Vertretern der Hilfsorganisationen und den Verantwortlichen der IOM. Sie traf viele Zurückgekehrte, die bereits mehrfach einen Fluchtversuch unternommen hatten. „Von den Männern wollen die meisten eigentlich wieder raus,“ beschrieb Alpes gegenüber dem SWR die Situation vor Ort. Ihre Perspektive im Heimatland habe sich meist nicht verbessert, sondern verschlimmert, denn viele hätten Schulden aufgenommen, um die gefährliche Flucht anzutreten oder würden nach der Rückkehr stigmatisiert.

      „Während der Feldforschung war es so, dass auch die IOM Schwierigkeiten hatte, mit den Menschen, die sie bei der Rückkehr unterstützt hatte, wieder Kontakt aufzunehmen – kann sein, dass viele von ihnen wieder losgezogen sind.“ Für die meisten von Alpes befragten Betroffenen stelle sich die Notfallrückführung de facto als Abschiebung dar.

      Im Falle der „Rückkehr“ aus Algerien hatten einige Betroffene offenbar sogar bereits einen Flüchtlingsstatus oder hätten aufgrund ihrer Staatsangehörigkeit nicht aus Algerien ausgewiesen werden dürften.
      Ergebnisse der Studie

      Brot für die Welt kommentiert die Ergebnisse der Studie: „Die EU nimmt Menschenrechtsverletzungen in Kauf, insbesondere an den Außengrenzen Europas und den Transitländern wie Libyen, Niger und Algerien sind die Zustände eklatant.“

      Medico international kritisiert zudem, dass mit dem Nothilfe-Treuhandfonds für Afrika „Mittel der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit eingeflossen sind, um so genannte irreguläre Migration zu unterbinden“.

      SWR Recherchen zeigen: Über den EU-Haushalt fließen Entwicklungsmittelgelder in die umstrittene Mission. Von den insgesamt 5 Milliarden Euro des Treuhandfond kommt mit 4.4 Milliarden der größte Anteil aus der Europäischen Entwicklungshilfe (EDF). Aus den Protokollen der Board Meetings des EUTF geht hervor, dass Deutschland darauf drängt, die Gelder vor allem im Bereich „Migrationsmanagement“ einzusetzen. „Hierbei geht es eher darum, innenpolitisch Handlungsfähigkeit zu beweisen – auf Kosten der Betroffenen. Eine Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, der es um Menschenrechte und die Bekämpfung von Armut geht, darf sich dafür nicht vereinnahmen lassen,“ kritisiert medico international.

      Brot für die Welt fordert darum einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der Europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik: „Im Vordergrund müssen die Rechte der Migrant*innen und deren Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen. Um tatsächlich zum Schutz beizutragen, müssen die Europäischen Mitgliedstaaten die Finanzierung der libyschen Küstenwache einstellen und für eine proaktive Such – und Rettungsaktion, vorhersehbare Ausschiffungs- und faire Verteilungsmechanismen sowie besseren Zugang zu Asylverfahren sorgen.“

      Die Bundesregierung setzt sich dagegen für eine Fortführung der Gemeinsamen Initiative ein, heißt es aus dem Auswärtigen Amt. Die Finanzierung ist aktuell Gegenstand der noch laufenden Verhandlungen zum mehrjährigen EU-Finanzrahmen.

      Die Studie liegt bisher dem SWR exklusiv vor.

      https://www.swr.de/report/swr-recherche-unit/studie-zur-eu-fluechtlingspolitik/-/id=24766532/did=25311586/nid=24766532/1rbvj1t/index.html

    • Studie: Rückkehrprogramme für Migranten verstoßen oft gegen Menschenrechte

      Die Teilnahme sei oft unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher Druck ausgeübt, kritisieren „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Die EU, die auf solche Programme setze, nehme das in Kauf.

      Bei Rückkehrprogrammen für Migranten nimmt die EU schwere Menschenrechtsverletzungen an den Außengrenzen und in Transitländern in Kauf. Zu diesem Fazit kommt eine Studie von „Brot für die Welt“ und „Medico International“. Immer wieder gebe es Berichte über eklatante Verstöße gegen die humanitären Bedingungen, erklärten die beiden Organisationen. Die neue Studie belege diese Vorwürfe: Die Teilnahme an solchen Programmen erfolge oftmals unfreiwillig, teils werde erheblicher psychischer und in Einzelfällen auch physischer Druck auf die Migrantinnen und Migranten ausgeübt.

      Die EU lagere seit Jahren Grenzkontrollen aus und setze innerhalb von Herkunfts- und Transitregionen auf die Förderung „freiwilliger“ Rückkehr, erklärten die Entwicklungsorganisationen. Bei der Umsetzung von Rückkehrprogrammen komme es jedoch teilweise zu erheblichen Verstößen gegen humanitäre und menschenrechtliche Prinzipien. So sei etwa die Beteiligung keineswegs immer freiwillig - anders als von der Internationalen Organisation für Migration (IOM) behauptet, die von der EU für ein humanitäres Rückführprogramm aus Libyen beauftragt worden sei.

      Für die Studie befragte Autorin Jill Alpes den Angaben zufolge Rückkehrer aus Libyen sowie Migranten in Niger und Mali, weiter sprach sie mit Vertretern von IOM, Nichtregierungsorganisationen, nationalen staatlichen Institutionen, EU, UNHCR und europäischen Entwicklungsagenturen.

      Vielfach erscheine den Menschen angesichts drohender Folter und Gewalt in Libyen eine Rückkehr in ihr Herkunftsland letztlich als das kleinere Übel, nicht jedoch als geeignete Maßnahme, um tatsächlich in Sicherheit und Schutz zu leben. Im Niger hätten interviewte Migranten ihre Rückführung nach schweren Menschenrechtsverletzungen und einer lebensbedrohlichen Abschiebung in die Wüste durch algerische Behörden akzeptiert. „Häufig finden sich Migrantinnen und Migranten nach ihrer Rückführung mit neuen Gefahren konfrontiert beziehungsweise genau jenen Gefahren wieder ausgesetzt, die sie einst zur Flucht bewegten“, betonen die Entwicklungsorganisationen.

      Die zur Verfügung gestellten Reintegrationshilfen bewertet Studienautorin Alpes ebenfalls kritisch: Libyen allein habe seit 2015 mehr als 280 Millionen Euro für die Rückkehrprogramme bekommen, nur ein Teil der Rückkehrerinnen und Rückkehrer habe aber überhaupt Zugang zu den Programmen erhalten. Von den Empfängern hätten viele bemängelt, dass die Hilfen am Bedarf vorbeigingen und nicht das Ziel erfüllten, nachhaltige Lebensperspektiven zu entwickeln.

      „Wir fordern einen grundlegenden Kurswechsel und eine Neuausrichtung in der europäischen Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik“, erklärte Katherine Braun, Referentin für Migration und Entwicklung bei „Brot für die Welt“. Im Vordergrund müssten die Rechte der Migrantinnen und Migranten und der Schutz vor Ausbeutung und Folter stehen.

      https://www.sueddeutsche.de/politik/fluechtlinge-rueckkehr-studie-1.4961909

  • EU: Damning draft report on the implementation of the Return Directive

    Tineke Strik, the Green MEP responsible for overseeing the passage through the European Parliament of the ’recast Return Directive’, which governs certain common procedures regarding the detention and expulsion of non-EU nationals, has prepared a report on the implementation of the original 2008 Return Directive. It criticises the Commission’s emphasis, since 2017, on punitive enforcement measures, at the expense of alternatives that have not been fully explored or implemented by the Commission or the member states, despite the 2008 legislation providing for them.

    See: DRAFT REPORT on the implementation of the Return Directive (2019/2208(INI)): https://www.statewatch.org/media/documents/news/2020/jun/ep-libe-returns-directive-implementation-draft-rep-9-6-20.pdf

    From the explanatory statement:

    “This Report, highlighting several gaps in the implementation of the Return Directive, is not intended to substitute the still overdue fully-fledged implementation assessment of the Commission. It calls on Member States to ensure compliance with the Return Directive and on the Commission to ensure timely and proper monitoring and support for its implementation, and to enforce compliance if necessary.

    (...)

    With a view to the dual objective of the Return Directive, notably promoting effective returns and ensuring that returns comply with fundamental rights and procedural safeguards, this Report shows that the Directive allows for and supports effective returns, but that most factors impeding effective return are absent in the current discourse, as the effectiveness is mainly stressed and understood as return rate.”

    Parliamentary procedure page: Implementation report on the Return Directive (European Parliament, link: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2019/2208(INI)&l=en)

    https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-damning-draft-report-on-the-implementation-of-the-return-directive
    #Directive_Retour #EU #Europe #Union_européenne #asile #migrations #réfugiés #renvois #expulsions #rétention #détention_administrative #évaluation #identification #efficacité #2008_Return_Directive #régimes_parallèles #retour_volontaire #déboutés #sans-papiers #permis_de_résidence #régularisation #proportionnalité #principe_de_proportionnalité #AVR_programmes #AVR #interdiction_d'entrée_sur_le_territoire #externalisation #Gambie #Bangladesh #Turquie #Ethiopie #Afghanistan #Guinée #Côte_d'Ivoire #droits_humains #Tineke_Strik #risque_de_fuite #fuite #accord #réadmission

    –—

    Quelques passages intéressants tirés du rapport:

    The study shows that Member States make use of the possibility offered in Article 2(2)(a) not to apply the Directive in “border cases”, by creating parallel regimes, where procedures falling outside the scope of the Directive offer less safeguards compared to the regular return procedure, for instance no voluntary return term, no suspensive effect of an appeal and less restrictions on the length of detention. This lower level of protection gives serious reasons for concern, as the fact that border situations may remain outside the scope of the Directive also enhances the risks of push backs and refoulement. (...) Your Rapporteur considers that it is key to ensure a proper assessment of the risk of refoulement prior to the issuance of a return decision. This already takes place in Sweden and France. Although unaccompanied minors are rarely returned, most Member States do not officially ban their return. Their being subject to a return procedure adds vulnerability to their situation, due to the lack of safeguards and legal certainty.

    (p.4)
    #frontières #zones_frontalières #push-backs #refoulement

    Sur les #statistiques et #chiffres de #Eurostat:

    According to Eurostat, Member States issued over 490.000 return decisions in 2019, of which 85% were issued by the ten Member States under the current study. These figures are less reliable then they seem, due to the divergent practices. In some Member States, migrants are issued with a return decision more than once, children are not issued a decision separately, and refusals at the border are excluded.

    Statistics on the percentage of departure being voluntary show significant varieties between the Member States: from 96% in Poland to 7% in Spain and Italy. Germany and the Netherlands have reported not being able to collect data of non-assisted voluntary returns, which is remarkable in the light of the information provided by other Member States. According to Frontex, almost half of the departures are voluntary.

    (p.5)

    As Article 7(4) is often applied in an automatic way, and as the voluntary departure period is often insufficient to organise the departure, many returnees are automatically subject to an entry ban. Due to the different interpretations of a risk of absconding, the scope of the mandatory imposition of an entry ban may vary considerably between the countries. The legislation and practice in Belgium, Bulgaria, France, the Netherlands and Sweden provides for an automatic entry ban if the term for voluntary departure was not granted or respected by the returnee and in other cases, the imposition is optional. In Germany, Spain, Italy, Poland and Bulgaria however, legislation or practice provides for an automatic imposition of entry bans in all cases, including cases in which the returnee has left during the voluntary departure period. Also in the Netherlands, migrants with a voluntary departure term can be issued with an entry ban before the term is expired. This raises questions on the purpose and effectiveness of imposing an entry ban, as it can have a discouraging effect if imposed at an early stage. Why leave the territory in time on a voluntary basis if that is not rewarded with the possibility to re-enter? This approach is also at odds with the administrative and non-punitive approach taken in the Directive.

    (p.6)

    National legislation transposing the definition of “risk of absconding” significantly differs, and while several Member States have long lists of criteria which justify finding a risk of absconding (Belgium has 11, France 8, Germany 7, The Netherlands 19), other Member States (Bulgaria, Greece, Poland) do not enumerate the criteria in an exhaustive manner. A broad legal basis for detention allows detention to be imposed in a systematic manner, while individual circumstances are marginally assessed. National practices highlighted in this context also confirm previous studies that most returns take place in the first few weeks and that longer detention hardly has an added value.

    (p.6)

    In its 2016 Communication on establishing a new Partnership Framework with third countries under the European Agenda on Migration, the Commission recognised that cooperation with third countries is essential in ensuring effective and sustainable returns. Since the adoption of this Communication, several informal arrangements have been concluded with third countries, including Gambia, Bangladesh, Turkey, Ethiopia, Afghanistan, Guinea and Ivory Coast. The Rapporteur regrets that such informal deals are concluded in the complete absence of duly parliamentary scrutiny and democratic and judicial oversight that according to the Treaties the conclusion of formal readmission agreements would warrant.

    (p.7)

    With the informalisation of cooperation with third countries in the field of migration, including with transit countries, also came an increased emphasis on conditionality in terms of return and readmission. The Rapporteur is concerned that funding earmarked for development cooperation is increasingly being redirected away from development and poverty eradication goals.

    (p.7)
    #développement #aide_au_développement #conditionnalité_de_l'aide

    ping @_kg_ @isskein @i_s_ @karine4 @rhoumour

  • « #Retour ». Banalité d’un mot, #brutalité d’une politique

    Au catalogue des euphémismes dont aiment à user les institutions européennes pour camoufler le caractère répressif de la politique migratoire, le terme « retour » figure en bonne place. En langage bureaucratique européen, « retour » veut dire « #expulsion ». Mais, alors qu’expulser une personne étrangère suppose l’intervention d’une autorité pour la contraindre à quitter le territoire où elle est considérée comme indésirable, l’utilisation du mot « retour » donne l’illusion que cette personne serait l’actrice de son départ. Preuve que le mot est inapproprié, le discours européen a été obligé de lui adjoindre un qualificatif pour distinguer ceux des retours qu’il considère comme imposés – il parle alors de « retours forcés » – de ceux qu’il prétend librement consentis, qu’il nomme, toujours abusivement, « retours volontaires ». Il ajoute ici le mensonge à l’euphémisme : dans la grande majorité des cas, les conditions dans lesquelles sont organisés les « retours volontaires » n’en font en réalité qu’un autre habillage de l’expulsion [1].

    C’est sur cette double fiction que s’est construite la directive européenne relative aux normes et procédures communes applicables dans les États membres au retour des ressortissants des pays tiers en séjour irrégulier, communément appelée directive « Retour », adoptée en 2008.

    Cette directive a clos un cycle normatif, constitué d’une dizaine de règlements et de directives, dont l’objet était de définir des règles communes dans les trois domaines censés asseoir la politique d’asile et d’immigration de l’Union européenne (UE), ainsi qu’il en avait été décidé au sommet européen de Tampere en 1999 : l’intégration des immigrés en situation régulière, la protection des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés, et la gestion des frontières pour lutter contre l’immigration irrégulière. Très vite, surtout après le 11 septembre 2001 qui a favorisé l’amalgame entre immigration irrégulière et terrorisme, il est clairement apparu que les États membres accordaient la priorité au dernier volet, en traitant la question migratoire sous un angle principalement sécuritaire, avec l’adoption d’une série de mesures qui s’articulent autour de deux objectifs : protéger les frontières et éloigner les indésirables.

    Dès 2001, une directive sur la « reconnaissance mutuelle des décisions d’éloignement » prises dans les différents États membres est adoptée pour faciliter l’expulsion d’un étranger par les autorités d’un autre pays que celui qui l’a ordonnée. En 2002, un « Programme d’action en matière de retour » est élaboré, qui vise à organiser « des retours efficaces, en temps voulu et durables » de plusieurs façons. Parmi celles-ci, figure la coopération opérationnelle entre États membres et avec les pays tiers concernés : il s’agit d’améliorer les outils de mesure, les statistiques et les échanges d’informations entre fonctionnaires et de rationaliser les procédures, les ressources humaines et les moyens matériels afin de faciliter les expulsions. Dans la foulée, l’agence Frontex est créée en 2004. Si, dans ses premières années d’existence, elle a surtout fait parler d’elle pour ses opérations de surveillance des frontières extérieures, notamment maritimes, dès l’origine, elle comptait parmi ses tâches celle de « fournir aux États membres l’appui nécessaire pour organiser des opérations de retour conjointes ».

    Mais un autre volet du « Programme d’action » de 2002 prévoit aussi l’élaboration de normes communes applicables au renvoi des étrangers. Il faudra attendre plusieurs années pour que ce projet se transforme en proposition, puis devienne la directive « Retour ».

    Officiellement, comme précisé dans la première proposition présentée par la Commission européenne en septembre 2005, celle-ci vise à « définir des règles communes claires, transparentes et équitables en matière de retour, d’éloignement, de recours à des mesures coercitives, de garde temporaire et de réadmission, qui prennent pleinement en compte le respect des droits de l’homme et des libertés fondamentales des intéressés [2] ». On relèvera que, bien qu’il s’agisse du principal objet de la directive, il n’est pas fait allusion à l’expulsion, ici appelée « retour » ou « éloignement », non plus qu’à l’enfermement, pourtant pierre angulaire de la mise en œuvre des expulsions : la Commission européenne préfère pudiquement parler de « droit de garde ». La fiction continue.

    Bien loin des principes proclamés (des règles communes transparentes et équitables, dans le respect des droits fondamentaux), la directive de 2008, qualifiée de « directive de la honte » par les associations qui l’ont combattue, consacre au contraire un nivellement par le bas des pratiques des différents États membres. C’est notamment le cas en matière de détention, autorisée jusqu’à 18 mois, mais également sur le plan des garanties procédurales. Au demeurant, l’usage des « mesures coercitives » au cours des expulsions entraîne régulièrement des dérives inquiétantes [3].

    Pour quel résultat ? Pour les observateurs qui en constatent chaque jour les conséquences sur les droits des personnes, dont ce numéro de Plein droit donne quelques illustrations, le bilan de la politique d’expulsion de l’UE est négatif. Au regard des objectifs qu’elle prétend atteindre (nombre d’« éloignements effectifs »), elle semble toujours très en-deçà des attentes. Dans son premier rapport d’évaluation de la directive, rendu public en 2014 [4], la Commission européenne révèle qu’elle a été saisie de « cas flagrants de détention dans des conditions inhumaines », reconnaissant par là que de graves violations des droits étaient commises et restaient impunies au niveau national. Pour autant, déplorant « l’écart considérable entre le nombre de personnes qui s’étaient vu notifier une décision de retour et celles qui avaient effectivement quitté l’UE » (environ le quart), elle n’en conclut pas moins à la nécessité de défendre et d’encourager la poursuite du dispositif, en proposant de « promouvoir des pratiques plus cohérentes et compatibles avec les droits fondamentaux ».

    Elle invite en particulier à un « recours proportionné à des mesures coercitives d’expulsion, des moyens de recours effectif, des garanties dans l’attente du retour, des conditions de rétention humaines et dignes, de même que la protection des personnes vulnérables ». Elle porte une attention particulière aux opérations de retour conjointes menées par l’agence Frontex, annonçant que chacune d’entre elles ferait l’objet de contrôles « indépendants ». Vœu pieux lorsque l’on sait les conditions dans lesquelles sont organisés ces charters d’expulsion [5].

    Si, dans son bilan de 2014, la Commission se félicite que la directive « Retour » ait « contribué à la convergence – et d’une manière générale à une réduction – des durées de rétention maximales dans l’ensemble de l’Union », ajoutant qu’elle constate « une tendance soutenue en faveur d’une plus large mise en œuvre de solutions alternatives à la rétention dans les États membres [6] », la réalité est tout autre. Les États membres, dont la France, continuent en réalité à recourir largement à la rétention en abusant de la marge d’appréciation dont ils disposent quant à la définition du risque de fuite (voir infra). Quant aux garanties procédurales, le Rapporteur spécial des Nations unies pour les droits de l’Homme des personnes migrantes, François Crépeau, s’alarmait déjà en 2013 du fait que le droit au recours effectif reste très fortement limité [7].
    « Frontières intelligentes » contre le « return shopping »

    Un an et demi plus tard, le contexte n’est plus le même. En pleine crise de l’accueil des personnes exilées en Europe, la Commission adopte, en septembre 2015, à l’invitation du Conseil européen, un « Plan d’action de l’UE en matière de retour » [8]. Le ton adopté par la Commission se durcit. Si le retour dit « volontaire » figure toujours comme une voie à privilégier, les conditions de sa mise en œuvre par les États membres doivent être révisées et harmonisées, afin d’éviter qu’elles ne constituent un facteur d’attraction vers les pays où elles sont plus favorables. La rétention doit en principe rester une mesure de dernier ressort mais elle ne doit pas pour autant cesser « tant qu’une perspective raisonnable d’éloignement existe ». Devront s’y ajouter d’autres projets mis sur la table des négociations par la Commission, tel le programme des « frontières intelligentes » de l’UE et la création d’un système d’entrée/sortie des ressortissants de pays tiers qui franchissent les frontières extérieures de l’Union.

    En mars 2017, les mesures proposées dans ce premier plan d’action font l’objet d’un bilan mitigé [9]. Selon la Commission, les taux de retour effectif restent faibles : de 41,8 % en 2014, il s’élève à 42,5 % en 2015. Le ton est alors donné : tous les instruments juridiques, opérationnels, financiers et pratiques disponibles devront être mis au service de la politique de retour.

    Un « Groupe de haut niveau » est créé afin d’étudier les possibilités d’interopérabilité de différents fichiers, existants et à venir, que les agents chargés de l’immigration et des frontières devront pouvoir consulter. Les législations nationales devront être adaptées afin que la décision du refus de séjour ou de rejet d’une demande d’asile, et l’obligation de quitter le territoire soient notifiées dans une seule et même décision, avec une durée de validité illimitée.

    Quant aux garanties procédurales, que la Commission semblait avoir à cœur de préserver lors de sa communication de mars 2014, elles passent au second plan, les États membres étant surtout invités à « éviter toute utilisation abusive des droits et des procédures ».

    Tout comme l’action déployée par l’UE à l’égard de pays tiers pour qu’ils s’engagent à accepter sur leur sol les personnes expulsées depuis l’un des États membres, la « dimension intérieure » de la politique de retour se dévoile dans ce qu’elle a de plus contraignant.

    Un an plus tard, encouragée par les conclusions du Conseil européen du 28 juin 2018 [10], la Commission passera à la vitesse encore supérieure en présentant, dès le 12 septembre, sa proposition de « refonte » de la directive « Retour » [11], identifiant en préambule les deux difficultés auxquelles se heurte toujours, selon elle, la politique de retour [12].

    La première tiendrait à l’insuffisant développement des accords de coopération avec les pays d’origine, alors pourtant qu’ils permettent d’accroître les retours ou les réadmissions dans ces pays au moyen « d’arrangements juridiquement non contraignants ». L’appel à recourir beaucoup plus largement à ce type d’accords irait de pair avec la nécessité « de renforcer le recours à la politique des visas de l’UE en tant qu’outil permettant de faire progresser la coopération avec les pays tiers en matière de retour et de réadmission ». La Commission escompte ainsi « améliorer sensiblement l’effet de levier de l’UE dans ses relations avec les pays d’origine ». On ne saurait mieux dire que la politique européenne des visas n’est pas seulement un moyen de contrôle migratoire à distance : les marchandages auxquels elle donne lieu peuvent aussi s’avérer payants pour assurer le retour de celles et ceux qui, au péril de leur vie, contournent les barrières administratives qu’elle leur oppose.

    La seconde difficulté, au cœur des préoccupations motivant la refonte de la directive, tient à trois obstacles que rencontreraient les États membres dans la mise en œuvre des décisions d’éloignement. D’une part, « des pratiques qui varient d’un État membre à l’autre » et notamment « l’absence de cohérence entre les définitions et interprétations du risque de fuite et du recours à la rétention », ces approches hétérogènes « donnant lieu à la fuite de migrants en situation irrégulière et à des mouvements secondaires » ; d’autre part, « le manque de coopération » de la part des personnes en instance d’éloignement. Enfin, le manque d’équipement des États membres, qui empêche les autorités compétentes « d’échanger rapidement les informations nécessaires en vue de procéder aux retours ».
    Dimension coercitive

    Pour lever ces difficultés, les efforts porteront plus particulièrement sur quatre dispositifs renforçant considérablement la dimension coercitive de la directive de 2008, dont trois sont entièrement nouveaux.

    Il s’agit d’abord de soumettre les personnes en instance d’éloignement à une « obligation de coopérer » à la procédure. La formule révèle les faux semblants du dispositif : la collaboration de ces personnes à leur propre expulsion ne sera obtenue que sous la menace d’un ensemble de sanctions dissuasives. Elles devront fournir toutes les informations et documents justifiant de leur identité, de leurs lieux de résidence antérieurs, ainsi que de leur itinéraire de voyage et pays de transit, et « rester présentes et disponibles » tout au long de la procédure d’éloignement. Tout manquement à ces obligations pourra caractériser le « refus de coopérer » d’où se déduira un « risque de fuite », avec les conséquences qui s’y attacheront ipso facto. Il s’agira d’abord de la privation du délai de départ « volontaire » qui assortit en principe les décisions d’éloignement. Surtout, ce risque de fuite ouvrira la voie à un placement en rétention que l’administration ne sera pas tenue de justifier plus avant. L’alternative à la maigre carotte du départ volontaire sera donc le gros bâton de l’enfermement.

    Assurer « un recours plus efficace à la rétention à l’appui de l’exécution des retours » (il faut comprendre : utiliser massivement la rétention) constitue précisément le deuxième moyen, pour la Commission, d’accroître significativement le nombre d’éloignements. C’est bien l’objectif vers lequel convergent toutes les modifications apportées à la directive de 2008 : caractère dorénavant non limitatif des motifs de placement en rétention énoncés dans la directive, élargissement des critères du risque de fuite justifiant la rétention, apparition d’un motif spécifique visant « les ressortissants qui constituent un danger pour l’ordre public, la sécurité publique ou la sécurité nationale », sorte de fourre-tout laissé à la discrétion des administrations. À quoi s’ajoute l’obligation faite aux États membres de prévoir une durée totale de rétention qui ne puisse être inférieure à 3 mois [13]. Cette évolution vers le « tout détention » est résumée dans la suppression d’un seul mot de l’exposé des motifs, révisé, de la directive : il n’est plus recommandé que le recours à la rétention soit « limité ». Il devra seulement rester « subordonné au respect du principe de proportionnalité en ce qui concerne les moyens utilisés et les objectifs poursuivis ».

    Manifestement convaincue par avance que ni la « coopération » des personnes, même contrainte, ni même un recours débridé à l’enfermement ne suffiront, la Commission œuvre également pour doter la politique de retour des technologies de surveillance de masse, en s’appuyant sur un double principe : garantir la traçabilité des personnes migrantes dans chaque État membre tout en élevant au niveau supranational l’architecture et la maîtrise des outils dédiés à leur contrôle. Chaque État membre devra créer un « système national de gestion des retours », autrement dit un fichier destiné à recueillir et traiter toutes les informations nominatives et personnelles « nécessaires à la mise en œuvre des dispositions de la directive ». Mais, au prétexte ambigu d’en « réduire de manière significative la charge administrative », ces systèmes nationaux devront être reliés non seulement au système d’information Schengen mais aussi à une « plateforme intégrée de gestion des retours » dont l’agence Frontex doit être dotée entre-temps. Si l’initiative des procédures d’éloignement reste une prérogative des États membres, l’Union apparaît bien décidée à en prendre la gestion en mains, quitte à s’affranchir des principes régissant la protection des données personnelles pourvu que l’efficacité de la politique de retour soit au rendez-vous.

    L’accroissement significatif, à partir de l’année 2015, du nombre d’exilé·es qui se sont présenté·es aux frontières de l’Union motive un troisième dispositif, emblématique de l’obsession qui inspire le projet de directive révisée. L’objectif est d’« établir une nouvelle procédure pour le retour rapide des demandeurs d’une protection internationale déboutés à la suite d’une procédure d’asile à la frontière ». Le mécanisme proposé pour l’atteindre est brutal : la personne qui a été maintenue contre son gré à la frontière pendant l’examen de sa demande d’asile doit, après en avoir été déboutée, y être retenue jusqu’à son éloignement effectif et pendant une période maximale de 4 mois. Et pour garantir la rapidité de cet éloignement, il est prévu qu’aucun délai de départ volontaire ne soit accordé, que le délai de recours contre la décision d’éloignement fondée sur le rejet de la demande de protection ne pourra pas excéder 48 heures et que ce recours ne sera suspensif que dans certaines hypothèses et sous certaines conditions. Dans le monde idéal de la Commission, les hotspots et autres dispositifs de tri installés aux frontières de l’Union ne sont pas seulement le point d’arrivée de tous les exilé·es en quête de protection : ils doivent être également le point de départ de l’immense majorité à laquelle cette protection est refusée.

    https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6434
    #renvois #expulsions #migrations #asile #réfugiés #déboutés #sans-papiers #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire #euphémisme #retour_forcé #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #Plein_Droit

    ping @_kg_ @rhoumour

  • Migrants : les échecs d’un #programme_de_retour_volontaire financé par l’#UE

    Alors qu’il embarque sur un vol de la Libye vers le Nigeria à la fin 2018, James a déjà survécu à un naufrage en Méditerranée, traversé une demi-douzaine d’États africains, été la cible de coups de feu et passé deux ans à être maltraité et torturé dans les centres de détention libyens connus pour la brutalité qui y règne.

    En 2020, de retour dans sa ville de Benin City (Etat d’Edo au Nigéria), James se retrouve expulsé de sa maison après n’avoir pas pu payer son loyer. Il dort désormais à même le sol de son salon de coiffure.

    Sa famille et ses amis l’ont tous rejeté parce qu’il n’a pas réussi à rejoindre l’Europe.

    « Le fait que tu sois de retour n’est source de bonheur pour personne ici. Personne ne semble se soucier de toi [...]. Tu es revenu les #mains_vides », raconte-t-il à Euronews.

    James est l’un des quelque 81 000 migrants africains qui sont rentrés dans leur pays d’origine avec l’aide de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) des Nations unies et le #soutien_financier de l’Union européenne, dans le cadre d’une initiative conjointe de 357 millions d’euros (https://migrationjointinitiative.org). Outre une place sur un vol au départ de la Libye ou de plusieurs autres pays de transit, les migrants se voient promettre de l’argent, un #soutien et des #conseils pour leur permettre de se réintégrer dans leur pays d’origine une fois rentrés chez eux.

    Mais une enquête d’Euronews menée dans sept pays africains a révélé des lacunes importantes dans ce programme, considéré comme la réponse phare de l’UE pour empêcher les migrants d’essayer de se rendre en Europe.

    Des dizaines de migrants ayant participé au programme ont déclaré à Euronews qu’une fois rentrés chez eux, ils ne recevaient aucune aide. Et ceux qui ont reçu une aide financière, comme James, ont déclaré qu’elle était insuffisante.

    Nombreux sont ceux qui envisagent de tenter à nouveau de se rendre en Europe dès que l’occasion se présente.

    « Je ne me sens pas à ma place ici », confie James. « Si l’occasion se présente, je quitte le pays ».

    Sur les 81 000 migrants qui ont été rapatriés depuis 2017, près de 33 000 ont été renvoyés de Libye par avion. Parmi eux, beaucoup ont été victimes de détention, d’abus et de violences de la part de passeurs, de milices et de bandes criminelles. Les conditions sont si mauvaises dans le pays d’Afrique du Nord que le programme est appelé « retour humanitaire volontaire » (VHR), plutôt que programme de « retour volontaire assisté » (AVR) comme ailleurs en Afrique.

    Après trois ans passés en Libye, Mohi, 24 ans, a accepté l’offre d’un vol de retour en 2019. Mais, une fois de retour dans son pays, son programme de réintégration ne s’est jamais concrétisé. « Rien ne nous a été fourni ; ils continuent à nous dire ’demain’ », raconte-t-il à Euronews depuis le nord du Darfour, au Soudan.

    Mohi n’est pas seul. Les propres statistiques de l’OIM sur les rapatriés au Soudan révèlent que seuls 766 personnes sur plus de 2 600 ont reçu un soutien économique. L’OIM attribue cette situation à des taux d’inflation élevés et à une pénurie de biens et d’argent sur place.

    Mais M. Kwaku Arhin-Sam, spécialiste des projets de développement et directeur de l’Institut d’évaluation Friedensau, estime de manière plus générale que la moitié des programmes de réintégration de l’OIM échouent.

    « La plupart des gens sont perdus au bout de quelques jours », explique-t-il.
    Deux tiers des migrants ne terminent pas les programmes de réintégration

    L’OIM elle-même revoit cette estimation à la baisse : l’agence des Nations unies a déclaré à Euronews que jusqu’à présent, seul un tiers des migrants qui ont commencé à bénéficier d’une aide à la réintégration sont allés au bout du processus. Un porte-parole a déclaré que l’initiative conjointe OIM/EU étant un processus volontaire, « les migrants peuvent décider de se désister à tout moment, ou de ne pas s’engager du tout ».

    Un porte-parole de l’OIM ajoute que la réintégration des migrants une fois qu’ils sont rentrés chez eux va bien au-delà du mandat de l’organisation, et « nécessite un leadership fort de la part des autorités nationales », ainsi que « des contributions actives à tous les niveaux de la société ».

    Entre mai 2017 et février 2019, l’OIM a aidé plus de 12 000 personnes à rentrer au Nigeria. Parmi elles, 9 000 étaient « joignables » lorsqu’elles sont rentrées chez elles, 5 000 ont reçu une formation professionnelle et 4 300 ont bénéficié d’une « aide à la réintégration ». Si l’on inclut l’accès aux services de conseil ou de santé, selon l’OIM Nigéria, un total de 7 000 sur 12 000 rapatriés – soit 58 % – ont reçu une aide à la réintégration.

    Mais le nombre de personnes classées comme ayant terminé le programme d’aide à la réintégration n’était que de 1 289. De plus, les recherches de Jill Alpes, experte en migration et chercheuse associée au Centre de recherche sur les frontières de Nimègue, ont révélé que des enquêtes visant à vérifier l’efficacité de ces programmes n’ont été menées qu’auprès de 136 rapatriés.

    Parallèlement, une étude de Harvard sur les Nigérians de retour de Libye (https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/2464/2019/11/Harvard-FXB-Center-Returning-Home-FINAL.pdf) estime que 61,3 % des personnes interrogées ne travaillaient pas après leur retour, et que quelque 16,8 % supplémentaires ne travaillaient que pendant une courte période, pas assez longue pour générer une source de revenus stable. À leur retour, la grande majorité des rapatriés, 98,3 %, ne suivaient aucune forme d’enseignement régulier.

    La commissaire européenne aux affaires intérieures, Ylva Johansson, a admis à Euronews que « c’est un domaine dans lequel nous avons besoin d’améliorations ». Mme Johansson a déclaré qu’il était trop tôt pour dire quelles pourraient être ces améliorations, mais a maintenu que l’UE avait de bonnes relations avec l’OIM.

    Sandrine, Rachel et Berline, originaires du Cameroun, ont elles accepté de prendre un vol de l’OIM de Misrata, en Libye, à Yaoundé, la capitale camerounaise, en septembre 2018.

    En Libye, elles disent avoir subi des violences, des abus sexuels et avoir déjà risqué leur vie en tentant de traverser la Méditerranée. À cette occasion, elles ont été interceptées par les garde-côtes libyens et renvoyées en Libye.

    Une fois rentrées au Cameroun, Berline et Rachel disent n’avoir reçu ni argent ni soutien de l’OIM. Sandrine a reçu environ 900 000 fcfa (1 373,20 euros) pour payer l’éducation de ses enfants et lancer une petite entreprise – mais cela n’a pas duré longtemps.

    « Je vendais du poulet au bord de la route à Yaoundé, mais le projet ne s’est pas bien déroulé et je l’ai abandonné », confie-t-elle.

    Elle se souvient aussi d’avoir accouché dans un centre de détention de Tripoli avec des fusillades comme fond sonore.

    Toutes les trois ont affirmé qu’au moment de leur départ pour le Cameroun, elles n’avaient aucune idée de l’endroit où elles allaient dormir une fois arrivées et qu’elles n’avaient même pas d’argent pour appeler leur famille afin de les informer de leur retour.

    « Nous avons quitté le pays, et quand nous y sommes revenues, nous avons trouvé la même situation, parfois même pire. C’est pourquoi les gens décident de repartir », explique Berline.

    En novembre 2019, moins de la moitié des 3 514 migrants camerounais qui ont reçu une forme ou une autre de soutien de la part de l’OIM étaient considérés comme « véritablement intégrés » (https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/ENG_Press%20release%20COPIL_EUTF%20UE_IOM_Cameroon.pdf).

    Seydou, un rapatrié malien, a reçu de l’argent de l’OIM pour payer son loyer pendant trois mois et les factures médicales de sa femme malade. Il a également reçu une formation commerciale et un moto-taxi.

    Mais au Mali, il gagne environ 15 euros par jour, alors qu’en Algérie, où il travaillait illégalement, il avait été capable de renvoyer chez lui plus de 1 300 euros au total, ce qui a permis de financer la construction d’une maison pour son frère dans leur village.

    Il tente actuellement d’obtenir un visa qui lui permettrait de rejoindre un autre de ses frères en France.

    Seydou est cependant l’un des rares Maliens chanceux. Les recherches de Jill Alpes, publiées par Brot für die Welt et Medico (l’agence humanitaire des Églises protestantes en Allemagne), ont révélé que seuls 10 % des migrants retournés au Mali jusqu’en janvier 2019 avaient reçu un soutien quelconque de l’OIM.

    L’OIM, quant à elle, affirme que 14 879 Maliens ont entamé le processus de réintégration – mais ce chiffre ne révèle pas combien de personnes l’ont achevé.
    Les stigmates du retour

    Dans certains cas, l’argent que les migrants reçoivent est utilisé pour financer une nouvelle tentative pour rejoindre l’Europe.

    Dans un des cas, une douzaine de personnes qui avaient atteint l’Europe et avaient été renvoyées chez elles ont été découvertes parmi les survivants du naufrage d’un bateau en 2019 (https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/21407/mauritanian-coast-guard-intercepts-boat-carrying-around-190-migrants-i se dirigeait vers les îles Canaries. « Ils étaient revenus et ils avaient décidé de reprendre la route », a déclaré Laura Lungarotti, chef de la mission de l’OIM en Mauritanie.

    Safa Msehli, porte-parole de l’OIM, a déclaré à Euronews que l’organisation ne pouvait pas empêcher des personnes de tenter de repartir vers l’Europe une fois revenues.

    « C’est aux gens de décider s’ils veulent ou non émigrer et dans aucun de ses différents programmes, l’OIM ne prévoit pas d’empêcher les gens de repartir », a-t-elle expliqué.

    Qu’est-ce que l’OIM ?

    A partir de 2016, l’OIM s’est redéfinie comme agence des Nations unies pour les migrations, et en parallèle son budget a augmenté rapidement (https://governingbodies.iom.int/system/files/en/council/110/C-110-10%20-%20Director%20General%27s%20report%20to%20the%20110). Il est passé de 242,2 millions de dollars US (213 millions d’euros) en 1998 à plus de 2 milliards de dollars US (1,7 milliard d’euros) à l’automne 2019, soit une multiplication par huit. Bien qu’elle ne fasse pas partie des Nations unies, l’OIM est désormais une « organisation apparentée », avec un statut similaire à celui d’un prestataire privé.

    L’UE et ses États membres sont collectivement les principaux contributeurs au budget de l’OIM (https://governingbodies.iom.int/system/files/en/council/110/Statements/EU%20coordinated%20statement%20-%20Point%2013%20-%20final%20IOM), leurs dons représentant près de la moitié de son financement opérationnel.

    De son côté, l’OIM tient à mettre en évidence sur son site web les cas où son programme de retour volontaire a été couronné de succès, notamment celui de Khadeejah Shaeban, une rapatriée soudanaise revenue de Libye qui a pu monter un atelier de couture.

    –-
    Comment fonctionne le processus d’aide à la réintégration ?
    Les migrants embarquent dans un avion de l’OIM sur la base du volontariat et retournent dans leur pays ;
    Ils ont droit à des conseils avant et après le voyage ;
    Chaque « rapatrié » peut bénéficier de l’aide de bureaux locaux, en partenariat avec des ONG locales ;
    L’assistance à l’accueil après l’arrivée peut comprendre l’accueil à l’aéroport, l’hébergement pour la nuit, une allocation en espèces pour les besoins immédiats, une première assistance médicale, une aide pour le voyage suivant, une assistance matérielle ;
    Une fois arrivés, les migrants sont enregistrés et vont dans un centre d’hébergement temporaire où ils restent jusqu’à ce qu’ils puissent participer à des séances de conseil avec le personnel de l’OIM. Des entretiens individuels doivent aider les migrants à identifier leurs besoins. Les migrants en situation vulnérable reçoivent des conseils supplémentaires, adaptés à leur situation spécifique ;
    Cette assistance est généralement non monétaire et consiste en des cours de création d’entreprise, des formations professionnelles (de quelques jours à six mois/un an), des salons de l’emploi, des groupes de discussion ou des séances de conseil ; l’aide à la création de micro-entreprises. Toutefois, pour certains cas vulnérables, une assistance en espèces est fournie pour faire face aux dépenses quotidiennes et aux besoins médicaux ;
    Chaque module comprend des activités de suivi et d’évaluation afin de déterminer l’efficacité des programmes de réintégration.

    –-

    Des migrants d’#Afghanistan et du #Yémen ont été renvoyés dans ces pays dans le cadre de ce programme, ainsi que vers la Somalie, l’Érythrée et le Sud-Soudan, malgré le fait que les pays de l’UE découragent tout voyage dans ces régions.

    En vertu du droit international relatif aux Droits de l’homme, le principe de « #non-refoulement » garantit que nul ne doit être renvoyé dans un pays où il risque d’être torturé, d’être soumis à des traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants ou de subir d’autres préjudices irréparables. Ce principe s’applique à tous les migrants, à tout moment et quel que soit leur statut migratoire.

    L’OIM fait valoir que des procédures sont en place pour informer les migrants pendant toutes les phases précédant leur départ, y compris pour ceux qui sont vulnérables, en leur expliquant le soutien que l’organisation peut leur apporter une fois arrivés au pays.

    Mais même lorsque les migrants atterrissent dans des pays qui ne sont pas en proie à des conflits de longue durée, comme le Nigeria, certains risquent d’être confrontés à des dangers et des menaces bien réelles.

    Les principes directeurs du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR) sur la protection internationale considèrent que les femmes ou les mineurs victimes de trafic ont le droit de demander le statut de réfugié. Ces populations vulnérables risquent d’être persécutées à leur retour, y compris au Nigeria, voire même d’être à nouveau victime de traite.
    Forcer la main ?

    Le caractère volontaire contestable des opérations de retour s’étend également au Niger voisin, pays qui compte le plus grand nombre de migrants assistés par l’OIM et qui est présenté comme la nouvelle frontière méridionale de l’Europe.

    En 2015, le Niger s’est montré disposé à lutter contre la migration en échange d’un dédommagement de l’UE, mais des centaines de milliers de migrants continuent de suivre les routes à travers le désert en direction du nord pendant que le business du trafic d’êtres humains est florissant.

    Selon le Conseil européen sur les réfugiés et les exilés, une moyenne de 500 personnes sont expulsées d’Algérie vers le Niger chaque semaine, au mépris du droit international.

    La police algérienne détient, identifie et achemine les migrants vers ce qu’ils appellent le « #point zéro », situé à 15 km de la frontière avec le Niger. De là, les hommes, femmes et enfants sont contraints de marcher dans le désert pendant environ 25 km pour atteindre le campement le plus proche.

    « Ils arrivent à un campement frontalier géré par l’OIM (Assamaka) dans des conditions épouvantables, notamment des femmes enceintes souffrant d’hémorragies et en état de choc complet », a constaté Felipe González Morales, le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies, après sa visite en octobre 2018 (https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23698%26LangID).

    Jill Alpes, au Centre de recherche sur les frontières de Nimègue, estime que ces expulsions sont la raison principale pour laquelle les migrants acceptent d’être renvoyés du Niger. Souvent repérés lors d’opérations de recherche et de sauvetage de l’OIM dans le désert, ces migrants n’ont guère d’autre choix que d’accepter l’aide de l’organisation et l’offre de rapatriement qui s’ensuit.

    Dans ses travaux de recherche, Mme Alpes écrit que « seuls les migrants qui acceptent de rentrer au pays peuvent devenir bénéficiaire du travail humanitaire de l’OIM. Bien que des exceptions existent, l’OIM offre en principe le transport d’Assamakka à Arlit uniquement aux personnes expulsées qui acceptent de retourner dans leur pays d’origine ».

    Les opérations de l’IOM au Niger

    M. Morales, le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies, semble être d’accord (https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23698%26LangID). Il a constaté que « de nombreux migrants qui ont souscrit à l’aide au retour volontaire sont victimes de multiples violations des droits de l’Homme et ont besoin d’une protection fondée sur le droit international », et qu’ils ne devraient donc pas être renvoyés dans leur pays. « Cependant, très peu d’entre eux sont orientés vers une procédure de détermination du statut de réfugié ou d’asile, et les autres cas sont traités en vue de leur retour ».

    « Le fait que le Fonds fiduciaire de l’Union européenne apporte un soutien financier à l’OIM en grande partie pour sensibiliser les migrants et les renvoyer dans leur pays d’origine, même lorsque le caractère volontaire est souvent douteux, compromet son approche de la coopération au développement fondée sur les droits », indique le rapporteur spécial des Nations unies.
    Des contrôles insuffisants

    Loren Landau, professeur spécialiste des migrations et du développement au Département du développement international d’Oxford, affirme que le travail de l’OIM souffre en plus d’un manque de supervision indépendante.

    « Il y a très peu de recherches indépendantes et beaucoup de rapports. Mais ce sont tous des rapports écrits par l’OIM. Ils commandent eux-même leur propre évaluation , et ce, depuis des années », détaille le professeur.

    Dans le même temps, le Dr. Arhin-Sam, spécialiste lui de l’évaluation des programmes de développement, remet en question la responsabilité et la redevabilité de l’ensemble de la structure, arguant que les institutions et agences locales dépendent financièrement de l’OIM.

    « Cela a créé un haut niveau de dépendance pour les agences nationales qui doivent évaluer le travail des agences internationales comme l’OIM : elles ne peuvent pas être critiques envers l’OIM. Alors que font-elles ? Elles continuent à dire dans leurs rapports que l’OIM fonctionne bien. De cette façon, l’OIM peut ensuite se tourner vers l’UE et dire que tout va bien ».

    Selon M. Arhin-Sam, les ONG locales et les agences qui aident les rapatriés « sont dans une compétition très dangereuse entre elles » pour obtenir le plus de travail possible des agences des Nations unies et entrer dans leurs bonnes grâces.

    « Si l’OIM travaille avec une ONG locale, celle-ci ne peut plus travailler avec le HCR. Elle se considère alors chanceuse d’être financée par l’OIM et ne peuvent donc pas la critiquer », affirme-t-il.

    Par ailleurs, l’UE participe en tant qu’observateur aux organes de décision du HCR et de l’OIM, sans droit de vote, et tous les États membres de l’UE sont également membres de l’OIM.

    « Le principal bailleur de fonds de l’OIM est l’UE, et ils doivent se soumettre aux exigences de leur client. Cela rend le partenariat très suspect », souligne M. Arhin-Sam. « [Lorsque les fonctionnaires européens] viennent évaluer les projets, ils vérifient si tout ce qui est écrit dans le contrat a été fourni. Mais que cela corresponde à la volonté des gens et aux complexités de la réalité sur le terrain, c’est une autre histoire ».
    Une relation abusive

    « Les États africains ne sont pas nécessairement eux-mêmes favorables aux migrants », estime le professeur Landau. « L’UE a convaincu ces États avec des accords bilatéraux. S’ils s’opposent à l’UE, ils perdront l’aide internationale dont ils bénéficient aujourd’hui. Malgré le langage du partenariat, il est évident que la relation entre l’UE et les États africains ressemble à une relation abusive, dans laquelle un partenaire est dépendant de l’autre ».

    Les chercheurs soulignent que si les retours de Libye offrent une voie de sortie essentielle pour les migrants en situation d’extrême danger, la question de savoir pourquoi les gens sont allés en Libye en premier lieu n’est jamais abordée.

    Une étude réalisée par l’activiste humanitaire libyenne Amera Markous (https://www.cerahgeneve.ch/files/6115/7235/2489/Amera_Markous_-_MAS_Dissertation_2019.pdf) affirme que les migrants et les réfugiés sont dans l’impossibilité d’évaluer en connaissance de cause s’ils doivent retourner dans leur pays quand ils se trouvent dans une situation de détresse, comme par exemple dans un centre de détention libyen.

    « Comment faites-vous en sorte qu’ils partent parce qu’ils le veulent, ou simplement parce qu’ils sont désespérés et que l’OIM leur offre cette seule alternative ? » souligne la chercheuse.

    En plus des abus, le stress et le manque de soins médicaux peuvent influencer la décision des migrants de rentrer chez eux. Jean-Pierre Gauci, chercheur principal à l’Institut britannique de droit international et comparé, estime, lui, que ceux qui gèrent les centres de détention peuvent faire pression sur un migrant emprisonné pour qu’il s’inscrive au programme.

    « Il existe une situation de pouvoir, perçu ou réel, qui peut entraver le consentement effectif et véritablement libre », explique-t-il.

    En réponse, l’OIM affirme que le programme Retour Humanitaire Volontaire est bien volontaire, que les migrants peuvent changer d’avis avant d’embarquer et décider de rester sur place.

    « Il n’est pas rare que des migrants qui soient prêts à voyager, avec des billets d’avion et des documents de voyage, changent d’avis et restent en Libye », déclare un porte-parole de l’OIM.

    Mais M. Landau affirme que l’initiative UE-OIM n’a pas été conçue dans le but d’améliorer la vie des migrants.

    « L’objectif n’est pas de rendre les migrants heureux ou de les réintégrer réellement, mais de s’en débarrasser d’une manière qui soit acceptable pour les Européens », affirme le chercheur.

    « Si par ’fonctionner’, nous entendons se débarrasser de ces personnes, alors le projet fonctionne pour l’UE. C’est une bonne affaire. Il ne vise pas à résoudre les causes profondes des migrations, mais crée une excuse pour ce genre d’expulsions ».

    https://fr.euronews.com/2020/06/22/migrants-les-echecs-d-un-programme-de-retour-volontaire-finance-par-l-u
    #retour_volontaire #échec #campagne #dissuasion #migrations #asile #réfugiés #IOM #renvois #expulsions #efficacité #réintégration #EU #Union_européenne #Niger #Libye #retour_humanitaire_volontaire (#VHR) #retour_volontaire_assisté (#AVR) #statistiques #chiffres #aide_à_la_réintégration #Nigeria #réfugiés_nigérians #travail #Cameroun #migrerrance #stigmates #stigmatisation #Assamaka #choix #rapatriement #Fonds_fiduciaire_de_l'Union européenne #fonds_fiduciaire #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #HCR #partenariat #pouvoir

    –---
    Ajouté à la métaliste migrations & développement (et plus précisément en lien avec la #conditionnalité_de_l'aide) :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768702

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

  • Éloignement forcé des #étrangers : d’autres solutions justes et durables sont possibles

    Il y a deux ans, en 2018, l’ « #affaire_des_Soudanais » entraînait la mise en place d’une Commission chargée de l’évaluation de la #politique_du_retour_volontaire et de l’#éloignement_forcé d’étrangers de la #Belgique (ou #Commission_Bossuyt du nom de son président). Alors que le rapport final de la Commission Bossuyt est attendu pour l’été 2020, un regroupement d’associations, dont le CNCD-11.11.11 , publie aujourd’hui un rapport alternatif proposant une gestion différente de la politique actuelle, essentiellement basée sur l’éloignement forcé.

    Les faiblesses et limites de la Commission Bossuyt

    La Commission Bossuyt a été mise en place en réponse aux nombreuses critiques dont la politique de retour de la Belgique a fait l’objet à la suite de ladite « affaire des Soudanais » [1], à savoir la collaboration engagée avec le régime soudanais pour identifier et rapatrier une série de personnes vers ce pays sans avoir dûment vérifié qu’elles ne couraient aucun risque de torture ou de traitement dégradant, comme le prévoit l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH). Cette commission fait suite aux Commissions Vermeersh 1 et 2, mises en place vingt ans plus tôt, suite au décès tragique de la jeune nigériane Semira Adamu le 22 septembre 1998 lors d’une expulsion forcée depuis la Belgique.

    L’objectif de cette commission temporaire est d’évaluer le volet retour de la politique migratoire belge et d’émettre des recommandations à destination des responsables politiques en vue d’améliorer cette politique. Plusieurs faiblesses sont cependant manifestes : son mandat ne s’inscrit pas dans une approche holistique de la migration, les indicateurs de résultats n’ont pas été établis en amont du processus d’évaluation, les membres de la commission proviennent uniquement des administrations et du personnel exécutant la politique de retour. Le centre interfédéral Myria, qui a fait une analyse approfondie du rapport intermédiaire [2], déclare que la Commission Bossuyt est caractérisée par l’opacité de sa méthodologie, le manque d’indépendance de ses évaluateurs et la faible qualité de ses recommandations.
    Le rapport intermédiaire Bossuyt pointe l’inefficacité de la politique belge d’éloignement

    Lors de la présentation du rapport intermédiaire de la Commission Bossuyt, son président a salué les mesures édictées et partiellement mise en place depuis les Commissions Vermeersch, mais il a également déploré l’échec de la politique de retour de la Belgique. Les « chiffres » de retour sont en baisse malgré les moyens consacrés aux nombreuses arrestations et à la détention.

    Cette inefficacité est également constatée par d’autres acteurs, mais pour bien d’autres raisons. En effet, d’une part, comme l’acte Myria [3], « depuis 2016, on constate une diminution constante du nombre de rapatriements et de retours volontaires assistés, malgré l’augmentation du nombre d’arrestations administratives d’étrangers et du nombre de premières détentions en centre fermé ». D’autre part, comme le dénonce le Ciré [4], « la politique d’éloignement de la Belgique est avant tout symbolique mais elle est totalement inefficace et coûteuse. Elle est un non-sens au niveau financier mais aussi et avant tout au niveau des droits humains. Les alternatives à la détention sont 17% moins onéreuses que la politique de détention mais encore faut-il que celles-ci soient de véritables alternatives. Il faut pour cela obligatoirement changer de paradigme et mettre les besoins des personnes au centre de nos politiques migratoires ».

    Actuellement, la politique migratoire belge se focalise essentiellement sur l’augmentation des chiffres de retour plutôt que d’investir dans la recherche de solutions durables et profitables pour les personnes migrantes, les pays et sociétés d’accueil, de transit et d’origine. Cette obsession du retour entraîne une augmentation de la détention et des violences [5] qui lui sont intrinsèquement associées.

    Ainsi, les chiffres récemment demandés par le service d’information de la VRT à l’Office des étrangers montrent qu’en 2018, 33 386 personnes se sont vu notifier un ordre de quitter le territoire. Or, à peine 7 399 personnes ont effectivement quitté le territoire en 2018 [6], ce qui démontre l’inefficacité de cette politique actuelle.
    « Au-delà du retour » : un rapport de la société civile axé sur les alternatives

    A la veille de la publication du rapport final de la Commission Bossuyt, un collectif rassemblant des ONG, des syndicats, des chercheurs et chercheuses du monde académique, femmes et hommes du secteur de la Justice, a souhaité démontrer qu’une autre politique migratoire, notamment en matière d’éloignement, est à la fois nécessaire et réaliste. Le contenu de ce rapport, nommé « Au-delà du retour » , est basé sur celui d’un colloque organisé fin 2019 et centré sur deux dimensions : les alternatives à la détention et le respect des droits humains.

    Alternatives à la détention

    Comme le recommandait la campagne pour la justice migratoire coordonnée par le CNCD-11.11.11 de 2017 à 2019, la première recommandation du rapport porte sur la nécessité de sortir d’une vision focalisée sur la criminalisation du séjour irrégulier et le contrôle en vue du retour. Ce prisme négatif à travers lequel est pensée la politique migratoire actuelle entraine des violations des droits fondamentaux, est coûteux et inefficace au regard de ses propres objectifs (retour et éloignement effectif).

    La politique migratoire doit être basée sur un accueil solidaire, un accompagnement personnalisé basé sur l’empowerment et la recherche de solutions durables pour chaque personne.

    Des alternatives existent, comme le montre l’exemple de la ville d’Utrecht, aux Pays-Bas, détaillé dans le rapport. Grâce à un accueil accessible 24h/24, dans un climat de confiance et collaboratif, les personnes migrantes sont accompagnées de façon intensive tout au long du processus d’analyse de leur statut. Les résultats des 18 dernières années à Utrecht indiquent que 60 % des personnes obtiennent un titre de séjour légal, 20 % retournent dans leur pays d’origine, 13 % retournent dans un lieu d’accueil de demandeurs d’asile en vue d’un nouvel examen de leur dossier et 7 % disparaissent des radars. Depuis 2018, le projet pilote s’est étendu à cinq autres villes des Pays-Bas. Comme le montre cet exemple, la régularisation fait donc partie de la panoplie des outils en faveur de solutions durables.

    "La régularisation fait donc partie de la panoplie des outils en faveur de solutions durables"

    La seconde recommandation du rapport est d’investir dans les alternatives à la détention, comme le recommande le Pacte mondial sur les migrations adopté par la Belgique en décembre 2018, qui insiste sur la nécessité de ne détenir les personnes exilées qu’en tout dernier recours. La détention n’est en effet ni efficace, ni durable. Elle est extrêmement coûteuse en termes financiers et peut causer des dégâts psychologiques, en particulier chez les enfants. En Belgique, le budget consacré aux éloignements forcés a pourtant largement augmenté ces dernières années : de 63 millions € en 2014 à 88,4 millions en 2018 ; ce qui représente une augmentation de 40,3 % en cinq ans [7].
    Respect des droits humains et transparence

    L’ « affaire des Soudanais » et l’enquête de Mediapart sur le sort de Soudanais dans d’autres pays européens ont dévoilé qu’un examen minutieux du risque de mauvais traitement est essentiel tout au long du processus d’éloignement (arrestation, détention, expulsion). En effet, comme le proclame l’article 8 de la CEDH, toute personne à la droit au respect « de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondance ». Quant à l’article 3, il stipule que « Nul ne peut être soumis à la torture ni à des peines ou traitements inhumains ou dégradants ». Cette disposition implique l’interdiction absolue de renvoyer un étranger vers un pays où il existe un risque réel qu’il y subisse un tel traitement (principe de non-refoulement [8]) ou une atteinte à sa vie.

    Lorsqu’une personne allègue un risque de mauvais traitement ou que ce risque découle manifestement de la situation dans le pays de renvoi, la loi impose un examen individuel minutieux de ce risque par une autorité disposant des compétences et des ressources nécessaires. Une équipe spécialisée doit examiner la bonne application du principe de non-refoulement. Cette obligation incombe aux autorités qui adoptent une décision d’éloignement et ce indépendamment d’une demande de protection internationale [9].

    La détention, le retour forcé et l’éloignement des étrangers sont des moments du parcours migratoire qui posent des enjeux importants en termes de droits fondamentaux. C’est pourquoi des données complètes doivent être disponibles. Ceci nécessite la publication régulière de statistiques complètes, lisibles et accessibles librement, ainsi qu’une présentation annuelle devant le parlement fédéral.

    Cette question du respect des droits humains dépasse le cadre belge. Depuis plusieurs années , l’Union européenne (UE) multiplie en effet les accords d’externalisation de la gestion de ses frontières. La politique d’externalisation consiste à déléguer à des pays tiers une part de la responsabilité de la gestion des questions migratoires. L’externalisation poursuit deux objectifs principaux : réduire en amont la mobilité des personnes migrantes vers l’UE et augmenter le nombre de retours. La Belgique s’inscrit, comme la plupart des Etats membres, dans cette approche. Or, comme le met en évidence le rapport, les accords internationaux signés dans le cadre de cette politique manquent singulièrement de transparence.

    C’est le cas par exemple de la coopération bilatérale engagée entre la Belgique et la Guinée.
    Malgré les demandes des associations actives sur les questions migratoires, le mémorandum d’entente signé en 2008 entre la Belgique et la Guinée n’est pas public. Ce texte, encore d’application aujourd’hui, régit pourtant la coopération entre la Belgique et la Guinée en matière de retour. L’Etat belge refuse la publication du document au nom de la protection des relations internationales de la Belgique, invoquant aussi le risque de menaces contre l’intégrité physique des membres du corps diplomatique et la nécessité d’obtenir l’accord du pays partenaire pour publier le document.

    Enfin, et c’est essentiel, une des recommandations prioritaires du rapport « Au-delà du retour » est de mettre en place une collaboration structurelle entre l’Etat et la société civile autour des questions migratoires, et plus précisément la question de l’éloignement et du retour. Dans ce cadre, la mise en place d’une commission permanente et indépendante d’évaluation de la politique de retour de la Belgique incluant des responsables de la société civile est une nécessité.
    Le temps des choix

    « Le temps est venu de faire les bons choix et de ne pas se tromper d’orientation ». Tel était le message de Kadri Soova, Directrice adjointe de PICUM (Platform for international cooperation on undocumented migrants) lors de son intervention au colloque. Combien d’affaires sordides faudra-t-il encore pour que la Belgique réoriente sa politique migratoire, afin qu’elle soit mise au service de la justice migratoire ? Combien de violences, de décès, de potentiels gâchés, de rêves brisés pour satisfaire les appétits électoralistes de certains décideurs politiques ? Comme le démontre le rapport, si les propositions constructives sont bel et bien là, la volonté politique manque.
    Il est donc grand temps de repenser en profondeur les politiques migratoires. A ce titre, le modèle de la justice migratoire, fondé sur le respect des droits fondamentaux, l’égalité et la solidarité, devrait constituer une réelle base de travail. La justice migratoire passe d’abord par des partenariats pour le développement durable, afin que tout être humain puisse vivre dignement là où il est né, mais aussi par l’ouverture de voies sûres et légales de migrations, ainsi que par des politiques d’intégration sociale et de lutte contre les discriminations dans les pays d’accueil, afin de rendre les politiques migratoires cohérentes avec les Objectifs de développement durable.
    La publication prochaine du rapport définitif de la Commission Bossuyt doit être l’occasion d’ouvrir un débat serein sur la politique migratoire de la Belgique, en dialogue avec les organisations spécialisées sur la question. La publication d’un rapport alternatif par ces dernières constitue un appel à l’ouverture de ce débat.

    https://www.cncd.be/Eloignement-force-des-etrangers

    –---

    Pour télécharger le rapport :

    Rapport « Au-delà du retour » 2020. À la recherche d’une politique digne et durable pour les personnes migrantes en séjour précaire ou irrégulier


    https://www.cncd.be/Rapport-Au-dela-du-retour-2020

    #renvois #expulsions #renvois_forcés #migrations #alternative #retour_volontaire #justice_migratoire #rapport #régularisation #Soudan #inefficacité #efficacité #asile #déboutés #sans-papiers #alternatives #rétention #détention_administrative #transparence #droits_humains #mauvais_traitements #société_civile #politique_migratoire

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • Toujours pas de vols de #rapatriement pour les #employées_de_maison migrantes

    Le retour des travailleurs étrangers doit se faire selon un mécanisme qui respecte leurs droits, selon l’Organisation internationale du travail.

    Les premières opérations de #rapatriement de #travailleuses_migrantes devaient débuter hier, avaient annoncé les autorités libanaises. Un avion devait venir d’Addis-Abeba pour ramener chez elles des employées de maison éthiopiennes particulièrement touchées par la crise libanaise économico-financière et davantage fragilisées par la #pandémie de #coronavirus. Mais l’opération n’a pas eu lieu. Selon l’ambassade d’Éthiopie, ce vol n’était toujours pas programmé. « Nous n’avons pas encore annoncé de date », se contente de dire à L’Orient-Le Jour le consul d’Éthiopie, Aklilu Tatere. Mais du côté de la Sûreté générale, on indique que « l’Éthiopie n’aurait pas trouvé d’avion » pour rapatrier les travailleuses éthiopiennes en situation de grande #vulnérabilité coincées au Liban. « L’opération pourrait avoir lieu d’ici à deux jours », estime le porte-parole de la Sûreté générale, le général Nabil Hannoun, précisant que « la décision revient aux autorités éthiopiennes ». Car le rôle de la SG, en cette période exceptionnelle, est de donner le feu vert aux ambassades, après s’être assurée de l’identité des travailleuses migrantes, dont une grande partie est en situation irrégulière. « Nous régularisons leur situation sans contrepartie financière pour leur permettre de quitter le pays, à la condition qu’elles ne fassent pas l’objet d’une plainte judiciaire », affirme le responsable.

    Les coûts exorbitants du #retour

    Dans ce cadre, de nombreuses employées de maison éthiopiennes, philippines, bangladaises ou d’autres nationalités se pressent aux portes de leurs consulats, dans une volonté de quitter le pays du Cèdre. Même chose du côté des travailleurs étrangers, ouvriers, pompistes, éboueurs… Car travailler au Liban ne leur convient plus. Avec la dépréciation de la #livre_libanaise et la #paupérisation des employeurs libanais, leurs salaires fondent comme neige au soleil. Payées dans la monnaie nationale depuis la pénurie de dollars, alors que la promesse d’embauche était basée sur un #salaire en #dollars, les employées de maison touchent désormais le tiers, voire le quart de leur salaire initial. Et puis les #transferts_d’argent sont de plus en plus difficiles. Une situation à laquelle vient s’ajouter la crise du coronavirus, qui a mis des milliers de travailleuses au #chômage, #femmes_de_ménage ou #employées_domestiques. L’AFP rapporte le cas de Sophia notamment, une travailleuse domestique éthiopienne sous contrat, renvoyée et jetée dans la rue sans salaire, sans valise, sans passeport et qui n’a qu’un but désormais : rentrer chez elle. Alors, elle attend une promesse de rapatriement devant l’ambassade d’Éthiopie à Hazmieh, comme nombre de ses compatriotes. Or il est de notoriété publique que nombre de pays voient d’un mauvais œil le retour de leur #main-d’œuvre qui viendrait grossir les rangs des chômeurs en ces temps de crise mondiale.

    L’ambassade des Philippines a déjà rapatrié 618 employées de maison depuis le mois de décembre 2019, selon le vice-consul des Philippines, Edward Chan. La crise financière battait déjà son plein, et près de 2 000 demandes de rapatriement avaient été déposées, principalement des travailleuses non documentées qui avaient fui le domicile de leur employeur. « La pandémie de Covid-19 a interrompu le processus », regrette-t-il. Aujourd’hui, de nouveaux défis se posent, liés au #prix prohibitif des #billets_d’avion. « Affréter un charter coûterait une fortune, sachant que le billet Beyrouth-Manille coûte aujourd’hui entre 1 200 et 2 300 dollars », affirme M. Chan à L’Orient-Le Jour, précisant que « le consulat apporte un soutien financier aux travailleuses philippines pour leur permettre de rentrer chez elles ».

    Pour un #retour_volontaire et non forcé

    Une autre question se pose. Que deviendront les plaintes auprès des autorités libanaises des travailleuses domestiques victimes d’abus, de mauvais traitements ou de non-paiement de leurs salaires et qui décident de quitter le Liban ?

    Si le consulat philippin assure un ferme suivi des dossiers de ses ressortissantes auprès du ministère du Travail, sauf en cas de désistement, de nombreuses employées de maison migrantes n’auront jamais gain de cause, malgré les #abus dont elles ont été victimes.

    C’est la raison pour laquelle l’Organisation internationale du travail insiste pour que le retour des travailleurs migrants du Liban, et plus particulièrement des employées de maison, se déroule selon un mécanisme qui respecte leurs #droits. « Il faut d’abord que ce retour soit volontaire et non forcé. Car la travailleuse doit avoir le #choix entre trouver un autre emploi sur place ou partir, au cas où l’employeur n’aurait plus les moyens de respecter ses engagements », affirme la porte-parole de l’OIT, Zeina Mezher. « Il est aussi impératif que le rapatriement des travailleuses étrangères du Liban, touchées par la double #crise_économique et sanitaire, ne soit pas un prétexte pour les délester de leurs droits », ajoute-t-elle. D’autant plus que celles qui désirent quitter le pays sont généralement les plus vulnérables. Pour avoir fui un employeur abusif, elles sont souvent sans documents d’identité. « D’où la nécessité, précise la porte-parole, que l’employeur assume la responsabilité du billet d’avion comme prévu par le contrat de travail, même lorsque son employée a quitté le domicile. » Une réponse qui vient en marge d’une réunion virtuelle destinée à identifier les problèmes de la main-d’œuvre migrante au Liban en ces temps exceptionnels, organisée hier par l’OIT et l’OIM (Organisation internationale des migrations) et qui a réuni tous les acteurs locaux et internationaux, dans le but d’y apporter une réponse globale.

    https://www.lorientlejour.com/article/1218891/toujours-pas-de-vols-de-rapatriement-pour-les-employees-de-maison-mig
    #employé_domestique #employé_de_maison #migrations #femmes #crise_sanitaires #covid-19 #femmes_migrantes #Liban #Ethiopie #Philippines #Bangladesh #remittances #travail_domestique #travailleuses_domestiques

    ping @isskein @_kg_ @tony_rublon @thomas_lacroix

    • « Je veux rentrer au Soudan, je peux à peine manger à ma faim ! »

      Terrassés par la crise, des Soudanais tentent l’improbable traversée vers Israël.

      La crise économique et financière qui secoue le Liban impacte de plus en plus les travailleurs étrangers qui, avec la fermeture de l’aéroport en mars dernier, se retrouvent prisonniers dans un pays devenu trop cher pour eux et où ils voient leurs revenus fondre parallèlement à la chute libre de la livre face au billet vert.

      La forte dépréciation monétaire et l’explosion du chômage ont même provoqué un phénomène inédit à la frontière libano-israélienne, sous étroite surveillance, rapporte l’AFP sous la plume de Bachir el-Khoury à Beyrouth et Rosie Scammell à Jérusalem, en précisant que depuis début mai, au moins 16 Soudanais ont été interpellés alors qu’ils tentaient de traverser de nuit cette zone à hauts risques, gardée par les soldats de la Finul et de l’armée.

      Le dernier en date avait été retrouvé mercredi dernier par des soldats israéliens, caché dans une canalisation d’eau. Il a été interrogé par l’armée israélienne, avant d’être renvoyé de l’autre côté de la frontière, indiquent les deux auteurs.

      Des deux côtés, on s’accorde toutefois à dire que ces récentes tentatives de franchissement sont uniquement motivées par des considérations financières.

      « Selon l’enquête préliminaire », elles « ne revêtent aucune motivation sécuritaire ou d’espionnage », confirme une source de sécurité libanaise, sous le couvert de l’anonymat.

      La semaine dernière, l’armée libanaise avait découvert à la frontière le corps criblé de balles d’un Soudanais, tué dans des circonstances non élucidées à ce jour. Au cours des dernières semaines, elle avait procédé à plusieurs interpellations de Soudanais tentant de rallier Israël.

      À peine de quoi manger

      « Je veux rentrer au Soudan car la vie est devenue très chère ici. Je peux à peine manger à ma faim », déplore Issa, 27 ans, employé dans un supermarché de la banlieue sud de Beyrouth.

      Son salaire mensuel de 500 000 livres vaut désormais moins de 100 dollars, contre 333 avant la crise.

      Plus de 1 000 Soudanais se sont inscrits auprès de leur ambassade à Beyrouth dans l’espoir d’être rapatriés, sur les quelque 4 000 vivant au Liban, selon Abdallah Malek, de l’Association des jeunes Soudanais au Liban, cité par l’agence de presse.

      Ceux qui optent pour une tentative de départ vers l’État hébreu auraient des proches ou des connaissances au sein de la communauté soudanaise en Israël. Selon des informations récoltées par l’armée israélienne, il s’agit notamment d’employés du secteur de la restauration, qui ont organisé leur fuite via les réseaux sociaux.

      Protection humanitaire

      Impossible de déterminer le nombre exact ayant réussi à franchir la frontière pour s’installer en Israël. Un, au moins, Mohammad Abchar Abakar, est en détention depuis plusieurs mois après son arrestation en janvier par l’armée israélienne. L’ONG « Hotline pour les réfugiés et migrants » s’est mobilisée pour obtenir sa libération fin avril. Elle n’a pas encore pu le voir en raison de la pandémie de Covid-19.

      « Il nous a dit qu’il voulait demander l’asile », dit la porte-parole de cette ONG, Shira Abbo. Là encore, les chances de réussite sont maigres : ces dernières années, Israël a accordé le statut de réfugié à... un seul Soudanais, sur une communauté estimée à 6 000 personnes. La majorité d’entre eux ont une demande d’asile en cours d’étude depuis des années, qui leur permet de travailler provisoirement. Environ un millier ont obtenu un statut alternatif de « protection humanitaire ».

      La plupart des Soudanais en Israël ont commencé à affluer en 2007, empruntant une route là aussi périlleuse via le Sinaï égyptien. Longtemps poreuse, cette frontière a depuis été renforcée par l’État hébreu. Aujourd’hui, Mme Abbo déplore le refoulement des travailleurs interceptés par l’armée israélienne. « Si quelqu’un affirme vouloir demander l’asile, il doit au moins avoir la possibilité de rencontrer des spécialistes dans la prise en charge de ce type de population », dit-elle.

      Avec l’absence de la moindre relation entre les deux pays voisins, il n’existe évidemment aucune coopération bilatérale sur ce dossier.

      https://www.lorientlejour.com/article/1223224/-je-veux-rentrer-au-soudan-je-peux-a-peine-manger-a-ma-faim-.html
      #réfugiés #réfugiés_soudanais #faim #alimentation #nourriture

    • #Beyrouth  : les travailleuses domestiques veulent rentrer chez elles

      Souvent indécentes, les conditions de vie et de travail des employées domestiques migrantes au Liban se sont encore aggravées avec la crise économique qui ravage le pays. Cette crise a en effet poussé de nombreux employeurs et employeuses à abandonner leurs domestiques, sans argent ni papiers, devant l’ambassade du pays dont elles/ils sont originaires. Mais l’explosion du 4 août à Beyrouth renforce l’urgence de la situation pour ces migrant·es, en grande majorité des femmes, qui demandent juste à pouvoir rentrer chez elles/eux.

      Il existe environ 250.000 travailleuses domestiques au Liban, venues de pays asiatiques et africains dans l’espoir de gagner suffisamment d’argent pour subvenir aux besoins de leur famille restée au pays. Ne relevant pas du Code du travail, ces personnes sont soumises au système de la kafala  : elles sont «  parrainées  » par un·e employeur/euse qui en est donc légalement responsable. Bien souvent, cela revient à avoir son passeport confisqué, mais aussi, dans de nombreux cas, à ne pas recevoir son salaire et à subir des abus. Dans un rapport de 2019 consacré à «  l’exploitation des travailleuses domestiques migrantes au Liban  », Amnesty International dénonce «  des atteintes graves et systématiques aux droits humains imputables aux employeurs.  » L’organisation pointe notamment «  des horaires de travail journaliers indécents, l’absence de jours de repos, le non-versement ou la réduction de leur salaire, la confiscation de leur passeport, de graves restrictions à leur liberté de mouvement et de communication, le manque de nourriture, l’absence de logement convenable, des violences verbales et physiques, et la privation de soins médicaux. Des cas extrêmes de travail forcé et de traite des êtres humains  » ont également été rapportés.

      Les conditions de vie et de travail des employées domestiques migrantes se sont encore aggravées avec la crise économique qui a frappé le Liban dès 2019. Cette crise du secteur financier, qui a eu comme résultat de dévaluer la livre libanaise et de provoquer une inflation évaluée à 56,6 % en mai, a durement frappé les classes moyennes. Appauvries, ces familles n’ont plus les moyens de payer le salaire d’une domestique. Dans bien des cas, ces femmes ont juste été abandonnées par leur employeur/euse, sans argent et sans régularisation de leur situation pour pouvoir partir, tout cela en pleine pandémie de

      Une situation aggravée par l’explosion

      L’explosion du port de Beyrouth le 4 août dernier ne fait que rendre la situation des travailleuses domestiques encore plus désespérée. «  Les employeurs n’ont plus les moyens. La plupart étaient pauvres avant les multiples problèmes économiques et sanitaires suivis de l’explosion massive  », explique Dipendra Uprety, fondateur du groupe de mobilisation This is Lebanon. «  Les travailleuses migrantes n’ont pas été payées depuis des mois. Et si elles l’ont été, c’est en livres libanaises, ça n’a désormais aucune valeur. Elles travaillent 14 heures par jour pour [l’équivalent de] 30 dollars par mois [environ 25 euros, ndlr].  »

      Pour qu’une travailleuse puisse partir du pays, la Sûreté Générale [organisme sous l’autorité du ministère de l’Intérieur et des Municipalités] doit contrôler les conditions de départ de celle-ci auprès de son employeur/euse, un processus qui prend habituellement entre deux et trois mois. De nombreuses migrantes sont aussi bloquées au Liban sans papiers depuis des mois et parfois des années. Deux solutions s’offrent alors à elles  : payer des amendes astronomiques et partir après avoir obtenu un laissez-passer, ou se retrouver en prison dans des conditions dramatiques. Sans compter le prix du billet, entre 400 et 700 dollars [entre 340 et 590 euros environ, ndlr] selon les pays d’origine.
      Abandonnées à la rue

      «  Il s’agit d’un moment terrible pour les travailleuses domestiques  », raconte Farah Salka, directrice exécutive du Mouvement Anti-Raciste (ARM). «  Cette année a été très dure pour tout le monde au Liban… Si vous imaginiez un cauchemar, vous ne pourriez pas imaginer ça. Et maintenant, vous pouvez multiplier les dommages par dix pour les travailleuses domestiques. Elles demandent juste à rentrer chez elles  ! Elles sont encore sous le choc de l’explosion, comme nous. Certaines ont disparu, certaines sont mortes, les autres sont parfois blessées, et elles ne reçoivent aucun soutien pendant cette crise. Et au milieu de ce chaos, elles sont abandonnées à la rue. C’est devenu une scène commune à Beyrouth  : des centaines de migrantes à même le sol, sans abri.  »

      Les employé·es et volontaires d’ARM passent leurs journées à traiter des cas, traduire, assister administrativement, financièrement, médicalement, et lever des fonds pour permettre aux migrantes en possession de papiers de payer leur billet. «  Il faut une armée pour gérer tout ça, tout relève de l’urgence, ajoute Farah Salka. Elles sont à un stade où elles se fichent de leurs droits, de l’argent qui leur est dû. Elles veulent juste laisser ce cauchemar derrière elles et partir. Et je vais être honnête, n’importe où est mieux qu’ici.  »

      Un groupe d’activistes éthiopiennes, Egna Legna Besidet, est aussi sur le terrain, surtout depuis le début de la crise économique. L’une des membres, Zenash Egna, explique qu’elle n’a plus de mots pour décrire la situation  : «  La vie des travailleuses migrantes n’est pas bonne au Liban. Déjà avant la crise économique, la pandémie et l’explosion, on secourait des femmes battues, violées, qui s’enfuyaient sans papiers et sans argent. Tout ça a juste augmenté, c’est terrible. Le monde doit savoir quel enfer c’est de vivre sous le système de la kafala.  » En ligne, de nombreux témoignages de femmes désespérées abondent. Devant leur consulat, des Kényanes ont aussi manifesté, demandant à leur pays de les rapatrier.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KuhBhNRjxp4&feature=emb_logo

      «  Il est temps pour nous de partir  »

      Une domestique nigériane appelée Oluwayemi, 30 ans, a confié à axelle son calvaire personnel. Arrivée en juin 2019 au Liban, elle raconte avoir été traitée comme une esclave par ses employeurs/euses. «  Puis ils m’ont renvoyée de la maison, sans argent et sans passeport. Ils m’ont juste dit «  Pars  ». Avec la crise économique, tout est pire au Liban. Je pense qu’il est temps pour nous de partir. L’explosion a tué des domestiques nigérianes, d’autres ont été blessées, les maisons ont été détruites. J’ai eu tellement peur, je veux que l’on m’aide et que je puisse retourner dans mon pays. Je veux que l’on m’aide, vraiment, parce que je ne veux pas retourner au Nigeria et devenir une prostituée, ou une voleuse. Je veux que mon futur soit beau, je veux monter mon propre commerce. Je prie pour que l’on m’aide.  »

      Une autre domestique nigériane qui souhaite rester anonyme raconte qu’elle a été jetée de chez son employeur sans argent, téléphone, vêtements ou papiers après sept mois d’abus physiques. Elle a également plaidé pour recevoir de l’aide, insistant sur le fait qu’il n’y a plus rien au Liban pour les travailleuses migrantes  : «  Il n’y a pas d’argent, pas de travail, pas de nourriture. Je veux partir.  »
      Faire pression pour faciliter le retour des migrantes

      Pour que la situation se débloque, il faudrait que les pays d’origine et la Sûreté Générale se mettent d’accord pour faciliter le retour des ressortissantes bloquées au Liban. «  On doit mettre la pression sur les consulats et les ambassades pour qu’ils prennent enfin la situation au sérieux. La Sûreté Générale doit supprimer ses enquêtes, exempter les travailleuses de leurs amendes et approuver leur départ avec des laissez-passer pour celles qui n’ont pas leurs papiers, explique Farah Salka. Mais aussi, on a besoin d’argent, de tellement d’argent pour payer les billets d’avion. C’est inimaginable.  »

      Pour Dipendra Uprety, le mot à appliquer est «  amnistie  »  : «  Des efforts ponctuels ne peuvent pas répondre aux besoins. La seule solution possible est que la Sûreté Générale accorde une amnistie générale à ces femmes, ce qui équivaudra à des centaines de milliers de documents de voyage temporaires. L’argent commence à affluer maintenant pour les billets d’avion, la nourriture et les soins médicaux, mais les travailleurs sociaux ne sont pas assez nombreux pour répondre à tous les besoins [notamment en termes d’hébergement, ndlr].  »
      Dépasser le racisme

      Au-delà de l’urgence de la situation, le racisme est toujours bien présent dans les mentalités libanaises, même après l’explosion. Ainsi, la liste des personnes mortes et disparues est toujours incomplète  : les noms et visages des victimes étrangères non occidentales ne sont tout simplement pas mentionnés. Un texte publié par l’ARM le 13 août dit que  : «  Ce n’est pas un hasard. Les travailleurs migrants et les réfugiés sont systématiquement déshumanisés et marginalisés au Liban, dans la vie comme dans la mort.  »

      Selon Farah Salka, le Liban devrait se préparer à changer  : «  J’espère qu’aucune nouvelle femme ne viendra en tant que travailleuse domestique avant qu’on ne répare tout ça. J’espère que le Liban sera prêt, parce que c’est horrible. Si nous n’apprenons pas maintenant, je ne sais pas quand ou si nous pourrons apprendre.  »

      https://www.axellemag.be/beyrouth-les-travailleuses-domestiques-veulent-rentrer-chez-elles

    • Témoignage de #Rajabu_Kilamuna de l’association #Migrants_sans_frontières, enfermé dans le centre de rétention d’#El_Wardiya

      CRIMINALISATION DE LA SOLIDARITE

      Témoignage de Rajabu Kilamuna de l’association Migrants sans frontières, enfermé dans le centre de rétention d’El Wardiya

      Rajabu est fondateur et coordinateur de l’association Migrants sans frontières. Migrants sans frontières est une association de défense des Droits de l’Homme, à caractère humanitaire, qui mène des activités en coopération avec divers partenaires (Tunisie terre d’asile, l’OIM, le HCR, le Conseil tunisien pour les réfugiés, l’Instance tunisienne de Lutte contre la Traite, l’Institut Arabe des Droits de l’homme, l’ALDA, M’nemti, l’Observatoire international des Droits de l’Homme, l’AESAT, Euromed droits …). L’association promeut la liberté de circulation des personnes et agit dans plusieurs domaines pour venir en aide aux personnes migrantes, entre autres : aide médicale, lutte contre l’exploitation au travail, soutien à des micro-projets pour encourager l’autonomisation des migrant.es, lutte contre la traite, soutien juridique aux personnes migrantes et informations concernant leurs droits en Tunisie, accompagnement de la demande d’asile, reconstitutions des liens familiaux, etc… Une partie importante de son travail concerne la défense des personnes migrantes arrêtées de manière arbitraire et/ou envoyées dans des centres de rétention tels que El Wardiya.

      Wardiya est dans son appellation officielle un centre “de réception et d’orientation”, situé dans la banlieue de Tunis à Ben Arous dans l’enceinte du camp paramilitaire de la Garde Nationale où sont enfermées les personnes étrangères de différentes nationalités, majoritairement originaires d’Afrique subsaharienne et considérées comme étant en situation « irrégulière » sur le territoire tunisien. Les personnes étrangères sont généralement appréhendées à l’occasion d’arrestations arbitraires et au faciès. Une fois au centre de Wardiya, elles risquent l’expulsion à la frontière algérienne. La seule manière d’échapper à ce traitement pour les personnes étrangères est de régler leurs pénalités pour séjour irrégulier et de payer elles-mêmes leur billet d’avion pour rentrer dans leur pays d’origine. Si elles acceptent l’offre de retour « volontaire » de l’OIM, les pénalités sont annulées et le billet d’avion pris en charge par l’organisation.

      Concernant ces personnes migrantes enfermées à El Wardia, le soutien apporté par Rajabu consistait principalement à les mettre en contact avec leurs ambassades, des avocat.e.s, des instances juridiques ou encore des organisations de défense des Droits de l’Homme. Il se chargeait également de faire pression sur le HCR pour que l’organisation examine les demandes d’asile déposées depuis le centre. Car dans la plupart des cas, les demandes ne sont examinées que si elles sont transmises par la Police des frontières, qui bien souvent, fait obstacle à ces demandes. Aussi le travail de Rajabu était-il indispensable pour que les potentiels demandeurs d’asile enfermés à El Wardiya puissent malgré tout avoir accès au HCR. Selon lui, il arrive fréquemment que des demandeurs d’asile soient expulsés sans aucun examen préalable de leur demande d’asile.

      Impliqué dans la défense des personnes migrantes enfermées à EL Wardiya, en décembre 2019, Rajabu a assisté à une conférence organisée par le Forum tunisien des droits économiques et sociaux (FTDES), lors de laquelle ce sujet devait être évoqué. A cette occasion, la journaliste Amal El Mekki a pris la parole pour présenter les recherches qu’elles avaient menées sur le centre d’El Wardiya. Elle évoquait le statut juridique très flou de ce centre, les mauvaises conditions de rétention, les expulsions sauvages à la frontière algérienne et les pressions psychologiques pour que les migrants acceptent le retour « volontaire » de l’OIM. A la fin de la présentation de la journaliste, Rajabu était intervenu pour appuyer ses propos et présenter brièvement le travail de son association.

      Le 14 février 2020, Rajabu a été arrêté par la Police de la frontière tunisienne, à proximité de son bureau. Cela fait maintenant deux mois qu’il est enfermé dans le centre d’El Wardiya et il n’a encore reçu aucun motif clair pouvant justifier son arrestation, n’a fait l’objet d’aucune plainte, n’a jamais été conduit au Parquet, ni devant le Procureur de la République. Migrant lui-même en Tunisie depuis 7 ans et demandeur d’asile, il est titulaire d’un titre de séjour provisoire et d’un permis de travail. Il déclare avoir toutes les autorisations nécessaires concernant les activités de son association.

      D’après lui, une seule chose a pu motiver son arrestation : le fait qu’il constituait un témoin gênant et un potentiel obstacle au déroulement des expulsions sauvages depuis le centre d’El Wardiya. Ayant œuvré à la libération de nombreuses personnes (notamment en transmettant leur demande d’asile au HCR), il était selon lui vu comme étant un « bâton dans les roues » de l’administration. Dans le centre, les policiers l’accusent régulièrement d’être une menace à la sécurité nationale, sans lui préciser en quoi.

      Lorsqu’il a été emmené dans le centre d’El Wardiya, Rajabu a immédiatement été isolé seul dans une chambre et privé de téléphone pour l’empêcher de communiquer avec l’extérieur. Alors qu’il est blessé au niveau de la colonne vertébrale, qu’il souffre d’hémorroïdes aiguës et a besoin de changer ses lunettes pharmaceutiques, la Police de la Frontière et la Garde Nationale lui interdisent depuis son arrivée l’accès à des soins à l’hôpital. Malgré les tentatives d’isolement, Rajabu a réussi à se procurer des téléphones auprès de ses camarades pour alerter les Organisations des Droits de l’Homme sur sa situation.

      Rajabu est dans l’incertitude concernant son sort et en insécurité permanente. Depuis son arrivée dans le centre, il est régulièrement menacé d’expulsion. Il a répété plusieurs fois à la Police qu’il craignait des persécutions pour sa vie en cas de retour dans son pays d’origine en sa qualité de réfugié politique. La Police lui a alors dit qu’il n’avait qu’à aller dans un autre pays africain comme le Sénégal ou le Maroc.

      Le 18 février 2020, il a tenté de déposer une demande d’asile depuis le centre d’El Wardiya, à laquelle il a joint les demandes de 23 autres personnes migrantes enfermées avec lui, qui n’avaient pas encore pu avoir accès au HCR jusqu’alors. Malgré cette demande de protection, la Police de la Frontière a expulsé 6 d’entre elles, de nationalité guinéenne, à la frontière algérienne (lesquelles ont ensuite été expulsées au Niger par les autorités algériennes). Avant même que Rajabu ait passé son entretien avec un officier de protection du HCR, les policiers sont allés chercher son passeport dans son bureau en vue de son expulsion. Après celle des personnes guinéennes, Rajabu a assisté à deux autres expulsions. La première concernait 9 personnes, qui toutes sont retournées en Tunisie avant d’être à nouveau arrêtées par la police tunisienne et reconduites à El Wardiya. La seconde expulsion concernait 5 personnes dont 4 mineurs, lesquels, suite à la médiatisation de leur situation et aux pressions de la société civile, ont pu finalement être libérés et reconduits à Tunis pour le dépôt d’une demande d’asile auprès du HCR.

      Concernant les conditions dans le centre, Rajabu les décrit comme très difficiles. Ils sont environ 60 à y être enfermés dont 6 femmes. Les mesures préventives contre le COVID 19 ne sont pas respectées selon les normes de l’OMS. Les conditions sanitaires sont déplorables, avec seulement deux douches qui sont très sales. Ils reçoivent trois repas par jours mais les quantités sont insuffisantes et l’eau potable manque. Dans le réfectoire, il n’y a que 6 chaises pour tout le monde. Il n’y a qu’une prise de courant pour recharger les téléphones de l’ensemble des personnes enfermées.

      Depuis le lundi 6 avril, les personnes détenues à Wardiya sont en lutte. Certaines ont commencé une grève de la faim pour protester contre leur situation, ne buvant qu’un peu d’eau sucrée et salée. Depuis le jeudi 10 avril, ces personnes, ne recevant aucune suite favorable à leurs doléances, refusent de se laisser parquer dans les dortoirs la nuit (dont les portes sont fermées par des barres métalliques avec cadenas et sans lumière à l’intérieur) et ont sorti tous les matelas dehors. L’administration du centre a alors dressé une liste des contestataires et depuis le début du mouvement, leur fait subir diverses pressions.

      Rajabu a réussi à alerter plusieurs organisations sur sa situation, notamment le FTDES, Amnesty International, l’Organisation M’nemti, l’Observatoire International des Droits de l’homme, le Haut-commissariat des Nations-Unies aux Droits de l’Homme, la Ligue Tunisienne des Droits de l’homme, l’Organisation mondiale contre la torture… Il est également soutenu par des personnalités politiques, des avocat.es, divers médias ainsi que des journalistes indépendant.e.s. En revanche, aucun de ses partenaires n’ont répondu à ses appels à l’aide (OIM, ALDA, Tunisie terre d’asile, EUROMED…).

      Alors que pendant des années, il s’en est fait le défenseur et le porte-parole, le sort qu’il subit actuellement est celui de toutes les personnes en exil qui se heurtent à la violence des politiques migratoires !

      La criminalisation de ses activités solidaires avec les personnes migrantes et les tentatives de réduction au silence dont il fait l’objet sont inacceptables !

      Stop à la criminalisation de la solidarité et à l’enferment des migrant.es !

      https://ftdes.net/temoignage-de-rajabu-kilamuna-de-lassociation-migrants-sans-frontieres-enferm

      #Tunisia #Tunis #FTDES #migration #asylum #detention #expulsion #el-Ouardia #IOM #HCR

  • Bruxelles crée un #programme pour le retour volontaire de 5000 migrants

    Ylva Johansson, la commissaire aux affaires intérieures, a annoncé l’instauration d’un dispositif permettant le retour volontaire de 5000 migrants de Grèce vers leur pays d’origine. Avec 2000 euros par personne en guise de #mesure_incitative. Un article d’Euroefe.

    Lors d’une déclaration conjointe avec le ministre grec des Migrations, Notis Mitarakis, Ylva Johansson a précisé que la Commission européenne financerait ce programme afin d’aider à décongestionner les #îles surpeuplées de la mer Égée.

    Le dispositif, destiné aux personnes arrivées avant le premier janvier, ne donnera qu’un mois aux candidats pour se porter volontaires. Il sera géré en coopération avec l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (#OIM) et #Frontex, l’agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes.

    Notis Mitarakis a souligné que cette initiative venait s’ajouter aux 10000 transferts que le gouvernement grec s’était engagé à effectuer vers la Grèce continentale durant le premier trimestre 2020.

    https://www.euractiv.fr/section/migrations/news/bruxelles-cree-un-programme-pour-le-retour-volontaire-de-5000-migrants
    #UE #EU #retour_volontaire #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Europe #IOM #Grèce #hotspots

  • En #Libye, les oubliés

    #Michaël_Neuman a passé une dizaine de jours en Libye, auprès des équipes de Médecins Sans Frontières qui travaillent notamment dans des #centres_de_détention pour migrants. De son séjour, il ramène les impressions suivantes qui illustrent le caractère lugubre de la situation des personnes qui y sont retenues, pour des mois, des années, et celle plus difficile encore de toutes celles sujets aux #enlèvements et aux #tortures.

    La saison est aux départs. Les embarcations de fortune prennent la mer à un rythme soutenu transportant à leur bord hommes, femmes et enfants. Depuis le début de l’année, 2300 personnes sont parvenues en Europe, plus de 2000 ont été interceptées et ramenées en Libye, par les garde-côtes, formés et financés par les Européens. Les uns avaient dès leur départ le projet de rejoindre l’Europe, les autres ont fait ce choix après avoir échoué dans les réseaux de trafic d’êtres humains, soumis aux tortures et privations. Les trajectoires se mêlent, les raisons des départs des pays d’origine ne sont souvent pas univoques. En ce mois de février 2020, ils sont nombreux à tenter leur chance. Ils partent de Tripoli, de Khoms, de Sabrata… villes où se mêlent conflits, intérêts d’affaires, tribaux, semblants d’Etat faisant mine de fonctionner, corruption. Les Libyens ne sont pas épargnés par le désordre ou les épisodes de guerre. Pourtant, ce sont les apparences de vie normale qui frappent le visiteur. Les marchés de fruits et légumes, comme les bouchons qui encombrent les rues de Tripoli en témoignent  : la ville a gonflé au rythme des arrivées de déplacés originaires des quartiers touchés par la guerre d’attrition dont le pays est le théâtre entre le gouvernement intérimaire libyen qui règne encore sur Tripoli et une partie du littoral ouest et le LNA, du Maréchal Haftar, qui contrôle une grande partie du pays. Puissances internationales – Italie, France, Russie, Turquie, Emirats Arabes Unis – sont rentrées progressivement dans le jeu, transformant la Libye en poudrière dont chaque coup de semonce de l’un des belligérants semble annoncer une prochaine déflagration d’ampleur. Erdogan et Poutine se faisant face, le pouls du conflit se prend aujourd’hui autant à Idlib en Syrie qu’à Tripoli.

    C’est dans ce pays en guerre que l’Union européenne déploie sa politique de soutien aux interceptions et aux retours des ‘migrants’. Tout y passe  : financement et formation des gardes côtes-libyens, délégation du sauvetage aux navires commerciaux, intimidation des bateaux de sauvetage des ONG, suspension de l’Opération Sophia. Mais rien n’y fait  : ni les bombardements sur le port et l’aéroport de Tripoli, ni les tirs de roquettes sur des centres de détention situés à proximité d’installation militaire, pas davantage que les témoignages produits sur les exécrables conditions de vie qui prévalent dans les centres de détention, les détournements de financements internationaux, ou sur la précarité extrême des migrants résidant en ville n’ébranlent les certitudes européennes. L’hypocrisie règne  : l’Union européenne affirme être contre la détention tout en la nourrissant par l’entretien du dispositif libyen d’interception  ; le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les Réfugiés condamne les interceptions sans jamais évoquer la responsabilité des Européens.

    Onze centres de détention sont placés sous la responsabilité de la Direction chargée de l’immigration irrégulière libyenne (la DCIM). La liste évolue régulièrement sans que l’on sache toujours pourquoi, ni si la disparition d’un centre signifie véritablement qu’il a été vidé de ses détenus, ou qu’ils y résident encore sous un régime informel et sans doute plus violent encore. Une fois dans ces centres, les détenus ne savent jamais quand ils pourront en sortir  : certains s’en échappent, d’autres parviennent à acheter leur sortie, beaucoup y pourrissent des mois voire des années. L’attente y est physiquement et psychologiquement dévastatrice. C’est ainsi le lot des détenus de Dar El Jebel, près de Zintan, au cœur des montagnes Nafusa, loin et oubliés de tous : la plupart, des Erythréens, y sont depuis deux ans, parfois plus.

    La nourriture est insuffisante, les cellules, d’où les migrants ne sortent parfois que très peu, sont sombres et très froides ou très chaudes. Les journées sont parfois rythmées par les cliquetis des serrures et des barreaux. Dans la nuit du samedi 29 février au dimanche 1er mars 2020, une dizaine de jours après mon retour, un incendie sans doute accidentel à l’intérieur du centre de détention de Dar El Jebel a coûté la vie à un jeune homme érythréen.

    Nous pouvons certes témoigner que le travail entamé dans ces centres, l’attention portée à l’amélioration des conditions de vie, les consultations médicales, l’apport de compléments alimentaires, mais aussi et peut-être surtout la présence physique, visible, régulière ont contribué à les humaniser, voire à y limiter la violence qui s’y déploie. Pour autant, nous savons que tout gain est précaire, susceptible d’être mis à mal par un changement d’équilibre local, la rotation des gardes, la confiance qui se gagne et se perd, les services que nous rendons. Il n’est pas rare que les directeurs de centre expliquent que femmes et enfants n’ont rien à faire dans ces endroits, pas rare non plus qu’ils infligent des punitions sévères à ceux qui auraient tenté de s’échapper  ; certains affament leurs détenus, d’autres les libèrent lorsque la compagnie chargée de fournir les repas interrompt ses services faute de voir ses factures réglées. Il est probable que si les portes de certains centres de détention venaient à s’ouvrir, nombreux sont des détenus qui décideraient d’y rester, préférant à l’incertitude de l’extérieur leur précarité connue. Cela, beaucoup le disent à nos équipes. Dans ce pays fragmenté, les dynamiques et enjeux politiques locaux l’emportent. Ce qu’on apprend vite, en Libye, c’est l’impossibilité de généraliser les situations.

    Nous savons aussi que nous n’avons aucune vocation à devenir le service de santé d’un système de détention arbitraire  : il faut que ces gens sortent. Des hommes le plus souvent, mais aussi des femmes et des enfants, parfois tout petits, parfois nés en détention, parfois nés de viols. L’exposition à la violence, la perméabilité aux milices, aux trafiquants, la possibilité pour les détenus de travailler et de gagner un peu d’argent varient considérablement d’un centre à l’autre. Il en est aussi de leur accès pour les organisations humanitaires.

    Mais nous savons surtout que les centres de détention officiels n’abritent que 2000, 3000 des migrants en danger présents en Libye. Et les autres alors  ? Beaucoup travaillent, et assument une précarité qui est le lot, bien sûr à des degrés divers, de nombreux immigrés dans le monde, de Dubaï à Paris, de Khartoum à Bogota. Mais quelques dizaines de milliers d’autres, soit par malchance, soit parce qu’ils n’ont aucun projet de vie en Libye et recourent massivement aux services peu fiables de trafiquants risquent gros  : les enlèvements bien sûr, kidnappings contre rançons qui s’accompagnent de tortures et de sévices. Certains de ces «  migrants  », entre 45 000 et 50 000, sont reconnus «  réfugiés ou des demandeurs d’asiles  » par le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés : ils sont Erythréens, Soudanais, Somaliens pour la plupart. De très nombreux autres, migrants économiques dit-on, sont Nigérians, Maliens, Marocains, Guinéens, Bangladeshis, etc. Ils sont plus seuls encore.

    Pour les premiers, un maigre espoir de relocalisation subsiste  : l’année dernière, le HCR fut en mesure d’organiser le départ de 2400 personnes vers le Niger et le Rwanda, où elles ont été placées encore quelques mois en situation d’attente avant qu’un pays, le plus souvent européen, les accepte. A ce rythme donc, il faudrait 20 ans pour les évacuer en totalité – et c’est sans compter les arrivées nouvelles. D’autant plus que le programme de ‘réinstallation’ cible en priorité les personnes identifiées comme vulnérables, à savoir femmes, enfants, malades. Les hommes adultes, seuls – la grande majorité des Erythréens par exemple – ont peu de chance de faire partie des rares personnes sélectionnées. Or très lourdement endettés et craignant légitimement pour leur sécurité dans leur pays d’origine, ils ne rentreront en aucun cas ; ayant perdu l’espoir que le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés les fassent sortir de là, leur seule perspective réside dans une dangereuse et improbable traversée de la Méditerranée.

    Faute de lieux protégés, lorsqu’ils sont extraits des centres de détention par le HCR, ils sont envoyés en ville, à Tripoli surtout, devenant des ‘réfugiés urbains’ bénéficiant d’un paquet d’aide minimal, délivré en une fois et dont on peine à voir la protection qu’il garantit à qui que ce soit. Dans ces lieux, les migrants restent à la merci des trafiquants et des violences, comme ce fut le cas pour deux Erythréens en janvier dernier. Ceux-là avaient pourtant et pour un temps, été placés sous la protection du HCR au sein du Gathering and Departure Facility. Fin 2018, le HCR avait obtenu l’ouverture à Tripoli de ce centre cogéré avec les autorités libyennes et initialement destiné à faciliter l’évacuation des demandeurs d’asiles vers des pays tiers. Prévu à l’origine pour accueillir 1000 personnes, il n’aura pas résisté plus d’un an au conflit qui a embrasé la capitale en avril 2019 et à la proximité de milices combattantes.

    D’ailleurs, certains d’entre eux préfèrent la certitude de la précarité des centres de détention à l’incertitude plus inquiétante encore de la résidence en milieu ouvert  : c’est ainsi qu’à intervalles réguliers, nous sommes témoins de ces retours. En janvier, quatre femmes somalies, sommées de libérer le GDF en janvier, ont fait le choix de rejoindre en taxi leurs maris détenus à Dar El Jebel, dont elles avaient été séparées par le HCR qui ne reconnaissaient pas la légalité des couples. Les promesses d’évacuation étant virtuelles, elles sont en plus confrontées à une absurdité supplémentaire  : une personne enregistrée par le HCR ne pourra bénéficier du système de rapatriement volontaire de l’Organisation Internationale des Migrations quand bien même elle le souhaiterait.

    Pour les seconds, non protégés par le HCR, l’horizon n’est pas plus lumineux : d’accès à l’Europe, il ne peut en être question qu’au prix, là encore, d’une dangereuse traversée. L’alternative est le retour au pays, promue et organisée par l’Organisation internationale des Migrations et vécue comme une défaite souvent indépassable. De tels retours, l’OIM en a organisé plus de 40 000 depuis 2016. En 2020, ils seront probablement environ 10 000 à saisir l’occasion d’un «  départ volontaire  », dont on mesure à chaque instant l’absurdité de la qualification. Au moins, ceux-là auront-ils mis leur expérience libyenne derrière eux.

    La situation des migrants en Libye est à la fois banale et exceptionnelle. Exceptionnelle en raison de l’intense violence à laquelle ils sont souvent confrontés, du moins pour un grand nombre d’entre eux - la violence des trafiquants et des ravisseurs, la violence du risque de mourir en mer, la violence de la guerre. Mais elle est aussi banale, de manière terrifiante : la différence entre un Érythréen vivant parmi des rats sous le périphérique parisien ou dans un centre de détention à Khoms n’est pas si grande. Leur expérience de la migration est incroyablement violente, leur situation précaire et dangereuse. La situation du Darfouri à Agadez n’est pas bien meilleure, ni celle d’un Afghan de Samos, en Grèce. Il est difficile de ne pas voir cette population, incapable de bouger dans le monde de la mobilité, comme la plus indésirable parmi les indésirables. Ce sont les oubliés.

    https://www.msf-crash.org/index.php/fr/blog/camps-refugies-deplaces/en-libye-les-oublies
    #rapport_d'observation #torture #détention #gardes-côtes_libyens #hypocrisie #UE #EU #Union_européenne #responsabilité #Direction_chargée_de_l’immigration_irrégulière_libyenne (#DCIM) #Dar_El_Jebel #Zintan #montagne #Nafusa (#montagnes_Nafusa) #attente #violence #relocalisation #Niger #Rwanda #réinstallation #vulnérabilité #urban_refugees #Tripoli #réfugiés_urbains #HCR #GDF #OIM #IOM #rapatriement_volontaire #retour_au_pays #retour_volontaire

    ping @_kg_

  • Entre expulsion et retour volontaire, la frontière est fine

    Une nouvelle sémantique s’est construite au sein de l’Union européenne : celle du « retour volontaire » des migrants irréguliers. Découvrez sur le blog « Dialogues économiques » l’analyse du politologue #Jean-Pierre_Cassarino, qui travaille depuis de longues années sur la #migration_de_retour et met en garde contre l’utilisation abusive du terme « #retour » dans le discours politique.

    À l’heure des fake news et des décodex, les mots prennent des tournures ambivalentes. Langue de bois et autres artefacts langagiers construisent, au-delà des mots, des murs. Des murs qui n’ont plus d’oreilles et brouillent notre compréhension. Derrière cet appel incessant au « retour », résonnent les mots de Patrick Chamoiseau : « Ils organisent le fait que l’on n’arrive jamais1 ».

    Contrôles aux frontières, centres de détention, identification par empreintes digitales ou encore quotas d’expulsions ont fleuri dans tous les pays européens. Ces dispositifs ont germé sur le terreau fertile des discours sur le « retour » des migrants, diffusés dans les États membres et au sein de l’Union européenne.

    Avec la première vague migratoire venue des Balkans, cette nouvelle terminologie s’est affirmée au cours des années 1990 au point de devenir hégémonique aujourd’hui. Basée sur la dichotomie entre « #retour_volontaire » et « #retour_forcé », elle a été accréditée par l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM). Elle prend corps dans divers mécanismes comme « l’#aide_au_retour_volontaire » en France qui propose aux migrants irréguliers de retourner dans leur pays moyennant #compensation_financière.

    À travers une multitude d’entretiens réalisés en Algérie, au Maroc et en Tunisie avec des migrants expulsés ou ayant décidé de rentrer de leur propre chef, Jean-Pierre Cassarino, enseignant au Collège d’Europe et titulaire de la Chaire « Études migratoires » à l’IMéRA (Marseille), en résidence à l’IMéRA et enseignant au Collège d’Europe (Varsovie) revient sur l’utilisation trompeuse de ces catégories.

    La #novlangue du retour forcé/retour volontaire

    Dans 1984, George Orwell construisait une véritable novlangue où toutes les nuances étaient supprimées au profit de dichotomies qui annihilent la réflexion sur la complexité d’une situation. C’est oui, c’est non ; c’est blanc, c’est noir ; c’est simple. Toute connotation péjorative est supprimée et remplacée par la négation des concepts positifs. Le « mauvais » devient « non-bon ». Dans le livre d’Orwell, cette pensée binaire nie la critique vis-à-vis de l’État et tue dans l’œuf tout débat.

    Aujourd’hui, les instances internationales et européennes produisent un #discours_dichotomique où le retour volontaire se distingue du retour forcé. En 2005, le Conseil de l’Europe, écrit dans ses « Vingt principes directeurs sur le retour forcé » : « Le retour volontaire est préférable au retour forcé et présente beaucoup moins de #risques d’atteintes aux #droits_de_l’homme. C’est pourquoi il est recommandé aux pays d’accueil de l’encourager, notamment en accordant aux personnes à éloigner un délai suffisant pour qu’elles se conforment de leur plein gré à la décision d’éloignement et quittent le territoire national, en leur offrant une #aide_matérielle telle que des #primes ou la prise en charge des frais de transport, en leur fournissant des informations détaillées dans une langue qui leur est compréhensible sur les programmes existants de retour volontaire, en particulier ceux de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM)2. »

    Pour Jean-Pierre Cassarino, la #coercition s’applique pourtant dans les deux cas. L’Allemagne par exemple, considère l’Afghanistan comme un pays sûr. Elle a signé un accord avec ce dernier pour le « retour » volontaire et forcé des Afghans en situation irrégulière. Mais « les migrants qui ont été expulsés d’#Allemagne ont été forcés d’accepter le retour volontaire », explique Jean-Pierre Cassarino. Un des interrogés afghans témoigne ainsi : « On m’a demandé de signer et j’étais en détention, je ne voulais plus rester enfermé, j’avais peur ». Dans ce cas, parler de « retour volontaire » affirme un aspect positif. C’est un mécanisme politique plus facilement accepté par le public.

    Pour l’OIM, le retour volontaire concerne la personne qui signe une #déclaration dans laquelle elle accepte de retourner dans son pays. Dans ce cas et en règle générale, on lui offre le billet de retour. À l’inverse, dans le cas du retour forcé, la personne est contrainte, par ordre de la préfecture, de quitter le territoire. Elle est souvent accompagnée d’une #escorte de #rapatriement qui est coûteuse pour le gouvernement. Le retour volontaire n’est pas qu’une question sémantique, c’est aussi une question financière. On estime entre 10 000 et 15 000 euros une #reconduite_forcée à la frontière contre 2 000 à 4 000 pour un retour volontaire3. Dans tous les cas, dans cette dichotomie, la décision individuelle du migrant compte de moins en moins.

    Que se cache-t-il derrière le mot retour ?

    Peut-on utiliser le même mot pour un #migrant_rapatrié dans un pays en guerre, pour celui qui est renvoyé parce qu’illicite et pour celui qui décide, de sa propre initiative, de revenir au pays ? Difficile de nier l’aspect pluriel du retour migratoire.

    Jean-Pierre Cassarino explique comment la terminologie du « retour » s’assimile à l’#expulsion, par #manipulation_politique. Il se réfère à Albert Camus. Dans L’homme révolté, Camus plaide pour la #clarté_terminologique, parce qu’il ne faut pas « pactiser avec la propagande ». « Si une personne est expulsée de son pays elle n’est pas ‘retournée’ au pays. Les chercheurs travaillent de fait sur l’expulsion quand ils parlent de retour. »

    « Éjecté volontaire » ou « déplacé poétique », écrit l’écrivain Patrick Chamoiseau pour faire contrepoids.

    Retour pour le développement ?

    L’ampleur qu’a pu prendre « le retour » dans les instances internationales repose aussi sur la promotion du #développement dans les pays d’origine. Jean-Pierre Cassarino et son équipe de chercheurs ont interrogé 700 migrants tunisiens de retour en questionnant l’influence de l’expérience migratoire sur l’#entreprenariat. En mars 2014, un partenariat avait été signé entre la Tunisie et l’Union européenne pour faciliter l’acquisition de #compétences aux jeunes Tunisiens afin de leur permettre, une fois rentrés, de « développer des activités économiques rentables ».

    Qu’en est-il dans les faits ? Les migrants qui se sont insérés facilement dans le marché du travail avaient achevé leur séjour migratoire par eux-mêmes en affirmant leur souhait de revenir au pays. Qu’ils aient fini leurs études, qu’ils veuillent créer leur entreprise ou qu’ils aient atteint leurs objectifs en France, tous ont pu réunir les opportunités, le temps et les ressources nécessaires pour construire un projet de retour. Ici le « retour volontaire » prend tout son sens. Jean-Pierre Cassarino parle de cycle migratoire « complet ».

    Mais tous les migrants n’ont pas eu cette chance. La décision relève parfois d’un choix par défaut. Une socialisation difficile, des problèmes familiaux ou la précarité peuvent pousser la personne à rentrer à contrecœur. Pire, l’expérience migratoire peut être brutalement interrompue par une obligation à quitter le territoire. Pour ces migrants qui ne peuvent achever leur cycle (qu’il soit incomplet ou interrompu), de sérieuses difficultés se présentent sur la route du retour. Ils ont beaucoup plus de mal à s’insérer dans le monde professionnel.

    En approchant le retour par la complétude des #cycles_migratoires, Jean Pierre Cassarino montre qu’il n’y a pas qu’une façon de revenir et que la durée du séjour a des conséquences sur le développement dans le pays d’origine. C’est un appel à repenser les usages politiques et sémantiques du « retour » ; à remettre en question des notions qui s’inscrivent dans les inconscients collectifs. C’est un rappel à ce que Václav Havel écrit dans Quelques mots sur la parole : « Et voilà justement de quelle manière diabolique les mots peuvent nous trahir, si nous ne faisons pas constamment preuve de prudence en les utilisant ».

    Références :
    – Cassarino, Jean-Pierre (2014) « A Reappraisal of the EU’s Expanding Readmission System », The International Spectator : Italian Journal of International Affairs, 49:4, p. 130-145.
    – Cassarino, Jean-Pierre (2015) « Relire le lien entre migration de retour et entrepreneuriat, à la lumière de l’exemple tunisien », Méditerranée, n° 124, p. 67-72.

    https://lejournal.cnrs.fr/nos-blogs/dialogues-economiques-leco-a-portee-de-main/entre-expulsion-et-retour-volontaire-la
    #expulsion #retour_volontaire #mots #sémantique #vocabulaire #migrations #asile #réfugiés #dichotomie #prix #coût

    Autres mots, @sinehebdo ?
    #migration_de_retour
    #migrant_rapatrié
    « #éjecté_volontaire »
    « #déplacé_poétique »

    ping @_kg_ @karine4

  • Un tiers des rapatriements par Frontex provenait de la Belgique en 2019

    Environ un tiers de l’ensemble des rapatriements via Frontex provenait de Belgique.

    De tous les pays membres de l’Union européenne, la Belgique est celui qui a fait le plus appel l’an dernier au soutien de l’agence européenne de gardes-frontières et de gardes-côtes Frontex pour renvoyer dans leur pays d’origine des personnes en séjour illégal, ressort-il de chiffres livrés mercredi par le cabinet de la ministre en charge de l’Asile et de la Migration, Maggie De Block (Open Vld).

    Selon le cabinet de la ministre libérale flamande, en 2019, la Belgique a pu compter sur environ 2,5 millions d’euros de l’Union européenne pour les vols de 1.540 personnes qui devaient quitter le territoire. 233 ont été accompagnées jusqu’à leur pays d’origine et 1.279 ont pu monter à bord sans escorte. 28 sont parties volontairement. L’an dernier, Frontex a été utilisé dans le cadre du #retour_volontaire, tant en Belgique que dans l’Union européenne.

    Retour forcé, la clé de voûte

    « Le #retour_forcé reste la clé de voûte de notre politique de l’asile et de la migration ferme et humaine », a commenté Mme De Block dans ce contexte. Selon la ministre, en 2020, l’Office des Étrangers continue à miser de manière ciblée sur le retour forcé des #criminels_illégaux, des demandeurs d’asile déboutés et des #transmigrants. Il produira encore des efforts supplémentaires. Cette semaine, quarante places en centres fermés ont rouvert pour la détention de groupes cibles prioritaires, comme des criminels illégaux, des récidivistes causant des troubles et des illégaux en transit via la Belgique. Dans les centres fermés, leur expulsion continue à être préparée.

    Les quarante places avaient été libérées à la suite de la décision en décembre de la ministre De Block et de son collègue Pieter De Crem, ministre de l’Intérieur, d’"optimaliser l’approche de la transmigration". Pour les #illégaux_en_transit, 160 places restent prévues dans les centres fermés.

    En outre, la Belgique continue à miser sur des #accords avec les pays d’origine pour collaborer au retour. Ainsi, un accord de retour a été conclu en 2019 avec le Rwanda et des discussions sont en cours avec la Turquie (avec l’UE), l’Angola, le Kirghizistan, le Tadjikistan et le Vietnam (via le Benelux) et avec l’Algérie, le Niger et le Sénégal.

    https://www.levif.be/actualite/belgique/un-tiers-des-rapatriements-par-frontex-provenait-de-la-belgique-en-2019/article-news-1239993.html
    #renvois #expulsions #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Frontex #Belgique #statistiques #chiffres #2019 #machine_à_expulser

    @sinehebdo
    Trois mots en plus ? ça foisonne dans cet article où le choix des mots est fort discutable...
    #criminels_illégaux #transmigrants #illégaux_en_transit
    #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire

    • #Taimur_Shinwari, 07.08.2015

      IN MEMORIA DI TAIMUR SHINWARI

      Martedì 11 Agosto alla sera a Gorizia nel parco della Rimembranza si è tenuta una veglia di preghiera per Taimur Shinwari, un ragazzo pakistano di 25 anni.

      Venerdì scorso è morto tragicamente nelle acque dell’#Isonzo goriziano.

      Taimur aveva percorso un lungo tragitto da migrante per tutto il Medio Oriente e i Balcani come tanti suoi connazionali e coetanei, ma purtroppo è affogato in modo banale nel fiume di #Gorizia.

      Per ricordarlo e per raccogliere fondi, affinché il suo corpo possa ritornare a casa dalla sua famiglia, il movimento dei Focolarini ha organizzato una liturgia assieme agli altri rifugiati alternando preghiere musulmane a quelle cristiane. Oltre ai cittadini italiani vi era un numeroso gruppo di ragazzi richiedenti asilo di Gorizia che hanno mostrato molta solidarietà per il compagno morto.

      Tante erano le candele accese per Taimur e tanti sono stati i ringraziamenti da parte dei suoi compagni per il rispetto dimostrato durante la loro funzione. I Giovani per la Pace hanno partecipato a questo momento di raccoglimento.

      11866403_873446389392305_4084821147627854243_n
      http://www.giovaniperlapace.it/2015/08/13/per-taimur-shinwari

      –-> mort de « non-accueil », comme exprimé par la personne qui m’a signalé sa mort par mail.

    • #Zarzai_Mirwais, juillet 2016
      La morte di Zarzai Mirwais, oggi il lavaggio del corpo

      GRADISCA. Si avvicina il momento del rimpatrio in Afghanistan della salma di Zarzai Mirwais, il 35enne afghano ospite del #Cara annegato nell’#Isonzo, sul versante della sponda sagradina del fiume. Le procedure burocratiche, seguite dalla Prefettura e da un’associazione triestina di mediazione culturale che hanno mantenuto i contatti con l’ambasciata afghana a Roma, sono state quasi del tutto ultimate. I costi, ingenti, per il rimpatrio del corpo del povero Mirwais saranno sostenuti interamente dagli amici dell’uomo. Questa mattina, intanto, in una camera mortuaria del nosocomio di Monfalcone verrà celebrato, secondo il costume islamico, il rito del lavaggio del corpo. A celebrarlo, alle 10, sarà un imam proveniente dalla Germania e messo a disposizione dai parenti di Zarzai Mirwais, che già nelle ore immediatamente successive alla tragedia avevano raggiunto Gradisca. Al rito, che per la sua intimità si svolgerà comprensibilmente a porte chiuse, parteciperanno gli ospiti del Cara che più avevano legato con l’afghano, che in patria ha lasciato due figli e una consorte. Molti altri richiedenti asilo del centro gradiscano hanno manifestato l’intenzione di essere presenti in questo momento di dolore per la non piccola comunità del Cara, che conta attualmente circa 400 ospiti. La celebrazione del rito del lavaggio della salma sblocca, fra l’altro, anche lo svolgimento della veglia di preghiera interreligiosa che la Caritas diocesana, l’amministrazione comunale della Fortezza, la parrocchia di Gradisca e tante altre associazioni di volontariato avevano pensato per onorare la memoria di Zarzai. La tradizione islamica prevede infatti che non possa essere svolta una preghiera funebre prima che sia stato ultimato il simbolico rito del lavaggio del corpo del defunto. La veglia interconfessionale sarà organizzata con tutta probabilità domani sera alle 20 negli spazi esterni della parrocchia di San Valeriano, nella cittadina della Fortezza.

      https://necrologie.ilpiccolo.gelocal.it/news/34814

    • #Sajid_Hussain, 14.06.2019
      COMUNICATO PER LA MORTE DI SAJID HUSSAIN

      Sajid Hussain aveva 30 anni ed era originario del Parachinar, in Pakistan. Era arrivato in Europa qualche anno fa. Dalla Germania, dove aveva chiesto l’asilo politico e aveva vissuto alcuni anni, si era poi spostato in Italia, come molti suoi connazionali: tuttavia la sua richiesta d’asilo in Italia si era arenata in quanto il Paese di competenza – secondo il regolamento di Dublino II (2003/343/CE) – era la Germania, dove però le persone originarie del Parachinar difficilmente ricevono la protezione, al contrario di quanto avviene nel resto dell’Unione europea. In Italia, era entrato nel sistema di accoglienza a Staranzano (GO): era stato seguito dal Centro di Salute Mentale di Monfalcone. A seguito del cosiddetto Decreto Sicurezza e del conseguente smantellamento del sistema SPRAR di accoglienza diffusa, era stato trasferito, insieme ai suoi compagni, nel CARA di Gradisca d’Isonzo, gestito dalla cooperativa Minerva.

      Otto mesi fa, aveva chiesto di avviare la procedura per il cosiddetto rimpatrio volontario assistito, gestito dall’agenzia dell’ONU per le migrazioni (IOM/OIM): il rimpatrio volontario è una misura di controllo e contrasto all’immigrazione, attraverso la quale uno Stato (o un’organizzazione internazionale) danno un sostegno economico alle persone che decidono di rientrare nel loro Paese di provenienza. Il processo di rimpatrio assistito di Sajid Hussain era bloccato per mancanza di fondi, come è stato per mesi per tutti quelli gestiti da IOM/OIM. Sajid chiedeva insistentemente di essere rimpatriato o rimandato in Germania: per dimostrare questo suo desiderio, circa quattro mesi fa aveva stracciato i suoi documenti.

      Sajid si è annegato nell’Isonzo a Gorizia il 14 giugno, dopo essere stato in Questura a chiedere se si fosse sbloccata la sua procedura di rimpatrio.

      La vita di Sajid Hussain interseca in più punti l’insostenibilità del governo europeo delle migrazioni: un sistema che l’ha costretto a un ingresso pericoloso e illegale; che l’ha inserito in un database di sorveglianza (Eurodac); che gli ha vietato di scegliere il Paese dove vivere e l’ha costretto a tentare la procedura di asilo in Italia; che l’ha sottoposto a un processo per la richiesta d’asilo lungo e precarizzante; che lo ha costretto a vivere in una struttura affollata e non adatta alla vita delle persone; che non l’ha tutelato per i suoi problemi psichici; che non gli ha permesso di scegliere di tornare indietro, ingabbiandolo in una strada senza uscita. Il suicidio di Sajid è anche una conseguenza diretta di questo sistema: è la scelta di una persona senza possibilità di scelta; è la scelta di una persona che, come tante altre, viveva le condizioni materiali di invisibilità e disumanizzazione alle quali è sottoposta/o chi entra in Europa illegalmente. Il suicidio di Sajid è una morte di Stato.

      Se il Decreto sicurezza, con lo smantellamento del sistema SPRAR e l’eliminazione della protezione umanitaria, ha reso la vita in Italia dei/lle richiedenti asilo ancora più dura, è anche vero che in Italia l’immigrazione è sempre stata gestita come un fenomeno da controllare, incanalare e reprimere, secondo le necessità del mercato del lavoro. In questo razzismo istituzionale, che fonda lo Stato italiano come è oggi, sta l’origine dello sfruttamento delle migrazioni e dell’accettabilità dell’idea stessa che le persone richiedenti asilo possano essere ammassate in una struttura come il CARA di Gradisca, isolate, infantilizzate e costrette a un’attesa lunga mesi. A fianco a quel luogo, il CARA, dovrebbe essere presto aperta una prigione per persone irregolari: il Centro Permanente per il Rimpatrio (CPR), voluto dal Decreto Minniti-Orlando. L’apertura del CPR – di fatto un lager per le persone rinchiuse – porterebbe anche a un aumento del controllo poliziesco sulle vite delle persone che vivono nel CARA, oltre a essere per loro una minaccia visibile di espulsione e rimpatrio.

      Il suicidio di Sajid, morto di Stato, segue (almeno) altri quattro suicidi che sono avvenuti negli ultimi due anni tra i richiedenti asilo in Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Questa invisibilità che si fa visibile per un giorno come notizia di cronaca nera è un richiamo potente all’evidenza della brutalità del sistema delle frontiere, che crea una gerarchia mortale tra gli abitanti del mondo. La lotta per la distruzione di tutti i confini è una lotta per la libertà di tutt*.

      https://nofrontierefvg.noblogs.org/post/2019/06/20/comunicato-per-la-morte-di-sajid-hussain

      –--------

      Storia di Sajid, che voleva ritornare a casa

      Si chiamava Sajid Hussain il migrante pakistano annegato nel fiume Isonzo, a Gorizia, lo scorso 14 giugno. Sajid aveva trent’anni, proveniva dalla regione del Parachinar, dove aveva tre figli piccoli. Era in Europa da tre anni, prima in Germania e poi in Italia, da poco meno di un anno e mezzo. Nel nostro paese la sua richiesta di protezione si era però arenata a causa del trattato di Dublino. Lo stato competente, che per primo aveva identificato e ricevuto la domanda d’asilo di Sajid, era infatti la Germania.

      Sajid era ospitato da qualche tempo nel Centro d’accoglienza per richiedenti asilo di Gradisca d’Isonzo, in provincia di Gorizia, in seguito alla chiusura dei progetti di accoglienza diffusa dello Sprar, per effetto del decreto Salvini. Prima divideva con alcuni connazionali un alloggio nel vicino paese di Staranzano.

      Sajid però non è morto per un incidente, nell’Isonzo si è gettato volontariamente. Aveva deciso di tornare a casa, in Pakistan, o intanto in Germania, per poi partire da lì. Per questo aveva chiesto il rimpatrio, ma anche quella procedura era ferma da otto mesi, bloccata per la mancanza di fondi. Il rimpatrio volontario assistito è gestito dai governi con l’aiuto di organizzazioni internazionali come l’IOM (International Organization for Migration), o da ong come l’italiana Cefa. Il rimpatrio assistito prevede che il migrante riceva una somma, oltre i costi del viaggio, per aiutarlo a reinserirsi nel suo paese d’origine, trovare un lavoro o avviare un’attività. Questa soluzione è meno costosa per lo stato del rimpatrio coatto. L’Italia però ci investe meno di altri paesi europei come Francia e Germania.

      Come Sajid, chiedono il rimpatrio volontario molti migranti che non vedono nessuna prospettiva nel paese in cui si trovano. Per lui, però, il limbo in cui era finito era diventato insostenibile: quattro mesi fa aveva perfino strappato i suoi documenti per protesta. Negli ultimi mesi si era chiuso nel silenzio e chi lo conosceva bene è sicuro soffrisse di depressione. Sajid si è buttato nell’Isonzo dopo un’ultima visita alla questura di Gorizia. Era andato a controllare se la sua situazione si fosse sbloccata.

      Il suicidio di Sajid non è purtroppo un fatto isolato. Solo nelle strutture di accoglienza del Friuli-Venezia Giulia si sono registrati altri quattro casi negli ultimi anni. Sintomo di un sistema che funziona male, con strutture affollate e sempre meno tutele per la salute, anche psicologica, dei migranti.

      Per fare in modo che almeno la salma di Sajid possa tornare in Pakistan, amici e familiari si sono già mobilitati, promuovendo una raccolta fondi su internet.

      http://www.coopforwords.it/works/view/5647

      #Dublin #Staranzano #Cara #Gradisca #retour_volontaire #santé_mentale #suicide

    • juillet 2019:

      juillet 2019:
      Tentative de suicide, selon des informations reçues par mail il s’agit d’un pakistanais:

      All’inizio di luglio, un altro giovane migrante ospite del centro aveva tentato il suicidio, provando a buttarsi nell’Isonzo tra #Gradisca e #Poggio_Terza_Armata, ma era stato bloccato da un passante.

      https://www.dinamopress.it/news/gradisca-la-gestione-dellimmigrazione-uccide

      –------

      Tomasinsig porta il caso del migrante in Prefettura

      Il caso del 30enne pakistano che ha tentato di gettarsi dalla passerella fra Gradisca e Poggio Terza Armata, e che ha rischiato di bissare la tragica fine di un connazionale annegato nell’Isonzo a Gorizia appena 20 giorni prima, sarà portato dal sindaco della Fortezza, Linda Tomasinsig, al Tavolo per l’Accoglienza convocato per oggi in Prefettura a Gorizia.

      I due cittadini pakistani, entrambi ospiti del Cara, sognavano entrambi il rimpatrio. All’incontro parteciperanno anche i vertici di Prefettura e Questura, le forze dell’ordine e le associazioni locali impegnate nel campo dell’immigrazione. «Fra i temi all’ordine del giorno, è ipotizzabile che vi saranno novità sulle tempistiche di apertura del Cpr – spiega Tomasinsig – ma chiederò lumi anche sull’annunciato piano trasferimenti di migranti ad altre regioni, ed illustrerò i contenuti dell’ordinanza anti-bivacchi nelle aree fluviali redatta assieme al collega Vittori di Sagrado».

      https://messaggeroveneto.gelocal.it/udine/cronaca/2019/07/11/news/tomasinsig-porta-il-caso-del-migrante-in-prefettura-1.36965

    • 18.12.2019

      Mercoledì 18 dicembre #Atif, che viveva nel Cara di Gradisca, proprio a fianco del Cpr, è morto annegato nell’Isonzo.

      https://radioblackout.org/2020/01/gradisca-proteste-evasioni-solidarieta

      –---

      Il corpo di Atif se l’è preso l’Isonzo, la sua vita gli è stata rubata da un confine assurdo e da una legge ingiusta

      Mercoledì 18 dicembre Atif è caduto nell’Isonzo. Assieme ad altri ragazzi che come lui sono ospitati nel vicino CARA di Gradisca stava ingannando il tempo sulla riva del fiume.

      Alcuni articoli giornalistici lasciano intendere che la colpa è di un gioco avventato, di una stupida scommessa tra amici.

      Ma prima di lui l’Isonzo si è portato via Taimur nel 2015, e Zarzai nel 2016. Nel giugno di quest’anno Sajid nel fiume ha deciso di far finire la sua vita.

      Tutti loro hanno avuto la sfortuna di nascere in quello che secondo le nostre leggi è il lato “sbagliato” del mondo. Chi vi nasce se vuole cercare fortuna altrove non può, come facciamo noi europei, semplicemente comprare un biglietto d’aereo. Deve affidarsi ai trafficanti, affrontare un viaggio lungo e massacrante, pagare cifre astronomiche, solamente per poter mettere un piede oltre al confine della fortezza Europa.

      Atif vi era riuscito in ottobre, fermato nei pressi della frontiera con la Slovenia, e stava attendendo da allora l’esito della sua richiesta d’asilo.

      Era quindi entrato nel gorgo della legge sull’immigrazione italiana, quella che costringe ad attendere per mesi e mesi e in alcuni casi anni un colloquio con una “commissione” il cui esito sembra più l’estrazione di una lotteria che il frutto di una qualche valutazione.

      Nel frattempo la vita alienante al CARA di Gradisca, distante da tutto e tutti, nessun tipo di attività per far passare le giornate, nemmeno uno straccio di marciapiede per raggiungere il bar più vicino o le sponde dell’Isonzo.

      Quelle sponde dove i ragazzi del CARA vanno a consumare o cucinare il cibo che si comperano, per sfuggire all’immangiabile pasta o riso che all’infinito ripropone il “menu” della mensa della struttura.

      Quelle sponde dove a volte sono inseguiti dai solerti tutori delle forze dell’ordine pronti a comminare multe da 300€ a seguito dell’ordinanza della “democratica” amministrazione di Gradisca che vieta di bivaccarvi. La stessa amministrazione che non ha mai pensato di offrire nessuna alternativa degna per trascorrere il tempo, un posto al coperto dove poter stare assieme, magari leggere qualche libro, prepararsi il the o semplicemente stare in pace in un luogo sicuro.

      Chi ha conosciuto Atif racconta di un ragazzo solare, che seguiva un corso d’italiano organizzato da volontari fuori dal CARA, che voleva aiutare la madre e le quattro sorelle rimaste sole in Pakistan dopo la morte del padre.

      Atif non realizzerà i sui progetti: la sua vita gli è stata rubata da un confine assurdo e da una legge ingiusta.

      https://nofrontierefvg.noblogs.org/post/2019/12/22/il-corpo-di-atif-se-le-preso-lisonzo-la-sua-vita-gli-e-stata

  • IOM Organizes First Humanitarian #Charter Flight from Algeria to Niger

    This week (15/10), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) organized its first flight for voluntary return from the southern Algerian city of #Tamanrasset to Niger’s capital, #Niamey, carrying 166 Nigerien nationals, in close collaboration with the Governments of Algeria and Niger.

    This is the first movement of its kind for vulnerable Nigerien migrants through IOM voluntary return activities facilitated by the governments of Algeria and Niger and in close cooperation with Air Algérie. This flight was organized to avoid a long tiring journey for migrants in transit by using a shorter way to go home.

    For the first flight, 18 per cent of the returnees, including women and children were selected for their vulnerabilities, including medical needs.

    “The successful return of over 160 vulnerable Nigerien migrants through this inaugural voluntary return flight ensures, safe and humane return of migrants who are in need of assistance to get to their country of origin,” said Paolo Caputo, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Algeria. “This movement is the result of the combined efforts of both IOM missions and the Governments of Algeria and Niger.”

    IOM staff in Algeria provided medical assistance to more than 10 migrants prior to their flight and ensured that all their health needs were addressed during their travel and upon arrival in Niger.

    IOM also provides technical support to the Government of Niger in registering the returned Nigeriens upon arrival in Niger and deliver basic humanitarian assistance before they travel to their communities of origin.

    Since 2016, IOM missions in Niger and Libya have assisted over 7,500 Nigerien migrants with their return from Libya through voluntary humanitarian return operations.

    Upon arrival, the groups of Nigerien migrants returning with IOM-organized flights from both Algeria and Libya receive assistance, such as food and pocket money, to cover their immediate needs, including in-country onward transportation.

    After the migrants have returned to their communities of origin, IOM offers different reintegration support depending on their needs, skills and aspirations. This can include medical assistance, psychosocial support, education, vocational training, setting up an income generating activity, or support for housing and other basic needs.

    “This movement today represents a big step in the right direction for the dignified return of migrants in the region,” said Barbara Rijks, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Niger. “We are grateful for the financial support of the Governments of the United Kingdom and Italy who have made this possible,” she added.


    https://www.iom.int/news/iom-organizes-first-humanitarian-charter-flight-algeria-niger
    #IOM #OIM #Algérie #Niger #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #retours_volontaires #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réfugiés_nigérians #Nigeria #Italie #UK #Angleterre #externalisation #frontières #charters_humanitaires

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur les refoulements d’Algérie au Niger
    https://seenthis.net/messages/748397
    Ici il s’agit plutôt de migrants abandonnés dans le désert, alors que l’OIM parle de « dignified return », mais je me demande jusqu’à quel point c’est vraiment différent...

    signalé par @pascaline

    ping @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

  • Nigerian migrants struggle to reintegrate after Libya ordeal

    Emerging from her ordeal, Gloria considers herself “privileged”. Last year, the 26-year-old left Nigeria with four other women, dreaming of a better life in Europe.

    On a tortuous journey, three of the five friends died before reaching Libya, where the two survivors were stranded for almost a year. Now only Gloria is back home in Nigeria.

    She dreamed of being a fashion designer but now sews synthetic tracksuits in a shabby workshop in Benin City, southern Nigeria, for 15,000 naira a month ($41.50, 38 euros).

    “After transport, the money is almost finished”, she says.

    Still, she adds quickly, she “thanks God for having a job”.

    Her employment is part of a training programme, set up by southern Edo State, the departure point for most Nigerian migrants.

    Gloria is one of nearly 14,000 young Nigerians to have returned from Libya since 2017 under a United Nations voluntary repatriation programme.

    She and the other returnees quoted in this story asked not to be identified by their real names.

    She is “not asking for too much”, just a roof over her head and to be able to eat, Gloria tells AFP.

    But she blames herself for daring to dream that life could be better elsewhere and believing the smugglers’ promises that they would reach Europe within two weeks.

    – Broke and broken -

    In Libya, prospects of crossing the Mediterranean vanished, after a tightening of European Union immigration policies.

    Many spend months, even years stranded in Libya, sold as slaves by their smugglers.

    But once back home in Nigeria, life is even more difficult than before: saddled with debt, struggling to find work, broken by their treatment at the hands of the traffickers and by their failed dreams.

    Human Rights Watch highlighted the “continuing anguish” that returnees face.

    Many suffer long-term mental and physical health problems as well as social stigma on returning to Nigeria, the report released last month said.

    Government-run centres tasked with looking after them are poorly funded and “unable to meet survivors’ multiple needs for long-term comprehensive assistance”, it added.

    Edo State has set up a support programme which is rare in Nigeria.

    The state hosts some 4,800 of the nearly 14,000 returnees — most aged 17 to 35 and with no diploma or formal qualifications.

    Under the scheme, they can travel for free to Benin City, Edo’s capital, stay two nights in a hotel, receive an hour of psychological support and an about 1,000-euro allowance.

    It barely moves the needle for those starting again but is enough to stoke envy in a country where state aid is scarce and 83 million people live in extreme poverty.

    – Stigma -

    Showing potential students around, Ukinebo Dare, of the Edo Innovates vocational training programme, says many youngsters grumble that returnees get “preferential treatment”.

    In modern classrooms in Benin City, a few hundred students learn to “code”, do photography, start a small business and learn marketing in courses open to all.

    “Classes are both for the youth and returnees, (be)cause we don’t want the stigma to affect them,” Dare said.

    “It’s a priority for us to give youth, who are potential migrants, opportunities in jobs they can be interested in.”

    According to Nigeria’s National Bureau of Statistics, 55 percent of the under-35s were unemployed at the end of last year.

    Tike had a low paying job before leaving Nigeria in February 2017 but since returning from Libya says his life is “more, more, more harder than before”.

    Although he returned “physically” in December 2017 he says his “mindset was fully corrupted”.

    “I got paranoid. I couldn’t think straight. I couldn’t sleep, always looking out if there is any danger,” he said, at the tiny flat he shares with his girlfriend, also back from Libya, and their four-month-old daughter.

    – Crime -

    A few months after returning, and with no psychological support, Tike decided to train to be a butcher.

    But, more than a year since he registered for help with reintegration programmes, including one run by the International Organization for Migration, he has not found a job and has no money to start his own business.

    “We, the youth, we have no job. What we have is cultism (occult gangs),” Tike says.

    “People see it as a way of getting money, an excuse for getting into crime.”

    Since last year, when Nigeria was still in its longest economic recession in decades, crime has increased in the state of Edo, according to official data.

    “Returnees are seen as people who are coming to cause problems in the community,” laments Lilian Garuba, of the Special Force against Illegal Migration.

    “They see them as failure, and not for what they are: victims.”

    – Debt spiral -

    Peter, 24, was arrested a few days after his return.

    His mother had borrowed money from a neighbourhood lender to raise the 1,000 euros needed to pay his smuggler.

    “As soon as he heard I was back, he came to see her. She couldn’t pay (the debt), so I was arrested by the police,” he told AFP, still shaking.

    Financially crippled, his mother had to borrow more money from another lender to pay off her debts.

    Peter’s last trip was already his second attempt.

    “When I first came back from Libya, I thought I was going to try another country. I tried, but in Morocco it was even worse and thank God I was able to return to Nigeria,” he said, three weeks after getting back.

    “Now I have nothing, nothing,” he said, his voice breaking.

    “All I think about is ’kill yourself’, but what would I gain from it? I can’t do that to my mother.”

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/afp/article-7471729/Nigerian-migrants-struggle-reintegrate-Libya-ordeal.html
    #réintégration #Nigeria #asile #Libye #retour_volontaire #retour_au_pays #renvois #expulsions #migrations #réfugiés #Assisted_Return_and_Reintegration_Programmes
    ping @isskein @_kg_

    • Au Nigeria, la difficile réintégration des migrants rapatriés au lendemain du cauchemar libyen

      Après avoir été la proie des passeurs dans l’espoir d’une traversée pour l’Europe, 14 000 Nigérians sont revenus au pays, où ils sont souvent stigmatisés et rejetés.

      Gloria se considère comme une « privilégiée ». Elle est partie avec quatre autres filles vers l’Europe, mais, après avoir vécu l’enfer pendant près d’un an bloquée en Libye, elle est la seule à avoir été rapatriée au Nigeria. Trois de ses amies sont mortes pendant le voyage.

      La jeune femme de 26 ans a même trouvé un petit boulot de retour à Benin City, grâce à un programme de formation mis en place par l’Etat d’Edo, une région du sud du Nigeria d’où partent encore la majorité des candidats nigérians à l’exil.

      Gloria rêvait de devenir styliste. A la place, elle coud des survêtements synthétiques à la chaîne dans un atelier miteux pour 15 000 nairas par mois (40 euros), mais « remercie Dieu d’avoir un travail ».

      « Après avoir payé le transport pour rentrer à la maison, il ne reste presque rien, assure Gloria, dans un joli tee-shirt jaune. Mais je ne me plains pas. Je ne veux pas en demander trop. J’ai juste besoin d’un toit et de quoi manger », confie-t-elle.
      « Ne pas en demander trop »

      Comme beaucoup parmi les 14 000 jeunes Nigérians rentrés de Libye depuis 2017, Gloria « ne “veut” pas en demander trop ». Elle s’en veut encore d’avoir un jour osé rêver que la vie pouvait être meilleure ailleurs, et d’avoir cru naïvement des passeurs promettant de rejoindre l’Europe en moins de deux semaines.

      La plupart des Nigérians rapatriés via le programme de retour volontaire des Nations unies ont entre 17 et 35 ans et sont sans diplôme. Pendant des mois, et pour certains des années, ils sont restés bloqués en Libye, vendus, maltraités, extorqués par leurs passeurs, et incapables de traverser la Méditerranée avec le durcissement des politiques d’immigration de l’Union européenne.

      De retour dans leur pays d’origine, ils se retrouvent souvent confrontés à une vie encore plus difficile que lorsqu’ils sont partis : criblés de dettes, sans emploi, brisés par les tortures de leurs trafiquants et par leurs rêves échoués.

      Un rapport de Human Rights Watch publié le 27 août dénonce l’état terrible des « survivants de la traite » à leur retour. Beaucoup souffrent notamment de « troubles psychologiques graves », de « problèmes de santé et sont stigmatisés ». Les quelques centres ou associations qui existent pour s’occuper d’eux disposent de très peu d’aide financière et « sont incapables de répondre aux besoins des survivants sur le long terme ».

      L’Etat d’Edo, qui a dû accueillir à lui seul 4 800 des 14 000 rapatriés nigérians depuis 2017, a mis en place un rare programme de soutien pour ces populations extrêmement vulnérables : un transport gratuit à leur descente de l’avion de l’aéroport de Lagos jusqu’à Benin City, deux nuits d’hôtel, une heure de soutien psychologique et une allocation d’une centaine d’euros environ. C’est une goutte d’eau pour affronter une nouvelle vie, mais assez pour alimenter les jalousies dans un pays où les aides d’Etat sont quasiment inexistantes et où 83 millions de personnes vivent sous le seuil de l’extrême pauvreté (1,90 dollar par jour et par personne).
      « Retrouver la vie »

      La société les montre du doigt et les surnomme avec dédain les « retournés » ou les « déportés ». « Les gens disent que les “retournés” ont des traitements préférentiels », explique Ukinebo Dare, responsable du programme Edo Innovates de formation professionnelle ouvert à tous à Benin City. Il en fait la visite guidée : des salles de classe ultra modernes où des étudiants apprennent à « coder », à faire de la photographie, à monter une petite entreprise ou le B.A. ba du marketing.

      « Nous veillons à les mélanger avec d’autres jeunes. Nous ne voulons pas qu’ils soient stigmatisés, explique la jeune femme. C’est une priorité d’offrir des formations pour tous les jeunes, car ce sont autant de potentiels migrants. »

      Selon le Bureau national des statistiques, 55 % des moins de 35 ans n’avaient pas d’emploi au Nigeria fin 2018. Des chiffres particulièrement inquiétants dans ce pays qui a l’une des croissances démographiques les plus élevées au monde.

      Tike, lui, avait un petit boulot avant de tenter de gagner l’Europe en février 2017. « Quand je pense au passé, j’ai envie de pleurer », lâche-t-il dans son minuscule appartement où il vit avec sa petite amie, elle aussi de retour de Libye, et leur fille de 4 mois. Tike est rentré « physiquement » en décembre 2017. Son esprit, lui, était encore « là-haut », paralysé dans la « paranoïa » et les « traumas », confie-t-il.

      Mais quelques mois plus tard, sans aucun soutien psychologique, il a « retrouvé la vie », comme il dit, et a décidé de suivre une formation en boucherie. Cela fait plus d’un an qu’il a monté des dossiers auprès de diverses organisations d’aide à la réintégration, dont l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM), mais il n’a pas trouvé d’emploi et n’a aucun argent pour démarrer sa propre société. « Beaucoup de jeunes se tournent vers les “cultes”, les gangs locaux, reconnaît Tike. Ils sont facilement recrutés par les mafias qui leur promettent un peu d’argent. »
      Spirale de pauvreté

      Depuis l’année 2018, une période très difficile économiquement pour le pays, la criminalité a augmenté dans l’Etat d’Edo, selon les données officielles. « Les “retournés” sont tenus pour responsables, regrette Lilian Garuba, de la Force spéciale contre la migration illégale, une antenne contre le trafic des êtres humains mise en place par l’Etat d’Edo. La société les perçoit comme des problèmes et non pour ce qu’ils sont : des victimes. »

      Peter, 24 ans, a été arrêté quelques jours après son retour. Sa mère avait emprunté de l’argent à un créancier du quartier pour réunir le millier d’euros nécessaire afin de payer les passeurs. « Dès qu’il a entendu dire que j’étais revenu, il a menacé ma famille. La police est venue m’arrêter », raconte-t-il à l’AFP, encore tremblant.

      Sa mère a dû réemprunter de l’argent à un autre créancier pour éponger ses dettes. Une spirale de pauvreté dont Peter ne sait comment s’extraire, sauf peut-être en rêvant, encore et toujours de l’Europe. Il en est déjà à deux tentatives infructueuses.
      « Quand je suis rentré la première fois de Libye, je me suis dit que j’allais essayer en passant par un autre pays. Mais au Maroc, c’était encore pire et, grâce à Dieu j’ai pu rentrer au Nigeria. » C’était il y a quelques semaines. « Depuis je n’ai plus rien, rien, lâche-t-il la gorge nouée. Une voix à l’intérieur de moi me dit “Tue-toi, finis-en !” Mais bon… Ça servirait à quoi ? Je ne peux pas faire ça à ma mère. »

      https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2019/09/20/au-nigeria-la-reintegration-difficile-des-migrants-rapatries-au-lendemain-du

      #pauvreté #OIM #IOM

  • Réfugiés : du #Niger à la #Dordogne

    La France a adhéré en 2017 à l’#Emergency_Transit_Mechanism, programme humanitaire exceptionnel permettant à des réfugiés évacués d’urgence de #Libye (reconnus « particulièrement vulnérables ») d’être pris en charge dès le Niger, et réinstallés dans des #pays_sûrs. Comment cela passe-t-il aujourd’hui ?

    De nouveaux naufrages cette semaine au large de la Libye nous rappellent à quel point est éprouvant et risqué le périple de ceux qui tentent de rejoindre l’Europe après avoir fui leur pays. Partagée entre des élans contradictoires, compassion et peur de l’invasion, les pays de l’Union européenne ont durci leur politique migratoire, tout en assurant garantir le droit d’asile aux réfugiés. C’est ainsi que la #France a adhéré à l’Emergency Transit Mechanism (#ETM), imaginé par le #HCR fin 2017, avec une étape de transit au Niger.

    Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les Réfugiés (HCR) réinstalle chaque années des réfugiés présents dans ses #camps (Liban, Jordanie, Tchad ou encore Niger) dans des pays dits ‘sûrs’ (en Europe et Amérique du Nord). La réinstallation est un dispositif classique du HCR pour des réfugiés « particulièrement vulnérables » qui, au vu de la situation dans leur pays, ne pourront pas y retourner.

    Au Niger, où se rend ce Grand Reportage, cette procédure est accompagnée d’un dispositif d’#évacuation_d’urgence des #prisons de Libye. L’Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM) a été imaginé par le HCR fin 2017, avec une étape de #transit au Niger. Nouvelle frontière de l’Europe, pour certains, le pays participe à la #sélection entre migrants et réfugiés, les migrants étant plutôt ‘retournés’ chez eux par l’Organisation Internationale des Migrants (#OIM).

    Sur 660 000 migrants et 50 000 réfugiés (placés sous mandat HCR) présents en Libye, 6 600 personnes devraient bénéficier du programme ETM sur deux ans.

    La France s’est engagé à accueillir 10 000 réinstallés entre septembre 2017 et septembre 2019. 7 000 Syriens ont déjà été accueillis dans des communes qui se portent volontaires. 3 000 Subsahariens, dont une majorité évacués de Libye, devraient être réinstallés d’ici le mois de décembre.

    En Dordogne, où se rend ce Grand Reportage, des communes rurales ont fait le choix d’accueillir ces réfugiés souvent abîmés par les violences qu’ils ont subis. Accompagnés pendant un an par des associations mandatées par l’Etat, les réfugiés sont ensuite pris en charge par les services sociaux locaux, mais le rôle des bénévoles reste central dans leur installation en France.

    Comment tout cela se passe-t-il concrètement ? Quel est le profil des heureux élus ? Et quelle réalité les attend ? L’accompagnement correspond-il à leurs besoins ? Et parviennent-ils à s’intégrer dans ces villages français ?

    https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/grand-reportage/refugies-du-niger-a-la-dordogne
    #audio #migrations #asile #réfugiés #réinstallation #vulnérabilité #retour_volontaire #IOM #expulsions #renvois #externalisation #tri #rural #ruralité #accueil
    ping @isskein @pascaline @karine4 @_kg_ @reka

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765335

  • For Syrians in #Istanbul, fears rise as deportations begin

    Turkey is deporting Syrians from Istanbul to Syria, including to the volatile northwest province of #Idlib, according to people who have been the target of a campaign launched last week against migrants who lack residency papers.

    The crackdown comes at a time of rising rhetoric and political pressure on the country’s 3.6 million registered Syrian refugees to return home. Estimates place hundreds of thousands of unregistered Syrians in Turkey, many living in urban areas such as Istanbul.

    Refugee rights advocates say deportations to Syria violate customary international law, which prohibits forcing people to return to a country where they are still likely to face persecution or risk to their lives.

    Arrests reportedly began as early as 13 July, with police officers conducting spot-checks in public spaces, factories, and metro stations around Istanbul and raiding apartments by 16 July. As word spread quickly in Istanbul’s Syrian community, many people shut themselves up at home rather than risk being caught outside.

    It is not clear how many people have been deported so far, with reported numbers ranging from hundreds to a thousand.

    “Deportation of Syrians to their country, which is still in the midst of armed conflict, is a clear violation of both Turkish and international law.”

    Turkey’s Ministry of Interior has said the arrests are aimed at people living without legal status in the country’s most populous city. Istanbul authorities said in a Monday statement that only “irregular migrants entering our country illegally [will be] arrested and deported.” It added that Syrians registered outside Istanbul would be obliged to return to the provinces where they were first issued residency.

    Mayser Hadid, a Syrian lawyer who runs a law practice catering to Syrians in Istanbul, said that the “deportation of Syrians to their country, which is still in the midst of armed conflict, is a clear violation of both Turkish and international law,” including the “return of Syrians without temporary protection cards.”

    Istanbul authorities maintain that the recent detentions and deportations are within the law.

    Starting in 2014, Syrian refugees in Turkey have been registered under “temporary protection” status, which grants the equivalency of legal residency and lets holders apply for a work permit. Those with temporary protection need special permission to work or travel outside of the area where they first applied for protection.

    But last year, several cities across the country – including Istanbul – stopped registering newly-arrived Syrians.

    In the Monday statement, Istanbul authorities said that Syrians registered outside of the city must return to their original city of registration by 20 August. They did not specify the penalty for those who do not.

    Barely 24 hours after the beginning of raids last week, Muhammad, a 21-year-old from Eastern Ghouta in Syria, was arrested at home along with his Syrian flatmates in the Istanbul suburb of Esenler.

    Muhammad, who spoke by phone on the condition of anonymity for security reasons – as did all Syrian deportees and their relatives interviewed for this article – said that Turkish police officers had forced their way into the building. “They beat me,” he said. “I wasn’t even allowed to take anything with me.”

    Muhammad said that as a relatively recent arrival, he couldn’t register for temporary protection and had opted to live and work in Istanbul without papers.

    After his arrest, Muhammad said, he was handcuffed and bundled into a police van, and transferred to a detention facility on the eastern outskirts of the city.

    There, he said, he was forced to sign a document written in Turkish that he couldn’t understand and on Friday was deported to Syria’s Idlib province, via the Bab al-Hawa border crossing.
    Deportation to Idlib

    Government supporters say that Syrians have been deported only to the rebel-held areas of northern Aleppo, where the Turkish army maintains a presence alongside groups that it backs.

    A representative from Istanbul’s provincial government office did not respond to a request for comment, but Youssef Kataboglu, a pro-government commentator who is regarded as close to the government, said that “Turkey only deports Syrians to safe areas according to the law.”

    He denied that Syrians had been returned to Idlib, where a Syrian government offensive that began in late April kicked off an upsurge in fighting, killing more than 400 civilians and forcing more than 330,000 people to flee their homes. The UN said on Monday alone, 59 civilians were killed, including 39 when a market was hit by airstrikes.

    Kataboglu said that deportation to Idlib would “be impossible.”

    Mazen Alloush, a representative of the border authorities on the Syrian side of the Bab al-Hawa crossing that links Turkey with Idlib, said that more than 3,800 Syrians had entered the country via Bab al-Hawa in the past fortnight, a number he said was not a significant change from how many people usually cross the border each month.

    The crossing is controlled by rebel authorities affiliated to Tahrir a-Sham, the hardline Islamist faction that controls most of Idlib.

    “A large number of them were Syrians trying to enter Turkish territory illegally,” who were caught and forced back across, Alloush said, but also “those who committed offences in Turkey or requested to return voluntarily.”

    “We later found out that he’d been deported to Idlib.”

    He added that “if the Turkish authorities are deporting [Syrians] through informal crossings or crossings other than Bab al-Hawa, I don’t have information about it.”

    Other Syrians caught up in the crackdown, including those who did have the proper papers to live and work in Istanbul, confirmed that they had been sent to Idlib or elsewhere.

    On July 19, Umm Khaled’s son left the family’s home without taking the documents that confirm his temporary protection status, she said. He was stopped in the street by police officers.

    “They [the police] took him,” Umm Khaled, a refugee in her 50s originally from the southern Damascus suburbs, said by phone. “We later found out that he’d been deported to Idlib.”

    Rami, a 23-year-old originally from eastern Syria’s Deir Ezzor province, said he was deported from Istanbul last week. He was carrying his temporary protection status card at the time of his arrest, he added.

    "I was in the street in Esenler when the police stopped me and asked for my identity card,” he recalled in a phone conversation from inside Syria. “They checked it, and then asked me to get on a bus.”

    Several young Syrian men already on board the bus were also carrying protection documents with them, Rami said.

    “The police tied our hands together with plastic cords,” he added, describing how the men were then driven to a nearby police station and forced to give fingerprints and sign return documents.

    Rami said he was later sent to northern Aleppo province.
    Rising anti-Syrian sentiment

    The country has deported Syrians before, and Human Rights Watch and other organisations have reported that Turkish security forces regularly intercept and return Syrian refugees attempting to enter the country. As conflict rages in and around Idlib, an increasing number of people are still trying to get into Turkey.

    Turkey said late last year that more than 300,000 Syrians have returned to their home country voluntarily.

    A failed coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in July 2016 led to an emergency decree that human rights groups say was used to arrest individuals whom the government perceived as opponents. Parts of that decree were later passed into law, making it easier for authorities to deport foreigners on the grounds that they are either linked to terrorist groups or pose a threat to public order.

    The newest wave of deportations after months of growing anti-Syrian sentiment in political debate and on the streets has raised more questions about how this law might be used, as well as the future of Syrian refugees in Turkey.

    In two rounds of mayoral elections that ended last month with a defeat for Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), the winning candidate, Ekrem İmamoğlu of the Republican People’s Party (CHP), repeatedly used anti-Syrian rhetoric in his campaign, capitalising on discontent towards the faltering economy and the increasingly contentious presence of millions of Syrian refugees.

    Shortly after the elections, several incidents of mob violence against Syrian-owned businesses took place. Widespread anti-Syrian sentiment has also been evident across social media; after the mayoral election trending hashtags on Twitter reportedly included “Syrians get out”.

    As the deportations continue, the families of those sent back are wondering what they can do.

    “By God, what did he do [wrong]?” asked Umm Khaled, speaking of her son, now in war-torn Idlib.

    “His mother, father, and all his sisters are living here legally in Turkey,” she said. “What are we supposed to do now?”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news/2019/07/23/syrians-istanbul-fears-rise-deportations-begin
    #Turquie #asile #migrations #réfugiés_syriens #réfugiés #Syrie #renvois #expulsions #peur

    • Des milliers de migrants arrêtés à Istanbul en deux semaines

      Mardi, le ministre de l’intérieur a indiqué que l’objectif de son gouvernement était d’expulser 80 000 migrants en situation irrégulière en Turquie, contre 56 000 l’an dernier.

      C’est un vaste #coup_de_filet mené sur fond de fort sentiment antimigrants. Les autorités turques ont annoncé, mercredi 24 juillet, avoir arrêté plus de 6 000 migrants en deux semaines, dont des Syriens, vivant de manière « irrégulière » à Istanbul.

      « Nous menons une opération depuis le 12 juillet (…). Nous avons attrapé 6 122 personnes à Istanbul, dont 2 600 Afghans. Une partie de ces personnes sont des Syriens », a déclaré le ministre de l’intérieur, Suleyman Soylu, dans une interview donnée à la chaîne turque NTV. Mardi, ce dernier a indiqué que l’objectif de son gouvernement était d’expulser 80 000 migrants en situation irrégulière en Turquie, contre 56 000 l’an dernier.

      M. Soylu a démenti que des Syriens étaient expulsés vers leur pays, déchiré par une guerre civile meurtrière depuis 2011, après que des ONG ont affirmé avoir recensé des cas de personnes renvoyées en Syrie. « Ces personnes, nous ne pouvons pas les expulser. (…) Lorsque nous attrapons des Syriens qui ne sont pas enregistrés, nous les envoyons dans des camps de réfugiés », a-t-il affirmé, mentionnant un camp dans la province turque de Hatay, frontalière de la Syrie. Il a toutefois assuré que certains Syriens choisissaient de rentrer de leur propre gré en Syrie.

      La Turquie accueille sur son sol plus de 3,5 millions de Syriens ayant fui la guerre, dont 547 000 sont enregistrés à Istanbul. Les autorités affirment n’avoir aucun problème avec les personnes dûment enregistrées auprès des autorités à Istanbul, mais disent lutter contre les migrants vivant dans cette ville alors qu’ils sont enregistrés dans d’autres provinces, voire dans aucune province.

      Le gouvernorat d’Istanbul a lancé lundi un ultimatum, qui expire le 20 août, enjoignant les Syriens y vivant illégalement à quitter la ville. Un groupement d’ONG syriennes a toutefois indiqué, lundi, que « plus de 600 Syriens », pour la plupart titulaires de « cartes de protection temporaires » délivrées par d’autres provinces turques, avaient été arrêtés la semaine dernière à Istanbul et renvoyés en Syrie.

      La Coalition nationale de l’opposition syrienne, basée à Istanbul, a déclaré mardi qu’elle était entrée en contact avec les autorités turques pour discuter des dernières mesures prises contre les Syriens, appelant à stopper les « expulsions ». Son président, Anas al-Abda, a appelé le gouvernement turc à accorder un délai de trois mois aux Syriens concernés pour régulariser leur situation auprès des autorités.

      Ce tour de vis contre les migrants survient après la défaite du parti du président Recep Tayyip Erdogan lors des élections municipales à Istanbul, en juin, lors desquelles l’accueil des Syriens s’était imposé comme un sujet majeur de préoccupation les électeurs.

      Pendant la campagne, le discours hostile aux Syriens s’était déchaîné sur les réseaux sociaux, avec le mot-dièse #LesSyriensDehors. D’après une étude publiée début juillet par l’université Kadir Has, située à Istanbul, la part des Turcs mécontents de la présence des Syriens est passée de 54,5 % en 2017 à 67,7 % en 2019.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2019/07/24/des-milliers-de-migrants-arretes-a-istanbul-en-deux-semaines_5492944_3210.ht
      #arrestation #arrestations

    • Turkey Forcibly Returning Syrians to Danger. Authorities Detain, Coerce Syrians to Sign “Voluntary Return” Forms

      Turkish authorities are detaining and coercing Syrians into signing forms saying they want to return to Syria and then forcibly returning them there, Human Rights Watch said today. On July 24, 2019, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu denied that Turkey had “deported” Syrians but said that Syrians “who voluntarily want to go back to Syria” can benefit from procedures allowing them to return to “safe areas.”

      Almost 10 days after the first reports of increased police spot-checks of Syrians’ registration documents in Istanbul and forced returns of Syrians from the city, the office of the provincial governor released a July 22 statement saying that Syrians registered in one of the country’s other provinces must return there by August 20, and that the Interior Ministry would send unregistered Syrians to provinces other than Istanbul for registration. The statement comes amid rising xenophobic sentiment across the political spectrum against Syrian and other refugees in Turkey.

      “Turkey claims it helps Syrians voluntarily return to their country, but threatening to lock them up until they agree to return, forcing them to sign forms, and dumping them in a war zone is neither voluntary nor legal,” said Gerry Simpson, associate Emergencies director. “Turkey should be commended for hosting record numbers of Syrian refugees, but unlawful deportations are not the way forward.”

      Turkey shelters a little over 3.6 million Syrian Refugees countrywide who have been given temporary protection, half a million of them in Istanbul. This is more refugees than any other country in the world and almost four times as many as the whole European Union (EU).

      The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) says that “the vast majority of Syrian asylum-seekers continue to … need international refugee protection” and that it “calls on states not to forcibly return Syrian nationals and former habitual residents of Syria.”

      Human Rights Watch spoke by phone with four Syrians who are in Syria after being detained and forcibly returned there.

      One of the men, who was from Ghouta, in the Damascus countryside, was detained on July 17 in Istanbul, where he had been living unregistered for over three years. He said police coerced him and other Syrian detainees into signing a form, transferred them to another detention center, and then put them on one of about 20 buses headed to Syria. They are now in northern Syria.

      Another man, from Aleppo, who had been living in Gaziantep in southeast Turkey since 2013, said he was detained there after he and his brother went to the police to complain about an attack on a shop that they ran in the city. He said the police transferred them from the Gaziantep Karşıyaka police station to the foreigners’ deportation center at Oğuzeli, holding them there for six days and forcing them to sign a deportation form without telling them what it was. On July 9, the authorities forcibly returned the men to Azaz in Syria via the Öncüpınar/Bab al Salama border gate near the Turkish town of Kilis, Human Rights Watch also spoke by phone with two men who said the Turkish coast guard and police intercepted them at checkpoints near the coast as they tried to reach Greece, detained them, and coerced them into signing and fingerprinting voluntary repatriation forms. The authorities then deported them to Idlib and northern Aleppo governorate.

      One of the men, a Syrian from Atmeh in Idlib governorate who registered in the Turkish city of Gaziantep in 2017, said the Turkish coast guard intercepted him on July 9. He said [“Guvenlik”] “security” held him with other Syrians for six days in a detention facility in the town of Aydın, in western Turkey. He said the guards verbally abused him and other detainees, punched him in the chest, and coerced him into signing voluntary repatriation papers. Verbally abusive members of Turkey’s rural gendarmerie police forces [jandarma] deported him on July 15 to Syria with about 35 other Syrians through the Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salameh border crossing.

      He said that there were others in the Aydin detention center who had been there for up to four months because they had refused to sign these forms.

      The second man said he fled Maarat al-Numan in 2014 and registered in the Turkish city of Iskenderun. On July 4, police stopped him at a checkpoint as he tried to reach the coast to take a boat to Greece and took him to the Aydin detention facility, where he said the guards beat some of the other detainees and shouted and cursed at them.

      He said the detention authorities confiscated his belongings, including his Turkish registration card, and told him to sign forms. When he refused, the official said they were not deportation forms but just “routine procedure.” When he refused again, he was told he would be detained indefinitely until he agreed to sign and provided his fingerprints. He said that the guards beat another man who had also refused, so he felt he had no choice but to sign. He was then put on a bus for 27 hours with dozens of other Syrians and deported through the Öncüpınar/Bab al-Salameh border crossing.

      In addition, journalists have spoken with a number of registered and unregistered Syrians who told them by phone from Syria that Turkish authorities detained them in the third week of July, coerced them into signing and providing a fingerprint on return documents. The authorities then deported them with dozens, and in some cases as many as 100, other Syrians to Idlib and northern Aleppo governorate through the Cilvegözü/Bab al-Hawa border crossing.

      More than 400,000 people have died because of the Syrian conflict since 2011, according to the World Bank. While the nature of the fighting in Syria has changed, with the Syrian government retaking areas previously held by anti-government groups and the battle against the Islamic State (ISIS) winding down, profound civilian suffering and loss of life persists.

      In Idlib governorate, the Syrian-Russian military alliance continues to indiscriminately bomb civilians and to use prohibited weapons, resulting in the death of at least 400 people since April, including 90 children, according to Save the Children. In other areas under the control of the Syrian government and anti-government groups, arbitrary arrests, mistreatment, and harassment are still the status quo.

      The forcible returns from Turkey indicate that the government is ready to double down on other policies that deny many Syrian asylum seekers protection. Over the past four years, Turkey has sealed off its border with Syria, while Turkish border guards have carried out mass summary pushbacks and killed and injured Syrians as they try to cross. In late 2017 and early 2018, Istanbul and nine provinces on the border with Syria suspended registration of newly arriving asylum seekers. Turkey’s travel permit system for registered Syrians prohibits unregistered Syrians from traveling from border provinces they enter to register elsewhere in the country.

      Turkey is bound by the international customary law of nonrefoulement, which prohibits the return of anyone to a place where they would face a real risk of persecution, torture or other ill-treatment, or a threat to life. This includes asylum seekers, who are entitled to have their claims fairly adjudicated and not be summarily returned to places where they fear harm. Turkey may not coerce people into returning to places where they face harm by threatening to detain them.

      Turkey should protect the basic rights of all Syrians, regardless of registration status, and register those denied registration since late 2017, in line with the Istanbul governor’s July 22 statement.

      On July 19, the European Commission announced the adoption of 1.41 billion euros in additional assistance to support refugees and local communities in Turkey, including for their protection. The European Commission, EU member states with embassies in Turkey, and the UNHCR should support Turkey in any way needed to register and protect Syrians, and should publicly call on Turkey to end its mass deportations of Syrians at the border and from cities further inland.

      “As Turkey continues to shelter more than half of registered Syrian refugees globally, the EU should be resettling Syrians from Turkey to the EU but also ensuring that its financial support protects all Syrians seeking refuge in Turkey,” Simpson said.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/07/26/turkey-forcibly-returning-syrians-danger
      #retour_volontaire

    • Turquie : à Istanbul, les réfugiés vivent dans la peur du racisme et de la police

      Depuis quelques semaines, le hashtag #StopDeportationsToSyria (#SuriyeyeSınırdışınaSon) circule sur les réseaux sociaux. Il s’accompagne de témoignages de Syriens qui racontent s’être fait arrêter par la police turque à Istanbul et renvoyer en Syrie. Les autorités turques ont décidé de faire la chasse aux réfugiés alors que les agressions se multiplient.

      Le 21 juillet, alors qu’il fait ses courses, le jeune Amjad Tablieh se fait arrêter par la police turque à Istanbul. Il n’a pas sa carte de protection temporaire – kimlik – sur lui et la police turque refuse d’attendre que sa famille la lui apporte : « J’ai été mis dans un bus avec d’autres syriens. On nous a emmenés au poste de police de Tuzla et les policiers on dit que nous serions envoyés à Hatay [province turque à la frontière syrienne] ». La destination finale sera finalement la Syrie.

      Étudiant et disposant d’un kimlik à Istanbul, Amjad ajoute que comme les autres syriens arrêtés ce jour-là, il a été obligé de signer un document reconnaissant qu’il rentrait volontairement en Syrie. Il tient à ajouter qu’il a « vu des personnes se faire frapper pour avoir refusé de signer ce document ». Étudiant en architecture, Hama est arrivé à Istanbul il y a quatre mois pour s’inscrire à l’université. Il a été arrêté et déporté car son kimlik a été délivré à Gaziantep, près de la frontière avec la Syrie. Amr Dabool, également enregistré dans la ville de Gaziantep, a quant à lui été expulsé en Syrie alors qu’il tentait de se rendre en Grèce.
      Pas de statut de réfugié pour les Syriens en Turquie

      Alors que des récits similaires se multiplient sur les réseaux sociaux, le 22 juillet, les autorités d’Istanbul ont annoncé que les Syriens disposant de la protection temporaire mais n’étant pas enregistrés à Istanbul avaient jusqu’au 20 août pour retourner dans les provinces où ils sont enregistrés, faute de quoi ils seront renvoyés de force dans des villes choisies par le ministère de l’Intérieur. Invité quelques jours plus tard à la télévision turque, le ministre de l’intérieur Süleyman Soylu a nié toute expulsion, précisant que certains Syriens choisissaient « de rentrer de leur propre gré en Syrie ».

      Sur les 3,5 millions de Syriens réfugiés en Turquie, ils sont plus de 500 000 à vivre à Istanbul. La grande majorité d’entre eux ont été enregistrés dans les provinces limitrophes avec la Syrie (Gaziantep ou Urfa) où ils sont d’abord passés avant d’arriver à Istanbul pour travailler, étudier ou rejoindre leur famille. Depuis quelques jours, les contrôles se renforcent pour les renvoyer là où ils sont enregistrés.

      Pour Diane al Mehdi, anthropologue et membre du Syrian Refugees Protection Network, ces refoulements existent depuis longtemps, mais ils sont aujourd’hui plus massifs. Le 24 juillet, le ministre de l’intérieur a ainsi affirmé qu’une opération visant les réfugiés et des migrants non enregistrés à Istanbul avait menée à l’arrestation, depuis le 12 juillet, de 1000 Syriens. Chaque jour, environ 200 personnes ont été expulsées vers le nord de la Syrie via le poste frontière de Bab al-Hawa, précise la chercheuse. « Ces chiffres concernent principalement des Syriens vivant à Istanbul », explique-t-elle.

      Le statut d’« invité » dont disposent les Syriens en Turquie est peu clair et extrêmement précarisant, poursuit Diane al Mehdi. « Il n’y a pas d’antécédents légaux pour un tel statut, cela participe à ce flou et permet au gouvernement de faire un peu ce qu’il veut. » Créé en 2013, ce statut s’inscrivait à l’époque dans une logique de faveur et de charité envers les Syriens, le gouvernement ne pensant alors pas que la guerre en Syrie durerait. « À l’époque, les frontières étaient complètement ouvertes, les Syriens avaient le droit d’être enregistrés en Turquie et surtout ce statut comprenait le principe de non-refoulement. Ces trois principes ont depuis longtemps été bafouées par le gouvernement turc. »

      Aujourd’hui, les 3,5 millions de Syriens réfugiés en Turquie ne disposent pas du statut de réfugié en tant que tel. Bien que signataire de la Convention de Genève, Ankara n’octroie le statut de réfugié qu’aux ressortissants des 47 pays membres du Conseil de l’Europe. La Syrie n’en faisant pas partie, les Syriens ont en Turquie un statut moins protecteur encore que la protection subsidiaire : il est temporaire et révocable.
      #LesSyriensDehors : « Ici, c’est la Turquie, c’est Istanbul »

      Si le Président Erdoğan a longtemps prôné une politique d’accueil des Syriens, le vent semble aujourd’hui avoir tourné. En février 2018, il déclarait déjà : « Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de continuer d’accueillir 3,5 millions de réfugiés pour toujours ». Et alors qu’à Istanbul la possibilité d’obtenir le kimlik a toujours été compliquée, depuis le 6 juillet 2019, Istanbul n’en délivre officiellement plus aucun selon Diane al Mehdi.

      Même si le kimlik n’offre pas aux Syriens la possibilité de travailler, depuis quelques années, les commerces aux devantures en arabe sont de plus en plus nombreux dans rues d’Istanbul et beaucoup de Syriens ont trouvé du travail dans l’économie informelle, fournissant une main-d’œuvre bon marché. Or, dans un contexte économique difficile, avec une inflation et un chômage en hausse, les travailleurs syriens entrent en concurrence avec les ressortissants turcs et cela accroît les tensions sociales.

      Au printemps dernier, alors que la campagne pour les élections municipales battait son plein, des propos hostiles accompagnés des hashtags #SuriyelilerDefoluyor (« Les Syriens dehors ») ou #UlkemdeSuriyeliIstemiyorum (« Je ne veux pas de Syriens dans mon pays ») se sont multipliés sur les réseaux sociaux. Le candidat d’opposition et aujourd’hui maire d’Istanbul Ekrem Imamoglu, étonné du nombre d’enseignes en arabe dans certains quartiers, avait lancé : « Ici, c’est la Turquie, c’est Istanbul ».

      Après la banalisation des propos anti-syriens, ce sont les actes de violence qui se sont multipliés dans les rues d’Istanbul. Fin juin, dans le quartier de Küçükçekmece, une foule d’hommes a attaqué des magasins tenus par des Syriens. Quelques jours plus tard, les autorités d’Istanbul sommaient plus de 700 commerçants syriens de turciser leurs enseignes en arabe. Publié dans la foulée, un sondage de l’université Kadir Has à Istanbul a confirmé que la part des Turcs mécontents de la présence des Syriens est passée de 54,5 % en 2017 à 67,7 % en 2019.
      Climat de peur

      Même s’ils ont un kimlik, ceux qui ne disposent pas d’un permis de travail - difficile à obtenir - risquent une amende d’environs 550 euros et leur expulsion vers la Syrie s’ils sont pris en flagrant délit. Or, la police a renforcé les contrôles d’identités dans les stations de métro, les gares routières, les quartiers à forte concentration de Syriens mais aussi sur les lieux de travail. Cette nouvelle vague d’arrestations et d’expulsions suscite un climat de peur permanente chez les Syriens d’Istanbul. Aucune des personne contactée n’a souhaité témoigner, même sous couvert d’anonymat.

      « Pas protégés par les lois internationales, les Syriens titulaires du kimlik deviennent otages de la politique turque », dénonce Syrian Refugees Protection Network. Et l’[accord signé entre l’Union européenne et Ankara au printemps 2016 pour fermer la route des Balkans n’a fait que détériorer leur situation en Turquie. Pour Diane al-Mehdi, il aurait fallu accorder un statut qui permette aux Syriens d’avoir un avenir. « Tant qu’ils n’auront pas un statut fixe qui leur permettra de travailler, d’aller à l’école, à l’université, ils partiront en Europe. » Selon elle, donner de l’argent - dont on ne sait pas clairement comment il bénéficie aux Syriens - à la Turquie pour que le pays garde les Syriens n’était pas la solution. « Évidemment, l’Europe aurait aussi dû accepter d’accueillir plus de Syriens. »

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Turquie-a-Istanbul-les-refugies-vivent-dans-la-peur-du-racisme-et

    • En Turquie, les réfugiés syriens sont devenus #indésirables

      Après avoir accueilli les réfugiés syriens à bras ouverts, la Turquie change de ton. Une façon pour le gouvernement Erdogan de réagir aux crispations qu’engendrent leur présence dans un contexte économique morose.

      Les autorités avaient donné jusqu’à mardi soir aux migrants sans statut légal pour régulariser leur situation, sous peine d’être expulsés. Mais selon plusieurs ONG, ces expulsions ont déjà commencé et plus d’un millier de réfugiés ont déjà été arrêtés. Quelque 600 personnes auraient même déjà été reconduites en Syrie.

      « Les policiers font des descentes dans les quartiers, dans les commerces, dans les maisons. Ils font des contrôles d’identité dans les transports en commun et quand ils attrapent des Syriens, ils les emmènent au bureau de l’immigration puis les expulsent », décrit Eyup Ozer, membre du collectif « We want to live together initiative ».

      Le gouvernement turc dément pour sa part ces renvois forcés. Mais cette vague d’arrestations intervient dans un climat hostile envers les 3,6 millions de réfugiés syriens installés en Turquie.

      Solidarité islamique

      Bien accueillis au début de la guerre, au nom de la solidarité islamique défendue par le président turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan dans l’idée de combattre Bachar al-Assad, ces réfugiés syriens sont aujourd’hui devenus un enjeu politique.

      Retenus à leur arrivée dans des camps, parfois dans des conditions difficiles, nombre d’entre eux ont quitté leur point de chute pour tenter leur chance dans le reste du pays et en particulier dans les villes. A Istanbul, le poumon économique de la Turquie, la présence de ces nouveaux-venus est bien visible. La plupart ont ouvert des commerces et des restaurants, et leurs devantures, en arabe, agacent, voire suscitent des jalousies.

      « L’économie turque va mal, c’est pour cette raison qu’on ressent davantage les effets de la crise syrienne », explique Lami Bertan Tokuzlu, professeur de droit à l’Université Bilgi d’Istanbul. « Les Turcs n’approuvent plus les dépenses du gouvernement en faveur des Syriens », relève ce spécialiste des migrations.
      Ressentiment croissant

      Après l’euphorie économique des années 2010, la Turquie est confrontée depuis plus d’un an à la dévaluation de sa monnaie et à un taux de chômage en hausse, à 10,9% en 2018.

      Dans ce contexte peu favorable et alors que les inégalités se creusent, la contestation s’est cristallisée autour de la question des migrants. Celle-ci expliquerait, selon certains experts, la déroute du candidat de Recep Tayyip Erdogan à la mairie d’Istanbul.

      Conscient de ce ressentiment dans la population et des conséquences potentielles pour sa popularité, le président a commencé à adapter son discours dès 2018. L’ultimatum lancé à ceux qui ont quitté une province turque où ils étaient enregistrés pour s’installer à Istanbul illustre une tension croissante.

      https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/10649380-en-turquie-les-refugies-syriens-sont-devenus-indesirables.html

    • Europe’s Complicity in Turkey’s Syrian-Refugee Crackdown

      Ankara is moving against Syrians in the country—and the European Union bears responsibility.

      Under the cover of night, Turkish police officers pushed Ahmed onto a large bus parked in central Istanbul. In the darkness, the Syrian man from Damascus could discern dozens of other handcuffed refugees being crammed into the vehicle. Many of them would not see the Turkish city again.

      Ahmed, who asked that his last name not be used to protect his safety, was arrested after police discovered that he was registered with the authorities not in Istanbul, but in a different district. Turkish law obliges Syrian refugees with a temporary protection status to remain in their locale of initial registration or obtain separate permission to travel, and the officers reassured him he would simply be transferred back to the right district.

      Instead, as dawn broke, the bus arrived at a detention facility in the Istanbul suburb of Pendik, where Ahmed said he was jostled into a crowded cell with 10 others and no beds, and received only one meal a day, which was always rotten. “The guards told us we Syrians are just as rotten inside,” he told me. “They kept shouting that Turkey will no longer accept us, and that we will all go back to Syria.”

      Ahmed would spend more than six weeks in the hidden world of Turkey’s so-called removal centers. His account, as well as those of more than half a dozen other Syrians I spoke to, point to the systemic abuse, the forced deportations, and, in some cases, the death of refugees caught in a recent crackdown here.
      More Stories

      Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte addresses the upper house of parliament.
      Italy’s Transition From One Weak Government to Another
      Rachel Donadio
      A cyclist heads past the houses of Parliament in central London.
      Boris Johnson Is Suspending Parliament. What’s Next for Brexit?
      Yasmeen Serhan Helen Lewis Tom McTague
      Robert Habeck and Annalena Baerbock, the German Greens leaders, at a news conference in Berlin
      Germany’s Future Is Being Decided on the Left, Not the Far Right
      Noah Barkin
      A Cathay Pacific plane hovers beside the flag of Hong Kong.
      Angering China Can Now Get You Fired
      Michael Schuman

      Yet Turkey is not the only actor implicated. In a deeper sense, the backlash also exposes the long-term consequences of the European Union’s outsourcing of its refugee problem. In March 2016, the EU entered into a controversial deal with Turkey that halted much of the refugee influx to Europe in return for an aid package worth €6 billion ($6.7 billion) and various political sweeteners for Ankara. Preoccupied with its own border security, EU decision makers at the time were quick to reassure their critics that Turkey constituted a “safe third country” that respected refugee rights and was committed to the principle of non-refoulement.

      As Europe closed its doors, Turkey was left with a staggering 3.6 million registered Syrian refugees—the largest number hosted by any country in the world and nearly four times as many as all EU-member states combined. While Turkish society initially responded with impressive resilience, its long-lauded hospitality is rapidly wearing thin, prompting President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government to take measures that violate the very premise of the EU-Turkey deal.

      Last month, Turkish police launched operations targeting undocumented migrants and refugees in Istanbul. Syrian refugees holding temporary protection status registered in other Turkish districts now have until October 30 to leave Istanbul, whereas those without any papers are to be transferred to temporary refugee camps in order to be registered.

      Both international and Turkish advocates of refugee rights say, however, that the operation sparked a wave of random arrests and even forced deportations. The Istanbul Bar Association, too, reported its Legal Aid Bureau dealt with 3.5 times as many deportation cases as in June, just before the operation was launched. UNHCR, the UN’s refugee agency, and the European Commission have not said whether they believe Turkey is deporting Syrians. But one senior EU official, who asked for anonymity to discuss the issue, estimated that about 2,200 people were sent to the Syrian province of Idlib, though he said it was unclear whether they were forcibly deported or chose to return. The official added that, were Turkey forcibly deporting Syrians, this would be in explicit violation of the principle of non-refoulement, on which the EU-Turkey deal is conditioned.

      The Turkish interior ministry’s migration department did not respond to questions about the allegations. In a recent interview on Turkish television, Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu said that “it is not possible for us to deport any unregistered Syrian” and insisted that returns to Syria were entirely voluntary.

      Ahmed and several other Syrian refugees I spoke to, however, experienced firsthand what voluntary can look like in practice.

      After being transferred from the facility in Pendik to a removal center in Binkılıç, northwest of Istanbul, Ahmed said he was pressured into signing a set of forms upon arrival. The female official in charge refused to explain the papers’ contents, he said. As Ahmed was about to sign and fingerprint the last document, he noticed she was deliberately using her fingers to cover the Arabic translation of the words voluntary return. When he retracted his finger, she called in the guards, who took Ahmed to a nearby bathroom with another Syrian who had refused to sign. There, he said, the two were intimidated for several hours, and he was shown images of a man who had been badly beaten and tied to a chair with plastic tape. According to Ahmed, an official told him, “If you don’t sign, you’ll end up like that.”

      The other Syrian present at the time, Hussein, offered a similar account. In a phone interview from Dubai, where he escaped to after negotiating deportation to Malaysia instead of Syria, Hussein, who asked to be identified by only his first name to protect relatives still in Turkey, detailed the abuse in the same terms as Ahmed, and added that he was personally beaten by one of the guards. When the ordeal was over, both men said, the other Syrians who had arrived with them were being taken to a bus, apparently to be deported.

      Ahmed was detained in Binkılıç for a month before being taken to another removal center in nearby Kırklareli, where he said he was made to sleep outside in a courtyard together with more than 100 other detainees. The guards kept the toilets locked throughout the day, he said, so inmates had to either wait for a single 30-minute toilet break at night or relieve themselves where they were sleeping. When Ahmed fell seriously ill, he told me, he was repeatedly denied access to a doctor.

      After nine days in Kırklareli, the nightmare suddenly ended. Ahmed was called in by the facility’s management, asked who he was, and released when it became clear he did in fact hold temporary protection status, albeit for a district other than Istanbul. The Atlantic has seen a photo of Ahmed’s identity card, as well as his release note from the removal center.

      The EU has funded many of the removal centers in which refugees like Ahmed are held. As stated in budgets from 2010 and 2015, the EU financed at least 12 such facilities as part of its pre-accession funding to Turkey. And according to a 2016 report by an EU parliamentary delegation, the removal center in Kırklareli in which Ahmed was held received 85 percent of its funding from the EU. The Binkılıç facility, where Syrians were forced to sign return papers, also received furniture and other equipment funded by Britain and, according to Ahmed, featured signs displaying the EU and Turkish flags.

      It is hard to determine the extent to which the $6.7 billion allocated to Ankara under the 2016 EU-Turkey deal has funded similar projects. While the bulk of it went to education, health care, and direct cash support for refugees, a 2018 annual report also refers to funding for “a removal center for 750 people”—language conspicuously replaced with the more neutral “facility for 750 people” in this year’s report.

      According to Kati Piri, the European Parliament’s former Turkey rapporteur, even lawmakers like her struggle to scrutinize the precise implementation of EU-brokered deals on migration, which include agreements not just with Turkey, but also with Libya, Niger, and Sudan.

      “In this way, the EU becomes co-responsible for human-rights violations,” Piri said in a telephone interview. “Violations against refugees may have decreased on European soil, but that’s because we outsourced them. It’s a sign of Europe’s moral deficit, which deprives us from our credibility in holding Turkey to account.” According to the original agreement, the EU pledged to resettle 72,000 Syrian refugees from Turkey. Three years later, it has taken in less than a third of that number.

      Many within Turkish society feel their country has simply done enough. With an economy only recently out of recession and many Turks struggling to make a living, hostility toward Syrians is on the rise. A recent poll found that those who expressed unhappiness with Syrian refugees rose to 67.7 percent this year, from 54.5 percent in 2017.

      Just as in Europe, opposition parties in Turkey are now cashing in on anti-refugee sentiment. In municipal elections this year, politicians belonging to the secularist CHP ran an explicitly anti-Syrian campaign, and have cut municipal aid for refugees or even banned Syrians’ access to beaches since being elected. In Istanbul, on the very evening the CHP candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu was elected mayor, a jubilantly racist hashtag began trending on Twitter: “Syrians are fucking off” (#SuriyelilerDefoluyor).

      In a statement to The Atlantic, a Turkish foreign-ministry spokesperson said, “Turkey has done its part” when it came to the deal with the EU. “The funds received amount to a fraction of what has been spent by Turkey,” the text noted, adding that Ankara expects “more robust support from the EU” both financially and in the form of increased resettlements of Syrian refugees from Turkey to Europe.

      Though international organizations say that more evidence of Turkey’s actions is needed, Nour al-Deen al-Showaishi argues the proof is all around him. “The bombs are falling not far from here,” he told me in a telephone interview from a village on the outskirts of Idlib, the Syrian region where he said he was sent. Showaishi said he was deported from Turkey in mid-July after being arrested in the Istanbul neighborhood of Esenyurt while having coffee with friends. Fida al-Deen, who was with him at the time, confirmed to me that Showaishi was arrested and called him from Syria two days later.

      Having arrived in Turkey in early 2018, when the governorate of Istanbul had stopped giving out identity cards to Syrians, Showaishi did not have any papers to show the police. Taken to a nearby police station, officers assured him that he would receive an identity card if he signed a couple of forms. When he asked for more detail about the forms, however, they changed tactics and forced him to comply.

      Showaishi was then sent to a removal center in Tuzla and, he said, deported to Syria the same day. He sent me videos to show he was in Idlib, the last major enclave of armed resistance against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. According to the United Nations, the region contains 3 million people, half of them internally displaced, and faces a humanitarian disaster now that Russia and the Assad regime are stepping up an offensive to retake the territory.

      The only way out leads back into Turkey, and, determined to prevent yet another influx of refugees, Ankara has buttressed its border.

      Still, Hisham al-Steyf al-Mohammed saw no other option. The 21-year-old was deported from Turkey in mid-July despite possessing valid papers from the governorate of Istanbul, a photo of which I have seen. Desperate to return to his wife and two young children, he paid a smuggler to guide him back to Turkey, according to Mohammed Khedr Hammoud, another refugee who joined the perilous journey.

      Shortly before sunset on August 4, Hammoud said, a group of 13 refugees set off from the village of Dirriyah, a mile from the border, pausing in the mountains for the opportune moment to cross into Turkey. While they waited, Mohammed knelt down to pray, but moments later, a cloud of sand jumped up next to him. Realizing it was a bullet, the smuggler called for the group to get moving, but Mohammed lay still. “I crawled up to him and put my ear on his heart,” Hammoud told me, “but it wasn’t beating.” For more than an hour, he said, the group was targeted by bullets from Turkish territory, and only at midnight was it able to carry Mohammed’s body away.

      I obtained a photo of Mohammed’s death certificate issued by the Al-Rahma hospital in the Darkoush village in Idlib. The document, dated August 5, notes, “A bullet went through the patient’s right ear, and came out at the level of the left neck.”

      The Turkish interior ministry sent me a statement that largely reiterated an article published in Foreign Policy last week, in which an Erdoğan spokesman said Mohammed was a terror suspect who voluntarily requested his return to Syria. He offered no details on the case, though.

      Mohammed’s father, Mustafa, dismissed the spokesman’s argument, telling me in an interview in Istanbul, “If he really did something wrong, then why didn’t they send him to court?” Since Mohammed had been the household’s main breadwinner, Mustafa said he now struggled to feed his family, including Mohammed’s 3-month-old baby.

      Yet he is not the only one struck by Mohammed’s death. In an interview in his friend’s apartment in Istanbul, where he has returned but is in hiding from the authorities, Ahmed had just finished detailing his week’s long detention in Turkey’s removal centers when his phone started to buzz—photos of Mohammed’s corpse were being shared on Facebook.

      “I know him!” Ahmed screamed, clasping his friend’s arm. Mohammed, he said, had been with him in the removal center in Binkılıç. “He was so hopeful to be released, because he had a valid ID for Istanbul. But when he told me that he had been made to sign some forms, I knew it was already too late.”

      “If I signed that piece of paper,” Ahmed said, “I could have been dead next to him.”

      It is this thought that pushes Ahmed, and many young Syrians like him, to continue on to Europe. He and his friend showed me videos a smuggler had sent them of successful boat journeys, and told me they planned to leave soon.

      “As long as we are in Turkey, the Europeans can pretend that they don’t see us,” Ahmed concluded. “But once I go there, once I stand in front of them, I am sure that they will care about me.”

      https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2019/08/europe-turkey-syria-refugee-crackdown/597013
      #responsabilité

  • Afghan Migration to Germany: History and Current Debates

    In light of the deteriorating security situation in Afghanistan, Afghan migration to Germany accelerated in recent years. This has prompted debates and controversial calls for return.

    Historical Overview
    Afghan migration to Germany goes back to the first half of the 20th century. To a large extent, the arrival of Afghan nationals occurred in waves, which coincided with specific political regimes and periods of conflict in Afghanistan between 1978 and 2001. Prior to 1979 fewer than 2,000 Afghans lived in Germany. Most of them were either businesspeople or students. The trade city of Hamburg and its warehouses attracted numerous Afghan carpet dealers who subsequently settled with their families. Some families who were among the traders that came to Germany at an early stage still run businesses in the warehouse district of the city.[1]

    Following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, the number of Afghans seeking refuge and asylum in Germany increased sharply. Between 1980 and 1982 the population grew by around 3,000 persons per year. This was followed by a short period of receding numbers, before another period of immigration set in from 1985, when adherents of communist factions began facing persecution in Afghanistan. Following a few years with lower immigration rates, numbers started rising sharply again from 1989 onwards in the wake of the civil war in Afghanistan and due to mounting restrictions for Afghans living in Iran and Pakistan. Increasing difficulties in and expulsions from these two countries forced many Afghans to search for and move on to new destinations, including Germany.[2] Throughout the 1990s immigration continued with the rise of the Taliban and the establishment of a fundamentalist regime. After reaching a peak in 1995, numbers of incoming migrants from Afghanistan declined for several years. However, they began to rise again from about 2010 onwards as a result of continuing conflict and insecurity in Afghanistan on the one hand and persistently problematic living conditions for Afghans in Iran and Pakistan on the other hand.

    A particularly sharp increase occurred in the context of the ’long summer of migration’[3] in 2015, which continued in 2016 when a record number of 253,485 Afghan nationals were registered in Germany. This number includes established residents of Afghan origin as well as persons who newly arrived in recent years. This sharp increase is also mirrored in the number of asylum claims of Afghan nationals, which reached a historical peak of 127,012 in 2016. Following the peak in 2016 the Afghan migrant population has slightly decreased. Reasons for the numerical decrease include forced and voluntary return to Afghanistan, onward migration to third countries, and expulsion according to the so-called Dublin Regulation. Naturalisations also account for the declining number of Afghan nationals in Germany, albeit to a much lesser extent (see Figures 1 and 2).

    The Afghan Migrant Population in Germany
    Over time, the socio-economic and educational backgrounds of Afghan migrants changed significantly. Many of those who formed part of early immigrant cohorts were highly educated and had often occupied high-ranking positions in Afghanistan. A significant number had worked for the government, while others were academics, doctors or teachers.[4] Despite being well-educated, professionally trained and experienced, many Afghans who came to Germany as part of an early immigrant cohort were unable to find work in an occupational field that would match their professional qualifications. Over the years, levels of education and professional backgrounds of Afghans arriving to Germany became more diverse. On average, the educational and professional qualifications of those who came in recent years are much lower compared to earlier cohorts of Afghan migrants.

    At the end of 2017, the Federal Statistical Office registered 251,640 Afghan nationals in Germany. This migrant population is very heterogeneous as far as persons’ legal status is concerned. Table 1 presents a snapshot of the different legal statuses that Afghan nationals in Germany held in 2017.

    Similar to other European countrie [5], Germany has been receiving increasing numbers of unaccompanied Afghan minors throughout the last decade.[6] In December 2017, the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) registered 10,453 persons of Afghan origin under the age of 18, including asylum seekers, holders of a temporary residence permit as well as persons with refugee status. The situation of unaccompanied minors is specific in the sense that they are under the auspices of the Children and Youth support services (Kinder- und Jugendhilfe). This implies that unaccompanied Afghan minors are entitled to specific accommodation and the support of a temporary guardian. According to the BAMF, education and professional integration are priority issues for the reception of unaccompanied minors. However, the situation of these migrants changes once they reach the age of 18 and become legally deportable.[7] For this reason, their period of residence in Germany is marked by ambiguity.

    Fairly modest at first, the number of naturalisations increased markedly from the late 1980s, which is likely to be connected to the continuous aggravation of the situation in Afghanistan.[8]

    With an average age of 23.7 years, Germany’s Afghan population is relatively young. Among Afghan residents who do not hold German citizenship there is a gender imbalance with males outweighing females by roughly 80,390 persons. Until recently, most Afghans arrived in Germany with their family. However, the individual arrival of Afghan men has been a dominant trend in recent years, which has become more pronounced from 2012 onwards with rising numbers of Afghan asylum seekers (see Figure 2).[9]

    The Politicization of Afghan Migration
    Prior to 2015, the Afghan migrant population that had not received much public attention. However, with the significant increase in numbers from 2015 onwards, it was turned into a subject of increased debate and politicization. The German military and reconstruction engagement in Afghanistan constitutes an important backdrop to the debates unfolding around the presence of Afghan migrants – most of whom are asylum seekers – in Germany. To a large extent, these debates revolved around the legitimacy of Afghan asylum claims. The claims of persons who, for example, supported German troops as interpreters were rarely questioned.[10] Conversely, the majority of newly arriving Afghans were framed as economic migrants rather than persons fleeing violence and persecution. In 2015, chancellor Angela Merkel warned Afghan nationals from coming to Germany for economic reasons and simply in search for a better life.[11] She underlined the distinction between “economic migrants” and persons facing concrete threats due to their past collaboration with German troops in Afghanistan. The increasing public awareness of the arrival of Afghan asylum seekers and growing skepticism regarding the legitimacy of their presence mark the context in which debates on deportations of Afghan nationals began to unfold.

    Deportations of Afghan Nationals: Controversial Debates and Implementation
    The Federal Government (Bundesregierung) started to consider deportations to Afghanistan in late 2015. Debates about the deportation of Afghan nationals were also held at the EU level and form an integral part of the Joint Way Forward agreement between Afghanistan and the EU. The agreement was signed in the second half of 2016 and reflects the commitment of the EU and the Afghan Government to step up cooperation on addressing and preventing irregular migration [12] and encourage return of irregular migrants such as persons whose asylum claims are rejected. In addition, the governments of Germany and Afghanistan signed a bilateral agreement on the return of Afghan nationals to their country of origin. At that stage it was estimated that around five percent of all Afghan nationals residing in Germany were facing return.[13] To back plans of forced removal, the Interior Ministry stated that there are “internal protection alternatives”, meaning areas in Afghanistan that are deemed sufficiently safe for people to be deported to and that a deterioration of security could not be confirmed for the country as such.[14] In addition, the BAMF would individually examine and conduct specific risk assessments for each asylum application and potential deportees respectively.

    Country experts and international actors such as the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) agree on the absence of internal protection alternatives in Afghanistan, stating that there are no safe areas in the country.[15] Their assessments are based on the continuously deteriorating security situation. Since 2014, annual numbers of civilian deaths and casualties continuously exceed 10,000 with a peak of 11,434 in 2016. This rise in violent incidents has been recorded in 33 of 34 provinces. In August 2017 the United Nations changed their assessment of the situation in Afghanistan from a “post-conflict country” to “a country undergoing a conflict that shows few signs of abating”[16] for the first time after the fall of the Taliban. However, violence occurs unevenly across Afghanistan. In 2017 the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), registered the highest levels of civilian casualties in Kabul province and Kabul city more specifically. After Kabul, the highest numbers of civilian casualties were recorded in Helmand, Nangarhar, Kandahar, Faryab, Uruzgan, Herat, Paktya, Kunduz, and Laghman provinces.[17]

    Notwithstanding deteriorating security conditions in Afghanistan and parliamentary, non-governmental and civil society protests, Germany’s Federal Government implemented a first group deportation of rejected asylum seekers to Afghanistan in late 2016. Grounds for justification of these measures were not only the assumed “internal protection alternatives”. In addition, home secretary Thomas de Maizière emphasised that many of the deportees were convicted criminals.[18] The problematic image of male Muslim immigrants in the aftermath of the incidents on New Year’s Eve in the city of Cologne provides fertile ground for such justifications of deportations to Afghanistan. “The assaults (sexualized physical and property offences) which young, unmarried Muslim men committed on New Year’s Eve offered a welcome basis for re-framing the ‘refugee question’ as an ethnicized and sexist problem.”[19]

    It is important to note that many persons of Afghan origin spent long periods – if not most or all of their lives – outside Afghanistan in one of the neighboring countries. This implies that many deportees are unfamiliar with life in their country of citizenship and lack local social networks. The same applies to persons who fled Afghanistan but who are unable to return to their place of origin for security reasons. The existence of social networks and potential support structures, however, is particularly important in countries marked by high levels of insecurity, poverty, corruption, high unemployment rates and insufficient (public) services and infrastructure.[20] Hence, even if persons who are deported to Afghanistan may be less exposed to a risk of physical harm in some places, the absence of social contacts and support structures still constitutes an existential threat.

    Debates on and executions of deportations to Afghanistan have been accompanied by parliamentary opposition on the one hand and street-level protests on the other hand. Non-governmental organisations such as Pro Asyl and local refugee councils have repeatedly expressed their criticism of forced returns to Afghanistan.[21] The execution of deportations has been the responsibility of the federal states (Ländersache). This leads to significant variations in the numbers of deportees. In light of a degrading security situation in Afghanistan, several governments of federal states (Landesregierungen) moreover paused deportations to Afghanistan in early 2017. Concomitantly, recognition rates of Afghan asylum seekers have continuously declined.[22]

    A severe terrorist attack on the German Embassy in Kabul on 31 May 2017 led the Federal Government to revise its assessment of the security situation in Afghanistan and to temporarily pause deportations to the country. According to chancellor Merkel, the temporary ban of deportations was contingent on the deteriorating security situation and could be lifted once a new, favourable assessment was in place. While pausing deportations of rejected asylum seekers without criminal record, the Federal Government continued to encourage voluntary return and deportations of convicted criminals of Afghan nationality as well as individuals committing identity fraud during their asylum procedure.

    The ban of deportations of rejected asylum seekers without criminal record to Afghanistan was lifted in July 2018, although the security situation in the country continues to be very volatile.[23] The decision was based on a revised assessment of the security situation through the Foreign Office and heavily criticised by the centre left opposition in parliament as well as by NGOs and churches. Notwithstanding such criticism, the attitude of the Federal Government has been rigorous. By 10 January 2019, 20 group deportation flights from Germany to Kabul were executed, carrying a total number of 475 Afghans.[24]

    Assessing the Situation in Afghanistan
    Continuing deportations of Afghan nationals are legitimated by the assumption that certain regions in Afghanistan fulfil the necessary safety requirements for deportees. But how does the Federal Government – and especially the BAMF – come to such arbitrary assessments of the security situation on the one hand and individual prospects on the other hand? While parliamentary debates about deportations to Afghanistan were ongoing, the news magazine Spiegel reported on how the BAMF conducts security assessments for Afghanistan. According to their revelations, BAMF staff hold weekly briefings on the occurrence of military combat, suicide attacks, kidnappings and targeted killings. If the proportion of civilian casualties remains below 1:800, the level of individual risk is considered low and insufficient for someone to be granted protection in Germany.[25] The guidelines of the BAMF moreover rule that young men who are in working age and good health are assumed to find sufficient protection and income opportunities in Afghanistan’s urban centres, so that they are able to secure to meet the subsistence level. Such possibilities are even assumed to exist for persons who cannot mobilise family or other social networks for their support. Someone’s place or region of origin is another aspect considered when assessing whether or not Afghan asylum seekers are entitled to remain in Germany. The BAMF examines the security and supply situation of the region where persons were born or where they last lived before leaving Afghanistan. These checks also include the question which religious and political convictions are dominant at the place in question. According to these assessment criteria, the BAMF considers the following regions as sufficiently secure: Kabul, Balkh, Herat, Bamiyan, Takhar, Samangan and Panjshir.[26]

    Voluntary Return
    In addition to executing the forced removal of rejected Afghan asylum seekers, Germany encourages the voluntary return of Afghan nationals.[27] To this end it supports the Reintegration and Emigration Programme for Asylum Seekers in Germany which covers travel expenses and offers additional financial support to returnees. Furthermore, there is the Government Assisted Repatriation Programme, which provides financial support to persons who wish to re-establish themselves in their country of origin. The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) organises and supervises return journeys that are supported by these programmes. Since 2015, several thousand Afghan nationals left Germany with the aid of these programmes. Most of these voluntary returnees were persons who had no legal residence status in Germany, for example persons whose asylum claim had been rejected or persons holding an exceptional leave to remain (Duldung).

    Outlook
    The continuing conflict in Afghanistan not only causes death, physical and psychological hurt but also leads to the destruction of homes and livelihoods and impedes access to health, education and services for large parts of the Afghan population. This persistently problematic situation affects the local population as much as it affects migrants who – voluntarily or involuntarily – return to Afghanistan. For this reason, migration out of Afghanistan is likely to continue, regardless of the restrictions which Germany and other receiving states are putting into place.

    http://www.bpb.de/gesellschaft/migration/laenderprofile/288934/afghan-migration-to-germany
    #Allemagne #Afghanistan #réfugiés_afghans #histoire #asile #migrations #réfugiés #chiffres #statistiques #renvois #expulsions #retour_volontaire #procédure_d'asile
    ping @_kg_

  • The trouble with plans to send 116,000 Burundian refugees home

    Under pressure to go home, Burundian refugees in Tanzania face two bad options: return to face social and economic hardship and possible rights violations; or remain in chronically under-resourced camps that restrict their opportunities.

    With both governments confirming plans to return 116,000 Burundians by the end of 2019, it’s crunch time for the international community if it wants to ensure returns are truly voluntary and offer returnees the level of support they will need to reintegrate properly back in Burundi.

    More than 400,000 people fled Burundi, most into neighbouring Tanzania, following violent unrest and repression that accompanied 2015 elections, which saw former rebel leader Pierre Nkurunziza returned to power for a controversial third presidential term.

    Limited repatriations began in 2017, but funding shortages mean the process has so far been little more than an offer of free transport back across the border, with a return package of food, non-food items, and cash that doesn’t even last the three months it’s expected to cover.

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/opinion/2019/03/05/Burundian-refugees-Tanzania-plans-send-home
    #retour_au_pays #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Tanzanie #réfugiés_burundais

    Pour les #retours_volontaires initiés en 2017, voir le doc publié par @reka:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/636524
    #retour_volontaire

    • Tanzania wants Burundian refugees sent home. But they face big challenges

      Tanzania says it has reached an agreement with Burundi to begin sending back all Burundian refugees from October. The repatriation effort will take place in collaboration with the United Nations. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked Amelia Kuch to give some insights into the decision.

      How many Burundian refugees are there in Tanzania and why did they migrate there?

      Tanzania has long been held up as a safe haven for refugees in the region. There’s a long history of refugees from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Mozambique seeking refuge and safety there. Burundians have been seeking refuge in Tanzania since 1960, with major waves of displacement happening in 1972, 1988, 1993, and 2015. This was due to several civil wars and genocidal violence.

      The current displacement crisis started in 2015 when President Pierre Nkurunziza sought a third term in office and eventually won. Street protests led to violent clashes. The growing fear and uncertainty pushed over 400 000 Burundians to seek refuge in neighbouring countries. About 60% of them went to Tanzania.

      Interviews with Burundian refugees revealed that if they were not a member of the leading party they faced violent persecution. They shared personal accounts of torture and rape by the Imbonerakure, the youth wing of the ruling party, and of disappearances and executions of family members.

      There’s now a total of about 342 867 Burundian refugees and asylum seekers in Tanzania that are mostly settled in three refugee camps: Nyarugusu, Nduta and Mtendeli.

      Tanzania had previously granted some Burundian refugees citizenship. Why do you think they’re choosing repatriation now?

      Tanzania offered citizenship, through naturalisation, to 160 000 Burundian refugees. But this only benefited individuals and families who fled to Tanzania in 1972 and were settled in the three rural settlements –- Mishamo, Urambo and Katumba. It didn’t include more recent arrivals.

      As much as the announcement of forced repatriation is troubling, it is not surprising. Over the past 15 years Tanzania has been making moves away from acting as a host country.

      The 2005 election manifesto of Tanzania’s ruling party, Chama Cha Mapinduzi, included a pledge to make Tanzania “refugee-free” by 2010. Their justification was that there wasn’t enough international aid to support the camps and that the camps were having a negative impact on neighbouring host communities and Tanzania’s security situation.

      This has already led to repatriations. In 2012 residents of Mtabila refugee camp, most of whom fled to Tanzania in the 1990s, were returned to Burundi against their will and the camp was closed.

      In 2018, Tanzania pulled out of the UN’s Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework – a declaration by countries to commit to respect the human rights of refugees and migrants and to support the countries that welcome them – citing a lack of international funding. The Burundian refugee situation is the lowest funded in the world. In 2018, UNHCR and its partners received just 33% of the required US$391 million requested to support Burundian refugees.

      How should the repatriation process happen?

      First and foremost Burundian refugees need to be able to make an informed decision if they wish to repatriate or remain in Tanzania. It must be a voluntary decision. At the moment it seems like refugees won’t be given a choice and will be forced to repatriate. Tanzanian Interior Minister Kangi Lugola announced that Tanzania will return Burundian refugees at the rate of 2 000 people a week.

      Ideally, people should be allowed to travel back to Burundi to assess the situation for themselves and decide, after that initial first-hand experience, if they wish to repatriate voluntarily.

      If they decide to repatriate, they should be given access to land and the ability to re-establish their livelihoods in Burundi. The support might come in the form of a financial grant, basic household items, food items, as well as financial support so they can access shelter and rent land.

      Following repatriation, it’s essential that the safety of refugees is monitored. Repatriation is a political process and it will be necessary to ensure that returnees are protected and can access the same rights as other citizens.

      Monitoring the reintegration of returnees is a UNHCR commitment under the Tripartite Agreement from 2017 and it is critical that journalists and researchers are safe to report on the reintegration process.

      What do the prospects look like for the refugees once they’re back in Burundi?

      Through current and previous research I’ve done on Burundian refugees who repatriated and then returned to Tanzania, I’ve seen a complex matrix of challenges that they face. These include hunger, the inability to access land and shelter, and a shortage of medicine.

      There are also safety concerns. Today the Burundian government controls the political space and refuses to engage in dialogue with opposition parties. While there is less open violence, refugees still fear going back and for some, that’s with good reason.

      With the closing migratory space in Tanzania, those who won’t be able to safely stay in Burundi will have to seek other destinations of refuge.

      What are Tanzania’s international obligations in terms of protection of refugees?

      The 1951 Refugee Convention – whose core principle asserts that a refugee should not be returned to a country where they face serious threats to their life or freedom – has been ratified by 145 states, including Tanzania.

      The Tanzanian government’s decision to repatriate Burundian refugees, despite evidence that their life and freedom might be threatened in Burundi, breaches the core principle of non-refoulement.

      This, however, must be seen in the global context. The decision of the Tanzanian government to expel refugees is not happening in a political void. Rather, it emulates the policies implemented by some Western countries, including the US, Australia, France, Hungary and Italy.

      These countries are also breaching the Convention; by obstructing refugees from coming, putting their lives in danger and even penalising those who try to assist refugees.

      Rather than an exception, the recent decision by the Tanzanian government to forcefully repatriate Burundian refugees is a reflection of a growing, global hostility towards refugees and other migrants.

      https://theconversation.com/tanzania-wants-burundian-refugees-sent-home-but-they-face-big-chall

    • Tanzania to send back all Burundian refugees from October

      Tanzanian and Burundian officials announce deal but UNHCR says Burundi conditions are not conducive to promote returns.

      Tanzania says it has reached an agreement with neighbouring Burundi to begin sending back all Burundian refugees from October, adding that the repatriation will take place in collaboration with the United Nations.

      However, the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) said in a statement on Tuesday that the conditions in Burundi, which was plunged into a political crisis four years ago, are not “conducive to promote returns” and noted that it is assisting refugees who indicate they have made a voluntary choice to return home.

      Hundreds of people were killed and more than 400,000 fled to neighbouring countries due to violence the UN says was mostly carried out by state security forces following President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision in April 2015 to run for a third, disputed, term in office.

      Nkurunziza won re-election and, the following year, Burundi suspended all cooperation with the UN human rights office in the country after a UN-commissioned report accused the Bujumbura government and its supporters of being responsible for crimes against humanity.

      Currently, some 200,000 Burundians are in Tanzania, according to government figures.

      Speaking to the AFP news agency, Tanzanian Interior Minister Kangi Lugola said: “In agreement with the Burundian government and in collaboration with the High Commissioner for Refugees, we will start the repatriation of all Burundian refugees on October 1.”

      “Under this agreement, it will be 2,000 refugees who will be repatriated every week until there are no more Burundian refugees in Tanzania,” he said.
      ’Returns should be voluntary’

      Lugola said that Burundi is currently at peace, adding that he had “information whereby people, international organisations, are deceiving people, telling them there is no peace in Burundi”.

      He was speaking after he and Burundian Interior Minister Pascal Barandagiye on Sunday visited a camp where they annouced the return to the refugees themselves.

      In an emailed statement to Al Jazeera, Dana Hughes, the UNHCR spokesperson for East Horn and Great Lakes, said around 75,000 Burundians had returned home in the past two years. She added, however, that hundreds still flee Burundi each month and urged governments in the region to maintain open borders and access to asylum for those who need it.

      UNHCR also called upon the governments of Tanzania and Burundi “to uphold international obligations and ensure that any returns are voluntary in line with the tripartite agreement signed in March of 2018”, referring to a deal covering refugees who wish to return on a voluntary basis.

      “The UNHCR urges states to ensure that no refugee is returned to Burundi against their will, and that measures are taken to make conditions in Burundi more conducive for refugees returns, including confidence-building efforts and incentives for those who have chosen to go home,” Hughes said.

      One Burundian refugee, a man in his 40s who crossed over with his family and now lives in Tanzania’s Nduta camp, said he would not be returning home.

      “We heard that the governments agreed on forced repatriation ... There is no way we can go to Burundi, there is no security there at all,” the man, who declined to be named, told Reuters news agency on Tuesday.

      Human Rights Watch says Burundi’s government does not tolerate criticism, and security services carry out summary executions, rapes, abductions and intimidation of suspected political opponents.

      Burundi’s ruling party denies it carries out systematic human rights violations.

      https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/08/tanzania-send-burundian-refugees-october-190827180318193.html

    • Tanzania begins repatriating Burundian refugees

      Tanzania and Burundi agree to facilitate voluntary repatriation of refugees by the end of 2019.

      Tanzania on Thursday began repatriating 1000 Burundians, who had taken refuge in 2015, following political violence and instability in their country.

      “Today [Thursday] we are repatriating 1000 refugees with all their belongings. All international organizations are aware of this operation,” Director of Information Services and Government Spokesperson, Hassan Abbasi told reporters.

      In April 2015 protests broke out in the landlocked East African country Burundi, when President Pierre Nkurunziza decided to seek a third term in office. A coup attempt failed to dislodge him, leading to a clamp down and arrests. Over 300,000 people left the country, causing a humanitarian crisis.

      In August, Tanzania and Burundi agreed to repatriate all the refugees peacefully to their homes, by the end of 2019. The mass repatriation was supposed to commence from Oct.1.

      Reports said that the first batch of 1000 refugees were transported by buses to Gisuru transit center in eastern Burundi, where they stayed overnight.

      According to officials, they will be transported to their home districts along with rations, that will sustain them for three months.

      Abbasi said the Tanzanian government and the international agencies will ensure the refugees are at peace in their country.

      The UN High Commission for Refugees has asked Tanzania’s government to avoid forceful repatriation of refugees.

      “While an overall security has improved, UNHCR is of the opinion that conditions in Burundi are not currently conducive to promote returns,” the UN agency responsible for the welfare for refugees said in a statement in August.

      However, Abbasi emphasized that repatriation is voluntary. “All those refugees, leaving camps were eager to go home,” he said.

      He stressed that Tanzania respects international agreements on refugees and would ensure the repatriation process takes place well within international humanitarian laws.

      Nestor Bimenyimana, the director general of repatriation and rehabilitation department in Burundi’s Home Ministry told local media that the UNHCR is involved in the identification and registration of Burundian refugees, willing to be repatriated from Tanzania.

      “We don’t force anyone to register,” he said.

      According to the UN agency, as many as 343,000 refugees, were living in the neighboring countries of Tanzania, Rwanda, DR Congo and Uganda as of August 2019.

      Over past two years, refugee agency has facilitated repatriation of 74,600 refugees to their homes in Burundi.

      https://www.aa.com.tr/en/africa/tanzania-begins-repatriating-burundian-refugees/1602122

    • Tanzania: Burundians Pressured into Leaving

      Mounting Intimidation for 163,000 Burundian Refugees and Asylum Seekers.

      The fear of violence, arrest, and deportation is driving many of the 163,000 Burundian refugees and asylum seekers in Tanzania out of the country. Tanzanian authorities have also made it very difficult for the United Nations refugee agency to properly check whether hundreds of refugees’ recent decision to return to Burundi was voluntary.

      In October and November 2019, Tanzanian officials specifically targeted parts of the Burundian refugee population whose insecure legal status and lack of access to aid make them particularly vulnerable to coerced return to Burundi. The actions come after the Tanzanian president, John Magufuli, said on October 11 that Burundian refugees should “go home.”

      “Refugees say police abuses, insecurity in Tanzania’s refugee camps, and deportation threats drove them out of the country,” said Bill Frelick, refugee rights director at Human Rights Watch. “Tanzania should reverse course before it ends up unlawfully coercing thousands more to leave.”

      In mid-November, Human Rights Watch interviewed 20 Burundian refugees in Uganda who described the pressure that caused them to leave Tanzania between August 2018 and October 2019. Seven returned to Burundi but said they then fled to Uganda to escape members of the Burundian ruling party’s youth league, the Imbonerakure, who threatened, intimidated, or arbitrarily arrested them. Thirteen went directly to Uganda.

      Refugees said their reasons for leaving Tanzania include fear of getting caught up in a spate of arrests, and alleged disappearances and killings in or near refugee camps and fear of suspected members of the Imbonerakure and of abusive Burundian refugees working with Tanzanian police on camp security. They also cited the government’s threats to deport Burundian refugees, the closing and destruction of markets, restrictions on commercial activities, and lack of access to services in the camps and freedom of movement.

      On December 3, Tanzanian Home Affairs Minister Kangi Lugola denied that the government is “expelling” refugees, and said the Tanzanian and Burundian authorities “merely mobilize, to encourage those who are ready to return on their own accord, to go back.”

      A refugee who returned from Tanzania to Burundi in August said: “I returned to Burundi because the Tanzanian authorities said those staying would be forced back… The police became increasingly violent and insecurity was the main reason I decided to return.” In late August, Imbonerakure members targeted him: “They arrested me, tied my arms behind my back and said, ‘you said you fled [Burundi] because of the Imbonerakure, but we are still here.’” He said his wife paid a bribe for his release and he fled to Uganda.

      A December 6 Human Rights Watch report documented widespread abuses by members of the youth league, often working with local Burundian administrators. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said in August that conditions in Burundi were not safe or stable enough for it to encourage refugees to return, and that it would only facilitate voluntary returns.

      The 1951 Refugee Convention and the 1969 African Refugee Convention prohibit refoulement, the return of refugees in any manner whatsoever to places where their lives or freedom would be threatened. UNHCR says that refoulement occurs not only when a government directly rejects or expels a refugee, but also when indirect pressure is so intense that it leads people to believe they have no option but to return to a country where they face a serious risk of harm.

      Between September 2017 and end of October 2019, 78,380 Burundians – about 725 a week – left Tanzania under an agreement between Burundi, Tanzania, and the UNHCR, which tasks UNHCR with conducting detailed interviews with refugees to ensure they are leaving Tanzania voluntarily. The number is well below the target of 2,000 a week Tanzania and Burundi agreed on in March 2018. An August 24, 2019 agreement between Tanzania and Burundi says all the refugees “are to return to their country of origin whether voluntarily or not” by December 31.

      On November 9, UNHCR said that some Burundians signing up for voluntary return with UNHCR had “cited insecurity in refugee camps, fear of enforced return …, deteriorating living conditions …, prohibition of small commercial activities and closure of camp markets as the main reasons for their return.” The agency previously told Human Rights Watch that “push factors play a significant role” in refugees’ return decision, but that UNHCR considers their return to be voluntary because they have “made an informed decision” and “many other refugees” have decided to stay.

      A government’s duty to protect refugee rights should not be assessed based on statistics but on a case-by-case basis, Human Rights Watch said. The fact that some or many refugees can stay in a host country is not evidence that those who leave do so voluntarily or that they did not leave due to coercion.

      Seven of the refugees Human Rights Watch interviewed said they returned to Burundi between March 2018 and June 2019. One refugee who left Tanzania’s Nduta camp for Uganda in August said he had helped many families register for return to Burundi: “Before August 2018, UNHCR asked people who registered many questions about their decision to return and gave them time to change their minds,” he said. “But now they don’t give time to think or ask questions. They immediately process people for return.”

      UNHCR’s mandate requires it to ask refugees signing up for voluntary return about the reasons behind the decision to ensure the decision is truly voluntary.

      A well-informed source said that after a recent “validation exercise” to verify the number of registered and unregistered Burundians living in camps in Tanzania, about 3,300 people were registered but not given “active status,” which means they have no clear legal status or access to assistance, and are particularly vulnerable to government intimidation and coerced return to Burundi.

      In October, the Tanzanian authorities summoned these people and registered “hundreds” who said they wanted to return to Burundi. The authorities told them to report to a departure center, leaving UNHCR, which usually speaks to people leaving a few days beforehand to make sure they are leaving voluntarily, to conduct some interviews at the departure center “in less than ideal circumstances,” it said.

      Human Rights Watch previously reported on the coerced return of hundreds of Burundian asylum seekers on October 15, after camp authorities said that if they did not register to return, they would be in the camps without legal status and aid.

      In late October, UNHCR said Tanzania was increasing “pressure on Burundian refugees and asylum-seekers to return home.” In the second week of November, Tanzanian authorities banned 10 UNHCR staff involved in managing the refugee registration database from the camp.

      Tanzanian authorities should ensure that UNHCR staff are able to properly verify the voluntary nature of refugees’ decision to return to Burundi, Human Rights Watch said. The African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Union should send a team to visit the refugee camps and urge Tanzania not to directly or indirectly forcibly return asylum seekers or refugees.

      “The African Union should publicly press the Tanzanian authorities to stop trying to bully refugees and the UN into submission,” Frelick said. “Tanzania claims it isn’t doing anything wrong, but Burundian refugees are telling us in clear terms that they are being driven out of the country.”

      Factors Driving Burundian Refugees out of Tanzania

      Twenty Burundian refugees formerly living in three camps – Nduta, Nyarugusu, and Mtendeli – in Tanzania’s northwestern Kigoma region spoke with Human Rights Watch in Uganda in November.

      Tanzanian Deadline; Memories of 2012 Forced Return

      All 20 said they left due to Tanzanian officials’ statements that Burundian refugees should go home. Some said that the combination of Burundian and Tanzanian officials telling refugees to go home, and refugees’ memories of Tanzanian forced refugee return in 2012 had created a climate in which they felt they had no choice but to leave Tanzania.

      Thirteen who went directly to Uganda said they feared for their lives if forced to return to Burundi. Many said they knew other refugees who had returned to Burundi only to flee again to Tanzania to escape ongoing insecurity in Burundi.

      Ten left the camps between August and October, with most citing increased pressure at that time. On August 24, Burundi and Tanzania signed an agreement to ensure that all Burundian refugees would leave Tanzania by the end of 2019. Both countries’ interior ministers jointly visited the camps the following day and said returns would start on October 1.

      A 40-year-old woman said: “I decided to leave the camp when the authorities said they would start sending people back on October 1 and that they didn’t want any more refugees in Tanzania. During the meeting, [the authorities] said they had agreed with the Burundian government to repatriate us. That’s why I left.” She left for Uganda on foot with her young child on September 10. She spent a night in a local family’s compound but became frightened that Tanzanian authorities would catch her and ran away, leaving all her belongings behind.

      Many refugees said they feared Tanzanian officials’ threatening language would turn into forced return. Several cited camp authorities’ phrases such as, “The last cow of the herd is always beaten” or “the cows that go to the trough first drink clean water, those that go last get the dirty water,” which they interpreted as saying that those who do not leave the camp now may be beaten or left without a return support package.

      A refugee who left Mtendeli camp in October said: “Tanzanian authorities intimidated people to make them sign up for repatriation. They said otherwise they would use force and we wouldn’t even have time to collect our belongings or get any assistance. People were afraid, so they registered [to return].”

      Tanzania has hosted hundreds of thousands of refugees over the past few decades and offered citizenship to tens of thousands who had been in the country since 1972. But the country also has a troubling history of forced return. After the forced return of hundreds of thousands of Rwandans in 1996, Tanzania began in 2006 to reduce the number of what it termed “illegal immigrants” by violently expelling thousands of registered Rwandan and Burundian refugees.

      In June 2009, Tanzanian authorities announced the closure of a camp sheltering more than 37,000 Burundian refugees, at Mtabila. Pressure mounted until the camp was closed in December 2012. Some refugees in Uganda said that they had been in Mtabila camp in late 2012 when Tanzanian authorities forced people into returning to Burundi and that they were afraid the Tanzanian authorities would use similar tactics again.

      A refugee leader from Nduta camp said he was summoned to a meeting with Tanzanian authorities on March 14, where refugees were asked: “Do you remember what happened in Mtabila? Our guns still work, you know. Burundi and Tanzania are one country.” A 25-year-old woman who left Tanzania for Uganda in August said: “I left because of what happened in Mtabila. I didn’t want to be forced back while there is insecurity in Burundi.”

      Fear of Insecurity in and Around Refugee Camps

      Most of the refugees said growing insecurity in the camps contributed to their decision to leave Tanzania.

      All said they feared the Tanzanian police, who they believe work closely with the Burundian authorities to encourage refugees to return. Fourteen also said they were afraid of Burundian refugees in charge of refugee camp security, called “Sungu Sungu,” a term used to describe neighborhood militias in Tanzania. Refugees, including a former Sungu Sungu member, and an independent well-informed source in the camps said that Tanzanian police approve the appointment of the most senior Sungu Sungu representatives in the camps, some of whom refugees believed to be Imbonerakure.

      Refugees said Sungu Sungu members had arrested refugees and helped Tanzanian authorities carry out what some called “mobilization efforts” to encourage their return.

      One interviewee said: “In the camps, they [Sungu Sungu members] targeted the [political] opposition, arrested people at night, confiscated phones and demanded bribes. They organized meetings to tell people to return, and said if we don’t return voluntarily, we will be forced back.”

      Some refugees said that Sungu Sungu members came to the houses of those who had registered for return, but had failed to show up on the day of the return convoy, and told people to leave Tanzania, but Human Rights Watch was not able to independently verify these allegations.

      One refugee said he knew four Sungu Sungu members in Nyarugusu camp who were also Imbonerakure members in his home commune in Burundi. He said: “If a normal refugee comes home after 8 p.m., it’s fine, but if an opposition member goes home after 8 p.m., he’s beaten and made to pay a fine of up to 10.000 Shillings (US$4.3).”

      Human Rights Watch independently verified the identity of the four men, as well as that of three other Imbonerakure members in Nduta camp, with a well-informed source in Burundi, who confirmed that at least five of the seven men were Imbonerakure members who either had ties with Tanzania or who had left their home communes in Cankuzo, Ruyigi, Karuzi, and Makamba provinces in Burundi.

      Thirteen interviewees said they had heard of killings, disappearances, and arrests of Burundians in and around Tanzania’s refugee camps since 2018, including when refugees left the camps to look for firewood. The resulting climate of fear and suspicion triggered their decision to leave.

      A 44-year-old man said: “After the August agreement … arrests increased. There were new ones every day. The camp authorities said they wanted to close the camps and that we had to register to go back.” A well-informed source confirmed that reports of disappearances and arrests by Tanzanian police have increased since August. Refugees also said that they believe Tanzanian authorities arrested people suspected of opposing their refugee-return “mobilization efforts.”

      Market Closures; Other Restrictions

      Most refugees said that restrictions that led to market closures, a ban on motorbikes and bicycles, and restrictions on access to services and commercial activities in the camps convinced them that Tanzanian authorities were planning to close the camps. Several also said that police and Sungu Sungu members prevented refugees from moving around the camps at night and prohibited refugees from listening to radio broadcasts by Burundian exiles.

      One refugee who was repatriated to Burundi in August 2018 said: “I didn’t want to leave but they put us in an untenable situation… [The Sungu Sungu] forbade us from listening to the radio and beat us if they found us out after 7 p.m. They worked with the Tanzania police, which collaborates with the Burundian police.”

      “In August, camp authorities closed Nduta camp market,” a 25-year-old woman who left Tanzania in August said. “This meant we had to survive on food rations, as we couldn’t buy vegetables and other small things in the camps anymore.”

      A 35-year-old carpenter, who left Tanzania for Uganda with his wife and four children on September 24 said: “Something changed after August 2019. Assistance for building houses or education programs were suspended. Aid for refugees definitely diminished.”

      Although these restrictions were added incrementally, refugees said that in August they became more severe. One refugee said: “After August, things changed. Markets inside and outside the camps were closed. The camp authorities said it would continue this way until all infrastructure is closed down.”

      Increasing Pressure on Certain Groups

      Human Rights Watch research indicates that as of October 31, there were about 151,000 registered refugees living in Tanzania’s camps together with 12,000 registered asylum seekers who were waiting for the Tanzanian authorities to decide on their individual asylum applications. In their August agreement, the Tanzanian and Burundian authorities erroneously referred to the 12,000 as “illegal migrants.”

      The source said that a recent “validation exercise” in the camps also identified about 2,800 Burundians who arrived in the camps after January 2018, when the Tanzanian authorities stopped registering asylum seekers. The authorities registered their presence in October, but refused to give them “active status,” leaving them without clear legal status and assistance.

      The source said that the exercise also identified and registered the presence of another 500 people whose refugee or asylum seeker status had been deactivated by UNHCR after they failed to show up for three consecutive food distributions, indicating they had left, but who had subsequently returned to the camps. As of early December, hundreds of them remain in the camp without “active status” or assistance.

      In October, sources in the camps said Tanzanian authorities posted lists in the camps of people without active legal status and access to assistance, saying they should report to Home Affairs Ministry officials in the camps. Hundreds did and signed up to return to Burundi. Tanzanian authorities did not follow standard procedure, requiring them to report to UNHCR to verify the Burundians were leaving Tanzania voluntarily. Instead, the authorities told them to report to Nduta camp’s departure center, where returning refugees go with all their belongings ahead of their scheduled return to Burundi. UNHCR said they had to conduct some voluntariness interviews at the departure center “in less than ideal circumstances.”

      UNHCR’s Handbook on Voluntary Repatriation says that “registration for repatriation should not be viewed as a merely clerical task” and that staff should “interview…the potential repatriates to obtain … relevant information, counselling them on issues of concern, answering questions on repatriation related issues [and] assessing vulnerability.”

      The source said that between September 2017 and mid-November 2019, about 10,500 refugees signed up for voluntary return to Burundi but then decided to stay in Tanzania. They informed UNHCR, which took them off the agency’s “pending departure” list.

      Nonetheless, in early October, the Tanzanian authorities posted a list of names in the camps of about 4,000 refugees who had signed up for return but had not shown up on the departure date and summoned them to Home Affairs Ministry representatives in the camps. A few hundred responded and said they wanted to return to Burundi and left in October and November. The rest remain in the camps.

      Returning Refugees Fleeing Burundi Again

      In its September report, the UN Human Rights Council’s Commission of Inquiry on Burundi said that “serious human rights violations – including crimes against humanity – have continued…across the country” and that the targets were real and suspected opposition supporters, including Burundians who had returned from abroad.

      Seven refugees said they had returned to Burundi between March 2018 and August 2019 under the voluntary repatriation program. Four said that members of the Imbonerakure had stolen the money and goods they had received from UNHCR, which include 70,000 Burundian Francs ($37), perishable goods, and cooking and other utensils. All said they left Burundi for Uganda to escape insecurity in Burundi.

      A man who returned to Burundi on September 27, 2018 and left again for Uganda one year later, described the challenges returning refugees face in Burundi:

      The Imbonerakure said we were ibipinga [a pejorative Kirundi expression to designate those who are against the party] and that we would pay for it in [the] 2020 [elections]. When they saw us at the market, they made us pay more. In July, August, and September [2019], CNDD-FDD [ruling party] members forced us to pay contributions for the elections and the ruling party. The Imbonerakure monitored our houses, especially if they suspected people might try and flee, and said they were going to kill us. The [local] authorities made me sign up to become a member of the ruling party... I thought I would be killed.

      Several interviewees said Imbonerakure members accused them of joining rebel groups abroad and threatened to arrest them. One person said that Imbonerakure members beat people trying to get goods at distributions by aid agencies and prevented people from getting food. He said he was forced to give up much of the repatriation-assistance money he had received from UNHCR:

      Of the 70,000 Francs I received [from UNHCR], I had to give 10,000 ($5.3) to the communal counsellor, 5,000 ($2.6) to the hill-level authorities, and 3,000 ($1.6) to the local Imbonerakure chief. Then, whenever an Imbonerakure came to my house, I had to give them 1,000 Francs ($0.5) …The Imbonerakure said they were going to kill me because I didn’t tell them how rebel groups were planning on attacking Burundi. They said they would cut my head off. I was afraid and decided to leave without any belongings – if the Imbonerakure suspected I was fleeing; they would have prevented me from crossing the border.

      An interviewee who returned to Burundi in August said Imbonerakure members arrested and accused him of denouncing Imbonerakure abuses while he was abroad. He said his wife had to sell all the goods they had received from UNHCR in Tanzania to pay for his release, and they both fled the country later the same month.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/12/12/tanzania-burundians-pressured-leaving

  • Lebanon looks to hardline eastern Europe approach for Syrian refugees

    Lebanon said on Wednesday it wanted to follow the example of eastern EU states that have largely rejected refugees as a way of resolving its own refugee crisis.
    Foreign Minister Gebran Bassil sympathized with the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia’s refusal to accept refugee distribution quotas proposed by the EU after the 2015-16 migrant crisis, when more than a million people streamed into Europe, mostly from Syria.
    Populist eastern EU leaders including Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, Poland’s powerbroker Jaroslaw Kaczynski and Czech President Milos Zeman, among others, blasted German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s “open door” policy on accepting migrants during that period.
    These countries “were acting in their national interest and decided that the redistribution of refugees among European countries is not in their national interest, although they faced EU sanctions for that,” Bassil told reporters in Prague.
    “I would like this attitude to be an inspiration for Lebanon, because every state must make national interests its top priority and at this moment Lebanon’s key national interest is the return of Syrian refugees to their homeland,” he added.
    Lebanon says it is hosting 1.5 million Syrians — around a quarter of its own population. Less than one million of them are registered with UN refugee agency the UNHCR.
    Most of the Syrian refugees in Lebanon live in insecurity and depend on international aid.
    The International Monetary Fund has said their presence has led to increased unemployment and a rise in poverty due to greater competition for jobs.
    The influx has also put strain on Lebanese water and electrical infrastructure.
    Lebanese government officials and politicians have ramped up calls for Syrians to return home, but the United Nations has consistently warned that conditions in the war-ravaged country are not suitable for such returns.
    “I would like Prague or Beirut to host a meeting, an initiative of countries seeking to plan and ensure the return of Syrian refugees to their country,” said Bassil.
    “This would be immensely useful for both Lebanon and Syria and in general it would be the best solution to the human, humanitarian and political crisis we have right now and which could get worse in the future,” he said.


    http://www.arabnews.com/node/1473496/middle-east
    #Liban #it_has_begun #modèle_hongrois #asile #migrations #réfugiés #réfugiés_syriens #intérêt_national #populisme #modèle_Visegrad #retour_au_pays

  • Quand l’#Union_europeénne se met au #fact-checking... et que du coup, elle véhicule elle-même des #préjugés...
    Et les mythes sont pensés à la fois pour les personnes qui portent un discours anti-migrants ("L’UE ne protège pas ses frontières"), comme pour ceux qui portent des discours pro-migrants ("L’UE veut créer une #forteresse_Europe")...
    Le résultat ne peut être que mauvais, surtout vu les pratiques de l’UE...

    Je copie-colle ici les mythes et les réponses de l’UE à ce mythe...


    #crise_migratoire


    #frontières #protection_des_frontières


    #Libye #IOM #OIM #évacuation #détention #détention_arbitraire #centres #retours_volontaires #retour_volontaire #droits_humains


    #push-back #refoulement #Libye


    #aide_financière #Espagne #Grèce #Italie #Frontex #gardes-frontière #EASO


    #Forteresse_européenne


    #global_compact


    #frontières_intérieures #Schengen #Espace_Schengen


    #ONG #sauvetage #mer #Méditerranée


    #maladies #contamination


    #criminels #criminalité


    #économie #coût #bénéfice


    #externalisation #externalisation_des_frontières


    #Fonds_fiduciaire #dictature #dictatures #régimes_autoritaires

    https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/european-agenda-migration/20190306_managing-migration-factsheet-debunking-myths-about-migration_en.p
    #préjugés #mythes #migrations #asile #réfugiés
    #hypocrisie #on_n'est_pas_sorti_de_l'auberge
    ping @reka @isskein

  • L’agenda européen en matière de migration : l’UE doit poursuivre les progrès accomplis au cours des quatre dernières années

    Dans la perspective du Conseil européen de mars, la Commission dresse aujourd’hui le bilan des progrès accomplis au cours des quatre dernières années et décrit les mesures qui sont encore nécessaires pour relever les défis actuels et futurs en matière de migration.

    Face à la crise des réfugiés la plus grave qu’ait connu le monde depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale, l’UE est parvenue à susciter un changement radical en matière de gestion des migrations et de protection des frontières. L’UE a offert une protection et un soutien à des millions de personnes, a sauvé des vies, a démantelé des réseaux de passeurs et a permis de réduire le nombre d’arrivées irrégulières en Europe à son niveau le plus bas enregistré en cinq ans. Néanmoins, des efforts supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour assurer la pérennité de la politique migratoire de l’UE, compte tenu d’un contexte géopolitique en constante évolution et de l’augmentation régulière de la pression migratoire à l’échelle mondiale (voir fiche d’information).

    Frans Timmermans, premier vice-président, a déclaré : « Au cours des quatre dernières années, l’UE a accompli des progrès considérables et obtenu des résultats tangibles dans l’action menée pour relever le défi de la migration. Dans des circonstances très difficiles, nous avons agi ensemble. L’Europe n’est plus en proie à la crise migratoire que nous avons traversée en 2015, mais des problèmes structurels subsistent. Les États membres ont le devoir de protéger les personnes qu’ils abritent et de veiller à leur bien-être. Continuer à coopérer solidairement dans le cadre d’une approche globale et d’un partage équitable des responsabilités est la seule voie à suivre si l’UE veut être à la hauteur du défi de la migration. »

    Federica Mogherini, haute représentante et vice-présidente, a affirmé : « Notre collaboration avec l’Union africaine et les Nations unies porte ses fruits. Nous portons assistance à des milliers de personnes en détresse, nous en aidons beaucoup à retourner chez elles en toute sécurité pour y démarrer une activité, nous sauvons des vies, nous luttons contre les trafiquants. Les flux ont diminué, mais ceux qui risquent leur vie sont encore trop nombreux et chaque vie perdue est une victime de trop. C’est pourquoi nous continuerons à coopérer avec nos partenaires internationaux et avec les pays concernés pour fournir une protection aux personnes qui en ont le plus besoin, remédier aux causes profondes de la migration, démanteler les réseaux de trafiquants, mettre en place des voies d’accès à une migration sûre, ordonnée et légale. La migration constitue un défi mondial que l’on peut relever, ainsi que nous avons choisi de le faire en tant qu’Union, avec des efforts communs et des partenariats solides. »

    Dimitris Avramopoulos, commissaire pour la migration, les affaires intérieures et la citoyenneté, a déclaré : « Les résultats de notre approche européenne commune en matière de migration parlent d’eux-mêmes : les arrivées irrégulières sont désormais moins nombreuses qu’avant la crise, le corps européen de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes a porté la protection commune des frontières de l’UE à un niveau inédit et, en collaboration avec nos partenaires, nous travaillons à garantir des voies d’entrée légales tout en multipliant les retours. À l’avenir, il est essentiel de poursuivre notre approche commune, mais aussi de mener à bien la réforme en cours du régime d’asile de l’UE. En outre, il convient, à titre prioritaire, de mettre en place des accords temporaires en matière de débarquement. »

    Depuis trois ans, les chiffres des arrivées n’ont cessé de diminuer et les niveaux actuels ne représentent que 10 % du niveau record atteint en 2015. En 2018, environ 150 000 franchissements irréguliers des frontières extérieures de l’UE ont été détectés. Toutefois, le fait que le nombre d’arrivées irrégulières ait diminué ne constitue nullement une garantie pour l’avenir, eu égard à la poursuite probable de la pression migratoire. Il est donc indispensable d’adopter une approche globale de la gestion des migrations et de la protection des frontières.

    Des #mesures immédiates s’imposent

    Les problèmes les plus urgents nécessitant des efforts supplémentaires sont les suivants :

    Route de la #Méditerranée_occidentale : l’aide au #Maroc doit encore être intensifiée, compte tenu de l’augmentation importante des arrivées par la route de la Méditerranée occidentale. Elle doit comprendre la poursuite de la mise en œuvre du programme de 140 millions d’euros visant à soutenir la gestion des frontières ainsi que la reprise des négociations avec le Maroc sur la réadmission et l’assouplissement du régime de délivrance des visas.
    #accords_de_réadmission #visas

    Route de la #Méditerranée_centrale : améliorer les conditions d’accueil déplorables en #Libye : les efforts déployés par l’intermédiaire du groupe de travail trilatéral UA-UE-NU doivent se poursuivre pour contribuer à libérer les migrants se trouvant en #rétention, faciliter le #retour_volontaire (37 000 retours jusqu’à présent) et évacuer les personnes les plus vulnérables (près de 2 500 personnes évacuées).
    #vulnérabilité #évacuation

    Route de la #Méditerranée_orientale : gestion des migrations en #Grèce : alors que la déclaration UE-Turquie a continué à contribuer à la diminution considérable des arrivées sur les #îles grecques, des problèmes majeurs sont toujours en suspens en Grèce en ce qui concerne les retours, le traitement des demandes d’asile et la mise à disposition d’un hébergement adéquat. Afin d’améliorer la gestion des migrations, la Grèce devrait rapidement mettre en place une stratégie nationale efficace comprenant une organisation opérationnelle des tâches.
    #accord_ue-turquie

    Accords temporaires en matière de #débarquement : sur la base de l’expérience acquise au moyen de solutions ad hoc au cours de l’été 2018 et en janvier 2019, des accords temporaires peuvent constituer une approche européenne plus systématique et mieux coordonnée en matière de débarquement­. De tels accords mettraient en pratique la #solidarité et la #responsabilité au niveau de l’UE, en attendant l’achèvement de la réforme du #règlement_de_Dublin.
    #Dublin

    En matière de migration, il est indispensable d’adopter une approche globale, qui comprenne des actions menées avec des partenaires à l’extérieur de l’UE, aux frontières extérieures, et à l’intérieur de l’UE. Il ne suffit pas de se concentrer uniquement sur les problèmes les plus urgents. La situation exige une action constante et déterminée en ce qui concerne l’ensemble des éléments de l’approche globale, pour chacun des quatre piliers de l’agenda européen en matière de migration :

    1. Lutte contre les causes de la migration irrégulière : au cours des quatre dernières années, la migration s’est peu à peu fermement intégrée à tous les domaines des relations extérieures de l’UE :

    Grâce au #fonds_fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique, plus de 5,3 millions de personnes vulnérables bénéficient actuellement d’une aide de première nécessité et plus de 60 000 personnes ont reçu une aide à la réintégration après leur retour dans leur pays d’origine.
    #fonds_fiduciaire_pour_l'Afrique

    La lutte contre les réseaux de passeurs et de trafiquants a encore été renforcée. En 2018, le centre européen chargé de lutter contre le trafic de migrants, établi au sein d’#Europol, a joué un rôle majeur dans plus d’une centaine de cas de trafic prioritaires et des équipes communes d’enquête participent activement à la lutte contre ce trafic dans des pays comme le #Niger.
    Afin d’intensifier les retours et la réadmission, l’UE continue d’œuvrer à la conclusion d’accords et d’arrangements en matière de réadmission avec les pays partenaires, 23 accords et arrangements ayant été conclus jusqu’à présent. Les États membres doivent maintenant tirer pleinement parti des accords existants.
    En outre, le Parlement européen et le Conseil devraient adopter rapidement la proposition de la Commission en matière de retour, qui vise à limiter les abus et la fuite des personnes faisant l’objet d’un retour au sein de l’Union.

    2. Gestion renforcée des frontières : créée en 2016, l’Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes est aujourd’hui au cœur des efforts déployés par l’UE pour aider les États membres à protéger les frontières extérieures. En septembre 2018, la Commission a proposé de renforcer encore le corps européen de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes et de doter l’Agence d’un corps permanent de 10 000 garde-frontières, afin que les États membres puissent à tout moment bénéficier pleinement du soutien opérationnel de l’UE. La Commission invite le Parlement européen et les États membres à adopter la réforme avant les élections au Parlement européen. Afin d’éviter les lacunes, les États membres doivent également veiller à un déploiement suffisant d’experts et d’équipements auprès de l’Agence.

    3. Protection et asile : l’UE continuera à apporter son soutien aux réfugiés et aux personnes déplacées dans des pays tiers, y compris au Moyen-Orient et en Afrique, ainsi qu’à offrir un refuge aux personnes ayant besoin d’une protection internationale. Plus de 50 000 personnes réinstallées l’ont été dans le cadre de programmes de l’UE depuis 2015. L’un des principaux enseignements de la crise migratoire est la nécessité de réviser les règles de l’UE en matière d’asile et de mettre en place un régime équitable et adapté à l’objectif poursuivi, qui permette de gérer toute augmentation future de la pression migratoire. La Commission a présenté toutes les propositions nécessaires et soutient fermement une approche progressive pour faire avancer chaque proposition. Les propositions qui sont sur le point d’aboutir devraient être adoptées avant les élections au Parlement européen. La Commission continuera de travailler avec le Parlement européen et le Conseil pour progresser vers l’étape finale.

    4. Migration légale et intégration : les voies de migration légale ont un effet dissuasif sur les départs irréguliers et sont un élément important pour qu’une migration ordonnée et fondée sur les besoins devienne la principale voie d’entrée dans l’UE. La Commission présentera sous peu une évaluation complète du cadre de l’UE en matière de migration légale. Parallèlement, les États membres devraient développer le recours à des projets pilotes en matière de migration légale sur une base volontaire. L’intégration réussie des personnes ayant un droit de séjour est essentielle au bon fonctionnement de la migration et plus de 140 millions d’euros ont été investis dans des mesures d’intégration au titre du budget de l’UE au cours de la période 2015-2017.

    http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-1496_fr.htm
    –-> Quoi dire plus si ce n’est que... c’est #déprimant.
    #Business_as_usual #rien_ne_change
    #hypocrisie
    #langue_de_bois
    #à_vomir
    ....

    #UE #EU #politique_migratoire #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières

  • IOM : Over 40.000 migrants voluntarily returned home from Libya since 2015

    After an operation for voluntary returns last week, the UN agency for migration International Organization for Migration (IOM) said that the total number of migrants that had voluntarily returned from Libya to their country of origin since 2015 had risen to 40,000.

    Over 160 Nigerian migrants stuck in southern Libya returned to Nigeria voluntarily on February 21 on a charter flight offered by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) as part of its program for Voluntary Humanitarian Returns (VHR).

    The February operation brought the total number of voluntary repatriations from Libya to 40,000 since 2015, IOM has explained.

    https://www.libyanexpress.com/iom-over-40-000-migrants-voluntarily-returned-home-from-libya-since-2
    #retours_volontaires (sic) #retour_volontaire #retour_au_pays #Libye #asile #migrations #réfugiés #OIM #IOM #organisation_contre_la_migration #statistiques #chiffres #machine_à_rapatriement #rapatriement #nouvelair

    j’ajoute à cette métaliste :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749

  • In cooperation with @IOM_Libya 8 stranded Eritrean #migrants returned safely home today via #Mitiga Int. Airport
    #Libya 17.02.19


    https://twitter.com/rgowans/status/1097176169978515456

    L’#OIM n’arrêtera jamais de me surprendre... Mais alors là... L’OIM mérite vraiment qu’on lui change son nom... Organisation Internationale CONTRE la migration !

    8 ressortissants érythréens retournés EN SECURITE au pays... soit donc en Erythrée !

    Et petit détail important...
    Dans ce tweet on parle de #migrants_érythréens... si il s’agit de migrants et non pas de réfugiés... leur retour VOLONTAIRE n’est pas considéré comme un #refoulement (#push-back)
    #mots #terminologie #vocabulaire

    #retour_au_pays #IOM #Erythrée #réfugiés_érythréens #Organisation_Internationale_contre_la_migration #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Libye #retour_volontaire #à_vomir

    @_kg_ : il y a aussi utilisation de ce terme dans le tweet, #stranded_migrants...