• Yale survey of refugees in Bangladesh aims to help prevent COVID-19 spread | YaleNews
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#refugie#Rohingya#Bangladesh#camp#sante#test

    https://news.yale.edu/2020/05/26/yale-survey-refugees-bangladesh-aims-help-prevent-covid-19-spread

    Cox’s Bazar, a coastal city in southeast Bangladesh, is home to about 900,000 Rohingya refugees living in overcrowded camps. Like other forcibly displaced people across the globe — more than 70 million in all — the Rohingya are extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 infection.

  • COVID-19: 1.1 million refugees are extremely vulnerable in Bangladesh - Modern Diplomacy
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#refugie#Bangladesh#camp#rohingya

    https://moderndiplomacy.eu/2020/05/20/covid-19-1-1-million-refugees-are-extremely-vulnerable-in-bangladesh

    Now the entire planet is rudderless and anxious of the threat of COVID-19 pandemic. This unknown enemy has already spread in every corner of the world, even in the world’s biggest Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh. Emergency teams are racing to contain a possible coronavirus outbreak in the largest refugee settlements. is home to nearly 1.1 million Rohingya refugee who fled violence in Myanmar. Some people have already tested positive for the virus in the area. A refugee and residents living nearby, one of them disappeared for hours after finding out he’d been infected while they now in isolation. Authorities worried that the virus has already spread in camp. Here, people are living 40,000 to 70,000 people per square kilometer. That’s at least 1.6 times the population density on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship. Where the disease spread four times as fast as in Wuhan at the peak of the outbreak.

  • 1st COVID-19 case detected in Rohingya camps in Bangladesh - StarTribune.com
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Bangladesh#Rohingya#sante#camp

    https://www.startribune.com/1st-covid-19-case-detected-in-rohingya-camps-in-bangladesh/570495502

    DHAKA, Bangladesh — The first coronavirus case has been confirmed in the crowded camps for Rohingya refugees in southern Bangladesh, where more than 1 million are taking shelter.

  • Fears over virus ’nightmare’ in Rohingya camps - Asia Times
    https://asiatimes.com/2020/05/fears-over-virus-nightmare-in-rohingya-camps

    Rahman said an entire block in one camp, housing around 5,000 people, was shut off, and that all contacts of the men were being traced and would be brought to isolation centres.“We have locked down the block, barring anyone from entering or leaving their homes,” he said. Rahman, the health official, said they would ramp up coronavirus testing to “at least” 100 per day from just five to 10 at present. Bercaru said that since February, the entire health sector had been “working round the clock” to increase capacity for testing, isolation and treatment, as well as to train health workers and talk to communities.The UN refugee agency said that 12 severe respiratory infection treatment centres were being established locally, and that up to 1,900 intensive care beds, five quarantine centres, and 20 isolation facilities were planned. (...) In early April authorities had locked down Cox’s Bazar – home to 3.4 million people including the refugees – after a number of COVID-19 cases.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#réfugiés#Rohingya#centre-d'isolement#quarantaine#test#confinement#Bangaldesh

  • Amid COVID-19 pandemic, thousands stranded in Bay of Bengal ‘unable to come ashore’ | | UN News
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Bangladesh#Rohingya#HCR#OIM

    https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/05/1063402

    In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic,United Nations agencies called on Wednesday for South-East Asian governments to show compassion to boats full of vulnerable people adrift in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea.

  • UNHCR - Joint statement by UNHCR, IOM and UNODC on protection at sea in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#OIM#HCR#Rohingya

    https://www.unhcr.org/news/press/2020/5/5eb15b804/joint-statement-unhcr-iom-unodc-protection-sea-bay-bengal-andaman-sea.html

    Five years on from the 2015 ‘boat crisis’ in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, in which thousands of refugees and migrants in distress at sea were denied life-saving care and support, we are alarmed that a similar tragedy may be unfolding once more.

  • Bangladesh : Rohingya Refugees in Risky Covid-19 Quarantine | Human Rights Watch
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Bangladesh#Rohingya#confinement

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/05/bangladesh-rohingya-refugees-risky-covid-19-quarantine

    (New York) – Bangladesh authorities have quarantined 29 Rohingya refugees without adequate access to aid on an unstable silt island in the Bay of Bengal, Human Rights Watch said today. The authorities said that they are holding the refugees, who had been adrift at sea for over two months, on Bhasan Char to prevent a Covid-19 outbreak in the camps.

  • Des réfugiés rohingya internés sur une île submersible du golfe du Bengale
    https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/05/05/des-refugies-rohingya-internes-sur-une-ile-submersible-du-golfe-du-bengale_6

    L’épidémie de Covid-19 va-t-elle servir de prétexte au Bangladesh ? Alors qu’il avait renoncé, début mars, à son projet d’installer 103 000 réfugiés rohingya sur un îlot perdu dans le golfe du Bengale, le gouvernement ­dirigé par Sheikh Hasina a fait débarquer sur place 29 membres de cette minorité ethnique, dimanche 3 mai.Ces personnes représentaient « un risque de contagion » trop élevé pour pouvoir rester sur le continent, a expliqué le ministre des affaires étrangères, AK Abdul Momen, omettant de mentionner que les intéressés venaient de passer plus de deux mois en pleine mer, avec une probabilité quasi nulle d’être contaminés.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#réfugiés#rohingyas#Bangladesh#Malaisie#risque#contagion#UNHCR#camp#Cox'sBazar#symtômes

  • Desert or sea: Virus traps migrants in mid-route danger zone | The Star Online
    #Covid-19#Bangladesh#Rohingya#migrant#migration
    https://www.thestar.com.my/news/regional/2020/05/03/desert-or-sea-virus-traps-migrants-in-mid-route-danger-zone

    YANGON: In another shocking case of migrants at a total loss, at least 29 Rohingya refugees from a fishing boat floating in the Bay of Bengal for weeks have landed on an island in southern Bangladesh, officials said Sunday (May 3).

  • Hundreds of Rohingya Refugees Stuck at Sea With ‘Zero Hope’ - The New York Time
    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Bangladesh#Rohingya#coince

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/world/asia/rohingya-muslim-refugee-crisis.html

    At least three boats carrying Rohingya refugees have been adrift for more than two months. As of this week, rights groups that had been tracking the boats lost sight of them.

  • U.N. Concerned Over ’Grave Immediate Risk’ to Rohingya Refugees on Boats - The New York Times
    #Covid-19 #migrant #migration #refugie#Bangladesh#Malaisie#Rohingya

    https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/04/23/world/asia/23reuters-southeastasia-rohingya.html

    (Reuters) - The U.N. refugee agency UNHCR voiced mounting concern on Thursday over a “grave immediate risk” to Rohingya refugees aboard boats in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, urging Southeast Asian nations not to close avenues to asylum.

  • Covid-19 a bad excuse for turning away Rohingya, say NGOs | Free Malaysia Today
    https://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2020/04/18/covid-19-a-bad-excuse-for-turning-away-rohingya-say-ngos

    Bernama reported yesterday that a Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) surveillance aircraft on Thursday morning spotted the refugee boat 70 nautical miles west of Pulau Langkawi and contacted the Royal Malaysian Navy.

    RMAF said in a media statement it feared the group might bring Covid-19 into the country.

    The crew of the KD Lekiu navy vessel distributed food to the group and escorted their boat out of Malaysian waters.

    Pereira noted that the Malaysian government had long sympathised with the Rohingya’s plight and said it should have given the group at least temporary sanctuary.

    “We should be able to accommodate them,” he said. “I really don’t think the issue of health is a good excuse. It can be managed.”

    He added that it would also be unreasonable to say they would strain the country’s resources since migrants were making significant contributions to the Malaysian economy. “It’s about how we manage the money.”

    He said the action of turning the group away would taint Malaysia’s international image.

    Des réfugiés #rohingya à la dérive dans les eaux de la #Malaisie. Le nouveau gouvernement, qui a dû faire alliance avec les islamistes, n’a pas l’air plus « bienveillant » avec la Umma, air connu.

  • The Gambia v #Myanmar at the International Court of Justice: Points of Interest in the Application

    On 11 November 2019, The Gambia filed an application at the International Court of Justice against Myanmar, alleging violation of obligations under the Genocide Convention.

    This legal step has been in the works for some time now, with the announcement by the Gambian Minister of Justice that instructions had been given to counsel in October to file the application. As a result, the application has been much anticipated. I will briefly go over some legally significant aspects of the application.

    On methodology, the application relies heavily on the 2018 and 2019 reports of the Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar (FFM) for much of the factual basis of the assertions – placing emphasis on the conclusions of the FFM in regard to the question of genocide. What struck me particularly is the timeline of events as the underlying factual basis of the application, commencing with the ‘clearance operations’ in October 2016 and continuing to date. This is the same timeframe under scrutiny at the International Criminal Court, but different from the FFM (which has now completed its mandate), and the Independent Investigative Mechanism for Myanmar (IIMM). The IIMM was explicitly mandated to inquire into events from 2011 onwards, while the FFM interpreted its mandate to commence from 2011. While these are clearly distinct institutions with vastly different mandates, there may well be points of overlap and a reliance on some of the institutions in the course of the ICJ case. (See my previous Opinio Juris post on potential interlinkages).

    For the legal basis of the application, The Gambia asserts that both states are parties to the Genocide Convention, neither have reservations to Article IX, and that there exists a dispute between it and Myanmar – listing a number of instances in which The Gambia has issued statements about and to Myanmar regarding the treatment of the Rohingya, including a note verbal in October 2019. (paras. 20 – 23) The Gambia asserts that the prohibition of genocide is a jus cogens norm, and results in obligations erga omnes and erga omnes partes, leading to the filing of the application. (para. 15) This is significant as it seeks to cover both bases – that the obligations arise towards the international community as a whole, as well as to parties to the convention.

    On the substance of the allegations of genocide, the application lays the groundwork – the persecution of the Rohingya, including denial of rights, as well as hate propaganda, and then goes on to address the commission of genocidal acts. The application emphasizes the mass scale destruction of villages, the targeting of children, the widespread use of rape and sexual assault, situated in the context of the clearance operations of October 2016, and then from August 2017 onwards. It also details the denial of food and a policy of forced starvation, through displacement, confiscation of crops, as well as inability to access humanitarian aid.

    Violations of the following provisions of the Genocide Convention are alleged: Articles I, III, IV, V and VI. To paraphrase, these include committing genocide, conspiracy to commit, direct and public incitement, attempt to commit, complicity, failing to prevent, failure to punish, and failure to enact legislation). (para. 111)

    As part of the relief asked for, The Gambia has asked that the continuing breach of the Genocide Convention obligations are remedied, that wrongful acts are ceased and that perpetrators are punished by a competent tribunal, which could include an international penal tribunal – clearly leaving the door open to the ICC or an ad hoc tribunal. In addition, as part of the obligation of reparation, The Gambia asks for safe and dignified return of the Rohingya with full citizenship rights, and a guarantee of non-repetition. (para. 112) This is significant in linking this to a form of reparations, and reflects the demands of many survivors.

    The Gambia makes detailed submissions in its request for provisional measures, in keeping with the evolving jurisprudence of the court. It addresses the compelling circumstances that necessitate provisional measures and cites the 2019 FFM report in assessing a grave and ongoing risk to the approximately 600,000 Rohingya that are in Myanmar. Importantly, it also cites the destruction of evidence as part of the argument (para. 118), indicating the necessity of the work of the IIMM in this regard.

    In addressing ‘plausible rights’ for the purpose of provisional measures, the application draws upon the case ofBelgium v Senegal, applying mutatis mutandis the comparison to the Convention against Torture. In that case, the court held that obligations in relation to the convention for the prohibition of torture would apply erga omnes partes – thereby leading to the necessary argument that in fact the rights of The Gambia also need to be protected by the provisional measures order. (para. 127) (For more on this distinction between erga omnesand erga omnes partes, see this post) The Gambia requests the courts protection in light of the urgency of the matter.

    As a last point, The Gambia has appointed Navanethem Pillay as an ad hoc judge. (para. 135) With her formidable prior experience as President of the ICTR, a judge at the ICC, and head of the OHCHR, this experience will be a welcome addition to the bench. (And no, as I’ve been asked many times, unfortunately we are not related!)

    The filing of the application by The Gambia is a significant step in the quest for accountability – this is the route of state accountability, while for individual responsibility, proceedings continue at the ICC, as well as with emerging universal jurisdiction cases. Success at the ICJ is far from guaranteed, but this is an important first step in the process.

    http://opiniojuris.org/2019/11/13/the-gambia-v-myanmar-at-the-international-court-of-justice-points-of-in
    #Birmanie #justice #Rohingya #Gambie #Cour_internationale_de_justice

    • Rohingyas : feu vert de la #CPI à une enquête sur des crimes présumés

      La #Cour_pénale_internationale (CPI) a donné jeudi son feu vert à une enquête sur les crimes présumés commis contre la minorité musulmane rohingya en Birmanie, pays confronté à une pression juridique croissante à travers le monde.

      Les juges de la Cour, chargée de juger les pires atrocités commises dans le monde, ont donné leur aval à la procureure de la CPI, #Fatou_Bensouda, pour mener une enquête approfondie sur les actes de #violence et la #déportation alléguée de cette minorité musulmane, qui pourrait constituer un #crime_contre_l'humanité.

      En août 2017, plus de 740.000 musulmans rohingyas ont fui la Birmanie, majoritairement bouddhiste, après une offensive de l’armée en représailles d’attaques de postes-frontières par des rebelles rohingyas. Persécutés par les forces armées birmanes et des milices bouddhistes, ils se sont réfugiés dans d’immenses campements de fortune au Bangladesh.

      Mme Bensouda a salué la décision de la Cour, estimant qu’elle « envoie un signal positif aux victimes des atrocités en Birmanie et ailleurs ».

      « Mon enquête visera à découvrir la vérité », a-telle ajouté dans un communiqué, en promettant une « enquête indépendante et impartiale ».

      La Cour pénale internationale (CPI) a donné jeudi son feu vert à une enquête sur les crimes présumés commis contre la minorité musulmane rohingya en Birmanie, pays confronté à une pression juridique croissante à travers le monde.

      De leur côté, les juges de la CPI, également basée à La Haye, ont évoqué des allégations « d’actes de violence systématiques », d’expulsion en tant que crime contre l’humanité et de persécution fondée sur l’appartenance ethnique ou la religion contre les Rohingya.

      Bien que la Birmanie ne soit pas un État membre du Statut de Rome, traité fondateur de la Cour, celle-ci s’était déclarée compétente pour enquêter sur la déportation présumée de cette minorité vers le Bangladesh, qui est lui un État partie.

      La Birmanie, qui a toujours réfuté les accusations de nettoyage ethnique ou de génocide, avait « résolument » rejeté la décision de la CPI, dénonçant un « fondement juridique douteux ».

      En septembre 2018, un examen préliminaire avait déjà été ouvert par la procureure, qui avait ensuite demandé l’ouverture d’une véritable enquête, pour laquelle les juges ont donné jeudi leur feu vert.

      Les investigations pourraient à terme donner lieu à des mandats d ?arrêt contre des généraux de l’armée birmane.

      Des enquêteurs de l’ONU avaient demandé en août 2018 que la justice internationale poursuive le chef de l’armée birmane et cinq autres hauts gradés pour « génocide », « crimes contre l’humanité » et « crimes de guerre ». Des accusations rejetées par les autorités birmanes.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/depeche/rohingyas-feu-vert-de-la-cpi-une-enquete-sur-des-crimes-presu

    • Joint statement of Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands

      Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands welcome The Gambia’s application against Myanmar before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the alleged violation of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Genocide Convention). In order to uphold international accountability and prevent impunity, Canada and the Netherlands hereby express their intention to jointly explore all options to support and assist The Gambia in these efforts.

      The Genocide Convention embodies a solemn pledge by its signatories to prevent the crime of genocide and hold those responsible to account. As such, Canada and the Netherlands consider it their obligation to support The Gambia before the ICJ, as it concerns all of humanity.

      In 2017, the world witnessed an exodus of over 700,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State. They sought refuge from targeted violence, mass murder and sexual and gender based violence carried out by the Myanmar security forces, the very people who should have protected them.

      For decades, the Rohingya have suffered systemic discrimination and exclusion, marred by waves of abhorrent violence. These facts have been corroborated by several investigations, including those conducted by the UN Independent Fact Finding Mission for Myanmar and human rights organizations. They include crimes that constitute acts described in Article II of the Genocide Convention.

      In light of this evidence Canada and the Kingdom of the Netherlands therefore strongly believe this is a matter that is rightfully brought to the ICJ to provide international legal judgment on whether acts of genocide have been committed. We call upon all States Parties to the Genocide Convention to support The Gambia in its efforts to address these violations.

      https://www.government.nl/documents/diplomatic-statements/2019/12/09/joint-statement-of-canada-and-the-kingdom-of-the-netherlands
      #Canada #Pays-Bas

  • Le #Bangladesh veut-il noyer ses #réfugiés_rohingyas ?

    Confronté à la présence sur son territoire d’un million de réfugiés musulmans chassés de Birmanie par les crimes massifs de l’armée et des milices bouddhistes, Dacca envisage d’en transférer 100 000 sur une île prison, dans le golfe du Bengale, menacée d’inondation par la mousson. Ce projet vient relancer les interrogations sur le rôle controversé de l’Organisation des Nations unies en #Birmanie.
    Dans les semaines qui viennent, le gouvernement du Bangladesh pourrait transférer plusieurs milliers de réfugiés rohingyas, chassés de Birmanie entre 2012 et 2017, dans une #île du #golfe_du_Bengale menacée de submersion et tenue pour « inhabitable » par les ONG locales. Préparé depuis des mois par le ministère de la gestion des catastrophes et des secours et par la Commission d’aide et de rapatriement des réfugiés, ce #transfert, qui devrait dans un premier temps concerner 350 familles – soit près de 1 500 personnes – puis s’étendre à 7 000 personnes, devrait par la suite être imposé à près de 100 000 réfugiés.

    Selon les agences des Nations unies – Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR) et Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) –, plus de 950 000 s’entassent aujourd’hui au Bangladesh dans plusieurs camps de la région de #Cox’s_Bazar, près de la frontière birmane. Près de 710 000 membres de cette minorité musulmane de Birmanie, ostracisée par le gouvernement de #Naypidaw, sont arrivés depuis août 2017, victimes du #nettoyage_ethnique déclenché par l’armée avec l’appui des milices villageoises bouddhistes.

    Les #baraquements sur #pilotis déjà construits par le gouvernement bangladais sur l’#île de #Bhasan_Char, à une heure de bateau de la terre ferme la plus proche, dans le #delta_du_Meghna, sont destinés à héberger plus de 92 000 personnes. En principe, les réfugiés désignés pour ce premier transfert doivent être volontaires.

    C’est en tout cas ce que les autorités du Bangladesh ont indiqué aux agences des Nations unies en charge des réfugiés rohingyas. Mais l’ONG régionale Fortify Rights, qui a interrogé, dans trois camps de réfugiés différents, quatorze personnes dont les noms figurent sur la liste des premiers transférables, a constaté qu’en réalité, aucune d’entre elles n’avait été consultée.

    « Dans notre camp, a déclaré aux enquêteurs de Fortify Rights l’un des délégués non élus des réfugiés chargé des relations avec l’administration locale, aucune famille n’accepte d’être transférée dans cette île. Les gens ont peur d’aller vivre là-bas. Ils disent que c’est une île flottante. » « Île qui flotte », c’est d’ailleurs ce que signifie Bhasan Char dans la langue locale.

    Les réfractaires n’ont pas tort. Apparue seulement depuis une vingtaine d’années, cette île, constituée d’alluvions du #Meghna, qui réunit les eaux du Gange et du Brahmapoutre, émerge à peine des eaux. Partiellement couverte de forêt, elle est restée inhabitée depuis son apparition en raison de sa vulnérabilité à la mousson et aux cyclones, fréquents dans cette région de la mi-avril à début novembre. Cyclones d’autant plus redoutés et destructeurs que l’altitude moyenne du Bangladesh ne dépasse pas 12 mètres. Selon les travaux des hydrologues locaux, la moitié du pays serait d’ailleurs submergée si le niveau des eaux montait seulement d’un mètre.

    « Ce projet est inhumain, a confié aux journalistes du Bangla Tribune, un officier de la marine du Bangladesh stationné dans l’île, dont l’accès est interdit par l’armée. Même la marée haute submerge aujourd’hui une partie de l’île. En novembre1970, le cyclone Bhola n’a fait aucun survivant sur l’île voisine de Nijhum Dwip. Et Bhasan Char est encore plus bas sur l’eau que Nijhum Dwip. » « Un grand nombre de questions demeurent sans réponses, observait, après une visite sur place en janvier dernier, la psychologue coréenne Yanghee Lee, rapporteure spéciale de l’ONU pour la situation des droits de l’homme en Birmanie. Mais la question principale demeure de savoir si cette île est véritablement habitable. »

    « Chaque année, pendant la mousson, ont confié aux enquêteurs de Human Rights Watch les habitants de l’île voisine de Hatiya, une partie de Bhasan Char est érodée par l’eau. Nous n’osons même pas y mettre les pieds. Comment des milliers de Rohingyas pourraient-ils y vivre ? » Par ailleurs, la navigation dans les parages de l’île est jugée si dangereuse, par temps incertain, que les pêcheurs du delta hésitent à s’y aventurer. Les reporters d’un journal local ont dû attendre six jours avant que la météo devienne favorable et qu’un volontaire accepte de les embarquer.

    À toutes ces objections des ONG, d’une partie de la presse locale et de plusieurs agences des Nations unies, le gouvernement bangladais répond que rien n’a été négligé. Une digue, haute de près de trois mètres et longue de 13 km, a été érigée autour de l’enclave de 6,7 km² affectée à l’hébergement des Rohingyas. Chacune des 120 unités de logement du complexe comprend douze bâtiments sur pilotis, une mare et un abri en béton destiné à héberger 23 familles en cas de cyclone et à recevoir les réserves de produits alimentaires. Conçus, selon les architectes, pour résister à des vents de 260 km/h, les abris pourront aussi être utilisés comme salles de classe, centres communautaires et dispensaires.

    Construit en parpaings, chaque bâtiment d’habitation contient, sous un toit de tôle métallique, seize chambres de 3,5 m sur 4 m, huit W.-C., deux douches et deux cuisines collectives. Destinées à héberger des familles de quatre personnes, les chambres s’ouvrent sur une coursive par une porte et une fenêtre à barreaux. Un réseau de collecte de l’eau de pluie, des panneaux solaires et des générateurs de biogaz sont également prévus. Des postes de police assureront la sécurité et 120 caméras de surveillance seront installées par la marine.

    Compte tenu des conditions de navigation très difficiles dans l’estuaire de la Meghna et du statut militarisé de l’île, la liberté de mouvement des réfugiés comme leur aptitude à assurer leur subsistance seront réduites à néant. « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison », estimait en mars dernier Brad Adams, directeur pour l’Asie de Human Rights Watch.
    Aung San Suu Kyi n’a pas soulevé un sourcil

    Aucun hôpital n’est prévu sur l’île. En cas d’urgence, les malades ou les blessés devront être transférés vers l’hôpital de l’île de Hatiya, à une heure de bateau lorsque le temps le permet. Faute de production locale, la quasi-totalité de l’alimentation devra être acheminée depuis le continent. La densité de population de ce complexe dont les blocs, disposés sur un plan orthogonal, sont séparés par d’étroites allées rectilignes, dépassera, lorsqu’il sera totalement occupé, 65 000 habitants au kilomètre carré, soit six fois celle du cœur de New York.

    On le voit, ce « paradis pour les Rohingyas », selon le principal architecte du projet, Ahmed Mukta, qui partage son activité entre Dacca et Londres, tient davantage du cauchemar concentrationnaire submersible que du tremplin vers une nouvelle vie pour les réfugiés birmans du Bangladesh. Ce n’est pourtant pas faute de temps et de réflexion sur la nature et la gestion du complexe. L’idée de transférer les réfugiés birmans sur Bhasan Char circulait depuis 2015 parmi les responsables birmans. À ce moment, leur nombre ne dépassait pas 250 000.

    Alimentés depuis 1990 par un chapelet de flambées de haine anti-musulmanes que le pouvoir birman tolérait quand il ne les allumait pas lui-même, plusieurs camps s’étaient créés dans la région de Cox’s Bazar pour accueillir les réfugiés chassés par la terreur ou contraints à l’exil par leur statut spécial. Musulmans dans un pays en écrasante majorité bouddhiste, les Rohingyas se sentent depuis toujours, selon l’ONU, « privés de leurs droits politiques, marginalisés économiquement et discriminés au motif de leur origine ethnique ».

    Le projet s’était apparemment endormi au fond d’un tiroir lorsqu’en août 2017, après la véritable campagne de nettoyage ethnique déclenchée par Tatmadaw (l’armée birmane) et ses milices, près de 740 000 Rohingyas ont fui précipitamment l’État de Rakhine, (autrefois appelé Arakan) où ils vivaient pour se réfugier de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Bangladesh, auprès de leurs frères, exilés parfois depuis plus de vingt-cinq ans. En quelques jours, le nombre de Rohingyas dans le district de Cox’s Bazar a atteint un million de personnes et le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong est devenu le plus peuplé de la planète.

    Nourrie par divers trafics, par le prosélytisme des émissaires islamistes, par la présence de gangs criminels et par l’activisme des agents de l’Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) à la recherche de recrues pour combattre l’armée birmane, une insécurité, rapidement jugée incontrôlable par les autorités locales, s’est installée dans la région. Insécurité qui a contribué à aggraver les tensions entre les réfugiés et la population locale qui reproche aux Rohingyas de voler les petits boulots – employés de restaurant, livreurs, conducteurs de pousse-pousse – en soudoyant les policiers et en acceptant des salaires inférieurs, alors qu’ils ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler.

    Cette situation est d’autant plus inacceptable pour le gouvernement de Dacca que Cox’s Bazar et sa plage de 120 km constituent l’une des rares attractions touristiques du pays.

    Pour mettre un terme à ce chaos, le gouvernement de Dacca a d’abord compté sur une campagne de retours volontaires et ordonnés des Rohingyas en Birmanie. Il y a un an, 2 200 d’entre eux avaient ainsi été placés sur une liste de rapatriement. Tentative vaine : faute d’obtenir des garanties de sécurité et de liberté du gouvernement birman, aucun réfugié n’a accepté de rentrer. Le même refus a été opposé aux autorités en août dernier lorsqu’une deuxième liste de 3 500 réfugiés a été proposée. Selon les chiffres fournis par le gouvernement birman lui-même, 31 réfugiés seulement sont rentrés du Bangladesh entre mai 2018 et mai 2019.

    Les conditions, le plus souvent atroces, dans lesquelles les Rohingyas ont été contraints de fuir en août 2017 et ce qu’ils soupçonnent de ce qui les attendrait au retour expliquent largement ces refus. Selon le rapport de la Mission d’établissement des faits de l’ONU remis au Conseil des droits de l’homme le 8 août 2019 [on peut le lire ici], les Rohingyas ont été victimes, un an plus tôt, de multiples « crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre ».

    Selon ce document, « la responsabilité de l’État [birman – ndlr] est engagée au regard de l’interdiction des crimes de génocide et des crimes contre l’humanité, ainsi que d’autres violations du droit international des droits de l’homme et du droit international humanitaire ».

    Le rapport précise que « la mission a établi une liste confidentielle de personnes soupçonnées d’avoir participé à des crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre, dans les États de Rakhine, kachin et shan depuis 2011. Cette liste […] contient plus d’une centaine de noms, parmi lesquels ceux de membres et de commandants de la Tatmadaw, de la police, de la police des frontières et des autres forces de sécurité, y compris de fonctionnaires de l’administration pénitentiaire, ainsi que les noms de représentants des autorités civiles, au niveau des districts, des États et du pays, de personnes privées et de membres de groupes armés non étatiques. […] La liste mentionne aussi un grand nombre d’entités avec lesquelles les auteurs présumés de violations étaient liés, notamment certaines unités des forces de sécurité, des groupes armés non étatiques et des entreprises ».

    On comprend dans ces conditions que, rien n’ayant changé depuis cet été sanglant en Birmanie où Aung San Suu Kyi, prix Nobel de la paix 1991, n’a pas levé un sourcil devant ces crimes, les Rohingyas préfèrent l’incertain chaos de leur statut de réfugiés à la certitude d’un retour à la terreur. Et refusent le rapatriement. Ce qui a conduit, début 2018, la première ministre bangladaise Sheikh Hasina à sortir de son tiroir le projet de transfert, en sommeil depuis 2015, pour le mettre en œuvre « en priorité ».

    Près de 300 millions de dollars ont été investis par Dacca dans ce projet, destiné dans un premier temps à réduire la population des camps où la situation est la plus tendue. Selon le représentant du gouvernement à Cox’s Bazar, Kamal Hossain, les opérations de transfert pourraient commencer « fin novembre ou début décembre ».

    Au cours d’une récente réunion à Dacca entre des représentants du ministère des affaires étrangères du Bangladesh et des responsables des Nations unies, les officiels bangladais auraient « conseillé » à leurs interlocuteurs d’inclure Bhasan Char dans le plan de financement de l’ONU pour 2020, sans quoi le gouvernement de Dacca pourrait ne pas approuver ce plan. Les responsables des Nations unies à Dacca ont refusé de confirmer ou démentir, mais plusieurs d’entre eux, s’exprimant officieusement, ont indiqué qu’ils étaient soumis « à une forte pression pour endosser le projet de Bhasan Char ».

    Interrogé sur la possibilité d’organiser le transfert des réfugiés sans l’aval des Nations unies, le ministre bangladais des affaires étrangères Abul Kalam Abdul Momen a répondu : « Oui, c’est possible, nous pouvons le faire. » La première ministre, de son côté, a été plus prudente. En octobre, elle se contentait de répéter que son administration ne prendrait sa décision qu’après avoir consulté les Nations unies et les autres partenaires internationaux du Bangladesh.

    L’un de ces partenaires, dont l’aide en matière d’assistance humanitaire est précieuse pour Dacca, vient de donner son avis. Lors d’une intervention fin octobre à la Chambre des représentants, Alice G. Wells, secrétaire adjointe du bureau de l’Asie du Sud et du Centre au Département d’État, a demandé au gouvernement du Bangladesh d’ajourner tout transfert de réfugiés vers Bhasan Char jusqu’à ce qu’un groupe d’experts indépendants détermine si c’est un lieu approprié. Washington ayant versé depuis août 2017 669 millions de dollars d’aide à Dacca, on peut imaginer que cette suggestion sera entendue.
    Les « défaillances systémiques » de l’ONU

    Les Nations unies sont pour l’instant discrètes sur ce dossier. On sait seulement qu’une délégation doit se rendre sur l’île les jours prochains. Il est vrai que face à ce qui s’est passé ces dernières années en Birmanie, et surtout face à la question des Rohingyas, la position de l’ONU n’a pas toujours été claire et son action a longtemps manqué de lucidité et d’efficacité. C’est le moins qu’on puisse dire.

    Certes l’actuel secrétaire général, António Guterres, a réagi rapidement et vigoureusement au sanglant nettoyage ethnique qui venait de commencer en Birmanie en adressant dès le 2 septembre 2017 une lettre au Conseil de sécurité dans laquelle il demandait un « effort concerté » pour empêcher l’escalade de la crise dans l’État de Rakhine, d’où 400 000 Rohingyas avaient déjà fui pour échapper aux atrocités.

    Mais il n’a pu obtenir de réaction rapide et efficace du Conseil. Il a fallu discuter deux semaines pour obtenir une réunion et 38 jours de plus pour obtenir une déclaration officielle de pure forme. Quant à obtenir l’envoi sur place d’une équipe d’observateurs de l’ONU en mesure de constater et dénoncer l’usage de la violence, il en était moins question que jamais : la Birmanie s’y opposait et son allié et protecteur chinois, membre du Conseil et détenteur du droit de veto, soutenait la position du gouvernement birman. Et personne, pour des raisons diverses, ne voulait s’en prendre à Pékin sur ce terrain.

    En l’occurrence, l’indifférence des États membres, peu mobilisés par le massacre de Rohingyas, venait s’ajouter aux divisions et différences de vues qui caractérisaient la bureaucratie de l’ONU dans cette affaire. Divergences qui expliquaient largement l’indifférence et la passivité de l’organisation depuis la campagne anti-Rohingyas de 2012 jusqu’au nettoyage ethnique sanglant de 2017.

    Incarnation de cette indifférence et de cette passivité, c’est-à-dire de la priorité que le système des Nations unies en Birmanie accordait aux considérations politiques et économiques sur la sécurité et les besoins humanitaires des Rohingyas, Renata Lok-Dessallien, la représentante de l’ONU en Birmanie depuis 2014, a quitté ses fonctions en octobre 2017, discrètement appelée par New York à d’autres fonctions, en dépit des réticences du gouvernement birman. Mais il était clair, à l’intérieur de l’organisation, qu’elle n’était pas la seule responsable de cette dérive désastreuse.

    Dans un rapport de 36 pages, commandé début 2018 par le secrétaire général et remis en mai dernier, l’économiste et diplomate guatémaltèque Gert Rosenthal, chargé de réaliser un diagnostic de l’action de l’ONU en Birmanie entre 2010 et 2018, constate qu’en effet, l’organisation n’a pas été à son meilleur pendant les années qui ont précédé le nettoyage ethnique d’août 2017 au cours duquel 7 000 Rohingyas au moins ont été tués, plus de 700 000 contraints à l’exil, des centaines de milliers d’autres chassés de leurs villages incendiés et enfermés dans des camps, le tout dans un climat de violence et de haine extrême [le rapport – en anglais – peut être lu ici].

    Selon Gert Rosenthal, qui constate des « défaillances systémiques » au sein de l’ONU, nombre d’agents des Nations unies ont été influencés ou déroutés par l’attitude de Aung San Suu Kyi, icône du combat pour la démocratie devenue, après les élections de 2015, l’alliée, l’otage et la caution des militaires et du clergé bouddhiste. C’est-à-dire la complice, par son silence, des crimes commis en 2017. Mais l’auteur du rapport pointe surtout la difficulté, pour les agences de l’ONU sur place, à choisir entre deux stratégies.

    L’une est la « diplomatie tranquille » qui vise à préserver dans la durée la présence et l’action, même limitée, de l’organisation au prix d’une certaine discrétion sur les obligations humanitaires et les droits de l’homme. L’autre est le « plaidoyer sans concession » qui entend faire respecter les obligations internationales par le pays hôte et implique éventuellement l’usage de mesures « intrusives », telles que des sanctions ou la menace de fermer l’accès du pays aux marchés internationaux, aux investissements et au tourisme.

    À première vue, entre ces deux options, le secrétaire général de l’ONU a fait son choix. Après une visite à Cox’s Bazar, en juillet 2018, il affirmait qu’à ses yeux, « les Rohingyas ont toujours été l’un des peuples, sinon le peuple le plus discriminé du monde, sans la moindre reconnaissance de ses droits les plus élémentaires, à commencer par le droit à la citoyenneté dans son propre pays, le Myanmar [la Birmanie] ».

    Il reste à vérifier aujourd’hui si, face à la menace brandie par Dacca de transférer jusqu’à 100 000 réfugiés rohingyas sur une île concentrationnaire et submersible, les Nations unies, c’est-à-dire le système onusien, mais aussi les États membres, choisiront le « plaidoyer sans concession » ou la « diplomatie tranquille ».

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/131119/le-bangladesh-veut-il-noyer-ses-refugies-rohingyas?onglet=full

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #rohingyas #Bangladesh #camps_de_réfugiés

    ping @reka

    • Bangladesh Turning Refugee Camps into Open-Air Prisons

      Bangladesh Army Chief Gen. Aziz Ahmed said this week that a plan to surround the Rohingya refugee camps in #Cox’s_Bazar with barbed wire fences and guard towers was “in full swing.” The plan is the latest in a series of policies effectively cutting off more than 900,000 Rohingya refugees from the outside world. The refugees have been living under an internet blackout for more than 75 days.

      Bangladesh is struggling to manage the massive refugee influx and the challenges of handling grievances from the local community, yet there is no end in sight because Myanmar has refused to create conditions for the refugees’ safe and voluntary return. But fencing in refugees in what will essentially be open-air prisons and cutting off communication services are neither necessary nor proportional measures to maintain camp security and are contrary to international human rights law.

      Humanitarian aid workers reported the internet shutdown has seriously hampered their ability to provide assistance, particularly in responding to emergencies. The fencing will place refugees at further risk should they urgently need to evacuate or obtain medical and other humanitarian services.

      Refugees told Human Rights Watch the fencing will hinder their ability to contact relatives spread throughout the camps and brings back memories of restrictions on movement and the abuses they fled in Myanmar.

      The internet shutdown has already hampered refugees’ efforts to communicate with relatives and friends still in Myanmar, which is critical for gaining reliable information about conditions in Rakhine State to determine whether it is safe to return home.

      The Bangladesh government should immediately stop its plans to curtail refugees’ basic rights or risk squandering the international goodwill it earned when it opened its borders to a desperate people fleeing the Myanmar military’s brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/11/26/bangladesh-turning-refugee-camps-open-air-prisons
      #internet #barbelés #liberté_de_mouvement

    • Le Bangladesh invoque le Covid-19 pour interner des réfugiés rohingyas sur une île inondable

      La protection des camps de réfugiés birmans contre la pandémie a servi de prétexte au gouvernement de Dacca pour mettre en quarantaine plus de 300 Rohingyas sur une île prison du golfe du Bengale menacée de submersion par la mousson et où il veut transférer 100 000 exilés.

      La lutte contre le coronavirus peut-elle être invoquée par un État pour justifier l’internement de réfugiés sur une île submersible, à la veille du début de la mousson ? Oui. Le gouvernement du Bangladesh vient de le prouver. Le dimanche 3 mai, puis le jeudi 7 mai, deux groupes de 29 puis 280 réfugiés rohingyas dont les embarcations erraient depuis des semaines en mer d’Andaman ont été transférés de force par les garde-côtes sur l’île de #Bhasan_Char – « l’île qui flotte » en bengali, à trois heures de bateau de la côte la plus proche, dans le golfe du Bengale.

      Selon les autorités bangladaises, les réfugiés internés à Bhasan Char avaient fui la Birmanie pour rejoindre la Malaisie, qui les avait refoulés et le chalutier à bord duquel ils se trouvaient était en difficulté dans les eaux du Bangladesh où les garde-côtes locaux les avaient secourus. Mais Human Rights Watch a une autre version. Après avoir visité plusieurs camps de réfugiés rohingyas de la région, les enquêteurs de HRW ont découvert que sept au moins des réfugiés transférés à Bhasan Char avaient déjà été enregistrés comme réfugiés au Bangladesh.

      Ce qui signifie qu’ils ne cherchaient pas à entrer dans le pays, mais à en sortir. Sans doute pour éviter un rapatriement en Birmanie, dont ils ne voulaient à aucun prix, comme l’écrasante majorité des Rohingyas, poussés à l’exil par les persécutions dont ils étaient victimes dans leur pays d’origine. Deux semaines plus tôt, un autre chalutier à bord duquel se trouvaient près de 400 Rohingyas, fuyant la Birmanie, avait été secouru par les garde-côtes après une longue dérive en mer au cours de laquelle une centaine de passagers avaient trouvé la mort.

      Le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong à Ukhia, au Bangladesh, le 15 mai 2020. © Suzauddin Rubel/AFP

      Sans s’attarder sur ces détails tragiques, le ministre des affaires étrangères du Bangladesh, Abul Kalam Abdul Momen, a avancé une explication strictement sanitaire à la décision de son gouvernement. « Nous avons décidé d’envoyer les rescapés rohingyas sur Bhasan Char pour des raisons de sécurité, a-t-il affirmé le 2 mai. Nous ne savions pas s’ils étaient positifs ou non au Covid-19. S’ils étaient entrés dans le camp de réfugiés de Kutupalong, la totalité de la population aurait été mise en danger. »

      Kutupalong, où s’entassent aujourd’hui, selon le Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés des Nations unies (HCR), 602 000 Rohingyas, est le plus vaste des 12 principaux camps de réfugiés de la région de Cox Bazar. C’est aussi, actuellement, le camp de réfugiés le plus peuplé de la planète. Depuis les années 1990, cette région frontalière a recueilli la majorité des membres de la minorité ethnique musulmane de Birmanie, historiquement ostracisée et contrainte à l’exil dans le pays voisin par la majorité bouddhiste et le pouvoir birman. Elle en abrite aujourd’hui plus d’un million.

      Aux yeux du gouvernement de Dacca, cette population de réfugiés concentrés sur son sol dans une misère et une promiscuité explosives constitue une véritable bombe à retardement sanitaire. Surtout si on accepte les données officielles – très discutées par les experts en santé publique – selon lesquelles le Bangladesh qui compte 165 millions d’habitants recenserait seulement près de 21 000 cas de Covid-19 et 300 morts, après deux mois de confinement. Jeudi dernier, les deux premiers cas de coronavirus dans les camps de réfugiés de la région de Cox Bazar ont été confirmés. Selon le HCR, l’un est un réfugié, l’autre un citoyen bangladais. Le lendemain, deux autres réfugiés contaminés étaient identifiés. D’après l’un des responsables communautaires des réfugiés près de 5 000 personnes qui auraient été en contact avec les malades testés positifs dans le camp no 5, auraient été mises en quarantaine.

      Mais ces informations n’étaient pas connues du gouvernement de Dacca lorsqu’il a décidé de placer les 309 rescapés en isolement à Bhasan Char. Et, de toutes façons, l’argument sanitaire avancé par les autorités locales n’avait pas été jugé recevable par les responsables locaux du HCR. « Nous disposons à Cox Bazar des installations nécessaires pour assurer la mise en quarantaine éventuelle de ces réfugiés, avait expliqué aux représentants du gouvernement Louise Donovan, au nom de l’agence de l’ONU. Des procédures rigoureuses sont en place. Elles prévoient notamment, pendant la période requise de 14 jours, un examen médical complet dans chacun de nos centres de quarantaine. Nous avons tout l’espace nécessaire et nous pouvons offrir toute l’assistance dont ils ont besoin, dans ces centres où ils bénéficient en plus du soutien de leurs familles et des réseaux communautaires indispensables à leur rétablissement après l’expérience traumatisante qu’ils viennent de vivre. »

      En d’autres termes, pourquoi ajouter au traumatisme de l’exil et d’une traversée maritime dangereuse, à la merci de passeurs cupides, l’isolement sur un îlot perdu, menacé de submersion par gros temps ? À cette question la réponse est cruellement simple : parce que le gouvernement du Bangladesh a trouvé dans cet argument sanitaire un prétexte inespéré pour commencer enfin à mettre en œuvre, sans bruit, un vieux projet contesté du premier ministre Sheikh Hasina qui a déjà investi 276 millions de dollars dans cette opération.

      Projet qui prévoyait le transfert de 100 000 réfugiés – un sur dix – sur Bhasan Char et qui avait été rejeté, jusque-là, par les principaux intéressés – les réfugiés rohingyas – mais aussi par la majorité des ONG actives dans les camps. Avant de faire l’objet de réserves très explicites de plusieurs agences des Nations unies. Au point que trois dates arrêtées pour le début du transfert des réfugiés – mars 2019, octobre 2019 et novembre 2019 – n’ont pas été respectées. Et qu’avant l’arrivée, il y a deux semaines, du premier groupe de 29 rescapés, seuls des militaires de la marine du Bangladesh, qui contrôle l’île, étaient présents sur les lieux.

      Et pour cause. Apparue seulement depuis une vingtaine d’années, cette île, constituée d’alluvions du Meghna qui réunit les eaux du Gange et du Brahmapoutre, émerge à peine des eaux. Partiellement couverte de forêt, elle est restée inhabitée depuis son apparition en raison de sa vulnérabilité à la mousson et aux cyclones, fréquents dans cette région, de la mi-avril à début novembre. Cyclones d’autant plus redoutés et destructeurs que même par beau temps l’île n’offre aucune résistance aux flots. Entre la marée basse et la marée haute, la superficie de Bhasan Char passe de 6 000 hectares à 4 000 hectares.
      « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison »

      « Ce projet est inhumain, a confié aux journalistes du Bangla Tribune un officier de la marine du Bangladesh stationné dans l’île, dont l’accès est interdit par l’armée. En novembre 1970, le cyclone de Bhola n’a fait aucun survivant sur l’île voisine de Nijhum Dwip. Et Bhasan Char est encore plus basse sur l’eau que Nijhum Dwip. » « Un grand nombre de questions demeurent sans réponses, observait après une visite sur place en janvier 2019 la psychologue coréenne Yanghee Lee, rapporteure spéciale de l’ONU pour la situation des droits de l’homme en Birmanie. Mais la question principale demeure de savoir si cette île est véritablement habitable. »

      « Chaque année, pendant la mousson, ont déclaré aux enquêteurs de Human Rights Watch les habitants de l’île voisine de Hatiya, une partie de Bhasan Char est érodée par l’eau. Nous n’osons même pas y mettre les pieds. Comment des milliers de Rohingyas pourraient-ils y vivre ? » Par ailleurs, la navigation dans les parages de l’île est jugée si dangereuse, par temps incertain, que les pêcheurs du delta hésitent à s’y aventurer. Les reporters d’un journal local ont dû attendre six jours avant que la météo devienne favorable et qu’un volontaire accepte de les embarquer.

      À toutes ces objections des ONG, d’une partie de la presse locale, et de plusieurs agences des Nations unies, le gouvernement bangladais répond que rien n’a été négligé. Une digue, haute de près de trois mètres et longue de 13 km a été érigée autour de l’enclave affectée à l’hébergement des Rohingyas. Chacune des 120 unités de logement du complexe comprend 12 bâtiments sur pilotis, une mare, et un abri en béton destiné à héberger 23 familles en cas de cyclone et à recevoir les réserves de produits alimentaires. Conçus, selon les architectes pour résister à des vents de 260 km/h, les abris pourront aussi être utilisés comme salles de classes, centres communautaires et dispensaires.

      Compte tenu des conditions de navigation très difficiles dans l’estuaire du Meghna et du statut militarisé de l’île, la liberté de mouvement des réfugiés, comme leur aptitude à assurer leur subsistance, seront réduites à néant. « Bhasan Char sera l’équivalent d’une prison », estimait, il y a un an Brad Adams, directeur pour l’Asie de Human Rights Watch. Aucun hôpital n’est prévu sur l’île. En cas d’urgence, les malades ou les blessés devront être transférés vers l’hôpital de l’île de Hatiya, à une heure de bateau – lorsque le temps le permet.

      Faute de production locale, la quasi-totalité de l’alimentation devra être acheminée depuis le continent. La densité de population de ce complexe dont les blocs, disposés sur un plan orthogonal, sont séparés par d’étroites allées rectilignes dépassera, lorsqu’il sera totalement occupé, 65 000 habitants au km² : soit six fois celle du cœur de New York. On le voit, ce « paradis pour les Rohingyas » selon le principal architecte du projet, Ahmed Mukta, tient davantage du cauchemar concentrationnaire submersible que du tremplin vers une nouvelle vie pour les réfugiés birmans du Bangladesh.

      Formulée pour la première fois, sans suite, en 2015 par les responsables bangladais, alors que le nombre de réfugiés birmans dans la région de Cox Bazar ne dépassait pas 250 000, l’idée de les transférer sur Bhasan Char est revenue en discussion deux ans plus tard, en août 2017, lorsque la campagne de nettoyage ethnique déclenchée par l’armée birmane et ses milices a chassé près de 740 000 Rohingyas de leurs villages dans l’État de Rakhine et les a contraints à se réfugier de l’autre côté de la frontière, au Bangladesh, auprès de leurs frères, exilés parfois depuis plus de 25 ans.

      Nourrie par divers trafics, par le prosélytisme des émissaires islamistes, par la présence de gangs criminels et par l’activisme des agents de l’Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA), à la recherche de recrues pour combattre l’armée birmane, une insécurité, rapidement jugée incontrôlable par les autorités locales, s’est installée dans la région. Insécurité qui a contribué à aggraver les tensions entre les réfugiés et la population locale qui reproche aux Rohingyas de voler les petits boulots – employés de restaurants, livreurs, conducteurs de pousse-pousse – en soudoyant les policiers et en acceptant des salaires inférieurs, alors qu’ils ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler. Cette situation est d’autant plus inacceptable pour le gouvernement de Dacca que Cox Bazar et sa plage de 120 km constituent l’une des rares attractions touristiques du pays.

      Pour mettre un terme à cette tension, le gouvernement de Dacca a d’abord compté sur une campagne de retours volontaires des Rohingyas en Birmanie. En vain. Faute d’obtenir des garanties de sécurité et de liberté du gouvernement birman, aucun réfugié n’a accepté de rentrer. Le même refus a été opposé aux autorités d’année en année chaque fois qu’une liste de volontaires pour le rapatriement a été proposée. Selon les chiffres fournis par le gouvernement birman lui-même, 31 réfugiés seulement sont rentrés du Bangladesh entre mai 2018 et mai 2019.

      Les conditions, le plus souvent atroces, dans lesquelles les Rohingyas ont été contraints de fuir en août 2017 et ce qu’ils soupçonnent de ce qui les attendrait au retour expliquent largement ces refus. Les ONG humanitaires estiment que depuis 2017, 24 000 Rohingyas ont été tués par l’armée birmane et ses milices, et 18 000 femmes et jeunes filles violées. En outre, 115 000 maisons auraient été brûlées et 113 000 autres vandalisées. Selon le rapport de la « Mission d’établissement des faits » de l’ONU remis au Conseil des droits de l’homme en août 2019, les Rohingyas ont été victimes de multiples « crimes de droit international, y compris des crimes de génocide, des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre ».
      On comprend dans ces conditions que, rien n’ayant changé depuis cet été sanglant en Birmanie où Aung San Suu Kyi, prix Nobel de la paix 1991, n’a pas soulevé un sourcil devant ces crimes, les Rohingyas se résignent à un destin de réfugiés plutôt que de risquer un retour à la terreur. Mais ils ne sont pas disposés pour autant à risquer leur vie dès le premier cyclone dans un centre de rétention insulaire coupé de tout où ils n’auront aucune chance d’espérer un autre avenir. Les responsables du HCR l’ont compris et, sans affronter ouvertement les autorités locales, ne cessent de répéter depuis un an, comme ils viennent de le faire encore la semaine dernière, qu’il n’est pas possible de transférer qui que ce soit sur Bhasan Char sans procéder à une « évaluation complète et détaillée » de la situation.

      Depuis deux ans, les « plans stratégiques conjoints » proposés par le HCR et l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) pour résoudre la « crise humanitaire » des Rohingyas estiment que sur les trois scénarios possibles – rapatriement, réinstallation et présence de longue durée – le dernier est le plus réaliste. À condition d’être accompagné d’une certaine « décongestion » des camps et d’une plus grande liberté de mouvements accordée aux réfugiés. L’aménagement de Bhasan Char et la volonté obstinée d’y transférer une partie des Rohingyas montrent que le gouvernement de Dacca a une conception particulière de la « décongestion ».

      Sans doute compte-t-il sur le temps – et le soutien de ses alliés étrangers – pour l’imposer aux agences de l’ONU. « Le Bangladesh affronte le double défi de devoir porter assistance aux Rohingyas tout en combattant la propagation du Covid-19, constatait la semaine dernière Brad Adams de Human Rights Watch. Mais envoyer les réfugiés sur une île dangereusement inondable, sans soins médicaux, n’est certainement pas la solution. »

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/160520/le-bangladesh-invoque-le-covid-19-pour-interner-des-refugies-rohingyas-sur

  • Return : voluntary, safe, dignified and durable ?

    Voluntary return in safety and with dignity has long been a core tenet of the international refugee regime. In the 23 articles on ‘Return’ in this issue of FMR, authors explore various obstacles to achieving sustainable return, discuss the need to guard against premature or forced return, and debate the assumptions and perceptions that influence policy and practice. This issue also includes a mini-feature on ‘Towards understanding and addressing the root causes of displacement’.


    https://www.fmreview.org/return

    #revue #retours_volontaires #dignité #retour #retour_au_pays
    #Soudan_du_Sud #réfugiés_sud-soudanais #réfugiés_Rohingya #Rohingya #Inde #Sri_Lanka #réfugiés_sri-lankais #réfugiés_syriens #Syrie #Allemagne #Erythrée #Liban #Turquie #Jordanie #Kenya #réfugiés_Somaliens #Somalie #Dadaab #Myanmar #Birmanie #Darfour #réintégration_économique #réintégration

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • #Rohingya crisis : Villages destroyed for government facilities - BBC News
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-49596113

    Entire Muslim Rohingya villages in Myanmar have been demolished and replaced by police barracks, government buildings and refugee relocation camps, the BBC has found.

    On a government tour, the BBC saw four locations where secure facilities have been built on what satellite images show were once Rohingya settlements.

    Officials denied building on top of the villages in Rakhine state.

    In 2017 more than 700,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar during a military operation.

    #birmanie

  • Au #Bangladesh, deux ans après l’afflux de #réfugiés_rohingyas, l’#hostilité grandit

    Quand des centaines de milliers de musulmans rohingyas, victimes d’exactions en #Birmanie, ont fui pour se réfugier à partir de l’été 2017 au Bangladesh, les populations locales les ont souvent bien accueillies. Mais deux ans après l’afflux de réfugiés, l’hostilité grandit.

    « Au départ, en tant que membres de la communauté musulmane, nous les avons aidés », raconte Riazul Haque. Cet ouvrier qui habite près de la ville frontalière d’Ukhiya, dans le district de Cox’s Bazar (sud-est du Bangladesh), a permis à une soixantaine de familles de s’établir sur un lopin de terre lui appartenant, pensant qu’elles allaient rester deux ou trois mois maximum.

    « Aujourd’hui, on a l’impression que les Rohingyas encore établis en Birmanie vont bientôt arriver au Bangladesh », s’inquiète-t-il.

    Ukhiya comptait environ 300.000 habitants, mais l’arrivée massive de réfugiés, à partir d’août 2017, a plus que triplé la population.

    La plupart des réfugiés sont logés dans le camp tentaculaire de Kutupalong. D’autres, qui disposent de davantage de ressources, ont tenté de se faire une place dans la société bangladaise.

    Pollution et criminalité en hausse, perte d’emplois : les locaux les accusent de tous les maux.

    « Ils nous volent les petits boulots en soudoyant les forces de l’ordre », assure Mohammad Sojol, qui a perdu son emploi de conducteur de pousse-pousse car, selon lui, les propriétaires des véhicules préfèrent désormais embaucher des réfugiés contre un salaire inférieur, même si ces derniers ne sont officiellement pas autorisés à travailler.

    A la suite de protestations, certains Rohingyas qui s’étaient installés en dehors des camps officiels sont maintenant obligés d’y retourner et leurs enfants sont expulsés des écoles locales.

    – Gangs de la drogue -

    Les Rohingyas, une minorité ethnique musulmane, ont fui les exactions - qualifiées de « génocide » par des enquêteurs de l’ONU - de l’armée birmane et de milices bouddhistes.

    Seule une poignée d’entre eux sont rentrés, craignant pour leur sécurité dans un pays où ils se voient refuser la citoyenneté et sont traités comme des clandestins.

    Le fait que ces réfugiés soient « inactifs dans les camps (les rend) instables », estime Ikbal Hossain, chef intérimaire de la police du district de Cox’s Bazar.

    « Ils reçoivent toutes sortes d’aides, mais ils ont beaucoup de temps libre », relève-t-il, ajoutant que beaucoup sont tombés entre les mains de trafiquants de drogue.

    Des dizaines de millions de comprimés de méthamphétamine (yaba) entrent depuis la Birmanie, un des premiers producteurs au monde de cette drogue de synthèse, au Bangladesh via les camps.

    Et les trafiquants utilisent les Rohingyas comme mules, chargées d’acheminer les stupéfiants dans les villes voisines.

    Au moins 13 Rohingyas, soupçonnés de transporter des milliers de yaba, ont été abattus au cours d’affrontements avec la police.

    Et la présence des gangs de la drogue dans les camps a renforcé l’insécurité et les violences, incitant le Bangladesh à accroître la présence policière.

    Selon la police, le taux de criminalité est ici supérieur aux statistiques nationales du pays, qui enregistre quelque 3.000 meurtres par an pour 168 millions d’habitants.

    318 plaintes au pénal ont été déposées contre des Rohingyas depuis août 2017, dont 31 pour meurtres, d’après Ikbal Hossain. Mais selon des experts, le nombre de crimes dans les camps serait bien supérieur aux chiffres de la police.

    « Nous ne nous sentons pas en sécurité la nuit, mais je ne peux pas quitter ma maison, sinon le reste de mes terres sera également occupé par des réfugiés », déplore Rabeya Begum, une femme au foyer vivant dans le hameau de Madhurchhara, à proximité du camp de Kutupalong.

    Mohib Ullah, un responsable de la communauté rohingya, réfute entretenir de mauvaises relations avec la population locale. « Nous nous entraidons car nous sommes voisins (...) Nous ferions la même chose pour eux ».

    Quelque 3.500 Rohingyas ont été autorisés à rentrer du Bangladesh en Birmanie à compter de jeudi, s’ils le souhaitent.

    En novembre 2018, une précédente tentative de placer quelque 2.200 d’entre eux sur une liste de rapatriement avait échoué, les réfugiés, sans garantie de sécurité en Birmanie, refusant de quitter les camps.

    https://www.liberation.fr/depeches/2019/08/21/au-bangladesh-deux-ans-apres-l-afflux-de-refugies-rohingyas-l-hostilite-g
    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Rohingyas #camps #camps_de_réfugiés

  • Male rape survivors go uncounted in #Rohingya camps

    ‘I don’t hear people talk about sexual violence against men. But this is also not specific to this response.’
    Nurul Islam feels the pain every time he sits: it’s a reminder of the sexual violence the Rohingya man endured when he fled Myanmar two years ago.

    Nurul, a refugee, says he was raped and tortured by Myanmar soldiers during the military purge that ousted more than 700,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State starting in August 2017.

    “They put me like a dog,” Nurul said, acting out the attack by bowing toward the ground, black tarp sheets lining the bamboo tent around him.

    Nurul, 40, is one of the uncounted male survivors of sexual violence now living in Bangladesh’s cramped refugee camps.

    Rights groups and aid agencies have documented widespread sexual violence against women and girls as part of the Rohingya purge. UN investigators say the scale of Myanmar military sexual violence was so severe that it amounts to evidence of “genocidal intent to destroy the Rohingya population” in and of itself.

    But boys and men like Nurul were also victims. Researchers who study sexual violence in crises say the needs of male survivors have largely been overlooked and neglected by humanitarian programmes in Bangladesh’s refugee camps.

    “There’s a striking division between aid workers and the refugees,” said Sarah Chynoweth, a researcher who has studied male survivors of sexual violence in emergencies around the world, including the Rohingya camps. “Many aid workers say we haven’t heard about it, but the refugees are well aware of it.”

    A report she authored for the Women’s Refugee Commission, a research organisation that advocates for improvements on gender issues in humanitarian responses, calls for aid groups in Bangladesh to boost services for all survivors of sexual violence – recognising that men and boys need help, in addition to women and girls.

    Rights groups say services for all survivors of gender-based violence are “grossly inadequate” and underfunded across the camps – including care for people attacked in the exodus from Myanmar, as well as abuse that happens in Bangladesh’s city-sized refugee camps.

    Stigma often prevents Rohingya men and boys from speaking up, while many aid groups aren’t asking the right questions to find out.

    But there are even fewer services offering male victims like Nurul specialised counselling and healthcare.

    Chynoweth and others who work on the issue say stigma often prevents Rohingya men and boys from speaking up, while many aid groups aren’t asking the right questions to find out – leaving humanitarian groups with scarce data to plan a better response, and male survivors of sexual violence with little help.

    In interviews with organisations working on gender-based violence, health, and mental health in the camps, aid staff told The New Humanitarian that the needs of male rape survivors have rarely been discussed, or that specialised services were unnecessary.

    Mercy Lwambi, women protection and empowerment coordinator at the International Rescue Committee, said focusing on female survivors of gender-based violence is not intended to exclude men.

    “What we do is just evidence-informed,” she said. “We have evidence to show it’s for the most part women and girls who are affected by sexual violence. The numbers of male survivors are usually low.”

    But according to gender-based violence case management guidelines compiled by organisations including the IRC, services should be in place for all survivors of sexual violence, with or without incident data.

    And in the camps, Rohingya refugees know that male survivors exist.

    TNH spoke with dozens of Rohingya refugees, asking about the issue of ”torture against private parts of men”. Over the course of a week, TNH met 21 Rohingya who said they were affected, knew other people who were, or said they witnessed it themselves.

    When fellow refugees reached out to Nurul on behalf of TNH, he decided to share his experiences as a survivor of sexual violence: “Because it happened to men too,” he said.
    Asking the right questions

    After his attack in Myanmar, Nurul said other Rohingya men dragged him across the border to Bangladesh’s camps. When he went to a health clinic, the doctors handed him painkillers. There were no questions about his injury, and he didn’t offer an explanation.

    “I was too ashamed to tell them what had happened,” he said.

    When TNH met him in June, Nurul said he hadn’t received any counselling or care for his abuse.

    But Chynoweth says the problem is more complicated than men being reluctant to out themselves as rape victims, or aid workers simply not acknowledging the severity of sexual violence against men and boys.

    She believes it’s also a question of language.

    When Chynoweth last year started asking refugees if they knew of men who had been raped or sexually abused, most at first said no. When she left out the words “sexual” and “rape” and instead asked if “torture” was done against their “private parts”, people opened up.

    “Many men have no idea that what happened to them is sexual violence,” she said.

    Similarly, when she asked NGO workers in Bangladesh if they had encountered sexual violence against Rohingya men, many would shake their heads. “As soon as I asked if they had treated men with genital trauma, the answer was: ‘Yes, of course,’” she said.

    This suggests that health workers must be better trained to ask the right questions and to spot signs of abuse, Chynoweth said.
    Challenging taboos

    The undercounting of sexual violence against men has long been a problem in humanitarian responses.

    A December 2013 report by the Office of the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict notes that sexual and gender-based violence is often seen as a women’s issue, yet “the disparity between levels of conflict-related sexual violence against women and levels against men is rarely as dramatic as one might expect”.

    A Security Council resolution this year formally recognised that sexual violence in conflict also targets men and boys; Human Rights Watch called it “an important step in challenging the taboos that keep men from reporting their experiences and deny the survivors the assistance they need”.

    But in the Rohingya refugee camps, the issue still flies under the radar.

    Mwajuma Msangi from the UN Population Fund, which chairs the gender-based violence subsector for aid groups in the camps, said sexual violence against men and boys is usually only raised, if at all, during the “any other business” section that ends bimonthly coordination meetings.

    “It hasn’t really come up,” Msangi said in an interview. “It’s good you are bringing this up, we should definitely look into it.”

    TNH asked staff from other major aid groups about the issue, including the UN’s refugee agency UNHCR, which co-manages UN and NGO efforts in the camps, and the World Health Organisation, which leads the health sector. There were few programmes training staff on how to work with male survivors of sexual violence, or offering specialised healthcare or counselling.

    “The [gender-based violence] sector has not been very proactive in training health workers to be honest,” said Donald Sonne Kazungu, Médecins Sans Frontières’ medical coordinator in Cox’s Bazar. “I don’t hear people talk about sexual violence against men. But this is also not specific to this response.”

    "The NGO world doesn’t acknowledge that it happened because there is no data, and there is no data because nobody is asking for it.”

    No data, no response

    For the few organisations that work with male survivors of sexual violence in the camps, the failure to assess the extent of the problem is part of a cycle that prevents solutions.

    "The NGO world doesn’t acknowledge that it happened because there is no data, and there is no data because nobody is asking for it,” said Eva Buzo, country director for Legal Action Worldwide, a European NGO that offers legal support to people in crises, including a women’s organisation in the camps, Shanti Mohila.

    LAW trains NGO medical staff and outreach workers, teaching them to be aware of signs of abuse among male survivors. It’s also trying to solidify a system through which men and boys can be referred for help. Through the first half of the year, the organisation has interacted with 25 men.

    "It’s really hardly a groundbreaking project, but unfortunately it is,” Buzo said, shrugging her shoulders. “Nobody else is paying attention.”

    But she’s reluctant to advertise her programme in the camps: there aren’t enough services where male victims of sexual violence can access specialised health and psychological care. Buzo said she trusts two doctors that work specifically with male survivors; both were trained by her organisation.

    “It’s shocking how ill-equipped the sector is,” she said, frustrated about her dilemma. “If we identify new survivors, I don’t even know where to refer them to.”

    The issue also underscores a larger debate in the humanitarian sector about whether gender-based violence programmes should focus primarily on women and girls, who face added risks in crises, or also better include men, boys, and the LGBTI community.

    “If we identify new survivors, I don’t even know where to refer them to.”

    Buzo says the lack of services for male survivors in the Rohingya camps points to a reluctance to recognise the need for action out of fear it might come at the expense of services for women – which already suffer from funding shortfalls.

    The Rohingya response could have been a precedent for the humanitarian sector as a whole to better respond to male survivors of sexual violence, according to an aid worker who worked on protection issues in the camps in 2017 as the massive refugee outflow was unfolding.

    When she questioned incoming refugees about sexual violence against women, numerous Rohingya asked what could be done for men who had also been raped, said the aid worker, who asked not to be named as she didn’t have permission to speak on behalf of her organisation.

    “We missed yet another chance to open this issue up,” she said.

    Chynoweth believes health, protection, and counselling programmes for all survivors – female and male – must improve.

    “There aren’t many services for women and girls. The response to all survivors is really poor,” she said. “But we should, and we can do both.”

    http://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news-feature/2019/09/04/Rohingya-men-raped-Myanmar-Bangladesh-refugee-camps-GBV
    #viol #viols #violences_sexuelles #conflits #abus_sexuels #hommes_violés #réfugiés #asile #migrations #camps_de_réfugiés #Myanmar #Birmanie

  • Myanmar’s Persecuted Rohingya Join Balkan Route into #Europe

    Persecuted for decades, members of Myanmar’s Rohingya ethnic group are now turning up on the Balkan route for migrants and refugees trying to reach Western Europe.

    “Army people were torturing my family,” Ali Mulla began his story. “That’s why I couldn’t live anymore in Myanmar.”

    Mulla, 17, spoke in a refugee and migrant camp near the northern Serbian town of Kikinda, some 7,000 kilometres from the home he fled in Southeast Asia.

    Stateless and persecuted in Myanmar, in 2017 some 700,000 Rohingya fled in the face of a military crackdown, joining many who fled earlier bouts of repression.

    Most are housed in sprawling refugee camps in neighbouring Bangladesh, but now a few have joined the long road to Western Europe carved through the Balkans by refugees and migrants from Asia, Africa and the Middle East since 2015.

    Mulla was one of three Rohingya in the Kikinda camp near Serbia’s northern borders with European Union members Hungary and Romania.

    Besides the three in Kikinda, Serbia’s Commissariat for Refugees says it has registered only four other Rohingya, in the summer of last year.

    The Rohingya themselves say they were among 30 who entered Serbia two months ago.

    Mulla left Myanmar in 2009, the 2017 crackdown only the latest chapter in decades of repression against the Rohingya, a mainly Muslim ethnic group effectively denied citizenship in Myanmar under a 1982 law.

    Mulla and his family first moved to Bangladesh before travelling through Pakistan and eventually reaching Turkey. There, he said, he lost touch last year with his family – his parents, four brothers and two sisters.

    “I was looking and searching for six months”, he said, without success. Someone told him they had perhaps gone to the EU. Mulla chose to try too. “Maybe I go,” he said. “Maybe I’ll get my family.”

    Long road to Europe

    Rights groups have documented mass killings, sexual violence and widespread arson among atrocities committed against the Rohingya by Myanmar’s security forces. The Myanmar government has dismissed the allegations, saying the army in 2017 was responding to attacks by Rohingya militants.

    In July, the United States imposed sanctions on Myanmar’s top general and three senior military officers, accusing them of human rights violations against the Rohingya.

    Mulla now shares the Kikinda camp with two other Rohingya – Omar Farur and Jahur Ahmed – and some 200 other refugees and migrants mainly from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    Serbian authorities say roughly 20,000 migrants pass through Serbia every year. According to the latest figures, some 3,000 are living in Serbia waiting for their chance to reach the EU.

    Ahmed, 29, first became a refugee in 1994 when his family settled in Bangladesh. Seven years ago, he travelled to India but soon became a target of mafia racketeering.

    “I went then in Pakistan, but too much mafia,” he said.

    From Pakistan, Ahmed travelled to Iran and then Turkey. Like thousands of others trying to reach Europe, he crossed from Turkey to Greece by boat before heading north through North Macedonia and into Serbia.

    He estimated the journey had cost him between 1,700 and 2,000 euros.

    Ahmed and Mulla both said they hoped to reach Germany, but had yet to try their luck crossing the border between Serbia and Croatia that has become notorious for the heavy-handed tactics used by Croatian police to deter migrants and refugees.

    Their compatriot, 24-year-old Farur, broke down telling his own story.

    Farur said most of his family had been killed or detained in Myanmar. He fled in 2017, crossing India, Pakistan, Iran, Turkey and Greece. He worked for a couple of months in each country – for example in an oil factory in Turkey – to earn money for the next leg of the trip but that his funds were running low.

    Asked if he ever planned to return to Myanmar, Farur replied: “There is no home in Myanmar anymore. It is lost. Crashed. Army crashed it”.

    https://balkaninsight.com/2019/08/02/myanmars-persecuted-rohingya-join-balkan-route-into-europe

    #route_des_balkans #Balkans #réfugiés #réfugiés_rohingya #Rohingya #asile #migrations #réfugiés #parcours_migratoires #itinéraires_migratoires
    ping @reka

  • Human rights groups slam draft UN plans to send #Rohingya to barren island
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/03/25/human-rights-groups-slam-draft-un-plans-send-rohingya-barren

    A document drawn up this month by the World Food Programme (WFP), the UN’s food aid arm, and seen by Reuters, has revealed how the agency supplied the Bangladeshi government with detailed plans of how it could provide for thousands of Rohingya being transported to the island on a voluntary basis.

    #onu #pam