#roumanie

  • UK sending Syrians back to countries where they were beaten and abused

    Refugees tell of being held in cages and even tortured in European countries including Hungary and Romania

    Britain is using EU rules to send asylum seekers from Syria and other countries back to eastern European states where they were beaten, incarcerated and abused, the Guardian has learned.

    Migrant rights groups and lawyers say the Home Office is using the rules to send people back to “police brutality, detention and beatings” in several European countries.

    The Guardian has spoken to refugees who were subjected to assaults as they travelled through Europe. The men tell of being held in “cages” in Hungary, waterboarded and handcuffed to beds by detention centre guards in Romania and beaten in Bulgaria.
    Britain is one of worst places in western Europe for asylum seekers
    Read more

    They now face being returned to those countries as, under the so-called Dublin law, asylum seekers are supposed to apply in their first EU country of entry.

    In 2015 more than 80,000 requests were made by EU countries for another government to take back an asylum seeker. The UK made 3,500 of these requests to countries around Europe, including Bulgaria, Romania, Italy and Hungary.

    The Home Office claims it should be entitled to assume that any EU country will treat asylum seekers properly.

    The charity Migrant Voice has collected testimony from several refugees who are fighting removal from the UK to other European countries. Nazek Ramadan, the director of the charity, said the men had been left traumatised by their journey and their subsequent treatment in the UK.

    “We know there are hundreds of Syrians in the UK who have fingerprints in other European countries,” said Ramadan. “Many no longer report to the Home Office because they are afraid of being detained and deported away from their family in the UK. Those who have been forcibly removed often end up destitute.

    “These are people who were abused in their home country, sometimes jailed by the regime there. Then they were imprisoned again in Europe. They feel that they are still living in a war zone, moving from one arrest and detention to another.”

    The law firm Duncan Lewis recently won a key case preventing forced removals back to Hungary because of the risk that people might be forced from there back to their country of origin.

    The firm is also challenging removals to Bulgaria because of what the UN refugee agency has described as “substandard” conditions there. A test case on whether Bulgaria is a safe country to send people back to is due to be heard by the court of appeal in November.

    The situation could get even more complex as an EU ban on sending asylum seekers back to Greece is due to be lifted on Wednesday after a six-year moratorium.

    Krisha Prathepan, of Duncan Lewis, said: “We intend to challenge any resumption of returns to Greece, as that country’s asylum system remains dysfunctional and the risk of refugees being returned from Greece to the very countries in which they faced persecution remains as high as ever.”

    The Home Office says it has no immediate plans to send refugees back to Greece, but is following European guidelines.

    “We have no current plans to resume Dublin returns to Greece,” a spokesperson said, citing among other reasons “the reception conditions in the country”.

    She added: “In April 2016, the high court ruled that transfer to Bulgaria under the Dublin regulation would not breach the European Convention on Human Rights. If there is evidence that Bulgaria is responsible for an asylum application, we will seek to transfer the application.”

    Mohammad Nadi Ismail, 32, Syrian

    Mohammad Nadi Ismail, a former Syrian navy captain, entered Europe via Bulgaria and Hungary, hoping to join his uncle and brother in Britain.

    In Bulgaria he was detained, beaten and humiliated. “They stripped us and made us stand in a row all naked. We had to bend over in a long line. Then they hit us on our private parts with truncheons.

    “They would wake us at night after they had been playing cards and drinking. Then they would come and hit us or kick us with their boots or truncheons.”

    One day he was released and took his chance to leave, walking for days to reach Hungary.

    But in Hungary he was locked up again. “They took us to a courtyard of a big building where there were five or six cages, about 8ft [2.4 metres] square. Most of the people were African. Some of them had been in there for four or five days. Luckily we Syrians were allowed out after one night and I headed for the UK.”

    In the UK Ismail met up with the family he hadn’t seen for three years and applied for asylum immediately.

    Then a letter came, saying his fingerprints had been found in Bulgaria and he would be returned. After a month in detention he now reports every two weeks, waiting and hoping that the UK will let him stay.

    “I will not go back to Bulgaria. I still have hope that I can stay here legally and rebuild my life with my family who have always supported me,” he said.

    ‘Dawoud’, 34, Iranian

    Dawoud (not his real name) was 28 when he fled Iran after his political activities had made him an enemy of the government. His brother and parents made it to the UK and were given refugee status.

    When he was told by border guards that he was in Romania he had no idea what that meant. “I had never even heard of this country,” he said. He was put in a camp where “water dripped through the electrics – we were electrocuted often. Children and families screamed. We lived in fear of the wild dogs who circled the camp, attacking and biting us. We were given no food; we had to go through bins in the town nearby for scraps.”

    He escaped once, to the Netherlands, but was sent back.

    “I experienced several beatings, on all parts of the body. There were people covered in blood and they were refused medical help. They even waterboarded me. I thought I would die.”

    Finally he managed to reach his mother, father and brother in the UK. For two years he has lived in hiding, too scared to apply for asylum for fear of being sent back to Romania. But a few months ago he finally reported to the Home Office. A letter informed him that a request had been made to Romania to take him back.

    Dawoud shakes as he talks about his fear of removal, saying: “When I hear people speak Romanian in the street it brings back my trauma. I once fell to the ground shaking just hearing someone speak. I will kill myself rather than go back.”

    Wael al-Awadi, 36, Syrian

    Wael travelled by sea to Italy and was detained on arrival in Sicily. “They hit us with their fists and sticks in order to make us give our fingerprints. Then they let us go. They gave us nothing, no accommodation, just told us: ‘Go where you like.’ So many Syrians were sleeping in the streets.”

    When he reached the UK he was detained for two months before friends helped him get bail. A year and a half later, when reporting at the Home Office, he was detained again and booked on to a plane to Italy.

    He refused to go and a solicitor got him out on bail. His appeal is due to be heard later this year. “I left Syria to avoid jail and detention and here I have been locked up twice,” he said. “I can’t understand it. Why can’t they look at me with some humanity? I am mentally so tired. My children call me from Syria but I can’t speak to them any more. It is too painful.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/12/the-refugees-uk-wants-to-send-back-to-countries-where-they-were-abused?
    #réfugiés_syriens #UK #Angleterre #Dublin #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Bulgarie #Roumanie #Hongrie #Italie #renvois #expulsions #renvois_Dublin


  • Jean-Claude Juncker doute de l’aptitude de Bucarest à présider l’UE afp/boi - 29 Décembre 2018 RTS _
    https://www.rts.ch/info/monde/10103802-jean-claude-juncker-doute-de-l-aptitude-de-bucarest-a-presider-l-ue.htm

    Le président de la Commission européenne Jean-Claude Juncker a exprimé samedi ses doutes sur l’aptitude de la Roumanie à assumer, pour la première fois, la présidence de l’Union européenne, dont elle doit prendre les rênes en janvier


    Juncker doute de l’aptitude de la Roumanie à présider l’UE

    Le président de la Commission européenne Jean-Claude Juncker a exprimé samedi ses doutes sur l’aptitude de la Roumanie à assumer, pour la première fois, la présidence de l’Union européenne, dont elle doit prendre les rênes en janvier.
    Si la Roumanie est « techniquement bien préparée » à piloter l’UE, Jean-Claude Juncker a cependant estimé que « le gouvernement de Bucarest n’a pas encore pleinement compris ce que signifie présider les pays de l’UE », dans un entretien paru samedi dans le quotidien allemand die Welt.

    « L’action prudente exige aussi la volonté d’être à l’écoute des autres et la ferme volonté de mettre ses propres préoccupations au second plan. J’ai quelques doutes à ce sujet », a poursuivi le Luxembourgeois. Le dirigeant européen a également émis des réserves quant à la capacité de la Roumanie, confrontée à de vives tensions politiques nationales, à apparaître comme une « unité compacte » en Europe.

    La Roumanie prendra le 1er janvier pour six mois la présidence tournante de l’UE, pour la première fois depuis son adhésion en 2007, succédant à l’Autriche.

    Tensions avec Bruxelles
    Cela fait plusieurs mois que les institutions européennes sont devenues la cible de la majorité de gauche au pouvoir en Roumanie qui n’a de cesse de dénoncer une Union « inique » déniant au pays le « droit d’avoir ses propres opinions », selon les termes du chef du parti-social démocrate au pouvoir, Liviu Dragnea.

    Ces tensions avec Bruxelles ont été exacerbées en raison de la volonté du pouvoir roumain d’imposer une vaste refonte du système judiciaire pour corriger les « abus » des magistrats. L’UE estime pour sa part que cette réforme saperait la lutte contre la corruption, un mal endémique dont souffre ce pays.

    #Roumanie #ue #union_européenne #racisme #mépris #Jean-Claude_Juncker #bêtise #droits


  • Detainees Evacuated out of Libya but Resettlement Capacity Remains Inadequate

    According to the United Nations Refugee Agency (#UNHCR) 262 migrants detained in Libya were evacuated to Niger on November 12- the largest evacuation from Libya carried out to date. In addition to a successful airlift of 135 people in October this year, this brings the total number of people evacuated to more than 2000 since December 2017. However Amnesty International describes the resettlement process from Niger as slow and the number of pledges inadequate.

    The evacuations in October and November were the first since June when the Emergency Transit Mechanism (ETM) centre in Niger reached its full capacity of 1,536 people, which according to Amnesty was a result of a large number of people “still waiting for their permanent resettlement to a third country.”

    57,483 refugees and asylum seekers are registered by UNHCR in Libya; as of October 2018 14,349 had agreed to Voluntary Humanitarian Return. Currently 3,886 resettlement pledges have been made by 12 states, but only 1,140 have been resettled.

    14,595 people have been intercepted by the Libyan coast guard and taken back to Libya, however it has been well documented that their return is being met by detention, abuse, violence and torture. UNHCR recently declared Libya unsafe for returns amid increased violence in the capital, while Amnesty International has said that “thousands of men, women and children are trapped in Libya facing horrific abuses with no way out”.

    In this context, refugees and migrants are currently refusing to disembark in Misrata after being rescued by a cargo ship on November 12, reportedly saying “they would rather die than be returned to land”. Reuters cited one Sudanese teenager on board who stated “We agree to go to any place but not Libya.”

    UNHCR estimates that 5,413 refugees and migrants remain detained in #Directorate_for_Combatting_Illegal_Migration (#DCIM) centres and the UN Refugee Agency have repetedly called for additional resettlement opportunities for vulnerable persons of concern in Libya.

    https://www.ecre.org/detainees-evacuated-out-of-libya-but-resettlement-capacity-remains-inadequate
    #réinstallation #Niger #Libye #évacuation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #HCR #détention #centres_de_détention

    • ET DES INFORMATIONS PLUS ANCIENNES DANS LE FIL CI-DESSOUS

      Libya: evacuations to Niger resumed – returns from Niger begun

      After being temporarily suspended in March as the result of concerns from local authorities on the pace of resettlement out of Niger, UNHCR evacuations of vulnerable refugees and asylum seekers from Libya through the Emergency Transit Mechanism has been resumed and 132 vulnerable migrants flown to the country. At the same time the deportation of 132 Sudanese nationals from Niger to Libya has raised international concern.

      Niger is the main host for refugees and asylum seekers from Libya evacuated by UNHCR. Since the UN Refugee Agency began evacuations in cooperation with EU and Libyan authorities in November 2017, Niger has received 1,152 of the 1,474 people evacuated in total. While UNHCR has submitted 475 persons for resettlement a modest 108 in total have been resettled in Europe. According to UNHCR the government in Niger has now offered to host an additional 1,500 refugees from Libya through the Emergency Transit Mechanism and upon its revival and the first transfer of 132 refugees to Niger, UNHCR’s Special Envoy for the Central Mediterranean Situation, Vincent Cochetel stated: “We now urgently need to find resettlement solutions for these refugees in other countries.”

      UNHCR has confirmed the forced return by authorities in Niger of at least 132 of a group of 160 Sudanese nationals arrested in the migrant hub of Agadez, the majority after fleeing harsh conditions in Libya. Agadez is known as a major transit hub for refugees and asylum seekers seeking passage to Libya and Europe but the trend is reversed and 1,700 Sudanese nationals have fled from Libya to Niger since December 2017. In a mail to IRIN News, Human Rights Watch’s associate director for Europe and Central Asia, Judith Sunderland states: “It is inhuman and unlawful to send migrants and refugees back to Libya, where they face shocking levels of torture, sexual violence, and forced labour,” with reference to the principle of non-refoulement.

      According to a statement released by Amnesty International on May 16: “At least 7,000 migrants and refugees are languishing in Libyan detention centres where abuse is rife and food and water in short supply. This is a sharp increase from March when there were 4,400 detained migrants and refugees, according to Libyan officials.”

      https://www.ecre.org/libya-evacuations-to-niger-resumed-returns-from-niger-begun

    • Libya: return operations running but slow resettlement is jeopardizing the evacuation scheme

      According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM) 15.000 migrants have been returned from Libya to their country of origin and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has assisted in the evacuation of more than 1,300 refugees from Libya thereby fulfilling the targets announced at the AU-EU-UN Taskforce meeting in December 2017. However, a modest 25 of the more than 1000 migrants evacuated to Niger have been resettled to Europe and the slow pace is jeopardizing further evacuations.

      More than 1000 of the 1300 migrants evacuated from Libya are hosted by Niger and Karmen Sakhr, who oversees the North Africa unit at the UNHCR states to the EU Observer that the organisation: “were advised that until more people leave Niger, we will no longer be able to evacuate additional cases from Libya.”

      During a meeting on Monday 5 March with the Civil Liberties Committee and Foreign Affairs Committee MEPs, members of the Delegation for relations with Maghreb countries, Commission and External Action Service representatives on the mistreatment of migrants and refugees in Libya, and arrangements for their resettlement or return, UNHCR confirmed that pledges have been made by France, Switzerland, Italy, Norway, Sweden and Malta as well as unspecified non-EU countries but that security approvals and interviewing process of the cases is lengthy resulting in the modest number of resettlements, while also warning that the EU member states need to put more work into resettlement of refugees, and that resettlement pledges still fall short of the needs. According to UNHCR 430 pledges has been made by European countries.

      An estimated 5000 people are in government detention and an unknown number held by private militias under well documented extreme conditions.

      https://www.ecre.org/libya-return-operations-running-but-slow-resettlement-is-jeopardizing-the-evac

    • Libya: migrants and refugees out by plane and in by boat

      The joint European Union (EU), African Union (AU) and United Nations (UN) Task Force visited Tripoli last week welcoming progress made evacuating and returning migrants and refugees out of Libya. EU has announced three new programmes, for protecting migrants and refugees in Libya and along the Central Mediterranean Route, and their return and reintegration. Bundestag Research Services and NGOs raise concerns over EU and Member State support to Libyan Coast Guard.

      Representatives of the Task Force, created in November 2017, met with Libyan authorities last week and visited a detention centres for migrants and a shelter for internally displaced people in Tripoli. Whilst they commended progress on Voluntary Humanitarian Returns, they outlined a number of areas for improvement. These include: comprehensive registration of migrants at disembarkation points and detention centres; improving detention centre conditions- with a view to end the current system of arbitrary detention; decriminalizing irregular migration in Libya.

      The three new programmes announced on Monday, will be part of the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa. €115 million will go towards evacuating 3,800 refugees from Libya, providing protection and voluntary humanitarian return to 15,000 migrants in Libya and will support the resettlement of 14,000 people in need of international protection from Niger, Chad, Cameroon and Burkina Faso. €20 million will be dedicated to improving access to social and protection services for vulnerable migrants in transit countries in the Sahel region and the Lake Chad basin. €15 million will go to supporting sustainable reintegration for Ethiopian citizens.

      A recent report by the Bundestag Research Services on SAR operations in the Mediterranean notes the support for the Libyan Coast Guard by EU and Member States in bringing refugees and migrants back to Libya may be violating the principle of non-refoulement as outlined in the Geneva Convention: “This cooperation must be the subject of proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights, because the people who are being forcibly returned with the assistance of the EU are being inhumanely treated, tortured or killed.” stated Andrej Hunko, European policy spokesman for the German Left Party (die Linke). A joint statement released by SAR NGO’s operating in the Mediterranean calls on the EU institutions and leaders to stop the financing and support of the Libyan Coast Guard and the readmissions to a third country which violates fundamental human rights and international law.

      According to UNHCR, there are currently 46,730 registered refugees and asylum seekers in Libya. 843 asylum seekers and refugees have been released from detention so far in 2018. According to IOM 9,379 people have been returned to their countries of origin since November 2017 and 1,211 have been evacuated to Niger since December 2017.

      https://www.ecre.org/libya-migrants-and-refugees-out-by-plane-and-in-by-boat

      Complément de Emmanuel Blanchard (via la mailing-list Migreurop):

      Selon le HCR, il y aurait actuellement environ 6000 personnes détenues dans des camps en Libye et qui seraient en attente de retour ou de protection (la distinction n’est pas toujours très claire dans la prose du HCR sur les personnes à « évacuer » vers le HCR...). Ces données statistiques sont très fragiles et a priori très sous-estimées car fondées sur les seuls camps auxquels le HCR a accès.

    • First group of refugees evacuated from new departure facility in Libya

      UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, in coordination with Libyan authorities, evacuated 133 refugees from Libya to Niger today after hosting them at a Gathering and Departure Facility (GDF) in Tripoli which opened on Tuesday.

      Most evacuees, including 81 women and children, were previously detained in Libya. After securing their release from five detention centres across Libya, including in Tripoli and areas as far as 180 kilometres from the capital, they were sheltered at the GDF until the arrangements for their evacuation were concluded.

      The GDF is the first centre of its kind in Libya and is intended to bring vulnerable refugees to a safe environment while solutions including refugee resettlement, family reunification, evacuation to emergency facilities in other countries, return to a country of previous asylum, and voluntary repatriation are sought for them.

      “The opening of this centre, in very difficult circumstances, has the potential to save lives. It offers immediate protection and safety for vulnerable refugees in need of urgent evacuation, and is an alternative to detention for hundreds of refugees currently trapped in Libya,” said UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi.

      The centre is managed by the Libyan Ministry of Interior, UNHCR and UNHCR’s partner LibAid. The initiative is one of a range of measures needed to offer viable alternatives to the dangerous boat journeys undertaken by refugees and migrants along the Central Mediterranean route.

      With an estimated 4,900 refugees and migrants held in detention centres across Libya, including 3,600 in need of international protection, the centre is a critical alternative to the detention of those most vulnerable.

      The centre, which has been supported by the EU and other donors, has a capacity to shelter up to 1,000 vulnerable refugees identified for solutions out of Libya.

      At the facility, UNHCR and partners are providing humanitarian assistance such as accommodation, food, medical care and psychosocial support. Child friendly spaces and dedicated protection staff are also available to ensure that refugees and asylum-seekers are adequately cared for.

      https://www.unhcr.org/news/press/2018/12/5c09033a4/first-group-refugees-evacuated-new-departure-facility-libya.html

    • Migration : à Niamey, des migrants rapatriés de Libye protestent contre leurs conditions de séjour

      Les manifestants protestent contre leur détention de vie qu’ils jugent « déplorables » et pour amplifier leurs mouvements, ils ont brandi des pancartes sur lesquelles ils ont écrit leurs doléances. Les migrants manifestant s’indignent également de leur séjour qui ne cesse de se prolonger, sans véritable alternatives ou visibilité sur leur situation. « Ils nous ont ramené de la Libye pour nous laisser à nous-mêmes ici », « on ne veut pas rester ici, laisser nous partir là où on veut », sont entre autres les slogans que les migrants ont scandés au cours de leur sit-in devant les locaux de l’agence onusienne. Plusieurs des protestataires sont venus à la manifestation avec leurs bagages et d’autres avec leurs différents papiers, qui attestent de leur situation de réfugiés ou demandeurs d’asiles.

      La situation, quoique déplorable, n’a pas manqué de susciter divers commentaires. Il faut dire que depuis le début de l’opération de rapatriement des migrants en détresse de Libye, ils sont des centaines à vivre dans la capitale mais aussi à Agadez où des centres d’accueil sont mis à leurs dispositions par les agences onusiennes (UNHCR, OIM), avec la collaboration des autorités nigériennes. Un certain temps, leur présence de plus en plus massive dans divers quartiers de la capitale où des villas sont mises à leur disposition, a commencé à inquiéter les habitants sur d’éventuels risques sécuritaires.

      Le gouvernement a signé plusieurs accords et adopté des lois pour lutter contre l’immigration clandestine. Il a aussi signé des engagements avec certains pays européens notamment la France et l’Italie, pour l’accueil temporaire des réfugiés en provenance de la Libye et en transit en attendant leur réinstallation dans leur pays ou en Europe pour ceux qui arrivent à obtenir le sésame pour l’entrée. Un geste de solidarité décrié par certaines ONG et que les autorités regrettent presque à demi-mot, du fait du non-respect des contreparties financières promises par les bailleurs et partenaires européens. Le pays fait face lui-même à un afflux de réfugiés nigérians et maliens sur son territoire, ainsi que des déplacés internes dans plusieurs régions, ce qui complique davantage la tâche dans cette affaire de difficile gestion de la problématique migratoire.

      Le Niger accueille plusieurs centres d’accueil pour les réfugiés et demandeurs d’asiles rapatriés de Libye. Le 10 décembre dernier, l’OFPRA français a par exemple annoncé avoir achevé une nouvelle mission au Niger avec l’UNHCR, et qui a concerné 200 personnes parmi lesquelles une centaine évacuée de Libye. En novembre dernier, le HCR a également annoncé avoir repris les évacuations de migrants depuis la Libye, avec un contingent de 132 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asiles vers le Niger.

      Depuis novembre 2017, le HCR a assuré avoir effectué vingt-trois (23) opérations d’évacuation au départ de la Libye et ce, « malgré d’importants problèmes de sécurité et les restrictions aux déplacements qui ont été imposées ». En tout, ce sont 2.476 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile vulnérables qui ont pu être libérés et acheminés de la Libye vers le Niger (2.069), l’Italie (312) et la Roumanie (95).


      https://www.actuniger.com/societe/14640-migration-a-niamey-des-migrants-rapatries-de-libye-protestent-contr

      Je découvre ici que les évacuations se sont faites aussi vers l’#Italie et... la #Roumanie !

    • Destination Europe: Evacuation. The EU has started resettling refugees from Libya, but only 174 have made it to Europe in seven months

      As the EU sets new policies and makes deals with African nations to deter hundreds of thousands of migrants from seeking new lives on the continent, what does it mean for those following dreams northwards and the countries they transit through? From returnees in Sierra Leone and refugees resettled in France to smugglers in Niger and migrants in detention centres in Libya, IRIN explores their choices and challenges in this multi-part special report, Destination Europe.

      Four years of uncontrolled migration starting in 2014 saw more than 600,000 people cross from Libya to Italy, contributing to a populist backlash that is threatening the foundations of the EU. Stopping clandestine migration has become one of Europe’s main foreign policy goals, and last July the number of refugees and migrants crossing the central Mediterranean dropped dramatically. The EU celebrated the reduced numbers as “good progress”.

      But, as critics pointed out, that was only half the story: the decline, resulting from a series of moves by the EU and Italy, meant that tens of thousands of people were stuck in Libya with no way out. They faced horrific abuse, and NGOs and human rights organisations accused the EU of complicity in the violations taking place.

      Abdu is one who got stuck. A tall, lanky teenager, he spent nearly two years in smugglers’ warehouses and official Libyan detention centres. But he’s also one of the lucky ones. In February, he boarded a flight to Niger run (with EU support) by the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to help some of those stranded in Libya reach Europe. Nearly 1,600 people have been evacuated on similiar flights, but, seven months on, only 174 have been resettled to Europe.

      The evacuation programme is part of a €500-million ($620-million) effort to resettle 50,000 refugees over the next two years to the EU, which has a population of more than 500 million people. The target is an increase from previous European resettlement goals, but still only represents a tiny fraction of the need – those chosen can be Syrians in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon as well as refugees in Libya, Egypt, Niger, Chad, Sudan, and Ethiopia – countries that combined host more than 6.5 million refugees.

      The EU is now teetering on the edge of a fresh political crisis, with boats carrying people rescued from the sea being denied ports of disembarkation, no consensus on how to share responsibility for asylum seekers and refugees within the continent, and increasing talk of further outsourcing the management of migration to African countries.

      Against this backdrop, the evacuation and resettlement programme from Libya is perhaps the best face of European policy in the Mediterranean. But, unless EU countries offer more spots for refugees, it is a pathway to safety for no more than a small handful who get the luck of the draw. As the first evacuees adjust to their new lives in Europe, the overwhelming majority are left behind.

      Four months after arriving in Niger, Abdu is still waiting to find out if and when he will be resettled to Europe. He’s still in the same state of limbo he was in at the end of March when IRIN met him in Niamey, the capital of Niger. At the time, he’d been out of the detention centre in Libya for less than a month and his arms were skeletally thin.

      “I thought to go to Europe [and] failed. Now, I came to Niger…. What am I doing here? What will happen from here? I don’t know,” he said, sitting in the shade of a canopy in the courtyard of a UNHCR facility. “I don’t know what I will be planning for the future because everything collapsed; everything finished.”
      Abdu’s story

      Born in Eritrea – one of the most repressive countries in the world – Abdu’s mother sent him to live in neighbouring Sudan when he was only seven. She wanted him to grow up away from the political persecution and shadow of indefinite military service that stifled normal life in his homeland.

      But Sudan, where he was raised by his uncle, wasn’t much better. As an Eritrean refugee, he faced discrimination and lived in a precarious legal limbo. Abdu saw no future there. “So I decided to go,” he said.

      Like so many other young Africans fleeing conflict, political repression, and economic hardship in recent years, he wanted to try to make it to Europe. But first he had to pass through Libya.

      After crossing the border from Sudan in July 2016, Abdu, then 16 years old, was taken captive and held for 18 months. The smugglers asked for a ransom of $5,500, tortured him while his relatives were forced to listen on the phone, and rented him out for work like a piece of equipment.

      Abdu tried to escape, but only found himself under the control of another smuggler who did the same thing. He was kept in overflowing warehouses, sequestered from the sunlight with around 250 other people. The food was not enough and often spoiled; disease was rampant; people died from malaria and hunger; one woman died after giving birth; the guards drank, carried guns, and smoked hashish, and, at the smallest provocation, spun into a sadistic fury. Abdu’s skin started crawling with scabies, his cheeks sank in, and his long limbs withered to skin and bones.

      One day, the smuggler told him that, if he didn’t find a way to pay, it looked like he would soon die. As a courtesy – or to try to squeeze some money out of him instead of having to deal with a corpse – the smuggler reduced the ransom to $1,500.

      Finally, Abdu’s relatives were able to purchase his freedom and passage to Europe. It was December 2017. As he finally stood on the seashore before dawn in the freezing cold, Abdu remembered thinking: “We are going to arrive in Europe [and] get protection [and] get rights.”

      But he never made it. After nearly 24 hours at sea, the rubber dinghy he was on with around 150 other people was intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard, which, since October 2016, has been trained and equipped by the EU and Italy.

      Abdu was brought back to the country he had just escaped and put in another detention centre.

      This one was official – run by the Libyan Directorate for Combating Irregular Migration. But it wasn’t much different from the smuggler-controlled warehouses he’d been in before. Again, it was overcrowded and dirty. People were falling sick. There was no torture or extortion, but the guards could be just as brutal. If someone tried to talk to them about the poor conditions “[they are] going to beat you until you are streaming blood,” Abdu said.

      Still, he wasn’t about to try his luck on his own again in Libya. The detention centre wasn’t suitable for human inhabitants, Abdu recalled thinking, but it was safer than anywhere he’d been in over a year. That’s where UNHCR found him and secured his release.

      The lucky few

      The small village of Thal-Marmoutier in France seems like it belongs to a different world than the teeming detention centres of Libya.

      The road to the village runs between gently rolling hills covered in grapevines and winds through small towns of half-timbered houses. About 40 minutes north of Strasbourg, the largest city in the region of Alsace, bordering Germany, it reaches a valley of hamlets that disrupt the green countryside with their red, high-peaked roofs. It’s an unassuming setting, but it’s the type of place Abdu might end up if and when he is finally resettled.

      In mid-March, when IRIN visited, the town of 800 people was hosting the first group of refugees evacuated from Libya.

      It was unseasonably cold, and the 55 people housed in a repurposed section of a Franciscan convent were bundled in winter jackets, scarves, and hats. Thirty of them had arrived from Chad, where they had been long-time residents of refugee camps after fleeing Boko Haram violence or conflict in the Sudanese region of Darfur. The remaining 25 – from Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Sudan – were the first evacuees from Libya. Before reaching France, they, like Abdu, had been flown to Niamey.

      The extra stop is necessary because most countries require refugees to be interviewed in person before offering them a resettlement spot. The process is facilitated by embassies and consulates, but, because of security concerns, only one European country (Italy) has a diplomatic presence in Libya.

      To resettle refugees stuck in detention centres, UNHCR needed to find a third country willing to host people temporarily, one where European resettlement agencies could carry out their procedures. Niger was the first – and so far only – country to volunteer.

      “For us, it is an obligation to participate,” Mohamed Bazoum, Niger’s influential interior minister, said when interviewed by IRIN in Niamey. Niger, the gateway between West Africa and Libya on the migration trail to Europe, is the top recipient of funds from the EU Trust Fund for Africa, an initiative launched in 2015 to “address the root causes of irregular migration”.

      “It costs us nothing to help,” Bazoum added, referring to the evacuation programme. “But we gain a sense of humanity in doing so.”

      ‘Time is just running from my life’

      The first evacuees landed in Niamey on 12 November. A little over a month later, on 19 December, they were on their way to France.

      By March, they had been in Thal-Marmoutier for three months and were preparing to move from the reception centre in the convent to individual apartments in different cities.

      Among them, several families with children had been living in Libya for a long time. But most of the evacuees were young women who had been imprisoned by smugglers and militias, held in official detention centres, or often both.

      “In Libya, it was difficult for me,” said Farida, a 24-year-old aspiring runner from Ethiopia. She fled her home in 2016 because of the conflict between the government and the Oromo people, an ethnic group.

      After a brief stay in Cairo, she and her husband decided to go to Libya because they heard a rumour that UNHCR was providing more support there to refugees. Shortly after crossing the border, Farida and her husband were captured by a militia and placed in a detention centre.

      “People from the other government (Libya has two rival governments) came and killed the militiamen, and some of the people in the prison also died, but we got out and were taken to another prison,” she said. “When they put me in prison, I was pregnant, and they beat me and killed the child in my belly.”

      Teyba, a 20-year-old woman also from Ethiopia, shared a similar story: “A militia put us in prison and tortured us a lot,” she said. “We stayed in prison for a little bit more than a month, and then the fighting started…. Some people died, some people escaped, and some people, I don’t know what happened to them.”

      Three months at the reception centre in Thal-Marmoutier had done little to ease the trauma of those experiences. “I haven’t seen anything that made me laugh or that made me happy,” Farida said. “Up to now, life has not been good, even after coming to France.”

      The French government placed the refugees in the reception centre to expedite their asylum procedures, and so they could begin to learn French.

      Everyone in the group had already received 10-year residency permits – something refugees who are placed directly in individual apartments or houses usually wait at least six months to receive. But many of them said they felt like their lives had been put on pause in Thal-Marmoutier. They were isolated in the small village with little access to transportation and said they had not been well prepared to begin new lives on their own in just a few weeks time.

      “I haven’t benefited from anything yet. Time is just running from my life,” said Intissar, a 35-year-old woman from Sudan.

      A stop-start process

      Despite their frustrations with the integration process in France, and the still present psychological wounds from Libya, the people in Thal-Marmoutier were fortunate to reach Europe.

      By early March, more than 1,000 people had been airlifted from Libya to Niger. But since the first group in December, no one else had left for Europe. Frustrated with the pace of resettlement, the Nigerien government told UNHCR that the programme had to be put on hold.

      “We want the flow to be balanced,” Bazoum, the interior minister, explained. “If people arrive, then we want others to leave. We don’t want people to be here on a permanent basis.”

      Since then, an additional 148 people have been resettled to France, Switzerland, Sweden and the Netherlands, and other departures are in the works. “The situation is improving,” said Louise Donovan, a UNHCR communications officer in Niger. “We need to speed up our processes as much as possible, and so do the resettlement countries.”

      A further 312 people were evacuated directly to Italy. Still, the total number resettled by the programme remains small. “What is problematic right now is the fact that European governments are not offering enough places for resettlement, despite continued requests from UNHCR,” said Matteo de Bellis, a researcher with Amnesty International.
      Less than 1 percent

      Globally, less than one percent of refugees are resettled each year, and resettlement is on a downward spiral at the moment, dropping by more than 50 percent between 2016 and 2017. The number of refugees needing resettlement is expected to reach 1.4 million next year, 17 percent higher than in 2018, while global resettlement places dropped to just 75,000 in 2017, UNHCR said on Monday.

      The Trump administration’s slashing of the US refugee admissions programme – historically the world’s leader – means this trend will likely continue.

      Due to the limited capacity, resettlement is usually reserved for people who are considered to be the most vulnerable.

      In Libya alone, there are around 19,000 refugees from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Sudan registered with UNHCR – a number increasing each month – as well as 430,000 migrants and potential asylum seekers from throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Many have been subjected to torture, sexual violence, and other abuses. And, because they are in Libya irregularly, resettlement is often the only legal solution to indefinite detention.

      In the unlikely scenario that all the sub-Saharan refugees in Libya were to be resettled, they would account for more than one third of the EU’s quota for the next two years. And that’s not taking into account people in Libya who may have legitimate grounds to claim asylum but are not on the official radar. Other solutions are clearly needed, but given the lack of will in the international community, it is unclear what those might be.

      “The Niger mechanism is a patch, a useful one under the circumstance, but still a patch,” de Bellis, the Amnesty researcher, said. “There are refugees… who cannot get out of the detention centres because there are no resettlement places available to them.”

      It is also uncertain what will happen to any refugees evacuated to Niger that aren’t offered a resettlement spot by European countries.

      UNHCR says it is considering all options, including the possibility of integration in Niger or return to their countries of origin – if they are deemed to be safe and people agree to go. But resettlement is the main focus. In April, the pace of people departing for Europe picked up, and evacuations from Libya resumed at the beginning of May – ironically, the same week the Nigerien government broke new and dangerous ground by deporting 132 Sudanese asylum seekers who had crossed the border on their own back to Libya.

      For the evacuees in Niger awaiting resettlement, there are still many unanswered questions.

      As Abdu was biding his time back in March, something other than the uncertainty about his own future weighed on him: the people still stuck in the detention centres in Libya.

      He had started his travels with his best friend. They had been together when they were first kidnapped and held for ransom. But Abdu’s friend was shot in the leg by a guard who accused him of stealing a cigarette. When Abdu tried to escape, he left his friend behind and hasn’t spoken to him or heard anything about him since.

      “UNHCR is saying they are going to find a solution for me; they are going to help me,” Abdu said. “It’s okay. But what about the others?”

      https://www.irinnews.org/special-report/2018/06/26/destination-europe-evacuation


  • Dimenticati ai confini d’Europa

    L’obiettivo della ricerca è dare voce alle esperienze dei migranti e dei rifugiati, per rendere chiaro il nesso tra quello che hanno vissuto e le politiche europee che i governi hanno adottato.
    Il report si basa su 117 interviste qualitative realizzate nell’enclave spagnola di Melilla, in Sicilia, a Malta, in Grecia, in Romania, in Croazia e in Serbia. Ciò che emerge chiaramente è che il momento dell’ingresso in Europa, sia che esso avvenga attraverso il mare o attraverso una foresta sul confine terrestre, non è che un frammento di un viaggio molto più lungo ed estremamente traumatico. Le rotte che dall’Africa occidentale e orientale portano fino alla Libia sono notoriamente pericolose, specialmente per le donne, spesso vittime di abusi sessuali o costrette a prostituirsi per pagare i trafficanti.

    Il report mostra che alle frontiere dell’Unione Europea, e talora anche a quelle interne, c’è una vera e propria emergenza dal punto di vista della tutela dei diritti umani. L’assenza di vie legali di accesso per le persone bisognose di protezione le costringe ad affidarsi ai trafficanti su rotte che si fanno sempre più lunghe e pericolose. I tentativi dell’UE e degli Stati Membri di chiudere le principali rotte non proteggono la vita delle persone, come a volte si sostiene, ma nella maggior parte dei casi riescono a far sì che la loro sofferenza abbia sempre meno testimoni.


    http://centroastalli.it/dimenticati-ai-confini-deuropa-2
    #Europe #frontières #asile #migrations #droits_humains #rapport #réfugiés #Sicile #Italie #Malte #Grèce #Roumanie #Croatie #Serbie #UE #EU #femmes #Libye #violence #violences_sexuelles #parcours_migratoires #abus_sexuels #viol #prostitution #voies_légales #invisibilisation #invisibilité #fermeture_des_frontières #refoulement #push-back #violent_borders #Dublin #règlement_dublin #accès_aux_droits #accueil #détention #mouvements_secondaires

    Pour télécharger le rapport :
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TT9vefCRv2SEqbfsaEyucSIle5U1dNxh/view

    ping @isskein

    • Migranti, il Centro Astalli: “È emergenza diritti umani alle frontiere d’Europa”

      Assenza di vie di accesso legale ai migranti forzati, respingimenti arbitrari, detenzioni, impossibilità di accedere al diritto d’asilo: è il quadro disegnato da una nuova ricerca della sede italiana del Servizio dei gesuiti per i rifugiati.

      S’intitola “Dimenticati ai confini d’Europa” il report messo a punto dal Centro Astalli, la sede italiana del Servizio dei gesuiti per i rifugiati, che descrive, attraverso le storie dei rifugiati, le sempre più numerose violazioni di diritti fondamentali che si susseguono lungo le frontiere di diversi Paesi europei. La ricerca, presentata oggi a Roma, si basa su 117 interviste qualitative realizzate nell’enclave spagnola di Melilla, in Sicilia, a Malta, in Grecia, in Romania, in Croazia e in Serbia.

      Il report, si spiega nella ricerca, «mostra che alle frontiere dell’Unione europea, e talora anche a quelle interne, c’è una vera e propria emergenza dal punto di vista della tutela dei diritti umani». Secondo padre Camillo Ripamonti, presidente del Centro Astalli, la ricerca mette bene in luce come l’incapacità di gestire il fenomeno migratorio solitamente attribuita all’Ue, nasca anche dalla «volontà di tanti singoli Stati che non vogliono assumersi le proprie responsabilità» di fronte all’arrivo di persone bisognose di protezione alle loro frontiere, al contrario è necessario che l’Europa torni ad essere «il continente dei diritti, non dobbiamo perdere il senso della nostra umanità». «Si tratta di una sfida importante - ha detto Ripamonti - anche in vista delle prossime elezioni europee».

      A sua volta, padre Jose Ignacio Garcia, direttore del Jesuit Refugee Service Europa, ha rilevato come «gli Stati membri dell’Ue continuano ad investire le loro energie e risorse nel cercare di impedire a migranti e rifugiati di raggiungere l’Europa o, nel migliore dei casi, vorrebbero confinarli in ‘centri controllati’ ai confini esterni». «La riforma della legislazione comune in materia d’asilo, molto probabilmente – ha aggiunto - non verrà realizzata prima delle prossime elezioni europee. I politici europei sembrano pensare che se impediamo ai rifugiati di raggiungere le nostre coste, non abbiamo bisogno di un sistema comune d’asilo in Europa».

      La fotografia delle frontiere europee che esce dalla ricerca è inquietante: violazioni di ogni sorta, violenze, detenzioni arbitrarie, respingimenti disumani, aggiramento delle leggi dei singoli Paesi e del diritto internazionale. Un quadro fosco che ha pesanti ricadute sulla vita dei rifugiati già provati da difficoltà a soprusi subiti nel lungo viaggio. «Il Greek Council for Refugees – spiega la ricerca - ha denunciato, nel febbraio del 2018, un numero rilevante di casi di respingimenti illegali dalla regione del fiume Evros, al confine terrestre con la Turchia. Secondo questa organizzazione, migranti vulnerabili come donne incinte, famiglie con bambini e vittime di tortura sono stati forzatamente rimandati in Turchia, stipati in sovraffollate barche attraverso il fiume Evros, dopo essere stati arbitrariamente detenuti in stazioni di polizia in condizioni igieniche precarie». Secondo le testimonianze raccolte in Croazia e Serbia, diversi sono stati gli episodi di violenze fisiche contro rifugiati e di respingimenti immediati da parte della polizia di frontiera.

      E in effetti nel nuovo rapporto del Centro Astalli, più dei soli dati numerici e dei carenti quadri normativi ben descritti, a colpire sono i racconti degli intervistati lungo le diverse frontiere d’Europa. Un ragazzo marocchino, in Sicilia, per esempio ha raccontato «di come i trafficanti gli abbiano rubato i soldi e il cellulare e lo abbiamo tenuto prigioniero in un edificio vuoto con altre centinaia di persone per mesi». «Durante il viaggio – è ancora la sua storia – i trafficanti corrompevano gli ufficiali di polizia e trattavano brutalmente i migranti». Nel corso di un tentativo di attraversamento del Mediterraneo ricorda poi di aver sentito un trafficante dire a un altro: «Qualsiasi cosa succeda non mi interessa, li puoi anche lasciar morire».

      Ancora, una ragazza somala di 19 anni, arrivata incinta in Libia, ha raccontato di come il trafficante la minacciasse di toglierle il bambino appena nato e venderlo perché non aveva la cifra richiesta per la traversata. Alla fine il trafficante ha costretto tutti i suoi compagni di viaggio a pagare per lei ma ci sono voluti comunque diversi mesi prima che riuscissero a mettere insieme la somma richiesta. Storie che sembrano provenire da un altro mondo e sono invece cronache quotidiane lungo i confini di diversi Paesi europei.

      Infine, padre Ripamonti, in merito allo sgombero del centro Baobab di Roma che ospitava diverse centinaia di migranti, ha osservato che «la politica degli sgomberi senza alternative è inaccettabile». Il Centro Astalli «esprime inoltre preoccupazione anche per le crescenti difficoltà di accesso alla protezione in Italia: in un momento in cui molti migranti restano intrappolati in Libia in condizioni disumane e il soccorso in mare è meno efficace rispetto al passato, il nostro Paese ha scelto di adottare nuove misure che rendono più difficile la presentazione della domanda di asilo in frontiera, introducono il trattenimento ai fini dell’identificazione, abbassano gli standard dei centri di prima accoglienza».

      https://www.lastampa.it/2018/11/13/vaticaninsider/immigrazione-il-centro-astalli-c-unemergenza-diritti-umani-alle-frontiere-deuropa-v3qbnNIYRSzCCQSfsPFBHM/pagina.html


  • Gebrauchte Diesel werden zum Exportschlager : Halb Europa kauft Selbstzünder aus Deutschland - WELT
    https://www.welt.de/motor/news/article179688046/Gebrauchte-Diesel-werden-zum-Exportschlager-Halb-Europa-kauft-Selbstzuender-aus


    Pendant la dernière année passée l’Allemagne a exportée 240.000 voitures d’occasion diesel dans les autres pays de l’UE.

    Wie aus einer Auswertung des „Export-/Import-Seismografen“ (ESD/ISD) auf Grundlage von Daten des Statistischen Bundesamtes hervorgeht, sind Exporte gebrauchter Diesel-Pkw innerhalb eines Jahres um rund 20 Prozent auf fast 240.000 Fahrzeuge gestiegen. „Neben den EU-Ländern Kroatien, Slowenien, Bulgarien und Rumänien gehen ältere Dieselfahrzeuge auch in die Ukraine“, sagt Christian Kille vom Institut für Angewandte Logistik der Hochschule Würzburg-Schweinfurt, das den ESD/ISD gemeinsam mit dem Softwarehaus AEB herausgibt. „Offenbar wegen der lockeren Einfuhrbestimmungen und des relativ niedrigen Zollsatzes von 7,3 Prozent für Gebrauchtwagen aus der EU.“ Den größten Boom erlebten die Exporte in die Ukraine, die sich mehr als verdoppelten, gefolgt von Kroatien mit einem Plus von gut 89 Prozent. Die anspruchsvolleren Märkte West-, Mittel und Südeuropas bevorzugen neuere Diesel-Gebrauchtwagen. Starkes Wachstum zeigen hier Spanien (+31%), Österreich (+41%) und Frankreich (+34%). „Für Schnäppchenjäger im Ausland gibt es aktuell eine gute Möglichkeit, günstig an einen Diesel zu kommen“, sagt Kille.



  • #Dick_Marty - Un grido per la giustizia

    Dopo gli attentati dell’11 settembre 2001, il governo americano stipula degli accordi segreti con i governi europei per combattere il terrorismo. Sono accordi che prevedono che la #Cia abbia pieni poteri per rapire e torturare delle persone sospette. Una violazione flagrante dei trattati internazionali, dello stato di diritto e delle leggi dei paesi europei, e uno schiaffo ai diritti dell’uomo. Quando il Washington Post nel 2005 rivela questo patto segreto, il Consiglio d’Europa incarica il parlamentare svizzero Dick Marty di indagare. Questo documentario è la storia di questa indagine e il ritratto di una persona fuori dal comune.

    Un racconto dettagliato e ricco di testimonianze che ci porta dentro ad una spy story degna delle più fantasiose sceneggiature: per Dick Marty la sete di verità è stata il motore di una ricerca minuziosa, condotta con pochi mezzi e con la pazienza di unire un tassello all’altro, sbrogliando una matassa più che ingarbugliata. Si sente davvero di poter contare qualcosa, quando ci si trova davanti a un gigante come i servizi segreti americani? Sarà proprio lui - l’ex procuratore pubblico con “Una certa idea di giustizia”, come recita il titolo del suo libro appena pubblicato per Favre - a portare la propria testimonianza anche nella parte in studio di questa puntata, unendo così il racconto più umano alla ricostruzione dei fatti.

    Nel documentario :

    «Io se dovessi sapere e tacere mi sentirei complice. Allora preferisco dire, denunciare, gridare, e non essere complice pur sapendo che il mio grido magari serve a poco»

    «Siamo sulla Terra per compiere qualcosa, non semplicemente per far passare il tempo. Ho l’impressione che finché uno ha la capacità di indignarsi di fronte all’ingiustizia, ci si sente vivi e si ha ancora il coraggio di guardarsi nello specchio»

    «Denunciare. E’ il compito di ogni testimone di un’ingiustizia. E ritengo complici tutti coloro che di fronte a un’ingiustizia stanno zitti. Ritengo che la rivolta di chi assiste all’ingiustizia permette di far progredire la nostra civiltà»

    https://www.rsi.ch/la1/programmi/cultura/storie/Dick-Marty-Un-grido-per-la-giustizia-10853348.html
    #justice #terrorisme #film #documentaire #CIA #torture #prisons_secrètes #anti-terrorisme #war_on_terror #USA #Etats-Unis #ennemi_combattant #Convention_de_Genève #extraordinary_renditions #transferts_aériens #Black_sites #Pologne #Roumanie #Abu_Omar (imam disparu à Milan) #Aviano #Italie #Guantanamo #zero_zone #extra-territorialité #torture_codifiée

    –-----------------

    #Dick_Marty, une très rares personnes pour laquelle j’ai vraiment un profond respect...

    Dans l’interview de présentation du film sur Dick Marty...

    Giornalista: «Tra giustizia e legalità, Lei dove si mette?»
    Dick Marty: «Io sarei dalla parte di Antigone e non di Creonte.»
    Giornalista: «Antigone che vuole dare sepoltura a suo fratello...»
    Dick Marty: «... violando la legge. La legge del potente. Sono chiaramente dalla parte di Antigone. E’ vero che nella maggior parte delle cose si è necessariamente dalla parte della giustizia. Però ci sono dei momenti cruciali in cui devi ribellarti. E questi atti di ribellione hanno fatto progredire l’umanità. E se ci fossero state più ribellioni... penso al tempo del Terzo Reich... forse avremmo evitato delle catastrofi umanitarie terribili.»
    Giornalista: «Ribellarsi non è facile però...»
    DM: «Certo, bisogna saper staccarsi dal gruppo. Bisogna saper gridare la propria rivolta, la propria verità. E questo chiede un certo impegno»


  • Ardennes : Peste porcine africaine : la filière française s’inquiète

    Le ministère français de l’Agriculture a reçu les différents acteurs de la filière porcine pour faire le point sur la situation, ce vendredi après-midi. Alors que deux cas de peste porcine africaine ont été détectés en Province de Luxembourg ce jeudi, les autorités françaises prennent des mesures pour contrer une menace économique importante dans l’Hexagone.


    Au lendemain de la détection de deux cas de Peste porcine africaine en Belgique, les acteurs français de la filière porcine ont été reçus par la Direction générale de l’Alimentation, qui dépend du ministère de l’Agriculture. Éleveurs, abatteurs, vétérinaires et chasseurs ont participé à cette réunion. L’objectif principal était qu’ils présentent leur stratégie pour contrer l’entrée de la maladie des suidés sur le territoire français.

    Mesures de prévention
    Si les éleveurs porcins sont très engagés dans la prévention, c’est notamment parce que la menace de peste les inquiète depuis plusieurs mois, sachant que la maladie existe depuis quatre ou cinq ans dans les pays de l’Est de l’Europe. C’est donc bien préparés que les acteurs de la filière ont interpellé les autorités. Des mesures ont ainsi été prises, notamment auprès des chasseurs de France. Il leur est d’abord demandé de restreindre la chasse dans les communes qui longent la frontière belge, de manière à éviter au maximum les déplacements d’animaux. Mais aussi d’organiser des actions de surveillance de l’état sanitaire des sangliers. Du côté des élevages, les autorités rappellent les règles de biosécurité, demandent d’isoler les bâtiments contre les animaux sauvages, et de porter « une attention particulière au développement frontalier avec la Belgique. »

    Tout un secteur en danger
    C’est la Bretagne qui est particulièrement concernée par le risque économique que représente la maladie, puisque 60% de la production porcine de France viennent de cette région du pays. Si le virus devait passer la frontière, c’est toute une filière pérenne qui serait en danger. Concrètement, si un cas est détecté dans un élevage de l’Hexagone, il sera directement question d’un abattage total. Mais également d’une désinfection complète des lieux, de l’instauration d’un périmètre de sécurité, d’une maîtrise du mouvement des animaux et d’un contrôle de tout ce qui entrera et sortira de l’exploitation victime. Bref, une éradication immédiate qui représenterait une perte colossale pour tout éleveur concerné.

    #agriculture #élevage #productivisme #mondialisation #porcs #cochons #sangliers #ue #union_européenne #Bretagne #transports #camions #sanglier

    • La peste porcine s’étend rapidement dans l’est de l’Europe, plus particulièrement en #Estonie, en #Lettonie, en #Lituanie, en #Pologne, en #Tchéquie, en #Hongrie, en #Roumanie et en #Bulgarie. Sur les huit premiers mois de l’année, quelque 4800 cas ont été recensés dans l’Union européenne, 3800 sur des sangliers et 1000 foyers dans de petits élevages porcins ou des structures plus professionnelles. Le nombre de cas dépasse déjà celui de l’ensemble de l’année 2017 lorsque 4100 foyers avaient été comptabilisés. La situation en Bulgarie est particulièrement préoccupante alors que l’épidémie a aussi vu le jour en #Chine.

      https://www.rtbf.be/info/societe/detail_le-boerenbond-appelle-a-la-vigilance-face-a-la-peste-porcine-africaine?i


      Peste porcine africaine : l’inquiétude des chasseurs
      https://www.rtbf.be/info/belgique/detail_peste-porcine-africaine-l-inquietude-des-chasseurs?id=10019284

      Jeudi soir, l’Afsca annonçait la découverte dans le sud du pays de plusieurs cas de peste porcine africaine. La maladie a été détectée sur des sangliers localisés sur la commune d’Etalle. Aujourd’hui, les chasseurs s’inquiètent. Dans 3 semaines, la saison de la chasse en battue démarre et ils se demandent franchement s’ils pourront chasser.
      . . . . . .
      Des sangliers contaminés exportés par des chasseurs ?

      D’après les premiers éléments de l’Afsca, l’épidémie serait arrivée chez nous (en Belgique) par le biais d’un morceau de porc venant d’un pays touché par cette peste porcine, un pays de l’est probablement. Si l’hypothèse du déchet alimentaire est privilégiée, une autre piste est avancée. Certains pensent que des sangliers infectés pourraient avoir été importés de ces pays.

    • Des sangliers d’élevage français régulièrement abattus lors de chasses belges, affirme un chasseur Christine Borowiak - 20 Septembre 2018 - RTBF
      https://www.rtbf.be/info/regions/detail_des-sangliers-d-elevage-francais-regulierement-abattus-lors-de-chasses-b


      Ce témoignage interpellant : celui d’un chasseur belge, d’un grand chasseur, habitué autant à chasser en Afrique ou dans les pays de l’Est, que dans nos contrées. Il a choisi de nous expliquer, sous le couvert de l’anonymat par crainte de représailles, le pourquoi de la pratique d’importation de sangliers d’élevage venant de pays étrangers, alors que la peste porcine africaine est présente parmi les sangliers wallons, et que l’importation de sangliers venant de pays de l’Est est une des hypothèses de l’arrivée de la maladie.

      Les sangliers d’élevage, ce chasseur les connaît bien : “J’en ai déjà tiré plusieurs, dans les Ardennes et du côté de Chimay. Souvent, ils ont une médaille à l’oreille. Ils sont numérotés, et la médaille a une couleur différente selon le pays. Ceux que j’ai tués venaient de France. Parfois aussi, je tombe sur des sangliers non identifiables, mais on voit tout de suite de quoi il s’agit, on n’est pas fou : un sanglier qui a le poil luisant comme celui d’un chien, on ne va pas me dire qu’il s’est roulé dans les boues hein !” Il évoque aussi ce camion, qui avait amené des sangliers du côté de Janhay, dans les Ardennes : “Les bêtes avaient encore de la paille dans les onglets !”

      Encore un cochon de ferme !
      Des rencontres qui ne semblent pas déranger grand monde : “On rigole entre nous, on se dit : c’est encore un cochon de ferme !”. Et quand on lui demande ce que deviennent ces médailles, la réponse fuse : “On coupe l’oreille, ainsi ça ne se voit pas ! On en fait pas de la publicité avec un sanglier qui a de la garniture aux oreilles !”.

      Pourquoi de telles pratiques ? Pour ce chasseur, c’est clair, c’est une question d’argent et de prestige. « Ce sont des chasses d’affaire. Des endroits où on va faire passer un bon moment aux invités, des gens de “la haute”, des notables. Il faut leur faire plaisir, parce qu’après la chasse, on va parler affaires avec eux. J’ai connu des chasses où, le matin même ou la veille au soir, on remettait dans le bois quelques belles bêtes, bourrées de calmants. On les envoient vers les invités, et ceux-ci tirent un gros cochon,un deuxième gros cochon, et ils se disent : fantastique, c’est une belle chasse ici ! Et alors, ils prennent des actions. »

      1000 euros par jour de #chasse
      Des actions, c’est-à-dire des parts de droit de chasse, payer pour avoir le droit de chasser du gibier. “Ça démarre à 1000 euros par jour, et ça peut aller jusqu’à 3000 euros, quand il y a des cervidés. Vous ajoutez à cela la location. Une grosse chasse, ça peut valoir 100.000 euros par an ! Donc, il faut trouver des actionnaires qui ont des gros moyens !”.

      Et pour les appâter, il faut du gibier en nombre. "Les invités, ils vont brûler des cartouches, ils vont tirer, tirer, tirer, il faut s’amuser. Avant, lors d’une journée de chasse, on tuait 3, 4, 5 sangliers, et on était satisfait. Maintenant, on aime en tirer 40, 50 sur la journée s’il y a moyen. Les gens ne sont plus contents avec 2 bêtes. Et avec le prix qu’ils mettent par jour, il leur faut du gibier, ils paient pour avoir quelque chose. Et s’il n’y a pas assez de gibier, on va le chercher ailleurs et on le ramène ici.


  • #métaliste sur la « #nouvelle_route_des_Balkans », soit l’après-2015 (probablement à compléter) :

    1. Les nouvelles routes des Balkans... qui passent au nord (#Bulgarie, #Roumanie, #Hongrie, #Autriche) et au sud (#Grèce, #Albanie, #Monténégro, #Bosnie, #Croatie, #Slovénie, #Autriche) par rapport l’ « originale », celle de l’automne 2015 :

    2. Description de cette nouvelle route et news :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/669257

    3. #Bosnie, nouveau pays de transit (route du nord) ?
    https://seenthis.net/messages/639454
    3a. sur la fermeture des #frontières entre #Bosnie et #Croatie
    https://seenthis.net/messages/702915

    4. #Bulgarie, nouveau pays de transit (route du sud) ?
    https://seenthis.net/messages/609387
    https://seenthis.net/messages/575032
    https://seenthis.net/messages/554021

    1. sur les #morts sur cette route :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/714897
    #décès #mourir_dans_la_forteresse_europe

    #route_des_Balkans

    cc @isskein @reka


  • Nous les Tsiganes, ou les Roms comme vous dites, vous
    Catégorisations ethniques et frontières sociales en Europe
    Swanie Potot, Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2018
    http://www.pur-editions.fr/detail.php?idOuv=4594

    Présentation :

    La présence et la visibilité des « Roms » dans les villes françaises sont devenues des questions politiques de premier plan depuis une dizaine d’années. Sans bien savoir qui l’on désigne par ce terme, on leur attribue la résurrection des bidonvilles et la responsabilité de la délinquance de rue. Dans les medias comme dans les discours politiques, ces pratiques sont moins renvoyées à une pauvreté extrême qu’il conviendrait de combattre qu’à la nature même des Roms : ce seraient leurs mœurs et leurs préférences culturelles qui feraient d’eux des marginaux inassimilables.

    A partir d’un travail ethnographique auprès de migrants roumains dits roms, dans des squats et bidonvilles de la région niçoise, ainsi que d’une analyse du mouvement rom et de son histoire, l’auteure montre que la mise en exergue de l’appartenance ethnique par des acteurs aux motivations diverses tend à naturaliser et figer une frontière sociale. L’ethnicisation de ces descendants d’esclaves justifie ainsi leur traitement différentiel sur le long terme, ouvrant simultanément la voie aux discriminations positives et aux pratiques xénophobes. Empruntant à la sociologie des migrations et à celle des relations interethniques, c’est le débat entre anti-racismes universaliste et différentialiste qui compose la toile de fond de cette enquête.

    Préface de Cécile Canut.

    Sommaire :
    -Des Tsiganes aux Roms, une ascension sociale continue ?
    -Les « Roms » de Nice, au-delà de la lentille ethnique
    -Ethnicité et frontières sociales
    -La République et l’ethnie

    #Tziganes #Roms #Sociologie #Ethnographie #France #Roumanie #Migrations #Racisme #Nice #Swanie_Potot



  • Derrière le #muguet, les petites mains roumaines du #maraîchage nantais

    Contrairement aux idées reçues, de nombreux habitants des #bidonvilles de l’agglomération nantaise travaillent. Où cela ? Là où l’on veut bien d’eux et notamment chez les maraîchers, où ils sont devenus indispensables à la cueillette du muguet ou des #radis.


    https://www.mediacites.fr/nantes/enquete-nantes/2018/04/26/derriere-le-muguet-les-petites-mains-roumaines-du-maraichage-nantais
    #agriculture #migrations #travailleurs_étrangers #Roumanie #France #Nantes #Roms #travail #muguets


  • Pas assez de soutien pour transférer l’ambassade de Roumanie à Jérusalem
    FranceSoir | Publié le : Jeudi 26 Avril 2018
    http://www.francesoir.fr/actualites-monde/pas-assez-de-soutien-pour-transferer-lambassade-de-roumanie-jerusalem-pre

    La Première ministre roumaine Viorica Dancila a affirmé jeudi qu’elle souhaitait le transfert de l’ambassade de son pays à Jérusalem, mais qu’elle ne disposait pas d’assez de soutien en Roumanie pour une telle initiative.

    « Nous menons des consultations sur ce sujet avec toutes les institutions en Roumanie », a affirmé Mme Dancila lors d’une rencontre à Jérusalem avec le président israélien Reuven Rivlin.

    « C’est notre souhait (le transfert), mais malheureusement nous ne disposons pas du soutien de la part de toutes les parties comme nous le voudrions », a-t-elle déploré.

    #Roumanie


  • La misère du « made in Macédoine »

    En Macédoine, comme dans d’autres pays d’Europe de l’Est, vêtements et chaussures sont fabriqués à prix cassés. Les #conditions_de_travail y sont parfois pires qu’en Asie.


    https://lecourrier.ch/2018/04/12/la-misere-du-made-in-macedoine

    #industrie_textile #Macédoine #exploitation #esclavage_moderne #habits #vêtements #mode #travail


  • #Roumanie : Secteur agricole – Investissement allemand de 15 millions € !
    https://www.farmlandgrab.org/post/view/27845-roumanie-secteur-agricole-investissement-allemand-de-15-millions

    Un investisseur allemand Astra Holding Gmbh déjà présent en Roumanie dans des investissements financiers = Fabrique de wagons et le secteur de l’industrie textile. L’entreprise étend à nouveau son portefeuille d’investissements dans l’#agriculture avec le rachat de 2500 hectares de terre situé dans la région Olt. L’investissement est estimé entre 12 et 15 millions €. La compagnie détient au total 7000 hectares sur la même région.

    #terres


  • #The_Dead_Nation

    The Dead Nation is a documentary-essay, which shows a stunning collection of photographs from a Romanian small town in the 1930′s and 1940′s. The soundtrack, composed mostly from excerpts taken from the diary of a Jewish doctor from the same era, shows us what the photographs do not: the rising of the anti-Semitism and eventually a harrowing depiction of the Romanian Holocaust, a topic which is not very talked about in the contemporary Romanian society.

    http://www.taskovskifilms.com/?film=the-dead-nation
    ça devrait intéresser les photographes... ping @albertocampiphoto @philippe_de_jonckheere

    #photographie #Roumanie #film #cinéma #anti-sémitisme #holocauste #histoire #Radu_Jude

    Trailer :
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLTdgbLIyc4


  • Le Premier ministre roumain Mihai Tudose à propos de la minorité hongroise de son pays : « S’ils pendent leur drapeau quelque part, on les pendra juste à côté. » Un appel au lynchage lancé par un « social-démocrate » féru de « valeurs européennes ».

    Rumänien: Regierungschef Mihai Tudose hetzt gegen ungarische Minderheit - SPIEGEL ONLINE
    http://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/rumaenien-regierungschef-mihai-tudose-hetzt-gegen-ungarische-minderheit-a-11

    Auf Tudoses Drohung folgten heftige Debatten und diplomatische Spannungen - die bis heute anhalten: Rumänische Nationalisten jubeln, die Kritik an der Aussage hält sich sogar unter gemäßigten Politikern und Kommentatoren in Grenzen. Die Orbán-Regierung im benachbarten Ungarn protestiert dagegen scharf, Außenminister Péter Szijjártó bestellte den rumänischen Botschafter ein.

    Doch nur vordergründig geht es um die Minderheitenrechte, vor allem für die 1,4 Millionen Ungarn in Siebenbürgen, das bis 1918 zum ungarischen Königreich gehörte. Der Eklat ist umso bemerkenswerter, da der rumänische Staat im Zuge seiner EU-Integration eine Abkehr von der jahrzehntelangen Rumänisierungspolitik vollzogen und gesetzliche Minderheitenrechte verankert hat. Diese gehen über die Standards in vielen europäischen Ländern hinaus. So können die Ungarn etwa vom Kindergarten bis zur Universität durchgehend in Ungarisch lernen. In Gebieten mit mehr als 20 Prozent Minderheitenanteil ist deren Sprache zweite Amtssprache. Dies gilt auch für die 1,4 Millionen Ungarn in Siebenbürgen, das bis 1918 zum ungarischen Königreich gehörte.



  • On a pu filmer une visite au centre de rétention pour femmes migrantes du Palais de justice

    MIGRANTS - Des anciennes cellules reconverties en chambres, des grillages un peu partout, des barquettes repas qui ressemblent à celles d’un hôpital et la télé branchée sur BFM TV dans la salle de détente. Bienvenue dans le centre de rétention administrative (CRA) pour femmes du Palais de justice de Paris. C’est ici que sont retenues les migrantes qui n’ont pas les papiers adéquats pour résider sur le territoire français.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.fr/2017/11/20/on-a-pu-filmer-une-visite-au-centre-de-retention-pour-femmes-migrante
    #vidéo #Paris #rétention #détention_administrative #migrations #asile #réfugiés #femmes #migrants_chinois #migrants_roumains #Roumanie #Chine #CRA #ordre_public #grossesse #unité_familiale #Roms #femmes_enceintes
    cc @isskein



  • #Roumanie : les forçats du textile

    Première industrie exportatrice du pays, les quelque 7000 entreprises textiles emploient plus de 200 000 travailleurs, majoritairement des femmes.

    Si l’Asie reste compétitive en termes de coûts de production, la Roumanie jouit de deux atouts comparatifs bien plus puissants sur le marché européen : le salaire minimum s’élève à 322 euros brut et le pays est capable de produire et de livrer la marchandise en moins d’une semaine. Une économie considérable d’un point de vue logistique et salarial, une situation déplorable au niveau humain… Les ouvrières travaillent dans des conditions précaires, à l’abri de tout contrôle, la peur au ventre. Un salaire dérisoire, des cadences de travail infernales, des menaces et des insultes. Une évidente violation du droit du travail, qui se heurte pourtant à un mur de silence : la crainte de perdre son emploi…

    https://info.arte.tv/fr/roumanie-les-forcats-du-textile
    #documentaire #travail #femmes #industrie_textile #working_poor #syndicats #droits_syndicaux #mondialisation #globalisation
    #ressources_pédagogiques

    Citation :

    « La Roumanie, c’est le Bangladesh de l’Europe »


  • Le delta du #Danube, une immense « réserve de biosphère » menacée de destruction - Basta !
    https://www.bastamag.net/Le-delta-du-Danube-une-immense-reserve-de-biosphere-menacee-de-destruction

    Le plus grand delta d’Europe, riche d’une longue histoire géopolitique, abrite aussi une faune et une flore exceptionnelle, protégée par l’Unesco depuis 1991 comme « réserve internationale de biosphère ». Mais le développement rapide et mal contrôlé du tourisme, devenu l’une des seules sources de revenu local, ainsi que le spectre d’une future exploitation des hydrocarbures, font peser de gros risques sur ce milieu hautement fragile.

    #environnement #roumanie #bulgarie #biodiversité #pollution


  • #Roumanie : les #femmes fuient l’hôpital pour accoucher (illégalement) à domicile

    Pour accoucher dans un hôpital roumain, mieux vaut préparer de l’argent à distribuer aux médecins et aux infirmières, et s’attendre à subir une césarienne, comme dans 40% des cas. Ce qui incite beaucoup de mères à donner illégalement naissance à leur enfant à la maison, avec un risque accru d’accidents et de complications.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Roumanie-le-marche-noir-des-accouchements-a-domicile
    #accouchement #grossesse


  • Bruce Lee, The King Of Sewers

    In a sewer under Bucharest’s biggest train station a man covered with iron chains and tattoos sits on a matrimonial bed watching an action movie on a flat screen. Around him, the sewer is packed with men, women and children injecting themselves and sniffing glue. Their feet are drenched in the muddy hot water that floods the whole tunnel, with floating syringes and condoms.


    http://casajurnalistului.ro/bruce-lee-king-sewers
    #underground #Bucarest #Roumanie #pauvreté #drogue #souterrain #égouts #photographie
    cc @albertocampiphoto


  • Cristina’s street

    It’s a Sunday in May and parishioners of a church in central Bucharest huddle in the shadows on the sidewalks that lead them home. Some cast a fleeting glance through the bars of a rusted fence, but quickly avert their eyes with disgust. From between two thick blankets emerge a deeply scarred forearm and a half a face, wrinkled by the blanket’s folds. It’s Cristina, a girl who has spent more than half of her 31 years on the streets.


    http://casajurnalistului.ro/cristinas-street
    #Roumanie #SDF #sans-abri #amour #Bucarest