• Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • Coronavirus: Iraq’s ’Covid-19 generation’ faces forced labour, lack of school | Middle East Eye

    Yusuf, a 10-year-old Arab boy originally from Iraq’s central Salahaddin province, sells plastic bags in the centre of Sulaymaniyah.

    Yusuf is one of hundreds, if not thousands, of children working across northern Iraq’s autonomous Kurdish region to help their families - or just to survive - at a time that Iraqi government coffers have shrunk due to the crash in oil prices, an economic crisis and a pandemic that has caused mayhem around the world.

    “I never attended school [and] have been working here for more than two years,” he told Middle East Eye. “My parents were killed by the Islamic State.”

    Many Kurdish families, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and Syrian refugees are forced to take their children out of school and send them to work in dangerous conditions in order to make ends meet.

    #Covid-19#Iraq#Déplacés#Précarité#Société_civile#migrant#migration

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/coronavirus-iraq-covid-19-generation-forced-labour-education-school

  • Gaza in lockdown to contain its first COVID-19 outbreak – Middle East Monitor

    A government spokesman said the four cases were uncovered after a woman travelled to the West Bank, where she tested positive. Four members of her family then tested positive in Gaza, the first cases outside quarantined border facilities.

    Interior Ministry spokesman Eyad al-Bozom said the family had been in contact with many other people in the Maghazi refugee camp in central Gaza, and that the camp was now isolated from the rest of the 360 sq. km. territory.

    #Covid-19#Palestine#Gaza#Santé#Société_civile#migrant#migration#confinement

    https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20200825-gaza-in-lockdown-to-contain-its-first-covid-19-outbreak

  • « Des milliers d’Irakiens n’arrivent plus à manger » : en Irak, le COVID-19 a précarisé les travailleurs pauvres -Al Monitor

    En périphérie de Bagdad, de nombreux Irakiens précaires ne peuvent plus subvenir aux besoins de leur famille depuis le début du confinement décrété à la mi-mars pour lutter contre le coronavirus. Seules les actions de solidarité leur permettent de survivre.
    Dans le faubourg chiite de Sabaa Qusoor, localisé dans le nord-ouest de Bagdad, un demi-million d’Irakiens s’entassent dans des habitations de fortune faites de bâches et de parpaings. Des constructions pour la plupart illégales, bâties dans l’urgence au gré des guerres et des conjonctures économiques fluctuantes en Irak.

    Les routes en terre, les installations électriques bricolées par les habitants et les marées d’eaux usées dessinent les allées de ce territoire laissé à l’abandon par les autorités.

    #Covid-19#Iraq#Coopération#Déplacés#Précarité#ONG#Société_civile#migrant#migration

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/reportages/irak-pauvrete-coronavirus-crise-economique-solidarite

  • Women from Turkey and Syria sing together: ‘If only life would be a feast’- English Bianet

    UN Women has released a statement to mark June 20 World Refugee Day on the 10th year of the war in Syria and raised concerns over the problems faced by Syrian women in Turkey. Women sing the song “If only life would be a feast.”

    As indicated by UN Women, 2020 marks the 10th year of the crisis in Syria. On the occasion of World Refugee Day on June 20, women of Turkey and Syria have sung “If only life would be a feast” – a cherished song in Turkish celebrating life and unity in diversity.

    As women sing the song together, they call for an equal world and future. The video was prepared with the support of UN Women project partners Association for Solidarity with Asylum Seekers and Migrants (ASAM), Habitat Association and Refugee Support Center (MUDEM).

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Syrie#Femmes#Coopération#Réfugié#Libertés#activistes#Société_civile#migrant#migration

    http://bianet.org/english/women/225998-women-from-turkey-and-syria-sing-together-if-life-would-be-a-feast

  • Les réseaux sociaux russes, lanceurs d’alerte de la catastrophe de #Norilsk

    Le 3 juin, le président russe Vladimir Poutine a déclaré l’#état_d’urgence au niveau fédéral, après la fuite le 29 mai d’au moins 20 000 tonnes de #diesel dans une rivière du Grand Nord. La catastrophe a été provoquée par l’effondrement d’un réservoir de la #centrale_thermique de Norilsk, en #Sibérie orientale.

    À Vladimir Potanine, dirigeant de l’entreprise en cause Norilsk Nickel (premier producteur de nickel au monde), le chef du Kremlin a adressé les reproches suivants : « Pourquoi les agences gouvernementales n’ont-elles été mises au courant que deux jours après les faits ? Allons-nous apprendre les situations d’urgence sur les réseaux sociaux ? »

    Ce sont en effet des vidéos postées par des citoyens sur les #réseaux_sociaux qui ont alerté les autorités sur le drame. Depuis des années en Russie, ils constituent un canal de communication important pour les experts et les écologistes qui cherchent à alerter sur les #catastrophes_industrielles et les conséquences du #changement_climatique. Cela offre à la #société_civile une mine d’informations et un espace où s’expriment les critiques sur le manque d’action et d’anticipation de l’État et des entreprises face à ces situations d’urgence.

    Cette nouvelle catastrophe a suscité grâce aux réseaux une attention médiatique nouvelle, pour ces régions isolées où des drames écologiques se jouent régulièrement.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kakLGwXGzM&feature=emb_logo

    Un temps précieux perdu

    Précisons que la catastrophe du 29 mai est particulièrement préoccupante. Plus encore que le pétrole, le diesel est extrêmement toxique et les sauveteurs de #Mourmansk, spécialisés dans la #dépollution, ne sont arrivés sur place que 40 heures après la catastrophe du fait du délai entre la survenue de l’#effondrement et l’alerte. Un retard qui n’a permis de récupérer qu’une infime quantité de diesel.

    La majeure partie du carburant a coulé au fond de la rivière #Ambarnaïa et déjà atteint le #lac_Piassino. Le #carburant est en train de se dissoudre dans l’#eau ce qui rend sa collecte difficile et il n’est pas non plus envisageable de le brûler, ce qui libérerait des substances toxiques en quantité trop importante.

    L’#Arctique ne compte par ailleurs ni route ni réservoir pour collecter les #déchets. En construire près des zones polluées est impossible, la #toundra étant marécageuse et impraticable. Les sites de déversement ne sont donc atteignables que par hélicoptère et l’été dans l’Arctique étant très court, le temps presse.

    Rappelons que le #Grand_Nord fait continuellement la triste expérience de la #pollution par le #pétrole, lors de son exploitation et de son acheminement.

    Succession de catastrophes

    La région de Norilsk n’en est en effet pas à son premier #désastre_écologique. Dans cette zone industrielle, les #rivières revêtent déjà toutes les couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, non seulement à cause des #hydrocarbures mais également d’autres #activités_industrielles (rejets de #métaux_lourds et de #dioxyde_de_souffre de la #mine de #nickel et du centre industriel métallurgique).

    Convoquée à l’occasion de la fuite massive, la mémoire d’Internet met en lumière les catastrophes passées. En 2016, la rivière #Daldykan à Norilsk avait elle aussi pris un aspect rouge. Les autorités locales et fédérales et les médias locaux avaient alors gardé le silence pendant plusieurs jours. Après avoir nié l’accident, #Norilsk_Nickel avait fini par l’admettre une semaine plus tard tout en assurant que le phénomène ne présentait aucun danger pour l’#environnement. Sous la pression de la société civile locale, images à l’appui, les autorités avaient été poussées à ouvrir une enquête.

    Et il y a seulement trois mois, le 4 mars, dans la même région, près de 100 tonnes de diesel se répandaient dans les glaces de la rivière #Angara après la rupture d’un #pipeline.

    Ces catastrophes lointaines, qui surviennent dans des régions peu peuplées, n’attirent généralement pas l’attention médiatique. Celle de Norilsk, par son ampleur et sa portée internationale, suscite une prise de conscience nouvelle.

    État incapable et entreprises négligentes

    La catastrophe réveille les débats sur les réseaux sociaux russes autour de la gestion du risque environnemental et l’absence totale de responsabilisation des entreprises polluantes en Russie. Les principes de pollueur-payeur, de prévention et de précaution, si difficiles à faire appliquer en France, n’y existent tout simplement pas.

    Les monstres de l’industrie (pétrole, gaz naturel et divers métaux) échappent au contrôle de l’État. Pour preuve, les services d’inspection fédéraux n’ont même pas été admis sur place par les vigiles de Norilsk Nickel, comme l’a déploré Svetlana Radionova, la responsable du Service fédéral de contrôle des ressources naturelles et de la protection de l’environnement, le 30 mai dernier sur son compte Facebook.

    Cette fuite constitue pourtant la plus grande catastrophe environnementale qu’a connue l’Arctique. Dans cette région, la #décomposition_biologique des produits issus du pétrole est extrêmement lente et pourrait prendre au moins 10 ans. Un drame qui aura des répercussions sur les milieux arctiques, déjà très vulnérables : comme l’expliquait en 2018 la géographe Yvette Vaguet,« Les #lichens peuvent nécessiter jusqu’à 30 ans pour repousser et un saule nain peut ici être vieux d’un siècle ».

    Fonte du #permafrost et catastrophes industrielles

    Depuis des années, des chercheurs spécialistes de l’Arctique tentent d’alerter via les réseaux sociaux, faute d’une prise de conscience dans la classe politique. On ne compte plus les dommages causés par le changement climatique aux écosystèmes : les feux de forêt se multiplient, la couverture neigeuse diminue fortement et l’épaisseur de la glace dans la #mer_de_Kara rétrécit de plus en plus rapidement – elle a commencé cette année à fondre un mois plus tôt que d’habitude.

    Les régions de Russie à permafrost, cette combinaison de glace et de terre qui représente environ 60 % de la masse terrestre du pays, ne peuvent plus supporter la même charge que dans les années 1980. Or la plupart des structures construites à l’époque soviétique pour l’exploitation des ressources n’ont jamais été remplacées, alors même que le problème est connu de longue date.

    Dans la région de Norilsk, la fonte du permafrost entraîne donc l’affaissement des installations, comme l’avait déjà alerté un rapport du ministère des Ressources naturelles et de l’Environnement, publié en 2018. La catastrophe du 29 mai en est la conséquence directe, provoquée par l’effondrement d’un des piliers du réservoir que la compagnie n’avait jamais remplacé depuis 1985.

    La #faune et la #flore du Grand Nord menacées

    Parmi les avertissements adressés par les chercheurs sur les réseaux sociaux, une préoccupation revient régulièrement, celle des effets du changement climatique et des activités humaines sur la faune et la flore du Grand Nord.

    La région de #Taimyr, dont Norilsk est la capitale, a déjà déploré la disparition d’un emblématique renne sauvage : en l’espace de 15 ans, 40 % des animaux du plus grand troupeau sauvage de rennes au monde ont disparu.

    En cette période de crue printanière, le diesel répandu par la catastrophe va imprégner tous les pâturages de #cerfs de la plaine inondable. Or la #chasse – au #cerf notamment – constitue avec la #pêche le principal moyen de subsistance des peuples indigènes de Taimyr. Sur les sites et les pages Internet où échangent ces populations, l’inquiétude est palpable. Gennady Shchukin, chef de la communauté #Dolgan, militant et adjoint du conseil de district #Dolgano-Nenets, a d’ailleurs publié sur les réseaux sociaux une lettre adressée au président Poutine et à différents hauts fonctionnaires pour réclamer une enquête publique et transparente et faire part de sa préoccupation.

    « Les cerfs ne survivront pas lorsqu’ils traverseront la rivière. Le diesel se déposera sur le corps de l’animal. Il ne survivra pas à l’hiver. L’animal ne pourra pas se débarrasser de ce film, et il ne pourra pas se réchauffer. Nous ne pourrons pas non plus vendre cette viande car elle aura une odeur de diesel. Les cerfs mourront et se décomposeront dans cette mer de diesel, dans la toundra. Le même sort attend les oiseaux et les poissons de l’Arctique. »

    Une autre voix, celle d’Alexander Kolotov, président de l’ONG écologiste Plotina.Net, résume ainsi la situation.

    « Je pense qu’un déversement de diesel de cette ampleur montre que nous ne disposons pas actuellement de technologies suffisamment sophistiquées pour faire face à des catastrophes d’une telle ampleur. Et cela soulève la question suivante : dans quelle mesure devrions-nous continuer à envahir et vouloir dompter l’Arctique, si nous ne pouvons faire face à la catastrophe ? »

    Sur l’Internet russe, des informations circulent, des alertes sont lancées, des critiques sont adressées. On y découvre effectivement les situations d’urgence… mais aussi l’histoire des catastrophes industrielles d’une région, leurs effets à long terme et l’incurie de l’État en la matière.

    https://theconversation.com/les-reseaux-sociaux-russes-lanceurs-dalerte-de-la-catastrophe-de-no
    #peuples_autochtones

  • 16 coronavirus cases registered, lockdown imposed on Ras al-Ma’ara town, Damascus Countryside - Sana

    The Ministry added that a lockdown was imposed on Ras al-Ma’ara town to prevent the outbreak of the virus and to maintain the public health the safety of citizens.

    #Covid-19#Syrie#Société_civile#Secondevague#Quarantaine#Pandémie#Migrant#Migration

    https://sana.sy/en/?p=193566

  • Éloignement forcé des #étrangers : d’autres solutions justes et durables sont possibles

    Il y a deux ans, en 2018, l’ « #affaire_des_Soudanais » entraînait la mise en place d’une Commission chargée de l’évaluation de la #politique_du_retour_volontaire et de l’#éloignement_forcé d’étrangers de la #Belgique (ou #Commission_Bossuyt du nom de son président). Alors que le rapport final de la Commission Bossuyt est attendu pour l’été 2020, un regroupement d’associations, dont le CNCD-11.11.11 , publie aujourd’hui un rapport alternatif proposant une gestion différente de la politique actuelle, essentiellement basée sur l’éloignement forcé.

    Les faiblesses et limites de la Commission Bossuyt

    La Commission Bossuyt a été mise en place en réponse aux nombreuses critiques dont la politique de retour de la Belgique a fait l’objet à la suite de ladite « affaire des Soudanais » [1], à savoir la collaboration engagée avec le régime soudanais pour identifier et rapatrier une série de personnes vers ce pays sans avoir dûment vérifié qu’elles ne couraient aucun risque de torture ou de traitement dégradant, comme le prévoit l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH). Cette commission fait suite aux Commissions Vermeersh 1 et 2, mises en place vingt ans plus tôt, suite au décès tragique de la jeune nigériane Semira Adamu le 22 septembre 1998 lors d’une expulsion forcée depuis la Belgique.

    L’objectif de cette commission temporaire est d’évaluer le volet retour de la politique migratoire belge et d’émettre des recommandations à destination des responsables politiques en vue d’améliorer cette politique. Plusieurs faiblesses sont cependant manifestes : son mandat ne s’inscrit pas dans une approche holistique de la migration, les indicateurs de résultats n’ont pas été établis en amont du processus d’évaluation, les membres de la commission proviennent uniquement des administrations et du personnel exécutant la politique de retour. Le centre interfédéral Myria, qui a fait une analyse approfondie du rapport intermédiaire [2], déclare que la Commission Bossuyt est caractérisée par l’opacité de sa méthodologie, le manque d’indépendance de ses évaluateurs et la faible qualité de ses recommandations.
    Le rapport intermédiaire Bossuyt pointe l’inefficacité de la politique belge d’éloignement

    Lors de la présentation du rapport intermédiaire de la Commission Bossuyt, son président a salué les mesures édictées et partiellement mise en place depuis les Commissions Vermeersch, mais il a également déploré l’échec de la politique de retour de la Belgique. Les « chiffres » de retour sont en baisse malgré les moyens consacrés aux nombreuses arrestations et à la détention.

    Cette inefficacité est également constatée par d’autres acteurs, mais pour bien d’autres raisons. En effet, d’une part, comme l’acte Myria [3], « depuis 2016, on constate une diminution constante du nombre de rapatriements et de retours volontaires assistés, malgré l’augmentation du nombre d’arrestations administratives d’étrangers et du nombre de premières détentions en centre fermé ». D’autre part, comme le dénonce le Ciré [4], « la politique d’éloignement de la Belgique est avant tout symbolique mais elle est totalement inefficace et coûteuse. Elle est un non-sens au niveau financier mais aussi et avant tout au niveau des droits humains. Les alternatives à la détention sont 17% moins onéreuses que la politique de détention mais encore faut-il que celles-ci soient de véritables alternatives. Il faut pour cela obligatoirement changer de paradigme et mettre les besoins des personnes au centre de nos politiques migratoires ».

    Actuellement, la politique migratoire belge se focalise essentiellement sur l’augmentation des chiffres de retour plutôt que d’investir dans la recherche de solutions durables et profitables pour les personnes migrantes, les pays et sociétés d’accueil, de transit et d’origine. Cette obsession du retour entraîne une augmentation de la détention et des violences [5] qui lui sont intrinsèquement associées.

    Ainsi, les chiffres récemment demandés par le service d’information de la VRT à l’Office des étrangers montrent qu’en 2018, 33 386 personnes se sont vu notifier un ordre de quitter le territoire. Or, à peine 7 399 personnes ont effectivement quitté le territoire en 2018 [6], ce qui démontre l’inefficacité de cette politique actuelle.
    « Au-delà du retour » : un rapport de la société civile axé sur les alternatives

    A la veille de la publication du rapport final de la Commission Bossuyt, un collectif rassemblant des ONG, des syndicats, des chercheurs et chercheuses du monde académique, femmes et hommes du secteur de la Justice, a souhaité démontrer qu’une autre politique migratoire, notamment en matière d’éloignement, est à la fois nécessaire et réaliste. Le contenu de ce rapport, nommé « Au-delà du retour » , est basé sur celui d’un colloque organisé fin 2019 et centré sur deux dimensions : les alternatives à la détention et le respect des droits humains.

    Alternatives à la détention

    Comme le recommandait la campagne pour la justice migratoire coordonnée par le CNCD-11.11.11 de 2017 à 2019, la première recommandation du rapport porte sur la nécessité de sortir d’une vision focalisée sur la criminalisation du séjour irrégulier et le contrôle en vue du retour. Ce prisme négatif à travers lequel est pensée la politique migratoire actuelle entraine des violations des droits fondamentaux, est coûteux et inefficace au regard de ses propres objectifs (retour et éloignement effectif).

    La politique migratoire doit être basée sur un accueil solidaire, un accompagnement personnalisé basé sur l’empowerment et la recherche de solutions durables pour chaque personne.

    Des alternatives existent, comme le montre l’exemple de la ville d’Utrecht, aux Pays-Bas, détaillé dans le rapport. Grâce à un accueil accessible 24h/24, dans un climat de confiance et collaboratif, les personnes migrantes sont accompagnées de façon intensive tout au long du processus d’analyse de leur statut. Les résultats des 18 dernières années à Utrecht indiquent que 60 % des personnes obtiennent un titre de séjour légal, 20 % retournent dans leur pays d’origine, 13 % retournent dans un lieu d’accueil de demandeurs d’asile en vue d’un nouvel examen de leur dossier et 7 % disparaissent des radars. Depuis 2018, le projet pilote s’est étendu à cinq autres villes des Pays-Bas. Comme le montre cet exemple, la régularisation fait donc partie de la panoplie des outils en faveur de solutions durables.

    "La régularisation fait donc partie de la panoplie des outils en faveur de solutions durables"

    La seconde recommandation du rapport est d’investir dans les alternatives à la détention, comme le recommande le Pacte mondial sur les migrations adopté par la Belgique en décembre 2018, qui insiste sur la nécessité de ne détenir les personnes exilées qu’en tout dernier recours. La détention n’est en effet ni efficace, ni durable. Elle est extrêmement coûteuse en termes financiers et peut causer des dégâts psychologiques, en particulier chez les enfants. En Belgique, le budget consacré aux éloignements forcés a pourtant largement augmenté ces dernières années : de 63 millions € en 2014 à 88,4 millions en 2018 ; ce qui représente une augmentation de 40,3 % en cinq ans [7].
    Respect des droits humains et transparence

    L’ « affaire des Soudanais » et l’enquête de Mediapart sur le sort de Soudanais dans d’autres pays européens ont dévoilé qu’un examen minutieux du risque de mauvais traitement est essentiel tout au long du processus d’éloignement (arrestation, détention, expulsion). En effet, comme le proclame l’article 8 de la CEDH, toute personne à la droit au respect « de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondance ». Quant à l’article 3, il stipule que « Nul ne peut être soumis à la torture ni à des peines ou traitements inhumains ou dégradants ». Cette disposition implique l’interdiction absolue de renvoyer un étranger vers un pays où il existe un risque réel qu’il y subisse un tel traitement (principe de non-refoulement [8]) ou une atteinte à sa vie.

    Lorsqu’une personne allègue un risque de mauvais traitement ou que ce risque découle manifestement de la situation dans le pays de renvoi, la loi impose un examen individuel minutieux de ce risque par une autorité disposant des compétences et des ressources nécessaires. Une équipe spécialisée doit examiner la bonne application du principe de non-refoulement. Cette obligation incombe aux autorités qui adoptent une décision d’éloignement et ce indépendamment d’une demande de protection internationale [9].

    La détention, le retour forcé et l’éloignement des étrangers sont des moments du parcours migratoire qui posent des enjeux importants en termes de droits fondamentaux. C’est pourquoi des données complètes doivent être disponibles. Ceci nécessite la publication régulière de statistiques complètes, lisibles et accessibles librement, ainsi qu’une présentation annuelle devant le parlement fédéral.

    Cette question du respect des droits humains dépasse le cadre belge. Depuis plusieurs années , l’Union européenne (UE) multiplie en effet les accords d’externalisation de la gestion de ses frontières. La politique d’externalisation consiste à déléguer à des pays tiers une part de la responsabilité de la gestion des questions migratoires. L’externalisation poursuit deux objectifs principaux : réduire en amont la mobilité des personnes migrantes vers l’UE et augmenter le nombre de retours. La Belgique s’inscrit, comme la plupart des Etats membres, dans cette approche. Or, comme le met en évidence le rapport, les accords internationaux signés dans le cadre de cette politique manquent singulièrement de transparence.

    C’est le cas par exemple de la coopération bilatérale engagée entre la Belgique et la Guinée.
    Malgré les demandes des associations actives sur les questions migratoires, le mémorandum d’entente signé en 2008 entre la Belgique et la Guinée n’est pas public. Ce texte, encore d’application aujourd’hui, régit pourtant la coopération entre la Belgique et la Guinée en matière de retour. L’Etat belge refuse la publication du document au nom de la protection des relations internationales de la Belgique, invoquant aussi le risque de menaces contre l’intégrité physique des membres du corps diplomatique et la nécessité d’obtenir l’accord du pays partenaire pour publier le document.

    Enfin, et c’est essentiel, une des recommandations prioritaires du rapport « Au-delà du retour » est de mettre en place une collaboration structurelle entre l’Etat et la société civile autour des questions migratoires, et plus précisément la question de l’éloignement et du retour. Dans ce cadre, la mise en place d’une commission permanente et indépendante d’évaluation de la politique de retour de la Belgique incluant des responsables de la société civile est une nécessité.
    Le temps des choix

    « Le temps est venu de faire les bons choix et de ne pas se tromper d’orientation ». Tel était le message de Kadri Soova, Directrice adjointe de PICUM (Platform for international cooperation on undocumented migrants) lors de son intervention au colloque. Combien d’affaires sordides faudra-t-il encore pour que la Belgique réoriente sa politique migratoire, afin qu’elle soit mise au service de la justice migratoire ? Combien de violences, de décès, de potentiels gâchés, de rêves brisés pour satisfaire les appétits électoralistes de certains décideurs politiques ? Comme le démontre le rapport, si les propositions constructives sont bel et bien là, la volonté politique manque.
    Il est donc grand temps de repenser en profondeur les politiques migratoires. A ce titre, le modèle de la justice migratoire, fondé sur le respect des droits fondamentaux, l’égalité et la solidarité, devrait constituer une réelle base de travail. La justice migratoire passe d’abord par des partenariats pour le développement durable, afin que tout être humain puisse vivre dignement là où il est né, mais aussi par l’ouverture de voies sûres et légales de migrations, ainsi que par des politiques d’intégration sociale et de lutte contre les discriminations dans les pays d’accueil, afin de rendre les politiques migratoires cohérentes avec les Objectifs de développement durable.
    La publication prochaine du rapport définitif de la Commission Bossuyt doit être l’occasion d’ouvrir un débat serein sur la politique migratoire de la Belgique, en dialogue avec les organisations spécialisées sur la question. La publication d’un rapport alternatif par ces dernières constitue un appel à l’ouverture de ce débat.

    https://www.cncd.be/Eloignement-force-des-etrangers

    –---

    Pour télécharger le rapport :

    Rapport « Au-delà du retour » 2020. À la recherche d’une politique digne et durable pour les personnes migrantes en séjour précaire ou irrégulier


    https://www.cncd.be/Rapport-Au-dela-du-retour-2020

    #renvois #expulsions #renvois_forcés #migrations #alternative #retour_volontaire #justice_migratoire #rapport #régularisation #Soudan #inefficacité #efficacité #asile #déboutés #sans-papiers #alternatives #rétention #détention_administrative #transparence #droits_humains #mauvais_traitements #société_civile #politique_migratoire

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

  • After Missteps, Turkey Tames Coronavirus - Voice of America
    President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced Tuesday the lifting of stay-at-home orders for people over 65, as well as for children, part of a further easing of restrictions imposed to curb the spread of the new coronavirus.

    Turkey lifted restrictions on intercity travel and allowed restaurants, cafes, parks and sports facilities to reopen on June 1 after a big reduction in new cases. However, case numbers are still rising in southeast Turkey.

    The government has been lauding its anti-coronavirus strategy — amplified by a pro-Erdogan press. Last month, Fahrettin Altun, the president’s spokesman, tweeted: “Turkey under Recep Tayyip Erdogan invested billions in health care infrastructure, let top scientists devise a strategy and treated all COVID-19 patients for free. The result? Our recovery rate is almost 75 percent. The pandemic has been contained. #MissionAccomplished.”

    #Covid-19#turquie#Déconfinement#Société_civile#économie#transport#réfugiés#migrant#migration

    https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/after-missteps-turkey-tames-coronavirus

  • Syrian civilians prepare for a new battle with invisible foe: coronavirus - PBS

    But, as is the case for so many in Syria, a gesture of humanity from those who’ve experienced inhumanity has now been defaced.

    Three hundred miles away, in Kurdish-controlled Northeast Syria, more than 100,000 people live in the Al Hol camp.

    Health care workers do their best to sanitize this medical tent and teach proper handwashing. There’s not enough testing to know whether COVID cases are low. But here in the Northeast, at least the Kurdish Red Crescent can create a medical facility without fear of attack.

    #Covid-19#Syrie#Société_civile#Pandémie#Migrant#Migration

    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/syrian-civilians-prepare-for-a-new-battle-with-invisible-foe-coronavirus

  • À Gaza, le coronavirus a un effet accélérateur sur les mariages - L’Orient le jour
    Dans l’enclave palestinienne, les jeunes couples doivent souvent emprunter de l’argent pour pouvoir organiser le mariage de leurs rêves, au risque de ne pas pouvoir rembourser leurs dettes. Les restrictions imposées pour endiguer toute propagation du coronavirus ont paradoxalement poussé de nombreux couples à précipiter la tenue de leurs noces pour organiser de petites cérémonies à domicile et ainsi économiser des milliers de dollars.

    #Covid-19#Moyen-Orient#Gaza#Mariage#Société_civile#Culture#migrant#migration

    https://www.lorientlejour.com/article/1219858/a-gaza-le-coronavirus-a-un-effet-accelerateur-sur-les-mariages.html

  • Coronavirus: Single-use prayer rugs produced in Turkey help protect from infection - Middle East Eye VIDEO

    A manufacturing company in Turkey is producing single-use prayer rugs to protect worshippers from Covid-19, as mosques across the Middle East gradually start to reopen

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Religion#Société_civile#Islam#Prières#Initiatives#migrant#migration

    https://youtu.be/0DCZ_1rMko4


    https://www.middleeasteye.net/video/coronavirus-single-use-prayer-rugs-produced-turkey-protect-infection

  • Olympic Refuge Foundations launches initiatives to help refugees amid coronavirus crisis- InfoMigrants
    Sports can help refugees and displaced people cope with the coronavirus pandemic, the Olympic Refuge Foundation (ORF) and UN refugee agency UNHCR have said in a joint statement. They announced the launch of several new sports initiatives, aimed at helping young people.
    Thomas Bach, the chair of the ORF and the President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, said they are worried about the growing impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of refugees and others uprooted by war, violence and persecution in the statement published on Tuesday.

    #Covid-19#Sport#Société_civile#Jeux_olympiques#migrant#migration

    https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/24894/olympic-refuge-foundations-launches-initiatives-to-help-refugees-amid-

  • Coronavirus: Under lockdown, Iranians turn to Instagram for taboo-breaking content -Middle East Eye

    As Iranians have spent much of the past three months under lockdown in the Middle Eastern country worst hit by the coronavirus, many have, like elsewhere in the world, turned to the internet to find distractions from the pandemic.

    Livestreams on Instagram - one of the few available social networks in the country - have become more and more popular, as Iranian celebrities have used them to attract more followers in various ways.

    But these live videos have brought about an unexpected social dilemma in the Islamic republic, as their often explicit content has clashed with government-mandated modesty and social taboos.

    #Covid-19#Iran#confinement#Société_civile#Réseaux_sociaux#migrant#migration

  • Syrian government lifts nightly curfew despite uptick in coronavirus cases - Al Monitor

    The Syrian government will do away with the overnight curfew imposed in March despite a surge in reported cases of the coronavirus.

    The Syrian Ministry of Health today announced 15 new COVID-19 cases in areas under government control, bringing the total number of cases to 121 and a death toll of four. All of the new cases were among Syrians returning from abroad, including nine from Kuwait. Experts have questioned the regime’s relatively low numbers, but Damascus has denied all charges of a cover-up.

    #Covid-19#Syrie#Zone_régime#Idlib#Rojava#Déconfinement#Société_civile

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/05/syria-coronavirus-curfew-uptick-cases-damascus-idlib.html

  • Palestinian Americans help feed the poor in New Jersey - Middle East Eye
    During lockdown, volunteers from New Jersey’s Palestinian community are helping feed the poor, with more than 400 families benefitting from this generosity.

    #Covid-19#USA#Palestinien#Société_civile#Diaspora#Santé#Initiative#Pandémie#migrant#migration

    https://youtu.be/8wtlLzdhgNo


    https://www.middleeasteye.net/video/palestinian-americans-help-feed-poor-new-jersey

  • Palestinians in the Jordan Valley face threat of displacement amid annexation push - Middle East Eye Video

    “The only thing left is to hang us.” Rafi Faqha, a Palestinian who lived through the Nakba and Naksa, faces the threat of displacement from the Jordan Valley under Israel’s annexation plans

    https://youtu.be/ZPau-l89DMs


    https://www.middleeasteye.net/video/palestinians-jordan-valley-face-threat-displacement-amid-annexation-p

    #Covid-19#Israël#Palestine#Cisjordanie#Colonie#Société_civile#Pandémie#migrant#migration#VIDEO

  • Iraqi doctor’s fight with virus lays bare a battered system -AP news

    Dr. Marwa al-Khafaji’s homecoming after 20 days in a hospital isolation ward was met by spite. Someone had barricaded her family home’s gate with a concrete block.

    The message from the neighbors was clear: She had survived coronavirus, but the stigma surrounding the disease would be a more pernicious fight.

    #Covid-19#Iraq#Société_civile#Hopital#Santé#Discrimination#Religion#Femme#migrant#migration

    https://apnews.com/f31c3ad6bce851aa143425bc93d32e84

  • May 19 Youth and Sports Day Observed Amid Coronavirus Measures- English Bianet

    Today is May 19, the Commemoration of Atatürk, Youth and Sports Day in Turkey. Observed as a national holiday and with the curfew in force in 15 major cities of Turkey as part of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) measures, the day has been celebrated with social distancing and masks.

    On the occasion of May 19, Minister of Youth and Sports Mehmet Muharrem Kasapoğlu attended the ceremony held in Mustafa Kemal Atatürk’s Monumental Tomb in the capital city of Ankara earlier today.

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Fête_nationale#Société_civile#Culture #Pandémie#migrant#migration

    http://bianet.org/english/other/224502-may-19-youth-and-sports-day-observed-amid-coronavirus-measures

  • Malls reopen, antivirus measures eased as Turkish economy teeters - Al Monitor
    Wearing face masks and standing meters apart, Istanbul residents lined up outside reopened shopping malls Monday as urban areas across Turkey began to ease coronavirus measures in a cautious effort to resume normalcy as new infections continue to decline in the country.

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Déconfinement#Société_civile#Pandémie#migrant#migration

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/05/turkey-malls-reopen-coronavirus.html

  • ‘If Seasonal Agricultural Workers Cannot Find a Job, Child Labor will Increase’ - Bianet English
    With the support of International Labor Organization (ILO), the Development Workshop has prepared a report regarding the potential impacts of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on mobile agricultural workers and their children as well as on the plant production in Turkey.

    The measures that need to be taken to prevent the spread of the disease and to protect the health of seasonal mobile agricultural workers increase the costs. Workers and farmers do not seem likely to afford them. However, there are no accepted offers for alternatives, either. Thus, it is safe to say that seasonal mobile agricultural workers, whose working conditions were already very difficult and wages meagre, will now have difficulties in even finding these jobs during the outbreak and when they do, they will earn less.

    These circumstances might mean that some workers will not participate in seasonal plant agriculture, which will mean an additional poverty for the ones who do not participate in work.

    #Covid-19#Turquie#Saisonniers#Agriculture#Société_civile#Pauvreté#Pandémie#migrant#migration

    http://bianet.org/english/human-rights/223919-if-seasonal-agricultural-workers-cannot-find-a-job-child-labor-will-i

  • Palestinian woman leads fight against coronavirus, while others fall victim to domestic violence - Al Monitor
    Women are taking the lead in the fight against the COVID-19 outbreak in the Palestinian territories, while at the same the virus has brought more violence and suffering to some women.
    #Covid-19#Palestine#Violences#Femmes#Discrimination#Coopération#Féminicide#Libertés#activistes#Société_civile#migrant#migration

    https://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2020/04/palestinian-women-fight-coronavirus-domestic-violence.html