• Pour que le Briançonnais reste un territoire solidaire avec les exilés - Libération
    https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/09/21/pour-que-le-brianconnais-reste-un-territoire-solidaire-avec-les-exiles_18

    fermeture du « Refuge solidaire » et du local des maraudeurs ou comment le nouveau maire de Briançon, Arnaud Murgia, prépare les drames de cet hiver...
    La pétition : https://www.change.org/p/pour-que-le-brian%C3%A7onnais-reste-un-territoire-solidaire-avec-les-exil%C3

    #Briançon #migrants #migrations #refuge_solidaire #ville-refuge #solidarité #asile

  • Greece files against 33 NGO members for assisting human traffickers

    Greek authorities have prepared a case file against 33 foreign nationals, members of four non-governmental organizations dealing with refugee issues on the island of Lesvos. The case file against the specific NGOs reportedly includes the offenses of forming and joining a criminal organization, espionage, violation of state secrets, as well as viol

    The case file reportedly includes the offenses of forming and joining a criminal organization, espionage, violation of state secrets, as well as violations of the Immigration Code against a total of 35 foreigners.

    Thirty-three of them are members of four non-governmental organisations (NGOs) whose names have not been disclosed, while two are third-country nationals working on migration issues.

    The NGOs have reportedly their headquarters abroad.

    Their action is estimated to date from the beginning of last June and consisted, according to the indictment, of providing substantial assistance to organized illegal migrant trafficking networks.

    Citing a press release by the Lesvos Police directorate, local news website stonisi, writes that “under the pretext of humanitarian action, those involved provided refugees in Turkey information about landing coordinates and weather conditions via closed groups and internet applications.”

    The information included:

    – gathering places on the Turkish coast and departure time for voyage to Lesvos.
    - coordinates (longitude and latitude) of specific refugee flows and their direction at a specific time and place
    - number of third-country nationals onboard of boats and the prevailing situation during the voyage
    - final destination (landing place on the coast),
    – details for the accommodation at Moria refugees center on Lesvos.”

    The Police announcement said also that “in addition, through the extensive use of a specific telephone connection application, related to the activation of rescue operations, they hampered the operational work of the Greek Coast Guard vessels, at a time when migratory flows were evolving.”

    The network was involved in at least 32 cases of refugees and migrants transfer.

    The investigation continues “in order to determine the full extent of the illegal activity of the criminal organization and its connections.

    The investigation was carried out in collaboration with the National Intelligence Service, with the assistance of the Counter-Terrorism Service as well as the Directorates for Information Management and Analysis, Attica Aliens Dept and Crime Department.

    https://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2020/09/28/greece-ngo-members-human-traffickers-lesvos-turkey
    #criminalisation #ONG #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #solidarité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Lesbos #Grèce

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • The Frontier Within: The European Border Regime in the Balkans

    In the summer of 2015, the migratory route across the Balkans »entered into the European spotlight, and indeed onto the screen of the global public« (Kasparek 2016: 2), triggering different interpretations and responses. Contrary to the widespread framing of the mass movement of people seeking refuge in Europe as ›crisis‹ and ›emergency‹ of unseen proportions, we opt for the perspective of »the long Summer of Migration« (Kasparek/Speer 2015) and an interpretation that regards it as »a historic and monumental year of migration for Europe precisely because disobedient mass mobilities have disrupted the European regime of border control« (Stierl/Heller/de Genova 2016: 23). In reaction to the disobedient mass mobilities of people, a state-tolerated and even state-organized transit of people, a »formalized corridor« (Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016), was gradually established. To avoid the concentration of unwanted migrants on their territory, countries along the route—sometimes in consultation with their neighboring countries and EU member states, sometimes simply by creating facts—strived to regain control over the movements by channeling and isolating them by means of the corridor (see e.g. Hameršak/Pleše 2018; Speer 2017; Tošić 2017). »Migrants didn’t travel the route any more: they were hurriedly channeled along, no longer having the power to either determine their own movement or their own speed« (Kasparek 2016). The corridor, at the same time, facilitated and tamed the movement of people. In comparison to the situation in Serbia, where migrants were loosely directed to follow the path of the corridor (see e.g. Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016; Greenberg/Spasić 2017; Kasparek 2016: 6), migrants in other states like North Macedonia, Croatia, and Slovenia were literally in the corridor’s power, i.e. forced to follow the corridor (see Hameršak/Pleše 2018; Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016; Chudoska Blazhevska/Flores Juberías 2016: 231–232; Kogovšek Šalamon 2016: 44–47; Petrović 2018). The corridor was operative in different and constantly changing modalities until March 2016. Since then, migration through the Balkan region still takes place, with migrants struggling on a daily basis with the diverse means of tightened border controls that all states along the Balkan route have been practicing since.

    This movements issue wants to look back on these events in an attempt to analytically make sense of them and to reflect on the historical rupture of the months of 2015 and 2016. At the same time, it tries to analyze the ongoing developments of bordering policies and the struggles of migration. It assembles a broad range of articles reaching from analytical or research based papers shedding light on various regional settings and topics, such as the massive involvement of humanitarian actors or the role of camp infrastructures, to more activist-led articles reflecting on the different phases and settings of pro-migrant struggles and transnational solidarity practices. In an attempt to better understand the post-2015 border regime, the issue furthermore presents analyses of varying political technologies of bordering that evolved along the route in response to the mass mobilities of 2015/2016. It especially focuses on the excessive use of different dimensions of violence that seem to characterize the new modalities of the border regime, such as the omnipresent practice of push-backs. Moreover, the articles shed light on the ongoing struggles of transit mobility and (transnational) solidarity that are specifically shaped by the more than eventful history of the region molded both by centuries of violent interventions and a history of connectivity.

    Our transnational editorial group came together in the course of a summer school on the border regime in the Balkans held in Belgrade, Serbia, in 2018. It was organized by the Network for Critical Migration and Border Regime Studies (kritnet), University of Göttingen, Department of Cultural Anthropology/European Ethnology (Germany), the Research Centre of the Academy of Sciences and Arts (Slovenia), the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research (Croatia), and the Institute of Ethnography SASA (Serbia). The summer school assembled engaged academics from all over the region that were involved, in one form or another, in migration struggles along the route in recent years.1 The few days of exchange proved to be an exciting and fruitful gathering of critical migration and border regime scholars and activists from different regional and disciplinary backgrounds of the wider Balkans. Therefore, we decided to produce this movements issue by inviting scholars and activists from the region or with a deep knowledge on, and experience with, regional histories and politics in order to share their analyses of the Balkan route, the formalized corridor, and the developments thereafter. These developments have left a deep imprint on the societies and regional politics of migration, but they are very rarely taken into consideration and studied in the West as the centuries long entanglements that connect the Balkan with the rest of Europe.

    In this editorial, we will outline the transnational mobility practices in the Balkans in a historical perspective that includes the framework of EU-Balkan relations. With this exercise we try to historize the events of 2015 which are portrayed in many academic as well as public accounts as ›unexpected‹ and ›new‹. We also intend to write against the emergency and escalation narrative underlying most public discourses on the Balkans and migration routes today, which is often embedded in old cultural stereotypes about the region. We, furthermore, write against the emergency narrative because it erodes the agency of migration that has not only connected the region with the rest of the globe but is also constantly reinventing new paths for reaching better lives. Not only the history of mobilities, migrations, and flight connecting the region with the rest of Europe and the Middle East can be traced back into the past, but also the history of political interventions and attempts to control these migrations and mobilities by western European states. Especially the EU accession processes produce contexts that made it possible to gradually integrate the (Western) Balkan states into the rationale of EU migration management, thus, setting the ground for today’s border and migration regime. However, as we will show in the following sections, we also argue against simplified understandings of the EU border regime that regard its externalization policy as an imperial top-down act. Rather, with a postcolonial perspective that calls for decentering western knowledge, we will also shed light on the agency of the national governments of the region and their own national(ist) agendas.
    The Formalized Corridor

    As outlined above, the formalized corridor of 2015 reached from Greece to Northern and Central Europe, leading across the states established in the 1990s during the violent breakdown of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and, today, are additionally stratified vis-à-vis the EU. Slovenia and Croatia are EU member states, while the others are still in the accession process. The candidate states Serbia, North Macedonia and Montenegro have opened the negotiation process. Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo—still not recognized as a sovereign state by Serbia and some EU member states—have the status of potential candidates. However, in 2015 and 2016, the states along the corridor efficiently collaborated for months on a daily basis, while, at the same time, fostering separate, sometimes conflicting, migration politics. Slovenia, for example, raised a razor-wire fence along the border to Croatia, while Croatia externalized its border to Serbia with a bilateral agreement (Protokol) in 2015 which stated that the »Croatian Party« may send a »train composition with its crew to the railway station in Šid [in Serbia], with a sufficient number of police officers of the Republic of Croatia as escort« (Article 3 Paragraph 2).

    Despite ruptures and disputes, states nevertheless organized transit in the form of corridor consisting of trains, buses, and masses of walking people that were guarded and directed by the police who forced people on the move to follow the corridor’s direction and speed. The way the movements were speedily channeled in some countries came at the cost of depriving people of their liberty and freedom of movement, which calls for an understanding of the corridor as a specific form of detention: a mobile detention, ineligible to national or EU legislation (see Hameršak/Pleše 2018; Kogovšek Šalamon 2016: 44–47). In the context of the corridor, camps became convergence points for the heterogeneous pathways of movements. Nevertheless, having in mind both the proclaimed humanitarian purpose of the corridor, and the monumental numbers of people to whom the corridor enabled and facilitated movement, the corridor can be designated as an unprecedented formation in recent EU history. In other words: »The corridor – with all its restrictions – remains a historical event initiated by the movement of people, which enabled thousands to reach central Europe in a relatively quick and safe manner. […] But at the same time it remained inscribed within a violent migration management system« (Santer/Wriedt 2017: 148).

    For some time, a broad consensus can be observed within migration and border studies and among policy makers that understands migration control as much more than simply protecting a concrete borderline. Instead, concepts such as migration management (Oelgemoller 2017; Geiger/Pécoud 2010) and border externalization (as specifically spelled out in the EU document Global Approach to Migration of 2005) have become increasingly important. In a spatial sense, what many of them have in common is, first, that they assume an involvement of neighboring states to govern migration in line with EU migration policies. Second, it is often stated that this leads to the creation of different zones encircling the European Union (Andreas/Snyder 2000). Maribel Casas-Cortes and Sebastian Cobarrubias, for instance, speak of four such zones: the first zone is »formed by EU member states, capable of fulfilling Schengen standards«, the second zone »consists of transit countries« (Casas-Cortes/Cobarrubias 2019), the third zone is characterized by countries such as Turkey, which are depicted by emigration as well as transit, and the fourth zone are countries of origin. While Casas-Cortes and Cobarrubias rightly criticize the static and eurocentric perspective of such conceptualizations, they nevertheless point to the unique nature of the formalized corridor because it crisscrossed the above mentioned zones of mobility control in an unprecedented way.

    Furthermore, the corridor through the Balkans can be conceived as a special type of transnational, internalized border. The internalized European borders manifest themselves to a great extent in a punctiform (see Rahola 2011: 96–97). They are not only activated in formal settings of border-crossings, police stations, or detention centers both at state borders and deep within state territories, but also in informal settings of hospitals, hostels, in the streets, or when someone’s legal status is taken as a basis for denying access to rights and services (i.e. to obtain medical aid, accommodation, ride) (Guild 2001; Stojić Mitrović/Meh 2015). With the Balkan corridor, this punctiform of movement control was, for a short period, fused into a linear one (Hameršak/Pleše 2018).

    The rules of the corridor and its pathways were established by formal and informal agreements between the police and other state authorities, and the corridor itself was facilitated by governmental, humanitarian, and other institutions and agencies. Cooperation between the countries along the route was fostered by representatives of EU institutions and EU member states. It would be too simple, though, to describe their involvement of the countries along the route as merely reactive, as an almost mechanical response to EU and broader global policies. Some countries, in particular Serbia, regarded the increasing numbers of migrants entering their territory during the year 2015 as a window of opportunity for showing their ›good face‹ to the European Union by adopting ›European values‹ and, by doing so, for enhancing their accession process to the European Union (Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016; Greenberg/Spasić 2017). As Tošić points out, »this image was very convenient for Serbian politicians in framing their country as ›truly European‹, since it was keeping its borders open unlike some EU states (such as Hungary)« (2017: 160). Other states along the corridor also played by their own rules from time to time: Croatia, for example, contrary to the Eurodac Regulation (Regulation EU No 603/2013), avoided sharing registration data on people in transit and, thus, hampered the Dublin system that is dependent on Eurodac registration. Irregular bureaucracies and nonrecording, as Katerina Rozakou (2017) calls such practices in her analysis of bordering practices in the Greek context, became a place of dispute, negotiations, and frustrations, but also a clear sign of the complex relationships and different responses to migration within the European Union migration management politics itself.

    Within EU-member states, however, the longer the corridor lasted, and the more people passed through it, the stronger the ›Hungarian position‹ became. Finally, Austria became the driving force behind a process of gradually closing the corridor, which began in November 2015 and was fully implemented in March 2016. In parallel, Angela Merkel and the European Commission preferred another strategy that cut access to the formalized corridor and that was achieved by adopting a treaty with Turkey known as the »EU-Turkey deal« signed on 18 March 2016 (see Speer 2017: 49–68; Weber 2017: 30–40).

    The humanitarian aspect for the people on the move who were supposed to reach a safe place through the corridor was the guiding principle of public discourses in most of the countries along the corridor. In Serbia, »Prime Minister Aleksandar Vučić officially welcomed refugees, spoke of tolerance, and compared the experience of refugees fleeing war-torn countries to those of refugees during the wars of Yugoslav Succession« (Greenberg/Spasić 2017: 315). Similar narratives could also be observed in other countries along the corridor, at least for some period of time (see, for Slovenia, Sardelić 2017: 11; for Croatia, Jakešević 2017: 184; Bužinkić 2018: 153–154). Of course, critical readings could easily detect the discriminatory, dehumanizing, securitarizing, and criminalizing acts, practices, tropes, and aspects in many of these superficially caring narratives. The profiling or selection of people, ad hoc detentions, and militarization—which were integral parts of the corridor—were, at the time, only denounced by a few NGOs and independent activists. They were mostly ignored, or only temporarily acknowledged, by the media and, consequently, by the general public.

    Before May 2015, ›irregular‹ migration was not framed by a discourse of ›crisis‹ in the countries along the route, rather, the discourse was led by a focus on ›separate incidents‹ or ›situations‹. The discursive framing of ›crisis‹ and ›emergency‹, accompanied by reports of UN agencies about ›unprecedented refugee flows in history‹, has been globally adopted both by policy makers and the wider public. »In the wake of the Summer of Migration, all involved states along the Balkan route were quick to stage the events as an ›emergency‹ (Calhoun 2004) and, in best humanitarian fashion, as a major humanitarian ›crisis‹, thus legitimizing a ›politics of exception‹« (Hess/Kasparek 2017: 66). Following the logic that extraordinary situations call for, and justify, the use of extraordinary measures, the emergency framework, through the construction of existential threats, resulted, on the one hand, in a loosely controlled allocation of resources, and, on the other hand, in silencing many critical interpretations, thus allowing various ›risk management activities‹ to happen on the edge of the law (Campesi 2014). For the states along the route, the crisis label especially meant a rapid infusion of money and other resources for establishing infrastructures for the urgent reception of people on the move, mainly deriving from EU funds. Politically and practically, these humanitarian-control activities also fastened the operational inclusion of non-EU countries into the European border regime.

    As Sabine Hess and Bernd Kasparek have pointed out, the politics of proclaiming a ›crisis‹ is at the heart of re-stabilizing the European border regime, »making it possible to systematically undermine and lever the standards of international and European law without serious challenges to date« (Hess/Kasparek 2017: 66). The authors:

    »have observed carefully designed policy elements, which can be labelled as anti-litigation devices. The design of the Hungarian transit zones is a striking case in point. They are an elementary part of the border fence towards Serbia and allow for the fiction that the border has not been closed for those seeking international protection, but rather that their admission numbers are merely limited due to administrative reasons: each of the two transit zones allows for 14 asylum seekers to enter Hungary every day« (Hess/Kasparek 2017: 66; on the administrative rationale in Slovenia see e.g. Gombač 2016: 79–81).

    The establishment of transit zones was accompanied by a series of legislative tightenings, passed under a proclaimed ›crisis situation caused by mass immigration‹, which, from a legal point of view, lasts until today. Two aspects are worth mentioning in particular: First, the mandatory deportation of all unwanted migrants that were detected on Hungarian territory to the other side of the fence, without any possibility to claim for asylum or even to lodge any appeal against the return. Second, the automatic rejection of all asylum applications as inadmissible, even of those who managed to enter the transit zones, because Serbia had been declared a safe third country (Nagy/Pál 2018). This led to a completely securitized border regime in Hungary, which might become a ›role model‹, not only for the countries in the region but also for the European border regime as a whole (ECtHR – Ilias and Ahmed v. Hungary Application No. 47287/15).
    The Long Genealogy of the Balkan Route and its Governance

    The history of the Balkan region is a multiply layered history of transborder mobilities, migration, and flight reaching back as far as the times of the Habsburg and Ottoman empires connecting the region with the East and Western Europe in many ways. Central transportation and communication infrastructures partially also used by today’s migratory projects had already been established at the heydays of Western imperialism, as the Orient Express, the luxury train service connecting Paris with Istanbul (1883), or the Berlin-Baghdad railway (built between 1903 and 1940) indicate. During World War II, a different and reversed refugee route existed, which brought European refugees not just to Turkey but even further to refugee camps in Syria, Egypt, and Palestine and was operated by the Middle East Relief and Refugee Administration (MERRA).

    The Yugoslav highway, the Highway of Brotherhood and Unity (Autoput bratstva i jedinstva) often simply referred to as the ›autoput‹ and built in phases after the 1950s, came to stretch over more than 1,000 km from the Austrian to the Greek borders and was one of the central infrastructures enabling transnational mobilities, life projects, and exile. In the 1960s, direct trains departing from Istanbul and Athens carried thousands of prospective labor migrants to foreign places in Germany and Austria in the context of the fordist labor migration regime of the two countries. At the end of that decade, Germany signed a labor recruitment agreement with Yugoslavia, fostering and formalizing decades long labor migrations from Croatia, Serbia, and other countries to Germany (Gatrell 2019, see e.g. Lukić Krstanović 2019: 54–55).

    The wars in the 1990s that accompanied the dissolution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, and the consequent establishment of several new nation states, created the first large refugee movement after the Second World War within Europe and was followed by increasing numbers of people fleeing Albania after the fall of its self-isolationist regime and the (civil) wars in the Middle East, Iraq, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan since the mid-1990s. As the migratory route did not go north through the Balkan Peninsula, but mainly proceeded to Italy at the time, the label Balkan route was mostly used as a name for a drugs and arms smuggling route well known in the West. Although there was migration within and to Europe, the Balkan migratory route, with the exception of refugee movements from ex-Yugoslavia, was yet predominantly invisible to the broader European public.

    Sparse ethnographic insights from the beginning of the 2000s point this out. Academic papers on migrant crossings from Turkey to the island of Lesbos mention as follows: »When the transport service began in the late 1980s it was very small and personal; then, in the middle of the 1990s, the Kurds began to show up – and now people arrive from just about everywhere« (Tsianos/Hess/Karakayali 2009: 3; see Tsianos/Karakayali 2010: 379). A document of the Council of the European Union from 1997 formulates this as following:

    »This migration appears to be routed essentially either through Turkey, and hence through Greece and Italy, or via the ›Balkans route‹, with the final countries of destination being in particular Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden. Several suggestions were put forward for dealing with this worrying problem, including the strengthening of checks at external borders, the stepping up of the campaign against illegal immigration networks, and pre-frontier assistance and training assignments in airports and ports in certain transit third countries, in full cooperation with the authorities in those countries« (ibid. quoted in Hess/Kasparek 2020).

    During this time, the EU migration management policies defined two main objectives: to prevent similar arrivals in the future, and to initiate a system of control over migration movements toward the EU that would be established outside the territories of the EU member states. This would later be formalized, first in the 2002 EU Action Plan on Illegal Immigration (see Hayes/Vermeulen 2012: 13–14) and later re-confirmed in the Global Approach to Migration (2005) framework concerning the cooperation of the EU with third states (Hess/Kasparek 2020). In this process, the so-called migratory routes-approach and accompanying strategies of controlling, containing, and taming the movement »through epistemology of the route« (Hess/Kasparek 2020) became a main rationale of the European border control regime. Thus, one can resume that the route was not only produced by movements of people but also by the logic, legislation, investment etc. of EU migration governance. Consequently, the clandestine pathways across the Balkans to Central and Western Europe were frequently addressed by security bodies and services of the EU (see e.g. Frontex 2011; Frontex 2014), resulting in the conceptual and practical production of the Balkan as an external border zone of the EU.

    Parallel to the creation of ›Schengenland‹, the birth of the ›Area of Freedom, Security and Justice‹ inter alia as an inner-EU-free-mobility-zone and EU-based European border and migration regime in the late 1990s, the EU created the Western Balkans as an imaginary political entity, an object of its neighborhood and enlargement policy, which lies just outside the EU with a potential ›European future‹. For the purpose of the Stabilization and Association Process (SAP) initiated in 1999, the term Western Balkan was launched in the EU political context in order to include, at that moment, ›ex-Yugoslav states minus Slovenia plus Albania‹ and to presumably avoid potential politically sensitive notions. The Western Balkans as a concept represents a combination of a political compromise and colonial imagery (see Petrović 2012: 21–36). Its aim was to stabilize the region through a radical redefinition that would restrain from ethno-national toponyms and to establish a free-trade area and growing partnership with the EU. The SAP set out common political and economic goals for the Western Balkan as a region and conducted political and economic progress evaluations ›on a countries’ own merits‹. The Thessaloniki Summit in 2003 strengthened the main objectives of the SAP and formally took over elements of the accession process—institutional domains and regulations that were to be harmonized with those existing in the EU. Harmonization is a wide concept, and it basically means adopting institutional measures following specific demands of the EU. It is a highly hierarchized process in which states asked to ›harmonize‹ do not have a say in things but have to conform to the measures set forth by the EU. As such, the adoption of the EU migration and border regime became a central part of the ongoing EU-accession process that emerged as the main platform and governmental technology of the early externalization and integration of transit and source countries into the EU border regime. This was the context of early bilateral and multilateral cooperation on this topic (concerning involved states, see Lipovec Čebron 2003; Stojić Mitrović 2014; Župarić-Iljić 2013; Bojadžijev 2007).

    The decisive inclusion of the Western Balkan states in the EU design of border control happened at the Thessaloniki European Summit in 2003, where concrete provisions concerning border management, security, and combating illegal migration were set according to European standards. These provisions have not been directly displayed, but were concealed as part of the package of institutional transformations that respective states had to conduct. The states were promised to become members of the EU if the conditions were met. In order to fulfill this goal, prospective EU member states had to maintain good mutual relations, build statehoods based on ›the rule of law‹, and, after a positive evaluation by the EU, begin with the implementation of concrete legislative and institutional changes on their territories (Stojić Mitrović/Vilenica 2019). The control of unwanted movements toward the EU was a priority of the EU accession process of the Western Balkan states from the very beginning (Kacarska 2012). It started with controlling the movement of their own nationals (to allow the states to be removed from the so-called Black Schengen list) during the visa facilitation process. If they managed to control the movement of their own nationals, especially those who applied for asylum in the EU via biometric passports and readmission obligations (asylum seekers from these states comprise a large portion of asylum seekers in the EU even today), they were promised easier access to the EU as an economic area. Gradually, the focus of movement control shifted to third-country nationals. In effect, the Western Balkan states introduced migration-related legislative and institutional transformations corresponding to the ones already existing in the EU, yet persistent ›non-doing‹ (especially regarding enabling access to rights and services for migrants) remained a main practice of deterrence (Valenta/Zuparic-Iljic/Vidovic 2015; Stojić Mitrović 2019).

    From the very beginning, becoming an active part of the European border regime and implementing EU-centric migration policies, or, to put it simply, conducting control policies over the movements of people, has not been the goal of the states along the Balkan route per se but a means to obtain political and economic benefits from the EU. They are included into the EU border regime as operational partners without formal power to influence migration policies. These states do have a voice, though, not only by creating the image of being able to manage the ›European problem‹, and accordingly receive further access to EU funds, but also by influencing EU migration policy through disobedience and actively avoiding conformity to ›prescribed‹ measures. A striking example of creative state disobedience are the so-called 72-hour-papers, which are legal provisions set by the Serbian 2007 Law on Asylum, later also introduced as law in North Macedonia in June 2015: Their initial function was to give asylum seekers who declared their ›intention to seek asylum‹ to the police the possibility to legally proceed to one of the asylum reception centers located within Serbia, where, in a second step, their asylum requests were to be examined in line with the idea of implementing a functioning asylum system according to EU standards. However, in practice, these papers were used as short-term visas for transiting through North Macedonia and Serbia that were handed out to hundreds of thousands of migrants (Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016: 17–19, 36).

    Furthermore, the introduction of migration control practices is often a means for achieving other political and economic goals. In the accessing states, migration management is seen as services they provide for the EU. In addition, demands created by migration management goals open new possibilities for employment, which are essential to societies with high unemployment rates.

    Besides direct economic benefits, migration has been confirmed to be a politically potent instrument. States and their institutions were more firmly integrated into existing EU structures, especially those related to the prevention of unwanted migration, such as increased police cooperation and Frontex agreements. On a local level, political leaders have increasingly been using migration-related narratives in everyday political life in order to confront the state or other political competitors, often through the use of Ethno-nationalist and related discourses. In recent times, as citizens of the states along the Balkan route themselves migrate in search for jobs and less precarious lives, migration from third states has been discursively linked to the fear of foreigners permanently settling in places at the expense of natives.
    Contemporary Context

    According to a growing body of literature (e.g. Hess/Kasparek 2020; Lunaček Brumen/Meh 2016; Speer 2017), the Balkan route of the year 2015 and the first months of 2016 can be conceptualized in phases, beginning with a clandestine phase, evolving to an open route and formalized corridor and back to an invisible route again. It is necessary to point to the fact that these different phases were not merely the result of state or EU-led top-down approaches, but the consequence of a »dynamic process which resulted from the interplay of state practices, practices of mobility, activities of activists, volunteers, and NGOs, media coverage, etc. The same applies for its closure« (Beznec/Speer/Stojić Mitrović 2016: 6).

    The closure of the corridor and stricter border controls resulted in a large transformation of the Balkan route and mobility practices in the recent years, when push-backs from deep within the EU-territory to neighboring non-EU states, erratic movements across borders and territories of the (Western) Balkan states, or desperate journeys back to Greece and then back to the north became everyday realities. In the same period, the route proliferated into more branches, especially a new one via Bosnia and Herzegovina. This proliferation lead to a heightened circulation of practices, people, and knowledge along these paths: a mushrooming of so-called ›jungle camps‹ in Bosnia and Herzegovina, an escalation of border violence in Croatia, chain push-backs from Slovenia, significant EU financial investments into border control in Croatia and camp infrastructures in neighboring countries, the deployment of Frontex in Albania, etc. As the actual itineraries of people on the move multiplied, people started to reach previously indiscernible spots, resulting in blurring of the differences between entering and exiting borders. Circular transit with many loops, involving moving forward and backwards, became the dominant form of migration movements in the region. It transformed the Balkan route into a »Balkan Circuit« (Stojić Mitrović/Vilenica 2019: 540; see also Stojić Mitrović/Ahmetašević/Beznec/Kurnik 2020). The topography changed from a unidirectional line to a network of hubs, accommodation, and socializing spots. In this landscape, some movements still remain invisible—undetected by actors aiming to support, contain, and even prevent migration. »We have no information about persons who have money to pay for the whole package, transfer, accommodation, food, medical assistance when needed, we have no idea how many of them just went further«, a former MSF employee stressed, »we only see those who reach for aid, who are poor or injured and therefore cannot immediately continue their journey.« Some movements are intentionally invisibilized by support groups in order to avoid unwanted attention, and, consequently, repressive measures have also become a common development in border areas where people on the move are waiting for their chance to cross. However, it seems that circular transnational migration of human beings, resulting directly from the securitarian practices of the European border regime, have also become a usual form of mobility in the region.

    The Balkan route as a whole has been increasingly made invisible to spectators from the EU in the last years. There were no mass media coverage, except for reports on deplorable conditions in certain hubs, such as Belgrade barracks (Serbia), Vučjak camp (Bosnia and Herzegovina), or violent push-backs from Croatia that received global and EU-wide attention. However, this spectacularization was rarely directly attributed to the externalization of border control but rather more readily linked to an presumed inability of the Balkan states to manage migration, or to manage it without the blatant use of violence.

    As Marta Stojić Mitrović and Ana Vilenica (2019) point out, practices, discourses, knowledge, concepts, technologies, even particular narratives, organizations, and individual professionals are following the changed topography. This is evident both in the securitarian and in the humanitarian sector: Frontex is signing or initiating cooperation agreements with non-EU member Balkan states, border guards learn from each other how to prevent movements or how to use new equipment, obscure Orbanist legislative changes and institutionalized practices are becoming mainstream, regional coordinators of humanitarian organizations transplant the same ›best practices‹ how to work with migrants, how to organize their accommodation, what aid to bring and when, and how to ›deal‹ with the local communities in different nation-states, while the emergency framework travels from one space to another. Solidarity groups are networking, exchanging knowledge and practices but simultaneously face an increased criminalization of their activities. The public opinion in different nation states is shaped by the same dominant discourses on migration, far-right groups are building international cooperations and exploit the same narratives that frame migrants and migration as dangerous.
    About the Issue

    This issue of movements highlights the current situation of migration struggles along this fragmented, circular, and precarious route and examines the diverse attempts by the EU, transnational institutions, countries in the region, local and interregional structures, and multiple humanitarian actors to regain control over the movements of migration after the official closure of the humanitarian-securitarian corridor in 2016. It reflects on the highly dynamic and conflicting developments since 2015 and their historical entanglements, the ambiguities of humanitarian interventions and strategies of containment, migratory tactics of survival, local struggles, artistic interventions, regional and transnational activism, and recent initiatives to curb the extensive practices of border violence and push-backs. In doing so, the issue brings back the region on the European agenda and sheds light on the multiple historical disruptions, bordering practices, and connectivities that have been forming its presence.

    EU migration policy is reaffirming old and producing new material borders: from border fences to document checks—conducted both by state authorities and increasingly the general population, like taxi drivers or hostel owners—free movement is put in question for all, and unwanted movements of migrants are openly violently prevented. Violence and repression toward migrants are not only normalized but also further legalized through transformations of national legislation, while migrant solidarity initiatives and even unintentional facilitations of movement or stay (performed by carriers, accommodation providers, and ordinary citizens) are increasingly at risk of being criminalized.

    In line with this present state, only briefly tackled here, a number of contributions gathered in this issue challenge normative perceptions of the restrictive European border regime and engage in the critical analysis of its key mechanisms, symbolic pillars, and infrastructures by framing them as complex and depending on context. Furthermore, some of them strive to find creative ways to circumvent the dominance of linear or even verbal explication and indulge in narrative fragments, interviews, maps, and graphs. All contributions are focused and space- or even person-specific. They are based on extensive research, activist, volunteer or other involvement, and they are reflexive and critical towards predominant perspectives and views.

    Artist and activist Selma Banich, in her contribution entitled »Shining«, named after one of her artistic intervention performed in a Zagreb neighborhood, assembles notes and reflections on her ongoing series of site-specific interventions in Zagreb made of heat sheet (hallmarks of migrants’ rescue boats and the shores of Europe) and her personal notes in which she engages with her encounters with three persons on the move or, rather, on the run from the European border control regime. Her contribution, formulated as a series of fragments of two parallel lines, which on the surface seem loosely, but in fact deeply, connected, speaks of the power of ambivalence and of the complexities of struggles that take place everyday on the fringes of the EU. Andrea Contenta visualizes and analyzes camps that have been mushrooming in Serbia in the recent years with a series of maps and graphs. The author’s detailed analysis—based on a critical use of available, often conflicting, data—shows how Serbia has kept thousands of people outside of the western EU territory following a European strategy of containment. Contenta concludes his contribution with a clear call, stating: »It is not only a theoretical issue anymore; containment camps are all around us, and we cannot just continue to write about it.« Serbia, and Belgrade in particular, is of central importance for transmigration through the Balkans. On a micro-level, the maps of Paul Knopf, Miriam Neßler and Cosima Zita Seichter visualize the so-called Refugee District in Belgrade and shed light on the transformation of urban space by transit migration. On a macro-level, their contribution illustrates the importance of Serbia as a central hub for migrant mobility in the Balkans as well as for the externalization of the European border regime in the region. The collective efforts to support the struggle of the people on the move—by witnessing, documenting, and denouncing push-backs—are presented by the Push-Back Map Collective’s self-reflection. In their contribution to this issue, the Push-Back Map Collective ask themselves questions or start a dialogue among themselves in order to reflect and evaluate the Push-Back map (www.pushbackmap.org) they launched and maintain. They also investigate the potentials of political organizing that is based on making an invisible structure visible. The activist collective Info Kolpa from Ljubljana gives an account of push-backs conducted by the Slovenian police and describes initiatives to oppose what they deem as systemic violence of police against people on the move and violent attempts to close the borders. The text contributes to understanding the role of extralegal police practices in restoring the European border regime and highlights the ingenuity of collectives that oppose it. Patricia Artimova’s contribution entitled »A Volunteer’s Diary« could be described as a collage of diverse personal notes of the author and others in order to present the complexity of the Serbian and Bosnian context. The genre of diary notes allows the author to demonstrate the diachronic line presented in the volunteers’ personal engagements and in the gradual developments occurring in different sites and states along the route within a four-year period. She also traces the effects of her support for people on the move on her social relations at home. Emina Bužinkić focuses on the arrest, detention, and deportation of a non-EU national done by Croatia to show the implications of current securitization practices on the everyday lives and life projects of migrants and refugees. Based on different sources (oral histories, official documentation, personal history, etc.), her intervention calls for direct political action and affirms a new genre one could provisionally call ›a biography of a deportation‹. In her »Notes from the Field« Azra Hromadžić focuses on multiple encounters between the locals of Bihać, a city located in the northwestern corner of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and people on the move who stop there while trying to cross into Croatia and the EU. Some of the sections and vignettes of her field notes are written as entries describing a particular day, while others are more anthropological and analytical reflections. Her focus lies on the local people’s perspectives, the dynamics of their daily encounters with migrants and alleged contradictions, philigram distinctions, as well as experiences of refugeeness that create unique relationships between people and histories in Bihać. Karolína Augustová and Jack Sapoch, activists of the grassroots organization No Name Kitchen and members of the Border Violence Monitoring Network, offer a systematized account of violence towards people on the move with their research report. The condensed analysis of violent practices, places, victims, and perpetrators of the increasingly securitized EU border apparatus is based on interviews conducted with people on the move in border areas with Croatia, Šid (Serbia) and Velika Kladuša (BiH). They identify a whole range of violence that people on the move are facing, which often remains ignored or underestimated, and thus condoned, in local national settings as well as on the EU and global level. They conclude that border violence against people on the move cannot be interpreted as mere aggression emanating from individuals or groups of the police but is embedded in the states’ structures.

    We also gathered scientific papers discussing and analyzing different aspects of the corridor and the years thereafter. In their article, Andrej Kurnik and Barbara Beznec focus on assemblages of mobility, which are composed of practices of migrants and local agencies that strive to escape what the authors call ›the sovereign imperative‹. In their analysis of different events and practices since 2015, they demonstrate how migratory movements reveal the hidden subalternized local forms of escape and invigorate the dormant critique of coloniality in the geopolitical locations along the Balkan route. In their concluding remarks, the authors ask to confront the decades-long investments into repressive and exclusionary EU migration policies and point to the political potential of migration as an agent of decolonization. The authors stress that post-Yugoslav European borderland that has been a laboratory of Europeanization for the last thirty years, a site of a ›civilizing‹ mission that systematically diminishes forms of being in common based on diversity and alterity is placed under scrutiny again. Romana Pozniak explores the ethnography of aid work, giving special attention to dynamics between emotional and rational dimensions. Based primarily on interviews conducted with humanitarians employed during the mass refugee transit through the Balkan corridor, she analyzes, historizes, and contextualizes their experiences in terms of affective labor. The author defines affective labor as efforts invested in reflecting on morally, emotionally, and mentally unsettling affects. She deals with local employment measures and how they had an impact on employed workers. Pozniak discusses the figure of the compassionate aid professional by it in a specific historical context of the Balkan corridor and by including personal narrations about it. The article of Robert Rydzewski focuses on the situation in Serbia after the final closure of the formalized corridor in March 2016. Rydzewski argues that extensive and multidirectional migrant movements on the doorstep of the EU are an expression of hope to bring a ›stuckedness‹ to an end. In his analysis, he juxtaposes the representations of migrant movements as linear with migrant narratives and their persistent unilinear movement despite militarized external European Union borders, push-backs, and violence of border guards. Rydzewsky approaches the structural and institutional imposition of waiting with the following questions: What does interstate movement mean for migrants? Why do migrants reject state protection offered by government facilities in favor of traveling around the country? In her article, Céline Cantat focuses on the Serbian capital Belgrade and how ›solidarities in transit‹ or the heterogeneous community of actors supporting people on the move emerged and dissolved in the country in 2015/2016. She analyzes the gradual marginalization of migrant presence and migration solidarity in Belgrade as an outcome of imposing of an institutionalized, official, camp-based, and heavily regulated refugee aid field. This field regulates the access not only to camps per se, but also to fundings for activities by independent groups or civil sector organizations. Teodora Jovanović, by using something she calls ›autoethnography of participation‹, offers a meticulous case study of Miksalište, a distribution hub in Belgrade established in 2015, which she joined as a volunteer in 2016. The transformation of this single institution is examined by elaborating on the transformation within the political and social contexts in Serbia and its capital, Belgrade, regarding migration policies and humanitarian assistance. She identifies three, at times intertwined, modes of response to migration that have shaped the development of the Miksalište center in corresponding stages: voluntarism, professionalization, and re-statization. She connects the beginning and end of each stage of organizing work in Miksalište by investigating the actors, roles, activities, and manners in which these activities are conducted in relation to broader changes within migration management and funding.

    Finishing this editorial in the aftermath of brutal clashes at the borders of Turkey and Greece and in the wake of the global pandemic of COVID-19—isolated in our homes, some of us even under curfew—we experience an escalation and normalization of restrictions, not only of movement but also of almost every aspect of social and political life. We perceive a militarization, which pervades public spaces and discourses, the introduction of new and the reinforcement of old borders, in particular along the line of EU external borders, a heightened immobilization of people on the move, their intentional neglect in squats and ›jungles‹ or their forceful encampment in deplorable, often unsanitary, conditions, where they are faced with food reductions, violence of every kind, and harrowing isolation. At the same time, we witness an increase of anti-migrant narratives not only spreading across obscure social networks but also among high ranked officials. Nonetheless, we get glimpses of resistance and struggles happening every day inside and outside the camps. Videos of protests and photos of violence that manage to reach us from the strictly closed camps, together with testimonies and outcries, are fragments of migrant agency that exist despite overwhelming repression.

    https://movements-journal.org/issues/08.balkanroute
    #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #asile #migrations #réfugiés #revue #humanitarisme #espoir #attente #mobilité #Belgrade #Serbie #solidarité #Miksaliste #Bihac #Bosnie #Bosnie-Herzégovine #encampement #corridor #cartographie #visualisation

  • Calais : maintien de l’interdiction de distribuer de la nourriture aux migrants

    Le tribunal administratif de Lille a rejeté mardi la demande de 13 associations et ONG de suspendre l’arrêté préfectoral leur interdisant de distribuer de la nourriture et des boissons aux migrants dans le centre de Calais. Leur avocat a annoncé vouloir faire appel.

    Les associations d’aide aux migrants de Calais essuient un nouveau revers. Dans une ordonnance rendue mardi 22 septembre, le tribunal administratif de Lille a rejeté une demande - faite par treize ONG et associations - de suspension d’un arrêté interdisant la distribution gratuite de nourriture et de boissons aux migrants dans certains endroits de Calais.

    La situation des migrants dans cette ville « ne [caractérise] pas des conditions de vie indignes de nature à justifier la suspension en urgence de la mesure prise par le préfet du Pas-de-Calais », peut-on lire dans le résumé de l’ordonnance.

    Selon ladite mesure, toute distribution gratuite par des associations non-mandatées par l’État est interdite jusqu’à fin septembre dans une vingtaine de rues, quais et places du centre-ville. Les autorités ont justifié cette interdiction par les « nuisances » causées par les distributions, les risques sanitaires liés au Covid-19 et le souci de salubrité publique.

    Une semaine après l’entrée en vigueur de cet arrêté, un groupement d’organisations, dont Médecins du Monde, l’Auberge des migrants, le Secours catholique et Emmaüs France, ont saisi le tribunal administratif de Lille le 16 septembre pour demander sa suspension. Selon elles, ce texte est « attentatoire au droit à la dignité, au principe de fraternité, à la possibilité d’aider autrui ».
    « Seul effet de l’interdiction : déplacer les lieux des distributions de quelques centaines de mètres »

    Pour le tribunal toutefois, les arguments des associations ne sont pas suffisamment solides, et la situation n’est d’ailleurs pas si problématique. ’"Le tribunal a constaté qu’une association mandatée par l’État [La Vie Active, NDLR] mettait à disposition d’une population de migrants estimée aujourd’hui à environ mille personnes (...) de l’eau sur la base d’une moyenne de 5,14 litres par personne et par jour et des repas au nombre de 2 402 par jour", est-il écrit dans le résumé de l’ordonnance de ce mardi.

    La Vie Active est en effet présente à Calais, à proximité d’un camp situé près du rond-point de Virval, surnommé l’’’Hospital’’. Mais les associations pointent non seulement le fait que ce lieu se trouve à une heure de marche du centre-ville - où sont contraints de dormir des migrants chassés par les démantèlements - mais aussi que cette association n’est pas, à elle seule, en mesure de s’occuper de tous les migrants de la ville - au nombre de 1 500, selon les militants.

    https://twitter.com/caritasfrance/status/1306878006153994240

    Le tribunal a également minimisé l’impact de cette interdiction sur le travail des humanitaires, estimant que « les associations requérantes continuaient à distribuer des repas et des boissons à proximité du centre-ville ». « L’interdiction édictée [a] eu pour seul effet de déplacer les lieux des distributions qu’elles assurent de quelques centaines de mètres seulement », peut-on lire dans le résumé de l’ordonnance.
    « Une limitation insupportable du droit des associations »

    À la suite de l’interdiction, les associations avaient de leur côté expliqué en être réduites à devoir se cacher pour apporter des vivres à cette population vulnérable. Pire, au moins deux associations, l’Auberge des migrants et Salam, ont assuré avoir été l’objet de ’’harcèlement policier’’ et même de contraventions alors qu’elles menaient des distributions en dehors du périmètre interdit par les autorités.

    Conséquence : ces nouvelles règles assorties à ces ’’entraves aux distributions’’ ont ’’un effet de dissuasion immense sur la solidarité’’, estime Juliette Delaplace, chargée de mission auprès des personnes exilées sur le littoral nord auprès du Secours Catholique, contactée par InfoMigrants. ’’Plein de personnes et de bénévoles ne sont pas à l’aise avec l’idée de se faire contrôler de manière répétée par les forces de l’ordre, cela se comprend’’, explique-t-elle, assurant que le collectif ’’va évidemment faire appel’’ de cette décision.

    « C’est une occasion manquée », a de son côté déploré à l’AFP l’avocat des ONG et associations d’aide aux migrants, Me Patrice Spinosi. Cet arrêté représente « une limitation insupportable du droit des associations à aider les personnes les plus vulnérables », a-t-il fustigé, quelques jours après avoir invoqué le principe de fraternité à l’audience.

    Selon l’avocat, un appel devrait être déposé devant le Conseil d’État pour obtenir un vrai débat sur le fond.

    Dans des observations présentées au tribunal, que l’AFP s’est procurées, la défenseure des Droits Claire Hédon a quant à elle estimé qu’"en privant les exilés de l’accès à un bien - la distribution de repas -, la mesure de police contestée est constitutive d’une discrimination fondée sur la nationalité". Une pratique prohibée par la loi.

    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27466/calais-maintien-de-l-interdiction-de-distribuer-de-la-nourriture-aux-m

    #Darmanin #Calais #repas #solidarité #distribution #nourriture #migrations #asile #réfugiés

    –—

    voir fil de discussion ici, commencé par @loutre :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875665

  • Demo : « Alle 12.000 Menschen aus Moria sollen Platz in Wien finden »

    PULS 24 Reporter Paul Batruel hat mit Mo Sedlak, Mitorganisator der Demo, gesprochen. Er will Druck auf die österreichische Regierung ausüben.

    https://www.puls24.at/video/demo-alle-12000-menschen-aus-moria-sollen-platz-in-wien-finden/short
    #solidarité #manifestation #Autrice
    #incendie #Lesbos #feu #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Moria

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’incendie de septembre 2020 à Lesbos :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

  • Calais : « On continuera à distribuer de la nourriture là où il y aura des exilés »
    Par - InfoMigrants - Leslie Carretero - Publié le : 17/09/2020
    https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27364/calais-on-continuera-a-distribuer-de-la-nourriture-la-ou-il-y-aura-des

    Une semaine après la publication d’un arrêté préfectoral qui interdit aux associations de distribuer de la nourriture aux migrants de Calais, 12 d’entre elles ont saisi le tribunal administratif de Lille pour demander sa « suspension immédiate ». En attendant la décision de justice, les humanitaires se cachent pour nourrir les quelque 1 500 exilés présents dans la ville. (...)

    #migrants #Calais #repas #solidarité #distribution #nourriture #réfugiés

  • Migrants : le règlement de Dublin va être supprimé

    La Commission européenne doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de sa politique migratoire, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée.

    Cinq ans après le début de la crise migratoire, l’Union européenne veut changer de stratégie. La Commission européenne veut “abolir” le règlement de Dublin qui fracture les Etats-membres et qui confie la responsabilité du traitement des demandes d’asile au pays de première entrée des migrants dans l’UE, a annoncé ce mercredi 16 septembre la cheffe de l’exécutif européen Ursula von der Leyen dans son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union.

    La Commission doit présenter le 23 septembre sa proposition de réforme de la politique migratoire européenne, très attendue et plusieurs fois repoussée, alors que le débat sur le manque de solidarité entre pays Européens a été relancé par l’incendie du camp de Moria sur lîle grecque de Lesbos.

    “Au coeur (de la réforme) il y a un engagement pour un système plus européen”, a déclaré Ursula von der Leyen devant le Parlement européen. “Je peux annoncer que nous allons abolir le règlement de Dublin et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration”, a-t-elle poursuivi.
    Nouveau mécanisme de solidarité

    “Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité”, a-t-elle dit, alors que les pays qui sont en première ligne d’arrivée des migrants (Grèce, Malte, Italie notamment) se plaignent de devoir faire face à une charge disproportionnée.

    La proposition de réforme de la Commission devra encore être acceptée par les Etats. Ce qui n’est pas gagné d’avance. Cinq ans après la crise migratoire de 2015, la question de l’accueil des migrants est un sujet qui reste source de profondes divisions en Europe, certains pays de l’Est refusant d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile.

    Sous la pression, le système d’asile européen organisé par le règlement de Dublin a explosé après avoir pesé lourdement sur la Grèce ou l’Italie.

    Le nouveau plan pourrait notamment prévoir davantage de sélection des demandeurs d’asile aux frontières extérieures et un retour des déboutés dans leur pays assuré par Frontex. Egalement à l’étude pour les Etats volontaires : un mécanisme de relocalisation des migrants sauvés en Méditerranée, parfois contraints d’errer en mer pendant des semaines en attente d’un pays d’accueil.

    Ce plan ne résoudrait toutefois pas toutes les failles. Pour le patron de l’Office français de l’immigration et de l’intégration, Didier Leschi, “il ne peut pas y avoir de politique européenne commune sans critères communs pour accepter les demandes d’asile.”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.fr/entry/migrants-le-reglement-de-dublin-tres-controverse-va-etre-supprime_fr_

    #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Dublin #règlement_dublin #fin #fin_de_Dublin #suppression #pacte

    ping @reka @karine4 @_kg_ @isskein

    • Immigration : le règlement de Dublin, l’impossible #réforme ?

      En voulant abroger le règlement de Dublin, qui impose la responsabilité des demandeurs d’asile au premier pays d’entrée dans l’Union européenne, Bruxelles reconnaît des dysfonctionnements dans l’accueil des migrants. Mais les Vingt-Sept, plus que jamais divisés sur cette question, sont-ils prêts à une refonte du texte ? Éléments de réponses.

      Ursula Von der Leyen en a fait une des priorités de son mandat : réformer le règlement de Dublin, qui impose au premier pays de l’UE dans lequel le migrant est arrivé de traiter sa demande d’asile. « Je peux annoncer que nous allons [l’]abolir et le remplacer par un nouveau système européen de gouvernance de la migration », a déclaré la présidente de la Commission européenne mercredi 16 septembre, devant le Parlement.

      Les États dotés de frontières extérieures comme la Grèce, l’Italie ou Malte se sont réjouis de cette annonce. Ils s’estiment lésés par ce règlement en raison de leur situation géographique qui les place en première ligne.

      La présidente de la Commission européenne doit présenter, le 23 septembre, une nouvelle version de la politique migratoire, jusqu’ici maintes fois repoussée. « Il y aura des structures communes pour l’asile et le retour. Et il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a-t-elle poursuivi. Un terme fort à l’heure où l’incendie du camp de Moria sur l’île grecque de Lesbos, plus de 8 000 adultes et 4 000 enfants à la rue, a révélé le manque d’entraide entre pays européens.

      Pour mieux comprendre l’enjeu de cette nouvelle réforme européenne de la politique migratoire, France 24 décrypte le règlement de Dublin qui divise tant les Vingt-Sept, en particulier depuis la crise migratoire de 2015.

      Pourquoi le règlement de Dublin dysfonctionne ?

      Les failles ont toujours existé mais ont été révélées par la crise migratoire de 2015, estiment les experts de politique migratoire. Ce texte signé en 2013 et qu’on appelle « Dublin III » repose sur un accord entre les membres de l’Union européenne ainsi que la Suisse, l’Islande, la Norvège et le Liechtenstein. Il prévoit que l’examen de la demande d’asile d’un exilé incombe au premier pays d’entrée en Europe. Si un migrant passé par l’Italie arrive par exemple en France, les autorités françaises ne sont, en théorie, pas tenu d’enregistrer la demande du Dubliné.
      © Union européenne | Les pays signataires du règlement de Dublin.

      Face à l’afflux de réfugiés ces dernières années, les pays dotés de frontières extérieures, comme la Grèce et l’Italie, se sont estimés abandonnés par le reste de l’Europe. « La charge est trop importante pour ce bloc méditerranéen », estime Matthieu Tardis, chercheur au Centre migrations et citoyennetés de l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). Le texte est pensé « comme un mécanisme de responsabilité des États et non de solidarité », estime-t-il.

      Sa mise en application est aussi difficile à mettre en place. La France et l’Allemagne, qui concentrent la majorité des demandes d’asile depuis le début des années 2000, peinent à renvoyer les Dublinés. Dans l’Hexagone, seulement 11,5 % ont été transférés dans le pays d’entrée. Outre-Rhin, le taux ne dépasse pas les 15 %. Conséquence : nombre d’entre eux restent « bloqués » dans les camps de migrants à Calais ou dans le nord de Paris.

      Le délai d’attente pour les demandeurs d’asile est aussi jugé trop long. Un réfugié passé par l’Italie, qui vient déposer une demande d’asile en France, peut attendre jusqu’à 18 mois avant d’avoir un retour. « Durant cette période, il se retrouve dans une situation d’incertitude très dommageable pour lui mais aussi pour l’Union européenne. C’est un système perdant-perdant », commente Matthieu Tardis.

      Ce règlement n’est pas adapté aux demandeurs d’asile, surenchérit-on à la Cimade (Comité inter-mouvements auprès des évacués). Dans un rapport, l’organisation qualifie ce système de « machine infernale de l’asile européen ». « Il ne tient pas compte des liens familiaux ni des langues parlées par les réfugiés », précise le responsable asile de l’association, Gérard Sadik.

      Sept ans après avoir vu le jour, le règlement s’est vu porter le coup de grâce par le confinement lié aux conditions sanitaires pour lutter contre le Covid-19. « Durant cette période, aucun transfert n’a eu lieu », assure-t-on à la Cimade.

      Le mécanisme de solidarité peut-il le remplacer ?

      « Il y aura un nouveau mécanisme fort de solidarité », a promis Ursula von der Leyen, sans donné plus de précision. Sur ce point, on sait déjà que les positions divergent, voire s’opposent, entre les Vingt-Sept.

      Le bloc du nord-ouest (Allemagne, France, Autriche, Benelux) reste ancré sur le principe actuel de responsabilité, mais accepte de l’accompagner d’un mécanisme de solidarité. Sur quels critères se base la répartition du nombre de demandeurs d’asile ? Comment les sélectionner ? Aucune décision n’est encore actée. « Ils sont prêts à des compromis car ils veulent montrer que l’Union européenne peut avancer et agir sur la question migratoire », assure Matthieu Tardis.

      En revanche, le groupe dit de Visegrad (Hongrie, Pologne, République tchèque, Slovaquie), peu enclin à l’accueil, rejette catégoriquement tout principe de solidarité. « Ils se disent prêts à envoyer des moyens financiers, du personnel pour le contrôle aux frontières mais refusent de recevoir les demandeurs d’asile », détaille le chercheur de l’Ifri.

      Quant au bloc Méditerranée (Grèce, Italie, Malte , Chypre, Espagne), des questions subsistent sur la proposition du bloc nord-ouest : le mécanisme de solidarité sera-t-il activé de façon permanente ou exceptionnelle ? Quelles populations sont éligibles au droit d’asile ? Et qui est responsable du retour ? « Depuis le retrait de la Ligue du Nord de la coalition dans le gouvernement italien, le dialogue est à nouveau possible », avance Matthieu Tardis.

      Un accord semble toutefois indispensable pour montrer que l’Union européenne n’est pas totalement en faillite sur ce dossier. « Mais le bloc de Visegrad n’a pas forcément en tête cet enjeu », nuance-t-il. Seule la situation sanitaire liée au Covid-19, qui place les pays de l’Est dans une situation économique fragile, pourrait faire évoluer leur position, note le chercheur.

      Et le mécanisme par répartition ?

      Le mécanisme par répartition, dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, revient régulièrement sur la table des négociations. Son principe : la capacité d’accueil du pays dépend de ses poids démographique et économique. Elle serait de 30 % pour l’Allemagne, contre un tiers des demandes aujourd’hui, et 20 % pour la France, qui en recense 18 %. « Ce serait une option gagnante pour ces deux pays, mais pas pour le bloc du Visegrad qui s’y oppose », décrypte Gérard Sadik, le responsable asile de la Cimade.

      Cette doctrine reposerait sur un système informatisé, qui recenserait dans une seule base toutes les données des demandeurs d’asile. Mais l’usage de l’intelligence artificielle au profit de la procédure administrative ne présente pas que des avantages, aux yeux de la Cimade : « L’algorithme ne sera pas en mesure de tenir compte des liens familiaux des demandeurs d’asile », juge Gérard Sadik.

      Quelles chances pour une refonte ?

      L’Union européenne a déjà tenté plusieurs fois de réformer ce serpent de mer. Un texte dit « Dublin IV » était déjà dans les tuyaux depuis 2016, en proposant par exemple que la responsabilité du premier État d’accueil soit définitive, mais il a été enterré face aux dissensions internes.

      Reste à savoir quel est le contenu exact de la nouvelle version qui sera présentée le 23 septembre par Ursula Van der Leyen. À la Cimade, on craint un durcissement de la politique migratoire, et notamment un renforcement du contrôle aux frontières.

      Quoi qu’il en soit, les négociations s’annoncent « compliquées et difficiles » car « les intérêts des pays membres ne sont pas les mêmes », a rappelé le ministre grec adjoint des Migrations, Giorgos Koumoutsakos, jeudi 17 septembre. Et surtout, la nouvelle mouture devra obtenir l’accord du Parlement, mais aussi celui des États. La refonte est encore loin.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/27376/immigration-le-reglement-de-dublin-l-impossible-reforme

      #gouvernance #Ursula_Von_der_Leyen #mécanisme_de_solidarité #responsabilité #groupe_de_Visegrad #solidarité #répartition #mécanisme_par_répartition #capacité_d'accueil #intelligence_artificielle #algorithme #Dublin_IV

    • Germany’s #Seehofer cautiously optimistic on EU asylum reform

      For the first time during the German Presidency, EU interior ministers exchanged views on reforms of the EU asylum system. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) expressed “justified confidence” that a deal can be found. EURACTIV Germany reports.

      The focus of Tuesday’s (7 July) informal video conference of interior ministers was on the expansion of police cooperation and sea rescue, which, according to Seehofer, is one of the “Big Four” topics of the German Council Presidency, integrated into a reform of the #Common_European_Asylum_System (#CEAS).

      Following the meeting, the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson, spoke of an “excellent start to the Presidency,” and Seehofer also praised the “constructive discussions.” In the field of asylum policy, she said that it had become clear that all member states were “highly interested in positive solutions.”

      The interior ministers were unanimous in their desire to further strengthen police cooperation and expand both the mandates and the financial resources of Europol and Frontex.

      Regarding the question of the distribution of refugees, Seehofer said that he had “heard statements that [he] had not heard in years prior.” He said that almost all member states were “prepared to show solidarity in different ways.”

      While about a dozen member states would like to participate in the distribution of those rescued from distress at the EU’s external borders in the event of a “disproportionate burden” on the states, other states signalled that they wanted to make control vessels, financial means or personnel available to prevent smuggling activities and stem migration across the Mediterranean.

      Seehofer’s final act

      It will probably be Seehofer’s last attempt to initiate CEAS reform. He announced in May that he would withdraw completely from politics after the end of the legislative period in autumn 2021.

      Now it seems that he considers CEAS reform as his last great mission, Seehofer said that he intends to address the migration issue from late summer onwards “with all I have at my disposal.” adding that Tuesday’s (7 July) talks had “once again kindled a real fire” in him. To this end, he plans to leave the official business of the Interior Ministry “in day-to-day matters” largely to the State Secretaries.

      Seehofer’s shift of priorities to the European stage comes at a time when he is being sharply criticised in Germany.

      While his initial handling of a controversial newspaper column about the police published in Berlin’s tageszeitung prompted criticism, Seehofer now faces accusations of concealing structural racism in the police. Seehofer had announced over the weekend that, contrary to the recommendation of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), he would not commission a study on racial profiling in the police force after all.

      Seehofer: “One step is not enough”

      In recent months, Seehofer has made several attempts to set up a distribution mechanism for rescued persons in distress. On several occasions he accused the Commission of letting member states down by not solving the asylum question.

      “I have the ambition to make a great leap. One step would be too little in our presidency,” said Seehofer during Tuesday’s press conference. However, much depends on when the Commission will present its long-awaited migration pact, as its proposals are intended to serve as a basis for negotiations on CEAS reform.

      As Johansson said on Tuesday, this is planned for September. Seehofer thus only has just under four months to get the first Council conclusions through. “There will not be enough time for legislation,” he said.

      Until a permanent solution is found, ad hoc solutions will continue. A “sustainable solution” should include better cooperation with the countries of origin and transit, as the member states agreed on Tuesday.

      To this end, “agreements on the repatriation of refugees” are now to be reached with North African countries. A first step towards this will be taken next Monday (13 July), at a joint conference with North African leaders.

      https://www.euractiv.com/section/justice-home-affairs/news/germany-eyes-breakthrough-in-eu-migration-dispute-this-year

      #Europol #Frontex

    • Relocation, solidarity mandatory for EU migration policy: #Johansson

      In an interview with ANSA and other European media outlets, EU Commissioner for Home Affairs #Ylva_Johansson explained the new migration and asylum pact due to be unveiled on September 23, stressing that nobody will find ideal solutions but rather a well-balanced compromise that will ’’improve the situation’’.

      European Home Affairs Commissioner Ylva Johansson has explained in an interview with a group of European journalists, including ANSA, a new pact on asylum and migration to be presented on September 23. She touched on rules for countries of first entry, a new mechanism of mandatory solidarity, fast repatriations and refugee relocation.

      The Swedish commissioner said that no one will find ideal solutions in the European Commission’s new asylum and migration proposal but rather a good compromise that “will improve the situation”.

      She said the debate to change the asylum regulation known as Dublin needs to be played down in order to find an agreement. Johansson said an earlier 2016 reform plan would be withdrawn as it ’’caused the majority’’ of conflicts among countries.

      A new proposal that will replace the current one and amend the existing Dublin regulation will be presented, she explained.

      The current regulation will not be completely abolished but rules regarding frontline countries will change. Under the new proposal, migrants can still be sent back to the country responsible for their asylum request, explained the commissioner, adding that amendments will be made but the country of first entry will ’’remain important’’.

      ’’Voluntary solidarity is not enough," there has to be a “mandatory solidarity mechanism,” Johansson noted.

      Countries will need to help according to their size and possibilities. A member state needs to show solidarity ’’in accordance with the capacity and size’’ of its economy. There will be no easy way out with the possibility of ’’just sending some blankets’’ - efforts must be proportional to the size and capabilities of member states, she said.
      Relocations are a divisive theme

      Relocations will be made in a way that ’’can be possible to accept for all member states’’, the commissioner explained. The issue of mandatory quotas is extremely divisive, she went on to say. ’’The sentence of the European Court of Justice has established that they can be made’’.

      However, the theme is extremely divisive. Many of those who arrive in Europe are not eligible for international protection and must be repatriated, she said, wondering if it is a good idea to relocate those who need to be repatriated.

      “We are looking for a way to bring the necessary aid to countries under pressure.”

      “Relocation is an important part, but also” it must be done “in a way that can be possible to accept for all member states,” she noted.

      Moreover, Johansson said the system will not be too rigid as the union should prepare for different scenarios.
      Faster repatriations

      Repatriations will be a key part of the plan, with faster bureaucratic procedures, she said. The 2016 reform proposal was made following the 2015 migration crisis, when two million people, 90% of whom were refugees, reached the EU irregularly. For this reason, the plan focused on relocations, she explained.

      Now the situation is completely different: last year 2.4 million stay permits were issued, the majority for reasons connected to family, work or education. Just 140,000 people migrated irregularly and only one-third were refugees while two-thirds will need to be repatriated.

      For this reason, stressed the commissioner, the new plan will focus on repatriation. Faster procedures are necessary, she noted. When people stay in a country for years it is very hard to organize repatriations, especially voluntary ones. So the objective is for a negative asylum decision “to come together with a return decision.”

      Also, the permanence in hosting centers should be of short duration. Speaking about a fire at the Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where more than 12,000 asylum seekers have been stranded for years, the commissioner said the situation was the ’’result of lack of European policy on asylum and migration."

      “We shall have no more Morias’’, she noted, calling for well-managed hosting centers along with limits to permanence.

      A win-win collaboration will instead be planned with third countries, she said. ’’The external aspect is very important. We have to work on good partnerships with third countries, supporting them and finding win-win solutions for readmissions and for the fight against traffickers. We have to develop legal pathways to come to the EU, in particular with resettlements, a policy that needs to be strengthened.”

      The commissioner then rejected the idea of opening hosting centers in third countries, an idea for example proposed by Denmark.

      “It is not the direction I intend to take. We will not export the right to asylum.”

      The commissioner said she was very concerned by reports of refoulements. Her objective, she concluded, is to “include in the pact a monitoring mechanism. The right to asylum must be defended.”

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27447/relocation-solidarity-mandatory-for-eu-migration-policy-johansson

      #relocalisation #solidarité_obligatoire #solidarité_volontaire #pays_de_première_entrée #renvois #expulsions #réinstallations #voies_légales

    • Droit d’asile : Bruxelles rate son « #pacte »

      La Commission européenne, assurant vouloir « abolir » le règlement de Dublin et son principe du premier pays d’entrée, doit présenter ce mercredi un « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile ». Qui ne bouleverserait rien.

      C’est une belle victoire pour Viktor Orbán, le Premier ministre hongrois, et ses partenaires d’Europe centrale et orientale aussi peu enclins que lui à accueillir des étrangers sur leur sol. La Commission européenne renonce définitivement à leur imposer d’accueillir des demandeurs d’asile en cas d’afflux dans un pays de la « ligne de front » (Grèce, Italie, Malte, Espagne). Certes, le volumineux paquet de textes qu’elle propose ce mercredi (10 projets de règlements et trois recommandations, soit plusieurs centaines de pages), pompeusement baptisé « pacte sur l’immigration et l’asile », prévoit qu’ils devront, par « solidarité », assurer les refoulements vers les pays d’origine des déboutés du droit d’asile, mais cela ne devrait pas les gêner outre mesure. Car, sur le fond, la Commission prend acte de la volonté des Vingt-Sept de transformer l’Europe en forteresse.
      Sale boulot

      La crise de 2015 les a durablement traumatisés. A l’époque, la Turquie, par lassitude d’accueillir sur son sol plusieurs millions de réfugiés syriens et des centaines de milliers de migrants économiques dans l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, ouvre ses frontières. La Grèce est vite submergée et plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes traversent les Balkans afin de trouver refuge, notamment en Allemagne et en Suède, parmi les pays les plus généreux en matière d’asile.

      Passé les premiers moments de panique, les Européens réagissent de plusieurs manières. La Hongrie fait le sale boulot en fermant brutalement sa frontière. L’Allemagne, elle, accepte d’accueillir un million de demandeurs d’asile, mais négocie avec Ankara un accord pour qu’il referme ses frontières, accord ensuite endossé par l’UE qui lui verse en échange 6 milliards d’euros destinés aux camps de réfugiés. Enfin, l’Union adopte un règlement destiné à relocaliser sur une base obligatoire une partie des migrants dans les autres pays européens afin qu’ils instruisent les demandes d’asile, dans le but de soulager la Grèce et l’Italie, pays de premier accueil. Ce dernier volet est un échec, les pays d’Europe de l’Est, qui ont voté contre, refusent d’accueillir le moindre migrant, et leurs partenaires de l’Ouest ne font guère mieux : sur 160 000 personnes qui auraient dû être relocalisées, un objectif rapidement revu à 98 000, moins de 35 000 l’ont été à la fin 2017, date de la fin de ce dispositif.

      Depuis, l’Union a considérablement durci les contrôles, notamment en créant un corps de 10 000 gardes-frontières européens et en renforçant les moyens de Frontex, l’agence chargée de gérer ses frontières extérieures. En février-mars, la tentative d’Ankara de faire pression sur les Européens dans le conflit syrien en rouvrant partiellement ses frontières a fait long feu : la Grèce a employé les grands moyens, y compris violents, pour stopper ce flux sous les applaudissements de ses partenaires… Autant dire que l’ambiance n’est pas à l’ouverture des frontières et à l’accueil des persécutés.
      « Usine à gaz »

      Mais la crise migratoire de 2015 a laissé des « divisions nombreuses et profondes entre les Etats membres - certaines des cicatrices qu’elle a laissées sont toujours visibles aujourd’hui », comme l’a reconnu Ursula von der Leyen, la présidente de la Commission, dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union du 16 septembre. Afin de tourner la page, la Commission propose donc de laisser tomber la réforme de 2016 (dite de Dublin IV) prévoyant de pérenniser la relocalisation autoritaire des migrants, désormais jugée par une haute fonctionnaire de l’exécutif « totalement irréaliste ».

      Mais la réforme qu’elle propose, une véritable « usine à gaz », n’est qu’un « rapiéçage » de l’existant, comme l’explique Yves Pascouau, spécialiste de l’immigration et responsable des programmes européens de l’association Res Publica. Ainsi, alors que Von der Leyen a annoncé sa volonté « d’abolir » le règlement de Dublin III, il n’en est rien : le pays responsable du traitement d’une demande d’asile reste, par principe, comme c’est le cas depuis 1990, le pays de première entrée.

      S’il y a une crise, la Commission pourra déclencher un « mécanisme de solidarité » afin de soulager un pays de la ligne de front : dans ce cas, les Vingt-Sept devront accueillir un certain nombre de migrants (en fonction de leur richesse et de leur population), sauf s’ils préfèrent « parrainer un retour ». En clair, prendre en charge le refoulement des déboutés de l’asile (avec l’aide financière et logistique de l’Union) en sachant que ces personnes resteront à leur charge jusqu’à ce qu’ils y parviennent. Ça, c’est pour faire simple, car il y a plusieurs niveaux de crise, des exceptions, des sanctions, des délais et l’on en passe…

      Autre nouveauté : les demandes d’asile devront être traitées par principe à la frontière, dans des camps de rétention, pour les nationalités dont le taux de reconnaissance du statut de réfugié est inférieur à 20% dans l’Union, et ce, en moins de trois mois, avec refoulement à la clé en cas de refus. « Cette réforme pose un principe clair, explique un eurocrate. Personne ne sera obligé d’accueillir un étranger dont il ne veut pas. »

      Dans cet ensemble très sévère, une bonne nouvelle : les sauvetages en mer ne devraient plus être criminalisés. On peut craindre qu’une fois passés à la moulinette des Etats, qui doivent adopter ce paquet à la majorité qualifiée (55% des Etats représentant 65% de la population), il ne reste que les aspects les plus répressifs. On ne se refait pas.


      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/22/droit-d-asile-bruxelles-rate-son-pacte_1800264

      –—

      Graphique ajouté au fil de discussion sur les statistiques de la #relocalisation :
      https://seenthis.net/messages/605713

    • Le pacte européen sur l’asile et les migrations ne tire aucune leçon de la « crise migratoire »

      Ce 23 septembre 2020, la nouvelle Commission européenne a présenté les grandes lignes d’orientation de sa politique migratoire à venir. Alors que cinq ans plutôt, en 2015, se déroulait la mal nommée « crise migratoire » aux frontières européennes, le nouveau Pacte Asile et Migration de l’UE ne tire aucune leçon du passé. Le nouveau pacte de l’Union Européenne nous propose inlassablement les mêmes recettes alors que les preuves de leur inefficacité, leur coût et des violences qu’elles procurent sont nombreuses et irréfutables. Le CNCD-11.11.11, son homologue néerlandophone et les membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à un changement de cap.

      Le nouveau Pacte repose sur des propositions législatives et des recommandations non contraignantes. Ses priorités sont claires mais pas neuves. Freiner les arrivées, limiter l’accueil par le « tri » des personnes et augmenter les retours. Cette stratégie pourtant maintes fois décriée par les ONG et le milieu académique a certes réussi à diminuer les arrivées en Europe, mais n’a offert aucune solution durable pour les personnes migrantes. Depuis les années 2000, l’externalisation de la gestion des questions migratoires a montré son inefficacité (situation humanitaires dans les hotspots, plus de 20.000 décès en Méditerranée depuis 2014 et processus d’encampement aux frontières de l’UE) et son coût exponentiel (coût élevé du contrôle, de la détention-expulsion et de l’aide au développement détournée). Elle a augmenté le taux de violences sur les routes de l’exil et a enfreint le droit international en toute impunité (non accès au droit d’asile notamment via les refoulements).

      "ll est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée"

      La proposition de mettre en place un mécanisme solidaire européen contraignant est à saluer, mais celui-ci doit être au service de l’accueil et non couplé au retour. La possibilité pour les États européens de choisir à la carte soit la relocalisation, le « parrainage » du retour des déboutés ou autre contribution financière n’est pas équitable. La répartition solidaire de l’accueil doit être permanente et ne pas être actionnée uniquement en cas « d’afflux massif » aux frontières d’un État membre comme le recommande la Commission. Il est important que tous les États membres développent des systèmes d’accueil de qualité et que l’UE s’oriente vers une protection plus unifiée. Le changement annoncé du Règlement de Dublin l’est juste de nom, car les premiers pays d’entrée resteront responsables des nouveaux arrivés.

      Le focus doit être mis sur les alternatives à la détention et non sur l’usage systématique de l’enfermement aux frontières, comme le veut la Commission. Le droit de demander l’asile et d’avoir accès à une procédure de qualité doit être accessible à tous et toutes et rester un droit individuel. Or, la proposition de la Commission de détenir (12 semaines maximum) en vue de screener (5 jours de tests divers et de recoupement de données via EURODAC) puis trier les personnes migrantes à la frontière en fonction du taux de reconnaissance de protection accordé en moyenne à leur pays d’origine (en dessous de 20%) ou de leur niveau de vulnérabilité est contraire à la Convention de Genève.

      "La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix."

      La priorité pour les personnes migrantes en situation irrégulière doit être la recherche de solutions durables (comme l’est la régularisation) plutôt que le retour forcé, à tous prix, comme le préconise la Commission.

      La meilleure façon de lutter contre les violences sur les routes de l’exil reste la mise en place de plus de voies légales et sûres de migration (réinstallation, visas de travail, d’études, le regroupement familial…). Les ONG regrettent que la Commission reporte à 2021 les propositions sur la migration légale. Le pacte s’intéresse à juste titre à la criminalisation des ONG de sauvetage et des citoyens qui fournissent une aide humanitaire aux migrants. Toutefois, les propositions visant à y mettre fin sont insuffisantes. Les ONG se réjouissent de l’annonce par la Commission d’un mécanisme de surveillance des droits humains aux frontières extérieures. Au cours de l’année écoulée, on a signalé de plus en plus souvent des retours violents par la Croatie, la Grèce, Malte et Chypre. Toutefois, il n’est pas encore suffisamment clair si les propositions de la Commission peuvent effectivement traiter et sanctionner les refoulements.

      Au lendemain de l’incendie du hotspot à Moria, symbole par excellence de l’échec des politiques migratoires européennes, l’UE s’enfonce dans un déni total, meurtrier, en vue de concilier les divergences entre ses États membres. Les futures discussions autour du Pacte au sein du parlement UE et du Conseil UE seront cruciales. Les ONG membres du groupe de travail pour la justice migratoire appellent le Parlement européen et le gouvernement belge à promouvoir des ajustements fermes allant vers plus de justice migratoire.

      https://www.cncd.be/Le-pacte-europeen-sur-l-asile-et

    • The New Pact on Migration and Asylum. A Critical ‘First Look’ Analysis

      Where does it come from?

      The New Migration Pact was built on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme that the Commission tried to push in 2016. And the least that one can say, is that it shows! The whole migration plan has been decisively shaped by this initial failure. Though the Pact has some merits, the very fact that it takes as its starting point the radical demands made by the most nationalist governments in Europe leads to sacrificing migrants’ rights on the altar of a cohesive and integrated European migration policy.

      Back in 2016, the vigorous manoeuvring of the Commission to find a way out of the European asylum dead-end resulted in a bittersweet victory for the European institution. Though the Commission was able to find a qualified majority of member states willing to support a fair distribution of the asylum seekers among member states through a relocation scheme, this new regulation remained dead letter. Several eastern European states flatly refused to implement the plan, other member states seized this opportunity to defect on their obligations and the whole migration policy quickly unravelled. Since then, Europe is left with a dysfunctional Dublin agreement exacerbating the tensions between member states and 27 loosely connected national asylum regimes. On the latter point, at least, there is a consensus. Everyone agrees that the EU’s migration regime is broken and urgently needs to be fixed.

      Obviously, the Commission was not keen to go through a new round of political humiliation. Having been accused of “bureaucratic hubris” the first time around, the commissioners Schinas and Johansson decided not to repeat the same mistake. They toured the European capitals and listened to every side of the entrenched migration debate before drafting their Migration Pact. The intention is in the right place and it reflects the complexity of having to accommodate 27 distinct democratic debates in one single political space. Nevertheless, if one peers a bit more extensively through the content of the New Plan, it is complicated not to get the feelings that the Visegrad countries are currently the key players shaping the European migration and asylum policies. After all, their staunch opposition to a collective reception scheme sparked the political process and provided the starting point to the general discussion. As a result, it is no surprise that the New Pact tilts firmly towards an ever more restrictive approach to migration, beefs up the coercive powers of both member states and European agencies and raises many concerns with regards to the respect of the migrants’ fundamental rights.
      What is in this New Pact on Migration and Asylum?

      Does the Pact concede too much ground to the demands of the most xenophobic European governments? To answer that question, let us go back to the bizarre metaphor used by the commissioner Schinas. During his press conference, he insisted on comparing the New Pact on Migration and Asylum to a house built on solid foundations (i.e. the lengthy and inclusive consultation process) and made of 3 floors: first, some renewed partnerships with the sending and transit states, second, some more effective border procedures, and third, a revamped mandatory – but flexible ! – solidarity scheme. It is tempting to carry on with the metaphor and to say that this house may appear comfortable from the inside but that it remains tightly shut to anyone knocking on its door from the outside. For, a careful examination reveals that each of the three “floors” (policy packages, actually) lays the emphasis on a repressive approach to migration aimed at deterring would-be asylum seekers from attempting to reach the European shores.
      The “new partnerships” with sending and transit countries, a “change in paradigm”?

      Let us add that there is little that is actually “new” in this New Migration Pact. For instance, the first policy package, that is, the suggestion that the EU should renew its partnerships with sending and transit countries is, as a matter of fact, an old tune in the Brussels bubble. The Commission may boast that it marks a “change of paradigm”, one fails to see how this would be any different from the previous European diplomatic efforts. Since migration and asylum are increasingly considered as toxic topics (for, they would be the main factors behind the rise of nationalism and its corollary, Euroscepticism), the European Union is willing to externalize this issue, seemingly at all costs. The results, however, have been mixed in the past. To the Commission’s own admission, only a third of the migrants whose asylum claims have been rejected are effectively returned. Besides the facts that returns are costly, extremely coercive, and administratively complicated to organize, the main reason for this low rate of successful returns is that sending countries refuse to cooperate in the readmission procedures. Neighbouring countries have excellent reasons not to respond positively to the Union’s demands. For some, remittances sent by their diaspora are an economic lifeline. Others just do not want to appear complicit of repressive European practices on their domestic political scene. Furthermore, many African countries are growing discontent with the forceful way the European Union uses its asymmetrical relation of power in bilateral negotiations to dictate to those sovereign states the migration policies they should adopt, making for instance its development aid conditional on the implementation of stricter border controls. The Commission may rhetorically claim to foster “mutually beneficial” international relation with its neighbouring countries, the emphasis on the externalization of migration control in the EU’s diplomatic agenda nevertheless bears some of the hallmarks of neo-colonialism. As such, it is a source of deep resentment in sending and transit states. It would therefore be a grave mistake for the EU to overlook the fact that some short-term gains in terms of migration management may result in long-term losses with regards to Europe’s image across the world.

      Furthermore, considering the current political situation, one should not primarily be worried about the failed partnerships with neighbouring countries, it is rather the successful ones that ought to give us pause and raise concerns. For, based on the existing evidence, the EU will sign a deal with any state as long as it effectively restrains and contains migration flows towards the European shores. Being an authoritarian state with a documented history of human right violations (Turkey) or an embattled government fighting a civil war (Lybia) does not disqualify you as a partner of the European Union in its effort to manage migration flows. It is not only morally debatable for the EU to delegate its asylum responsibilities to unreliable third countries, it is also doubtful that an increase in diplomatic pressure on neighbouring countries will bring major political results. It will further damage the perception of the EU in neighbouring countries without bringing significant restriction to migration flows.
      Streamlining border procedures? Or eroding migrants’ rights?

      The second policy package is no more inviting. It tackles the issue of the migrants who, in spite of those partnerships and the hurdles thrown their way by sending and transit countries, would nevertheless reach Europe irregularly. On this issue, the Commission faced the daunting task of having to square a political circle, since it had to find some common ground in a debate bitterly divided between conflicting worldviews (roughly, between liberal and nationalist perspectives on the individual freedom of movement) and competing interests (between overburdened Mediterranean member states and Eastern member states adamant that asylum seekers would endanger their national cohesion). The Commission thus looked for the lowest common denominator in terms of migration management preferences amongst the distinct member states. The result is a two-tier border procedure aiming to fast-track and streamline the processing of asylum claims, allowing for more expeditious returns of irregular migrants. The goal is to prevent any bottleneck in the processing of the claims and to avoid the (currently near constant) overcrowding of reception facilities in the frontline states. Once again, there is little that is actually new in this proposal. It amounts to a generalization of the process currently in place in the infamous hotspots scattered on the Greek isles. According to the Pact, screening procedures would be carried out in reception centres created across Europe. A far cry from the slogan “no more Moria” since one may legitimately suspect that those reception centres will, at the first hiccup in the procedure, turn into tomorrow’s asylum camps.

      According to this procedure, newly arrived migrants would be submitted within 5 days to a pre-screening procedure and subsequently triaged into two categories. Migrants with a low chance of seeing their asylum claim recognized (because they would come from a country with a low recognition rate or a country belonging to the list of the safe third countries, for instance) would be redirected towards an accelerated procedure. The end goal would be to return them, if applicable, within twelve weeks. The other migrants would be subjected to the standard assessment of their asylum claim. It goes without saying that this proposal has been swiftly and unanimously condemned by all human rights organizations. It does not take a specialized lawyer to see that this two-tiered procedure could have devastating consequences for the “fast-tracked” asylum seekers left with no legal recourse against the initial decision to submit them to this sped up procedure (rather than the standard one) as well as reduced opportunities to defend their asylum claim or, if need be, to contest their return. No matter how often the Commission repeats that it will preserve all the legal safeguards required to protect migrants’ rights, it remains wildly unconvincing. Furthermore, the Pact may confuse speed and haste. The schedule is tight on paper (five days for the pre-screening, twelve weeks for the assessment of the asylum claim), it may well prove unrealistic to meet those deadlines in real-life conditions. The Commission also overlooks the fact that accelerated procedures tend to be sloppy, thus leading to juridical appeals and further legal wrangling and eventually amounting to processes far longer than expected.
      Integrating the returns, not the reception

      The Commission talked up the new Pact as being “balanced” and “humane”. Since the two first policy packages focus, first, on preventing would-be migrants from leaving their countries and, second, on facilitating and accelerating their returns, one would expect the third policy package to move away from the restriction of movement and to complement those measures with a reception plan tailored to the needs of refugees. And here comes the major disappointment with the New Pact and, perhaps, the clearest indication that the Pact is first and foremost designed to please the migration hardliners. It does include a solidarity scheme meant to alleviate the burden of frontline countries, to distribute more fairly the responsibilities amongst member states and to ensure that refugees are properly hosted. But this solidarity scheme is far from being robust enough to deliver on those promises. Let us unpack it briefly to understand why it is likely to fail. The solidarity scheme is mandatory. All member states will be under the obligation to take part. But there is a catch! Member states’ contribution to this collective effort can take many shapes and forms and it will be up to the member states to decide how they want to participate. They get to choose whether they want to relocate some refugees on their national soil, to provide some financial and/or logistical assistance, or to “sponsor” (it is the actual term used by the Commission) some returns.

      No one expected the Commission to reintroduce a compulsory relocation scheme in its Pact. Eastern European countries had drawn an obvious red line and it would have been either naïve or foolish to taunt them with that kind of policy proposal. But this so-called “flexible mandatory solidarity” relies on such a watered-down understanding of the solidarity principle that it results in a weak and misguided political instrument unsuited to solve the problem at hand. First, the flexible solidarity mechanism is too indeterminate to prove efficient. According to the current proposal, member states would have to shoulder a fair share of the reception burden (calculated on their respective population and GDP) but would be left to decide for themselves which form this contribution would take. The obvious flaw with the policy proposal is that, if all member states decline to relocate some refugees (which is a plausible scenario), Mediterranean states would still be left alone when it comes to dealing with the most immediate consequences of migration flows. They would receive much more financial, operational, and logistical support than it currently is the case – but they would be managing on their own the overcrowded reception centres. The Commission suggests that it would oversee the national pledges in terms of relocation and that it would impose some corrections if the collective pledges fall short of a predefined target. But it remains to be seen whether the Commission will have the political clout to impose some relocations to member states refusing them. One could not be blamed for being highly sceptical.

      Second, it is noteworthy that the Commission fails to integrate the reception of refugees since member states are de facto granted an opt-out on hosting refugees. What is integrated is rather the return policy, once more a repressive instrument. And it is the member states with the worst record in terms of migrants’ rights violations that are the most likely to be tasked with the delicate mission of returning them home. As a commentator was quipping on Twitter, it would be like asking a bully to walk his victim home (what could possibly go wrong?). The attempt to build an intra-European consensus is obviously pursued at the expense of the refugees. The incentive structure built into the flexible solidarity scheme offers an excellent illustration of this. If a member state declines to relocate any refugee and offers instead to ‘sponsor’ some returns, it has to honour that pledge within a limited period of time (the Pact suggests a six month timeframe). If it fails to do so, it becomes responsible for the relocation and the return of those migrants, leading to a situation in which some migrants may end up in a country where they do not want to be and that does not want them to be there. Hardly an optimal outcome…
      Conclusion

      The Pact represents a genuine attempt to design a multi-faceted and comprehensive migration policy, covering most aspects of a complex issue. The dysfunctions of the Schengen area and the question of the legal pathways to Europe have been relegated to a later discussion and one may wonder whether they should not have been included in the Pact to balance out its restrictive inclination. And, in all fairness, the Pact does throw a few bones to the more cosmopolitan-minded European citizens. For instance, it reminds the member states that maritime search and rescue operations are legal and should not be impeded, or it shortens (from five to three years) the waiting period for refugees to benefit from the freedom of movement. But those few welcome additions are vastly outweighed by the fact that migration hardliners dominated the agenda-setting in the early stage of the policy-making exercise and have thus been able to frame decisively the political discussion. The end result is a policy package leaning heavily towards some repressive instruments and particularly careless when it comes to safeguarding migrants’ rights.

      The New Pact was first drafted on the ashes of the mandatory relocation scheme. Back then, the Commission publicly made amends and revised its approach to the issue. Sadly, the New Pact was presented to the European public when the ashes of the Moria camp were still lukewarm. One can only hope that the member states will learn from that mistake too.

      https://blog.novamigra.eu/2020/09/24/the-new-pact-on-migration-and-asylum-a-critical-first-look-analysis

    • #Pacte_européen_sur_la_migration : un “nouveau départ” pour violer les droits humains

      La Commission européenne a publié aujourd’hui son « Nouveau Pacte sur l’Asile et la Migration » qui propose un nouveau cadre règlementaire et législatif. Avec ce plan, l’UE devient de facto un « leader du voyage retour » pour les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s en Méditerranée. EuroMed Droits craint que ce pacte ne détériore encore davantage la situation actuelle pour au moins trois raisons.

      Le pacte se concentre de manière obsessionnelle sur la politique de retours à travers un système de « sponsoring » : des pays européens tels que l’Autriche, la Pologne, la Hongrie ou la République tchèque – qui refusent d’accueillir des réfugié.e.s – pourront « sponsoriser » et organiser la déportation vers les pays de départ de ces réfugié.e.s. Au lieu de favoriser l’intégration, le pacte adopte une politique de retour à tout prix, même lorsque les demandeurs.ses d’asile peuvent être victimes de discrimination, persécution ou torture dans leur pays de retour. A ce jour, il n’existe aucun mécanisme permettant de surveiller ce qui arrive aux migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s une fois déporté.e.s.

      Le pacte proposé renforce la sous-traitance de la gestion des frontières. En termes concrets, l’UE renforce la coopération avec les pays non-européens afin qu’ils ferment leurs frontières et empêchent les personnes de partir. Cette coopération est sujette à l’imposition de conditions par l’UE. Une telle décision européenne se traduit par une hausse du nombre de refoulements dans la région méditerranéenne et une coopération renforcée avec des pays qui ont un piètre bilan en matière de droits humains et qui ne possèdent pas de cadre efficace pour la protection des droits des personnes migrantes et réfugiées.

      Le pacte vise enfin à étendre les mécanismes de tri des demandeurs.ses d’asile et des migrant.e.s dans les pays d’arrivée. Ce modèle de tri – similaire à celui utilisé dans les zones de transit aéroportuaires – accentue les difficultés de pays tels que l’Espagne, l’Italie, Malte, la Grèce ou Chypre qui accueillent déjà la majorité des migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s. Placer ces personnes dans des camps revient à mettre en place un système illégal d’incarcération automatique dès l’arrivée. Cela accroîtra la violence psychologique à laquelle les migrant.e.s et réfugié.e.s sont déjà soumis. Selon ce nouveau système, ces personnes seront identifié.e.s sous cinq jours et toute demande d’asile devra être traitée en douze semaines. Cette accélération de la procédure risque d’intensifier la détention et de diviser les arrivant.e.s entre demandeurs.ses d’asile et migrant.e.s économiques. Cela s’effectuerait de manière discriminatoire, sans analyse détaillée de chaque demande d’asile ni possibilité réelle de faire appel. Celles et ceux qui seront éligibles à la protection internationale seront relocalisé.e.s au sein des États membres qui acceptent de les recevoir. Les autres risqueront d’être déportés immédiatement.

      « En choisissant de sous-traiter davantage encore la gestion des frontières et d’accentuer la politique de retours, ce nouveau pacte conclut la transformation de la politique européenne en une approche pleinement sécuritaire. Pire encore, le pacte assimile la politique de “retour sponsorisé” à une forme de solidarité. Au-delà des déclarations officielles, cela démontre la volonté de l’Union européenne de criminaliser et de déshumaniser les migrant.e.s et les réfugié.e.s », a déclaré Wadih Al-Asmar, Président d’EuroMed Droits.

      https://euromedrights.org/fr/publication/pacte-europeen-sur-la-migration-nouveau-depart-pour-violer-les-droits

    • Whose Pact? The Cognitive Dimensions of the New EU Pact on Migration and Asylum

      This Policy Insight examines the new Pact on Migration and Asylum in light of the principles and commitments enshrined in the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees (UN GCR) and the EU Treaties. It finds that from a legal viewpoint the ‘Pact’ is not really a Pact at all, if understood as an agreement concluded between relevant EU institutional parties. Rather, it is the European Commission’s policy guide for the duration of the current 9th legislature.

      The analysis shows that the Pact has intergovernmental aspects, in both name and fundamentals. It does not pursue a genuine Migration and Asylum Union. The Pact encourages an artificial need for consensus building or de facto unanimity among all EU member states’ governments in fields where the EU Treaties call for qualified majority voting (QMV) with the European Parliament as co-legislator. The Pact does not abolish the first irregular entry rule characterising the EU Dublin Regulation. It adopts a notion of interstate solidarity that leads to asymmetric responsibilities, where member states are given the flexibility to evade participating in the relocation of asylum seekers. The Pact also runs the risk of catapulting some contested member states practices’ and priorities about localisation, speed and de-territorialisation into EU policy.

      This Policy Insight argues that the Pact’s priority of setting up an independent monitoring mechanism of border procedures’ compliance with fundamental rights is a welcome step towards the better safeguarding of the rule of law. The EU inter-institutional negotiations on the Pact’s initiatives should be timely and robust in enforcing member states’ obligations under the current EU legal standards relating to asylum and borders, namely the prevention of detention and expedited expulsions, and the effective access by all individuals to dignified treatment and effective remedies. Trust and legitimacy of EU asylum and migration policy can only follow if international (human rights and refugee protection) commitments and EU Treaty principles are put first.

      https://www.ceps.eu/ceps-publications/whose-pact

    • First analysis of the EU’s new asylum proposals

      This week the EU Commission published its new package of proposals on asylum and (non-EU) migration – consisting of proposals for legislation, some ‘soft law’, attempts to relaunch talks on stalled proposals and plans for future measures. The following is an explanation of the new proposals (not attempting to cover every detail) with some first thoughts. Overall, while it is possible that the new package will lead to agreement on revised asylum laws, this will come at the cost of risking reduced human rights standards.

      Background

      Since 1999, the EU has aimed to create a ‘Common European Asylum System’. A first phase of legislation was passed between 2003 and 2005, followed by a second phase between 2010 and 2013. Currently the legislation consists of: a) the Qualification Directive, which defines when people are entitled to refugee status (based on the UN Refugee Convention) or subsidiary protection status, and what rights they have; b) the Dublin III Regulation, which allocates responsibility for an asylum seeker between Member States; c) the Eurodac Regulation, which facilitates the Dublin system by setting up a database of fingerprints of asylum seekers and people who cross the external border without authorisation; d) the Asylum Procedures Directive, which sets out the procedural rules governing asylum applications, such as personal interviews and appeals; e) the Reception Conditions Directive, which sets out standards on the living conditions of asylum-seekers, such as rules on housing and welfare; and f) the Asylum Agency Regulation, which set up an EU agency (EASO) to support Member States’ processing of asylum applications.

      The EU also has legislation on other aspects of migration: (short-term) visas, border controls, irregular migration, and legal migration – much of which has connections with the asylum legislation, and all of which is covered by this week’s package. For visas, the main legislation is the visa list Regulation (setting out which non-EU countries’ citizens are subject to a short-term visa requirement, or exempt from it) and the visa code (defining the criteria to obtain a short-term Schengen visa, allowing travel between all Schengen states). The visa code was amended last year, as discussed here.

      For border controls, the main legislation is the Schengen Borders Code, setting out the rules on crossing external borders and the circumstances in which Schengen states can reinstate controls on internal borders, along with the Frontex Regulation, setting up an EU border agency to assist Member States. On the most recent version of the Frontex Regulation, see discussion here and here.

      For irregular migration, the main legislation is the Return Directive. The Commission proposed to amend it in 2018 – on which, see analysis here and here.

      For legal migration, the main legislation on admission of non-EU workers is the single permit Directive (setting out a common process and rights for workers, but not regulating admission); the Blue Card Directive (on highly paid migrants, discussed here); the seasonal workers’ Directive (discussed here); and the Directive on intra-corporate transferees (discussed here). The EU also has legislation on: non-EU students, researchers and trainees (overview here); non-EU family reunion (see summary of the legislation and case law here) and on long-term resident non-EU citizens (overview – in the context of UK citizens after Brexit – here). In 2016, the Commission proposed to revise the Blue Card Directive (see discussion here).

      The UK, Ireland and Denmark have opted out of most of these laws, except some asylum law applies to the UK and Ireland, and Denmark is covered by the Schengen and Dublin rules. So are the non-EU countries associated with Schengen and Dublin (Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein). There are also a number of further databases of non-EU citizens as well as Eurodac: the EU has never met a non-EU migrant who personal data it didn’t want to store and process.

      The Refugee ‘Crisis’

      The EU’s response to the perceived refugee ‘crisis’ was both short-term and long-term. In the short term, in 2015 the EU adopted temporary laws (discussed here) relocating some asylum seekers in principle from Italy and Greece to other Member States. A legal challenge to one of these laws failed (as discussed here), but in practice Member States accepted few relocations anyway. Earlier this year, the CJEU ruled that several Member States had breached their obligations under the laws (discussed here), but by then it was a moot point.

      Longer term, the Commission proposed overhauls of the law in 2016: a) a Qualification Regulation further harmonising the law on refugee and subsidiary protection status; b) a revised Dublin Regulation, which would have set up a system of relocation of asylum seekers for future crises; c) a revised Eurodac Regulation, to take much more data from asylum seekers and other migrants; d) an Asylum Procedures Regulation, further harmonising the procedural law on asylum applications; e) a revised Reception Conditions Directive; f) a revised Asylum Agency Regulation, giving the agency more powers; and g) a new Resettlement Regulation, setting out a framework of admitting refugees directly from non-EU countries. (See my comments on some of these proposals, from back in 2016)

      However, these proposals proved unsuccessful – which is the main reason for this week’s attempt to relaunch the process. In particular, an EU Council note from February 2019 summarises the diverse problems that befell each proposal. While the EU Council Presidency and the European Parliament reached agreement on the proposals on qualification, reception conditions and resettlement in June 2018, Member States refused to support the Presidency’s deal and the European Parliament refused to renegotiate (see, for instance, the Council documents on the proposals on qualification and resettlement; see also my comments on an earlier stage of the talks, when the Council had agreed its negotiation position on the qualification regulation).

      On the asylum agency, the EP and Council agreed on the revised law in 2017, but the Commission proposed an amendment in 2018 to give the agency more powers; the Council could not agree on this. On Eurodac, the EP and Council only partly agreed on a text. On the procedures Regulation, the Council largely agreed its position, except on border procedures; on Dublin there was never much prospect of agreement because of the controversy over relocating asylum seekers. (For either proposal, a difficult negotiation with the European Parliament lay ahead).

      In other areas too, the legislative process was difficult: the Council and EP gave up negotiating amendments to the Blue Card Directive (see the last attempt at a compromise here, and the Council negotiation mandate here), and the EP has not yet agreed a position on the Returns Directive (the Council has a negotiating position, but again it leaves out the difficult issue of border procedures; there is a draft EP position from February). Having said that, the EU has been able to agree legislation giving more powers to Frontex, as well as new laws on EU migration databases, in the last few years.

      The attempted relaunch

      The Commission’s new Pact on asylum and immigration (see also the roadmap on its implementation, the Q and As, and the staff working paper) does not restart the whole process from scratch. On qualification, reception conditions, resettlement, the asylum agency, the returns Directive and the Blue Card Directive, it invites the Council and Parliament to resume negotiations. But it tries to unblock the talks as a whole by tabling two amended legislative proposals and three new legislative proposals, focussing on the issues of border procedures and relocation of asylum seekers.

      Screening at the border

      This revised proposals start with a new proposal for screening asylum seekers at the border, which would apply to all non-EU citizens who cross an external border without authorisation, who apply for asylum while being checked at the border (without meeting the conditions for legal entry), or who are disembarked after a search and rescue operation. During the screening, these non-EU citizens are not allowed to enter the territory of a Member State, unless it becomes clear that they meet the criteria for entry. The screening at the border should take no longer than 5 days, with an extra 5 days in the event of a huge influx. (It would also be possible to apply the proposed law to those on the territory who evaded border checks; for them the deadline to complete the screening is 3 days).

      Screening has six elements, as further detailed in the proposal: a health check, an identity check, registration in a database, a security check, filling out a debriefing form, and deciding on what happens next. At the end of the screening, the migrant is channelled either into the expulsion process (if no asylum claim has been made, and if the migrant does not meet the conditions for entry) or, if an asylum claim is made, into the asylum process – with an indication of whether the claim should be fast-tracked or not. It’s also possible that an asylum seeker would be relocated to another Member State. The screening is carried out by national officials, possibly with support from EU agencies.

      To ensure human rights protection, there must be independent monitoring to address allegations of non-compliance with human rights. These allegations might concern breaches of EU or international law, national law on detention, access to the asylum procedure, or non-refoulement (the ban on sending people to an unsafe country). Migrants must be informed about the process and relevant EU immigration and data protection law. There is no provision for judicial review of the outcome of the screening process, although there would be review as part of the next step (asylum or return).

      Asylum procedures

      The revised proposal for an asylum procedures Regulation would leave in place most of the Commission’s 2016 proposal to amend the law, adding some specific further proposed amendments, which either link back to the screening proposal or aim to fast-track decisions and expulsions more generally.

      On the first point, the usual rules on informing asylum applicants and registering their application would not apply until after the end of the screening. A border procedure may apply following the screening process, but Member States must apply the border procedure in cases where an asylum seeker used false documents, is a perceived national security threat, or falls within the new ground for fast-tracking cases (on which, see below). The latter obligation is subject to exceptions where a Member State has reported that a non-EU country is not cooperating on readmission; the process for dealing with that issue set out under the 2019 amendments to the visa code will then apply. Also, the border process cannot apply to unaccompanied minors or children under 12, unless they are a supposed national security risk. Further exceptions apply where the asylum seeker is vulnerable or has medical needs, the application is not inadmissible or cannot be fast-tracked, or detention conditions cannot be guaranteed. A Member State might apply the Dublin process to determine which Member State is responsible for the asylum claim during the border process. The whole border process (including any appeal) must last no more than 12 weeks, and can only be used to declare applications inadmissible or apply the new ground for fast-tracking them.

      There would also be a new border expulsion procedure, where an asylum application covered by the border procedure was rejected. This is subject to its own 12-week deadline, starting from the point when the migrant is no longer allowed to remain. Much of the Return Directive would apply – but not the provisions on the time period for voluntary departure, remedies and the grounds for detention. Instead, the border expulsion procedure would have its own stricter rules on these issues.

      As regards general fast-tracking, in order to speed up the expulsion process for unsuccessful applications, a rejection of an asylum application would have to either incorporate an expulsion decision or entail a simultaneous separate expulsion decision. Appeals against expulsion decisions would then be subject to the same rules as appeals against asylum decisions. If the asylum seeker comes from a country with a refugee recognition rate below 20%, his or her application must be fast-tracked (this would even apply to unaccompanied minors) – unless circumstances in that country have changed, or the asylum seeker comes from a group for whom the low recognition rate is not representative (for instance, the recognition rate might be higher for LGBT asylum-seekers from that country). Many more appeals would be subject to a one-week time limit for the rejected asylum seeker to appeal, and there could be only one level of appeal against decisions taken within a border procedure.

      Eurodac

      The revised proposal for Eurodac would build upon the 2016 proposal, which was already far-reaching: extending Eurodac to include not only fingerprints, but also photos and other personal data; reducing the age of those covered by Eurodac from 14 to 6; removing the time limits and the limits on use of the fingerprints taken from persons who had crossed the border irregularly; and creating a new obligation to collect data of all irregular migrants over age 6 (currently fingerprint data for this group cannot be stored, but can simply be checked, as an option, against the data on asylum seekers and irregular border crossers). The 2020 proposal additionally provides for interoperability with other EU migration databases, taking of personal data during the screening process, including more data on the migration status of each person, and expressly applying the law to those disembarked after a search and rescue operation.

      Dublin rules on asylum responsibility

      A new proposal for asylum management would replace the Dublin regulation (meaning that the Commission has withdrawn its 2016 proposal to replace that Regulation). The 2016 proposal would have created a ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry, requiring that State to examine first whether many of the grounds for removing an asylum-seeker to a non-EU country apply before considering whether another Member State might be responsible for the application (because the asylum seeker’s family live there, for instance). It would also have imposed obligations directly on asylum-seekers to cooperate with the process, rather than only regulate relations between Member States. These obligations would have been enforced by punishing asylum seekers who disobeyed: removing their reception conditions (apart from emergency health care); fast-tracking their substantive asylum applications; refusing to consider new evidence from them; and continuing the asylum application process in their absence.

      It would no longer be possible for asylum seekers to provide additional evidence of family links, with a view to being in the same country as a family member. Overturning a CJEU judgment (see further discussion here), unaccompanied minors would no longer have been able to make applications in multiple Member States (in the absence of a family member in any of them). However, the definition of family members would have been widened, to include siblings and families formed in a transit country. Responsibility for an asylum seeker based on the first Member State of irregular entry (a commonly applied criterion) would have applied indefinitely, rather than expire one year after entry as it does under the current rules. The ‘Sangatte clause’ (responsibility after five months of living in a second Member State, if the ‘irregular entry’ criterion no longer applies) would be dropped. The ‘sovereignty clause’, which played a key part in the 2015-16 refugee ‘crisis’ (it lets a Member State take responsibility for any application even if the Dublin rules do not require it, cf Germany accepting responsibility for Syrian asylum seekers) would have been sharply curtailed. Time limits for detention during the transfer process would be reduced. Remedies for asylum seekers would have been curtailed: they would only have seven days to appeal against a transfer; courts would have fifteen days to decide (although they could have stayed on the territory throughout); and the grounds of review would have been curtailed.

      Finally, the 2016 proposal would have tackled the vexed issue of disproportionate allocation of responsibility for asylum seekers by setting up an automated system determining how many asylum seekers each Member State ‘should’ have based on their size and GDP. If a Member State were responsible for excessive numbers of applicants, Member States which were receiving fewer numbers would have to take more to help out. If they refused, they would have to pay €250,000 per applicant.

      The 2020 proposal drops some of the controversial proposals from 2016, including the ‘bottleneck’ in the Member State of entry (the current rule, giving Member States an option to decide if a non-EU country is responsible for the application on narrower grounds than in the 2016 proposal, would still apply). Also, the sovereignty clause would now remain unchanged.

      However, the 2020 proposal also retains parts of the 2016 proposal: the redefinition of ‘family member’ (which could be more significant now that the bottleneck is removed, unless Member States choose to apply the relevant rules on non-EU countries’ responsibility during the border procedure already); obligations for asylum seekers (redrafted slightly); some of the punishments for non-compliant asylum-seekers (the cut-off for considering evidence would stay, as would the loss of benefits except for those necessary to ensure a basic standard of living: see the CJEU case law in CIMADE and Haqbin); dropping the provision on evidence of family links; changing the rules on responsibility for unaccompanied minors; retaining part of the changes to the irregular entry criterion (it would now cease to apply after three years; the Sangatte clause would still be dropped; it would apply after search and rescue but not apply in the event of relocation); curtailing judicial review (the grounds would still be limited; the time limit to appeal would be 14 days; courts would not have a strict deadline to decide; suspensive effect would not apply in all cases); and the reduced time limits for detention.

      The wholly new features of the 2020 proposal are: some vague provisions about crisis management; responsibility for an asylum application for the Member State which issued a visa or residence document which expired in the last three years (the current rule is responsibility if the visa expired less than six months ago, and the residence permit expired less than a year ago); responsibility for an asylum application for a Member State in which a non-EU citizen obtained a diploma; and the possibility for refugees or persons with subsidiary protection status to obtain EU long-term resident status after three years, rather than five.

      However, the most significant feature of the new proposal is likely to be its attempt to solve the underlying issue of disproportionate allocation of asylum seekers. Rather than a mechanical approach to reallocating responsibility, the 2020 proposal now provides for a menu of ‘solidarity contributions’: relocation of asylum seekers; relocation of refugees; ‘return sponsorship’; or support for ‘capacity building’ in the Member State (or a non-EU country) facing migratory pressure. There are separate rules for search and rescue disembarkations, on the one hand, and more general migratory pressures on the other. Once the Commission determines that the latter situation exists, other Member States have to choose from the menu to offer some assistance. Ultimately the Commission will adopt a decision deciding what the contributions will be. Note that ‘return sponsorship’ comes with a ticking clock: if the persons concerned are not expelled within eight months, the sponsoring Member State must accept them on its territory.

      Crisis management

      The issue of managing asylum issues in a crisis has been carved out of the Dublin proposal into a separate proposal, which would repeal an EU law from 2001 that set up a framework for offering ‘temporary protection’ in a crisis. Note that Member States have never used the 2001 law in practice.

      Compared to the 2001 law, the new proposal is integrated into the EU asylum legislation that has been adopted or proposed in the meantime. It similarly applies in the event of a ‘mass influx’ that prevents the effective functioning of the asylum system. It would apply the ‘solidarity’ process set out in the proposal to replace the Dublin rules (ie relocation of asylum seekers and other measures), with certain exceptions and shorter time limits to apply that process.

      The proposal focusses on providing for possible exceptions to the usual asylum rules. In particular, during a crisis, the Commission could authorise a Member State to apply temporary derogations from the rules on border asylum procedures (extending the time limit, using the procedure to fast-track more cases), border return procedures (again extending the time limit, more easily justifying detention), or the time limit to register asylum applicants. Member States could also determine that due to force majeure, it was not possible to observe the normal time limits for registering asylum applications, applying the Dublin process for responsibility for asylum applications, or offering ‘solidarity’ to other Member States.

      Finally, the new proposal, like the 2001 law, would create a potential for a form of separate ‘temporary protection’ status for the persons concerned. A Member State could suspend the consideration of asylum applications from people coming from the country facing a crisis for up to a year, in the meantime giving them status equivalent to ‘subsidiary protection’ status in the EU qualification law. After that point it would have to resume consideration of the applications. It would need the Commission’s approval, whereas the 2001 law left it to the Council to determine a situation of ‘mass influx’ and provided for the possible extension of the special rules for up to three years.

      Other measures

      The Commission has also adopted four soft law measures. These comprise: a Recommendation on asylum crisis management; a Recommendation on resettlement and humanitarian admission; a Recommendation on cooperation between Member States on private search and rescue operations; and guidance on the applicability of EU law on smuggling of migrants – notably concluding that it cannot apply where (as in the case of law of the sea) there is an obligation to rescue.

      On other issues, the Commission plan is to use current legislation – in particular the recent amendment to the visa code, which provides for sticks to make visas more difficult to get for citizens of countries which don’t cooperate on readmission of people, and carrots to make visas easier to get for citizens of countries which do cooperate on readmission. In some areas, such as the Schengen system, there will be further strategies and plans in the near future; it is not clear if this will lead to more proposed legislation.

      However, on legal migration, the plan is to go further than relaunching the amendment of the Blue Card Directive, as the Commission is also planning to propose amendments to the single permit and long-term residence laws referred to above – leading respectively to more harmonisation of the law on admission of non-EU workers and enhanced possibilities for long-term resident non-EU citizens to move between Member States (nb the latter plan is separate from this week’s proposal to amend this law as regards refugees and people with subsidiary protection already). Both these plans are relevant to British citizens moving to the EU after the post-Brexit transition period – and the latter is also relevant to British citizens covered by the withdrawal agreement.

      Comments

      This week’s plan is less a complete restart of EU law in this area than an attempt to relaunch discussions on a blocked set of amendments to that law, which moreover focusses on a limited set of issues. Will it ‘work’? There are two different ways to answer that question.

      First, will it unlock the institutional blockage? Here it should be kept in mind that the European Parliament and the Council had largely agreed on several of the 2016 proposals already; they would have been adopted in 2018 already had not the Council treated all the proposals as a package, and not gone back on agreements which the Council Presidency reached with the European Parliament. It is always open to the Council to get at least some of these proposals adopted quickly by reversing these approaches.

      On the blocked proposals, the Commission has targeted the key issues of border procedures and allocation of asylum-seekers. If the former leads to more quick removals of unsuccessful applicants, the latter issue is no longer so pressing. But it is not clear if the Member States will agree to anything on border procedures, or whether such an agreement will result in more expulsions anyway – because the latter depends on the willingness of non-EU countries, which the EU cannot legislate for (and does not even address in this most recent package). And because it is uncertain whether they will result in more expulsions, Member States will be wary of agreeing to anything which either results in more obligations to accept asylum-seekers on their territory, or leaves them with the same number as before.

      The idea of ‘return sponsorship’ – which reads like a grotesque parody of individuals sponsoring children in developing countries via charities – may not be appealing except to those countries like France, which have the capacity to twist arms in developing countries to accept returns. Member States might be able to agree on a replacement for the temporary protection Directive on the basis that they will never use that replacement either. And Commission threats to use infringement proceedings to enforce the law might not worry Member States who recall that the CJEU ruled on their failure to relocate asylum-seekers after the relocation law had already expired, and that the Court will soon rule on Hungary’s expulsion of the Central European University after it has already left.

      As to whether the proposals will ‘work’ in terms of managing asylum flows fairly and compatibly with human rights, it is striking how much they depend upon curtailing appeal rights, even though appeals are often successful. The proposed limitation of appeal rights will also be maintained in the Dublin system; and while the proposed ‘bottleneck’ of deciding on removals to non-EU countries before applying the Dublin system has been removed, a variation on this process may well apply in the border procedures process instead. There is no new review of the assessment of the safety of non-EU countries – which is questionable in light of the many reports of abuse in Libya. While the EU is not proposing, as the wildest headbangers would want, to turn people back or refuse applications without consideration, the question is whether the fast-track consideration of applications and then appeals will constitute merely a Potemkin village of procedural rights that mean nothing in practice.

      Increased detention is already a feature of the amendments proposed earlier: the reception conditions proposal would add a new ground for detention; the return Directive proposal would inevitably increase detention due to curtailing voluntary departure (as discussed here). Unfortunately the Commission’s claim in its new communication that its 2018 proposal is ‘promoting’ voluntary return is therefore simply false. Trump-style falsehoods have no place in the discussion of EU immigration or asylum law.

      The latest Eurodac proposal would not do much compared to the 2016 proposal – but then, the 2016 proposal would already constitute an enormous increase in the amount of data collected and shared by that system.

      Some elements of the package are more positive. The possibility for refugees and people with subsidiary protection to get EU long-term residence status earlier would be an important step toward making asylum ‘valid throughout the Union’, as referred to in the Treaties. The wider definition of family members, and the retention of the full sovereignty clause, may lead to some fairer results under the Dublin system. Future plans to improve the long-term residents’ Directive are long overdue. The Commission’s sound legal assessment that no one should be prosecuted for acting on their obligations to rescue people in distress at sea is welcome. The quasi-agreed text of the reception conditions Directive explicitly rules out Trump-style separate detention of children.

      No proposals from the EU can solve the underlying political issue: a chunk of public opinion is hostile to more migration, whether in frontline Member States, other Member States, or transit countries outside the EU. The politics is bound to affect what Member States and non-EU countries alike are willing to agree to. And for the same reason, even if a set of amendments to the system is ultimately agreed, there will likely be continuing issues of implementation, especially illegal pushbacks and refusals to accept relocation.

      https://eulawanalysis.blogspot.com/2020/09/first-analysis-of-eus-new-asylum.html?spref=fb

  • #Briançon : « L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique »

    Le nouveau maire a décidé de mettre l’association d’aide aux migrants à la porte de ses locaux. Dans la ville, la mobilisation citoyenne s’organise

    #Arnaud_Murgia, élu maire de Briançon en juin, avait promis de « redresser » sa ville. Il vient, au-delà même de ce qu’il affichait dans son programme, de s’attaquer brutalement aux structures associatives clefs du mouvement citoyen d’accueil des migrants qui transitent en nombre par la vallée haut-alpine depuis quatre ans, après avoir traversé la montagne à pied depuis l’Italie voisine.

    A 35 ans, Arnaud Murgia, ex-président départemental des Républicains et toujours conseiller départemental, a également pris la tête de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (CCB) cet été. C’est en tant que président de la CCB qu’il a décidé de mettre l’association Refuges solidaires à la porte des locaux dont elle disposait par convention depuis sa création en juillet 2017. Par un courrier daté du 26 août, il a annoncé à Refuges solidaires qu’il ne renouvellerait pas la convention, arrivée à son terme. Et « mis en demeure » l’association de « libérer » le bâtiment situé près de la gare de Briançon pour « graves négligences dans la gestion des locaux et de leurs occupants ». Ultimatum au 28 octobre. Il a renouvelé sa mise en demeure par un courrier le 11 septembre, ajoutant à ses griefs l’alerte Covid pesant sur le refuge, qui l’oblige à ne plus accueillir de nouveaux migrants jusqu’au 19 septembre en vertu d’un arrêté préfectoral.
    « Autoritarisme mêlé d’idées xénophobes »

    Un peu abasourdis, les responsables de Refuges solidaires n’avaient pas révélé l’information, dans l’attente d’une rencontre avec le maire qui leur aurait peut être permis une négociation. Peine perdue : Arnaud Murgia les a enfin reçus lundi, pour la première fois depuis son élection, mais il n’a fait que réitérer son ultimatum. Refuges solidaires s’est donc résolu à monter publiquement au créneau. « M. Murgia a dégainé sans discuter, avec une méconnaissance totale de ce que nous faisons, gronde Philippe Wyon, l’un des administrateurs. Cette fin de non-recevoir est un refus de prise en compte de l’accueil humanitaire des exilés, autant que de la paix sociale que nous apportons aux Briançonnais. C’est irresponsable ! » La coordinatrice du refuge, Pauline Rey, s’insurge : « Il vient casser une dynamique qui a parfaitement marché depuis trois ans : nous avons accueilli, nourri, soigné, réconforté près de 11 000 personnes. Il est illusoire d’imaginer que sans nous, le flux d’exilés va se tarir ! D’autant qu’il est reparti à la hausse, avec 350 personnes sur le seul mois d’août, avec de plus en plus de familles, notamment iraniennes et afghanes, avec des bébés parfois… Cet hiver, où iront-ils ? »

    Il faut avoir vu les bénévoles, au cœur des nuits d’hiver, prendre en charge avec une énergie et une efficacité admirables les naufragés de la montagne épuisés, frigorifiés, gelés parfois, pour comprendre ce qu’elle redoute. Les migrants, après avoir emprunté de sentiers d’altitude pour échapper à la police, arrivent à grand-peine à Briançon ou sont redescendus parfois par les maraudeurs montagnards ou ceux de Médecins du monde qui les secourent après leur passage de la frontière. L’association Tous migrants, qui soutient ces maraudeurs, est elle aussi dans le collimateur d’Arnaud Murgia : il lui a sèchement signifié qu’il récupérerait les deux préfabriqués où elle entrepose le matériel de secours en montagne le 30 décembre, là encore sans la moindre discussion. L’un des porte-parole de Tous migrants, Michel Rousseau, fustige « une forme d’autoritarisme mêlée d’idées xénophobes : le maire désigne les exilés comme des indésirables et associe nos associations au désordre. Ses décisions vont en réalité semer la zizanie, puisque nous évitons aux exilés d’utiliser des moyens problématiques pour s’abriter et se nourrir. Ce mouvement a permis aux Briançonnais de donner le meilleur d’eux-mêmes. C’est une expérience très riche pour le territoire, nous n’avons pas l’intention que cela s’arrête ».

    La conseillère municipale d’opposition Aurélie Poyau (liste citoyenne, d’union de la gauche et écologistes), adjointe au maire sortant, l’assure : « Il va y avoir une mobilisation citoyenne, j’en suis persuadée. J’ose aussi espérer que des élus communautaires demanderont des discussions entre collectivités, associations, ONG et Etat pour que des décisions éclairées soient prises, afin de pérenniser l’accueil digne de ces personnes de passage chez nous. Depuis la création du refuge, il n’y a pas eu le moindre problème entre elles et la population. L’expulsion de Refuges solidaires est une vraie catastrophe pour le territoire et une erreur politique. »
    « Peine profonde »

    Ce mardi, au refuge, en application de l’arrêté préfectoral pris après la découverte de trois cas positif au Covid, Hamed, migrant algérien, se réveille après sa troisième nuit passée dans un duvet, sur des palettes de bois devant le bâtiment et confie : « Il faut essayer de ne pas fermer ce lieu, c’est très important, on a de bons repas, on reprend de l’énergie. C’est rare, ce genre d’endroit. » Y., jeune Iranien, est lui bien plus frais : arrivé la veille après vingt heures de marche dans la montagne, il a passé la nuit chez un couple de sexagénaires de Briançon qui ont répondu à l’appel d’urgence de Refuges solidaires. Il montre fièrement la photo rayonnante prise avec eux au petit-déjeuner. Nathalie, bénévole fidèle du refuge, soupire : « J’ai une peine profonde, je ne comprends pas la décision du maire, ni un tel manque d’humanité. Nous faisons le maximum sur le sanitaire, en collaboration avec l’hôpital, avec MDM, il n’y a jamais eu de problème ici. Hier, j’ai dû refuser l’entrée à onze jeunes, dont un blessé. Même si une partie a trouvé refuge chez des habitants solidaires, cela m’a été très douloureux. »

    Arnaud Murgia nous a pour sa part annoncé ce mardi soir qu’il ne souhaitait pas « s’exprimer publiquement, en accord avec les associations, pour ne pas créer de polémiques qui pénaliseraient une issue amiable »… Issue dont il n’a pourtant pas esquissé le moindre contour la veille face aux solidaires.

    https://www.liberation.fr/france/2020/09/16/briancon-l-expulsion-de-refuges-solidaires-est-une-vraie-catastrophe-pour

    #refuge_solidaire #expulsion #asile #migrations #réfugiés #solidarité #Hautes-Alpes #frontière_sud-alpine #criminalisation_de_la_solidarité #Refuges_solidaires #mise_en_demeure #Murgia

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le Briançonnais :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_

    • A Briançon, le nouveau maire LR veut fermer le refuge solidaire des migrants

      Depuis trois ans, ce lieu emblématique accueille de façon inconditionnelle et temporaire les personnes exilées franchissant la frontière franco-italienne par la montagne. Mais l’élection d’un nouveau maire Les Républicains, Arnaud Murgia, risque de tout changer.

      Briançon (Hautes-Alpes).– La nouvelle est tombée lundi, tel un coup de massue, après un rendez-vous très attendu avec la nouvelle municipalité. « Le maire nous a confirmé que nous allions devoir fermer, sans nous proposer aucune alternative », soupire Philippe, l’un des référents du refuge solidaire de Briançon. En 2017, l’association Refuges solidaires avait récupéré un ancien bâtiment inoccupé pour en faire un lieu unique à Briançon, tout près du col de Montgenèvre et de la gare, qui permet d’offrir une pause précieuse aux exilés dans leur parcours migratoire.

      Fin août, l’équipe du refuge découvrait avec effarement, dans un courrier signé de la main du président de la communauté de communes du Briançonnais, qui n’est autre qu’Arnaud Murgia, également maire de Briançon (Les Républicains), que la convention leur mettant les lieux à disposition ne serait pas renouvelée.

      Philippe avait pourtant pris les devants en juillet en adressant un courrier à Arnaud Murgia, en vue d’une rencontre et d’une éventuelle visite du refuge. « La seule réponse que nous avons eue a été ce courrier recommandé mettant fin à la convention », déplore-t-il, plein de lassitude.

      Contacté, le maire n’a pas souhaité s’exprimer mais évoque une question de sécurité dans son courrier, la jauge de 15 personnes accueillies n’étant pas respectée. « Il est en discussion avec les associations concernées afin de gérer au mieux cet épineux problème, et cela dans le plus grand respect des personnes en situation difficile », a indiqué son cabinet.

      Interrogée sur l’accueil d’urgence des exilés à l’avenir, la préfecture des Hautes-Alpes préfère ne pas « commenter la décision d’une collectivité portant sur l’affectation d’un bâtiment dont elle a la gestion ». « Dans les Hautes-Alpes comme pour tout point d’entrée sur le territoire national, les services de l’État et les forces de sécurité intérieure s’assurent que toute personne souhaitant entrer en France bénéficie du droit de séjourner sur notre territoire. »

      Sur le parking de la MJC de Briançon, mercredi dernier, Pauline se disait déjà inquiète. « Sur le plan humain, il ne peut pas laisser les gens à la rue comme ça, lâche-t-elle, en référence au maire. Il a une responsabilité ! » Cette ancienne bénévole de l’association, désormais salariée, se souvient des prémices du refuge.

      « Je revois les exilés dormir à même le sol devant la MJC. On a investi ces locaux inoccupés parce qu’il y avait un réel besoin d’accueil d’urgence sur la ville. » Trois ans plus tard et avec un total de 10 000 personnes accueillies, le besoin n’a jamais été aussi fort. L’équipe évoque même une « courbe exponentielle » depuis le mois de juin, graphique à l’appui. 106 personnes en juin, 216 en juillet, 355 en août.

      Une quarantaine de personnes est hébergée au refuge ce jour-là, pour une durée moyenne de deux à trois jours. La façade des locaux laisse apparaître le graffiti d’un poing levé en l’air qui arrache des fils barbelés. Pauline s’engouffre dans les locaux et passe par la salle commune, dont les murs sont décorés de dessins, drapeaux et mots de remerciement.

      De grands thermos trônent sur une table près du cabinet médical (tenu en partenariat avec Médecins du monde) et les exilés vont et viennent pour se servir un thé chaud. À droite, un bureau sert à Céline, la deuxième salariée chargée de l’accueil des migrants à leur arrivée.

      Prénom, nationalité, date d’arrivée, problèmes médicaux… « Nous avons des fiches confidentielles, que nous détruisons au bout d’un moment et qui nous servent à faire des statistiques anonymes que nous rendons publiques », précise Céline, tout en demandant à deux exilés de patienter dans un anglais courant. Durant leur séjour, la jeune femme leur vient en aide pour trouver les billets de train les moins chers ou pour leur procurer des recharges téléphoniques.

      « Depuis plusieurs mois, le profil des exilés a beaucoup changé, note Philippe. On a 90 % d’Afghans et d’Iraniens, alors que notre public était auparavant composé de jeunes hommes originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest. » Désormais, ce sont aussi des familles, avec des enfants en bas âge, qui viennent chercher refuge en France en passant par la dangereuse route des Balkans.

      Dehors, dans la cour, deux petites filles jouent à se courir après, riant aux éclats. Selon Céline, l’aînée n’avait que huit mois quand ses parents sont partis. La deuxième est née sur la route.

      « Récemment, je suis tombée sur une famille afghane avec un garçon âgé de trois ans lors d’une maraude au col de Montgenèvre. Quand j’ai félicité l’enfant parce qu’il marchait vite, presque aussi vite que moi, il m’a répondu : “Ben oui, sinon la police va nous arrêter” », raconte Stéphanie Besson, coprésidente de l’association Tous migrants, qui vient de fêter ses cinq ans.

      L’auteure de Trouver refuge : histoires vécues par-delà les frontières n’a retrouvé le sourire que lorsqu’elle l’a aperçu, dans la cour devant le refuge, en train de s’amuser sur un mini-tracteur. « Il a retrouvé toute son innocence l’espace d’un instant. C’est pour ça que ce lieu est essentiel : la population qui passe par la montagne aujourd’hui est bien plus vulnérable. »

      Vers 16 heures, Pauline s’enfonce dans les couloirs en direction du réfectoire, où des biologistes vêtus d’une blouse blanche, dont le visage est encombré d’une charlotte et d’un masque, testent les résidents à tour de rôle. Un migrant a été positif au Covid-19 quelques jours plus tôt et la préfecture, dans un arrêté, a exigé la fermeture du refuge pour la journée du 10 septembre.

      Deux longues rangées de tables occupent la pièce, avec, d’un côté, un espace cuisine aménagé, de l’autre, une porte de secours donnant sur l’école Oronce fine. Là aussi, les murs ont servi de cimaises à de nombreux exilés souhaitant laisser une trace de leur passage au refuge. Dans un coin de la salle, des dizaines de matelas forment une pile et prennent la place des tables et des chaises, le soir venu, lorsque l’affluence est trop importante.

      « On a dû aménager deux dortoirs en plus de ceux du premier étage pour répondre aux besoins actuels », souligne Pauline, qui préfère ne laisser entrer personne d’autre que les exilés dans les chambres pour respecter leur intimité. Vers 17 heures, Samia se lève de sa chaise et commence à couper des concombres qu’elle laisse tomber dans un grand saladier.

      Cela fait trois ans que cette trentenaire a pris la route avec sa sœur depuis l’Afghanistan. « Au départ, on était avec notre frère, mais il a été arrêté en Turquie et renvoyé chez nous. On a décidé de poursuivre notre chemin malgré tout », chuchote-t-elle, ajoutant que c’est particulièrement dur et dangereux pour les femmes seules. Son regard semble triste et contraste avec son sourire.

      Évoquant des problèmes personnels mais aussi la présence des talibans, les sœurs expliquent avoir dû quitter leur pays dans l’espoir d’une vie meilleure en Europe. « Le refuge est une vraie chance pour nous. On a pu se reposer, dormir en toute sécurité et manger à notre faim. Chaque jour, je remercie les personnes qui s’en occupent », confie-t-elle en dari, l’un des dialectes afghans.

      Samia ne peut s’empêcher de comparer avec la Croatie, où de nombreux exilés décrivent les violences subies de la part de la police. « Ils ont frappé une des femmes qui était avec nous, ont cassé nos téléphones et ont brûlé une partie de nos affaires », raconte-t-elle.

      Ici, depuis des années, la police n’approche pas du refuge ni même de la gare, respectant dans une sorte d’accord informel la tranquillité des lieux et des exilés. « Je n’avais encore jamais vu de policiers aux alentours mais, récemment, deux agents de la PAF [police aux frontières] ont raccompagné une petite fille qui s’était perdue et ont filmé l’intérieur du refuge avec leur smartphone », assure Céline.

      À 18 heures, le repas est servi. Les parents convoquent les enfants, qui rappliquent en courant et s’installent sur une chaise. La fumée de la bolognaise s’échappe des assiettes, tandis qu’un joli brouhaha s’empare de la pièce. « Le dîner est servi tôt car on tient compte des exilés qui prennent le train du soir pour Paris, à 20 heures », explique Pauline.

      Paul*, 25 ans, en fait partie. C’est la deuxième fois qu’il vient au refuge, mais il a fait trois fois le tour de la ville de nuit pour pouvoir le retrouver. « J’avais une photo de la façade mais impossible de me rappeler l’emplacement », sourit-il. L’Ivoirien aspire à « une vie tranquille » qui lui permettrait de réaliser tous « les projets qu’il a en tête ».

      Le lendemain, une affiche collée à la porte d’entrée du refuge indique qu’un arrêté préfectoral impose la fermeture des lieux pour la journée. Aucun nouvel arrivant ne peut entrer.

      Pour Stéphanie Besson, la fermeture définitive du refuge aurait de lourdes conséquences sur les migrants et l’image de la ville. « Briançon est un exemple de fraternité. La responsabilité de ceux qui mettront fin à ce jeu de la fraternité avec des mesures politiques sera immense. »

      Parmi les bénévoles de Tous migrants, des professeurs, des agriculteurs, des banquiers et des retraités … « On a des soutiens partout, en France comme à l’étranger. Mais il ne faut pas croire qu’on tire une satisfaction de nos actions. Faire des maraudes une routine me brise, c’est une honte pour la France », poursuit cette accompagnatrice en montagne.

      Si elle se dit inquiète pour les cinq années à venir, c’est surtout pour l’énergie que les acteurs du tissu associatif vont devoir dépenser pour continuer à défendre les droits des exilés. L’association vient d’apprendre que le local qui sert à entreposer le matériel des maraudeurs, mis à disposition par la ville, va leur être retiré pour permettre l’extension de la cour de l’école Oronce fine.

      Contactée, l’inspectrice de l’Éducation nationale n’a pas confirmé ce projet d’agrandissement de l’établissement. « On a aussi une crainte pour la “maisonnette”, qui appartient à la ville, et qui loge les demandeurs d’asile sans hébergement », souffle Stéphanie.

      « Tout s’enchaîne, ça n’arrête pas depuis un mois », lâche Agnès Antoine, bénévole à Tous migrants. Cela fait plusieurs années que la militante accueille des exilés chez elle, souvent après leur passage au refuge solidaire, en plus de ses trois grands enfants.

      Depuis trois ans, Agnès héberge un adolescent guinéen inscrit au lycée, en passe d’obtenir son titre de séjour. « Il a 18 ans aujourd’hui et a obtenu les félicitations au dernier trimestre », lance-t-elle fièrement, ajoutant que c’est aussi cela qui l’encourage à poursuivre son engagement.

      Pour elle, Arnaud Murgia est dans un positionnement politique clair : « le rejet des exilés » et « la fermeture des frontières » pour empêcher tout passage par le col de Montgenèvre. « C’est illusoire ! Les migrants sont et seront toujours là, ils emprunteront des parcours plus dangereux pour y arriver et se retrouveront à la rue sans le refuge, qui remplit un rôle social indéniable. »

      Dans la vallée de Serre Chevalier, à l’abri des regards, un projet de tourisme solidaire est porté par le collectif d’architectes Quatorze. Il faut longer la rivière Guisane, au milieu des chalets touristiques de cette station et des montagnes, pour apercevoir la maison Bessoulie, au village du Bez. À l’intérieur, Laure et David s’activent pour tenir les délais, entre démolition, récup’ et réaménagement des lieux.

      « L’idée est de créer un refuge pour de l’accueil à moyen et long terme, où des exilés pourraient se former tout en côtoyant des touristes », développe Laure. Au rez-de-chaussée de cette ancienne auberge de jeunesse, une cuisine et une grande salle commune sont rénovées. Ici, divers ateliers (cuisine du monde, low tech, découverte des routes de l’exil) seront proposés.

      À l’étage, un autre espace commun est aménagé. « Il y a aussi la salle de bains et le futur studio du volontaire en service civique. » Un premier dortoir pour deux prend forme, près des chambres réservées aux saisonniers. « On va repeindre le lambris et mettre du parquet flottant », indique la jeune architecte.

      Deux autres dortoirs, l’un pour trois, l’autre pour quatre, sont prévus au deuxième étage, pour une capacité d’accueil de neuf personnes exilées. À chaque fois, un espace de travail est prévu pour elles. « Elles seront accompagnées par un gestionnaire présent à l’année, chargé de les suivre dans leur formation et leur insertion. »

      « C’est un projet qui donne du sens à notre travail », poursuit David en passant une main dans sa longue barbe. Peu sensible aux questions migratoires au départ, il découvre ces problématiques sur le tas. « On a une conscience architecturale et on compte tout faire pour offrir les meilleures conditions d’accueil aux exilés qui viendront. » Reste à déterminer les critères de sélection pour le public qui sera accueilli à la maison Bessoulie à compter de janvier 2021.

      Pour l’heure, le maire de la commune, comme le voisinage, ignore la finalité du projet. « Il est ami avec Arnaud Murgia, alors ça nous inquiète. Comme il y a une station là-bas, il pourrait être tenté de “protéger” le tourisme classique », confie Philippe, du refuge solidaire. Mais le bâtiment appartient à la Fédération unie des auberges de jeunesse (Fuaj) et non à la ville, ce qui est déjà une petite victoire pour les acteurs locaux. « Le moyen et long terme est un échelon manquant sur le territoire, on encourage donc tous cette démarche », relève Stéphanie Besson.

      Aurélie Poyau, élue de l’opposition, veut croire que le maire de Briançon saura prendre la meilleure décision pour ne pas entacher l’image de la ville. « En trois ans, il n’y a jamais eu aucun problème lié à la présence des migrants. Arnaud Murgia n’a pas la connaissance de cet accueil propre à la solidarité montagnarde, de son histoire. Il doit s’intéresser à cet élan », note-t-elle.

      Son optimisme reste relatif. Deux jours plus tôt, l’élue a pris connaissance d’un courrier adressé par la ville aux commerçants du marché de Briançon leur rappelant que la mendicité était interdite. « Personne ne mendie. On sait que ça vise les bénévoles des associations d’aide aux migrants, qui récupèrent des invendus en fin de marché. Mais c’est du don, et voilà comment on joue sur les peurs avec le poids des mots ! »

      Vendredi, avant la réunion avec le maire, un arrêté préfectoral est déjà venu prolonger la fermeture du refuge jusqu’au 19 septembre, après que deux nouvelles personnes ont été testées positives au Covid-19. Une décision que respecte Philippe, même s’il ne lâchera rien par la suite, au risque d’aller jusqu’à l’expulsion. Est-elle évitable ?

      « Évidemment, les cas Covid sont un argument de plus pour le maire, qui mélange tout. Mais nous lui avons signifié que nous n’arrêterons pas d’accueillir les personnes exilées de passage dans le Briançonnais, même après le délai de deux mois qu’il nous a imposé pour quitter les lieux », prévient Philippe. « On va organiser une riposte juridique et faire pression sur l’État pour qu’il prenne ses responsabilités », conclut Agnès.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/160920/briancon-le-nouveau-maire-lr-veut-fermer-le-refuge-solidaire-des-migrants?

      @sinehebdo : c’est l’article que tu as signalé, mais avec tout le texte, j’efface donc ton signalement pour ne pas avoir de doublons

    • Lettre d’information Tous Migrants. Septembre 2020

      Edito :

      Aylan. Moria. Qu’avons-nous fait en cinq ans ?

      Un petit garçon en exil, échoué mort sur une plage de la rive nord de la Méditerranée. Le plus grand camp de migrants en Europe ravagé par les flammes, laissant 12.000 personnes vulnérables sans abri.

      Cinq ans presque jour pour jour sont passés entre ces deux « occasions », terribles, données à nos dirigeants, et à nous, citoyens européens, de réveiller l’Europe endormie et indigne de ses principes fondateurs. De mettre partout en acte la fraternité et la solidarité, en mer, en montagne, aux frontières, dans nos territoires. Et pourtant, si l’on en juge par la situation dans le Briançonnais, la fraternité et la solidarité ne semblent jamais avoir été aussi menacées qu’à présent...

      Dénoncer, informer, alerter, protéger. Il y a cinq ans, le 5 septembre 2015, se mettait en route le mouvement Tous Migrants. C’était une première manifestation place de l’Europe à Briançon, sous la bannière Pas en notre nom. Il n’y avait pas encore d’exilés dans nos montagnes (10.000 depuis sont passés par nos chemins), mais des morts par centaines en Méditerranée... Que de chemin parcouru depuis 2015, des dizaines d’initiatives par an ont été menées par des centaines de bénévoles, des relais médiatiques dans le monde entier, que de rencontres riches avec les exilés, les solidaires, les journalistes, les autres associations...

      Mais hormis quelques avancées juridiques fortes de symboles - tels la consécration du principe de fraternité par le Conseil Constitutionnel, ou l’innocentement de Pierre, maraudeur solidaire -, force est de constater que la situation des droits fondamentaux des exilés n’a guère progressé. L’actualité internationale, nationale et locale nous en livre chaque jour la preuve glaçante, de Lesbos à Malte, de Calais à Gap et Briançon. Triste ironie du sort, cinq ans après la naissance de Tous Migrants, presque jour pour jour, le nouveau maire à peine élu à Briançon s’est mis en tête de faire fermer le lieu d’accueil d’urgence et d’entraver les maraudes... Quelles drôles d’idées. Comme des relents d’Histoire.

      Comment, dès lors, ne pas se sentir des Sisyphe*, consumés de l’intérieur par un sentiment tout à la fois d’injustice, d’impuissance, voire d’absurdité ? En se rappelant simplement qu’en cinq ans, la mobilisation citoyenne n’a pas faibli. Que Tous Migrants a reçu l’année dernière la mention spéciale du Prix des Droits de l’Homme. Que nous sommes nombreux à rester indignés.

      Alors, tant qu’il y aura des hommes et des femmes qui passeront la frontière franco-italienne, au péril de leur vie à cause de lois illégitimes, nous poursuivrons le combat. Pour eux, pour leurs enfants... pour les nôtres.

      Marie Dorléans, cofondatrice de Tous Migrants

      Reçue via mail, le 16.09.2020

    • Briançon bientôt comme #Vintimille ?

      Le nombre de migrants à la rue à Vintimille représente une situation inhabituelle ces dernières années. Elle résulte, en grande partie, de la fermeture fin juillet d’un camp humanitaire situé en périphérie de la ville et géré par la Croix-Rouge italienne. Cette fermeture décrétée par la préfecture d’Imperia a été un coup dur pour les migrants qui pouvaient, depuis 2016, y faire étape. Les différents bâtiments de ce camp de transit pouvaient accueillir quelque 300 personnes - mais en avait accueillis jusqu’à 750 au plus fort de la crise migratoire. Des sanitaires, des lits, un accès aux soins ainsi qu’à une aide juridique pour ceux qui souhaitaient déposer une demande d’asile en Italie : autant de services qui font désormais partie du passé.

      « On ne comprend pas », lâche simplement Maurizio Marmo. « Depuis deux ans, les choses s’étaient calmées dans la ville. Il n’y avait pas de polémique, pas de controverse. Personne ne réclamait la fermeture de ce camp. Maintenant, voilà le résultat. Tout le monde est perdant, la ville comme les migrants. »

      https://seenthis.net/messages/876523

    • Aide aux migrants : les bénévoles de Briançon inquiets pour leurs locaux

      C’est un non-renouvellement de convention qui inquiète les bénévoles venant en aide aux migrants dans le Briançonnais. Celui de l’occupation de deux préfabriqués, situés derrière le Refuge solidaire, par l’association Tous migrants. Ceux-ci servent à entreposer du matériel pour les maraudeurs – des personnes qui apportent leur aide aux réfugiés passant la frontière italo-française à pied dans les montagnes – et à préparer leurs missions.

      La Ville de Briançon, propriétaire des locaux, n’a pas souhaité renouveler cette convention, provoquant l’ire de certains maraudeurs.


      https://twitter.com/nos_pas/status/1298504847273197569

      Le maire de Briançon Arnaud Murgia se défend, lui, de vouloir engager des travaux d’agrandissement de la cour de l’école Oronce-Fine. “La Ville de Briançon a acquis le terrain attenant à la caserne de CRS voilà déjà plusieurs années afin de réaliser l’agrandissement et la remise à neuf de la cour de l’école municipale d’Oronce-Fine”, fait-il savoir par son cabinet.

      Une inquiétude qui peut s’ajouter à celle des bénévoles du Refuge solidaire. Car la convention liant l’association gérant le lieu d’hébergement temporaire de la rue Pasteur, signée avec la communauté de communes du Briançonnais (présidée par Arnaud Murgia), est caduque depuis le mois de juin dernier.

      https://www.ledauphine.com/politique/2020/08/28/hautes-alpes-briancon-aide-aux-migrants-les-benevoles-inquiets-pour-leur

      #solidarité_montagnarde

  • Transmis à @isskein par des « ami·es berlinois·es » (#septembre_2020) :

    #Berlin ce soir : sans doute 10 000 personnes dans la rue (et des manifs prévues ce soir, demain et après-demain dans une cinquantaine de villes allemandes) pour demander l’accueil des réfugiés du camp de Moria. Slogan scandé « #wir_haben_Platz » (nous avons de la place), et demande de démission du ministre fédéral de l’intérieur Horst Seehofer (CSU).

    #solidarité #manifestation #Allemagne
    #incendie #Lesbos #feu #Grèce #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Moria

    –—

    sur l’incendie à Lesbos, voir le fil de discussion :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/875743

    • Indignation en Allemagne après les incendies du camp de migrants en Grèce

      La classe politique affiche son indignation après les incendies qui ont ravagé le camp de Moria et aggravé encore plus les conditions de vie de 12 000 migrants sur l’Île de Lesbos en Grèce.

      Si l’Allemagne propose de répartir au sein de l’Union européenne les réfugiés, nombre de voix s’élèvent pour agir dans l’urgence et accueillir le plus rapidement ces personnes en immense détresse. Mais, si certains Länder sont déjà prêts à aider, il en va autrement du gouvernement fédéral.

      « Une catastrophe pour les gens, un désastre pour la politique », dit le journal du soir de la ZDF, la seconde grande chaîne de télévision publique allemande. Dans le viseur, le gouvernement d’Angela Merkel qui par la voix de son ministre de l’intérieur, Horst Seehofer, a répété ces derniers mois, son refus d’accueillir desréfugiés de Moria, malgré la volonté affichée de certains Länder de prendre en charge ces personnes. Joachim Stamp, ministre de l’intégration du Land de Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie, a pris les devants, mercredi, face à l’urgence. Nous avons touché le fond, la situation est dramatique et nous devons aider tout de suite ces personnes à se loger et à se nourrir. En tant que Land, nous avons confirmé au gouvernement grec notre volonté d’apporter une aide financière. Mais, si la solution ne peut se trouver qu’au niveau européen, nous sommes prêts de notre côté, à accueillir 1000 personnes en grand danger", dit Joachim Stamp.

      https://twitter.com/ZDFnrw/status/1303663535222915075

      Toute l’Allemagne mobilisée

      La Basse-Saxe a également fait part de ses capacités à accueillir 500 réfugiés, en plusieurs étapes. Et l’opposition met la pression sur Berlin, notamment les Verts, par la voix de Claudia Roth, vice-présidente du Bundestag. « C’est du ressort du pays qui a, en charge, la présidence du Conseil de l’Union européenne, de mettre enfin un terme à cette course à la mesquinerie qui se fait sur le dos de celles et ceux qui ont tout perdu », s’indigne Claudia Roth.

      Membre du groupe des chrétiens-démocrates au parlement européen, Elmar Brock appelle, lui à une solution européenne :

      « Bien sûr, on peut toujours dire que l’Europe ne fait pas assez. Mais il y a des mesures qui sont sur la table en matière de demandes d’asile et il est urgent de les appliquer. Nous devons enfin trouver un compromis pour répartir les réfugiés parmi les états membres de l’Union. Quitte à les aider financièrement. »

      La balle est désormais dans le camp d’Angela Merkel et de son ministre de l’intérieur. Et pour le secrétaire général du SPD, le partenaire de coalition de la CDU," il n’y a plus d’excuses".

      Plusieurs milliers de personnes ont manifesté spontanément dans plusieurs villes pour exiger des autorités de prendre en charge des migrants. « Droit de séjour, partout, personne n’est illégal » ou encore « nous avons de la place » ont scandé des manifestants à Berlin, Hambourg, Hanovre ou encore Münster.

      Ces dernières années, le camp de Moria a été décrié pour son manque d’hygiène et son surpeuplement par les ONG qui appellent régulièrement les autorités grecques à transférer les demandeurs d’asile les plus vulnérables vers le continent.

      L’île de Lesbos, d’une population de 85.000 personnes, a été déclarée en état d’urgence mercredi matin.

      https://www.dw.com/fr/indignation-en-allemagne-apr%C3%A8s-les-incendies-du-camp-de-migrants-en-gr%C3%A8ce/a-54877738

    • #Appel pour une évacuation immédiate du camp de Moria

      Ce camp, l’un des plus importants en Méditerranée, a été détruit mercredi par un incendie, laissant près de 13 000 réfugiés dans le dénuement le plus total. Des intellectuels de plusieurs pays lancent un appel pour qu’ils soient accueillis dignement.

      Au moment où 12 500 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile errent sans abri sur les routes et les collines de Lesbos, où les intoxiqués et les blessés de l’incendie de Moria sont empêchés par la police de rejoindre l’hôpital de Mytilène, où des collectifs solidaires apportant des produits de première nécessité sont bloqués par les forces de l’ordre ou pris à partie par de groupuscules d’extrême droite, où la seule réponse apportée par le gouvernement grec à cette urgence est national-sécuritaire, nous, citoyen·ne·s européen·ne·s ne pouvons plus nous taire.

      L’incendie qui a ravagé le camp de Moria ne peut être considéré ni comme un accident ni comme le fait d’une action désespérée. Il est le résultat inévitable et prévisible de la politique européenne qui impose l’enfermement dans les îles grecques, dans des conditions inhumaines, de dizaines de milliers de réfugiés. C’est le résultat de la stratégie du gouvernement grec qui, en lieu et place de mesures effectives contre la propagation du Covid-19 dans des « hot-spots », a imposé à ses habitants, depuis six mois déjà, des restrictions de circulation extrêmement contraignantes. A cet enfermement prolongé, est venu s’ajouter depuis une semaine un confinement total dont l’efficacité sanitaire est plus que problématique, tandis que les personnes porteuses du virus ont été sommées de rester enfermées vingt-quatre heures sur vingt-quatre dans un hangar. Ces conditions menaient tout droit au désastre.

      Cette situation intolérable qui fait la honte de l’Europe ne saurait durer un jour de plus.

      L’évacuation immédiate de Moria, dont les habitants peuvent être accueillis par les différentes villes de l’Europe prêtes à les recevoir, est plus qu’urgente. Il en va de même pour tous les autres camps dans les îles grecques et sur le continent. Faut-il rappeler ici que le gouvernement grec a déjà entrepris de travaux pour transformer non seulement les hot-spots, mais toute autre structure d’accueil sur le continent, en centres fermés entourés de double clôture et dotés de portiques de sécurité ? Que serait-il arrivé si l’incendie de Moria s’était déclaré dans un camp entouré d’une double série de barbelés avec des sorties bloquées ? Combien de milliers de morts aurions-nous à déplorer aujourd’hui ?

      Ne laissons pas des dizaines de milliers de personnes, dont le seul crime est de demander la protection internationale, livrées à une politique ultra-sécuritaire extrêmement dangereuse pour leur sécurité voire leur vie. Le gouvernement grec, au nom de la défense des frontières européennes et de la sécurité nationale, non seulement se croit autorisé à violer le droit international avec les refoulements systématiques en mer Egée et à la frontière d’Evros, mais interdit tout transfert sur le continent des victimes de l’incendie de Moria. Car, mis à part le transfert de 406 mineurs isolés au nord de la Grèce, le gouvernement Mitsotakis compte « punir » pour l’incendie les résidents du camp en les bloquant à Lesbos ! Actuellement, 12 500 réfugié·e·s sont actuellement en danger, privé·e·s de tout accès à des infrastructures sanitaires et exposé·e·s aux attaques de groupes d’extrême droite.

      Nous ne saurions tolérer que les requérants d’asile soient privés de tout droit, qu’ils soient réduits à des non-personnes. Joignons nos voix pour exiger des instances européennes et de nos gouvernements l’évacuation immédiate de Moria et la fermeture de tous les camps en Grèce, ainsi que le transfert urgent de leurs résidentes et résidents vers les villes et communes européennes qui se sont déclarées prêtes à les accueillir. Maintenant et non pas demain.

      Il y va de la dignité et de la vie de dizaines de milliers de personnes, mais aussi de notre dignité à nous, toutes et tous.

      Contre les politiques d’exclusion et de criminalisations des réfugié·e·s, il est plus qu’urgent de construire un monde « un », commun à toutes et à tous. Sinon, chacun de nous risque, à n’importe quel moment, de se retrouver du mauvais côté de la frontière.

      Evacuation immédiate de Moria !

      Transfert de tous ses habitants vers les villes européennes prêtes à les accueillir !

      Giorgio Agamben, philosophe. Michel Agier, directeur d’études à l’Ehess. Athena Athanasiou, professeure d’anthropologie sociale, université Panteion, Grèce. Alain Badiou, philosophe. Etienne Balibar, professeur émérite de philosophie, université de Paris-Ouest. Wendy Brown, université de Californie, Berkeley. Judith Butler, université de Californie, Berkeley. Claude Calame, directeur d’études à l’Ehess. Patrick Chamoiseau, écrivain. Zeineb Ben Said Cherni, professeure émérite à l’université de Tunis. Costas Douzinas, université de Londres. Natacha Godrèche, psychanalyste. Virginie Guirodon, directrice de recherches, CNRS. Sabine Hess, directrice des Centers for Global Migration Studies de Göttingen. Rada Iveković, professeur de philosophie, Paris. Leonie Jegen, chercheuse à l’université Albert-Ludwigs de Fribourg. Chloe Kolyri, psychiatre-psychanalyste. Konstantína Koúneva, députée européenne de 2014 à 2019, Gauche unitaire européenne/Gauche verte nordique. Michael Löwy, directeur de recherches émérite, CNRS. Eirini Markidi, psychologue. Gustave Massiah, membre du Conseil international du Forum social mondial. Katerina Matsa, psychiatre. Sandro Mezzadra,université de Bologne. Savas Matsas, écrivain. Warren Montag, Occidental College, Los Angeles. Adi Ophir, professeur invite des humanités, université de Brown, professeur émérite, université de Tel-Aviv. Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc, professeur de philosophie, université Paris-8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis. Didier Sicard, ancien président du Comité consultatif national d’éthique de France. Nikos Sigalas, historien. Athéna Skoulariki, professeure assistante, université de Crète. Vicky Skoumbi, directrice de programme au Collège international de philosophie. Barbara Spinelli, journaliste, Italie. Eleni Varikas, professeure émérite, université Paris-8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis. Dimitris Vergetis, psychanalyste, directeur de la revue grecque αληthεια (Aletheia). Frieder Otto Wolf, université libre de Berlin. Thodoris Zeis, avocat.

      https://www.liberation.fr/debats/2020/09/11/appel-pour-une-evacuation-immediate-du-camp-de-moria_1799245

    • Greece and EU Must Take Action Now

      A Civil Society Action Committee statement calling for an immediate humanitarian and human rights response to the Moria camp tragedy

      The Civil Society Action Committee expresses grave concern over the lives and health of all who were residing in the Reception and Identification Facility in Moria, on the Greek island of Lesvos, which was ravaged by fire this week. We call upon the Greek government and the European Union (EU) to provide immediate and needed support, including safe shelter, to all who have been affected, and with special emphasis to those at risk.

      For many years, civil society has provided support and assistance to people suffering inhumane conditions in the Moria camp. At the same time, civil society has been continuously calling for much-needed sustainable solutions, and a reversal of failed European policies rooted in xenophobia.

      For a Europe that positions itself as a champion of human rights and human dignity, the very existence and overall situation of a camp like that in Moria, is appalling.

      For a Europe that positions itself as a champion of human rights and human dignity, the very existence and overall situation of a camp like that in Moria, is appalling. Other solutions have always been available and possible, and these must now be urgently implemented. A humanitarian and human rights approach must be at the heart of the Greek government’s and EU’s responses.

      As the Civil Society Action Committee, we call for:

      A coherent plan that maximises all available resources for all those who have had to flee the fire in the Moria camp. They should be provided with safe housing, access to healthcare, and sufficient protection from possible violence. National support and consideration should also be given to cities across Europe who have expressed willingness to receive and accommodate those who have had to flee the Moria camp.
      Planning of alternative sustainable solutions for all those that suffer similar conditions in other sites in Greece and elsewhere;
      Lessons learnt and accountability on the failure to act so far.

      As civil society, we stand ready to support such actions to assist and protect all migrants and asylum-seekers suffering in the Moria camp aftermath and elsewhere.

      https://csactioncommittee.org/greece-and-eu-must-take-action-now

    • Migrants : cette fois, Berlin ne veut pas faire cavalier seul

      Malgré la mobilisation des ONG et des partis en faveur d’une prise en charge massive, et faute d’accord européen, l’Allemagne n’accueillera pas plus de 150 migrants mineurs.

      Les Allemands ont accueilli plus de 1,7 million de demandeurs d’asile au cours des cinq dernières années. Malgré toutes les difficultés liées à l’intégration, le manque de solidarité européenne et les tentatives de l’extrême droite de saper le moral de la population, ils sont disposés à rouvrir leurs portes aux enfants et aux familles du camp de Moria. Pour l’instant, les Allemands proréfugiés ont fait plus de bruit que l’extrême droite.

      Des manifestations ont eu lieu dans tout le pays aux cris de « Nous avons de la place ! » Un collectif d’ONG a fait installer, lundi dernier, 13 000 chaises vides devant le Reichstag, le siège de l’Assemblée fédérale (Bundestag), pour symboliser l’absurdité de la situation, alors que 180 communes se sont déclarées prêtes à accueillir des réfugiés. Hambourg, Cologne, Brême, Berlin ou Munich réclament depuis des mois la prise en charge des personnes sauvées en mer Méditerranée. Dix maires de grandes villes, dont Düsseldorf, Fribourg ou Göttingen, ont de nouveau protesté auprès de la chancellerie. « Nous sommes prêts à accueillir des gens pour éviter une catastrophe humanitaire à Moria », ont-ils insisté auprès d’Angela Merkel. Selon l’union des syndicats des services publics (DBB), les places se sont libérées dans les centres d’accueil. Les trois quarts des réfugiés arrivés en 2015 ont trouvé un logement ou ont quitté l’Allemagne. Les capacités sont actuellement de 25 000 places dans le pays, avec la possibilité de monter rapidement jusqu’à 65 000.

      « Détresse »

      A part l’extrême droite (AfD), qui refuse d’accueillir « des gens qui mettent le feu la nuit et qui attaquent les services de secours », tous les partis politiques allemands sont favorables au retour d’une « politique de l’accueil », y compris l’Union chrétienne démocrate (CDU). « Nos valeurs chrétiennes et démocratiques nous obligent à les aider », a insisté Norbert Röttgen, l’un des trois candidats à la présidence de la CDU, successeur potentiel de Merkel à la chancellerie. « Ce n’est pas le moment de trouver une solution européenne mais de répondre à une détresse humaine. L’Allemagne doit accueillir immédiatement 5 000 réfugiés, […] toute seule si nécessaire », estime-t-il dans une lettre signée par 16 autres députés conservateurs.

      Ces 5 000 réfugiés de Grèce seraient déjà en Allemagne si le ministre de l’Intérieur n’avait pas bloqué toutes les procédures. Le Bavarois conservateur Horst Seehofer (CSU), qui fut le grand détracteur de Merkel pendant la « crise des réfugiés », craint un appel d’air et une nouvelle « vague » incontrôlée, comme à l’été 2015, où des centaines de milliers de réfugiés s’étaient mis en route vers l’Allemagne après que la chancelière avait accepté d’en accueillir quelques milliers bloqués en Hongrie.
      « Complice »

      « Cela ne doit pas se reproduire », a prévenu Horst Seehofer, qui est sorti de son silence en fin de semaine. Sachant que l’objectif de la majorité des migrants est l’Allemagne, le ministre a refusé que son pays fasse cette fois cavalier seul. Sans solution européenne, Berlin ne bougera pas. « Nous avons été agréablement surpris d’apprendre que les Néerlandais ont accepté 50 personnes. Jusqu’ici, la position [des Pays-Bas] était différente », s’est félicité le ministre, qui a interprété cette concession néerlandaise comme un premier signe favorable à la mise en place d’un système de répartition en Europe.

      Pour sa part, l’Allemagne se contentera d’accueillir « 100 à 150 mineurs non accompagnés ». Un chiffre jugé scandaleux par les partis de la majorité et par l’opposition, alors que tant de communes sont prêtes à accueillir des réfugiés. « Monsieur Seehofer, vous vous faites le complice de la souffrance endurée par ces gens aux portes de l’Europe », a critiqué Claudia Roth, la vice-présidente des écologistes au Bundestag. « Votre façon de faire n’est pas chrétienne, elle est inhumaine », a accusé Dietmar Bartsch, président du groupe parlementaire de la gauche radicale (Die Linke). « Il a fallu attendre une catastrophe pour qu’on accueille des enfants », a déploré Dietlind Grabe-Bolz, maire sociale-démocrate (SPD) de Giessen, en Hesse, une ville qui fait partie des communes « volontaires » pour l’accueil.

      Une position jugée courageuse par les Allemands, car les élus risquent désormais leur vie pour leur engagement. Dans cette région où se trouve la capitale financière (Francfort-sur-le-Main), le conservateur proréfugiés Walter Lübcke a été abattu d’une balle dans la tête dans son jardin en juin 2019 par un néonazi qui voulait le « punir ». Un assassinat politique sans précédent depuis la fin de la guerre.
      Paris pusillanime

      Une « centaine ». C’est le nombre de migrants que Paris est prêt à accueillir après l’incendie de Moria. Il s’agira « notamment des mineurs isolés », précise au Parisien le secrétaire d’Etat aux Affaires européennes, Clément Beaune. Soit peu ou prou l’engagement d’autres pays de l’UE, comme l’Allemagne ou les Pays-Bas. « Il y a la réponse d’urgence et d’humanité », fait valoir Beaune, qui réclame une solution européenne « pérenne ». Selon lui, la France a participé aux efforts de répartition des réfugiés « à chaque fois qu’il y a eu des urgences humanitaires douloureuses » depuis 2018. Il cite le cas de l’Aquarius en septembre 2018. Sauf qu’à l’époque, Paris n’avaient pas accepté que le navire de secours aux migrants accoste en France et n’avait accueilli 18 des 58 réfugiés sauvés qu’une fois que Malte avait ouvert ses ports au navire humanitaire.

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2020/09/13/cette-fois-berlin-ne-veut-pas-faire-cavalier-seul_1799396

    • Bild: Germany could take thousands from Greek refugee camp

      Germany is considering taking in thousands of refugees from the destroyed Moria camp on the Greek island of Lesbos as a one-off gesture and hopes the camp can be rebuilt and run by the European Union, Bild newspaper reported on Monday.

      Berlin has been facing growing calls from regional and local politicians who have said they would take in people from the camp, which burned down last week, if the federal government allowed them to.

      Officials, led by federal Interior Minister Horst Seehofer, have been reluctant to move unilaterally, saying a European agreement is needed to disperse the camp’s more than 12,000 former residents across the European Union.

      Citing government and EU sources, Bild said conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel was now leaning towards taking in more refugees, ahead of a meeting with her Social Democrat coalition partners due to take place on Monday.

      She, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen aim to build a new refugee camp on Lesbos that would be run by the European Union, Bild reported. Currently, Greece runs the camp.

      There was no immediate comment from the government.

      The newspaper said the government was likely to agree to take in at least hundreds of children from the camp along with their parents, with thousands also a possibility.

      Earlier, Social Democrat Finance Minister Olaf Scholz, told a news conference Germany had to be ready to play a role in taking in refugees, though this could only be a stepping stone to finding a Europe-wide way of housing refugees arriving at Europe’s borders.

      “It can’t stand as it is now, where each time we decide on a case-by-case basis,” he said.

      Bild said Merkel hoped the coalition partners could agree by Wednesday on how many refugees Germany will take.

      https://www.ekathimerini.com/256934/article/ekathimerini/news/bild-germany-could-take-thousands-from-greek-refugee-camp

    • Thousands of protesters call on Germany to take in Moria refugees

      Thousands of people took to the streets of cities across Germany on Wednesday to show their solidarity and to call on the German government and the EU to take in more than 12,000 migrants left homeless by fires at Moria camp on Lesbos.

      The protesters in cities across Germany including Berlin, Frankfurt and Hamburg appealed to the government to evacuate all camps on the Greek islands and to bring to Germany migrants and refugees left homeless by the fires in Moria.

      An estimated 3,000 people demonstrated in Berlin on Wednesday evening, some 1,200 took to the streets in Hamburg, and another 300 in Frankfurt, according to police. There were also rallies in Leipzig and other cities across the country.

      Protesters chanted the motto of the demonstration, “We have room,” (Wir haben Platz), as can be heard in a video posted on Twitter by a member of the Sea-Watch charity. They also held up banners that said. “Evacuate Moria” and “Shame on you EU”. Speakers at the rallies said European leaders should have acted even before the fire happened.

      https://twitter.com/J_Pahlke/status/1303735477971935234

      They also called for the resignation of the interior minister, Horst Seehofer, who has so far blocked the arrival of refugees through federal reception initiatives.

      Refugee policy a sticking point

      Districts and states in Germany in the past months have offered to take in refugees from Greece to ease the overcrowding in camps – a move that Seehofer opposes.

      According to German law, refugee policy is decided on the federal level and states and districts may only accept refugees if they receive the green light from the federal government.

      Seehofer has also argued that regional efforts would undermine attempts at agreeing a long-overdue European mechanism for the distribution of refugees across the bloc.

      ’Ready to help’

      Although Foreign Minister Heiko Maas has said Germany was ready to help the residents of Moria, he called for the support of all EU member states. “What happened in Moria is a humanitarian catastrophe. With the European Commission and other EU member states that are ready to help, we need to quickly clarify how we can help Greece,” Maas said on Twitter. “That includes the distribution of refugees among those in the EU who are willing to take them in,” he added.

      https://twitter.com/HeikoMaas/status/1303617869897445376

      The fires at Moria this week have burnt down nearly the entire camp, leaving nearly 13,000 people in need of emergency housing. Many spent the first night after the fire on Tuesday evening sleeping in the fields, by the side of the road or in a small graveyard, AP reported.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/27190/thousands-of-protesters-call-on-germany-to-take-in-moria-refugees

    • Ils sont des centaines à avoir été gravement blessés par des tirs de police - balles « de défense », grenades de désencerclement ou explosives. Entre 2018 et 2019, 29 personnes ont été éborgnées ou perdu l’usage d’un œil et cinq ont eu la main arrachée. Une collecte initiée par l’Assemblée des blessés est lancée pour les aider à payer les frais médicaux et les frais de justice. Voici leur appel.

      Depuis des années nous tirons des constats douloureux, nous dénonçons l’arbitraire légal et la brutalité d’une démocratie toujours plus totalitaire, nous décryptons et combattons les violences d’une police dont le rôle de chien de garde du pouvoir n’est plus à démontrer.

      Pour nous, l’heure des constats et bilans est terminé. Il est l’heure d’agir.

      Nous avons investi l’espace public de la question des violences d’État, contribué à visibiliser les victimes et envoyé un certain nombre de policiers violents au tribunal, dont plusieurs ont été (légèrement) condamnés. Nous réfléchissons désormais à de nouveaux moyens d’action. Doucement, mais sûrement, nous allons déplacer notre champ d’intervention et développer des moyens de s’affranchir de la police.

      Ce combat, nous ne le mènerons pas seul-es !

      #violences_policières #solidarité

  • Refugee protection at risk

    Two of the words that we should try to avoid when writing about refugees are “unprecedented” and “crisis.” They are used far too often and with far too little thought by many people working in the humanitarian sector. Even so, and without using those words, there is evidence to suggest that the risks confronting refugees are perhaps greater today than at any other time in the past three decades.

    First, as the UN Secretary-General has pointed out on many occasions, we are currently witnessing a failure of global governance. When Antonio Guterres took office in 2017, he promised to launch what he called “a surge in diplomacy for peace.” But over the past three years, the UN Security Council has become increasingly dysfunctional and deadlocked, and as a result is unable to play its intended role of preventing the armed conflicts that force people to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. Nor can the Security Council bring such conflicts to an end, thereby allowing refugees to return to their country of origin.

    It is alarming to note, for example, that four of the five Permanent Members of that body, which has a mandate to uphold international peace and security, have been militarily involved in the Syrian armed conflict, a war that has displaced more people than any other in recent years. Similarly, and largely as a result of the blocking tactics employed by Russia and the US, the Secretary-General struggled to get Security Council backing for a global ceasefire that would support the international community’s efforts to fight the Coronavirus pandemic

    Second, the humanitarian principles that are supposed to regulate the behavior of states and other parties to armed conflicts, thereby minimizing the harm done to civilian populations, are under attack from a variety of different actors. In countries such as Burkina Faso, Iraq, Nigeria and Somalia, those principles have been flouted by extremist groups who make deliberate use of death and destruction to displace populations and extend the areas under their control.

    In states such as Myanmar and Syria, the armed forces have acted without any kind of constraint, persecuting and expelling anyone who is deemed to be insufficiently loyal to the regime or who come from an unwanted part of society. And in Central America, violent gangs and ruthless cartels are acting with growing impunity, making life so hazardous for other citizens that they feel obliged to move and look for safety elsewhere.

    Third, there is mounting evidence to suggest that governments are prepared to disregard international refugee law and have a respect a declining commitment to the principle of asylum. It is now common practice for states to refuse entry to refugees, whether by building new walls, deploying military and militia forces, or intercepting and returning asylum seekers who are travelling by sea.

    In the Global North, the refugee policies of the industrialized increasingly take the form of ‘externalization’, whereby the task of obstructing the movement of refugees is outsourced to transit states in the Global South. The EU has been especially active in the use of this strategy, forging dodgy deals with countries such as Libya, Niger, Sudan and Turkey. Similarly, the US has increasingly sought to contain northward-bound refugees in Mexico, and to return asylum seekers there should they succeed in reaching America’s southern border.

    In developing countries themselves, where some 85 per cent of the world’s refugees are to be found, governments are increasingly prepared to flout the principle that refugee repatriation should only take place in a voluntary manner. While they rarely use overt force to induce premature returns, they have many other tools at their disposal: confining refugees to inhospitable camps, limiting the food that they receive, denying them access to the internet, and placing restrictions on humanitarian organizations that are trying to meet their needs.

    Fourth, the COVID-19 pandemic of the past nine months constitutes a very direct threat to the lives of refugees, and at the same time seems certain to divert scarce resources from other humanitarian programmes, including those that support displaced people. The Coronavirus has also provided a very convenient alibi for governments that wish to close their borders to people who are seeking safety on their territory.

    Responding to this problem, UNHCR has provided governments with recommendations as to how they might uphold the principle of asylum while managing their borders effectively and minimizing any health risks associated with the cross-border movement of people. But it does not seem likely that states will be ready to adopt such an approach, and will prefer instead to introduce more restrictive refugee and migration policies.

    Even if the virus is brought under some kind of control, it may prove difficult to convince states to remove the restrictions that they have introduced during the COVD-19 emergency. And the likelihood of that outcome is reinforced by the fear that the climate crisis will in the years to come prompt very large numbers of people to look for a future beyond the borders of their own state.

    Fifth, the state-based international refugee regime does not appear well placed to resist these negative trends. At the broadest level, the very notions of multilateralism, international cooperation and the rule of law are being challenged by a variety of powerful states in different parts of the world: Brazil, China, Russia, Turkey and the USA, to name just five. Such countries also share a common disdain for human rights and the protection of minorities – indigenous people, Uyghur Muslims, members of the LGBT community, the Kurds and African-Americans respectively.

    The USA, which has traditionally acted as a mainstay of the international refugee regime, has in recent years set a particularly negative example to the rest of the world by slashing its refugee resettlement quota, by making it increasingly difficult for asylum seekers to claim refugee status on American territory, by entirely defunding the UN’s Palestinian refugee agency and by refusing to endorse the Global Compact on Refugees. Indeed, while many commentators predicted that the election of President Trump would not be good news for refugees, the speed at which he has dismantled America’s commitment to the refugee regime has taken many by surprise.

    In this toxic international environment, UNHCR appears to have become an increasingly self-protective organization, as indicated by the enormous amount of effort it devotes to marketing, branding and celebrity endorsement. For reasons that remain somewhat unclear, rather than stressing its internationally recognized mandate for refugee protection and solutions, UNHCR increasingly presents itself as an all-purpose humanitarian agency, delivering emergency assistance to many different groups of needy people, both outside and within their own country. Perhaps this relief-oriented approach is thought to win the favour of the organization’s key donors, an impression reinforced by the cautious tone of the advocacy that UNHCR undertakes in relation to the restrictive asylum policies of the EU and USA.

    UNHCR has, to its credit, made a concerted effort to revitalize the international refugee regime, most notably through the Global Compact on Refugees, the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework and the Global Refugee Forum. But will these initiatives really have the ‘game-changing’ impact that UNHCR has prematurely attributed to them?

    The Global Compact on Refugees, for example, has a number of important limitations. It is non-binding and does not impose any specific obligations on the countries that have endorsed it, especially in the domain of responsibility-sharing. The Compact makes numerous references to the need for long-term and developmental approaches to the refugee problem that also bring benefits to host states and communities. But it is much more reticent on fundamental protection principles such as the right to seek asylum and the notion of non-refoulement. The Compact also makes hardly any reference to the issue of internal displacement, despite the fact that there are twice as many IDPs as there are refugees under UNHCR’s mandate.

    So far, the picture painted by this article has been unremittingly bleak. But just as one can identify five very negative trends in relation to refugee protection, a similar number of positive developments also warrant recognition.

    First, the refugee policies pursued by states are not uniformly bad. Countries such as Canada, Germany and Uganda, for example, have all contributed, in their own way, to the task of providing refugees with the security that they need and the rights to which they are entitled. In their initial stages at least, the countries of South America and the Middle East responded very generously to the massive movements of refugees out of Venezuela and Syria.

    And while some analysts, including the current author, have felt that there was a very real risk of large-scale refugee expulsions from countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya and Lebanon, those fears have so far proved to be unfounded. While there is certainly a need for abusive states to be named and shamed, recognition should also be given to those that seek to uphold the principles of refugee protection.

    Second, the humanitarian response to refugee situations has become steadily more effective and equitable. Twenty years ago, it was the norm for refugees to be confined to camps, dependent on the distribution of food and other emergency relief items and unable to establish their own livelihoods. Today, it is far more common for refugees to be found in cities, towns or informal settlements, earning their own living and/or receiving support in the more useful, dignified and efficient form of cash transfers. Much greater attention is now given to the issues of age, gender and diversity in refugee contexts, and there is a growing recognition of the role that locally-based and refugee-led organizations can play in humanitarian programmes.

    Third, after decades of discussion, recent years have witnessed a much greater engagement with refugee and displacement issues by development and financial actors, especially the World Bank. While there are certainly some risks associated with this engagement (namely a lack of attention to protection issues and an excessive focus on market-led solutions) a more developmental approach promises to allow better long-term planning for refugee populations, while also addressing more systematically the needs of host populations.

    Fourth, there has been a surge of civil society interest in the refugee issue, compensating to some extent for the failings of states and the large international humanitarian agencies. Volunteer groups, for example, have played a critical role in responding to the refugee situation in the Mediterranean. The Refugees Welcome movement, a largely spontaneous and unstructured phenomenon, has captured the attention and allegiance of many people, especially but not exclusively the younger generation.

    And as has been seen in the UK this year, when governments attempt to demonize refugees, question their need for protection and violate their rights, there are many concerned citizens, community associations, solidarity groups and faith-based organizations that are ready to make their voice heard. Indeed, while the national asylum policies pursued by the UK and other countries have been deeply disappointing, local activism on behalf of refugees has never been stronger.

    Finally, recent events in the Middle East, the Mediterranean and Europe have raised the question as to whether refugees could be spared the trauma and hardship of making dangerous journeys from one country and continent to another by providing them with safe and legal routes. These might include initiatives such as Canada’s community-sponsored refugee resettlement programme, the ‘humanitarian corridors’ programme established by the Italian churches, family reunion projects of the type championed in the UK and France by Lord Alf Dubs, and the notion of labour mobility programmes for skilled refugee such as that promoted by the NGO Talent Beyond Boundaries.

    Such initiatives do not provide a panacea to the refugee issue, and in their early stages at least, might not provide a solution for large numbers of displaced people. But in a world where refugee protection is at such serious risk, they deserve our full support.

    http://www.against-inhumanity.org/2020/09/08/refugee-protection-at-risk

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #protection #Jeff_Crisp #crise #crise_migratoire #crise_des_réfugiés #gouvernance #gouvernance_globale #paix #Nations_unies #ONU #conflits #guerres #conseil_de_sécurité #principes_humanitaires #géopolitique #externalisation #sanctuarisation #rapatriement #covid-19 #coronavirus #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #liberté_de_mouvement #liberté_de_circulation #droits_humains #Global_Compact_on_Refugees #Comprehensive_Refugee_Response_Framework #Global_Refugee_Forum #camps_de_réfugiés #urban_refugees #réfugiés_urbains #banque_mondiale #société_civile #refugees_welcome #solidarité #voies_légales #corridors_humanitaires #Talent_Beyond_Boundaries #Alf_Dubs

    via @isskein
    ping @karine4 @thomas_lacroix @_kg_ @rhoumour

    –—
    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le global compact :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/739556

  • Réfugiés : #violences et #chaos dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie-Herzégovine
    Traduit et adapté par Manon Rumiz (Article original : https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Bosnia-Erzegovina/Migranti-caos-Bosnia-204594)

    Squats démantelés, familles déportées et laissées sans aide au bord de la route, violentes manifestations anti-migrants.... Dans le canton d’Una-Sana (nord-ouest de la Bosnie-Herzégovine), la situation des réfugiés devient toujours plus dramatique.

    « C’est le chaos. » Voilà comment Silvia Maraone, qui coordonne les activités de l’ONG italienne Ipsia (https://www.facebook.com/IPSIA.BIH) à #Bihać, résume la situation actuelle dans le canton d’#Una_Sana, explosive depuis le milieu de l’été. « Les conditions imposées par le gouvernement local n’offrent plus de répit à personne. Même les familles, les femmes et les enfants n’ont plus accès aux #camps officiels. Quant aux transports en commun, ils sont désormais interdits aux réfugiés, ce qui permet aux trafiquants de faire des affaires encore plus lucratives. »

    Dans le même temps, la police expulse les #squats et tous les #camps_informels, renvoyant les réfugiés hors des frontières du canton. La population locale, de son côté, manifeste ouvertement son hostilité face à la présence massive de candidats à l’exil. Les agressions verbales et physiques se multiplient, ainsi que les attaques contre les volontaires.

    “Le canton d’Una Sana est plus que jamais le #cul-de-sac de la route des Balkans.”

    Du fait de la #pandémie et de la proclamation de l’#état_d’urgence, la situation s’est encore détériorée depuis le printemps. Les camps officiels, déjà pleins, n’accueillent plus de nouveaux entrants alors mêmes que les arrivées ont repris depuis la réouverture des frontières au mois de juin. Le canton d’Una Sana est plus que jamais le cul-de-sac de la route des Balkans, d’autant qu’à l’ouest, le jeu de domino entre les polices italienne, slovène et croate se poursuit, aboutissant au #refoulement des migrants interceptés dans cette zone frontalière de l’Union européenne.

    La seule réponse apportée par les autorités locales a été l’ouverture, en avril, d’un « #camp_d’urgence » à Lipa, entre Bihać et #Bosanski_Petrovac, dont le millier places a vite été rempli. Les squats se sont donc multipliés dans les #friches_industrielles et dans les bois. De toute façon, les migrants ne souhaitent pas rester ici et le « #game » continue : chaque jour, ils sont des centaines à tenter de déjouer la surveillance de la frontière croate avec l’espoir de ne pas être arrêté avant d’avoir atteint l’Italie.

    Le début du « chaos » qu’évoque Silvia Maraone remonte à la mi-juillet, avec l’expulsion du camp de fortune qui s’était créé à l’entrée de #Velika_Kladuša, près du camp officiel de #Miral, le long de la rivière #Kladušnica. Officiellement, l’opération a été déclenchée à cause des plaintes répétées des riverains. Début août, la police est revenue pour chasser les migrants qui avaient reconstitué un nouveau camp.

    « #Milices_citoyennes »

    Quelques jours plus tard, le maire de Bihać, #Šuhret_Fazlić, déclarait que la situation était aussi devenue insoutenable dans sa commune. « Cela n’a jamais été pire qu’aujourd’hui. Chaque jour, nous assistons à l’arrivée d’un flux incontrôlé de migrants. Il y en a déjà des milliers qui campent un peu partout. Une fois de plus, on nous laisse seuls », avant de conclure, menaçant : « Nous sommes prêts à prendre des mesures radicales ». Ce n’est pas la première fois que le maire de Bihać tire la sonnette d’alarme. Début 2018, au tout début de la crise, l’édile déplorait déjà le manque de soutien des autorités de la Fédération, l’entité croato-bosniaque dont dépend le canton, et nationales. À l’automne 2019, Silvia Maraone s’inquiétait aussi : « La situation ne fera qu’empirer dans les mois qui viennent si de nouveaux camps officiels ne sont pas ouverts d’urgence ».

    Selon les chiffres officiels, plus de 80% des réfugiés présents sur le sol bosnien se concentreraient dans le seul canton d’Una Sana. « Il sont plus de 5000, dont à peine la moitié hébergés dans des centres d’accueil officiels. Les autres dorment dans des bâtiments détruits ou dans les bois en attendant de tenter le game », poursuit Silvia Maraone. Ces dernières semaines, la population de Velika Kladuša a organisé des manifestations hebdomadaires contre la présence de migrants. Organisées sur les réseaux sociaux, ces rassemblements réunissent des habitants venus de tout le canton.

    Pire, des #milices citoyennes ont commencé à se mettre en place pour refouler les migrants. « Dans certains groupes Facebook, des membres signalent les plaques des véhicules qui transportent des migrants », observe Silvia Maraone. « Des routes ont même été bloquées, des pierres et des bâtons jetés sur les véhicules. » Ce n’est pas tout. « Des citoyens ont attaqué des migrants en pleine rue, tandis que les volontaires leur venant en aide se sont faits dénoncer à la police. » Le 17 août, les forces de l’ordre ont dû intervenir à Velika Kladuša où des dizaines de riverains s’étaient massés et avaient attaqué un bus où se trouvaient des migrants.

    Pour justifier de telles actions coup de poing, on trouve la rhétorique habituelle de l’extrême-droite complotiste : la prétendue violence de ces migrants et la menace qu’ils feraient peser pour la sécurité de la population locale. Des arguments balayés par les statistiques officielles, mais qui font mouche auprès de Bosniens fatigués par des décennies de divisions, de corruption et de misère.

    Deux jours après la violente manifestation du 17 août à Velika Kladuša, la cellule de crise du canton d’Una-Sana a décrété des mesures très dures : l’évacuation de tous les migrants vivant hors des structures d’accueil officielles, perquisition dans tous les lieux privés offrants des services aux migrants, interdiction de quitter les camps officiels, d’utiliser les transports en commun et d’entrer dans le canton pour tous les migrants. Des postes de contrôle ont aussi été mis en place sur les routes d’accès au canton.

    “Ils ont tout brûlé, vêtements, téléphones portables, sacs à dos. Ils nous ont frappés avec des matraques.”

    « Les personnes expulsées des squats n’ont pas toutes pu être accueillies au camp de #Lipa et ont été refoulées en #Republika_Srpska (l’autre entité de Bosnie-Herzégovine) », dénonce Silvia Maraone. « Même les familles avec enfants sont abandonnées sans aucune aide. » Ces restrictions à la #liberté_de_mouvement violent les #droits_humains fondamentaux, comme l’a dénoncé Amnesty International dans un communiqué, le 25 août. Le réseau Transbalkanska Solidarnost (https://transbalkanskasolidarnost.home.blog) demande aux autorités locales et aux organisations internationales de « mettre fin à la politique du silence », de condamner publiquement ces pratiques illégales, de poursuivre les responsables et d’assurer un accueil digne et sûr aux migrants.

    Transbalkanska Solidarnost a recueilli plusieurs #témoignages sur ces expulsions, dont celles de l’ONG No Name Kitchen à Bosanska Otoka. « Nous dormions dans une ancienne usine abandonnée près de Bihać quand la police est arrivée. Il devait y avoir 20 ou 25 policiers. Ils ont tout brûlé, vêtements, téléphones portables, sacs à dos. Ils nous ont frappés avec des matraques, puis nous ont expulsés ici où nous sommes sans nourriture, sans rien. Je me suis échappé d’Afghanistan pour me sauver et là je retrouve cette violence... Pourquoi ?! », se désole A., 16 ans. Selon les chiffres des associations, plus de 500 réfugiés se sont retrouvés bloqués sur la ligne de démarcation entre les deux entités bosniennes, personne ne voulant les prendre en charge.

    Malgré les menaces qui se font toujours plus fortes, les réseaux de #volontaires continuent de venir en aide aux migrants : distribution de produits de première nécessité, de vêtements et signalement des violences et des violations des droits. « Ce n’est pas facile », reconnaît Silvia Maraone. « Tout le monde vous regarde mal et ceux que vous aidez sont détestés… Nous restons prudents. » Son ONG, Ipsia ; intervient toujours dans le camp de Bira, géré par l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM) où elle gère le Café social et prépare un projet plus vaste, soutenu par des fonds européens, pour développer des activités, hors des camps, visant à améliorer les relations entre migrants et population locale. Il y a urgence. « Jamais le bras-de-fer avec le reste de la Bosnie n’a été aussi tendu. »

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/refugies-chaos-dans-le-nord-ouest-de-la-bosnie-herzegovine

    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Bosnie #Bosnie-Herzégovine #Balkans #route_des_Balkans #camps_de_réfugiés #campements #IOM #extrême_droite #solidarité

    –-> « Quant aux transports en commun, ils sont désormais interdits aux réfugiés, ce qui permet aux trafiquants de faire des affaires encore plus lucratives »
    #ségrégation #transports_publics #transports_en_commun #apartheid

    –-> « l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM) gère le Café social et prépare un projet plus vaste, soutenu par des fonds européens, pour développer des activités, hors des camps, visant à améliorer les relations entre migrants et population locale. Il y a urgence. »
    En fait, ce qu’il faudrait faire c’est ouvrir les frontières et laisser ces personnes bloquées en Bosnie, où elles n’ont aucune intention de rester, de partir...

    ping @karine4 @isskein

  • Calais : sur instruction de Gérald Darmanin, le préfet interdit la distribution de repas aux migrants par les associations non-mandatées
    https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/863431/article/2020-09-10/migrants-le-ministre-interdit-la-distribution-des-repas-par-les-associa

    Ce jeudi en fin de journée, la maire de Calais Natacha Bouchart était reçue par le ministre de l’Intérieur Gérald Darmanin, place Beauvau, à Paris. Parmi les annonces du ministre, celle de ne plus autoriser les distributions de repas par les associations.

    Éric Dauchart | 10/09/2020

    • Après une heure et quart d’entretien avec le ministre nordiste, la maire a obtenu plusieurs avancées. Parmi elles la rédaction d’un arrêté préfectoral qui interdit la distribution de repas sauvages par les associations. Seules resteront autorisées celles de la Vie Active, financées par l’État. « Cela concerne un périmètre assez large qui va de la Mi-Voix (NDLR : centre commercial Carrefour) au Fort-Nieulay, en passant par le quai de la Moselle, la gare, le Minck… Le ministre s’est engagé à ce que l’on conserve une bonne tenue du centre-ville », note Natacha Bouchart.

      Par bonne tenue du centre-ville de Calais, le p’tit facho de l’intérieur veut dire qu’il faut avoir le bon dress code (avec un masque) pour faire son shopping.

    • comment oser ce terme de « repas sauvages » aux relents militaires racistes, ne pas énoncer plutôt « repas libres et ouverts » ou « repas solidaires », dire « repas sauvages » comme si il y avait à l’opposé des « repas civilisés ». Et c’est corroboré par le « bonne tenue du centre-ville » qui suit.
      Interdire à des personnes de recevoir un repas ce n’est pas être civilisé, c’est de la #barbarie.

      #journalisme_de_prefecture

    • Et faire croire que c’est pour des raisons sanitaires est mensonger :

      À Calais, Gérald Darmanin interdit la distribution de nourriture aux migrants
      https://www.ladepeche.fr/2020/09/12/a-calais-gerald-darmanin-interdit-la-distribution-de-nourriture-aux-migran

      Une décision fustigée par les associations

      Quatre distributions quotidiennes de repas seront toujours assurées par l’association La Vie Active selon la préfecture. L’État aurait par ailleurs mis à disposition 38 robinets d’eau dont 22 accessibles 7 jours sur 7. “L’ensemble des prestations assurées permet d’apporter aux personnes migrantes des prestations humanitaires suffisantes au regard des besoins de cette population notamment alimentaires” a estimé la préfecture.

      Des prestations jugées insuffisantes par beaucoup d’associations qui ont critiqué la décision des autorités : "Il y a un prétexte sanitaire mais aux distributions de La Vie Active (l’association mandatée par l’Etat), c’est pareil, les gens sont les uns sur les autres", a fustigé François Guennoc, vice-président de l’Auberge des migrants interrogé par l’AFP. L’Auberge des migrants dit assurer la distribution de 200 à 300 repas chaque jour en centre-ville et plusieurs centaines dans d’autres points de la ville. "Si l’Etat veut entasser les gens autour de l’hôpital (site de distribution de La Vie Active) où il y a déjà 700 personnes, il prend ses responsabilités, mais on va arriver à une situation pire que précédemment", a déclaré François Guennoc.

    • https://seenthis.net/messages/875983

      [...« Les arguments avancés sont totalement exagérés, on ne va pas laisser passer ça ! Quand on laisse des gens vivrent dans la rue, il est évident que les distanciations sociales ne peuvent être respectées », ajoute Antoine Nehr. Pour François Guennoc, cette mesure est contre-productive. « Des milliers de migrants vont s’entasser aux distributions de la Vie active, donc les mesures de distanciation ne pourront pas être appliquées », pense le militant. Selon les associations, environ 1 400 migrants sont actuellement présents à Calais...]

    • Un arrêté préfectoral indigne contre les actions de solidarité à Calais

      Communiqué LDH - 14.09.2020
      https://www.ldh-france.org/un-arrete-prefectoral-indigne-contre-les-actions-de-solidarite-a-calais

      Le ministre de l’Intérieur, pour la deuxième fois en visite à Calais depuis sa nomination, vient d’autoriser le préfet à prendre un arrêté restreignant les distributions alimentaires au centre de Calais à une seule association agréée par l’Etat, en dépit des besoins importants insatisfaits.

      Il cède ainsi aux pressions de la maire, Nathalie Bouchart, dans son travail de sape des actions humanitaires des associations et qui vise à réduire les droits fondamentaux des exilés qui cherchent désespérément à rejoindre le plus souvent famille et proches outre-manche.

      Aujourd’hui, alors que la situation reste dramatique, ces associations de terrain sont accusées de « créer des nuisances », d’organiser « des distributions de repas de façon totalement anarchique » « caractérisées par le non-respect des mesures de distanciation sociale dans le cadre de la lutte contre la Covid-19 ». (...)

    • Pour faire disparaître les migrant·es... il suffit de les affamer.
      https://www.gisti.org/spip.php?article6472
      « Il est interdit toute distribution gratuite de boissons et denrées alimentaires dans les rues listées ci-dessous [du centre-ville de Calais] pour mettre fin aux troubles à l’ordre public et limiter les risques sanitaires liés à des rassemblements non déclarés », a décidé le préfet du Pas-de-Calais par un arrêté longuement motivé publié le 10 septembre [1].
      https://www.gisti.org/IMG/pdf/arrete_2020-09-11.pdf

      Pour favoriser une meilleure compréhension de cet arrêté, nos associations en ont réalisé une réécriture, débarrassée des faux-semblants du langage bureaucratique.

      CABINET DU PRÉFET

      DIRECTION DES SÉCURITÉS - BUREAU DE LA RÉGLEMENTATION DE SÉCURITÉ

      Considérant que l’Europe et ses États membres mènent une politique visant à maintenir à distance respectable de leurs frontières les personnes qui tentent de fuir les guerres, persécutions et autres calamités provoquées par les élites politiques, économiques et financières ;

      Considérant que la présence persistante dans le centre ville de Calais de personnes que leur aspect désigne comme étrangères et totalement démunies met en évidence l’inhumanité de cette politique et constitue en conséquence une nuisance insupportable ;

      Considérant que la présence de ces exilé·es à proximité de la frontière franco-britannique accroît d’autant cette nuisance que, selon des sources bien informées, confronté aux pressions du Royaume-Uni en faveur d’un accord visant à renvoyer tous les migrant-es en provenance de France, le ministère de l’intérieur fait valoir que "si on accepte ça, on deviendra la poubelle des Anglais » [2] ;

      Considérant que les actions déterminées menées jusqu’à ce jour pour soustraire ces personnes aux regards de la population et les dissuader se rassembler sur le territoire de la commune et, si possible, du département, voire du territoire national, n’ont pas encore parfaitement atteint leur but ;

      Considérant notamment que si les destructions quotidiennes de campements, tentes et cabanes de même que les opérations policières de harcèlement et de dispersion ont largement contribué à réduire significativement leur visibilité, nombre d’entre elles s’obstinent pourtant à apparaître à la vue de tou·tes et ce, à toutes heures du jour ;

      Considérant que doit en conséquence être empêchée toute réunion de personnes paraissant étrangères et démunies ainsi que toute action favorisant ces réunions, notamment les points de fixation créés pour assurer la satisfaction de leurs besoins élémentaires ;

      Considérant que des associations subversives persévèrent à distribuer quotidiennement la nourriture dont ces personnes manquent et que, révélant les carences de la commune et de l’État, elles discréditent ainsi leur action ;

      Considérant que par une ordonnance du 22 mars 2017, le tribunal administratif de Lille avait certes sanctionné les décisions précédemment prises par la maire de Calais visant à interdire ces distributions en violation de la Convention européenne de sauvegarde des droits de l’Homme ;

      Mais considérant qu’après concertation entre la maire de Calais et le ministre de l’intérieur, il est apparu nécessaire, pour assurer l’éradication définitive des points de fixation, de passer outre cette décision de justice et, la police étant étatisée sur la commune de Calais, que soit pris un arrêté, préfectoral cette fois, réitérant les décisions interdisant la distribution de nourriture aux personnes étrangères qui en ont besoin ;

      Considérant que la pandémie de Covid 19 constitue dès lors l’occasion inespérée de fonder un tel arrêté sur les risques de propagation du virus, peu important que ces risques ne puissent être majorés par la réunion de personnes déjà en situation de proximité permanente et au demeurant parfaitement informées des mesures de distanciation à prendre ;

      Considérant en conséquence que cet arrêté doit être pris et ainsi motivé, quand bien même cette motivation apparaîtra pour ce qu’elle est : un prétexte ;

      Arrête

      Article 1er : Il est interdit aux personnes étrangères exilées et migrantes de se nourrir et, par voie de conséquence, à toute personne ou association de leur procurer de la nourriture ;

      Dans le prolongement de cet exercice de réécriture, nos associations appellent chacun·e à œuvrer pour que, sans délais, soient mises en œuvre des politiques tournant définitivement le dos à ces dérives nauséabondes et fondées sur le principe de la liberté de circulation et d’installation.
      Le 17 septembre 2020

      #gisti

      https://seenthis.net/messages/876342

  • Colombie
    La Confédération paysanne solidaire
    de la lutte pour la récupération des terres du peuple nasa

    Confédération paysanne

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Colombie-La-Confederation-paysanne-solidaire-de-la-lutte-pour-la-rec

    Depuis six ans les communautés indigènes du nord du Cauca, département de Colombie, ont ravivé les processus de récupération de terres qui leur ont été volées lors de la colonisation, épisodes de luttes acharnées.

    En décembre 2014, le peuple nasa occupe plusieurs propriétés terriennes détenues par les géants de la canne à sucre dont les monocultures s’étendent sur des centaines d’hectares dans la vallée. Ces terres sont les plus fertiles du département. Ce sont aussi celles dont ont été chassé·e·s les indigènes pendant la colonisation, où ils et elles ont été exploité·e·s par la suite, avec d’autres travailleu·se·rs pauvres, pour le compte des industries capitalistes qui gèrent la production de sucre de canne.

    Pendant les récupérations, la canne à sucre est coupée, les terres sont amendées et semées, réaménagées pour garantir un équilibre biologique depuis longtemps anéanti. Des animaux sont installés, pour paître les espaces non cultivés. Une véritable réappropriation paysanne pour l’autonomie et l’autosuffisance alimentaire. C’est une lutte que les communautés indigènes ont nommé « la libération de la Terre Mère », un « apport simple aux luttes du monde pour rétablir l’équilibre de la vie, détruit par le délire capitaliste ». « C’est pour cela qu’ils nous assassinent » et « c’est pour cela que nous sommes toujours debout ». (...)

    #Colombie #peuple_nasa #terres #libération #répression #assassinats #Confédération_paysanne #solidarité

  • Aux côtés du peuple kurde

    Pierre Bance

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Aux-cotes-du-peuple-kurde

    André Métayer
    Vingt-cinq années aux côtés du peuple kurde
    Histoire des Amitiés kurdes de Bretagne (1994-2019)

    Pourquoi s’intéresser aux Kurdes ? Pour le présent, ce ne sont pas les Kurdes par eux-mêmes qui intéressent, mais leur révolution au Rojava. Ainsi depuis sept ou huit ans, la cause kurde suscite de la curiosité en France. Encore ne faut-il pas exagérer, cet intérêt n’est souvent que compassionnel, quand il ne s’égare pas dans une exaltation qui risque fort d’être refroidie par la réalité.

    Il en est dont l’engagement est plus ancien et dont la durée assure de sa solidité. En des temps où nul ne connaissait le Rojava, où le Parti des travailleurs du Kurdistan (PKK) était suspecté de stalinisme, bien avant son abandon du marxisme-léninisme et du nationalisme dans les années 2000. Des temps, où Abdullah Öcalan, son leader, était encore libre, avant d’être kidnappé par les services secrets américains et turcs en 1999, puis emprisonné à vie dans une île de la mer de Marmara. C’était en 1994. Un petit groupe venu de Bretagne visite le Kurdistan de Turquie. Parmi eux, André Métayer. Ce qui n’aurait pu être que du tourisme militant va se muer en un engagement sous le coup de l’émotion. De ses yeux, voir un village détruit par l’armée turque comme le furent quelque quatre mille autres dans ces années de plomb, voir un peuple entier terrorisé dans ses villes et ses campagnes par la violence militaire et policière, bouleversa ces voyageurs qui prirent la résolution de se solidariser avec ces Kurdes qui paraissaient d’éternels vaincus alors qu’ils étaient d’éternels résistants. (...)

    #Kurdes #Bretagne #Turquie #résistance #amitié #solidarité #PKK #Öcalan #Erdoğan #Rojava #Moyen-Orient

  • Solidaires de « Rosa Nera », en Crète,
    où l’État grec met brutalement fin à seize années
    d’occupation libertaire auto-organisée

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Solidaires-de-Rosa-Nera-en-Crete-occupation-en-cours-de-demantelemen

    L’évacuation de l’occupation « Rosa Nera » sur la colline de Kastelli, dominant le vieux port de La Canée (Hania), a été effectuée tôt ce samedi 5 septembre au matin par les autorités policières.

    Depuis la prise du pouvoir par un gouvernement de droite, des dizaines de squats politiques anarchistes ou antiautoritaires ont été évacués par la violence policière ; il s’agit d’une décision centrale d’« ordre et de sécurité » appliquée par l’État grec.

    À La Canée, la zone était bouclée ce matin par plusieurs forces de police depuis 5 h 30. Tout de suite, les personnes solidaires ont été informées et ont commencé à se rassembler. L’opération d’évacuation a été menée par les Forces spéciales antiémeutes, alors que des forces de police locales ont également participé à l’opération. La colline était entourée de flics. Une escouade bleue — provenant peut-être de la ville voisine de Réthymnon — avait bloqué l’entrée du passage menant à l’occupation.

    Lorsque se déroulait l’opération de transfert à la direction de la police de celles et ceux détenu·e·s à l’intérieur du bâtiment (il s’agit de seize arrêté·e·s, parmi eux des immigré·e·s hébergé·e·s dans l’occupation), les personnes rassemblées criaient des slogans comme « Tout est à nous car tout est volé, occupons les villas et les maisons abandonnées », « Dans vos têtes il n’y a que la merde, comment comprendre ce que signifie liberté » (adressé aux flics) alors qu’ils et elles désignaient les équipes qui se rendaient sur la zone pour évacuer les lieux. (...)

    #Grèce #Crète #Rosa_Nera #occupation #anarchiste #démantèlement #répression #solidarité

  • #Montpellier : #expulsion du #squat_Bouisson-Bertrand, expulsion de la honte
    https://fr.squat.net/2020/09/01/montpellier-expulsion-du-squat-bouisson-bertrand-expulsion-de-la-honte

    La police a procédé lundi 31 août au matin à l’expulsion du squat Bouisson-Bertrand, situé rue de la Croix-Verte dans le quartier d’Euromédecine à Montpellier, et qui accueillait jusqu’à 200 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile depuis plus d’un an et demi. Des dizaines de migrant·es et de militant·es se sont mobilisé·es en se rassemblant devant la […]

    #778_rue_de_la_Croix_Verte #Euromédecine #ex_Institut_Bouisson_Bertrand #sans-papiers #Solidarité_Partagée #squat_de_la_Croix_Verte

  • Sorbonne nouvelle annonce son diplôme DU Passerelle

    L’université Sorbonne nouvelle ouvert les portes pour les étudiants exilés par son diplôme DU Passerelle.

    Le DU Passerelle est un diplôme d’université qui accueille des étudiants en exil titulaires d’un équivalent du bac, souhaitant commencer ou reprendre des études.

    La formation vise l’acquisition de compétences linguistiques, culturelles et méthodologiques relatives au niveau B2 du Cadre européen de référence, avec pour objectif l’insertion des étudiants dans une formation universitaire.

    https://uniondesetudiantsexiles.org/fr/archives/1401
    #université #réfugiés #asile #migrations #solidarité #France #Sorbonne

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les villes refuge, et plus précisément sur les #universités-refuge :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145#message766829

  • Banksy funds refugee rescue boat operating in Mediterranean | Refugees | The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/aug/27/banksy-funds-refugee-rescue-boat-operating-in-mediterranean
    https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/9c537a55c8670bc3aae9d8384dd7a036078b08ff/0_0_3451_2072/master/3451.jpg?width=605&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=4a6708442fa582f5

    The British street artist #Banksy has financed a boat to rescue refugees attempting to reach Europe from north Africa, the Guardian can reveal.

    The vessel, named #Louise_Michel after a French feminist anarchist, set off in secrecy on 18 August from the Spanish seaport of Burriana, near Valencia, and is now in the central Mediterranean where on Thursday it rescued 89 people in distress, including 14 women and four children.

    It is now looking for a safe seaport to disembark the passengers or to transfer them to a European coastguard vessel.[...]

    Banksy’s involvement in the rescue mission goes back to September 2019 when he sent an email to #Pia_Klemp, the former captain of several NGO boats that have rescued thousands of people over recent years.

    Une bien belle équipe #migration #sauvetage #réfugié·es #assistance #humanisme #solidarité

    • https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2020/08/27/un-navire-pour-secourir-les-migrants-en-mediterranee-le-dernier-projet-du-st

      Ayant d’abord cru qu’il s’agissait d’un canular, Pia Klemp estime que Banksy l’a choisie en raison de ses prises de position politiques : « Je ne vois pas le sauvetage en mer comme une action humanitaire, mais comme faisant partie d’un combat antifasciste » , déclare-t-elle. Les dix membres d’équipage du Louise-Michel se revendiquent tous comme des militants antiracistes et antifascistes prônant un changement politique radical, rapporte le Guardian.

      https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EgfvZayUYAEadhM?format=jpg&name=small

    • via @val_k sur cuicui
      https://paris-luttes.info/l-humanitaire-ce-n-est-pas-ma-14189

      L’humanitaire, ce n’est pas ma lutte .

      Retour de mission avec l’ONG de sauvetage en mer Seawatch.

      Non, Papa, je ne crois pas que je sois fière de moi.

      A mon retour de mission avec Seawatch, tu as été le premier à me demander si j’étais « fière ».

      Fière de ces plus de 200 vies secourues en Méditerranée, « arrachées à l’enfer libyen » au cours de trois opérations de sauvetages difficiles. Difficiles car en contexte de COVID-19. De fermeture des ports européens. De politique d’intimidation des milices libyennes. De météo dégueulasse pour un mois de juin.

      Non, Papa, je ne crois pas que je sois fière de moi. La vérité, c’est que je n’ai jamais eu aussi honte. Je n’ai jamais été aussi en colère.

      La vérité, c’est que je ne sais pas comment je pourrais être fière.

      D’avoir embarqué sur un bateau de sauvetage avec d’autres militant.e.s plus ou moins pro pour secourir des vies en mer que les États européens ont les moyens et l’obligation légale de sauver eux-mêmes.

      D’avoir distribué des gilets de sauvetage à des enfants tout juste nés et d’avoir découvert à ce moment-là que les tailles bébés existaient aussi pour les équipements de secours en mer.

      D’avoir tenu dans mes bras des êtres humains incapables de soutenir leur poids, couverts d’essence et d’excréments après avoir dérivé pendant trois jours en mer.

      D’avoir dû avec le reste de l’équipage maintenir des corps en vie sur un bateau surpeuplé et une mer agitée en attendant que l’Italie accepte d’ouvrir ses ports pour les accueillir.

      D’avoir distribué des barres de survie, des chaussettes et des brosses à dents à des gens infiniment plus autonomes que moi.

      D’avoir pris soin de corps meurtris, affamés et torturés pour rien. Au nom de l’absurdité des politiques migratoires européennes.

      De m’être presque habituée aux histoires de torture et de viols. Aux marques sur les corps.

      D’avoir répondu « oui, je sais… » à une énième histoire de Libye. Pour l’écourter. Pour ne pas entendre plus. Ne pas voir.

      D’avoir été si faible devant des gens si forts.

      D’avoir oublié, le temps d’une fête improvisée sur le pont arrière du Sea watch, au milieu des cris de joie, des rires et des danses, la violence et l’absurdité de la situation.

      D’avoir menti en acquiesçant aux « tout ira mieux en Europe » lâchés çà et là, de peur de froisser trop vite et trop tôt des espoirs impossibles.

      D’avoir distraitement répondu « see you soon in Paris », sans avoir le courage d’expliquer la merde qu’était Dublin, de peur que des gens se jettent par-dessus bord, comme cela s’est passé sur l’Ocean Viking.

      D’avoir offert à ces personnes comme premier spectacle de l’Europe des hommes en uniforme armés de matraques.

      D’avoir endossé à leurs yeux l’image affreuse et violente du héros. Du sauveteur blanc venant au secours de personnes racisées.

      D’avoir dû « offrir » à des gens comme un privilège ce qui relève d’un droit fondamental.

      D’avoir posé mes fesses dans un avion pour faire un Palerme-Paris à 50 euros en pensant que ce même trajet prendrait à mes ami.e.s des mois voire des années, plusieurs centaines d’euros, une bonne dose de violences policières et tant des tracas administratifs.

      D’avoir lu à mon retour, dans un journal italien à l’aéroport, qu’au mois de juin, 20% des personnes ayant tenté de traverser la Méditerranée avaient perdu la vie.

      D’avoir les soirs observé la mer depuis la proue du bateau et de l’avoir trouvée belle. Aimé ce qui est une hideuse fosse commune. De m’y être baigné. D’y avoir nagé.

      D’avoir, entre deux dinghies, croisé en mer des ferries et des bateaux de croisière remplis de gens qui ont le droit de voyager. D’être libres. De vivre.

      D’avoir partagé des moments si forts et si précaires avec des inconnus, qui pour certains sont devenus des ami.e.s.

      Des personnes avec lesquelles on aimerait lutter ensemble et debout, plutôt qu’assise sur le pont d’un bateau à distribuer des chaussettes.

      Non, Papa, je ne crois pas que je sois fière de moi. La vérité, c’est que je n’ai jamais eu aussi honte. Je n’ai jamais été aussi en colère.

      L’humanitaire, ce n’est pas ma lutte. Ce n’est celle de personne d’ailleurs. Ni celle de Seawatch. Ni de son équipage.

      Tout cela ne devrait juste pas exister.

    • Migrants : deux navires humanitaires au secours du bateau de Banksy en Méditerranée
      https://www.arte.tv/fr/afp/actualites/migrants-deux-navires-humanitaires-au-secours-du-bateau-de-banksy-en-mediterran

      Deux navires humanitaires sont en route pour porter assistance au bateau affrété en Méditerranée par le street artist Banksy, qui compte 219 migrants à bord et a lancé un appel de détresse, a-t-on appris samedi de sources concordantes.
      Parti le 18 août d’Espagne dans le plus grand secret, le Louise-Michel est actuellement dans l’incapacité d’avancer après avoir sauvé vendredi 130 naufragés supplémentaires et a demandé « une assistance immédiate », affirmant avoir sollicité les autorités italiennes et maltaises. Un migrant est mort sur le bateau et plusieurs sont blessés.
      Actuellement en Méditerranée, où il a sauvé 201 migrants et est lui-même en quête d’un port d’accueil, le Sea-Watch 4 a décidé de venir en aide au Louise-Michel « face à l’absence de réaction » des autorités, a indiqué à l’AFP un porte-parole de l’ONG allemande Sea-Watch qui affrète ce bateau avec Médecins sans frontières.
      « Nous avons une clinique à bord du Sea-Watch 4 et on va voir comment on peut les aider. On pourra aussi peut-être prendre des migrants à bord même si nous avons des procédures Covid à respecter », a complété Hassiba Hadj-Sahraoui, chargée des questions humanitaires de MSF aux Pays-Bas, qui dénonce la « situation intenable » des navires humanitaires en Méditerranée.
      Parallèlement, le collectif italien de gauche Mediterranea a annoncé l’envoi du navire Mare Ionio depuis le port d’Augusta en Sicile pour porter assistance au Louise-Michel, invoquant lui aussi l’absence de réponse de l’Italie ou de Malte face « au danger de mort imminent » encouru par les migrants.
      « La situation est dramatique (...) Il y a beaucoup de femmes et d’enfants, beaucoup de gens ont de graves problèmes médicaux à cause de brûlures d’essence et de nombreuses heures passées en mer », affirme le collectif dans un communiqué.
      Selon les dernières données du Haut-commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), les tentatives de départ augmentent en Méditerranée, route migratoire la plus meurtrière du monde. Entre début janvier et fin juillet, les tentatives au départ de la Libye ont augmenté de 91%, comparé à la même période l’an dernier, représentant 14.481 personnes ayant pris la mer.

    • Le bateau Le Louise Michel avec des migrants à bord a été refusé par plusieurs villes. Mais Marseille décide de lui venir en aide.
      https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/migrants/marseille-ouvre-son-port-au-louise-michel_4089283.html

      Qu’est-ce qui a motivé la Ville à prendre cette décision ? « Justement, ce ne sont pas des migrants. Je n’accepte pas ce terme. Ce sont des naufragés, ce sont de gens qui risquent la mort. Ils sont en mer dans une situation critique. Le droit maritime, l’Histoire maritime, l’Histoire de la ville, tous convoquent notre responsabilité. Des femmes et des enfants sont en train de mourir… dans cette situation-là, on ne demande ni les papiers, ni la régularité de la situation de ces gens-là. On les sauve, on les secoure », martèle Benoit Payan, premier adjoint de la ville de Marseille.

  • Agression contre les communautés zapatistes,
    le Congrès national indigène appelle à la solidarité

    CNI

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/Agression-contre-des-communautes-zapatistes-le-Congres-national-indi

    Aux peuples du Mexique et du monde,

    Le Conseil indigène de gouvernement - Congrès national indigène dénonce la lâche attaque des membres du groupe paramilitaire appelé Organisation régionale des caféiculteurs d’Ocosingo (Orcao) qui, le samedi 22 août aux environs de 11 heures du matin, ont volé et brûlé les installations du Centro de Comercio Nuevo Amanecer del Arcoiris situé sur le site connu comme « croisement » de Cuxuljá, Commune autonome Lucio Cabañas, à l’intérieur de la municipalité officielle d’Ocosingo, Chiapas.

    L’organisation paramilitaire Orcao a maintenu depuis des années une pression, et une violence constante sur les communautés zapatistes ; c’est le cas dans la Commune autonome Moisés Gandhi, pour arrêter l’organisation autonome, pour privatiser les terres qui ont coûté la lutte et l’organisation des peuples originaires bases d’appui zapatistes, pour terroriser et menacer les compañeros et compañeras qui depuis le bas ont parié sur l’espoir. C’est le cas aussi des diverses agressions contre les compañeros du Congrès national indigène qui furent violentés et séquestrés par les paramilitaires de l’Orcao, les « Chinchulines » et des gens du parti Morena.

    Nous dénonçons la guerre qui, depuis le haut, se déploie contre l’organisation des communautés zapatistes en même temps que d’en haut les mauvais gouvernements cherchent à imposer, dans tout le pays, les mégaprojets de mort auxquels nous nous opposons et nous opposerons, parce que nous ne sommes pas disposés à renoncer à nos territoires et à permettre la destruction que nous promettent les puissants. (...)

    #Mexique #Chiapas #zapatistes #paramilitaires #agression #solidarité

  • Chrysochoidis meets Austrian interior minister

    Citizens’ Protection Minister #Michalis_Chrysochoidis on Tuesday thanked Austria for helping Greece secure its border with Turkey which tens of thousands of migrants and refugees tried for days to breach in March.

    Chrysochoidis was speaking during a meeting with Austrian Interior Minister #Karl_Nehammer in Athens for talks on security, migration and the novel coronavirus.

    “In #Evros in March, we, you and other Europeans moved Europe forward. We fought for a common cause: our borders,” Chrysochoidis said.

    “There was no hesitation about supporting Greece,” Nehammer said about the decision to send dozens of police officers to the border.

    “At this difficult time, European solidarity depends on actions, not just words,” he said.

    “We had to send a clear message to Turkey that no one will be left alone,” he said.

    https://www.ekathimerini.com/256205/article/ekathimerini/news/chrysochoidis-meets-austrian-interior-minister
    #Autriche #Grèce #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #externalisation #Turquie #police #solidarité_européenne (sic)

    –---

    Ajouté au fil de discussion sur l’extension du mur dans l’Evros, car l’envoi de policiers participe aussi à la militarisation de la frontière :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/830355

  • 19 septembre - 17 octobre
    Marche nationale des sans-papiers

    https://lavoiedujaguar.net/19-septembre-17-octobre-Marche-nationale-des-sans-papiers

    À l’appel de quinze collectifs de sans-papiers, de la Marche des solidarités, des États généraux des migrations et de plus de cent vingt organisations, des sans-papiers marcheront à partir du 19 septembre des quatre coins du pays pour atteindre Paris en une grande manifestation le samedi 17 octobre.

    Acte 3 des sans-papiers
    De toutes les villes, de tous les foyers et de tous les quartiers,
    on marche vers l’Élysée !

    Acte 1. Le 30 mai des milliers de sans-papiers et de soutiens ont bravé l’interdiction de manifester à Paris et dans plusieurs autres villes.

    Dans les jours et les semaines qui ont suivi des dizaines de milliers de personnes ont manifesté contre le racisme et les violences policières.

    Acte 2. Le 20 juin des dizaines de milliers de sans-papiers et soutiens ont manifesté à Paris, Marseille, Lyon, Lille, Rennes, Montpellier, Strasbourg et dans de nombreuses autres villes.

    Mais Macron n’a eu aucun mot pour les « premier·e·s de corvée », aucun mot pour les sans-papiers, exploité·e·s dans les pires des conditions ou perdant leur emploi sans chômage partiel, retenu·e·s dans les CRA (centres de rétention administrative), vivant à la rue ou dans des hébergements souvent précaires et insalubres. Aucun mot pour les jeunes migrant·e·s isolé·e·s. Il n’a eu aucun mot contre le racisme, aucun mot pour les victimes des violences policières. (...)

    #sans-papiers #mobilisation #marche #solidarité #migrations #régularisation #17_octobre