• Decolonisation and humanitarian response

    As part of our annual Careers in Humanitarianism Day, we were joined by:

    #Juliano_Fiori (Save the Children, and PhD Candidate at HCRI)
    – Professor #Patricia_Daley (Oxford University)
    – Professor #Elena_Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL)

    in discussion (and sometimes disagreement!) on the notions of humanitarianism and decolonisation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLcf7O1Y_SOZQ24s6vCT8rtR9ANGs0nzEi&v=BSTjc3YCH9I&feature=youtu.b


    #décolonialité #décolonialisme #humanitaire #conférence

    ping @cede @isskein @karine4

    • Migration, Humanitarianism, and the Politics of Knowledge —> An Interview with #Juliano_Fiori.

      Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh: In this issue of Migration and Society we are interested in the overarching theme of “Recentering the South in Studies of Migration.” Indeed, it is increasingly acknowledged that studies of and policy responses to migration and displacement often have a strong Northern bias. For instance, in spite of the importance of different forms of migration within, across, and between countries of the “global South” (i.e., “South-South migration”), there is a significant tendency to focus on migration from “the South” to countries of “the North” (i.e., South-North migration), prioritizing the perspectives and interests of stakeholders associated with the North. Against this backdrop, what is your position with regard to claims of Eurocentrism in studies of and responses to migration?

      Juliano Fiori: To the extent that they emerge from immanent critiques of colonialism and liberal capitalism, I am sympathetic toward them.1 Decentering (or provincializing) Europe is necessarily an epistemological project of deconstruction. But to contribute to a counterhegemonic politics, this project must move beyond the diagnosis of epistemicide to challenge the particular substance of European thought that has produced systems of oppression.

      The idea of “decolonizing the curriculum” is, of course, à la mode (Sabaratnam 2017; Vanyoro 2019). It is difficult to dispute the pedagogical necessity to question epistemic hierarchies and create portals into multiple worlds of knowledge. These endeavors are arguably compatible with the exigencies of Enlightenment reason itself. But, though I recognize Eurocentrism as an expression of white identity politics, I am wary of the notion that individual self-identification with a particular body of knowledge is a worthy or sufficient end for epistemic decolonization—a notion I associate with a prevalent strain of woke post-politics, which, revering the cultural symbols of late capitalism but seeking to resignify them, surely produces a solipsistic malaise. Decolonization of the curriculum must at least aim at the reconstruction of truths.

      Eurocentrism in the study of human migration is perhaps particularly problematic—and brazen—on account of the transnational and transcultural histories that migrants produce. Migrants defy the neat categorization of territories and peoples according to civilizational hierarchies. They redefine the social meaning of physical frontiers, and they blur the cultural frontier between Self and Other. They contribute to an intellectual miscegenation that undermines essentialist explanations of cultural and philosophical heritage. Migration itself is decentering (Achiume 2019).

      And it is largely because of this that it is perceived as a threat. Let’s consider Europe’s contemporary backlash against immigration. The economic argument about the strain immigration places on the welfare state—often framed in neo-Malthusian terms—can be readily rebutted with evidence of immigrants’ net economic contribution. But concerns about the dethroning of “European values” are rarely met head-on; progressive political elites have rather responded by doubling down on calls for multiculturalism from below, while promoting universalism from above, intensifying the contradictions of Eurocentricity.

      It is unsurprising that, in the Anglophone world, migration studies developed the trappings of an academic discipline—dedicated university programs, journals, scholarly societies—in the late 1970s, amid Western anxieties about governing increased emigration from postcolonial states. It quickly attracted critical anthropologists and postcolonial theorists. But the study of the itinerant Other has tended to reinforce Eurocentric assumptions. Migration studies has risen from European foundations. Its social scientific references, its lexicon, its institutional frameworks and policy priorities, its social psychological conceptions of identity—all position Europe at the zero point. It has assembled an intellectual apparatus that privileges the Western gaze upon the hordes invading from the barrens. That this gaze might be cast empathetically does nothing to challenge epistemic reproduction: Eurocentrism directs attention toward the non-Western Other, whose passage toward Europe confirms the centrality of Europe and evokes a response in the name of Eurocentrism. To the extent that Western scholars focus on South-South migration, the policy relevance of their research is typically defined by its implications for flows from South to North.

      The Eurocentrism of responses to forced migration by multinational charities, UN agencies, and the World Bank is not only a product of the ideological and cultural origins of these organizations. It also reflects the political interests of their principal donors: Western governments. Aid to refugees in countries neighboring Syria has been amply funded, particularly as the European Union has prioritized the containment of Syrians who might otherwise travel to Europe. Meanwhile, countries like India, South Africa, and Ivory Coast, which host significant numbers of regional migrants and refugees, receive proportionally little attention and support.

      It is an irony of European containment policies that, while adopted as a measure against supposed threats to Europeanness, they undermine the moral superiority that Eurocentrism presupposes. The notion of a humanitarian Europe is unsustainable when European efforts to deter immigration are considered alongside the conditions accepted for other regions of the world. A continent of more than half a billion people, Europe hosts just under 2.3 million refugees; Lebanon, with a population of six million, hosts more than 1.5 million refugees from Syria alone. It should be noted that, in recent years, European citizens’ movements have mobilized resources to prevent the death of people crossing the Mediterranean. Initiatives like Alarm Phone, Open Arms, Sea Watch, and SOS MEDITERRANEE seem to represent a politicized humanitarianism for the network age. But in their overt opposition to an emboldened ethnonationalist politics, they seek to rescue not only migrants and refugees, but also an idea of Europe.

      EFQ: How, if at all, do you engage with constructs such as “the global North,” “the global South,” and “the West” in your own work?

      JF: I inevitably use some of these terms more than others, but they are all problematic in a way, so I just choose the one that I think best conveys my intended meaning in each given context. West, North, and core are not interchangeable; they are associated with distinct, if overlapping, ontologies and temporalities. As are Third World, South, and developing world.

      I try to stick to three principles when using these terms. The first is to avoid the sort of negative framing to which your work on South-South encounters has helpfully drawn attention (i.e., Fiddian-Qasmiyeh 2015, 2018; Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley 2018). When we come across one of these terms being deployed negatively, it invariably describes that which is not of the West or of the North. As such, it centers Europe and North America, and it opens up an analytical terrain on which those residing beyond the imagined cultural bounds of these regions tend to be exoticized. When I need to frame something negatively, I try to do so directly, using the appropriate prefix.

      Second, I try to avoid setting up dichotomies and continuities. Placing East and West or North and South in opposition implies entirely dissimilar bodies, separated by a definite, undeviating frontier. But these terms are mutually constitutive, and it is rarely clear where, or even if, a frontier can be drawn. Such dichotomies also imply a conceptual equilibrium: that what lies on one side of the opposition is ontologically equivalent to what lies on the other. But the concept of the West is not equivalent to what the East represents today; indeed, it is questionable whether a concept of the East is now of much analytical value. South, West, North, and East might be constructed dialectically, but their imagined opposites are not necessarily their antitheses. Each arguably has more than one counterpoint.

      Similarly, I generally don’t use terms that associate countries or regions with stages of development—most obviously, least developed, developing, and developed. They point toward a progressivist and teleological theory of history to which I don’t subscribe. (The world-systems concepts of core, semiperiphery, and periphery offer a corrective to national developmental mythologies, but they are nonetheless inscribed in a systemic teleology.) The idea of an inexorable march toward capitalist modernity—either as the summit of civilization or as the point of maximum contradiction—fails to account for the angles, forks, and dead ends that historical subjects encounter. It also tends to be founded on a Eurocentric and theological economism that narrows human experience and, I would argue, mistakenly subordinates the political.

      Third, I try to use these terms conceptually, without presenting them as fixed unities. They must be sufficiently tight as concepts to transmit meaning. But they inevitably obscure the heterogeneity they encompass, which is always in flux. Moreover, as concepts, they are continuously resignified by discursive struggles and the reordering of the interstate system. Attempts to define them too tightly, according to particular geographies or a particular politics, can give the impression that they are ahistorical. Take Boaventura de Sousa Santos’s definition of the South, for example. For Santos, the South is not a geographical concept: he contends that it also exists in the geographical North (2014, 2016). Rather, it is a metaphor for the human suffering caused by capitalism and colonialism. It is anticapitalist, anticolonialist, antipatriarchal, and anti-imperialist. According to this definition, the South becomes representative of a particular left-wing politics (and it is negative). It thus loses its utility as a category of macrosociological analysis.

      Ultimately, all these terms are problematic because they are sweeping. But it is also for this reason that they can be useful for certain kinds of systemic analysis.

      EFQ: You have written on the history of “Western humanitarianism” (i.e., Fiori 2013; Baughan and Fiori 2015). Why do you focus on the “Western” character of humanitarianism?

      JF: I refer to “Western humanitarianism” as a rejoinder to the fashionable notion that there is a universal humanitarian ethic. Within both the Anglophone academy and the aid sector, it has become a commonplace that humanitarianism needs to be decolonized, and that the way to do this is to recognize and nurture “local” humanitarianisms around the world. In the last decade and a half, enthusiasm for global history has contributed to broader and more sophisticated understandings of how humanitarian institutions and discourses have been constructed. But it has also arguably contributed to the “humanitarianization” of different altruistic impulses, expressions of solidarity, and charitable endeavors across cultures.

      The term “humanitarian” was popularized in English and French in the first half of the nineteenth century, and it soon became associated with humanistic religion. It thus connoted the existence of an ideal humanity within every individual and, as Didier Fassin (2012) has argued, it has come to represent the secularization of the Christian impulse to life. It was used to describe a wide range of campaigns, from abolition and temperance to labor reform. But all promoted a rationalist conception of humanity derived from European philosophy. That is, an abstract humanity, founded upon a universal logos and characterized by the mind-body duality. What is referred to today as the “humanitarian system”—of financial flows and liberal institutions—has been shaped predominantly by Western power and political interests. But the justification for its existence also depends upon the European division between the reasoned human and the unreasoned savage. The avowed purpose of modern humanitarianism is to save, convert, and civilize the latter. To cast modern humanitarian reason as a universal is to deny the specificity of ethical dispositions born of other conceptions of humanity. Indeed, the French philosopher François Jullien (2014) has argued that the concept of “the universal” itself is of the West.

      Of course, there are practices that are comparable to those of Western humanitarian agencies across different cultures. However, claiming these for humanitarianism sets them on European foundations, regardless of their author’s inspiration; and it takes for granted that they reproduce the minimalist politics of survival with which the Western humanitarian project has come to be associated.

      So why not refer to “European humanitarianism”? First, because it must be recognized that, as a set of evolving ethical practices, humanitarianism does not have a linear intellectual genealogy. European philosophy itself has of course been influenced by other traditions of thought (see Amin 1989; Bevilacqua 2018; Hobson 2004; Patel 2018): pre-Socratic Greek thinkers borrowed from the Babylonians, the Persians, and the Egyptians; Enlightenment philosophes had exchanges with Arab intellectuals. Second, reference to the West usefully points to the application of humanitarian ideas through systems of power.

      Since classical antiquity, wars and ruptures have produced various narratives of the West. In the mid-twentieth century, essentialist histories of Western civilization emphasized culture. For Cold War political scientists, West and East often represented distinct ideological projects. I refer to the West as something approaching a sociopolitical entity—a power bloc—that starts to take form in the early nineteenth century as Western European intellectuals and military planners conceive of Russia as a strategic threat in the East. This bloc is consolidated in the aftermath of World War I, under the leadership of the United States, which, as net creditor to Europe, shapes a new liberal international order. The West, then, becomes a loose grouping of those governments and institutional interests (primarily in Europe and North America) that, despite divergences, have been at the forefront of efforts to maintain and renew this order. During the twentieth century, humanitarians were sometimes at odds with the ordering imperatives of raison d’état, but contemporary humanitarianism is a product of this West—and a pillar of liberal order.2

      EFQ: With this very rich historically and theoretically grounded discussion in mind, it is notable that policy makers and practitioners are implementing diverse ways of “engaging” with “the global South” through discourses and practices of “partnership” and supporting more “horizontal,” rather than “vertical,” modes of cooperation. In turn, one critique of such institutionalized policy engagement is that it risks instrumentalizing and co-opting modes of so-called South-South cooperation and “hence depoliticising potential sources of resistance to the North’s neoliberal hegemony” (Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley 2018: 2). Indeed, as you suggested earlier, it has been argued that policy makers are strategically embracing “South-South migration,” “South-South cooperation,” and the “localisation of aid agenda” as efficient ways both “to enhance development outcomes” and to “keep ‘Southerners’ in the South,” as “part and parcel of Northern states’ inhumane, racist and racialised systems of border and immigration control” (Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Daley 2018: 19). What, if any, are the dangers of enhancing “policy engagement” with “the South”? To what extent do you think that such instrumentalization and co-option can be avoided?

      JF: The term “instrumentalization” gives the impression that there are circumstances under which policy engagement can be objectively just and disinterested. Even when framed as humanitarian, the engagement of Western actors in the South is inspired by a particular politics. Policy engagement involves an encounter of interests and a renegotiation of power relations; for each agent, all others are instruments in its political strategy. Co-option is just a symptom of negotiation between unequal agents with conflicting interests—which don’t need to be stated, conscious, or rationally pursued. It is the means through which the powerful disarm and transform agendas they cannot suppress.

      The “localization agenda” is a good example. Measures to enable effective local responses to disaster are now discussed as a priority at international humanitarian congresses. These discussions can be traced at least as far back as Robert Chambers’s work (1983) on participatory rural development, in the 1980s. And they gathered momentum in the mid-2000s, as a number of initiatives promoted greater local participation in humanitarian operations. But, of course, there are different ideas about what localization should entail.

      As localization has climbed the humanitarian policy agenda, the overseas development divisions of Western governments have come to see it as an opportunity to increase “value for money” and, ultimately, reduce aid expenditure. They promote cash transfer programming as the most “empowering” aid technology. Localization then becomes complementary to the integration of emergency response into development agendas, and to the expansion of markets.

      Western humanitarian agencies that call for localization—and there are those, notably some branches of Médecins Sans Frontières, that do not—have generally fallen in line with this developmental interpretation, on account of their own ideological preferences as much as coercion by donor governments. But they have also presented localization as a moral imperative: a means of “shifting power” to the South to decolonize humanitarianism. While localization might be morally intuitive, Western humanitarians betray their hubris in supposing that their own concessions can reorder the aid industry and the geostrategic matrix from which it takes form. Their proposed solutions, then, including donor budgetary reallocations, are inevitably technocratic. Without structural changes to the political economy of aid, localization becomes a pretext for Western governments and humanitarian agencies to outsource risk. Moreover, it sustains a humanitarian imaginary that associates Westerners with “the international”—the space of politics, from which authority is born—and those in disaster-affected countries with “the local”—the space of the romanticized Other, vulnerable but unsullied by the machinations of power. (It is worth stating that the term “localization” itself implies the transformation of something “global” into something local, even though “locals”—some more than others—are constitutive of the global.)

      There are Southern charities and civil society networks—like NEAR,3 for example—that develop similar narratives on localization, albeit in more indignant tones. They vindicate a larger piece of the pie. But, associating themselves with a neomanagerial humanitarianism, they too embrace a politics incapable of producing a systemic critique of the coloniality of aid.

      Yet demands for local ownership of disaster responses should also be situated within histories of the subaltern. Some Western humanitarian agencies that today advocate for localization, including Save the Children, once faced opposition from anticolonial movements to their late imperial aid projects. More recently, so-called aid recipient perception surveys have repeatedly demonstrated the discontent of disaster-affected communities regarding impositions of foreign aid, but they have also demonstrated anguish over histories of injustice in which the Western humanitarian is little more than an occasional peregrine. It is the structural critique implicit in such responses that the localization agenda sterilizes. In the place of real discussion about power and inequalities, then, we get a set of policy prescriptions aimed at the production of self-sufficient neoliberal subjects, empowered to save themselves through access to markets.

      While some such co-option is always likely in policy engagement, it can be reduced through the formation of counterhegemonic coalitions. Indeed, one dimension of what is now called South-South cooperation involves a relatively old practice among Southern governments of forming blocs to improve their negotiating position in multilateral forums. And, in the twenty-first century, they have achieved moderate successes on trade, global finance, and the environment. But it is important to recognize that co-option occurs in South-South encounters too. And, of course, that political affinities and solidarity can and do exist across frontiers.

      EFQ: You edited the first issue of the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs, which focused on “humanitarianism and the end of liberal order” (see Fiori 2019), and you are also one of the editors of a forthcoming book on this theme, Amidst the Debris: Humanitarianism and the End of Liberal Order. New populisms of the right now challenge the liberal norms and institutions that have shaped the existing refugee regime and have promoted freer movement of people across borders. Can decolonial and anticolonial thinking provide a basis for responses to displacement and migration that do more than resist?

      JF: Any cosmopolitan response to migration is an act of resistance to the political organization of the interstate system.4 As blood-and-soil politicians now threaten to erect walls around the nation-state, the political meaning and relevance of cosmopolitan resistance changes. But if this resistance limits itself to protecting the order that appears to be under threat, it is likely to be ineffective. Moreover, an opportunity to articulate internationalisms in pursuit of a more just order will be lost.

      In recent years, liberal commentators have given a great deal of attention to Trump, Salvini, Duterte, Orbán, Bolsonaro, and other leading figures of the so-called populist Right. And these figures surely merit attention on account of their contributions to a significant conjunctural phenomenon. But the fetishization of their idiosyncrasies and the frenzied investigation of their criminality serves a revanchist project premised on the notion that, once they are removed from office (through the ballot box or otherwise), the old order of things will be restored. To be sure, the wave that brought them to power will eventually subside; but the structures (normative, institutional, epistemological) that have stood in its way are unlikely to be left intact. Whether the intention is to rebuild these structures or to build new ones, it is necessary to consider the winds that produced the wave. In other words, if a cosmopolitan disposition is to play a role in defining the new during the current interregnum, resistance must be inscribed into strategies that take account of the organic processes that have produced Trumpism and Salvinism.

      French geographer Christophe Guilluy offers an analysis of one aspect of organic change that I find compelling, despite my discomfort with the nativism that occasionally flavors his work. Guilluy describes a hollowing out of the Western middle class (2016, 2018). This middle class was a product of the postwar welfarist pact. But, since the crisis of capitalist democracy in the 1970s, the internationalization of capital and the financialization of economies have had a polarizing effect on society. According to Guilluy, there are now two social groupings: the upper classes, who have profited from neoliberal globalization or have at least been able to protect themselves from its fallout; and the lower classes, who have been forced into precarious labor and priced out of the city. It is these lower classes who have had to manage the multicultural integration promoted by progressive neoliberals of the center-left and center-right. Meanwhile, the upper classes have come to live in almost homogenous citadels, from which they cast moral aspersions on the reactionary lower classes who rage against the “open society.” An assertion of cultural sovereignty, this rage has been appropriated by conservatives-turned-revolutionaries, who, I would argue, represent one side of a new political dichotomy. On the other side are the progressives-turned-conservatives, who cling to the institutions that once seemed to promise the end of politics.

      This social polarization would appear to be of significant consequence for humanitarian and human rights endeavors, since their social base has traditionally been the Western middle class. Epitomizing the open society, humanitarian campaigns to protect migrants deepen resentment among an aging precariat, which had imagined that social mobility implied an upward slope, only to fall into the lower classes. Meanwhile, the bourgeois bohemians who join the upper classes accommodate themselves to their postmodern condition, hunkering down in their privileged enclaves, where moral responses to distant injustices are limited to an ironic and banalizing clicktivism. The social institutions that once mobilized multiclass coalitions in the name of progressive causes have long since been dismantled. And, despite the revival of democratic socialism, the institutional Left still appears intellectually exhausted after decades in which it resigned itself to the efficient management of neoliberal strategies.

      And yet, challenges to liberal order articulated through a Far Right politics create a moment of repoliticization; and they expose the contradictions of globalization in an interstate system, without undermining the reality of, or the demand for, connectivity. As such, they seem to open space for the formulation of radical internationalisms with a basis in the reconstruction of migrant rights. In this space, citizens’ movements responding to migration have forged a politics of transnational solidarity through anarchistic practices of mutual aid and horizontalism more than through the philosophizing of associated organic intellectuals. Fueled by disaffection with politics, as much as feelings of injustice, they have attracted young people facing a precarious future, and migrants themselves; indeed, there are movements led by migrants in Turkey, in Germany, in Greece, and elsewhere. They construct social commons with a basis in difference, forming “chains of equivalence.” Decolonial and anticolonial thinking is thus more likely to influence their responses to migration and displacement than those of Western governments and conventional humanitarian agencies. Indeed, beyond the political inspiration that horizontalism often draws from anticolonial struggles, decolonial and postcolonial theories offer a method of deconstructing hierarchy from the inside that can transform resistance into the basis for a pluralist politics built from the bottom up. But for this sort of internationalism to reshape democratic politics, the movements promoting it would need to build bridges into political institutions and incorporate it into political strategies that redress social polarization. To the extent that this might be possible, it will surely dilute their more radical propositions.

      I rather suspect that the most likely scenario, in the short term at least, involves a political reordering through the reassertion of neoliberal strategies. We could see the development of the sort of political economy imagined by the early neoliberal thinker Gottfried Haberler (1985): that is, one in which goods, wages, and capital move freely, but labor doesn’t. This will depend on the consolidation of authoritarian states that nonetheless claim a democratic mandate to impose permanent states of emergency.

      https://www.berghahnjournals.com/view/journals/migration-and-society/3/1/arms030114.xml

      #migrations

    • Conceptualising the global South and South–South encounters

      Long before the institutional interest in ‘engaging with’, and ostensibly mobilising and co-opting actors from across the global South, rich, critical literatures have been published in diverse languages around the world, demonstrating the urgency of developing and applying theoretical and methodological frameworks that can be posited as Southern, anti-colonial, postcolonial and/or decolonial in nature.[1] These and other approaches have traced and advocated for diverse ways of knowing and being in a pluriversal world characterised (and constituted) by complex relationalities and unequal power relations, and equally diverse ways of resisting these inequalities – including through historical and contemporary forms of transnational solidarities.

      Of course, the very term ‘South’ which is included not once but twice in the title of the Handbook of South-South Relations, is itself a debated and diversely mobilised term, as exemplified in the different usages and definitions proposed (and critiqued) across the Handbook’s constituent chapters.

      For instance, a number of official, institutional taxonomies exist, including those which classify (and in turn interpellate) different political entities as ‘being’ from and of ‘the South’ or ‘the North’. Such classifications have variously been developed on the basis of particular readings of a state’s geographical location, of its relative position as a (formerly) colonised territory or colonising power, and/or of a state’s current economic capacity on national and global scales.[2]

      In turn, Medie and Kang (2018) define ‘countries of the global South’ as ‘countries that have been marginalised in the international political and economic system’. Indeed, Connell (2007) builds upon a long tradition of critical thinking to conceptualise the South and the North, respectively, through the lens of the periphery and the metropole, as categories that transcend fixed physical geographies. And of course, as stressed by Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Kenneth Tafira in their contribution to the Handbook, such geographies have never been either static or defined purely through reference to physical territories and demarcations:

      ‘imperial reason and scientific racism were actively deployed in the invention of the geographical imaginaries of the global South and the global North.’

      Through conceptualising the South and North through the lenses of the periphery and metropole, Connell argues that there are multiple souths in the world, including ‘souths’ (and southern voices) within powerful metropoles, as well as multiple souths within multiple peripheries. As Sujata Patel notes in her chapter in the Handbook, it is through this conceptualisation that Connell subsequently posits that

      ‘the category of the south allows us to evaluate the processes that permeate the non-recognition of its theories and practices in the constitution of knowledge systems and disciplines’.

      It enables, and requires us, to examine how, why and with what effect certain forms of knowledge and being in the world come to be interpellated and protected as ‘universal’ while others are excluded, derided and suppressed ‘as’ knowledge or recognisable modes of being.[3] Indeed, in her chapter, Patel follows both Connell (2007) and de Sousa Santos (2014) in conceptualising ‘the South’ as ‘a metaphor’ that ‘represents the embeddedness of knowledge in relations of power’.

      In turn, in their contribution to the Handbook, Dominic Davies and Elleke Boehmer centralise the constitutive relationality of the South by drawing on Grovogu (2011), who defines ‘the term “Global South” not as an exact geographical designation, but as “an idea and a set of practices, attitudes, and relations” that are mobilised precisely as “a disavowal of institutional and cultural practices associated with colonialism and imperialism”’ (cited in Davies and Boehmer). Viewing the South, or souths, as being constituted by and mobilising purposeful resistance to diverse exploitative systems, demonstrates the necessity of a contrapuntal reading of, and through, the South.

      As such, as Ndlovu-Gatsheni and Tafira powerfully argue in their chapter,

      ‘the global South was not only invented from outside by European imperial forces but it also invented itself through resistance and solidarity-building.’

      In this mode of analysis, the South has been constituted through a long history of unequal encounters with, and diverse forms of resistance to, different structures and entities across what can be variously designated the North, West or specific imperial and colonial powers. An analysis of the South therefore necessitates a simultaneous interrogation of the contours and nature of ‘the North’ or ‘West’, with Mignolo arguing (2000) that ‘what constitutes the West more than geography is a linguistic family, a belief system and an epistemology’.

      Indeed, the acknowledgement of the importance of relationality and such mutually constitutive dynamics provides a useful bridge between these rich theoretical and conceptual engagements of, with and from ‘the South’ on the one hand, and empirically founded studies of the institutional interest in ‘South–South cooperation’ as a mode of technical and political exchange for ‘international development’ on the other. In effect, as noted by Urvashi Aneja in her chapter, diverse policies, modes of political interaction and ‘responses’ led by political entities across the South and the North alike ‘can thus be said to exist and evolve in a mutually constitutive relationship’, rather than in isolation from one another.

      An important point to make at this stage is that it is not our aim to propose a definitive definition of the South or to propose how the South should be analysed or mobilised for diverse purposes – indeed, we would argue that such an exercise would be antithetical to the very foundations of the debates we and our contributors build upon in our respective modes of research and action.

      Nonetheless, a common starting point for most, if not all, of the contributions in the Handbook is a rejection of conceptualisations of the South as that which is ‘non-Western’ or ‘non-Northern’. As noted by Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (here and in the Handbook), it is essential to continue actively resisting negative framings of the South as that which is not of or from ‘the West’ or ‘the North’ – indeed, this is partly why the (still problematic) South/North binary is often preferred over typologies such as Western and non-Western, First and Third World, or developed and un(der)developed countries, all of which ‘suggest both a hierarchy and a value judgment’ (Mawdsley, 2012).

      In effect, as Fiddian-Qasmiyeh argues in the Handbook (drawing on Brigg), such modes of negative framing risk ‘maintaining rather than disrupting the notion that power originates from and operates through a unidirectional and intentional historical entity’. She – like other contributors to the Handbook addressing the relationships between theoretical, conceptual and empirical dynamics and modes of analysis, response and action – advocates for us to ‘resist the tendency to reconstitute the power of “the North” in determining the contours of the analysis’, while simultaneously acknowledging the extent to which ‘many Southern-led responses are purposefully positioned as alternatives and challenges to hegemonic, Northern-led systems’.

      This is, in many ways, a ‘double bind’ that persists in many of our studies of the world, including those of and from the South: our aim not to re-inscribe the epistemic power of the North, while simultaneously acknowledging that diverse forms of knowledge and action are precisely developed as counterpoints to the North.

      As noted above, in tracing this brief reflection on conceptualisations of the South it is not our intention to offer a comprehensive definition of ‘the South’ or to posit a definitive account of Southern approaches and theories. Rather, the Handbook aims to trace the debates that have emerged about, around, through and from the South, in all its heterogeneity (and not infrequent internal contradictions), in such a way that acknowledges the ways that the South has been constructed in relation to, with, through but also against other spaces, places, times, peoples, modes of knowledge and action.

      Such processes are, precisely, modes of construction that resist dependence upon hegemonic frames of reference; indeed, the Handbook in many ways exemplifies the collective power that emerges when people come together to cooperate and trace diverse ‘roots and routes’ (following Gilroy) to knowing, being and responding to the world – all with a view to better understanding and finding more nuanced ways of responding to diverse encounters within and across the South and the North.

      At the same time as we recognise internal heterogeneity within and across the South/souths, and advocate for more nuanced ways of understanding the South and the North that challenge hegemonic epistemologies and methodologies, Ama Biney’s chapter in the Handbook reminds us of another important dynamic that underpins the work of most, perhaps all, of the contributors to the Handbook. While Biney is writing specifically about pan-Africanism, we would argue that the approach she delineates is essential to the critical theoretical perspectives and analyses presented throughout the Handbook:

      ’Pan-Africanism does not aim at the external domination of other people, and, although it is a movement operating around the notion of being a race conscious movement, it is not a racialist one … In short, pan-Africanism is not anti-white but is profoundly against all forms of oppression and the domination of African people.’

      While it is not our aim to unequivocally idealise or romanticise decolonial, postcolonial, anti-colonial, or Southern theories, or diverse historical or contemporary modes of South South Cooperation and transnational solidarity – such processes are complex, contradictory, and at times are replete of their own forms of discrimination and violence – we would nonetheless posit that this commitment to challenging and resisting all forms of oppression and domination, of all peoples, is at the core of our collective endeavours.

      With such diverse approaches to conceptualising ‘the South’ (and its counterpoint, ‘the North’ or ‘the West’), precisely how we can explore ‘South–South relations’ thus becomes, first, a matter of how and with what effect we ‘know’, ‘speak of/for/about’, and (re)act in relation to different spaces, peoples and objects around the world; subsequently, it is a process of tracing material and immaterial connections across time and space, such as through the development of political solidarity and modes of resistance, and the movement of aid, trade, people and ideas. It is with these overlapping sets of debates and imperatives in mind, that the Handbook aims to explore a broad range of questions regarding the nature and implications of conducting research in and about the global South, and of applying a ‘Southern lens’ to such a wide range of encounters, processes and dynamics around the world.[4]

      […]

      From a foundational acknowledgement of the dangers of essentialist binaries such as South–North and East–West and their concomitant hierarchies and modes of exploitation, the Handbook aims to explore and set out pathways to continue redressing the longstanding exclusion of polycentric forms of knowledge, politics and practice. It is our hope that the Handbook unsettles thinking about the South and about South–South relations, and prompts new and original research agendas that serve to transform and further complicate the geographic framing of the peoples of the world for emancipatory futures in the 21st century.

      This extract from Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Patricia Daley’s Introduction to The Handbook of South-South Relations has been slightly edited for the purposes of this blog post. For other pieces published as part of the Southern Responses blog series on Thinking through the Global South, click here.

      References cited

      Anzaldúa, G., 1987. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. San Francisco: Spinsters/Aunt Lute.

      Brigg, M., 2002. ‘Post-development, Foucault and the Colonisation Metaphor.’ Third World Quarterly 23(3), 421–436.

      Chakrabarty, D., 2007. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

      Connell, R., 2007. Southern Theory: The Global Dynamics of Knowledge in Social Science. London: Polity.

      Dabashi, H., 2015. Can Non-Europeans Think? London: Zed Books.

      de Sousa Santos, B., 2014. Epistemologies of the South: Justice Against Epistemicide. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

      Dussel, E., 1977. Filosofía de Liberación. Mexico City: Edicol.

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E., 2015. South-South Educational Migration, Humanitarianism and Development: Views from the Caribbean, North Africa and the Middle East. Oxford: Routledge.

      Gilroy, P., 1993. The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. London: Verso.

      Grosfoguel, R., 2011. Decolonizing Post-Colonial Studies and Paradigms of Political-Economy: Transmodernity, Decolonial Thinking, and Global Coloniality. Transmodernity: Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World 1(1). Available from: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/21k6t3fq [Accessed 7 September 2018].

      Grovogu, S., 2011. A Revolution Nonetheless: The Global South in International Relations. The Global South 5(1), Special Issue: The Global South and World Dis/Order, 175–190.

      Kwoba, B, Nylander, O., Chantiluke, R., and Nangamso Nkopo, A. (eds), 2018. Rhodes Must Fall: The Struggle to Decolonise the Racist Heart of Empire. London: Zed Books.

      Mawdsley, E., 2012. From Recipients to Donors: The Emerging Powers and the Changing Development Landscape. London: Zed Books.

      Medie, P. and Kang, A.J., 2018. Power, Knowledge and the Politics of Gender in the Global South. European Journal of Politics and Gender 1(1–2), 37–54.

      Mignolo, W.D., 2000. Local Histories/Global Designs: Coloniality, Subaltern Knowledges, and Border Thinking. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

      Mignolo, W.D., 2015. ‘Foreword: Yes, We Can.’ In: H. Dabashi, Can Non-Europeans Think? London and New York: Zed Books, pp. viii–xlii.

      Minh-ha, Trinh T., 1989. Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

      Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S.J., 2013. Empire, Global Coloniality and African Subjectivity. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books.

      Quijano, A., 1991. Colonialidad y Modernidad/Racionalidad. Perú Indígena 29, 11–21.

      Said, E., 1978. Orientalism: Western Conceptions of the Orient. New York: Vintage Books.

      Spivak, G.C., 1988. In Other Worlds: Essays in Cultural Politics. New York: Routledge.

      Sundberg, J., 2007. Reconfiguring North–South Solidarity: Critical Reflections on Experiences of Transnational Resistance. Antipode 39(1), 144–166.

      Tuhiwai Smith, L., 1999. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed Books.

      wa Thiong’o, N., 1986. Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature. London: Heinemann Educational.

      Wynter, S., 2003. Unsettling the Coloniality of Being/Power/Truth/Freedom: Towards the Human, After Man, Its Overrepresentation – An Argument. The New Centennial Review 3(3), 257–337.

      * Notes

      [1] For instance, see Anzaldúa 1987; Chakrabarty 2007; Connell 2007; de Sousa Santos 2014; Dussell 1977; Grosfoguel 2011; Kwoba et al. 2018; Mignolo 2000; Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2013; Quijano 1991, 2007; Said 1978; Spivak 1988; Sundberg 2007; Trinh T. Minh-ha 1989; Tuhiwai Smith 1999; wa Thiong’o 1986; Wynter 2003.

      [2] Over 130 states have defined themselves as belonging to the Group of 77 – a quintessential South–South platform – in spite of the diversity of their ideological and geopolitical positions in the contemporary world order, their vastly divergent Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and per capita income, and their rankings in the Human Development Index – for a longer discussion of the challenges and limitations of diverse modes of definition and typologies, see Fiddian-Qasmiyeh 2015.

      [3] Also see Mignolo 2000; Dabashi 2015.

      [4] Indeed, Connell notes that ‘#Southern_theory’ is a term I use for social thought from the societies of the global South. It’s not necessarily about the global South, though it often is. Intellectuals from colonial and postcolonial societies have also produced important analyses of global-North societies, and of worldwide structures (e.g. Raúl Prebisch and Samir Amin).

      https://southernresponses.org/2018/12/05/conceptualising-the-global-south-and-south-south-encounters
      #développement

    • Exploring refugees’ conceptualisations of Southern-led humanitarianism

      By Prof Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Principal Investigator, Southern Responses to Displacement Project

      With displacement primarily being a Southern phenomena – circa 85-90% of all refugees remain within the ‘global South – it is also the case that responses to displacement have long been developed and implemented by states from the South (a construct we are critically examining throughout the Southern Responses to Displacement project – see here). Some of these state-led responses to displacement have been developed and implemented within the framework of what is known as ‘South-South Cooperation’. This framework provides a platform from which states from the global South work together to complement one another’s abilities and resources and break down barriers and structural inequalities created by colonial powers. It can also be presented as providing an alternative mode of response to that implemented by powerful Northern states and Northern-led organisations (see here).

      An example of this type of South-South Cooperation, often driven by principles of ‘internationalism,’ can be found in the international scholarship programmes and schools established by a number of Southern states to provide primary, secondary and university-level education for refugees from across the Middle East and North Africa. In particular, since the 1960s, Cuba has provided free education through a scholarship system for Palestinian refugees based in camps and cities across the Middle East following the Nakba (the catastrophe) and for Sahrawi refugees who have lived in desert-based refugee camps in Algeria since the mid-1970s.

      In line with the Southern Responses to Displacement project, which aims to purposefully centralise refugees’ own experiences of and perspectives on Southern-led initiatives to support refugees from Syria, throughout my previous work I have examined how Palestinian and Sahrawi refugees have conceptualised, negotiated or, indeed, resisted, diverse programmes that have been developed and implemented ‘on their behalf.’ While long-standing academic and policy debates have addressed the relationship between humanitarianism, politics and ideology, few studies to date have examined the ways in which refugee beneficiaries – as opposed to academics, policymakers and practitioners – conceptualise the programmes which are designed and implemented ‘for refugees’. The following discussion addresses this gap precisely by centralising Palestinian and Sahrawi graduates’ reflections on the Cuban scholarship programme and the extent to which they conceptualise political and ideological connections as being compatible with humanitarian motivations and outcomes.

      This blog, and my previous work (here and here) examines how Palestinian and Sahrawi refugees have understood the motivations, nature and impacts of Cuba’s scholarship system through reference to identity, ideology, politics and humanitarianism. Based on my interviews with Palestinians and Sahrawis while they were still studying in Cuba, and with Palestinian and Sahrawi graduates whom I interviewed after they had returned to their home-camps in Lebanon and Algeria respectively, this short piece examines the complex dynamics which underpin access to, as well as the multifaceted experiences and outcomes of, the scholarship programme on both individual and collective levels.
      Balancing ‘the humanitarian’

      Although both Palestinian and Sahrawi interviewees in Cuba and Sahrawi graduates in their Algeria-based home-camps repeatedly asserted the humanitarian nature of the Cuban scholarship programme, precisely what this denomination of ‘humanitarianism’ might mean, and how compatible it could be given the ideological and political links highlighted by Palestinian graduates whom I interviewed in a range of refugee camps in Lebanon, requires further discussion.

      The contemporary international humanitarianism regime is habitually equated with the principles of humanity, impartiality, neutrality and independence (Ferris 2011: 11), and a strict separation is firmly upheld by Western humanitarian institutions between morality and politics (as explored in more detail by Pacitto and Fiddian-Qasmiyeh 2013). However, many critics reject the assertion that humanitarianism can ever be separated from politics, since ‘“humanitarianism” is the ideology of hegemonic states in the era of globalisation’ (Chimni 2000:3). Recognising the extent to which the Northern-led and Northern-dominated humanitarian regime is deeply implicated in, and reproduces, ‘the ideology of hegemonic [Northern] states’ is particularly significant since many (Northern) academics, policymakers and practitioners reject the right of Southern-led initiatives to be denominated ‘humanitarian’ in nature on the basis that such projects and programmes are motivated by ideological and/or faith-based principles, rather than ‘universal’ humanitarian principles.

      Palestinians who at the time of our interviews were still studying in Cuba, in addition to those who had more recently graduated from Cuban universities, medical and dentistry schools and had ‘returned’ to their home-camps in Lebanon, repeatedly referred to ‘ideology’, ‘politics’, ‘humanitarianism’ and ‘human values’ when describing the Cuban scholarship programme. Yet, while they maintained that Cuba’s programme for Palestinian refugees is ‘humanitarian’ in nature, Palestinian graduates offered different perspectives regarding the balance between these different dimensions, implicitly and at times explicitly noting the ways in which these overlap or are in tension.

      Importantly, these recurrent concepts are to be contrasted with the prevalent terminology and frames of reference arising in Sahrawi refugees’ accounts of the Cuban educational programme. Having also had access to the Cuban educational migration programme, Sahrawi graduates’ accounts can perhaps be traced to the continued significance of Spanish – the language learned and lived (following Bhabha 2006:x) in Cuba – amongst graduates following their return to the Sahrawi refugee camps, where Spanish is the official language used in the major camp-based Sahrawi medical institutions.

      As such, in interviews and in informal conversations in the Sahrawi camps, Cuban-educated Sahrawis (commonly known as Cubarauis) consistently used the Spanish-language term solidaridad (solidarity) to define both the nature of the connection between the Sahrawi people and Cuba, and the nature of the scholarship programme; they also regularly cited Cuban revolutionary figures such as José Martí and Fidel Castro. In contrast, no such quotes were offered by the Palestinian graduates I interviewed in Lebanon, even if the significance of Fidel Castro and Ché Guevara was noted by many during our interviews in Cuba.

      Explaining his understanding of the basis of the scholarship programme for Palestinians, Abdullah elaborated that this was:

      ‘mainly prompted because Cuban politics is based upon human values and mutual respect, and in particular upon socialism, which used to be very prominent in the Arab world during that time.’

      In turn, referring to the common visions uniting both parties and facilitating Cuba’s scholarship programme for Palestinian refugees, Hamdi posited that:

      ‘Certain ideological and political commonalities contributed to this collaboration between the Cuban government and the PLO. However, the humanitarian factor was present in these negotiations.’ (Emphasis added)

      These accounts reflect the extent to which ideology and humanitarianism are both recognised as playing a key role in the scholarship programme, and yet Hamdi’s usage of the term ‘however’, and his reference to ‘the humanitarian factor’, demonstrate an awareness that a tension may be perceived to exist between ideology/politics and humanitarian motivations.

      Indeed, rather than describing the programme as a humanitarian programme per se, eight of my interviewees offered remarkably similar humanitarian ‘qualifiers’: the Cuban education programme is described as having ‘a humanitarian component’ (Marwan), ‘a humanitarian dimension’ (Younis), a ‘humanitarian aspect’ (Saadi), and ‘humanitarian ingredients’ (Abdel-Wahid); while other interviewees argued that it is ‘a mainly humanitarian system’ (Nimr) which ‘carr[ies] humanitarian elements’ (Hamdi) and ‘shares its humanitarian message in spite of the embargo [against Cuba]’ (Ibrahim).

      As exemplified by these qualifiers, Palestinians who participated in this programme themselves recognise that humanitarianism was not the sole determining justification for the initiative, but rather that it formed part of the broader Cuban revolution and a particular mode of expressing support for other liberation movements, including the Palestinian cause.

      In terms of weighting these different motivating and experiential elements, Mohammed argued that the ‘humanitarian aspect outweighs the ideological one’, emphasising the ‘programme’s strong humanitarian aspect’. In turn, Ahmed and Nimr declared that the Cuban scholarships were offered ‘without conditions or conditionalities’ and without ‘blackmailing Palestinians to educate them’.

      These references are particularly relevant when viewed alongside critiques of neoliberal development programmes and strategies which have often been characterised by ‘tied aid’ or diverse economic, socio-political and gendered conditionalities which require beneficiaries to comply with Northern-dominated priorities vis-à-vis ‘good governance’ – all of which are, in effect, politically and/or ideologically driven.

      Concurrently, Khalil argued that the programme is ‘humanitarian if used correctly’, thereby drawing attention to the extent to which the nature of the programme transcends either Cuba’s or the PLO’s underlying motivating factors per se, and is, rather, characterised both by the way in which the programme has been implemented since the 1970s, and its longer-term impacts.

      With reference to the former, claims regarding the absence of conditionalities on Cuba’s behalf must be viewed alongside the extent to which Palestinians could only access the scholarships if they were affiliated with specific Palestinian factions (as I explore in the book): can the programme be ‘truly’ humanitarian if individual participation has historically been contingent upon an official declaration of ideological commonality with a leftist faction and/or the Cuban internationalist project?

      With universality, neutrality and impartiality being three of the core ‘international’ humanitarian principles, a tension is apparent from the perspective of ‘the Northern relief elite’ who arguably monopolise the epithet humanitarian (Haysom, cited in Pacitto and Fiddian-Qasmiyeh 2013: 6). Indeed, although José Martí’s humanitarian principle to ‘compartir lo que tienes, no dar lo que te sobra’ (‘to share what you have, not what is left over’) has historically guided many of the Cuban state’s revolutionary programmes on national(ist) and international(ist) levels, precisely who Cuba should share with (on a collective) has often been geopolitically framed. Whilst designed to overcome the historical legacy of diverse exclusionary processes in Cuba, the programme could itself be conceptualised as being guided by an ideological commitment to inclusion with exclusionary underpinnings.

      The imposition of a hegemonic discourse leaves people out, primarily on ideological grounds. Ideological repression means that everybody who questions the regime in a fundamental way is basically left out in the dark. There is a creation of boundaries between Self and Other that leaves very little room for fundamental critique. However, the existence of a hegemonic discourse, and demands for students to publicly assert their affiliation to an official ideological stance, whether this refers to Cuban or Palestinian discourses, should not necessarily be equated with the exclusion of individuals and groups who do not share particular opinions and beliefs.

      In the case explored in this blog and in the book it is based on, a distinction can therefore perhaps be usefully made between the collective basis of scholarships primarily being offered to groups and nations with political and ideological bonds to Cuba’s revolutionary project, and the extent to which individual Palestinian students have arguably negotiated the Cuban system and the factional system alike to maximise their personal, professional and political development. To achieve the latter, individuals have developed official performances of ideological loyalty to access and complete their university studies in Cuba, whilst ultimately maintaining or developing political and ideological opinions, and critiques, of their own.

      With reference to the broader outcomes of the programme, is it sufficient to announce, as seven Palestinian graduates did, that the project was ‘humanitarian’ in nature precisely because the beneficiaries of the scheme were refugees, and the overarching aim was to achieve professional self-sufficiency in refugee camps?

      In effect, and as explored in my other research (here) Cuba’s programme might appear to fall under the remit of a developmental approach, rather than being ‘purely’ humanitarian in nature, precisely due to the official aim of maximising self-sufficiency as opposed to addressing immediate basic needs in an emergency phase (with the latter more readily falling under the remit of ‘humanitarian’ assistance).

      Nonetheless, Cuba’s aim to enhance refugees’ self-sufficiency corresponds to the UNHCR’s well-established Development Assistance to Refugees approach, and programmes supporting medium- and long-term capacity building are particularly common in protracted refugee situations. At the same time, it could be argued that the distinction between humanitarianism and development is immaterial given that the rhetoric of solidarity underpins all of Cuba’s internationalist projects, whether in contexts of war or peace, and, furthermore, since Cuba has offered scholarships not only to refugees but also to citizens from across the Global South.

      Related to the programme’s reach to citizens and refugees alike, and simultaneously to the nature of the connection between humanitarianism and politics, Younis drew attention to another pivotal dimension: ‘although the educational system had a humanitarian dimension, I don’t think it is possible to separate the human being from politics’. Cuba’s political (in essence, socialist) commitment to the ‘human being’ was reasserted throughout the interviews, with Saadi, for instance, referring to Cuba’s prioritisation of the ‘relationship between a human being and a fellow human being’, and Khalil explaining that Cuba had adopted ‘the cause of the human being, and that’s why it supported Palestinians in their struggle’.

      While critiques of Northern-led human rights discourses have been widespread, and such critiques have often paralleled or influenced critical analyses of humanitarianism (as I explore elsewhere), in their responses Palestinian graduates invoked an alternative approach to supporting the rights of human beings.

      By conceptualising Cuba’s commitment to human beings as being inherently connected to politics, graduates, by extension, also highlighted that politics cannot be separated from approaches geared towards supporting humanity, whether external analysts consider that such approaches should be labelled ‘development’ or ‘humanitarianism’. Whilst absent from the terminology used by Palestinian graduates, it can be argued that the notion of solidarity centralised in Cubaraui (and Cuban) accounts captures precisely these dimensions of Cuba’s internationalist approach.
      Moving Forward

      These dynamics – including conceptualisations of the relationship between politics, ideology, and humanitarianism; of short-, medium- and long-term responses to displacement; and how refugees themselves negotiate and conceptualise responses developed by external actors ‘on their behalf’ – will continue to be explored throughout the Southern Responses to Development from Syria project. This ongoing research project aims, amongst other things, to examine how people displaced from Syria – Syrians, Palestinians, Iraqis, Kurds … -, experience and perceive the different forms of support that ‘Southern’ states, civil society groups, and refugees themselves have developed in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey since the outbreak of the Syrian conflict in 2011. This will include reflections on how refugees conceptualise (and resist) both the construct of ‘the South’ itself and diverse responses developed by states such as Malaysia and Indonesia, but also by different groups of refugees themselves. The latter include Palestinian refugees whose home-camps in Lebanon have been hosting refugees from Syria, but also whose educational experiences in Cuba mean that they are amongst the medical practitioners who are treating refugees from Syria, demonstrating the complex legacies of the Cuban scholarship programme for refugees from the Middle East.

      *

      For more information on Southern-led responses to displacement, including vis-à-vis South-South Cooperation, read our introductory mini blog series here, and the following pieces:

      Carpi, E. (2018) ‘Empires of Inclusion‘

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. (2019) ‘Looking Forward. Disasters at 40′

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. (2018) Histories and spaces of Southern-led responses to displacement

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. (2018) Internationalism and solidarity

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. (2018) Refugee-refugee humanitarianism

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. (2014) The Ideal Refugees: Islam, Gender, and the Sahrawi Politics of Survival

      Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, E. and Daley, P. (2018) Conceptualising the global South and South–South encounters

      Featured Image: A mural outside a school in Baddawi camp, N. Lebanon. Baddawi has been home to Palestinian refugees from the 1950s, and to refugees from Syria since 2011 (c) E. Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, 2017

      https://southernresponses.org/2019/04/08/exploring-refugees-conceptualisations-of-southern-led-humanitaria

      #réfugiés #post-colonialisme #ressources_pédagogiques

  • Soupe à la crème d’ail en miche de #Pain (krémová cesnačka)
    https://www.cuisine-libre.org/soupe-creme-ail-en-miche-de-pain-kremova-cesnacka

    Soupe slovaque populaire à la crème d’ail, servie dans une miche de pain de campagne, pour réchauffer l’âme et le corps. Éplucher et émincer grossièrement l’oignon et l’ail pour les faire revenir dans l’huile sans les faire brunir. Une fois l’odeur libérée, ajouter les pommes de terre coupées en petits morceaux. Verser le bouillon, ajouter les aromates, saler et poivrer. Laisser cuire environ 15 minutes jusqu’à ce que l’ail remonte à la surface. Pendant ce temps, couper le haut des pains pour dégager un… #Ail, Pain, #Veloutés, #Soupes, #Slovaquie / #Sans viande, #Sans œuf, #Végétarien, #Bouilli

  • L’#enseignement_numérique ou le supplice des Danaïdes. Austérité, surveillance, désincarnation et auto-exploitation

    Où l’on apprend comment les étudiants en #STAPS de #Grenoble et #Saint-Étienne ont fait les frais de la #numérisation - #déshumanisation de l’#enseignement bien avant l’apparition du coronavirus. Et comment ce dernier pourrait bien avoir été une aubaine dans ce processus de #destruction programmé – via notamment la plate-forme #FUN (sic).

    Les #plateformes_numériques d’enseignement ne datent pas de la série quasiment continue de confinements imposés aux universités depuis mars 2020. Enseignante en géographie à l’Université Grenoble Alpes, je constate le développement croissant d’« outils numériques d’enseignement » dans mon cadre de travail depuis plus d’une dizaine d’années. En 2014, une « #licence_hybride », en grande majorité numérique, est devenue la norme à Grenoble et à Saint-Étienne dans les études de STAPS, sciences et techniques des activités physiques et sportives. En 2020, tous mes enseignements sont désormais numériques à la faveur de l’épidémie. Preuves à l’appui, ce texte montre que le passage total au numérique n’est pas une exceptionnalité de crise mais une #aubaine inédite d’accélération du mouvement de numérisation global de l’#enseignement_supérieur en France. La #souffrance et les dégâts considérables que provoque cette #numérisation_de_l’enseignement étaient aussi déjà en cours, ainsi que les #résistances.

    Une politique structurelle de #transformation_numérique de l’enseignement supérieur

    La licence hybride de l’UFR STAPS à Grenoble, lancée en 2014 et en majorité numérique, autrement dit « à distance », est une des applications « pionnières » et « innovantes » des grandes lignes stratégiques du ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur en matière d’enseignement numérique définies dès 2013. C’est à cette date que la plateforme FUN - #France_Université_Numérique [1] -, financée par le Ministère, a été ouverte, regroupant des #MOOC - Massive Open Online Courses - ayant pour but d’« inciter à placer le numérique au cœur du parcours étudiant et des métiers de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche [2] » sous couvert de « #démocratisation » des connaissances et « #ouverture au plus grand nombre ». De fait, la plateforme FUN, gérée depuis 2015 par un #GIP - #Groupe_d’Intérêt_Public [3] -, est organisée autour de cours gratuits et en ligne, mais aussi de #SPOC -#Small_Private_Online_Course- diffusés par deux sous-plateformes : #FUN-Campus (où l’accès est limité aux seuls étudiant·e·s inscrit·e·s dans les établissements d’enseignement qui financent et diffusent les cours et doivent payer un droit d’accès à la plateforme) et #FUN-Corporate (plate-forme destinée aux entreprises, avec un accès et des certifications payants). En 2015, le ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur présentait le nouveau « #GIP-FUN » et sa stratégie pour « mettre en place un modèle économique viable en développant de nouveaux usages de cours en ligne » avec :

    - une utilisation des MOOC en complément de cours sur les campus, voire en substitution d’un #cours_magistral, selon le dispositif de la #classe_inversée ;
    - une proposition de ces #cours_en_ligne aux salariés, aux demandeurs d’emploi, aux entreprises dans une perspective de #formation_continue ;
    – un déploiement des plateformes en marques blanches [4]

    Autrement dit, il s’agit de produire de la sur-valeur à partir des MOOC, notamment en les commercialisant via des #marques_blanches [5] et des #certifications_payantes (auprès des demandeurs d’emploi et des entreprises dans le cadre de la formation continue) et de les diffuser à large échelle dans l’enseignement supérieur comme facteur de diminution des #coûts_du_travail liés à l’#encadrement. Les MOOC, dont on comprend combien ils relèvent moins de l’Open Source que de la marchandise, sont voués aussi à devenir des produits commerciaux d’exportation, notamment dans les réseaux postcoloniaux de la « #francophonie [6] ». En 2015, alors que la plateforme FUN était désormais gérée par un GIP, vers une #marchandisation de ses « produits », était créé un nouveau « portail de l’enseignement numérique », vitrine de la politique du ministère pour « déployer le numérique dans l’enseignement supérieur [7] ». Sur ce site a été publié en mars 2016 un rapport intitulé « MOOC : À la recherche d’un #business model », écrit par Yves Epelboin [8]. Dans ce rapport, l’auteur compare en particulier le #coût d’un cours classique, à un cours hybride (en présence et via le numérique) à un cours uniquement numérique et dresse le graphique suivant de rentabilité :

    Le #coût fixe du MOOC, à la différence du coût croissant du cours classique en fonction du nombre d’étudiants, suffit à prouver la « #rentabilité » de l’enseignement numérique. La suite du document montre comment « diversifier » (depuis des partenariats publics-privés) les sources de financement pour rentabiliser au maximum les MOOC et notamment financer leur coût de départ : « la coopération entre les universités, les donateurs, des fonds spéciaux et d’autres sources de revenus est indispensable ». Enfin, en octobre 2019, était publié sur le site du ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur un rapport intitulé « #Modèle_économique de la transformation numérique des formations dans les établissements d’enseignement supérieur [9] », écrit par Éric Pimmel, Maryelle Girardey-Maillard et Émilie‐Pauline Gallie, inspecteurs généraux de l’éducation, du sport et de la recherche. Le rapport commence par le même invariable constat néolibéral d’#austérité : « croissance et diversité des effectifs étudiants, concurrence nationale et internationale, égalité d’accès à l’enseignement supérieur dans les territoires et augmentation des coûts, dans un contexte budgétaire contraint », qui nécessitent donc un développement généralisé de l’enseignement numérique. La préconisation principale des autrices·teurs du rapport tient dans une « réorganisation des moyens » des universités qui :

    « consiste notamment à réduire le volume horaire des cours magistraux, à modifier les manières d’enseigner (hybridation, classes inversées...) et à répartir différemment les heures de cours, voire d’autres ressources, comme les locaux par exemple. Les économies potentielles doivent être chiffrées par les établissements qui devront, pour ne pas se voir reprocher de dégrader les conditions d’enseignement, redéployer ces montants dans les équipements ou le développement de contenus pédagogiques. »

    Autrement dit encore, pour financer le numérique, il s’agit de « redéployer » les moyens en encadrement humain et en locaux, soit les moyens relatifs aux cours « classiques », en insistant sur la dimension « pédagogique » du « redéploiement » pour « ne pas se voir reprocher de dégrader les conditions d’enseignement ». Le financement du numérique dans l’enseignement universitaire par la marchandisation des MOOC est aussi envisagé, même si cette dernière est jugée pour l’instant insuffisante, avec la nécessité d’accélérer les sources de financement qu’ils peuvent générer : « Le développement de nouvelles ressources propres, tirées notamment de l’activité de formation continue ou liées aux certificats délivrés dans le cadre des MOOCs pourrait constituer une voie de développement de ressources nouvelles. » Un programme « ambitieux » d’appel à « #flexibilisation des licences » a d’ailleurs été lancé en 2019 :

    Au‐delà de la mutualisation des ressources, c’est sur la mutualisation des formations qu’est fondé le projet « #Parcours_Flexibles_en_Licence » présenté par la mission de la pédagogie et du numérique pour l’enseignement supérieur (#MIPNES / #DGESIP) au deuxième appel à projets du #fonds_pour_la_transformation_de_l’action_publique (#FTAP) et financé à hauteur de 12,4 M€ sur trois ans. La mission a retenu quatre scénarios qui peuvent se combiner :

    - l’#hybridation d’une année de licence ou le passage au #tout_numérique ;

    - la transformation numérique partielle de la pédagogie de l’établissement ;

    - la #co‐modalité pour répondre aux contraintes ponctuelles des étudiants ;

    - les MOOCS comme enjeu de visibilité et de transformation.

    Le ministère a pour ambition, depuis 2013 et jusqu’à aujourd’hui, « la transformation numérique partielle de la pédagogie des établissements ». Les universités sont fermées depuis quasiment mars 2020, avec une courte réouverture de septembre à octobre 2020. L’expérience du passage au numérique, non plus partiel, mais total, est en marche dans la start-up nation.

    Nous avons déjà un peu de recul sur ce que l’enseignement numérique produit comme dégâts sur les relations d’enseignement, outre la marchandisation des connaissances qui remet en cause profondément ce qui est enseigné.

    A Grenoble, la licence « pionnière » de STAPS- Sciences et Techniques des Activités Physiques et Sportives

    En 2014 et dans le cadre des politiques financières décrites précédemment, était lancée à Grenoble une licence « unique en son genre » de STAPS- Sciences et Techniques des Activités Physiques et Sportives dont voici le fonctionnement :

    Les universités Grenoble-Alpes et Jean-Monnet-Saint-Étienne proposent une licence STAPS, parcours « entraînement sportif », unique en son genre : la scolarité est asynchrone, essentiellement à distance, et personnalisée.

    Cette licence s’appuie sur un dispositif de formation hybride : les étudiant·e·s s’approprient les connaissances chez eux, à leur rythme avant de les manipuler lors de cours en présentiel massés.

    Le travail personnel à distance s’appuie sur de nouvelles pédagogies dans l’enseignement numérique : les cours #vidéos, les #screencasts, #quizz et informations complémentaires s’articulent autour de #parcours_pédagogiques ; des sessions de #classe_virtuelle sont également organisées à distance [10].

    Dès 2017, des enseignant·e·s de STAPS faisaient paraître un texte avec la section grenobloise du syndicat FSU - Fédération Syndicale Unitaire - intitulé « Les STAPS de Grenoble sont-ils un modèle à suivre ? ». Les auteur·trice·s expliquaient que, en 2014, la présidence de l’université avait instrumentalisé un « dilemme impossible : “la pédagogie numérique ou la limitation d’accueil” ». Il s’agit ici d’un exemple significatif de technique néolibérale de capture de l’intérêt liée à la rhétorique de l’#austérité. Ce même non-choix a été appliqué dans l’organisation de la #PACES à Grenoble, première année de préparation aux études de médecine : numérique ou limitation drastique des étudiant·e·s accueilli·e·s. La tierce voie, toujours écartée, est évidemment celle de recruter plus d’enseignant·e·s, de personnels administratifs, de réduire les groupes d’amphithéâtres, de construire des locaux qui permettent à des relations d’enseignement d’exister. En 2017, les enseignant·e·s de STAPS constataient, effectivement, que « l’enseignement numérique permet(tait) d’accueillir beaucoup de monde avec des moyens constants en locaux et personnels enseignants titulaires (postes) ; et même avec une diminution des #coûts_d’encadrement ». Elles et ils soulignaient dans le même temps que le niveau d’#épuisement et d’#isolement des enseignant·e·s et des étudiant·e·s était inédit, assorti d’inquiétudes qui résonnent fortement avec la situation que nous traversons aujourd’hui collectivement :

    —Nous craignons que le système des cours numérisés s’accompagne d’une plus grande difficulté à faire évoluer les contenus d’enseignements compte tenu du temps pour les réaliser.
    — Nous redoutons que progressivement les cours de L1 soient conçus par un seul groupe d’enseignants au niveau national et diffusé dans tous les UFR de France, l’enseignant local perdant ainsi la main sur les contenus et ceux-ci risquant de se rigidifier.
    — Un certain nombre de travaux insistent sur le temps considérable des jeunes générations accrochées à leur smartphone, de 4 à 6 heures par jour et signalent le danger de cette pratique pour la #santé physique et psychique. Si s’ajoutent à ces 4 à 6 heures de passe-temps les 3 ou 4 heures par jour de travail des cours numériques sur écran, n’y a-t-il pas à s’inquiéter ?
    — Si les étudiants de L1 ne sont plus qu’une douzaine d’heures par semaine à l’université pour leurs cours, qu’en est-il du rôle de #socialisation de l’université ?

    (…)

    Il est tout de même très fâcheux de faire croire qu’à Grenoble en STAPS en L1, avec moins de moyens humains nous faisons aussi bien, voire mieux, et que nous ayons trouvé la solution au problème du nombre. Il serait plus scrupuleux d’exposer que :

    — nous sommes en difficulté pour défendre la qualité de nos apprentissages, que sans doute il y a une perte quant aux compétences formées en L1 et que nous devrons compenser en L2, L3, celles-ci. Ce qui semble très difficile, voire impossible ;
    — le taux de réussite légèrement croissant en L1 se fait sans doute à ce prix et qu’il est toujours faible ;
    — nous nous interrogeons sur la faible participation de nos étudiants au cours de soutien (7 % ) ;
    — nous observons que les cours numériques n’ont pas fait croître sensiblement la motivation des étudiants [11].

    Ces inquiétudes, exprimées en 2017, sont désormais transposables à large échelle. Les conditions actuelles, en période de #confinement et de passage au tout numérique sur fond de #crise_sanitaire, ne sont en effet ni « exceptionnelles », ni « dérogatoires ». Ladite « #exceptionnalité de crise » est bien plus l’exacerbation de ce qui existe déjà. Dans ce contexte, il semble tout à fait légitime de s’interroger sur le très probable maintien de l’imposition des fonctionnements généralisés par temps de pandémie, aux temps « d’après », en particulier dans le contexte d’une politique très claire de transformation massive de l’#enseignement_universitaire en enseignement numérique. Ici encore, l’analyse des collègues de STAPS publiée en 2017 sur les modalités d’imposition normative et obligatoire de mesures présentées initialement comme relevant du « volontariat » est éloquente :

    Alors qu’initialement le passage au numérique devait se faire sur la base du #volontariat, celui-ci est devenu obligatoire. Il reste à l’enseignant ne souhaitant pas adopter le numérique la possibilité d’arrêter l’enseignement qui était le sien auparavant, de démissionner en quelque sorte. C’est sans doute la première fois, pour bon nombre d’entre nous, qu’il nous est imposé la manière d’enseigner [12].

    Depuis 2020, l’utopie réalisée. Passage total à l’enseignement numérique dans les Universités

    Depuis mars et surtout octobre 2020, comme toutes les travailleur·se·s et étudiant·e·s des universités en France, mes pratiques d’enseignement sont uniquement numériques. J’avais jusqu’alors résisté à leurs usages, depuis l’analyse des conditions contemporaines du capitalisme de plateforme lié aux connaissances : principalement (1) refuser l’enclosure et la #privatisation des connaissances par des plateformes privées ou publiques-privées, au service des politiques d’austérité néolibérale destructrices des usages liés à l’enseignement en présence, (2) refuser de participer aux techniques de surveillance autorisées par ces outils numériques. Je précise ici que ne pas vouloir déposer mes cours sur ces plateformes ne signifiait pas me replier sur mon droit de propriété intellectuelle en tant qu’enseignante-propriétaire exclusive des cours. Au contraire, un cours est toujours co-élaboré depuis les échanges singuliers entre enseignant·e·s et étudiant·e·s ; il n’est pas donc ma propriété exclusive, mais ressemble bien plus à un commun élaboré depuis les relations avec les étudiant·e·s, et pourrait devoir s’ouvrir à des usages et des usager·ère·s hors de l’université, sans aucune limite d’accès. Sans défendre donc une propriété exclusive, il s’agit dans le même temps de refuser que les cours deviennent des marchandises via des opérateurs privés ou publics-privés, déterminés par le marché mondial du capitalisme cognitif et cybernétique, et facilité par l’État néolibéral, comme nous l’avons vu avec l’exposé de la politique numérique du ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur.

    Par ailleurs, les plateformes d’enseignement numérique, en particulier de dépôt et diffusion de documents, enregistrent les dates, heures et nombres de clics ou non-clics de toutes celles et ceux qui les utilisent. Pendant le printemps 2020, sous les lois du premier confinement, les débats ont été nombreux dans mon université pour savoir si l’ « #assiduité », comme facteur d’ « #évaluation » des étudiant·e·s, pouvait être déterminée par les statistiques individuelles et collectives générées par les plateformes : valoriser celles et ceux qui seraient les plus connectées, et pénaliser les autres, autrement dit « les déconnecté·e·s », les dilettantes. Les éléments relatifs à la #fracture_numérique, l’inégal accès matériel des étudiant·e·s à un ordinateur et à un réseau internet, ont permis de faire taire pendant un temps celles et ceux qui défendaient ces techniques de #surveillance (en oubliant au passage qu’elles et eux-mêmes, en tant qu’enseignant·e·s, étaient aussi possiblement surveillé·e·s par les hiérarchies depuis leurs fréquences de clics, tandis qu’elles et ils pouvaient s’entre-surveiller depuis les mêmes techniques).

    Or depuis la fermeture des universités, ne pas enseigner numériquement signifie ne pas enseigner du tout. Refuser les plateformes est devenu synonyme de refuser de faire cours. L’épidémie a créé les conditions d’un apparent #consentement collectif, d’une #sidération aussi dont il est difficile de sortir. Tous les outils que je refusais d’utiliser sont devenus mon quotidien. Progressivement, ils sont même devenus des outils dont je me suis rendue compte dépendre affectivement, depuis un rapport destructeur de liens. Je me suis même mise à regarder les statistiques de fréquentation des sites de mes cours, les nombres de clics, pour me rassurer d’une présence, là où la distance commençait à creuser un vide. J’ai eu tendance à surcharger mes sites de cours de « ressources », pour tenter de me rassurer sur la possibilité de resserrer des liens, par ailleurs de plus en plus ténus, avec les étudiant·e·s, elles-mêmes et eux-mêmes confronté·e·s à un isolement et une #précarisation grandissantes. Là où la fonction transitionnelle d’objets intermédiaires, de « médias », permet de symboliser, élaborer l’absence, j’ai fait l’expérience du vide creusé par le numérique. Tout en étant convaincue que l’enseignement n’est jamais une affaire de « véhicule de communication », de « pédagogie », de « contenus » à « communiquer », mais bien une pratique relationnelle, réciproque, chargée d’affect, de transfert, de contre-transfert, que « les choses ne commencent à vivre qu’au milieu [13] », je n’avais jamais éprouvé combien la « communication de contenus » sans corps, sans adresse, créait de souffrance individuelle, collective et d’auto-exploitation. Nombreuses sont les analyses sur la difficulté de « #concentration », de captation d’une #attention réduite, derrière l’#écran. Avec Yves Citton et ses travaux sur l’#écologie_de_l’attention, il m’apparaît que la difficulté est moins celle d’un défaut de concentration et d’attention, que l’absence d’un milieu relationnel commun incarné :
    Une autre réduction revient à dire que c’est bien de se concentrer et que c’est mal d’être distrait. Il s’agit d’une évidence qui est trompeuse car la concentration n’est pas un bien en soi. Le vrai problème se situe dans le fait qu’il existe toujours plusieurs niveaux attentionnels. (…) La distraction en soi n’existe pas. Un élève que l’on dit distrait est en fait attentif à autre chose qu’à ce à quoi l’autorité veut qu’il soit attentif [14].

    La souffrance ressentie en tant que désormais « enseignante numérique » n’est pas relative à ce que serait un manque d’attention des étudiant·e·s généré par les écrans, mais bien à l’absence de #relation incarnée.

    Beaucoup d’enseignant·e·s disent leur malaise de parler à des « cases noires » silencieuses, où figurent les noms des étudiant·e·s connecté·e·s au cours. Ici encore, il ne s’agit pas de blâmer des étudiant·e·s qui ne « joueraient pas le jeu », et n’ouvriraient pas leurs caméras pour mieux dissimuler leur distraction. Outre les questions matérielles et techniques d’accès à un matériel doté d’une caméra et d’un réseau internet suffisamment puissant pour pouvoir suivre un cours et être filmé·e en même temps, comment reprocher à des étudiant·e·s de ne pas allumer la caméra, qui leur fait éprouver une #intrusion dans l’#espace_intime de leur habitation. Dans l’amphithéâtre, dans la salle de classe, on peut rêver, regarder les autres, regarder par la fenêtre, regarder par-dessus le tableau, à côté, revenir à sa feuille ou son écran…pas de gros plan sur le visage, pas d’intrusion dans l’espace de sa chambre ou de son salon. Dans une salle de classe, la mise en lien est celle d’une #co-présence dans un milieu commun indéterminé, sans que celui-ci n’expose à une intrusion de l’espace intime. Sans compter que des pratiques d’enregistrement sont possibles : où voyagent les images, et donc les images des visages ?

    Pour l’enseignant·e : parler à des cases noires, pour l’étudiant·e : entendre une voix, un visage en gros plan qui ne le·la regarde pas directement, qui invente une forme d’adresse désincarnée ; pour tou·te·s, faire l’expérience de l’#annihilation des #corps. Même en prenant des notes sur un ordinateur dans un amphithéâtre, avec un accès à internet et maintes possibilités de « s’évader » du cours, le corps pris dans le commun d’une salle engage des #liens. Quand la relation ne peut pas prendre corps, elle flotte dans le vide. Selon les termes de Gisèle Bastrenta, psychanalyste, l’écran, ici dans la relation d’enseignement, crée l’« aplatissement d’un ailleurs sans au-delà [15] ».

    Le #vide de cet aplatissement est synonyme d’#angoisse et de symptômes, notamment, celui d’une #auto-exploitation accrue. Le récit de plusieurs étudiant.e.s fait écho à l’expérience d’auto-exploitation et angoisse que je vis, depuis l’autre côté de l’écran. Mes conditions matérielles sont par ailleurs très souvent nettement meilleures aux leurs, jouissant notamment de mon salaire. La précarisation sociale et économique des étudiant·e·s creuse encore le vide des cases noires. Plusieurs d’entre elles et eux, celles et ceux qui peuvent encore se connecter, expliquent qu’ils n’ont jamais autant passé d’heures à écrire pour leurs essais, leurs dissertations…, depuis leur espace intime, en face-à-face avec les plateformes numériques qui débordent de fichiers de cours, de documents… D’abord, ce temps très long de travail a souvent été entrecoupé de crises de #panique. Ensuite, ce temps a été particulièrement angoissant parce que, comme l’explique une étudiante, « tout étant soi-disant sur les plateformes et tout étant accessible, tous les cours, tous les “contenus”, on s’est dit qu’on n’avait pas le droit à l’erreur, qu’il fallait qu’on puisse tout dire, tout écrire, tout ressortir ». Plutôt qu’un « contenu » élaborable, digérable, limité, la plateforme est surtout un contenant sans fond qui empêche d’élaborer une #réflexion. Plusieurs étudiant·e·s, dans des échanges que nous avons eus hors numérique, lors de la manifestation du 26 janvier 2021 à l’appel de syndicats d’enseignant·e·s du secondaire, ont également exprimé cet apparent #paradoxe : -le besoin de plus de « #contenu », notamment entièrement rédigé à télécharger sur les plateformes pour « mieux suivre » le cours, -puis, quand ce « contenu » était disponible, l’impression de complètement s’y noyer et de ne pas savoir quoi en faire, sur fond de #culpabilisation d’« avoir accès à tout et donc de n’avoir pas le droit à l’erreur », sans pour autant parvenir à élaborer une réflexion qui puisse étancher cette soif sans fin.

    Face à l’absence, la privatisation et l’interdiction de milieu commun, face à l’expression de la souffrance des étudiant·e·s en demande de présence, traduite par une demande sans fin de « contenu » jamais satisfaite, car annulée par un cadre désincarné, je me suis de plus en plus auto-exploitée en me rendant sur les plateformes d’abord tout le jour, puis à des heures où je n’aurais pas dû travailler. Rappelons que les plateformes sont constamment accessibles, 24h/24, 7j/7. Poster toujours plus de « contenu » sur les plateformes, multiplier les heures de cours via les écrans, devoir remplir d’eau un tonneau troué, supplice des Danaïdes. Jusqu’à l’#épuisement et la nécessité - politique, médicale aussi - d’arrêter. Alors que je n’utilisais pas les plateformes d’enseignement numérique, déjà très développées avant 2020, et tout en ayant connaissance de la politique très offensive du Ministère en matière de déshumanisation de l’enseignement, je suis devenue, en quelque mois, happée et écrasée par la fréquentation compulsive des plateformes. J’ai interiorisé très rapidement les conditions d’une auto-exploitation, ne sachant comment répondre, autrement que par une surenchère destructrice, à la souffrance généralisée, jusqu’à la décision d’un arrêt nécessaire.

    L’enjeu ici n’est pas seulement d’essayer de traverser au moins pire la « crise » mais de lutter contre une politique structurelle de #destruction radicale de l’enseignement.

    Créer les milieux communs de relations réciproques et indéterminées d’enseignement, depuis des corps présents, et donc des présences et des absences qui peuvent s’élaborer depuis la #parole, veut dire aujourd’hui en grande partie braconner : organiser des cours sur les pelouses des campus…L’hiver est encore là, le printemps est toujours déjà en germe.

    https://lundi.am/L-enseignement-numerique-ou-le-supplice-des-Danaides

    #numérique #distanciel #Grenoble #université #facs #France #enseignement_à_distance #enseignement_distanciel

    • Le #coût fixe du MOOC, à la différence du coût croissant du cours classique en fonction du nombre d’étudiants, suffit à prouver la « #rentabilité » de l’enseignement numérique.

      mais non ! Si la création du MOOC est effectivement un coût fixe, son fonctionnement ne devrait pas l’être : à priori un cours en ligne décemment conçu nécessite des interactions de l’enseignant avec ses étudiants...

  • Lettre d’un Tigréen à son pays en guerre

    Alors que la guerre se poursuit au Tigré, ce professeur d’université, originaire de la région, explique comment les divisions ethniques ont eu raison de son sentiment d’appartenance nationale.

    Dans les années 1980, quand j’étais enfant, à Asmara, ville alors éthiopienne [et actuelle capitale de l’Eythrée voisine], mes parents me demandaient souvent ce que je voudrais faire quand je serais grand. Invariablement, je leur répondais que je voulais être pilote de chasse ou général de l’armée de terre. La raison était simple : mon père était soldat dans l’armée éthiopienne sous le régime du Derg [régime socialiste autoritaire à la tête de l’Ethiopie à partir de 1974] et, moi aussi, je voulais tuer les « ennemis » de la nation.

    J’avais grandi en temps de guerre, le bruit des roquettes et des balles constituait la bande-son de ma vie et les médias d’Etat fournissaient le scénario. On m’a appris à voir le conflit de façon manichéenne, avec d’un côté les bons Ethiopiens patriotes et de l’autre les rebelles haineux. En 1991, dans les derniers jours du régime sanglant du Derg, je me revois en train de pleurer, tout en brandissant notre drapeau vert, jaune et rouge.

    Ce que je ne savais pas, c’est que parmi les « ennemis » combattus par mon père, il y avait des cousins à lui et les enfants de nos voisins. La #guerre_civile a rompu les liens sociaux et culturels qu’avaient tissés de nombreux groupes ethniques, dressant souvent les membres de mêmes familles les uns contre les autres. Mon père, de la région du Tigré, avait combattu des membres de sa propre ethnie appartenant au #Front_de_libération_du_peuple_du_Tigré (#TPLF). Pour ma famille, il ne faisait pas bon être à la fois tigréen et éthiopien. Parmi les partisans du régime du #Derg, on se méfiait de nous en raison de notre appartenance ethnique : on nous soupçonnait d’être des agents du TPLF. Parmi les Tigréens, nous étions perçus comme ayant trahi notre peuple en prenant parti pour le gouvernement. Comme des milliers d’autres familles, nous essuyions des insultes de différents camps.

    En 1991, le régime répressif du Derg a été vaincu et le TPLF a pris la tête de l’Ethiopie. Ma famille a quitté Asmara pour Addis Abeba [la capitale éthiopienne], où nous avons vécu dans un camp de réfugiés pendant dix ans.

    Durant les vingt-sept années qui ont suivi, la coalition menée par le TPLF a gouverné le pays. Elle a mis en oeuvre une sorte de #fédéralisme_ethnique qui a favorisé la #conscience_ethnique, au détriment de l’#identité panéthiopienne. Toutefois, avec le temps, la #résistance populaire à la domination tigréenne et à ses pratiques non démocratiques a fait tomber le régime, à la suite de manifestations monstres. En 2018, la coalition au pouvoir a choisi un nouveau dirigeant. #Abiy_Ahmed a promis lors de son investiture de promouvoir la paix, l’espoir et l’unité. Cela n’a pas duré longtemps. Le 4 novembre 2020, Abiy déclarait la guerre au Tigré.

    Le conflit a fait naître une conscience nouvelle de ce que signifie être Tigréen dans la société éthiopienne au sens large. Le gouvernement qualifie sa propre action d’" #opération_de_police " , et non de guerre contre le peuple du Tigré. Pourtant, c’est ainsi que la vivent beaucoup de gens. De nombreux Tigréens soutiennent le TPLF. En outre, dans le cadre de l’actuelle « opération de police » destinée à capturer les principaux dirigeants du parti, des milliers de citoyens lambda ont été tués ou déplacés. Entre-temps, de nombreux « non-Tigréens » ont salué la prise de #Mekele, la capitale du Tigré, et ont gardé le silence quand le gouvernement a empêché des convois d’aide de parvenir à leurs compatriotes. Le #fichage_ethnique et le #harcèlement des Tigréens s’accentuent.

    Devant l’émergence d’une #crise_humanitaire qui touche les Tigréens ordinaires, la volonté délibérée du gouvernement de refuser l’envoi d’aide, le #silence et le soutien de la majorité des Ethiopiens, sapent mon sentiment d’appartenance à l’Ethiopie. Pour moi, l’un des pires aspects de cette situation est que mon père, qui a toujours été fier d’être éthiopien, a une fois de plus été condamné à la souffrance et à l’isolement. Personnellement, il me paraît impossible d’être à la fois tigréen et éthiopien dans le contexte actuel. Le lien que je gardais avec l’Ethiopie semble définitivement rompu.

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/recit-lettre-dun-tigreen-son-pays-en-guerre

    #Tigré #guerre #lettre #Soudan

  • Je découvre #The_Freedom_Affair, un nouveau groupe de soul de Kansas City, avec de très beaux titres :

    Give A Little Love (chanson « feel good », qui appelle à voter Biden, mais où l’on trouve aussi à 1’30", le livre d’ #Angela_Davis sur la #Palestine !)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOpPPcU9spQ

    Don’t Shoot (sur les #violences_policières bien sûr, en acoustique)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmGNaucvoGs

    Rise Up
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwZTbFLVoWc

    #Soul #Musique #Musique_et_politique #USA

  • #Covid-19 : un recul mondial en trompe-l’œil ?
    https://www.france24.com/fr/europe/20210212-covid-19-un-recul-mondial-en-trompe-l-%C5%93il

    Mais ce spécialiste précise que ces données de l’#OMS ne racontent qu’une partie de l’histoire. Elles montrent essentiellement la trajectoire du #Sars-CoV-2 « historique »... sans refléter l’émergence des #variants. « Ce qui transparaît dans les chiffres, c’est l’évolution des cas de contamination à la #souche majoritaire du virus, qui est encore la forme originale du Covid-19 », résume-t-il.

    Pour lui, le monde pourrait être, en réalité, à un moment de bascule : le variant historique arrive en bout de course car les autorités ont réussi à le maîtriser, ce que montrent les chiffres de l’OMS, mais les nouvelles formes du Sars-CoV-2 sont prêtes à prendre le relais.

    Pour avoir une vision plus réaliste de l’évolution de l’épidémie, « il faudrait faire du #séquençage massif du virus dans la population contaminée pour savoir au plus vite quand un nouveau ‘#mutant’ apparaît et s’il est plus contagieux ou dangereux », assure Jean-Stéphane Dhersin. Sans ça, on risque de continuer à se fier aveuglément à des chiffres de l’OMS qui ne peuvent pas prendre en compte ces variants qui, petit à petit, deviennent moins petits.

  • Le cœur imbibé de soul
    comme une bière à 0% mais en mieux


    Une émission de Chadek deck, bourrée, mais à la #soul.

    https://www.radiopanik.org/emissions/chadek-s-deck/le-cur-imbibe-de-soul

    un #shameless_autopromo bien sous modulé mais parce que la playlist est tellement puissante de joie que ça devrait être remboursé par la sécu.
    https://www.radiopanik.org/media/sounds/chadek-s-deck/le-cur-imbibe-de-soul_10775__1.mp3

    • #merci !

      Jesus wayne - The Chicago Party Theme
      Générique
      Johnny Davis - You’ve got to crawl to me
      Otis Brown - whatever you do do it good
      Nate Evans - Main Squeeze
      The dynamic Tints - Fallin in love
      Syl johnson - I feel an urge
      Skip drake - Wrapped around your finger
      Little ben and the cheers - I’m gonna get even with you
      Jerry townes - Just say the word
      Harlem Meat Company - I din’t now why
      The Notations - A new day
      Linda balintine - glad about that
      Iron jaw harris - all ready to go
      Matta baby - do the pearl girl
      Harrison and the majestic kind - tearing me inside
      The majestic arrows - Love is all i need
      South shore comission - Shadows
      The Schiller street gang - Remind me
      NTM - Soul soul

      #musique #radio #radio_panik

  • Pandémie de Covid-19 : le virus circulait sans doute en France dès novembre 2019
    https://www.lemonde.fr/planete/article/2021/02/10/le-sars-cov-2-circulait-sans-doute-en-france-des-novembre-2019_6069431_3244.

    Interpellés par plusieurs cas cliniques ayant précédé l’épidémie de Covid-19, des médecins de l’hôpital Albert-Schweitzer de Colmar (Haut-Rhin) réanalysaient, en mai, plusieurs centaines de scanners thoraciques de patients admis dans leur établissement dès octobre 2019, pour des pneumopathies sévères. Un de ces malades, hospitalisé le 16 novembre, était porteur de lésions évocatrices du Covid-19. Une présence du nouveau coronavirus sur le territoire français était dès lors suspectée à cette date, mais sans analyse de prélèvements biologiques, l’hypothèse demeurait fragile. Des travaux de chercheurs français publiés samedi 6 février dans la revue European Journal of Epidemiology viennent appuyer ces observations : ils indiquent, avec un haut niveau de preuve, que le SARS-CoV-2 circulait déjà en France en novembre 2019.
    Les chercheurs, conduits par le professeur Fabrice Carrat, directeur de l’Institut Pierre-Louis d’épidémiologie et de santé publique (Inserm, Sorbonne Université), ont procédé avec un soin particulier. Ils ont analysé 9 144 échantillons sanguins collectés sur des participants à la cohorte « Constances » – la plus grande cohorte épidémiologique suivie en France, forte de plus de 200 000 individus, lancée en 2012 grâce au programme des investissements d’avenir. Ils les ont d’abord passés au crible d’un test rapide détectant des immunoglobulines de type G (IgG) anti-SARS-CoV-2. Ce test étant réputé générer des « faux positifs », les auteurs ont confirmé ou infirmé la mesure grâce à un second test, très spécifique, mais plus délicat à mettre en œuvre.
    Résultats : sur les 9 144 échantillons analysés, treize prélevés entre novembre et janvier se sont révélés positifs aux deux tests, dont dix prélevés en novembre ou décembre. « Nous avons commencé par analyser des échantillons prélevés en janvier et février, et nous en avons trouvé bien plus de positifs que ce à quoi nous nous attendions, explique l’épidémiologiste Marie Zins (Inserm, université de Paris), principale investigatrice de la cohorte “Constances”. Nous avons donc cherché à voir si nous en trouvions dès l’automne. » Pour M. Carrat, « ces résultats suggèrent que dès les mois de novembre et décembre, le taux de contamination dans la population française est déjà de l’ordre d’un cas pour mille ». « Ces résultats ne montrent pas de surreprésentation de la maladie dans certaines régions, ajoute M. Carrat. On semble trouver des cas de manière sporadique, un peu partout sur le territoire. »
    Jusqu’à présent, le premier cas français de Covid-19 confirmé par test PCR est un patient hospitalisé pour une pneumopathie sévère, fin décembre 2019, en Seine-Saint-Denis, et dont les prélèvements, congelés, avaient été réanalysés en avril 2020 à l’initiative des professeurs Yves Cohen et Jean-Ralph Zahar (hôpital Avicenne, à Bobigny). Parmi les treize cas positifs entre novembre et janvier, onze ont en outre répondu à un questionnaire adressé par Santé publique France – qui a cofinancé ces travaux – pour mettre en évidence des facteurs de risque ou une éventuelle association avec des symptômes caractéristiques du Covid-19, chez l’intéressé ou l’un de ses proches. Une femme d’une trentaine d’années, positive en novembre, a expliqué que son partenaire avait souffert d’une toux intense en octobre. Une autre, ayant voyagé en Espagne début novembre, a été en contact avec un membre de sa famille ayant souffert d’une pneumonie d’origine inconnue entre octobre et décembre.
    « Dans plus de la moitié des cas, on a affaire à des gens qui ont voyagé ou qui ont été en contact avec des personnes ayant été malades, dit M. Carrat. L’un des cas avait voyagé deux mois en Asie et est revenu début décembre en France… un autre est médecin, ce qui est aussi un facteur de risque. » Un grand nombre d’échantillons sanguins étant collectés de manière routinière, depuis 2018, sur les membres de la cohorte « Constances », les chercheurs pourraient tenter de remonter plus loin encore dans le temps. « La question que nous nous posons désormais, c’est de savoir si le virus était déjà en France en septembre et pourquoi pas en août, explique Mme Zins. Nous cherchons les financements pour mener les analyses nécessaires. » En attendant, ces résultats confortent d’autres travaux italiens suggérant que les premiers cas d’infections par le nouveau coronavirus remontaient, en Italie, au mois d’octobre 2019. Ces travaux avaient été publiés en novembre 2020 dans le Tumori Journal, mais la méthodologie mise en œuvre avait été jugée fragile par plusieurs spécialistes, alors interrogés par Le Monde. Ces indices d’une circulation déjà soutenue du nouveau coronavirus en Europe dès les mois de novembre, voire d’octobre, mettent à mal l’hypothèse d’un départ de l’épidémie sur le marché de Huanan, à Wuhan, en Chine, au début du mois de décembre 2019. Toutefois, ils ne permettent pas de remettre en cause les connaissances acquises sur la phylogénie du virus – les souches du SARS-CoV-2 circulant actuellement dans le monde dérivant toutes d’un virus apparu vers septembre-otobre 2019, dans la province chinoise du Hubei.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#france#chine#sante#souche#coronavirus#circulation#frontiere

  • L’oriflamme russe au Soudan : un enracinement stratégique sur la mer Rouge et au-delà - REGARD SUR L’EST
    https://regard-est.com/loriflamme-russe-au-soudan-un-enracinement-strategique-sur-la-mer-rouge-

    L’éclosion prochaine d’une base russe au Soudan marque une étape tant dans le rapprochement entre les deux pays que pour la présence de la Russie en Afrique. Cette base revêt une importance particulière pour la protection des intérêts russes et aura de multiples effets stratégiques.

    #russafrique #rusie #soudan #armement #bases_militaires #armée #géopolitique #déploiment_miliatrie

  • L’#excellence en temps de pandémie : chronique du #naufrage des Universités

    Entre mesures incohérentes des responsables politiques, #inaction des instances universitaires et #chaos_organisationnel dans les services, accompagner correctement les étudiants en pleine crise sanitaire sur fond de généralisation de l’#enseignement_à_distance devient une mission impossible... Petit aperçu du quotidien dans la « #Big_French_University ».

    Maîtresse de conférences depuis cinq ans dans une « grande » Université parisienne et responsable d’une L1 depuis septembre, je prends le temps aujourd’hui de décrire un peu ce à quoi ressemble la vie d’une universitaire d’un établissement qui se dit d’excellence en temps de #crise_sanitaire.

    Depuis peu, mon université a été fusionnée dans un énorme établissement, gros comme trois universités, qui désormais s’enorgueillit d’émarger au top 100 du #classement_de_Shanghai.

    Mais depuis septembre, étudiants, personnels administratifs et enseignants-chercheurs vivent un véritable #cauchemar au sein de cet établissement "d’excellence". Je ne pourrai pas retranscrire ici l’expérience des étudiants ni celle des personnels administratifs. Car je ne l’ai pas vécue de l’intérieur. Mais comme enseignante-chercheure et responsable pédagogique d’une promo de 250 étudiants de L1, j’ai un petit aperçu aussi de ce qu’elles et ils ont vécu. Si j’écris sur mon expérience personnelle en utilisant « je », ce n’est pas pour me singulariser, mais c’est pour rendre concret le quotidien actuel au sein des universités de toute une partie de celles et ceux qui y travaillent et y étudient. Ce texte se nourrit des échanges avec des collègues de mon université, enseignants-chercheurs et administratifs, et d’autres universités en France, il a été relu et amendé par plusieurs d’entre elles et eux – que je remercie.

    Depuis juillet, nous préparons une #rentrée dans des conditions d’#incertitude inégalée : crise sanitaire et #fusion. Quand je dis "nous", je parle du niveau le plus local : entre enseignants chercheurs, avec l’administration la plus proche de nous, les collègues de la logistique, de la scolarité, des ressources humaines. Car nous avons peu de nouvelles de notre Université…

    Sur la crise sanitaire

    Notre Université a acheté des licences #Zoom. Voilà à peu près tout ce qui a été fait pour anticiper la crise sanitaire qui s’annonçait pourtant. A part cela, rien n’a été fait. Rien.

    En septembre, aucune consigne claire à l’échelle de l’Université n’a été donnée : sur un site d’enseignement, il fallait respecter des #demies_jauges ; sur un autre campus du même établissement, pas de contrainte de demies jauges. Mais quelles jauges faut-il mettre en œuvre : diviser les effectifs par deux ? Mettre en place une distance d’un mètre ? Un mètre sur les côtés seulement ou devant/derrière aussi ? Les équipes logistiques s’arrachent les cheveux.

    L’université n’a rien fait pour rendre possible les #demi-groupes.

    Aucun système de semaine A/semaine B n’a été proposé et, chez nous, tout a été bricolé localement, par les enseignants-chercheurs, en faisant des simulations sur excel ("on découpe par ordre alphabétique ou par date de naissance ?"). Aucun #équipement des salles pour la captation vidéo et audio n’a été financé et mis en place, pour permettre des #cours_en_hybride : les expériences - que j’ai tentées personnellement - du "#bimodal" (faire cours à des étudiants présents et des étudiants absents en même temps) ont été faites sur l’équipement personnel de chacun.e, grâce à la caméra de mon ordinateur portable et mes propres oreillettes bluetooth. Et je ne parle pas des capteurs de CO2 ou des systèmes de #ventilation préconisés depuis des mois par des universitaires.

    Depuis, nous naviguons à vue.

    Au 1er semestre, nous avons changé trois fois de système d’organisation : jauges pleines pendant une semaine sur un site, puis demi jauge sur tous les sites, puis distanciel complet. Ce sont à chaque fois des programmes de cours qu’il faut refaire. Car sans équipement, quand on a des demi groupes, on doit dédoubler les séances, diviser le programme par deux, et faire deux fois le même cours pour chaque demi groupe. Tout en préparant des contenus et exercices pour les étudiants contraints de rester chez eux. Avec des groupes complets sur Zoom, l’#organisation change à nouveau.

    Alors même que le gouvernement annonçait la tenue des examens en présentiel en janvier, notre UFR a décidé de faire les examens à distance, pour des raisons compréhensibles d’anticipation sanitaire.

    Le gouvernement faisait de la communication, et localement on était obligé de réfléchir à ce qui était épidémiologiquement le plus réaliste. La période des #examens a été catastrophique pour les étudiants qui ont dû les passer en présentiel : des étudiants ont été entassés dans des amphis, terrorisés de ramener le virus à leurs parents déjà fragiles ; d’autres, atteints du Covid, se sont rendus en salle d’examen car ils n’étaient pas assurés sinon de pouvoir valider leur semestre. Les #examens_à_distance ne sont qu’un pis-aller, mais dans notre Licence, on a réussi à faire composer nos étudiants à distance, en bricolant encore des solutions pour éviter les serveurs surchargés de l’Université, sans grande catastrophe et sans abandon massif, on en était assez fiers.

    Le 2e semestre commence, et les #annonces_contradictoires et impossibles du gouvernement continuent.

    Le 14 janvier le gouvernement annonce que les cours reprendront en présentiel demie jauge le 25 janvier pour les étudiants de L1. Avec quels moyens ??? Les mêmes qu’en septembre, c’est-à-dire rien. Alors qu’en décembre, le président de la république avait annoncé une possible réouverture des universités 15 jours après le 20 janvier, c’est-à-dire le 10 février (au milieu d’une semaine, on voit déjà le réalisme d’une telle annonce...).

    A cette annonce, mes étudiants étrangers repartis dans leur famille en Égypte, en Turquie, ou ailleurs en France, s’affolent : ils avaient prévu de revenir pour le 8 février, conformément aux annonces du président. Mais là, ils doivent se rapatrier, et retrouver un #logement, en quelques jours ? Quant aux #équipes_pédagogiques, elles doivent encore bricoler : comment combiner #présentiel des demi groupes en TD avec le #distanciel des CM quand les étudiants sur site ne sont pas autorisés à occuper une salle de cours pour suivre un cours à distance s’il n’y a pas de prof avec eux ? Comment faire pour les créneaux qui terminent à 18h alors que les circulaires qui sortent quelques jours plus tard indiquent que les campus devront fermer à 18h, voire fermer pour permettre aux étudiants d’être chez eux à 18h ?

    Dans notre cursus de L1, 10 créneaux soit l’équivalent de 250 étudiants sont concernés par des créneaux terminant à 18h30. Dans mon université, les étudiants habitent souvent à plus d’une heure, parfois deux heures, du campus. Il faut donc qu’on passe tous les cours commençant après 16h en distanciel ? Mais si les étudiants sont dans les transports pour rentrer chez eux, comment font-ils pour suivre ces cours en distanciel ? Sur leur smartphone grâce au réseau téléphone disponible dans le métro et le RER ?

    Nous voulons revoir les étudiants. Mais les obstacles s’accumulent.

    On organise tout pour reprendre en présentiel, au moins deux semaines, et petit à petit, l’absence de cadrage, l’accumulation des #contraintes nous décourage. A quatre jours de la rentrée, sans information de nos instances ne serait-ce que sur l’heure de fermeture du campus, on se résout à faire une rentrée en distanciel. Les étudiants et nous sommes habitués à Zoom, le lien a été maintenu, peu d’abandons ont été constatés aux examens de fin de semestre.

    C’est une solution peu satisfaisante mais peut-être que c’est la seule valable... Et voilà que jeudi 21 janvier nous apprenons que les Présidences d’Université vont émettre des circulaires rendant ce retour au présentiel obligatoire. Alors même que partout dans les médias on parle de reconfinement strict et de fermeture des écoles ? Rendre le présentiel obligatoire sans moyen, sans organisation, de ces demis groupes. Je reçois aujourd’hui les jauges des salles, sans que personne ne puisse me dire s’il faudra faire des demi salles ou des salles avec distanciation de 1 mètre, ce qui ne fait pas les mêmes effectifs. Il faut prévenir d’une reprise en présentiel les 250 étudiants de notre L1 et les 37 collègues qui y enseignent deux jours avant ?

    Breaking news : à l’heure où j’écris Emmanuel Macron a annoncé une nouvelle idée brillante.

    Les étudiants devront venir un jour par semaine à la fac. Dans des jauges de 20% des capacités ? Sur la base du volontariat ? Est-ce qu’il a déjà regardé un planning de L1 ? 250 étudiants en L1 avec plusieurs Unités d’enseignement, divisés en CM et TD, c’est des dizaines et des dizaines de créneaux, de salles, d’enseignant.es. Une L1 c’est un lycée à elle toute seule dans beaucoup de filières. Un lycée sans les moyens humains pour les gérer.

    Derrière ces annonces en l’air qui donnent l’impression de prendre en compte la souffrance étudiante, ce sont des dizaines de contraintes impossibles à gérer. Les étudiants veulent de la considération, de l’argent pour payer leur loyer alors qu’ils ont perdu leurs jobs étudiants, des moyens matériels pour travailler alors que des dizaines d’entre eux suivent les cours en visio sur leur téléphone et ont dû composer aux examens sur leur smartphone !

    Les étudiants ne sont pas plus stupides ou irresponsables que le reste de la population : il y a une crise sanitaire, ils en ont conscience, certains sont à risque (oui, il y a des étudiants immuno-déprimés qui ne peuvent pas prendre le #risque de venir en cours en temps d’épidémie aiguë), ils vivent souvent avec des personnes à risque. Ils pourraient prendre leur parti du distanciel pour peu que des moyens leur soient donnés. Mais il est plus facile d’annoncer la #réouverture des universités par groupe de 7,5 étudiants, pendant 1h15, sur une jambe, avec un chapeau pointu, que de débloquer de réels moyens pour faire face à la #précarité structurelle des étudiants.

    Et dans ce contexte, que fait notre Présidence d’Université ? Quelles ont été les mesures prises pour la réouvrir correctement ? Je l’ai déjà dit, rien n’a changé depuis septembre, rien de plus n’a été mis en place.

    Sur la fusion et le fonctionnement, de l’intérieur, d’une Université d’excellence

    Mais sur cette crise sanitaire se greffe une autre crise, interne à mon Université, mais symptomatique de l’état des Universités en général.

    Donc oui, j’appartiens désormais à une Université entrée dans le top 100 des Universités du classement de Shanghai.

    Parlez-en aux étudiants qui y ont fait leur rentrée en septembre ou y ont passé leurs examens en janvier. Sur twitter, mon Université est devenu une vraie célébrité : en septembre-octobre, des tweets émanant d’étudiants et d’enseignants indiquaient l’ampleur des #dysfonctionnements. Le système informatique était totalement dysfonctionnel : dans le service informatique central, 45 emplois étaient vacants.

    Tant la fusion s’était faite dans des conditions désastreuses de gestion du personnel, tant le travail est ingrat, mal payé et mal reconnu.

    Cela a généré des semaines de problèmes d’inscriptions administratives, d’étudiants en attente de réponse des services centraux de scolarité pendant des jours et des jours, sans boîte mail universitaire et sans plateforme numérique de dépôt des cours (le fameux Moodle) pendant des semaines - les outils clés de l’enseignement à distance ou hybride.

    Pendant trois mois, en L1, nous avons fonctionné avec une liste de diffusion que j’ai dû créer moi-même avec les mails personnels des étudiants.

    Pendant des semaines, un seul informaticien a dû régler tous les dysfonctionnement de boîte mail des dizaines d’étudiants qui persistaient en novembre, décembre, janvier…

    En janvier, les médias ont relayé le désastre des examens de 2e année de médecine encore dans notre Université - avec un hashtag qui est entré dans le top 5 les plus relayés sur twitter France dans la 2e semaine de janvier, face à la catastrophe d’examens organisés en présentiel, sur des tablettes non chargées, mal configurées, des examens finalement reportés à la dernière minute. Les articles de presse ont mis en lumière plus largement la catastrophe de la fusion des études de médecine des Universités concernées : les étudiants de 2e année de cette fac de médecine fusionnée ont dû avaler le double du programme (fusion = addition) le tout en distanciel !

    Les problèmes de personnel ne concernent pas que le service informatique central.

    Ils existent aussi au niveau plus local : dans mon UFR, le poste de responsable "Apogée" est resté vacant 6 mois. Le responsable #Apogée c’est le nerf de la guerre d’une UFR : c’est lui qui permet les inscriptions en ligne de centaines d’étudiants dans des groupes de TD, qui fait les emplois du temps, qui compile les notes pour faire des jurys et donc les fameux bulletins de notes qui inquiètent tant les Ministères de l’Enseignement supérieur – et ce pour des dizaines de formations (plusieurs Licences, plusieurs Masters).

    Pendant six mois, personnels et enseignants chercheurs, nous avons essayé de pallier son absence en faisant les emplois du temps, les changements de groupe des étudiants, l’enregistrement des étudiants en situation de handicap non gérés par l’université centrale (encore une défaillance honteuse), l’organisation des jurys, etc. Mais personne n’a touché à la configuration des inscriptions, des maquettes, des notes, car il faut connaître le logiciel. Les inscriptions dans les groupes de TD du 2e semestre doivent se faire avant la rentrée du semestre 2 logiquement, idéalement dès le mois de décembre, ou début janvier.

    Mais le nouveau responsable n’arrive qu’en décembre et n’est que très peu accompagné par les services centraux de l’Université pour se familiariser aux réglages locaux du logiciel, par manque de personnel... Les inscriptions sont prévues le 18 janvier, une semaine avant la rentrée…

    Résultat : la catastrophe annoncée depuis des mois arrive, et s’ajoute à la #mauvaise_gestion de la crise sanitaire.

    Depuis lundi, les inscriptions dans les groupes de TD ne fonctionnent pas. Une fois, deux fois, trois fois les blocages se multiplient, les étudiants s’arrachent les cheveux face à un logiciel et un serveur saturés, ils inondent le secrétariat de mails inquiets, nous personnels administratifs et enseignants-chercheurs passons des heures à résoudre les problèmes. Le nouveau responsable reprend problème par problème, trouve des solutions, jusqu’à 1h du matin, tous les jours, depuis des jours, week-end compris.

    Maintenant nous voilà jeudi 21 janvier après-midi, à 3 jours de la rentrée. Sans liste d’étudiants par cours et par TD, sans informations claires sur les jauges et les horaires du campus, avec des annonces de dernière minute plus absurdes et irréalistes les unes que les autres, et on nous demande de ne pas craquer ? On nous dit que la présidence de l’Université, le ministère va nous obliger à reprendre en présentiel ? Nous renvoyant l’image de tire-au-flanc convertis au confort du distanciel ?

    L’an passé, un mouvement de grève sans précédent dans l’enseignement supérieur et la recherche a été arrêté net par le confinement de mars 2020.

    Ce mouvement de grève dénonçait l’ampleur de la précarité à l’université.

    La #précarité_étudiante, qui existait avant la crise sanitaire, nous nous rappelons de l’immolation de Anas, cet étudiant lyonnais, à l’automne 2019. La précarité des personnels de l’université : les #postes administratifs sont de plus en plus occupés par des #vacataires, formés à la va-vite, mal payés et mal considérés, qui vont voir ailleurs dès qu’ils en ont l’occasion tant les #conditions_de_travail sont mauvaises à l’université. La précarité des enseignants chercheurs : dans notre L1, dans l’équipe de 37 enseignants, 10 sont des titulaires de l’Université. 27 sont précaires, vacataires, avec des heures de cours payées des mois en retard, à un taux horaire en dessous du SMIC, qui attendent pendant des années avant de décrocher un poste de titulaire, pour les plus « chanceux » d’entre eux, tant les postes de titulaires se font rares alors que les besoins sont criants…

    Deux tiers des créneaux de cours de notre L1 sont assurés par des vacataires. Le mouvement de #grève a été arrêté par le #confinement mais la colère est restée intacte. En pleine crise sanitaire, le gouvernement a entériné une nouvelle #réforme de l’université, celle-là même contre laquelle la mobilisation dans les universités s’était construite, la fameuse #LPPR devenue #LPR, une loi qui augmente encore cette précarité, qui néglige encore les moyens nécessaires à un accueil décent des étudiants dans les universités. Le gouvernement a fait passer une loi sévèrement critiquée par une grande partie du monde universitaire au début du 2e confinement en novembre, et a fait passer ses décrets d’application le 24 décembre, la veille de Noël.

    Le gouvernement piétine le monde de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche et nous montre maintenant du doigt parce qu’on accueillerait pas correctement les étudiants ? Parce qu’on serait réticents à les revoir en présentiel ?

    Parce que finalement, pour nous enseignants à l’université, c’est bien confortable de faire cours au chaud depuis chez soi, dans sa résidence secondaire de Normandie ?

    J’enseigne depuis mon appartement depuis novembre.

    Mon ordinateur portable est posé sur la table à manger de mon salon, car le wifi passe mal dans ma chambre dans laquelle j’ai un bureau. J’ai acheté une imprimante à mes frais car de temps en temps, il est encore utile d’imprimer des documents, mais j’ai abandonné de corriger les devoirs de mes étudiants sur papier, je les corrige sur écran. Heureusement que je ne vis pas avec mon compagnon, lui aussi enseignant-chercheur, car matériellement, nous ne pourrions pas faire cours en même temps dans la même pièce : pas assez de connexion et difficile de faire cours à tue-tête côte à côte.

    A chaque repas, mon bureau devient ma table à manger, puis redevient mon bureau.

    En « cours », j’ai des écrans noirs face à moi, mais quand je demande gentiment à mes étudiants d’activer leur vidéo, ils font un effort, même s’ils ne sont pas toujours à l’aise de montrer le lit superposé qui leur sert de décor dans leur chambre partagée avec une sœur aide-soignante à l’hôpital qui a besoin de dormir dans l’obscurité quand elle rentre d’une garde de nuit, de voir leur mère, leur frère passer dans le champ de leur caméra derrière eux. Certains restent en écran noir, et c’est plus dur pour moi de leur faire la petite morale habituelle que j’administre, quand je fais cours dans une salle, aux étudiants endormis au fond de la classe. Je ne sais pas si mon cours les gonfle, s’ils sont déprimés ou si leur connexion ne permet pas d’activer la vidéo...

    Donc non, ce n’est pas confortable l’enseignement à distance. Ce n’est pas la belle vie. Ce n’est pas de gaieté de cœur que nous envisageons de ne pas revoir d’étudiants en vrai avant septembre prochain.

    Je suis enseignante-chercheure. Je dois donner des cours en L1, L3, Master.

    Depuis des jours, plutôt que de préparer des scénarios de rentrée intenables ou de résoudre les problèmes des inscriptions, j’aimerais pouvoir me consacrer à l’élaboration de ces cours, réfléchir aux moyens d’intéresser des étudiants bloqués derrière leurs ordinateurs en trouvant des supports adaptés, en préparant des petits QCM interactifs destinés à capter leur attention, en posant des questions qui visent à les faire réfléchir. Je dois leur parler d’immigration, de réfugiés, de la manière dont les États catégorisent les populations, des histoires de vie qui se cachent derrière les chiffres des migrants à la frontière.

    C’est cela mon métier.

    Je suis enseignante-chercheur mais à l’heure qu’il est, si je pouvais au moins être correctement enseignante, j’en serais déjà fortement soulagée.

    Il faut donc que nos responsables politiques et nos Présidences d’université se comportent de manière responsable. En arrêtant de faire de la com’ larmoyante sur l’avenir de notre jeunesse. Et en mettant vraiment les moyens pour diminuer la souffrance de toutes et tous.

    Il s’agit de notre jeunesse, de sa formation, de son avenir professionnel et citoyen.

    La mise en péril de cette jeunesse ne date pas de la crise sanitaire, ne nous faisons pas d’illusion là-dessus.

    La #crise_des_universités est plus ancienne, leur #sous-financement devenu structurel au moins depuis les années 2000. Alors arrêtez de vous cacher derrière l’imprévu de la crise sanitaire, arrêtez de vous faire passer pour des humanistes qui vous souciez de votre jeunesse alors que depuis mars dernier, rares ou marginaux ont été les discours et mesures prises pour maintenir l’enseignement en présentiel à l’Université.

    Cela fait cinq ans que j’enseigne à l’Université et déjà, je suis épuisée. De la même manière que nos soignant.es se retrouvent désemparé.es dans les hôpitaux face à l’impossibilité d’assurer correctement leur mission de service public de santé en raison des coupes budgétaires et des impératifs gestionnaires absurdes, je suis désespérée de voir à quel point, en raison des mêmes problèmes budgétaires et gestionnaires, nous finissons, dans les Universités, par assurer si mal notre #service_public d’#éducation...

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/une-universitaire-parmi-dautres/blog/220121/l-excellence-en-temps-de-pandemie-chronique-du-naufrage-des-universi

    #université #facs #France #covid-19 #pandémie #coronavirus #épuisement

    signalé aussi dans ce fil de discussion initié par @marielle :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/896650

  • Roots : Curtis Mayfield, de la soul engagée
    https://pan-african-music.com/black-history-month-curtis-mayfield-roots

    Les années 60 et 70… rien ne pourra dépasser ces décennies musicalement…

    Pendant le Black History Month, PAM revient sur des œuvres phares de la musique noire américaine, qui ont rencontré l’histoire du pays. Aujourd’hui, l’album Roots dans lequel le virage de Curtis Mayfield vers le Black Power s’affine.

    We got to have peace
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CM2YMaZSWk

    Choice of colors
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpf0XckJKQc

    We the people who are darker than blue
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSDCPKsSf2U

    Beautifyl brother of mine
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvWfsTBIJzU

    Superfly
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cmo6MRYf5g

    Right on for the darkness
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igC_1jwWR9o

    #musique #Curtis_Mayfield #soul #Black_Power #années_70

  • Difference between a coronavirus variant and strain - Los Angeles Times
    https://www.latimes.com/science/story/2021-02-04/whats-difference-between-variant-strain-coronavirus

    Pas de définitions strictes semble-t-il, mais lesdits « #variants » britannique (parce qu’il est plus contagieux) et sud-africain (parce qu’il échappe partiellement aux précédents anticorps) devraient plutôt être appelés « #souches. »

    [...] a particular coronavirus specimen may contain one or more mutations that another specimen lacks. If there is no detectable functional difference, it is merely a variant.

    However, if those mutations make the specimen more transmissible than its predecessors, or endow it with an added ability to evade a drug or vaccine, or alters it in another meaningful way, then it qualifies as a distinct strain.

    #virus

    • https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_de_La_Bo%C3%A9tie

      [...]

      Discours de la servitude volontaire.

      Lorsqu’il écrit ce texte, vers 1548, Étienne de La Boétie est un étudiant en droit de 18 ans, à l’université d’Orléans, qui se prépare à une carrière dans la magistrature. Sans doute marqué par la brutalité de la répression d’une révolte antifiscale en Guyenne en 1548, il traduit le désarroi de l’élite cultivée devant la réalité de l’absolutisme.

      Le Discours de la servitude volontaire constitue une remise en cause de la légitimité des gouvernants, que La Boétie appelle « maîtres » ou « tyrans ». Quelle que soit la manière dont un tyran s’est hissé au pouvoir (élections, violence, succession), ce n’est jamais son bon gouvernement qui explique sa domination et le fait que celle-ci perdure. Pour La Boétie, les gouvernants ont plutôt tendance à se distinguer par leur impéritie. Plus que la peur de la sanction, c’est d’abord l’habitude qu’a le peuple de la servitude qui explique que la domination du maître perdure. Ensuite viennent la religion et les superstitions. Mais ces deux moyens ne permettent de dominer que les ignorants. Vient le « secret de toute domination » : faire participer les dominés à leur domination. Ainsi, le tyran jette des miettes aux courtisans. Si le peuple est contraint d’obéir, les courtisans ne doivent pas se contenter d’obéir mais doivent aussi devancer les désirs du tyran. Aussi, ils sont encore moins libres que le peuple lui-même, et choisissent volontairement la servitude. Ainsi s’instaure une pyramide du pouvoir : le tyran en domine cinq, qui en dominent cent, qui eux-mêmes en dominent mille… Cette pyramide s’effondre dès lors que les courtisans cessent de se donner corps et âme au tyran. Alors celui-ci perd tout pouvoir acquis.

      Dans ce texte majeur de la philosophie politique, repris à travers les âges par des partis de colorations diverses, La Boétie oppose l’équilibre de la terreur qui s’instaure entre bandits, égaux par leur puissance et qui se partagent à ce titre le butin des brigandages, à l’amitié qui seule permet de vivre libre. Le tyran, quant à lui, vit dans la crainte permanente : n’ayant pas d’égaux, tous le craignent, et par conséquent, il risque à chaque instant l’assassinat. Elias Canetti fera une peinture similaire du « despote paranoïaque » dans Masse et puissance.
      Graffiti à Genève, 2007.

      Si La Boétie est toujours resté, par ses fonctions, serviteur fidèle de l’ordre public, il est cependant considéré par beaucoup comme un précurseur intellectuel de l’anarchisme13 et de la désobéissance civile. Également, et surtout, comme l’un des tout premiers théoriciens de l’aliénation.

      Pour comprendre les intentions qui conduisent Étienne de La Boétie à écrire le Discours de la servitude volontaire ou le Contr’un, il faut remonter au drame qui a lieu vers 1548. « En 1539, François Ier, roi de France, tente d’unifier la gabelle. Il impose des greniers à sel près de la frontière espagnole, dans les régions qui en sont dépourvues. En réaction de cette tentative des soulèvements ont lieu. Le premier en 1542, puis le plus grand en 1548 à Bordeaux ». Le connétable de Montmorency rétablit l’ordre de manière impitoyable. Si l’on s’en rapporte à l’écrivain Jacques-Auguste de Thou, ce serait sous l’impression de ces horreurs et cruautés commises à Bordeaux, que La Boétie compose le Discours de la servitude volontaire.

      La Boétie s’attache à démontrer que de petites acceptations en compromis et complaisances, la soumission en vient à s’imposer à soi tel un choix volontaire fait dès les premiers instants. La question avec laquelle il interpelle ses lecteurs touche à l’essence même de la politique : « pourquoi obéit-on ? ». Il met en évidence les mécanismes de la mise en place des pouvoirs et interroge sur ceux de l’obéissance. Il en vient à observer qu’un homme ne peut asservir un peuple si ce peuple ne s’asservit pas d’abord lui-même par une imbrication pyramidale.

      Bien que la violence soit son moyen spécifique, elle seule ne suffit pas à définir l’État. C’est à cause de la légitimité que la société lui accorde que les crimes sont commis. Il suffirait à l’homme de ne plus vouloir servir pour devenir libre ; « Soyez résolus à ne plus servir, et vous voilà libres ». À cet égard, La Boétie tente de comprendre pour quelles raisons l’homme a perdu le désir de retrouver sa liberté. Le Discours a pour but d’expliquer cette soumission.

      Tout d’abord La Boétie distingue trois sortes de tyrans : « Les uns règnent par l’élection du peuple, les autres par la force des armes, les derniers par succession de race ». Les deux premiers se comportent comme en pays conquis. Ceux qui naissent rois, en général ne sont guère meilleurs, puisqu’ils ont grandi au sein de la tyrannie. C’est ce dernier cas qui intéresse La Boétie. Comment se fait-il que le peuple continue à obéir aveuglément au tyran ? Il est possible que les hommes aient perdu leur liberté par contrainte, mais il est quand même étonnant qu’ils ne luttent pas pour regagner leur liberté.

      La première raison pour laquelle les hommes servent volontairement, c’est qu’il y a ceux qui n’ont jamais connu la liberté et qui sont « accoutumés à la sujétion ». La Boétie décrit dans son Discours : « Les hommes nés sous le joug, puis nourris et élevés dans la servitude, sans regarder plus avant, se contentent de vivre comme ils sont nés et ne pensent point avoir d’autres biens ni d’autres droits que ceux qu’ils ont trouvés ; ils prennent pour leur état de nature l’état de leur naissance ».

      La seconde raison, c’est que sous les tyrans les gens deviennent « lâches et efféminés ». Les gens soumis n’ont ni ardeur ni pugnacité au combat. Ils ne combattent plus pour une cause, mais par obligation. Cette envie de gagner leur est enlevée. Les tyrans essaient de stimuler cette pusillanimité et maintiennent les hommes stupides en leur donnant du « pain et des jeux ».

      La dernière raison est sans doute la plus importante, car elle nous dévoile le ressort et le secret de la domination, « le soutien et fondement de toute tyrannie ». Le tyran est soutenu par quelques hommes fidèles qui lui soumettent tout le pays. Ces hommes sont appelés par le tyran pour être « les complices de ses cruautés » ou se sont justement rapprochés du tyran afin de pouvoir le manipuler. Ces fidèles ont à leur tour des hommes qui leur sont obéissants. Ces derniers ont à leur dépendance d’autres hommes qu’ils élèvent en dignité. À ces derniers est donné le gouvernement des provinces ou « le maniement des deniers ». Ce maniement est attribué à ces hommes « afin de les tenir par leur avidité ou par leur cruauté, afin qu’ils les exercent à point nommé et fassent d’ailleurs tant de mal qu’ils ne puissent se maintenir que sous leur ombre, qu’ils ne puissent s’exempter des lois et des peines que grâce à leur protection ».

      Tout le monde est considéré comme tyran. Ceux qui sont en bas de la pyramide, les fermiers et les ouvriers, sont dans un certain sens « libres » : ils exécutent les ordres de leurs supérieurs et font du reste de leur temps libre ce qui leur plaît. Mais « s’approcher du tyran, est-ce autre chose que s’éloigner de sa liberté et, pour ainsi dire, embrasser et serrer à deux mains sa servitude » ? En d’autres termes, ceux qui sont en bas de l’échelon sont bien plus heureux et en quelque sorte bien plus « libres » que ceux qui les traitent comme des « forçats ou des esclaves ». « Est-ce là vivre heureux ? Est-ce même vivre ? », se demande La Boétie. Ces favoris devraient moins se souvenir de ceux qui ont gagné beaucoup auprès des tyrans que de ceux qui, « s’étant gorgés quelque temps, y ont perdu peu après les biens et la vie ».

      Par ailleurs il est impossible de se lier d’amitié avec un tyran, parce qu’il est et sera toujours au-dessus. « Il ne faut pas attendre de l’amitié de celui qui a le cœur assez dur pour haïr tout un royaume qui ne fait que lui obéir. Mais ce n’est pas le tyran que le peuple accuse du mal qu’il souffre, mais bien ceux qui le gouvernent. » Pour achever son Discours, La Boétie a recours à la prière. Il prie un « Dieu bon et libéral pour qu’il réserve là-bas tout exprès, pour les tyrans et leurs complices, quelque peine particulière ».

      [...]

  • #Laëty/ #ChanSigne

    À 15 ans Laëtitia Tual ouvre son premier livre sur la Langue des Signes. Depuis sa vocation ne l’a jamais lâchée. Cette artiste se bat pour l’accès à la culture pour les sourds, le monde des entendants ayant trop tendance à exclure les personnes sourdes. Laëty sert d’interface.

    Pionnière, son premier atelier, en 1999, mélange sourds et entendants, prémices de son engagement actif. Soutenue par l’association nantaise Cultiv’Art, elle foule ses premières planches en reprenant des poésies traduites en Langue des Signes.

    Elle travaille dès 2006, et pendant 6 ans, avec le grand rendez-vous nantais des arts de la rue, HIP OPsession. Elle permettra de rendre ce festival accessible. Laëtitia est alors totalement reconnue sur la scène hip hop locale.

    D’autres expériences suivront comme avec le festival « Jardin du Michel à Nancy », « Les foins de la rue » à Laval, le Festival « Sign’O » à Toulouse…..
    Sa passion pour les concerts et le mélange des genres lui permettront de travailler aux côtés de groupes comme Djazafaz (Hip Hop Jazz), Fumuj (Hip Hop/Electro/Rock Fusion), Manivelswing (Chanson Française), Flow Démo (Hip Hop Reggae Musette) ou encore Chel (concerts pour enfant). Dans toutes ses tournées, en France et à l’étranger, Laëtitia est sur scène, elle « Chansigne », le concert devient bilingue.

    Elle a créé son entreprise ainsi que l’association #TAC (#Tout_Art_et_Culture), qui a pour objet de sensibiliser à l’accueil du public sourd mais aussi de densifier l’offre culturelle proposée aux #sourds « signeurs ». Depuis une quinzaine d’années, l’artiste s’implique dans le secteur culturel au sens large pour faire reconnaître la place du public et de l’artiste sourd. Au-delà de ce parcours de « médiation », Laëty s’est aujourd’hui affirmée en tant qu’artiste.

    Elle travaille aujourd’hui au côté du Rappeur #Erremsi, qui est enfant de parents sourds. Fort de son éducation, il rejoint Laëty sur sa démarche : les 2 complices pensent le concert bilingue de façon naturelle.

    Laëty est toujours, en mouvement, à la recherche de nouvelles inspirations et collaborations.

    Le but de son engagement et de ses créations reste le même : le partage.

    https://www.laetysignmouv.com

    –—

    Erremsi x Laëty - Plan De Base (Clip Officiel)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh2CjJdCyd8&feature=emb_logo

    #langue_des_signes #musique #Laëty_Tual

    ping @sinehebdo

  • The American Negro | Adrian Younge
    https://adrianyounge.bandcamp.com/album/the-american-negro

    The American Negro is an unapologetic critique, detailing the systemic and malevolent psychology that afflicts people of color. This project dissects the chemistry behind blind racism, using music as the medium to restore dignity and self-worth to my people. It should be evident that any examination of black music is an examination of the relationship between black and white America. This relationship has shaped the cultural evolution of the world and its negative roots run deep into our psyche. Featuring various special guests performing over a deeply soulful, elaborate orchestration, The American Negro reinvents the black native tongue through this album and it’s attendant short film (TAN) and 4-part podcast (invisible Blackness). The American Negro - both as a collective experience and as individual expressions - is insightful, provocative and inspiring and should land at the center of our ongoing reckoning with race, racism and the writing of the next chapter of American history.

    #Adrian_Younge #musique #politique #musique_et_politique #États-Unis #Black_History_Month #soul

  • Aux sources de l’utopie numérique : De la contre culture à la cyberculture - Corps en Immersion
    http://corpsenimmersion.com/2020/05/aux-sources-de-l-utopie-numerique-de-la-contre-culture-a-la-cyberc

    Stewart Brand occupe une place essentielle, celle du passeur qui au-delà de la technique fait naître les rêves, les utopies et les justifications auto- réalisatrices. Depuis la fin des années soixante, il a construit et promu les mythes de l’informatique avec le Whole Earth Catalog, le magazine Wired ou le système de conférences électroniques du WELL et ses communautés virtuelles. Aux sources de l’utopie numérique nous emmène avec lui à la découverte du mouvement de la contre-culture et de son rôle déterminant dans l’histoire de l’internet. « Ce livre réussit un véritable tour de force. Suivant la biographie de Stewart Brand, il dresse le portrait d’un personnage collectif : internet. En déplaçant l’attention des inventeurs vers les passeurs, Fred Turner offre une leçon de sociologie des sciences et des techniques. Toujours là au bon moment, Stewart Brand est le point d’intersection d’univers hétérogènes. Il amène le LSD dans les laboratoires du Stanford Research Institute, et introduit la micro- informatique dans l’univers pastoral des hippies »

    Fred Turner, 2013, Aux sources de l’utopie numérique : De la contre culture à la cyberculture, C&F Editions, 430 pages, 32,00 euros.

    #Fred_Turner #Sources_utopie_numerique

  • Droit du travail : un chauffeur Uber requalifié en « salarié »
    http://www.bonnes-nouvelles.be/site/index.php?iddet=2849&id_surf=&idcat=305&quellePage=999&surf_lang=fr

    Je me sens comme un esclave : je travaille de longues heures chaque jour, sous les ordres d’une application, mais je n’ai pas de quoi me payer un salaire à la fin du mois. » Guillaume* est chauffeur indépendant, ou « limousine » comme on dit chez Bruxelles Mobilité, où il a obtenu sa licence il y a un peu plus de deux ans. Depuis novembre 2018, il « collabore » avec Uber, qui organise le transport rémunéré de citadins dans la capitale et un peu partout dans le monde. À ce stade, il n’a « plus rien à (...)

    #Uber #procès #législation #conducteur·trice·s #GigEconomy #travail

    • Je me sens comme un esclave : je travaille de longues heures chaque jour, sous les ordres d’une application, mais je n’ai pas de quoi me payer un salaire à la fin du mois. »

      Guillaume* est chauffeur indépendant, ou « limousine » comme on dit chez Bruxelles Mobilité, où il a obtenu sa licence il y a un peu plus de deux ans. Depuis novembre 2018, il « collabore » avec Uber, qui organise le transport rémunéré de citadins dans la capitale et un peu partout dans le monde. À ce stade, il n’a « plus rien à perdre », nous explique-t-il. « Mais peut-être, quelque chose à gagner ». À savoir : devenir salarié de la multinationale.

      Début juillet, Guillaume a introduit une demande de qualification de sa relation avec la plateforme d’origine américaine auprès de la Commission administrative de règlement de la relation de travail (CRT). Quand la nature de votre relation avec votre donneur d’ordre ou votre employeur vous apparaît comme suspecte, cet organe est là pour analyser votre cas et décider, si au regard de la législation locale, vous êtes salarié ou indépendant.

      « Je ne gagne pas ma vie décemment »

      Guillaume, sur papier, appartient à la seconde catégorie de travailleurs (les deux seules existant en droit du travail belge). Il a enregistré une société en personne physique, son véhicule lui appartient, il a obtenu seul les autorisations nécessaires pour exercer son métier. « Avec Uber, je ne connais que les inconvénients de ce statut, en aucun cas les avantages. Je ne gagne de toute façon pas ma vie décemment, donc j’ai décidé d’aller jusqu’au bout », poursuit le trentenaire.

      Une démarche concluante puisque Le Soir a appris que la CRT lui avait donné raison à travers une décision longue de 12 pages rendue le 26 octobre dernier : Uber est bien, selon la Commission qui dépend du SPF Sécurité sociale, l’employeur de Guillaume. Précisément, la CRT conclut après un examen approfondi que « les modalités d’exécution de la relation de travail sont incompatibles avec la qualification de #travail_indépendant ».

      Pour aboutir à cette conclusion – la question est épineuse et fait débat dans bon nombre de pays européens ainsi qu’aux États-Unis (lire ci-contre) –, plusieurs éléments contractuels ont été analysés. Notamment ceux qui concernent la #liberté_d’organisation_du_travail et d’organisation du #temps_de_travail de Guillaume, deux démarches inhérentes au #statut_d’indépendant. Deux leitmotivs aussi utilisés par Uber depuis son lancement : l’entreprise estime, en effet, que la #flexibilité de ses chauffeurs ainsi que leur #liberté de prester quand ils le souhaitent et pour qui ils le souhaitent est à la base de sa « philosophie ».

      « Je ne peux pas refuser une course »

      « La réalité est bien différente », détaille Guillaume. « Uber capte quasi tout le marché à Bruxelles et, si je suis connecté à l’#application, je n’ai pas le #droit_de_refuser une course. Si je le fais, Uber abaisse ma “#cotation”. Si je le fais trois fois de suite, Uber me vire », détaille Guillaume. Qui précise qu’il lui est également impossible de jongler entre plusieurs plateformes. « Si je suis sur deux applications et que j’accepte une course pour un autre opérateur et qu’Uber me demande d’être disponible, je suis obligé de refuser la course. Au final, comme expliqué, cela me porte préjudice. »

      Guillaume, en outre, ne connaît pas son itinéraire avant d’accepter de prendre en charge un client. « On peut m’envoyer à 10 kilomètres. Soit un long trajet non rémunéré pour un trajet payé de 1.500 mètres. » S’il choisit de dévier du chemin imposé par la plateforme, par bon sens ou à la demande d’un client pressé, le chauffeur se dit également régulièrement pénalisé. Chez Uber, le client est roi. Quand ce dernier commande une course, l’application lui précise une fourchette de #prix. « Évidemment, si je prends le ring pour aller jusqu’à l’aéroport, le prix de la course augmente car le trajet est plus long, mais le client peut très facilement réclamer à Uber la différence tarifaire. Même s’il m’a demandé d’aller au plus vite. » Dans ce cas de figure, la différence en euros est immédiatement déduite de la #rémunération de Guillaume.

      La CRT estime que le chauffeur ne peut pas influer sur la manière dont Uber organise un #trajet, qu’il « n’a aucune marge de manœuvre quant à la façon dont la prestation est exercée. (…) En cas de non-respect de l’#itinéraire, si le prix de la course ne correspond pas à l’estimation, il peut être ajusté a posteriori par Uber, le passager peut alors obtenir un remboursement mais le chauffeur ne sera payé que sur base du prix annoncé à ce dernier. (…) A aucun moment, un dialogue direct entre le chauffeur et le passager n’est possible. (…) De telles modalités obligent le chauffeur à fournir une prestation totalement standardisée. »

      Un chantier dans le « pipe » du gouvernement

      Guillaume n’est pas naïf, ses représentants qui l’ont accompagné dans la démarche administrative – le syndicat CSC via sa branche dédiée aux indépendants #United_Freelancers et le collectif du secteur des taxis – ne le sont pas non plus. Il sait que l’avis de la CRT est « non contraignant » pour Uber mais qu’elle a de lourdes implications pour son cas personnel. À moins d’être requalifié comme « salarié » par l’entreprise elle-même (un recommandé a été envoyé à ce titre aux différentes filiales impliquées en Belgique), il ne peut désormais plus travailler pour Uber.

      De son côté, Uber explique qu’il « n’a pas encore pas encore reçu le point de la vue de la CRT » mais qu’il « estime que la justice bruxelloise a déjà tranché en 2019 le fait que ses chauffeurs étaient indépendants » (un procès a opposé l’entreprise au secteur des #taxis et lui a donné raison, mais ce dernier a fait appel et le jugement n’a pas encore été rendu). La société américaine pourrait d’ailleurs attaquer la décision en justice. L’anglaise #Deliveroo avait opté pour cette démarche en 2018 après que le même organe a acté en 2018 qu’un de ses #coursiers indépendants était en réalité salarié de la plateforme (l’audience aura lieu en septembre de cette année).

      « Notre priorité est de faire réagir les autorités. Uber, comme d’autres plateformes, doit occuper ses travailleurs selon une qualification conforme à la réalité du travail. Soit les #prestataires sont véritablement indépendants et devraient, dès lors, pouvoir fixer leurs prix, leurs conditions d’intervention, choisir leurs clients, organiser leur service comme ils l’entendent… Soit Uber continue à organiser le service, à fixer les prix et les règles, à surveiller et contrôler les chauffeurs, et ceux-ci sont alors des travailleurs salariés », cadrent Martin Willems, qui dirige United Freelancers et Lorenzo Marredda, secrétaire exécutif de la CSC Transcom.

      Au cabinet du ministre en charge du Travail Pierre-Yves Dermagne (PS), on confirme avoir déjà analysé les conclusions de la CRT et la volonté de débuter rapidement un chantier sur le sujet avec les partenaires sociaux. « Nous allons nous attaquer à la problématique des #faux_indépendants des #plateformes_numériques, comme décidé dans l’accord de gouvernement. L’idée est bien d’adapter la loi de 2006 sur la nature des #relations_de_travail. Cela pourrait passer par une évaluation des critères nécessaires à l’exercice d’une #activité_indépendante, par un renforcement des critères également. Mais il s’agit évidemment d’une matière qui doit être concertée », précise Nicolas Gillard, porte-parole.

      * Le prénom est d’emprunt, les décisions de la CRT sont anonymisées quand elles sont publiées.

      Des pratiques désormais similaires chez les taxis

      A.C.

      Selon le collectif des Travailleurs du taxi et la #CSC-Transcom, les problèmes constatés chez Uber sont actuellement également une réalité chez d’autres acteurs du secteur, en l’occurrence les #centrales_de_taxis. « Les taxis indépendants sont très dépendants des centrales. Et depuis leur #numérisation, il y a vraiment un glissement des pratiques. Les chauffeurs de taxi indépendants ne savent pas non plus où on les envoie avant d’accepter une course », explique Michaël Zylberberg, président du collectif. « La dernière version de l’application #Taxis_Verts est un clone de celle d’Uber. Au début, il y a cette idée de #concurrence_déloyale mais, comme le problème n’a pas été réglé, les centrales tendent à copier les mauvaises habitudes des plateformes. Cela est très inquiétant pour les travailleurs, qui perdent progressivement leur #autonomie », ajoute Lorenzo Marredda, secrétaire exécutif de la CSC-Transcom.

      Des décisions dans d’autres pays

      Mis en ligne le 13/01/2021 à 05:00

      Par A.C.

      Lors de son introduction en Bourse en 2019, Uber expliquait collaborer avec 3 millions de chauffeurs indépendants dans le monde. Fatalement, face à une telle masse de main-d’œuvre, qui se plaint souvent de #conditions_de_travail et de #rémunération indécentes, procès et interventions des législateurs ponctuent régulièrement l’actualité de l’entreprise. Ces derniers mois, trois décisions retiennent particulièrement l’attention.

      En #Suisse

      Plusieurs cantons sont en plein bras de fer avec la plateforme américaine. A #Genève et à #Zurich, les chauffeurs Uber sont désormais considérés comme des salariés. Les caisses d’#assurances_sociales réclament des sommes très importantes à l’entreprise, qui refuse jusqu’à présent de payer les #cotisations_sociales employeurs réclamées.

      En #France

      La# Cour_de_cassation a confirmé en mars dernier que le lien entre un conducteur et l’entreprise est bien un « #contrat_de_travail ». Les arguments utilisés se rapprochent de ceux de la CRT : la plus haute juridiction du pays a jugé que « le chauffeur qui a recours à l’application Uber ne se constitue pas sa propre clientèle, ne fixe pas librement ses tarifs et ne détermine pas les conditions d’exécution de sa prestation de transport ». Une #jurisprudence qui permet d’appuyer les demandes de #requalification des chauffeurs indépendants de l’Hexagone.

      En #Californie

      Une loi contraint, depuis le 1er janvier 2020, Uber et #Lyft à salarier ses collaborateurs. Les deux entreprises refusant de s’y plier ont investi environ 200 millions de dollars pour mener un référendum citoyen sur la question qu’ils ont remporté en novembre dernier, avec un texte baptisé « #proposition_22 ». Qui introduit pour les dizaines de milliers de chauffeurs concernés un #revenu_minimum_garanti et une contribution à l’#assurance_santé.

      #néo-esclavage #ordres #Bruxelles_Mobilité #sous-traitance #travailleur_indépendant #salariat #salaire #Commission_administrative_de_règlement_de_la_relation_de_travail (#CRT) #Belgique #droit_du_travail

  • Nouveautés
    http://anarlivres.free.fr/pages/nouveau.html#occasions

    Occasions. Les Editions de La Pigne ont lancé une souscription pour Brèves de prison (80 pages au format 20 x 12 cm), une BD de Lahass. 6 euros franco de port au lieu de 7 euros (plus 2,54 euros de frais de port) pour un volume commandé avant fin février, 17 euros pour trois, 25 euros pour cinq. Le chèque à l’ordre de La Pigne est à envoyer à Editions de La Pigne, 21, rue Yvan-Goll, 88100 Saint-Dié-de-Vosges. Bon de souscription à imprimer. Pour le centenaire de la naissance de Murray Bookchin (1921-2006, biographie), l’Atelier de création libertaire propose un lot de quatre de ses ouvrages pour 25 euros : Pour un municipalisme libertaire, Qu’est-ce que l’écologie sociale, Notre environnement synthétique. La naissance de l’écologie politique, Quelle écologie radicale ? Ecologie sociale et écologie profonde en débat (avec Dave Foreman). Offre valable jusqu’au 31 janvier.

    #souscription #prison #bookchin #édition #anarchisme

  • « Just Dropped In », l’album de reprises de Sharon Jones en écoute
    https://www.fip.fr/groove/soul/just-dropped-l-album-de-reprises-de-sharon-jones-en-ecoute-18705

    Le label Daptone a sélectionné les meilleures reprises de la diva soul et de son groupe The Dap-Kings, de Prince à Bob Marley, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Shuggie Otis ou Dusty Springfield.

    https://sharonjonesandthedapkings.bandcamp.com/album/just-dropped-in-to-see-what-condition-my-renditi

    #musique #Sharon_Jones #soul #reprises

  • "Nous, élus, avons décidé de soutenir SOS Méditerranée" : l’appel de 28 collectivités pour « l’#inconditionnalité_du_sauvetage_en_mer »"

    Ces élus, maires et présidents d’intercommunalités, de conseils départementaux et régionaux ont décidé, avec leurs assemblées locales, d’apporter un #soutien_moral et financier à #SOS_Méditerranée, qui vient en aide aux migrants.

    Vingt-huit maires ou présidents de collectivités lancent un appel dans une tribune publiée sur franceinfo.fr jeudi 21 janvier pour soutenir SOS Méditerranée et pour "affirmer collectivement l’inconditionnalité du sauvetage en mer". La Méditerranée est "la route migratoire la plus meurtrière au monde", rappellent les signataires, parmi lesquels figurent la maire de Paris, Anne Hidalgo, les maires de Lyon (Grégory Doucet), Marseille (Benoît Payan), Lille (Martine Aubry), Bordeaux (Pierre Hurmic) ou Grenoble (Eric Piolle). Ils appellent les villes, intercommunalités, départements et régions de France à apporter "leur soutien moral et financier" aux trois missions poursuivies par l’association SOS Méditerranée : secourir les personnes en détresse en mer, protéger les rescapés et témoigner.

    Nous ne pourrons pas dire que nous ne savions pas et appelons les villes, intercommunalités, départements et régions de France à soutenir SOS Méditerranée.

    Plus de 20 000 personnes ont péri noyées ces six dernières années en tentant de traverser la Méditerranée sur des embarcations de fortune. L’Organisation internationale des migrations a dénombré 1 224 morts sur la seule année 2020, dont 848 sur l’axe reliant la Libye à l’Europe. Faute de témoins, le nombre de naufrages et de victimes est en réalité bien plus élevé.

    Ainsi, aux portes de l’Europe, la Méditerranée confirme son terrible statut de route migratoire la plus meurtrière au monde.
    "L’assistance, une obligation morale"

    Pourtant, l’assistance aux personnes en détresse en mer est non seulement une obligation morale, valeur cardinale chez les marins, mais aussi un devoir inscrit dans les textes internationaux et dans le corpus législatif français. Pourtant, l’Europe dispose de tous les moyens techniques, financiers et humains pour sauver ces vies.

    Or, face à cette tragédie au long cours, les États européens se sont progressivement soustraits à leur obligation de secours en mer et de débarquement des rescapés en lieu sûr. Les navires de l’opération Mare Nostrum ont d’abord été retirés. Puis la coordination des opérations de recherche et de sauvetage en Méditerranée centrale a été déléguée à la Libye, un pays dont les garde-côtes ne disposent ni des moyens ni des compétences pour assumer une telle mission, et qui en aucun cas ne peut être considéré comme sûr pour le débarquement des personnes secourues.

    Pour pallier cette défaillance des États, des citoyennes et des citoyens décidés à agir afin de ne plus laisser mourir des milliers de femmes, hommes et enfants affrètent des navires et leur portent secours. Ainsi a été créée en 2015 SOS Méditerranée. Bien implantée en France et labellisée en 2017 “Grande cause nationale" par l’État, l’association a, depuis cinq ans, sauvé 31 799 personnes, avec l’Aquarius les premières années, puis avec l’Ocean-Viking à compter d’août 2019.

    Pour SOS Méditerranée comme pour toutes les ONG de sauvetage intervenant en Méditerranée centrale, l’année 2020 aura été des plus éprouvantes. Au printemps, les ports fermés d’une Europe confinée les ont amenées à suspendre leurs missions de sauvetage, tandis que les départs depuis la Libye se poursuivaient. Au déconfinement, à peine avaient-elles repris la mer qu’un véritable harcèlement administratif s’est abattu sur elles, aggravant là des pratiques observées depuis 2017 et avec pour seul résultat de les empêcher de rejoindre les zones de secours. Les navires humanitaires ne sont d’ailleurs plus les seules cibles de ce cynisme depuis que, en août dernier, le pétrolier Maersk-Etienne a été empêché par les autorités maltaises de débarquer les naufragés qu’il avait auparavant recueillis à la demande de ces mêmes autorités… De son côté, poursuivant son leitmotiv de respect du droit, qui est au fondement même de sa mission, il aura fallu cinq mois à SOS Méditerranée afin de satisfaire aux exigences zélées des autorités italiennes et lever la détention dont a été victime l’Ocean-Viking pour, enfin, reprendre ses opérations en mer le 11 janvier dernier.
    "Nous ne pourrons pas dire que nous ne savions pas"

    Parce qu’elle nous montre le cap du refus de l’indifférence et que nous ne pourrons pas dire que nous ne savions pas, en cohérence avec les actions déjà menées par nos collectivités pour l’accueil et l’intégration des personnes exilées, nous, élu·e·s, maires et président·e·s d’intercommunalités, de conseils départementaux et régionaux avons décidé, avec nos assemblées locales, de soutenir SOS Méditerranée et d’affirmer collectivement l’inconditionnalité du sauvetage en mer.

    Nous appelons aujourd’hui tou·te·s les maires et président·e·s des villes, intercommunalités, départements et régions de France à rejoindre la plateforme des collectivités solidaires avec SOS Méditerranée, lancée ce 21 janvier 2021, et à apporter leur soutien moral et financier aux trois missions poursuivies par cette association  :

    • Secourir les personnes en détresse en mer grâce à ses activités de recherche et de sauvetage

    • Protéger les rescapés, à bord de son navire ambulance, en leur prodiguant les soins nécessaires jusqu’à leur débarquement dans un lieu sûr

    • Témoigner du drame humain qui se déroule en Méditerranée centrale

    De la plus petite à la plus grande, du littoral et de l’intérieur, du Centre, du Sud, du Nord, de l’Est et de l’Ouest, toutes nos collectivités sont concernées, chacune à la mesure de ses moyens. Il s’agit de sauver des vies, sans distinction, et de faire vivre la devise républicaine qui fait battre le cœur de nos territoires  : liberté, égalité, fraternité. Il s’agit de sauver nos valeurs et d’assumer la part qui est la nôtre dans ce qui est l’honneur de notre pays.

    Tant que les États européens se soustrairont à leurs devoirs, nous serons là pour nous mobiliser et les rappeler à leurs responsabilités, nous serons aux côtés des citoyennes et des citoyens de SOS Méditerranée pour faire vivre sa mission vitale de sauvetage en mer.

    >>> La plateforme des collectivités solidaires françaises

    Les signataires :

    Anne Hidalgo, maire de Paris, Philippe Grosvalet, président du département de Loire-Atlantique, Carole Delga, présidente de la région Occitanie, Georges Meric, président du département de Haute-Garonne, Michael Delafosse, maire de Montpellier, président de Montpellier Méditerranée Métropole, Serge De Carli, maire de Mont-Saint-Martin, président de la communauté d’agglomération de Longwy, Cédric Van Styvendael, maire de Villeurbanne, Loïg Chesnais-Girard, président de la région Bretagne, Nathalie Sarrabezolles, présidente du département du Finistère, Bertrand Affile, maire de Saint-Herblain, Jean-Luc Chenut, président du département d’Ille-et-Vilaine, Pierrick Spizak, maire de Villerupt, David Samzun, maire de Saint-Nazaire, Thomas Dupont-Federici, maire de Bernières-sur-Mer, Martine Aubry, maire de Lille, Hermeline Malherbe, présidente du département des Pyrénées-Orientales, Bertrand Kern, maire de Pantin, Grégory Doucet, maire de Lyon, Pierre Hurmic, maire de Bordeaux
    Benoît Payan, maire de Marseille, Hélène Sandragne, présidente du département de l’Aude, Eric Piolle, maire de Grenoble, Nathalie Appéré, maire de Rennes, présidente de Rennes Métropole, Hervé Neau, maire de Rezé, Kléber Mesquida, président du département de l’Hérault, Alain Lassus, président du département de la Nièvre, Johanna Rolland, maire de Nantes, Pierre Laulagnet, maire d’Alba-la-Romaine.

    https://www.francetvinfo.fr/monde/europe/migrants/tribune-nous-elus-avons-decide-de-soutenir-sosmediterranee-lappel-de-28
    #soutien_financier #solidarité #France #migrations #asile #réfugiés #frontières #villes-refuge

    La version française du #From_Sea_to_Cities :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/759145#message885662