technology:video conferencing

  • Mark Zuckerberg’s Plans to Capitalize on Facebook’s Failures | The New Yorker
    https://www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/mark-zuckerbergs-plans-to-capitalize-on-facebooks-failures

    On Wednesday, a few hours before the C.E.O. of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, published a thirty-two-hundred-word post on his site titled “A privacy-focused vision for social networking,” a new study from the market research firm Edison Research revealed that Facebook had lost fifteen million users in the United States since 2017. “Fifteen million is a lot of people, no matter which way you cut it,” Larry Rosin, the president of Edison Research, said on American Public Media’s “Marketplace.” “This is the second straight year we’ve seen this number go down.” The trend is likely related to the public’s dawning recognition that Facebook has become both an unbridled surveillance tool and a platform for propaganda and misinformation. According to a recent Harris/Axios survey of the hundred most visible companies in the U.S., Facebook’s reputation has taken a precipitous dive in the last five years, with its most acute plunge in the past year, and it scores particularly low in the categories of citizenship, ethics, and trust.

    While Zuckerberg’s blog post can be read as a response to this loss of faith, it is also a strategic move to capitalize on the social-media platform’s failures. To be clear, what Zuckerberg calls “town square” Facebook, where people post updates about new jobs, and share prom pictures and erroneous information about vaccines, will continue to exist. (On Thursday, Facebook announced that it would ban anti-vaccine advertisements on the site.) His new vision is to create a separate product that merges Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram into an encrypted and interoperable communications platform that will be more like a “living room.” According to Zuckerberg, “We’ve worked hard to build privacy into all our products, including those for public sharing. But one great property of messaging services is that, even as your contacts list grows, your individual threads and groups remain private. As your friends evolve over time, messaging services evolve gracefully and remain intimate.”

    This new Facebook promises to store data securely in the cloud, and delete messages after a set amount of time to reduce “the risk of your messages resurfacing and embarrassing you later.” (Apparently, Zuckerberg already uses this feature, as Tech Crunch reported, in April, 2018.) Its interoperability means, for example, that users will be able to buy something from Facebook Marketplace and communicate with the seller via WhatsApp; Zuckerberg says this will enable the buyer to avoid sharing a phone number with a stranger. Just last week, however, a user discovered that phone numbers provided for two-factor authentication on Facebook can be used to track people across the Facebook universe. Zuckerberg does not address how the new product will handle this feature, since “town square” Facebook will continue to exist.

    Once Facebook has merged all of its products, the company plans to build other products on top of it, including payment portals, banking services, and, not surprisingly, advertising. In an interview with Wired’s editor-in-chief, Nicholas Thompson, Zuckerberg explained that “What I’m trying to lay out is a privacy-focused vision for this kind of platform that starts with messaging and making that as secure as possible with end-to-end encryption, and then building all of the other kinds of private and intimate ways that you would want to interact—from calling, to groups, to stories, to payments, to different forms of commerce, to sharing location, to eventually having a more open-ended system to plug in different kinds of tools for providing the interaction with people in all the ways that you would want.”

    L’innovation vient maintenant de Chine, en voici une nouvelle mention

    If this sounds familiar, it is. Zuckerberg’s concept borrows liberally from WeChat, the multiverse Chinese social-networking platform, popularly known as China’s “app for everything.” WeChat’s billion monthly active users employ the app for texting, video conferencing, broadcasting, money transfers, paying fines, and making medical appointments. Privacy, however, is not one of its attributes. According to a 2015 article in Quartz, WeChat’s “heat map” feature alerts Chinese authorities to unusual crowds of people, which the government can then surveil.

    “I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever,” Zuckerberg tells us. “This is the future I hope we will help bring about.” By announcing it now, and framing it in terms of privacy, he appears to be addressing the concerns of both users and regulators, while failing to acknowledge that a consolidated Facebook will provide advertisers with an even richer and more easily accessed database of users than the site currently offers. As Wired reported in January, when the merger of Facebook’s apps was floated in the press, “the move will unlock huge quantities of user information that was previously locked away in silos.”

    Le chiffrage des messages est loin d’être une panacée pour la vie privée, ni pour la responsabilité sociale des individus.

    Zuckerberg also acknowledged that an encrypted Facebook may pose problems for law enforcement and intelligence services, but promised that the company would work with authorities to root out bad guys who “misuse it for truly terrible things like child exploitation, terrorism, and extortion.” It’s unclear how, with end-to-end encryption, it will be able to do this. Facebook’s private groups have already been used to incite genocide and other acts of violence, suppress voter turnout, and disseminate misinformation. Its pivot to privacy will not only give such activities more space to operate behind the relative shelter of a digital wall but will also relieve Facebook from the responsibility of policing them. Instead of more—and more exacting—content moderation, there will be less. Instead of removing bad actors from the service, the pivot to privacy will give them a safe harbor.

    #facebook #Cryptographie #Vie_privée #Médias_sociaux #Mark_Zuckerberg

  • 50 years on, we’re living the reality first shown at the “Mother of All Demos” | Ars Technica
    https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/12/50-years-on-were-living-the-reality-first-shown-at-the-mother-of-all-de

    A half century ago, computer history took a giant leap when Douglas Engelbart—then a mid-career 43-year-old engineer at Stanford Research Institute in the heart of Silicon Valley—gave what has come to be known as the “mother of all demos.”

    On December 9, 1968 at a computer conference in San Francisco, Engelbart showed off the first inklings of numerous technologies that we all now take for granted: video conferencing, a modern desktop-style user interface, word processing, hypertext, the mouse, collaborative editing, among many others.

    Even before his famous demonstration, Engelbart outlined his vision of the future more than a half-century ago in his historic 1962 paper, “Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework.”

    To open the 90-minute-long presentation, Engelbart posited a question that almost seems trivial to us in the early 21st century: “If in your office, you as an intellectual worker were supplied with a computer display, backed up by a computer that was alive for you all day, and was instantly responsible—responsive—to every action you had, how much value would you derive from that?”

    Of course at that time, computers were vast behemoths that were light-years away from the pocket-sized devices that have practically become an extension of ourselves.

    #Histoire_informatique #Mother_of_all_demos #Douglas_Engelbart

  • Rien ne va plus en Arabie où l’application des dispositions pour déporter les étrangers en situation irrégulière ont fait paniquer les conducteurs de camion-citernes qui, en infraction à la loi sur le travail, se sont arrêtés de travailler...
    Dans les files d’attente, les rumeurs, parmi les citoyens privés d’eau depuis parfois 2 semaines, vont bon train contre les officiels accusés de se servir d’eau en priorité..

    http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&contentid=20130405159988

    • Dans la rubrique rien ne va plus en Arabie...
      la menace de bloquer Skype/Whatsapp etc. n’inquiète pas que les bloggeurs de nationalité saoudienne, dont le gouvernmenet s’inquiète mais aussi les invisibles, ceux qui travaillent loin de chez eux et qui appellent gratuitement par Skype :

      “My life will end without Skype,” said Muhammad Saleem, a Saudi who runs a textile business in Riyadh and uses video conferencing on Skype to coordinate with his distributors in Qatar and Oman daily.

      He explained that it is not just an application for him, but rather an indispensable part of his work and, if banned, his business might come to an end.

      Naeem Ahmad, a Pakistani worker, uses Skype to talk to his wife and children back home.

      “For expatriates like us, who don’t earn a lot, Skype is the best option since it’s free of cost and offers excellent voice and image quality,” he said.

      http://www.saudigazette.com.sa/index.cfm?method=home.regcon&contentid=20130405160000

    • Suite à a rubrique rien ne va plus en Arabie...
      l’Arabie a décidé de suspendre l’application de la loi sur le travail illégal et la déportation des travailleurs qui ne sont pas enrègle.

      Saudi Arabia orders three-month delay to illegal worker crackdown

      “King Abdullah directed both the Interior Ministry and the Labor Ministry to give an opportunity to workers in breach of the labor and residency regulations in the kingdom to clarify their status in a period not exceeding three months,” said a statement carried on official media.

      le fond du problème :

      Under Saudi law, expatriates have to be sponsored by their employer, but many switch jobs without transferring their residency papers.

      That has allowed companies to dodge strict Labor Ministry quotas regulating the number of Saudis and expatriates each firm can employ by booking their foreign workers under a different sponsor. Companies with too few Saudi employees face fines.

      It has also led to the emergence of a labor black market in which sponsors illegally charge expatriates to renew their residence documents when they in fact work for somebody else.

      http://english.alarabiya.net/en/business/economy/2013/04/07/Saudi-king-orders-three-month-delay-to-illegal-worker-crackdown.h

  • BitTorrent Live: Cheap, Real-Time P2P Video Streaming That Will Kill TV | TechCrunch
    http://techcrunch.com/2012/02/13/bittorrent-live

    #BitTorrent Live lets any content owner or publisher stream video to millions of people at good quality and with just a few seconds of latency…for free or cheap. Sports, news events, simulcast TV shows, education, video conferencing, or uncensored war zone broadcasts — this technology will power the future of video.

    “My goal is to kill off #television” Cohen said during the SF MusicTech demo session

    #censure #internet #p2p