• Europe’s Border Guards Are Illegally Expelling Refugees

    Border guards expelling Syrian refugees after they’ve already been granted asylum has shown the hollowness of European Union humanitarianism. An expansion of the EU-wide Frontex force will make things even worse.

    A young man known in public documents only as Fady has been fighting a battle far harder than anyone his age would normally imagine.

    He first came to Europe from Deir az-Zour, Syria, fleeing that country’s civil war. In 2015, German authorities recognized him as a legally protected refugee. Since then, Fady has used his German passport to look for his lost brother, who he believes to be stuck in Greece and who he wishes to bring to Germany.

    He has paid dearly for those wishes.

    According to information and quotes from Fady provided to Jacobin by the Global Legal Action Network (GLAN), which is representing him in front of international policymakers, Fady took a trip to Greece in November 2016, hoping to track down his brother. At that time just eleven years of age, his brother had fled recruitment by ISIS, and Fady hoped to find him in Greece.

    While searching for him at a bus station in that country’s Evros region, Fady says he was approached by police and asked about his ethnic origin. After responding that he was Syrian, he was taken into custody by the police, who drove him to an unknown location, despite his protestations that he was a documented German resident who was in the EU legally, with the papers to prove it. They allegedly took his ID, papers, and belongings away from him before handing him to a group of people he describes as “commandos,” who he told the Intercept spoke German and were armed, masked, and clad entirely in black.

    He said the commandos beat anyone who tried to speak to them as they took a group of detained people — some as young as one or two years old — across the river border with Turkey in a rubber boat. There they were dumped paperless, homeless, and stateless in a country that many of them had never resided in for more than a couple days. It took Fady three years to get back his papers and EU residency — a period during which he tried multiple times to get back into Greece in order to search for his brother. He has not found him.

    The ordeal to which Fady was subjected is the most extreme version of what is known as a “pushback” operation. In other forms, these operations can involve keeping people outside of the borders of the EU — denying them entry at sea, for example. GLAN is arguing in front of the United Nations Human Rights Council that the type of pushback operation Fady endured, in which identity papers are confiscated, goes beyond that, amounting to a forced disappearance, which is illegal under a clause of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which Greece is a signatory. (Turning away refugees in general is also illegal under international law, but GLAN hopes to add weight to the potential HRC ruling by having the actions acknowledged as forced disappearances.)
    Frontex

    Such operations, many immigrant rights groups allege, are often led by Frontex, the EU’s border security agency, which coordinates national governments’ anti-immigration operations and is the fastest-growing agency in the EU. Headquartered in Warsaw, the organization is slated to grow from a relatively small current workforce to a staff likely to include a potential ten thousand border guards by 2027, in addition to national governments’ forces.

    I wanted to get detailed statements from the German government, the Greek government, and the Frontex bureaucracy about Fady’s incident, so I sent each group a list of several detailed questions.

    A spokesperson for the German government’s press office declined to answer the questions, sending back a short statement that read, “Within the framework of Frontex operations, the German Federal Police supports the Greek authorities to protect the Greek border. The German officers comply with German, European and international law.”

    A Frontex representative also declined to answer specific questions, stating that “Frontex is not aware of any such incident. Frontex officers deployed at the Greek land borders have not been involved in any such incidents. In addition, two investigations have found no evidence of any participation by Frontex in any alleged violations of human rights at the Greek sea borders.”

    The Greek government is keeping its silence about whether it was involved in Fady’s kidnapping. Five emails sent to the Greek Ministry of Migration and Asylum over the course of two weeks went unanswered.

    Dr Valentina Azarova of the Manchester International Law Centre and GLAN noted that Frontex’s assurances that it is not involved in violent pushbacks alongside Greek border forces are based on faulty information, citing a “dysfunctional reporting system” that was in place at the time of the alleged incident and that is under scrutiny as part of a recent wave of probes.

    While she says that Frontex’s reporting system was supposed to have improved since 2019 reforms went into place — three years after Fady says he was abducted and expelled — the scope of the current probes to the fact that there’s still a long way to go.

    “Frontex’s reporting practice is irregular and opaque,” she told me. “When it does report, it misrepresents illegal expulsions as ‘prevention of departure’ [from Turkey].”
    Driven From Home

    That euphemistic band-aid — an alleged way of trying to reverse an immigration journey that has already happened without getting caught doing so — is emblematic of the problems of this EU agency. For it is tasked with treating only the symptoms of a condition that European countries are guilty of helping to perpetuate, rather than taking on the root causes forcing people onto the move.

    The effects are felt across much of the Global South. By pulling the financial and governmental levers that control the global economy, leaders in industrialized and postindustrial countries have created what Dr Michael Yates — an economist, writer, editor, and editorial director of Monthly Review Press — calls a “complex brew” of austerity, land theft, and political oppression.

    As an addition to this brew of factors, European countries are often either silently complicit or actively encouraging of weapons sales to nearby conflict zones. For example, German manufacturers Hensoldt and Rheinmetall supplied arms to Saudi Arabia via South Africa for its war against Yemen, skirting an export ban, with full knowledge of the German government. And the French industrial giant Airbus dodged an arms embargo on Libya by routing planes through Turkey. This behavior is a logical outgrowth of late-stage capitalism, as weapon sales are one of the more profitable sectors that a business can enter, and as bought-and-paid-for politicians are told to look the other way when misbehavior occurs.

    Together, these factors — the austerity, the land theft, the political oppression, and the encouragement of violent civil conflicts — form a neocolonialist zone of low opportunity that pushes people from the Global South to the Global North.

    Not least among these sources of pressure is the Syrian civil war from which Fady and his brother fled. That conflict has now been going on for more than a decade, involving at least a half-dozen major belligerents, along with other minor parties. It has killed hundreds of thousands of people.

    Any left-wingers in the United States who had held onto hopes that the new Biden administration might introduce a more pacifist stance on Syria — perhaps removing one party from the bloody, multifaceted tragedy playing out between the Tigris and the Mediterranean — were severely disappointed. Immediately after taking office, Biden prioritized bombing that country over fulfilling his $15 minimum wage pledge. And so, the weapon sales continue, the conflict continues, and the Syrian refugees continue trying to find better lives elsewhere.

    Increasingly, those who would help the refugees are finding themselves the targets of government actions. As a Jacobin essayist documented last month, Italy’s new, supposedly centrist government has made some of its first actions a series of moves against groups that assist migrants braving the Mediterranean. On March 1, a hundred officers raided homes and offices all around Italy, seizing activists’ computers, telephones, and files. The accused are, as the essayist argued, “targeted under suspicion of the crime of saving lives.”

    Greece isn’t doing much better. As Jacobin reported last year, at least a thousand asylum seekers have been subjected to pushbacks at the hands of the Greek border authorities.
    Answering to No One

    It’s not just Greece and Italy doing dirty deeds either. Frontex is staffing up, and it is not accountable to the European Court of Human Rights, which only has jurisdiction over member states — not over the EU’s own continent-wide agencies.

    This unaccountability has emboldened Frontex, to the point where it’s comfortable flying an entire plane full of would-be refugees out of Greece to be left — as with Fady — in Turkey. As Melanie Fink wrote for the blog of the European Journal of International Law, it is “notoriously difficult to hold Frontex to account for failures” to uphold its obligations under international law, thanks to the way the bureaucracy is set up.

    And that bureaucracy just gave itself the power to carry weapons, even though, as the Frontex Files investigative website published by German broadcaster ZDF puts it, “no legal regulations permit members of an EU agency to carry firearms.” In other words, the member states never voted on these powers arming Frontex — they are fully an outgrowth of the EU unilaterally deciding that it wants a paramilitary border force to call its own.

    Either by accident or by design, Frontex has by some accounts become an opaque group of European security forces, with no one to answer to. Here there is a great risk of mission creep — for instance, if its agents join other border forces in pursuing or persecuting migrants’ rights activists or labor leaders who speak out for underpaid refugees. As the ongoing probes have affirmed, Azarova says, the whole Frontex system has been set up to be “highly unaccountable.”

    Azarova explains that both Frontex and the European Commission rely on Greece to conduct border operations in accordance with EU law but have not even considered the suspension of their extensive technical and financial assistance to Greece’s abusive border operations. Since EU institutions have done little to redress the illegal expulsions at the EU’s borders, GLAN has taken Fady’s case to the UN.

    Fady says that what he likes about Germany is that his life and work are now here. “I like Germany’s nice people and how kind they are. My work is good, and life is safe here,” he said. He’s even started supporting Bayern Munich.

    But he hopes to go back to the border areas, bringing cameras to document what governments are doing there.

    The authorities can ignore him — or kidnap him once more. While that could damage his life all over again, it will make little difference for them, as their actions will remain almost entirely futile: as long as instability, inequality, and wars encouraged by the Global North push residents of the Global South out of their homes, even ten thousand militarized, unaccountable border guards will not be enough to stop the flow. The people will keep coming.

    https://jacobinmag.com/2021/05/europe-syrian-refugees-greece-germany-frontex

    #push-backs #frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #refoulement #réfugiés_syriens #Evros #Thraces #Grèce #Turquie #frontière_terrestre #Frontex

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur les refoulements dans la région de l’Evros :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/914147

  • Weaponizing a River

    The Dam

    On the 10th of March, news reports emerged suggesting that Bulgaria had released water downstream from the Ivaylovgrad Dam on the Ardas, a tributary of the Evros (also Meriç, and Maritsa),
    and flooded the river border at the request of the Greek government. This intentional flooding of the border was subsequently denounced as fake news by the Bulgarian authorities and remains unverified. Yet due to the increasing severity of spring floods, including as recently as 2018, the release of water from Bulgarian dams has been a subject of friction between Greece, Turkey, and their upstream riparian neighbor. On the 27th of February, Turkey decided to effectively suspend the 2016 EU-Turkey deal and in doing so directed thousands of asylum seekers to the border with Greece. In the context of Greece’s military response, the recent reports have revealed a hidden violence designed into the environment of the Evros river. In the weeks since, there have been two confirmed casualties from the use of either live or rubber rounds—Muhammad al Arab and Muhammad Gulzar.

    The alleged opening of the dam and these shootings are not distinct but are in continuity with the long-term, albeit previously low intensity, weaponization of the river. These exceptional events prove the more insidious use of the Evros as an ecological border infrastructure extending to its entire floodplain.

    The intentional flooding of the valley, and its entanglement with border defense strategies, testifies to Evros as an arcifinious space. Derived from the legal heredity of international border law, according to legal scholar John W. Donaldson, the term “arcifinious” is the territorial concept whereby a state is bounded by geophysical limits with defensive capabilities, or “natural” boundaries “fit to keep the Enemy out,” such as seas, rivers, deserts, and mountains.
    According to eighteenth-century Dutch jurist Hugo Grotius and his followers, rivers are “part of ’arcifinious’ or ’natural’ military frontier zones that are ‘indetermined,’ and flexible based on the application of force.” While rivers shift of their own volition, they are also manipulated, like straightening. Perhaps more tellingly, the very flexibility of a river—its interstitial condition between water and sediment—is useful in the production of an “indeterminate” space that is materially porous, shifting, and thus difficult for trespassers to cross. This material ambiguity also makes river boundaries unstable in the eyes of international jurisprudence. The hostile characteristics of arcifinious boundaries are mobilized in naturalizing processes central to sovereign claims to territory in a practice that enables states to obscure their agency in relation to border deaths.Some days before the 10th, word had been circulating inside the Fylakio registration and pre-removal detention center in the north of the Evros region that the dam would be opened to make the river more difficult to cross. The dam being discussed by border guards as part of a border defense strategy emphasizes the river not as “natural” but, to the contrary, always flexible to force. Fylakio, also located near the Ardas river, would be one the first villages reached when onrushing water from the dam crosses the Bulgarian-Greek border. Before these waters arrive at the “Karaağaç Triangle,” the Ardas serves as the Greek-Turkey border for one kilometer, after which it meets the Evros/Meriç between the Greek villages of Marasia and Kastanies. This is the northwestern point of the Karaağaç Triangle, which was the only segment of the Greece-Turkey border not originally delimited by the Evros/Meriç river in the 1926 Athens Protocol, an annex to the 1923 Lausanne Peace Treaty. Instead, it is today a stretch of deforested land with an eleven-kilometer-long deterrent fence. Proposed in 2011 and completed in 2012, the fence directs border crossers to more dangerous routes across the river, and to deadlier maritime crossing routes in the Aegean sea. Fittingly, the fence is mentioned as a “technical obstacle” in FRONTEX Serious Incident Reports (SIR).The Karaağaç Triangle is where refugees were directed by the Turkish government on the 27th of February, and where they found themselves trapped between Greek forces who would not let them cross and Turkish forces who prevented them from returning to Istanbul and the Turkish mainland. It is where Muhamad Gulzar, a young man from Pakistan, was shot dead, and five more were injured on the 4th of March. During our visit to the Evros in early March, we witnessed trucks carrying fencing towards strategic—yet unfortified—parts of the river. The fence is currently being elongated by forty kilometers, particularly along parcels of Greek land that sit on the Turkish side of the river, and vice versa.In the war of words exchanged by the two sides, the Greek government and far right Twitter has been using the term “hybrid war” to describe what they perceive as a Turkish attempt to “intrude” on Greek territory through indirect means, here with refugee bodies instead of bullets. In response to Turkey’s weaponization of refugees, Greece and the EU are also employing a form of hybrid warfare explicitly incorporating the river ecology itself. Where so many people were—and still are—trapped in spaces along the frontier, like at Karaağaç, they are exposed to a hybrid form of border violence involving farmers spraying pesticides onto refugees across the fence, the deployment of large fans to direct teargas back to the Turkish side, and the use of water cannons to spray blue liquid across the fence so those who make it onto the Greek side can be easily identified. In addition to these assembled elements, on the night of the 26th of March, the impromptu camp that had been set up in Pazarkule, on the Turkish side of the border, caught fire. In videos that were circulated, witnesses claim that the fires were lit by Turkish authorities (jandarma) in their attempts to remove asylum seekers from the border (a measure supposed to counter the spread of COVID-19).Authors in critical border studies refer to the mobilization of geophysical and environmental features either as a hybrid collectif, an assemblage of actants, landscape as space of moral alibi,

    or what we call border natures. The border’s ecology of exception is made possible by both the river’s adaptability to force and flexibility, and contributes to the production of an ambiguous space in which multiple modes of violence are perpetrated with impunity. Methods of hybrid warfare are unambiguously mobilizing environmental elements. As such, “nature” can no longer be an alibi but is directly incorporated in the production of death at the border.

    What is the role of water in the politics of death at the border? Here river waters stand at the intersection of connection-division, and life-death.
    The fluvial frontier is a complex and nuanced territorial condition braiding together multiple elements including conservation, transboundary river management, military technology, the geopolitics of resource logistics, and the divergently visible and opaque politics of border crossing. Thinking against material and discursive reproductions of both rivers and borders as “natural” phenomena, the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa river is the result of multiple organizational technologies of territorial sovereignty. Primary amongst these is the mobilization of major infrastructure: the dam and the contingent release of waters downstream would be a direct threat to the lives of asylum seekers attempting to enter the EU. If Bulgaria, as a member state, had opened the dam, this would have been premised on its contribution to the fortification of the external borders of fortress Europe.

    2. A Shifting Border

    The Evros/Meriç/Maritsa has its source in the Rila mountains. It runs for 310 of its 528 kilometers through Bulgaria, with the final 210 kilometers forming a border, initially between Bulgaria and Greece, and then for the last 192 kilometers between Greece and Turkey before reaching its delta and emptying into the Thracian Sea in the Aegean. The river is fast, with a mean annual flow rate of 103 cubic meters per second (a rate which can increase twofold between December and April). Its course flows over sandy and malleable soil, and annually discharges approximately 3.2 million tons of sediment and 9.5 billion cubic meters of freshwater into the sea.
    This results in frequent erosion that alters its banks. Capricious shifts of the river produce islands of stranded land; there are expanses of “Turkish” earth on the “wrong” side of the river, and elsewhere, land has been ceded by the river to Greece. These stranded territories are also points where fatalities become concentrated. Pavlos Pavlidis, coroner at the University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, capital of the Evros prefecture, and Maria-Valeria Karakasi have identified a particular parcel of land near Feres, the entry point to the Delta, as the location where seventy-two bodies were recovered between 2000 and 2014. This is also where refugees were recently directed by geographers aligned with Turkish authorities,

    and where a young man from Aleppo, Muhammad al Arab, was shot dead by Greek soldiers standing inside the dry river bed of the 1926 border, which now acts as little more than a trench. Within the above calculations of river flow and sediment transportation is concealed a deadly politics of bordering that incorporates the full spectrum of the Evros’s hydrology and manipulates the ambiguities produced by rivers.

    The river’s movements occupy a central role in the territorial disputes between the riparian states of Bulgaria, Greece, and Turkey, and compound what is already a militarized terrain. Due to these shifts, and the river’s own agency, many have considered rivers as inadequate political boundaries. Donaldson words it thus: “the presence of water makes a boundary river unstable, forceful, and risky; incompatible with the legal fiction of a fixed boundary line that would prefer the stability of land over the dynamism of water.”
    This instability lies behind the fantasies of territorial control implied by the international committee assembled in 1926 with the task of determining the precise course of the border between Greece and Turkey at the end of the Ottoman Empire.The 1926 committee, headed by Dutch colonel J. Backer, deemed that the border follow the median line between the banks throughout the course of the river, or its main “branch,” when the river splits. The border was marked with red ink on ten maps that were attached as annexes to the protocol, and the first twenty-six demarcation “pyramids” were installed. Delimited in such an inflexible way, like many river borders, it could not respond to shifts in the median line and changes in the course of the river. Instead, the demarcation of the protocol fixed the river in time and to an abstract line. Consequently, efforts to enforce the demarcation of the border have long been hampered by the agency of the river itself. As early as 1965, markers installed to designate part of the border along the Evros/Meriç by a joint Greek-Turkish committee were quickly carried away by the river. Similarly, in 2015, parts of the fence were carried away by flood waters released from the Ivaylovgrad dam. As recently as October 2017, Turkish authorities dug trenches underneath the fence to prevent flooding.

    There is now almost 100 years of geomorphological variation between the drawn border and the current course of the river. Islands that used to be there are no longer; banks have moved and canalizations have directed the river in divergent ways. Two rivers and two borders exist at the Evros/Meriç: the cartographic border of the old median line (featuring now almost unmoving oxbow lakes) and the water of the new trespass line. It comes with little surprise then that stabilizing the river banks to the 1926 condition has been a concern of both Greece and Turkey. Since 1936, the two countries have made efforts to draft plans for common flood defense, most notably the study undertaken in 1953 by the Chicago-based Harza Engineering Company. None of these plans were fully implemented, and after the 1970s, bilateral communication ceased for decades.

    In addition to the proposal of the fence in 2011, the Hellenic Army General Staff planned an unfulfilled project to dig a “120-kilometer-long, thirty-meter-wide, and seven-meter-deep” “moat.”

    Officially an “anti-tank trap” functioning primarily as a defense against Turkish invasion, in the context of increased crossings in 2011, the “moat” would have only been a further technical barrier for border crossers.

    Where rivers appear at first glance as “natural,” they are, to greater and lesser extents, the result of centuries of small and large-scale engineering interventions. In Stefan Helmreich’s concept of “infranature,” second nature—that which is always produced as socio-technical—is “folded” back into first or organic nature.
    What appears as “natural” or “organic” is therefore actually a mask for the production of techno-natural infrastructures. Helmreich echoes a famous passage in Michel Serres’s The Natural Contract where he describes the birth of geometry emerging from the calculations of Nile floods. Out of the “chaos” and “disorder” of flood events, Serres proposes that measurements made by surveyors, for irrigation purposes, reordered nature to give “it a new birth into culture.”

    Such culture, however, may itself produce violent effects. The measurements that reorder the river waters of the Evros are born into a culture that takes the form of a hybrid military-natural assemblage.

    Understanding the often intentionally ambiguous calculations of infranature in its combative applications helps to clarify how rivers are technologized through overt human interventions, such as dams and other large engineering projects, as well as in less overt ways. Rivers and their flows respond to assemblages of smaller scale and almost invisible interventions or those that occur far up river, like the opening of a dam. In these ways, the very speed at which water travels, or the amount of sediment that accumulates in the muddy delta, are part of the measurements of the infrantural technology of the arcifinious river. In these border environments, the river itself is potentially armed and dangerous.

    The river and its imagined doubling as a moat instrumentalizes the already treacherous route for asylum seekers beyond the scale of a “deterrent” into an engineered space unconcerned with fatalities. Stepping back from the Hellenic Army General Staff’s imagination, the Evros already performs the arcifinious role of a moat at the EU’s fluvial frontier. The drawing of a fixed, yet imaginary line along the central course of the river effectively produced the river as a frontier, whereby its movements and muds become spaces where sovereign territorial imaginaries are projected with horrifyingly real effects.

    3. Flood

    The risk of major flood events has long been one of the primary transboundary concerns in the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa. Such events have increased in frequency over the last twenty-five years, leading to a once in a thousand-year flood in 2005, severe events in 2006, 2007, 2011, 2014, and 2015, and a “state of emergency” announced by the Greek Government in March and April 2018.
    Flooding in the region is closely tied to the politics of hydro-electric infrastructure. The majority of large dams and reservoirs in the basin are concentrated on Bulgarian territory (as many as 722), while Turkey has built sixty, and Greece just five (mainly for irrigation purposes, as opposed to energy production). Flow variability is central to many transboundary agreements whereby upstream riparian nations either force or allow downstream riparians to adapt to seasonal changes in both wet and dry conditions.

    This is a concern for hyrdrodiplomatic relations between Greece, Turkey, and Bulgaria.

    When a tri-lateral working group met in October 2006 in Alexandroupolis, Turkey made a written demand, supported by Greece, that the reservoir storage capacity of large dams situated on the Ardas tributary in Bulgaria be regulated to “minimize water discharges downstream and reduce flow at Edirne,” a densely populated area, near to the border fence, and a major confluence where the Ardas and another tributary, the Tundzha, meet the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa. The Bulgarian delegation refused to respond and cancelled future working groups. Bulgaria is resistant to such regulation because of the role that the private sector plays in managing hydro-electric infrastructure.
    To maximize energy productivity and profits, their primary interest is to maintain the highest possible water level in the dam reservoirs all year round. Under previous conditions, this would have been in direct opposition to the interests of the downstream nations who want to regulate reservoir storage in wet seasons so they have the capacity to accommodate potential increases in volume that risk overtopping dams and result in flooding. The events of the past month, however, show that within the context of Bulgaria’s entrance into the EU in 2007, upstream storage of high levels of water is also part of military contingency planning to flood the valley and safeguard what is now a common European frontier.

    Recent attempts at hydrodiplomacy in the region include the 2016 “Joint Declaration Between the Government of the Hellenic Republic and the Government of the Republic of Turkey” signed by Prime Ministers Alexis Tsipras and Ahmet Davutoglu.

    This agreement incorporated multiple political and hydrographical issues that fold onto the frontier, including a Joint Action Plan to “stem migration flows,” with the implied proviso that Greece will support Turkey in EU visa liberalization dialogue. While this proviso has since been forgotten, the lubrication of one form of movement was unambiguously exchanged for the curtailment of another. This is followed by a section on flooding, acknowledging the damage caused each year and expressing a joint commitment to adhering to the centralized European Water Directive. As downstream nations, Greece and Turkey agreed and welcomed faintly veiled “goodwill and cooperation” from the “other relevant parties,” intimating Bulgaria, to whom they direct much of the blame.

    The overlaps between a river that regularly floods and a territory where border crossers are at the mercy of systematic violence resonates troublingly with nationalist media and governmental rhetoric of “flows,” “floods,” or “surges” and the “stemming” of migrants.”
    Naturalizing metaphors such as these emerge wherever border regimes are discursively or materially constructed to ensure the illegality of movement across borders, and in doing so, racially “other” border crossers. Indeed, hydrologic metaphors are evoked to draw a distinction between those who do not belong and those who do within a sedentary notion of territory. In light of the events of March 2020, the material movement of water out of place is not perceived as a threat that must be contained to prevent it seeping into discourses that legally and culturally ground the nation-state. Instead, the movement of these waters are deployed in the very efforts to exclude others from the space of the nation-state.Joint Operation Poseidon Land, EU border agency Frontex’s Evros operation, began in 2011. The name conjures a pathologic mythology, casting border crossers as mortals committing the hubris of seeking refuge in Europe, while Frontex claims the role of chastising deity. Here Poseidon, god of both the sea and rivers, intervenes at the land-water divide. In mythology, where his trident struck, land quakes and flooding and drowning ensues. Echoing a crude sketch of the hydrologic cycle, Operation Poseidon Land transposes border violence in liquid form from the Aegean—where Operation Poseidon Sea is enacted—to the headwaters of the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa and back down along its course. The rumored intentional flooding of the valley from the Ivaylovgrad dam brings Frontex’s troubling mythological sensibility into reality.

    4. Anachoma

    A week before the flooding made the headlines, and a day after Muhammad al Arab’s killing, the European commission president, Ursula von der Leyen visited Evros, along with three EU leaders and the Greek Prime Minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis. Following the visit, they gave a joint statement in which der Leyen thanked Greece for being Europe’s aspida, using the Greek word for “shield” (ασπίδα).

    Der Leyen’s choice of vocabulary uncannily echoes local military discourse, in which the region is often called Greece’s ανάχωμα (anachoma), or embankment, against Turkish invasion, and more recently against asylum seekers. The landscape of the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa is entirely sculpted to either contain or facilitate movement, be it of military personnel, people, or water. The berm, a versatile and ambiguous military-ecological technology, is the physical embodiment of the ανάχωμα. There are multiple types of berms, each of which is designed to perform distinct functions. There are surpassable/summer berms, main berms, tertiary berms for flood defense, raised rail lines and roads enabling movement during flood periods, irrigation, and, most explicitly in the delta, anti-tank installations. A hierarchy is designed into the system of flood control to allow water, armies, and people to penetrate the frontier space to varying degrees.

    The military imaginary of Evros as an ανάχωμα also refers to a more nuanced politics of demographic engineering. The delimitation of the border in the 1920s coincided with the exchange of populations between Greece and Turkey, a process which created imagined communities that the river division helped crystalize. The process intended to produce a Greek Christian population along the border as a demographic buffer—or embankment—against invasion. This began with the transfer of Greek-speaking populations from what became Turkish territory on the shores of the Aegean and the Anatolian peninsula, as well as Pontic Greeks from the shores of the Black Sea. In return, Turkish-speaking and other Muslim populations from Greek territory were moved to Turkey, although significant minority populations still remain in western Thrace. In the century since, Turkish, Pomak, Bektashi, and other Muslim minorities in western Thrace have been the focus of multiple marginalizing practices. A system of checkpoints (barres) was put in place in 1936 to isolate these communities, the last of which were removed as recently as 1995.
    When we visited the Bektashi villages of Roussa and Goniko in Evros, we saw the check point still standing, an abandoned yet powerful reminder of the state as an ambient presence.

    As embankments of wet earth, berms are concentrations of these politics of demographic engineering and territorial control. They are ground engineered in excess. They are routes of control through the floodplain for the police, military, and local farmers, and they figure within the imaginary of the moat as obstacles for invading forces. The berms reveal the border regime’s deployment of the environment as defensive “infranatural” technology.

    Corresponding to the engineered limits of the floodplain, berms are often placed along the edge of the military buffer zone that runs along the Greek side of the Evros border, also known as ZAP (Zoni Asfaleias Prokalypsis). As human rights reports have been claiming for years, where the floodplain/buffer zone broadens, the river becomes a site where human rights violations occur. These include the failure to rescue and illegal pushbacks of border crossers back to Turkey.
    A case on May 8, 2018 involving a group of fourteen people attempting to cross during a flood event speaks directly to the overlapping of flooding with the operations of the border. The attempt failed and resulted in one fatality. Once the group returned to Turkey, they attempted to contact Greek authorities with a picture of the ID card and the GPS location of the body. Greek police stated that the flooding was too severe to attempt a recovery, and over the next few days, no confirmation of the recovery of the body was received. In other examples, the police have refuted the possibility of pushbacks because the water is too high or the geomorphology makes it impossible. In this way, the behavior of water in excess is co-opted as an obviatory device; a mask in the construction of denial. The flood is an alibi for border violence. Consequently, the berm infrastructure marks the limit of the flood and acts as a container for this riverine geography of exception.

    5. The Delta

    The Evros Delta, where the river meets the Thracian Sea, covers a surface area of 111,937 square kilometers. A protected conservation area designated as a wetland of international importance by the 1971 Ramsar treaty, the delta’s saline waters, ponds, and islands are home to a number of migratory bird species. Since last month, however, it has hosted a different kind of migration, with army and police units operating side by side with local, self-proclaimed “frontiersmen,” “guardians of the border,” and hunting clubs from all over Greece arriving to prevent what they understand to be an “intrusion” of “illegal aliens” (“lathrometanastes”) into Greece. Joining them are far-right and neo-nazi militants from Europe and the US who have flocked there to demonstrate their support, and “safeguard Europe’s borders.” Showing little regard for human life, they describe their operations as “hunting” for refugees. The ongoing dehumanization of asylum seekers using both language and physical force permeates the region. Detainees in the recently exposed border guard center at Poros, have described guards treating them “like animals.”
    The violent events of the past month, including the killings of Muhammad al Arab inside the Evros delta and Muhamad Gulzar in the Karaağaç Triangle, as well as the reports of the opening of the Ivaylovgrad dam, are punctuating moments that bring to the fore the slower environmental processes mobilized against asylum seekers at the border. The Evros catchment basin is currently a densely braided space of border violence and death, incorporating military personnel, nationalist and neo-nazi paramilitaries, local farmers and hunters, as well as the very ecology of this deltaic marshland, such as temperature and meteorological conditions. Indeed, rather than being a “natural” border, the Evros is an exemplary case of a borderized nature, where environmental elements, which are not deadly on their own, are made deadly by forcing people to traverse them under treacherous conditions. We have spoken with asylum seekers who have described the fog that hangs above the Evros. Fog, like clothes sodden from swimming across the river, and combined with freezing winter temperatures, contribute to the threat of hypothermia for border crossers, which, after drowning, is the second highest cause of death at Evros. As reported in the media, paramilitaries who have been recently drawn to the area to hunt people who cross “at night and in the fog,” are transposing the old Nazi directive for disappearing bodies “Nacht und Nebel” (“Night and Fog”) onto the Evros Delta.Through the waters of the river, amongst the impacted earth of the berms, and under the veil of the heavy airs of teargas and pesticides, complex forces are deployed and emerge from the fog of the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa. Understanding the complexity of the river as a weaponized border ecology is crucial to reveal the ongoing and intensifying violence that unfolds across different scales in this region. To confront the far-right that is currently assembling its forces rhetorically, environmentally, and in person in the Evros delta and all along the fluvial frontier, and to counter the obfuscating tactics long deployed by the police in their use of the river as alibi, requires understanding how this border is constructed. When considering the Evros border, we must learn to perceive the entire floodplain as a border technology. This, in turn, involves striving to see the river as a spectrum, from freezing fog in the valley, dew in the field, and mud in the floodplain as clearly as it sees water flowing between the riverbanks themselves.To assist migrants in defending their rights, and to resist the far-right seeping out of border regions into increasingly xenophobic societies, the very concept of “nature” needs to be reframed to encompass the ways it is deployed within the military imaginary of borderized environments. Practices must be developed to perceive how border regimes harness environmental processes. Such practices reveal the varying watery states of the Evros/Meriç/Maritsa as what they are: the riverine arsenal of a deadly defense architecture. The border regime operates as an expanded or “dispersed” territorial technology: an entire region designed as a violent ανάχωμα.

    https://www.e-flux.com/architecture/at-the-border/325751/weaponizing-a-river

    #weaponization #Evros #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Thrace #Grèce #Turquie #architecture_forensique #Forensic_Architecture #rivière

    • GEOGRAPHY OF EVROS/MERIÇ RIVER PUSHBACKS

      Across January, BVMN collected testimonies
      documenting pushbacks over the Evros/
      Meriç river on the Greek-Turkish border,
      impacting over 500 people-on-the-move.
      These incidents validate a pattern identified
      by BVMN of Greek authorities using small
      islands in the river to stage pushbacks, often
      leaving groups stranded there for indefinite
      periods. Beyond inhumane treatment –
      pregnant women have been left without food,
      water or shelter – several reports indicate
      that people are placed at direct risk of
      drowning (see 8.4) in the river.
      Ironically, Greece has cited flooding as a
      reason not to mount rescue operations or
      recover the bodies of those who have
      drowned, while using the riverʼs water level
      and challenging geomorphology to refute the
      possibility of pushbacks.
      One testimony (see 8.5) offers a compelling
      example of the dangers associated with this
      practice. It describes how eight North African
      men were driven into the middle of the Evros
      river and ordered to jump in. With “water
      reaching their chests ”, the men were forced
      to wade to an island from where they could
      swim to Turkish shores. While attempting the
      crossing, however, one man was swept away
      by the overwhelming current, only managing
      to survive by grabbing onto a fallen tree.
      Witnessing this scene, the remaining men on
      the island feared to cross as they could not
      swim. With soaking wet clothes, they were
      stuck there for three days in sub-zero
      temperatures, until they were eventually
      retrieved by Greek police and pushed back to
      Turkey.
      Perhaps most unsettling is that the officers
      allegedly watched this scene unfold and took
      over 72 hours to intervene. Hypothermia is
      the second highest killer of transit groups in
      the Evros region. Reminiscent of the triborder
      area between Bulgaria, Greece and
      Turkey, which is being used to stage indirect
      chain pushbacks, this phenomenon
      represents a weaponization of geography, or
      as one commentator eloquently wrote, ʻa
      form of hybrid border violence that explicitly
      incorporates the river ecology itselfʼ.

      https://www.borderviolence.eu/balkan-region-report-january-2021
      –-> pp.7-8

  • Αίτημα επιστροφής 1.500 προσφύγων στην Τουρκία κατέθεσε η Ελλάδα στην Ε.Ε.
    –-> La Grèce demande à l’UE le #retour de 1 500 réfugiés en Turquie.

    Αίτημα προς την Ευρωπαϊκή Επιτροπή και τη Frontex για την άμεση επιστροφή 1.450 προσώπων, των οποίων έχουν απορριφθεί τα αιτήματα παροχής ασύλου, κατέθεσε το υπουργείο Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου, επικαλούμενο την Κοινή Δήλωση Ε.Ε.-Τουρκίας. Ωστόσο να σημειωθεί ότι πλέον η έκδοση των αποφάσεων παροχής ασύλου σε πρώτο βαθμό γίνονται με διαδικασίες εξπρές, μη εξασφαλίζοντας επαρκή νομική βοήθεια και κατά συνέπεια δίκαιη απόφαση.

    Στην ανακοίνωση του υπουργείου Μετανάστευσης αναφέρεται ότι η Ελλάδα ζητά να επιστρέψουν στην Τουρκία 955 αλλοδαποί που μπήκαν στη χώρα μας από την Τουρκία και βρίσκονται στη Λέσβο, 180 που βρίσκονται στη Χίο, 128 που βρίσκονται στη Σάμο και 187 στην Κω, επισημαίνοντας ότι τα αιτήματά τους για άσυλο έχουν απορριφθεί τελεσίδικα και ως εκ τούτου είναι επιστρεπτέοι, βάσει της Κοινής Δήλωσης ΕΕ- Τουρκίας.

    Το πρώτο δίμηνο του 2020 καταγράφηκαν συνολικά 139 επιστροφές προς την Τουρκία, με τη διαδικασία να έχει σταματήσει από τις 15 Μαρτίου 2020, καθώς η Τουρκία επικαλέστηκε τις δυσκολίες που επέφερε το ξέσπασμα της πανδημίας του κορονοϊού. Πλέον, το υπουργείο Μετανάστευσης ισχυρίζεται ότι « οι ταχείες διαδικασίες ελέγχων για κορονοϊό στην Ελλάδα και η σημαντική επιτάχυνση της διαδικασίας ασύλου, έχουν δημιουργήσει τις κατάλληλες συνθήκες για την επανέναρξη της διαδικασίας επιστροφών με ασφάλεια όσων αλλοδαπών δεν δικαιούνται διεθνούς προστασίας και εισήλθαν στην Ελλάδα από την Τουρκία ».

    Ο υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου, Νότης Μηταράκης, επισημαίνει στη δήλωσή του ότι η Ελλάδα αναμένει από την Τουρκία « να ενισχύσει τις προσπάθειες στα πλαίσια της Κοινής Δήλωσης : πρώτον, στην αποτροπή διέλευσης βαρκών που ξεκινούν από τα παράλιά της με προορισμό τη χώρα μας. Δεύτερον, στην αποδοχή επιστροφών στη βάση της Κοινής Δήλωσης Ε.Ε.-Τουρκίας, αλλά και των διμερών συμφωνιών επανεισδοχής ».

    Και αναφερόμενος στην ευρωπαϊκή πολιτική για το προσφυγικό/μεταναστευτικό, σημειώνει ότι « το ζητούμενο για την Ευρώπη είναι να κατοχυρώσει στο νέο Σύμφωνο Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου έναν κοινό μηχανισμό, καθώς και το απαραίτητο νομικό οπλοστάσιο για επιστροφές. Και να οχυρώσει, με αυτόν τον τρόπο, τις χώρες πρώτης υποδοχής απέναντι σε ανεξέλεγκτες μεταναστευτικές ροές, αλλά και τη δράση κυκλωμάτων λαθροδιακινητών ».

    Την ίδια ώρα, με αφορμή το αίτημα του ελληνικού υπουργείου Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου προς την Κομισιόν και τη Frontex, η οργάνωση-ομπρέλα για τα ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα HIAS Greece εξέδωσε ανακοίνωση στην οποία σημειώνει ότι η ταχεία διαδικασία που ακολουθείται για την εξέταση των αιτημάτων ασύλου δεν εξασφαλίζει σωστή και δίκαιη απόφαση.

    Επίσης οι αιτούντες άσυλο δεν έχουν επαρκή νομική βοήθεια και η διαδικασία της προσφυγής σε δεύτερο βαθμό είναι νομικά περίπλοκη, ουσιαστικά αποτρέποντας τους πρόσφυγες από να διεκδικήσουν την παραμονή τους στη χώρα.

    « Καθίσταται σαφές ότι χωρίς νομική συνδρομή είναι αδύνατον οι αιτούντες/ούσες άσυλο να παρουσιάσουν εγγράφως και μάλιστα στην ελληνική γλώσσα, τους νομικούς και πραγματικούς λόγους για τους οποίους προσφεύγουν κατά της απορριπτικής τους απόφασης », σημειώνει μεταξύ άλλων, τονίζοντας επίσης :

    « Η έλλειψη δωρεάν νομικής συνδρομής αποβαίνει εις βάρος του δίκαιου και αποτελεσματικού χαρακτήρα που θα έπρεπε να διακρίνει τη διαδικασία ασύλου στο σύνολό της, ιδίως αν ληφθούν υπόψη οι εξαιρετικά σύντομες προθεσμίες που προβλέπονται για διαδικασία των συνόρων και τα σημαντικά κενά στη πρόσβαση σε νομική συνδρομή ήδη από το πρώτο βαθμό της διαδικασίας ασύλου ».

    https://www.efsyn.gr/node/276785

    –—

    Traduction de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migeurop :

    Le ministère de l’Immigration et de l’Asile a soumis une demande à la Commission européenne et à #Frontex pour le #retour_immédiat de 1 450 personnes dont la demande d’asile a été rejetée, citant la déclaration commune UE-Turquie. Cependant, il convient de noter que désormais, les décisions d’asile en première instance sont prises par des procédures expresses, sans que soit assuré une aide juridique suffisante au requérant, ce qui pourrait garantir une décision équitable.

    L’annonce du ministère de l’Immigration indique que la Grèce demande le retour en Turquie de 955 étrangers qui sont entrés dans notre pays depuis la Turquie et se trouvent à #Lesbos, 180 à #Chios, 128 à #Samos et 187 à #Kos, notant que leurs demandes d’asile ont été définitivement rejetés et qu’il est possible de les renvoyer, en vertu de la déclaration commune UE-Turquie. Au cours des deux premiers mois de 2020, un total de 139 #retours_forcés en Turquie ont été enregistrés, un processus qui est au point mort depuis le 15 mars 2020, date à laquelle la Turquie a évoqué les difficultés supplémentaires causées par l’apparition de la #pandémie de #coronavirus.

    Désormais, le ministère de l’Immigration affirme que "les procédures de #dépistage_rapide du coronavirus en Grèce et l’accélération significative du processus d’asile, ont créé les bonnes conditions pour la #reprise en toute sécurité du processus de retour des étrangers qui n’ont pas droit à une protection internationale et sont entrés en Grèce depuis la Turquie. ». Le ministre de l’Immigration et de l’Asile, #Notis_Mitarakis, souligne dans sa déclaration que la Grèce attend de la Turquie "un renforcement des efforts dans le cadre de la Déclaration commune : premièrement, pour empêcher le passage des bateaux partant de ses côtes vers notre pays". Deuxièmement, par l’acceptation des retours sur la base de la déclaration commune UE-Turquie, mais aussi des accords bilatéraux de #réadmission ". Faisant référence à la politique européenne des réfugiés / immigration, il a noté que « l’objectif de l’Europe est d’établir un mécanisme commun dans le nouveau pacte d’immigration et d’asile, ainsi que l’arsenal juridique nécessaire pour les retours. Et de fortifier, de cette manière, les premiers pays d’accueil contre les flux migratoires incontrôlés, mais aussi l’action des réseaux de passeurs ".

    Dans le même temps, à l’occasion de la demande du ministère grec de l’Immigration et de l’asile à la Commission et à Frontex, l’organisation de défense des droits de l’homme HIAS Greece a publié une déclaration dans laquelle elle note que la procédure rapide suivie pour l’examen des demandes d’asile ne garantit pas décision juste et équitable. De plus, les demandeurs d’asile ne bénéficient pas d’une aide juridique suffisante et la procédure de recours en deuxième instance est juridiquement compliquée, ce qui empêche les réfugiés de défendre leur droit de séjour dans le pays. « Il devient clair que sans assistance juridique, il est impossible pour les demandeurs d’asile de présenter par écrit et qui plus est en langue grecque, les raisons juridiques et réelles pour lesquelles ils font appel de la décision de rejet de leur demande », notent-t-ils, entre autres, en soulignant : « L’absence d’assistance juridique gratuite se fait au détriment du caractère équitable et efficace de la #procédure_d'asile dans son ensemble, en particulier compte tenu des délais extrêmement courts prévus de la #procédure_à_la_frontière (#Border_procedure) et des lacunes importantes déjà en matière d’accès à l’#aide_juridique, dès la première instance de la procédure d’asile ".

    #Grèce #Turquie #asile #migrations #renvois #expulsions #réfugiés #accord_UE-Turquie #déboutés

    ping @isskein @karine4

    • « Ναι » στις επιστροφές μεταναστών λέει η Τουρκία

      Πρόκειται για αίτημα που κατέθεσε την περασμένη εβδομάδα στην Ε.Ε. και στον Frontex ο υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου Νότης Μηταράκης.

      Θετική ανταπόκριση της Τουρκίας στο ελληνικό αίτημα για επιστροφή 1.450 αλλοδαπών των οποίων τα αιτήματα ασύλου έχουν απορριφθεί τελεσιδίκως προκύπτει από τη χθεσινή συνάντηση του αντιπροέδρου της Ευρωπαϊκής Επιτροπής Μαργαρίτη Σχοινά με τον Τούρκο υπουργό Εξωτερικών Μεβλούτ Τσαβούσογλου. Πρόκειται για αίτημα που κατέθεσε την περασμένη εβδομάδα στην Επιτροπή και στον Frontex ο υπουργός Μετανάστευσης και Ασύλου Νότης Μηταράκης. Ο κ. Τσαβούσογλου, σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες της εφημερίδας Καθημερινη , είπε ότι το ζήτημα θα επιλυθεί με ορίζοντα τον Μάρτιο.

      Σύμφωνα με τις ίδιες πληροφορίες, η συνάντηση με τον κ. Σχοινά –η πρώτη μεταξύ των δύο ανδρών– διήρκεσε μία ώρα και συζητήθηκαν όλα τα θέματα αρμοδιότητος του αντιπροέδρου : το μεταναστευτικό, η ασφάλεια, ο διαθρησκειακός διάλογος και οι επαφές μεταξύ των λαών. Κοινοτικές πηγές αναφέρουν ότι, ενόψει της Συνόδου Κορυφής του Μαρτίου και της έκθεσης Μπορέλ για τις ευρωτουρκικές σχέσεις, είναι επιτακτική ανάγκη η οικοδόμηση ενός πλαισίου θετικής συνεννόησης και η αποφυγή διχαστικών δηλώσεων που θα οξύνουν εκ νέου τις εντάσεις. Ο κ. Τσαβούσογλου κάλεσε τον κ. Σχοινά να συμμετάσχει ως κεντρικός ομιλητής στο Φόρουμ της Αττάλειας τον προσεχή Ιούνιο.

      Σε θετικό κλίμα εξελίχθηκε και η συνάντηση του Τούρκου υπουργού με την επίτροπο Εσωτερικών Υποθέσεων Ιλβα Γιόχανσον. Τα βασικά θέματα τα οποία συζήτησαν, σύμφωνα με πληροφορίες, ήταν οι δεσμεύσεις των δύο πλευρών όπως απορρέουν από την Κοινή Δήλωση Ε.Ε. – Τουρκίας για τη διαχείριση του μεταναστευτικού και τα προαπαιτούμενα με τα οποία πρέπει να συμμορφωθεί η Αγκυρα για να υπάρξει πρόοδος στο θέμα της απελευθέρωσης των θεωρήσεων. Ο κ. Τσαβούσογλου συναντήθηκε επίσης με τον Ζοζέπ Μπορέλ και τον επίτροπο Διεύρυνσης Ολιβερ Βαρχέλι, ενώ είχε και ένα σύντομο τετ α τετ με την Ούρσουλα φον ντερ Λάιεν. Σε δηλώσεις του πριν από τη δική του συνάντηση με τον κ. Τσαβούσογλου, ο ύπατος εκπρόσωπος της Ε.Ε. για την Εξωτερική Πολιτική χαρακτήρισε το 2020 « περίπλοκο έτος » για τις σχέσεις των δύο πλευρών. « Πρόσφατα όμως », πρόσθεσε ο κ. Μπορέλ, « έχουμε δει βελτίωση της ατμόσφαιρας » και « κάποια σημαντικά βήματα » στην αναζήτηση « κοινών στρατηγικών συμφερόντων ».

      « Ενα θετικό βήμα είναι η ανακοινωθείσα επανέναρξη των διερευνητικών συνομιλιών μεταξύ Ελλάδας και Τουρκίας », είπε ο κ. Μπορέλ, σημειώνοντας : « Πρέπει να υπάρξει επιμονή σε αυτές τις προσπάθειες. Προθέσεις και ανακοινώσεις πρέπει να μεταφραστούν σε πράξεις ». Επανέλαβε δε την « πλήρη δέσμευση » της Ε.Ε. να στηρίξει την « ταχεία επανέναρξη » των διαπραγματεύσεων για το Κυπριακό, υπό την αιγίδα του γ.γ. του ΟΗΕ. « Είναι ισχυρή μας επιθυμία να υπάρξει μια αποκλιμάκωση διαρκείας στην Ανατ. Μεσόγειο και στην ευρύτερη περιοχή και είμαι βέβαιος ότι μπορούμε να έχουμε ένα διάλογο ουσίας για να ενισχύσουμε τις πολιτικές διαδικασίες που συνδέονται με συγκρούσεις στην περιοχή, στη Λιβύη, στη Συρία ή στο Ναγκόρνο-Καραμπάχ », είπε.

      Επιπλέον, « με πλήρη αμοιβαίο σεβασμό, θα μιλήσουμε ειλικρινά και ανοιχτά για την πολιτική κατάσταση στην Τουρκία και τις προοπτικές ένταξης [της χώρας στην Ε.Ε.] », ανέφερε ο κ. Μπορέλ. Μιλώντας νωρίτερα στο Ευρωκοινοβούλιο, ο ύπατος εκπρόσωπος επανέλαβε τις ανησυχίες της Ε.Ε. για τα ανθρώπινα δικαιώματα στην Τουρκία. Εκανε αναφορά στις υποθέσεις Ντεμιρτάς και Καβαλά αλλά και στις « βαθιά ανησυχητικές » διώξεις δημάρχων της αντιπολίτευσης.

      ​​​​​​Από την πλευρά του, ο κ. Τσαβούσογλου χαρακτήρισε κι αυτός το περασμένο έτος « προβληματικό » για τις σχέσεις Ε.Ε. – Τουρκίας. Χαιρέτισε τις αμοιβαίες κινήσεις βελτίωσης της ατμόσφαιρας που έχουν γίνει έκτοτε και είπε ότι μαζί με τον κ. Μπορέλ θα « εργαστούν για να προετοιμάσουν » την επίσκεψη στην Αγκυρα της Ούρσουλα φον ντερ Λάιεν και του προέδρου του Ευρωπαϊκού Συμβουλίου Σαρλ Μισέλ. Υπενθυμίζεται, πάντως, ότι η επίσκεψη αυτή δεν έχει επιβεβαιωθεί ακόμα από ευρωπαϊκής πλευράς.

      https://www.stonisi.gr/post/14486/nai-stis-epistrofes-metanastwn-leei-h-toyrkia

    • Le Ministre grec de la politique migratoire demande la #révision de l’accord UE-Turquie, afin que les retours puissent être également effectués depuis la #frontière_terrestre

      Traduction du grec reçue via la mailing-list Migreup :

      "Il est clair qu’aucune nouvelle structure ne sera créée en #Thrace", a déclaré M. Mitarakis.

      La nécessité de réviser la déclaration commune UE-Turquie, de manière à inclure les frontières terrestres, mais si et seulement si elle est accompagnée par la levée de restriction géographique pour ceux qui arrivent aux îles, a été mise en avant lors d’une conférence de presse d’Alexandroupolis par le ministre de l’Immigration et de l’Asile Notis Mitarakis.

      Évoquant les points qui doivent être modifiés dans l’accord, M. Mitarakis a déclaré que << le premier est la question de la levée de la restriction géographique imposée par l’accord qui a créé une énorme pression sur les îles de la mer Égée, car elle associait a possibilité d’un renvoi à Turquie de ceux qui n’ont pas droit à une protection internationale à leur confinement géographique aux îles jusqu’à la fin de la procédure d’asile.

      Le ministre a souligné que si la clause de la restriction géographique est levée, nous devrions reconsidérer l’accord européen afin que les retours puissent être effectués depuis les frontières terrestres [et non pas uniquement par voie maritime], "à condition de ne pas rendre obligatoire le séjour des demandeurs d’asile qui arrivent par voie terrestre à la région Evros », dit-il.

      Après les réactions extrêmes de certains habitants d’Orestiada avant-hier, Notis Mitarakis a souligné que "la politique nationale pour Thrace et Evros ne change pas, il est clair qu’aucune nouvelle structure ne sera créée en Thrace, et qu’il n’y aura pas de séjour d’immigrants en Thrace. Le caractère du #hotspot #Fylakio ne change pas non plus, tous les demandeurs vont être transférés après les contrôles nécessaires vers les structures existantes de régions non-frontalières ».

      Enfin, le ministre a essentiellement annoncé la décision prise de déplacer le bureau régional d’asile d’#Alexandroupoli à #Kavala, arguant que la présence d’immigrants à Alexandroupoli pour traiter leurs dossiers est contraire à la politique qui stipule que les migrants ne doivent pas s’installer à la région frontalière d’#Evros.

      source en grec :
      https://www.efsyn.gr/ellada/koinonia/280765_mitarakis-epanexetasi-tis-symfonias-gia-na-mporoyn-na-ginontai-epistrof

      #transferts

  • Sur la frontière gréco-turque, à l’épicentre des tensions

    L’Union européenne entend sanctionner la politique de plus en plus expansionniste de la Turquie, qui ravive en Grèce les souvenirs des conflits du passé. Ligne de rupture, mais aussi d’échanges entre Orient et Occident, la frontière gréco-turque ne respire plus depuis la crise sanitaire. De #Kastellorizo à la #Thrace en passant par #Lesbos, les deux pays ont pourtant tant de choses en commun, autour de cette démarcation qui fut mouvante et rarement étanche.

    Petite île aux confins orientaux de la Grèce, Kastellorizo touche presque la #Turquie. Le temps s’écoule lentement dans l’unique village, logé dans une baie profonde. En cette fin septembre, de vieux pêcheurs jouent aux cartes près des enfants qui appâtent des tortues dans les eaux cristallines. Devant son café froid, M. Konstantinos Papoutsis observe, placide, l’immense côte turque, à guère plus de deux kilomètres, et la ville de Kaş, son seul horizon. « Nous sommes une île touristique tranquille, assure cet homme affable qui gère une agence de voyages. Je l’ai répété aux touristes tout l’été. » Attablée autour de lui, la poignée d’élus de cette commune de cinq cents âmes reprend ses propos d’un air débonnaire : « Il n’y a aucun danger à Kastellorizo ! »

    Un imposant ferry, qui paraît gigantesque dans ce petit port méditerranéen, vient animer le paysage. Parti d’Athènes vingt-quatre heures plus tôt, il manœuvre difficilement pour débarquer ses passagers, parmi lesquels une cinquantaine d’hommes en treillis et chapeaux de brousse. Les soldats traversent la baie d’un pas vif avant de rejoindre les falaises inhabitées qui la dominent. « C’est une simple relève, comme il y en a tous les mois », commente M. Papoutsis, habitué à cette présence.

    Selon le #traité_de_Paris de février 1947 (article 14), et du fait de la cession par l’Italie à la Grèce du Dodécanèse, les îles dont fait partie Kastellorizo sont censées être démilitarisées. Dans les faits, les troupes helléniques y guettent le rivage turc depuis l’occupation par Ankara de la partie nord de Chypre, en 1974, précisent plusieurs historiens (1). Cette défense a été renforcée après la crise gréco-turque autour des îlots disputés d’Imia, en 1996. La municipalité de Kastellorizo refuse de révéler le nombre d’hommes postés sur ses hauteurs. Et si les villageois affichent un air de décontraction pour ne pas effrayer les visiteurs — rares en cette période de Covid-19 —, ils n’ignorent pas l’ombre qui plane sur leur petit paradis.

    Un poste avancé d’Athènes en Méditerranée

    Kastellorizo se trouve en première ligne face aux menaces du président turc Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, qui veut redessiner les cartes et imposer son propre #partage_des_eaux. Depuis les années 1970, les #îles du #Dodécanèse font l’objet d’un #conflit larvé entre ces deux pays membres de l’Organisation du traité de l’Atlantique nord (OTAN). La Turquie conteste la souveraineté grecque sur plusieurs îles, îlots et rochers le long de sa côte. Surtout, elle est l’un des rares pays, avec notamment les États-Unis, à ne pas avoir signé la convention des Nations unies sur le droit de la mer (dite #convention_de_Montego_Bay, et entrée en vigueur en 1994), et ne reconnaît pas la revendication par la Grèce d’un plateau continental autour de ses îles. Athènes justifie dès lors leur #militarisation au nom de la #légitime_défense (2), en particulier depuis l’occupation turque de Chypre et en raison d’une importante présence militaire à proximité : la marine et l’armée de l’air turques de l’Égée sont basées à İzmir, sur la côte occidentale de l’Asie Mineure.

    Si proche de la Turquie, Kastellorizo se trouve à 120 kilomètres de la première autre île grecque — Rhodes — et à plus de 520 kilomètres du continent grec. Alors que l’essentiel de la #mer_Egée pourrait être revendiqué par Athènes comme #zone_économique_exclusive (#ZEE) (3) au titre de la convention de Montego Bay (voir la carte ci-contre), ce lointain îlot de neuf kilomètres carrés lui permet de facto de jouir d’une large extension de plusieurs centaines de kilomètres carrés en Méditerranée orientale. Or, faute d’accord bilatéral, cette ZEE n’est pas formellement établie pour Ankara, qui revendique d’y avoir librement accès, surtout depuis la découverte en Méditerranée orientale de gisements d’#hydrocarbures potentiellement exploitables. À plusieurs reprises ces derniers mois, la Turquie a envoyé dans le secteur un bateau de recherche sismique baptisé #Oruç_Reis, du nom d’un corsaire ottoman du XVIe siècle — surnommé « #Barberousse » — né à Lesbos et devenu sultan d’Alger.

    Ces manœuvres navales font écho à l’idéologie de la « #patrie_bleue » (#Mavi_Vatan). Soutenue par les nationalistes et les islamistes, cette doctrine, conçue par l’ancien amiral #Cem_Gürdeniz, encourage la Turquie à imposer sa #souveraineté sur des #zones_disputées en #mer_Noire, en mer Égée et en #Méditerranée. Ces derniers mois, M. Erdoğan a multiplié les discours martiaux. Le 26 août, à l’occasion de l’anniversaire de la bataille de Manzikert, en 1071, dans l’est de la Turquie, où les Turcs Seldjoukides mirent en déroute l’armée byzantine, il avertissait la Grèce que toute « erreur » mènerait à sa « ruine ». Quelques semaines plus tard, le 21 octobre, lors d’une rencontre avec les présidents chypriote et égyptien à Nicosie, M. Kyriakos Mitsotakis, le premier ministre grec conservateur, accusait la Turquie de « fantasmes impérialistes assortis d’actions agressives ».

    Sous pression en août dernier, Athènes a pu compter sur le soutien de la République de Chypre, de l’Italie et de la France, avec lesquelles elle a organisé des manœuvres communes. Ou encore de l’Égypte, avec laquelle elle vient de signer un accord de partage des #zones_maritimes. Déjà en conflit ouvert avec son homologue turc sur la Syrie, la Libye et le Caucase, le président français Emmanuel Macron s’est résolument rangé aux côtés d’Athènes. « C’est un allié précieux que l’on voudrait inviter à venir sur notre île », déclare l’adjoint à la municipalité de Kastellorizo, M. Stratos Amygdalos, partisan de Nouvelle Démocratie, le parti au pouvoir. À la mi-septembre 2020, la Grèce annonçait l’acquisition de dix-huit Rafale, l’avion de combat de Dassault Aviation.

    « Erdoğan se prend pour Soliman le Magnifique. Mais il perd du crédit dans son pays, la livre turque s’effondre. Alors il essaie de redorer son image avec des idées de conquêtes, de rêve national… », maugrée de son côté M. Konstantinos Raftis, guide touristique à Kastellorizo. La comparaison entre le sultan de la Sublime Porte et l’actuel président turc revient fréquemment dans ce pays qui fit partie de l’Empire ottoman durant quatre siècles (de 1430, date de la chute de Salonique, à l’indépendance de 1830). La résistance hellénique a forgé l’identité de l’État grec moderne, où l’on conserve une profonde suspicion à l’égard d’un voisin encombrant, quatre fois plus riche, six fois plus grand et huit fois plus peuplé. Cette méfiance transcende les clivages politiques, tant le #nationalisme irrigue tous les partis grecs. Athènes voit aujourd’hui dans la doctrine de la « patrie bleue » une politique expansionniste néo-ottomane, qui fait écho à l’impérialisme passé.

    À l’embouchure du port de Kastellorizo, la silhouette d’une mosquée transformée en musée — rare vestige de la présence ottomane — fait de l’ombre à un bar à cocktails. L’édifice trône seul face aux vingt-six églises orthodoxes. La Constitution précise que l’orthodoxie est la « religion dominante » dans le pays, et, jusqu’en 2000, la confession était inscrite sur les cartes d’identité nationales. La suppression de cette mention, à la demande du gouvernement socialiste, a provoqué l’ire de la puissante Église orthodoxe, plus de 95 % des Grecs se revendiquant alors de cette religion. « Pendant toute la période du joug ottoman, nous restions des Grecs. Nos ancêtres ont défendu Kastellorizo pour qu’elle garde son identité. Nous nous battrons aussi pour qu’elle la conserve », s’emballe soudainement M. Raftis.

    Son île a dû résister plus longtemps que le reste du pays, insiste le sexagénaire. Après le départ des Ottomans, Kastellorizo, convoitée par les nations étrangères pour sa position géographique aux portes de l’Orient, a été occupée ou annexée par les Français (1915-1921), les Italiens (1921-1944), les Britanniques (1944-1945)… L’îlot n’est devenu complètement grec qu’en 1948, comme l’ensemble des îles du Dodécanèse. Depuis, il arbore fièrement ses couleurs. Dans la baie, plusieurs étendards bleu et blanc flottent sur les balcons en encorbellement orientés vers la ville turque de Kaş (huit mille habitants). Le nombre de ces drapeaux augmente quand la tension s’accroît.

    Trois autres grands étendards nationaux ont été peints sur les falaises par des militaires. En serrant les poings, M. Raftis raconte un épisode qui a « mis les nerfs de tout le monde à vif ». À la fin septembre 2020, un drone d’origine inconnue a diffusé des chants militaires turcs avant d’asperger ces bannières d’une peinture rouge vif, évoquant la couleur du drapeau turc. « C’est une attaque impardonnable, qui sera punie », peste l’enfant de l’île, tout en scrutant les quelques visages inconnus sur la promenade. Il redoute que des espions viennent de Turquie.

    « Les #tensions durent depuis quarante ans ; tout a toujours fini par se régler. Il faut laisser la Turquie et la Grèce dialoguer entre elles », relativise pour sa part M. Tsikos Magiafis, patron avenant d’une taverne bâtie sur un rocher inhabité, avec une vue imprenable sur Kaş. « Les querelles sont affaire de diplomates. Les habitants de cette ville sont nos frères, nous avons grandi ensemble », jure ce trentenaire marié à une Turque originaire de cette cité balnéaire. Adolescent, déjà, il délaissait les troquets de Kastellorizo pour profiter du bazar de Kaş, du dentiste ou des médecins spécialisés qui manquent au village. Les Turcs, eux, ont compté parmi les premiers touristes de l’île, avant que la frontière ne ferme totalement en mars 2020, en raison du Covid-19.

    À Lesbos, les réfugiés comme « #arme_diplomatique »

    À 450 kilomètres plus au nord-ouest, au large de l’île de Lesbos, ce ne sont pas les navires de recherche d’hydrocarbures envoyés par Ankara que guettent les Grecs, mais les fragiles bateaux pneumatiques en provenance de la côte turque, à une dizaine de kilomètres seulement. Cette île montagneuse de la taille de la Guadeloupe, qui compte 85’000 habitants, constitue un autre point de friction, dont les migrants sont l’instrument.

    Depuis une décennie, Lesbos est l’une des principales portes d’entrée dans l’Union européenne pour des centaines de milliers d’exilés. Afghans, Syriens, Irakiens ou encore Congolais transitent par la Turquie, qui accueille de son côté environ quatre millions de réfugiés. En face, le rivage turc se compose de plages peu touristiques et désertes, prisées des passeurs car permettant des départs discrets. Les migrants restent toutefois bloqués à Lesbos, le temps du traitement de leur demande d’asile en Grèce et dans l’espoir de rejoindre d’autres pays de l’espace Schengen par des voies légales. Le principal camp de réfugiés, Moria, a brûlé dans des conditions obscures le 8 septembre, sans faire de victime grave parmi ses treize mille occupants.

    Pour M. Konstantinos Moutzouris, le gouverneur des îles égéennes du Nord, ces arrivées résultent d’un calcul stratégique d’Ankara. « Erdoğan utilise les réfugiés comme arme diplomatique, il les envoie lorsqu’il veut négocier. Il a une attitude très agressive, comme aucun autre dirigeant turc avant lui », accuse cette figure conservatrice locale, connue pour ses positions tranchées sur les migrants, qu’il souhaite « dissuader de venir ».

    Il en veut pour preuve l’épisode de tension de mars 2020. Mécontent des critiques de l’Union européenne lors de son offensive contre les Kurdes dans le nord de la Syrie, le président turc a annoncé l’ouverture de ses frontières aux migrants voulant rejoindre l’Europe, malgré l’accord sur le contrôle de l’immigration qu’il a passé avec Bruxelles en mars 2016. Plusieurs milliers de personnes se sont alors massées aux portes de la Grèce, à la frontière terrestre du Nord-Est, suscitant un renforcement des troupes militaires grecques dans ce secteur. Dans le même temps, à Lesbos, une dizaine de bateaux chargés de réfugiés atteignaient les côtes en quelques jours, déclenchant la fureur d’extrémistes locaux. « Nous ne communiquons plus du tout avec les autorités turques depuis », affirme M. Moutzouris.

    Athènes assume désormais une ligne dure, quitte à fermer une partie de sa frontière commune avec la Turquie aux demandeurs d’asile, en dépit des conventions internationales que la Grèce a signées. Le gouvernement a ainsi annoncé mi-octobre la construction d’un nouveau #mur de 27 kilomètres sur la frontière terrestre. Au début de l’année 2020, il avait déjà déclaré vouloir ériger un #barrage_flottant de 2,7 kilomètres au large de Lesbos. Un ouvrage très critiqué et jugé illégal par les organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) de défense des droits humains. Un projet « absurde », juge M. Georgios Pallis, pharmacien de l’île et ancien député Syriza (gauche). Plusieurs sources locales évoquent une suspension de la construction de ce barrage. Le gouvernement, lui, ne communique pas à ce sujet.

    « Les réfugiés payent la rupture du dialogue gréco-turc », déplore M. Pallis entre deux mezze arrosés de l’ouzo local, près du port bruyant de Mytilène, dans le sud de l’île. « Des retours forcés de migrants sont organisés par les gardes-côtes grecs. » En septembre, le ministre de la marine se targuait, au cours d’une conférence de presse, d’avoir « empêché » quelque dix mille migrants d’entrer en 2020. Un mois plus tard, le ministre de l’immigration tentait, lui, de rectifier le tir en niant tout retour forcé. À Lesbos, ces images de réfugiés rejetés ravivent un douloureux souvenir, analyse M. Pallis : « Celui de l’exil des réfugiés d’Asie Mineure. » Appelé aussi en Grèce la « #grande_catastrophe », cet événement a fondé l’actuelle relation gréco-turque.

    Au terme du déclin de l’Empire ottoman, lors de la première guerre mondiale, puis de la guerre gréco-turque (1919-1922), les Grecs d’Asie Mineure firent l’objet de #persécutions et de #massacres qui, selon de nombreux historiens, relèvent d’un #génocide (4). En 1923, les deux pays signèrent le #traité_de_Lausanne, qui fixait les frontières quasi définitives de la Turquie moderne et mettait fin à l’administration par la Grèce de la région d’İzmir-Smyrne telle que l’avait décidée le #traité_de_Sèvres de 1920 (5). Cet accord a aussi imposé un brutal #échange_de_populations, fondé sur des critères religieux, au nom de l’« #homogénéité_nationale ». Plus de 500 000 musulmans de Grèce prirent ainsi le chemin de l’Asie Mineure — soit 6,5 % des résidents de Lesbos, selon un recensement de 1920 (6). En parallèle, le traité a déraciné plus de 1,2 million de chrétiens orthodoxes, envoyés en Grèce. Au total, plus de 30 000 sont arrivés dans l’île. Ils ont alors été péjorativement baptisés les « #graines_de_Turcs ».

    « Ils étaient chrétiens orthodoxes, ils parlaient le grec, mais ils étaient très mal perçus des insulaires. Les femmes exilées de la grande ville d’İzmir étaient surnommées “les prostituées”. Il a fallu attendre deux générations pour que les relations s’apaisent », raconte M. Pallis, lui-même descendant de réfugiés d’Asie Mineure. « Ma grand-mère est arrivée ici à l’âge de 8 ans. Pour s’intégrer, elle a dû apprendre à détester les Turcs. Il ne fallait pas être amie avec “l’autre côté”. Elle n’a pas remis les pieds en Turquie avant ses 80 ans. »

    Enfourchant sa Vespa sous une chaleur accablante, M. Pallis s’arrête devant quelques ruines qui se dressent dans les artères de #Mytilène : d’anciennes mosquées abandonnées. L’une n’est plus qu’un bâtiment éventré où errent des chatons faméliques ; une autre a été reconvertie en boutique de fleuriste. « Les autorités n’assument pas ce passé ottoman, regrette l’ancien député. L’État devrait financer la reconstruction de ces monuments et le développement du tourisme avec la Turquie. Ce genre d’investissements rendrait la région plus sûre que l’acquisition de Rafale. »

    En #Thrace_occidentale, une population musulmane ballottée

    Dans le nord-est du pays, près de la frontière avec la Turquie et la Bulgarie, ce passé ottoman reste tangible. En Thrace occidentale, les #mosquées en activité dominent les villages qui s’élèvent au milieu des champs de coton, de tournesols et de tabac. La #minorité_musulmane de Grèce vit non loin du massif montagneux des #Rhodopes, dont les sommets culminent en Bulgarie. Forte d’entre 100 000 et 150 000 personnes selon les autorités, elle se compose de #Roms, de #Pomaks — une population d’origine slave et de langue bulgare convertie à l’#islam sous la #domination_ottomane — et, majoritairement, d’habitants aux racines turques.

    « Nous sommes des citoyens grecs, mais nous sommes aussi turcs. Nous l’étions avant même que la Turquie moderne existe. Nous parlons le turc et nous avons la même #religion », explique M. Moustafa Moustafa, biologiste et ancien député Syriza. En quelques mots, il illustre toute la complexité d’une #identité façonnée, une fois de plus, par le passé impérial régional. Et qui se trouve elle aussi au cœur d’une bataille d’influence entre Athènes et Ankara.

    Rescapée de l’#Empire_ottoman, la minorité musulmane a vu les frontières de la Grèce moderne se dessiner autour d’elle au XXe siècle. Elle fut épargnée par l’échange forcé de populations du traité de Lausanne, en contrepartie du maintien d’un patriarcat œcuménique à Istanbul ainsi que d’une diaspora grecque orthodoxe en Turquie. Principalement turcophone, elle évolue dans un État-nation dont les fondamentaux sont la langue grecque et la religion orthodoxe.

    Elle a le droit de pratiquer sa religion et d’utiliser le turc dans l’enseignement primaire. La région compte une centaine d’écoles minoritaires bilingues. « Nous vivons ensemble, chrétiens et musulmans, sans heurts. Mais les mariages mixtes ne sont pas encore tolérés », ajoute M. Moustafa, dans son laboratoire de la ville de #Komotini — aussi appelée #Gümülcine en turc. Les quelque 55 000 habitants vivent ici dans des quartiers chrétiens et musulmans érigés autour d’une rivière méandreuse, aujourd’hui enfouie sous le béton. M. Moustafa n’a presque jamais quitté la Thrace occidentale. « Notre minorité n’est pas cosmopolite, nous sommes des villageois attachés à cette région. Nous voulons juste que nos descendants vivent ici en paix », explique-t-il. Comme de nombreux musulmans de la région, il a seulement fait ses études supérieures en Turquie, avant de revenir, comme aimanté par la terre de ses ancêtres.

    À cent kilomètres de Komotini, la Turquie demeure l’« État parrain » de ces musulmans, selon le traité de Lausanne. Mais l’influence de celle que certains nomment la « mère patrie » n’est pas toujours du goût de la Grèce. Les plus nationalistes craignent que la minorité musulmane ne se rapproche trop du voisin turc et ne manifeste des velléités d’indépendance. Son statut est au cœur de la discorde. La Turquie plaide pour la reconnaissance d’une « #minorité_turque ». La Grèce refuse, elle, toute référence ethnique reliée à une appartenance religieuse.

    La bataille se joue sur deux terrains : l’#éducation et la religion. À la fin des années 1990, Athènes a voulu intégrer la minorité dans le système d’éducation publique grec, appliquant notamment une politique de #discrimination_positive et offrant un accès facilité à l’université. Les musulmans proturcs plaident, eux, pour la création de davantage d’établissements minoritaires bilingues. Sur le plan religieux, chaque partie nomme des muftis, qui ne se reconnaissent pas mutuellement. Trois représentants officiels sont désignés par la Grèce pour la région. Deux autres, officieux, le sont par les musulmans de Thrace occidentale soutenus par Ankara, qui refuse qu’un État chrétien désigne des religieux.

    « Nous subissons toujours les conséquences des #crises_diplomatiques. Nous sommes les pions de leur jeu d’échecs », regrette d’une voix lasse M. Moustafa. Le sexagénaire évoque la période qui a suivi le #pogrom dirigé principalement contre les Grecs d’Istanbul, qui avait fait une quinzaine de morts en 1955. Puis les années qui ont suivi l’occupation du nord de #Chypre par la Turquie, en 1974. « Notre minorité a alors subi une violation de ses droits par l’État grec, dénonce-t-il. Nous ne pouvions plus passer le permis de conduire. On nous empêchait d’acheter des terres. » En parallèle, de l’autre côté de la frontière, la #peur a progressivement poussé la communauté grecque de Turquie à l’exil. Aujourd’hui, les Grecs ne sont plus que quelques milliers à Istanbul.

    Ces conflits pèsent encore sur l’évolution de la Thrace occidentale. « La situation s’est améliorée dans les années 1990. Mais, maltraités par le passé en Grèce, certains membres de la minorité musulmane se sont rapprochés de la Turquie, alimentant une méfiance dans l’imaginaire national grec. Beaucoup de chrétiens les considèrent comme des agents du pays voisin », constate M. Georgios Mavrommatis, spécialiste des minorités et professeur associé à l’université Démocrite de Thrace, à Komotini.
    « Ankara compte des milliers d’#espions dans la région »

    Une atmosphère de #suspicion plane sur cette ville, sous l’emprise de deux discours nationalistes concurrents. « Les gens de l’extrême droite grecque nous perçoivent comme des janissaires [soldats de l’Empire ottoman]. Erdoğan, lui, nous qualifie de soydas [« parents », en turc] », détaille d’une voix forte Mme Pervin Hayrullah, attablée dans un café animé. Directrice de la Fondation pour la culture et l’éducation en Thrace occidentale, elle se souvient aussi du passage du président turc dans la région, fin 2017. M. Erdoğan avait dénoncé les « discriminations » pratiquées par l’État grec à l’égard de cette communauté d’origine turque.

    Une chrétienne qui souhaite rester anonyme murmure, elle, que « les autorités grecques sont dépassées. La Turquie, qui est bien plus présente sur le terrain, a davantage de pouvoir. Ankara compte des milliers d’espions dans la région et donne des millions d’euros de budget chaque année au consulat turc de Komotini ». Pour Mme Hayrullah, qui est proche de cette institution, « le consulat ne fait que remplir une mission diplomatique, au même titre que le consulat grec d’Edirne [ville turque à quelque deux cents kilomètres, à la frontière] ». L’allure du consulat turc tranche avec les façades abîmées de Komotini. Surveillé par des caméras et par des gardes en noir, l’édifice est cerné de hautes barrières vertes.

    « La Grèce nous traite bien. Elle s’intéresse au développement de notre communauté et nous laisse exercer notre religion », vante de son côté M. Selim Isa, dans son bureau calme. Le président du comité de gestion des biens musulmans — désigné par l’État grec — est fier de montrer les beaux lustres et les salles lumineuses et rénovées d’une des vingt mosquées de Komotini. « Mais plus les relations avec la Turquie se détériorent et plus le consulat étend son influence, plus il revendique la reconnaissance d’une minorité turque », ajoute M. Isa, regard alerte, alors que l’appel du muezzin résonne dans la ville.

    À l’issue du sommet européen des 10 et 11 décembre, l’Union européenne a annoncé un premier volet de #sanctions contre la Turquie en raison de ses opérations d’exploration. Des mesures individuelles devraient cibler des responsables liés à ces activités. Athènes plaidait pour des mesures plus fortes, comme un embargo sur les armes, pour l’heure écarté. « C’était une proposition-clé. Nous craignons que la Turquie s’arme davantage. Sur le plan naval, elle est par exemple en train de se doter de six #sous-marins de type #214T fournis par l’#Allemagne, explique le diplomate grec Georgios Kaklikis, consul à Istanbul de 1986 à 1989. M. Erdoğan se réjouit de ces sanctions, qui sont en réalité minimes. » Le président turc a réagi par des #rodomontades, se félicitant que des pays « dotés de bon sens » aient adopté une « approche positive ». Bruxelles assure que d’autres mesures pourraient tomber en mars 2021 si Ankara ne cesse pas ces actions « illégales et agressives ».

    https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2021/01/PERRIGUEUR/62666
    #Grèce #Turquie #frontière #asile #migrations #réfugiés
    #Oruc_Reis #murs #Evros #barrières_frontalières #histoire

    ping @reka

    –—

    #terminologie #mots #vocabulaire :
    – "Le traité (de Lausanne) a déraciné plus de 1,2 million de chrétiens orthodoxes, envoyés en Grèce. Au total, plus de 30 000 sont arrivés dans l’île. Ils ont alors été péjorativement baptisés les « #graines_de_Turcs »."
    – "Les femmes exilées de la grande ville d’İzmir étaient surnommées “les prostituées”."

    –-> ajoutés à la métaliste sur la terminologie de la migration :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/414225

    ping @sinehebdo

  • Le #Racist_Violence_Recording_Network (#RVRN), un réseau qui recense les violences racistes en Grèce auquel participe 46 ONG et associations de la société civile, vient de présenter son #rapport annuel pour 2018. (le rapport est accessible en anglais en cliquant ici:http://rvrn.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/RVRN_report_2018en.pdf

    On y constate une recrudescence inquiétante de violences racistes dont la grande majorité des victimes sont des réfugiés et des migrants. Parmi les 117 incidents répertoriés, 74 ont eu pour cible des migrants et des réfugiés. Le rapport constate un renforcement de l’action des groupes organisés d’#extrême_droite qui se revendiquent comme tels et dont les attaques sont souvent planifiées d’avance. Un scénario typique est celui de la #poursuite_en_voiture des réfugiés sortant ou rentrant à un camp par un groupe d’individus qui les attaquent à coup des pieds et de barres, en visant surtout les parties visibles du corps et le visage, afin d’y provoquer des marques dans un but d’#intimidation.

    Particulièrement alarmant est le fait que les #violences_racistes de la part de #forces_de_l’ordre ont plus que doublé l’année dernière, et notamment à #Lesbos, au port de #Patras et à la frontière gréco-turque terrestre en #Thrace. On dénombre 22 incidents racistes dont les auteurs sont des policiers au lieu de 10 pour 2017, et ce ne sont que les incidents qui ont été dénoncés tandis que plusieurs autres sont sans doute passés sous silence.

    –-> message reçu de Vicky Skoumbi via la mailing-list Migreurop

    #rapport #Grèce #violence #racisme #xénophobie #migrations #asile #réfugiés #Evros #violences_policières #statistiques #chiffres #2018 #homophobie #attaques_racistes

  • Migrants: over 5,000 apprehended in Turkey in 7 days

    Turkish authorities have apprehended over the past week a total of 5,371 migrants and refugees who were trying to illegally cross the borders with the European Union or to enter the country, the Turkish interior ministry has said. They included 389 who were intercepted at sea, it said.

    The ministry also said that 136 suspected human traffickers were arrested.

    Since a deal between the EU and Turkey two years ago, the number of migrants and refugees reaching EU countries, mainly Greece, from Turkey has sharply declined by a few thousands for a daily average of just a few dozens. (ANSAmed).

    http://www.ansamed.info/ansamed/en/news/sections/generalnews/2018/03/12/migrants-over-5000-apprehended-in-turkey-in-7-days_b658086f-7528-453c-9653
    #arrivées #statistiques #chiffres #accord_UE-Turquie #Turquie #Grèce

    cc @isskein @i_s_

  • 1,700 years ago, the mismanagement of a migrant crisis cost Rome its empire

    On Aug. 3, 378, a battle was fought in Adrianople, in what was then Thrace and is now the province of Edirne, in Turkey. It was a battle that Saint Ambrose referred to as “the end of all humanity, the end of the world.”

    http://qz.com/677380/1700-years-ago-the-mismanagement-of-a-migrant-crisis-cost-rome-its-empire/?platform=hootsuite
    #histoire #migrations #Empire_romain (fin de-) #Turquie #Grèce #Thrace
    cc @albertocampiphoto @reka

    • La lecture réactionnaire de la fin de l’Empire romain sous les coups des invasions barbares a le vent en poupe. D’ailleurs, il y a 2 mois, les magazines avaient quasiment tous leur une barrées d’un gros titres : BARBARES avec une simultanéité touchante.

      On peut rappeler utilement que la partie orientale de l’Empire a survécu plus de 1000 ans à cette défaite d’#Andrinople, l’Occident un tout petit peu moins de 100 ans.

      Sur les #Barbares, je renvoie au livre de Barbero déjà pointé ici http://seenthis.net/messages/133660#message134070 mais à l’occasion d’un autre thème…

      Dans les causes, on peut d’ailleurs rajouter
      • la discorde sociale (les Bagaudes) provoquées par l’enrichissement sans frein de l’oligarchie
      • le conflit religieux (on pourrait dire la version antique de la « laïcité » :-D) puisque les Barbares n’ont pas été christianisés dans la « bonne » version (arianisme) d’où l’abondante littérature eschatologique de l’époque…

  • La #charia appliquée en #Grèce

    Il existe au sein de l’Union européenne un territoire où la charia est officiellement reconnue et appliquée. C’est en Grèce, précisément en #Thrace_occidentale, à la frontière gréco-turque, que les citoyens grecs musulmans peuvent faire appel aux muftis et à la #loi_islamique pour régler leurs affaires familiales et personnelles tout en restant en conformité avec le droit grec.


    http://orientxxi.info/lu-vu-entendu/la-charia-appliquee-en-grece,0643
    #religion #droit_religieux