• Judge adjourns Fakhoury questioning | News , Lebanon News | THE DAILY STAR
    http://www.dailystar.com.lb//News/Lebanon-News/2019/Sep-17/491752-military-judge-begins-questioning-fakhoury.ashx

    Local media reported that a delegation from the U.S. Embassy that included an American lawyer was prevented from going into court. Fakhoury holds the American passport.

    Despite having been sentenced to 15 years in jail and having several arrest warrants against him, Fakhoury was allowed to leave Beirut’s airport freely after arriving earlier this month, drawing criticism from many.

    A former military leader in the South Lebanon Army, an Israeli proxy militia, Fakhoury left Lebanon for Israel in 2000, and later traveled to the U.S.

    Between 1985 and 2000, more than 5,000 people passed through the Khiam detention center, run by Fakhoury, where they suffered #torture and other forms of mistreatment.

    At least 10 people died. The 144 people who remained in detention when Israeli forces withdrew from south Lebanon in May 2000 were freed by residents of Khiam who stormed the prison.

    A judicial source had told The Daily Star that the sentence and warrants against Fakhoury had been rendered invalid “due to the passage of more than 20 years.”

    « Un pays ouvert à tous les vents » avait dit un jour René Nabaa en parlant du #Liban.
    #collabo #criminel

  • Why is the 9/11 Mastermind Still Awaiting Trial? | The American Conservative
    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/why-the-9-11-mastermind-is-still-awaiting-trial

    The reason why KSM and his four cohorts have not gone to trial yet is because there is a dispute over whether their confessions are admissible because they were gleaned through torture sessions in #CIA prisons. By law the any evidence obtained under these conditions is inadmissible. Defense lawyers in this case, as well in the other major case at Camp Justice—the 2000 USS Cole bombing—have been able to hold up the progress of both cases on this basis. If for some reason these men are convicted, and they get the death penalty, their lawyers were use torture to prolong that process too.

    #torture

  • Scars and trauma run deep for Eritrean refugees

    It’s been one year since I first started getting messages from refugees locked up in Libyan detention centres. Using hidden phones, they risked brutal retaliation to send information about the horrors they were experiencing, and how the European Union is directly implicated. They hoped some good would come from this being exposed to the world, but little has changed since.

    Libya, a war-torn country in North Africa, was once a key transit state for people trying to reach Europe. Since 2017, tens of thousands of refugees and migrants have been returned there from the Mediterranean Sea and locked up indefinitely. Most were intercepted by the EU-supported Libyan coast guard, under a deal aimed at stopping migration to Europe.

    In detention, they face disease, sickness, forced labour and sexual violence. Tuberculosis is common. Medical care, food and water are lacking. Hundreds of children and minors are among the incarcerated, left without an education. Couples are separated. In one detention centre, at least 22 people died in eight months.

    A small number manage to escape.

    One of the first people to contact me from a Libyan detention centre was Yosi. He was being held with hundreds of others in Ain Zara, south Tripoli, when conflict broke out in August 2018. Buildings smoked around them, while fighters patrolled with anti-aircraft guns outside.

    In April this year, war in Tripoli erupted again. A week into it, one of Yosi’s close friends, a 17 year old called Meron, died after throwing himself into a septic tank behind their detention centre. Meron was traumatised and depressed from all that he had experienced. “Today I hated living in this shameful world,” Yosi told me. “I lost my friend, brother, my everything . . . Meron was a good boy.”
    Evacuated to Italy

    In May, Yosi was evacuated to Italy by the United Nations Refugee Agency – one of a lucky few. He received little help from Italian authorities, and decided to travel on to Luxembourg, after seeing fellow Eritreans sleeping on the streets and worrying that would be his future.

    Last month, I finally met him in person.

    On my first day in Luxembourg, we talked for more than 10 hours. We walked around the city, through the caving park and by the ancient castles. We went back to the reception centre where he shared close quarters with dozens of other asylum seekers, all waiting for decisions on their cases.

    The whole time we were discussing Libya and everything he has gone through. Yosi was tortured by smugglers and abused by Libyan guards. He has many scars: physical and mental.

    Yosi doesn’t like being in cars anymore or any small spaces, because it reminds him of being locked up. He jumps at the sound of a slamming door or a dog barking.

    A few days before we met there were fireworks, part of some festival. Yosi ran outside, believing the sound was heavy weapons. He wanted to know how far off the missile was.

    Eritreans who flee towards Europe, like Yosi, are often underage. They escape before they are forced to begin a programme of indefinite, mandatory military service, which has been likened to slavery by the United Nations.
    Ageing test

    Though the UN Refugee Agency interviewed Yosi in Libya and gave him papers saying he was 16 years old, Luxembourg’s authorities accuses him of lying. They ordered a medical test designed to measure physical growth, which has been criticised as inaccurate by activists and aid workers. Afterwards, officials told Yosi he is 25.

    “What’s at stake is big here: minors benefit from a much bigger protection,” Ambre Schulz told me last week. Schulz works at Passerell, an organisation that gives legal help to refugees and migrants in Luxembourg, including Yosi.

    Shortly after my visit, Yosi was moved back to another detention centre, a crushing blow in the country he hoped to make his home. He may be deported back to Italy, where he was first fingerprinted. He’s hoping his case can be reconsidered.

    Yosi’s age isn’t the only part of his story that has been questioned. He’s realising most Europeans have no idea of the gross human rights abuses being used to solidify EU borders. After he was taken to hospital in Luxembourg with an ankle injury, from playing football, he told one of the medical staff he has a problem remembering instructions because of the trauma in his past.

    He spoke of detention centres in Libya, of #torture and #violence. He said she didn’t believe him. “She was confused,” he said. “She said like [/laughing/], is it a movie?”

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/europe/scars-and-trauma-run-deep-for-eritrean-refugees-1.4004285
    #réfugiés_érythréens #trauma #santé_mentale #traumatisme #réfugiés #asile #migrations

  • #Et_pourtant_elles_dansent

    Marie-Noëlle, Denise, Asyath, Odile, Lizana, Emi­na ou encore Augustine et d’autres, toutes femmes réfugiées en France, se retrouvent à l’association Femmes en Luth à Valence et se sont confiées sur les raisons qui les ont contraintes à quitter leurs pays, souvent pour leur survie, laissant parfois leurs proches et leurs biens derrière elles. Portant le poids d’une culpabilité qui ne les quittera pas, elles évoquent les violences subies, les tortures au tra­vers de leurs témoignages, affichent leur courage et transmettent malgré tout un message de paix. Elles chantent, dansent, peignent et sourient ! Présent dans l’association, Vincent Djinda les a accompa­gnées durant une année.


    https://www.desrondsdanslo.com/EtPourtantEllesDansent.html
    #BD #livre #asile #migrations #réfugiés #procédure_d'asile #France #déqualification #femmes #déracinement #Tchétchénie #viols #viol_comme_arme_de_guerre #torture #violences_domestiques #violences_conjugales #prostitution #Valence #Femmes_en_Luth #guerre #témoignage #audition #récit #preuves #torture

  • Ethiopians Abused on Gulf Migration Route

    Ethiopians undertaking the perilous journey by boat across the Red Sea or Gulf of Aden face exploitation and torture in Yemen by a network of trafficking groups, Human Rights Watch said today. They also encounter abusive prison conditions in Saudi Arabia before being summarily forcibly deported back to Addis Ababa. Authorities in Ethiopia, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia have taken few if any measures to curb the violence migrants face, to put in place asylum procedures, or to check abuses perpetrated by their own security forces.


    A combination of factors, including unemployment and other economic difficulties, drought, and human rights abuses have driven hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians to migrate over the past decade, traveling by boat over the Red Sea and then by land through Yemen to Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia and neighboring Gulf states are favored destinations because of the availability of employment. Most travel irregularly and do not have legal status once they reach Saudi Arabia.

    “Many Ethiopians who hoped for a better life in Saudi Arabia face unspeakable dangers along the journey, including death at sea, torture, and all manners of abuses,” said Felix Horne, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The Ethiopian government, with the support of its international partners, should support people who arrive back in Ethiopia with nothing but the clothes on their back and nowhere to turn for help.”

    Human Rights Watch interviewed 12 Ethiopians in Addis Ababa who had been deported from Saudi Arabia between December 2018 and May 2019. Human Rights Watch also interviewed humanitarian workers and diplomats working on Ethiopia migration-related issues.

    The International Organization for Migration (IOM) estimates as many as 500,000 Ethiopians were in Saudi Arabia when the Saudi government began a deportation campaign in November 2017. The Saudi authorities have arrested, prosecuted, or deported foreigners who violate labor or residency laws or those who crossed the border irregularly. About 260,000 Ethiopians, an average of 10,000 per month, were deported from Saudi Arabia to Ethiopia between May 2017 and March 2019, according to the IOM, and deportations have continued.

    An August 2 Twitter update by Saudi Arabia’s Interior Ministry said that police had arrested 3.6 million people, including 2.8 million for violations of residency rules, 557,000 for labor law violations, and 237,000 for border violations. In addition, authorities detained 61,125 people for crossing the border into Saudi Arabia illegally, 51 percent of them Ethiopians, and referred more than 895,000 people for deportation. Apart from illegal border crossing, these figures are not disaggregated by nationality.

    Eleven of the 12 people interviewed who had been deported had engaged with smuggling and trafficking networks that are regionally linked across Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia’s semi-autonomous Puntland state, the self-declared autonomous state of Somaliland, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. Traffickers outside of Ethiopia, particularly in Yemen, often used violence or threats to extort ransom money from migrants’ family members or contacts, those interviewed told Human Rights Watch. The 12th person was working in Saudi Arabia legally but was deported after trying to help his sister when she arrived illegally.

    Those interviewed described life-threatening journeys as long as 24 hours across the Gulf of Aden or the Red Sea to reach Yemen, in most cases in overcrowded boats, with no food or water, and prevented from moving around by armed smugglers.

    “There were 180 people on the boat, but 25 died,” one man said. “The boat was in trouble and the waves were hitting it. It was overloaded and about to sink so the dallalas [an adaptation of the Arabic word for “middleman” or “broker”] picked some out and threw them into the sea, around 25.”

    Interviewees said they were met and captured by traffickers upon arrival in Yemen. Five said the traffickers physically assaulted them to extort payments from family members or contacts in Ethiopia or Somalia. While camps where migrants were held capture were run by Yemenis, Ethiopians often carried out the abuse. In many cases, relatives said they sold assets such as homes or land to obtain the ransom money.

    After paying the traffickers or escaping, the migrants eventually made their way north to the Saudi-Yemen border, crossing in rural, mountainous areas. Interviewees said Saudi border guards fired at them, killing and injuring others crossing at the same time, and that they saw dead bodies along the crossing routes. Human Rights Watch has previously documented Saudi border guards shooting and killing migrants crossing the border.

    “At the border there are many bodies rotting, decomposing,” a 26-year-old man said: “It is like a graveyard.”

    Six interviewees said they were apprehended by Saudi border police, while five successfully crossed the border but were later arrested. They described abusive prison conditions in several facilities in southern Saudi Arabia, including inadequate food, toilet facilities, and medical care; lack of sanitation; overcrowding; and beatings by guards.

    Planes returning people deported from Saudi Arabia typically arrive in Addis Ababa either at the domestic terminal or the cargo terminal of Bole International Airport. Several humanitarian groups conduct an initial screening to identify the most vulnerable cases, with the rest left to their own devices. Aid workers in Ethiopia said that deportees often arrive with no belongings and no money for food, transportation, or shelter. Upon arrival, they are offered little assistance to help them deal with injuries or psychological trauma, or to support transportation to their home communities, in some cases hundreds of kilometers from Addis Ababa.

    Human Rights Watch learned that much of the migration funding from Ethiopia’s development partners is specifically earmarked to manage migration along the routes from the Horn of Africa to Europe and to assist Ethiopians being returned from Europe, with very little left to support returnees from Saudi Arabia.

    “Saudi Arabia has summarily returned hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians to Addis Ababa who have little to show for their journey except debts and trauma,” Horne said. “Saudi Arabia should protect migrants on its territory and under its control from traffickers, ensure there is no collusion between its agents and these criminals, and provide them with the opportunity to legally challenge their detention and deportation.”

    All interviews were conducted in Amharic, Tigrayan, or Afan Oromo with translation into English. The interviewees were from the four regions of SNNPR (Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Region), Oromia, Amhara, and Tigray. These regions have historically produced the bulk of Ethiopians migrating abroad. To protect interviewees from possible reprisals, pseudonyms are being used in place of their real names. Human Rights Watch wrote to the Ethiopian and Saudi governments seeking comment on abuses described by Ethiopian migrants along the Gulf migration route, but at the time of writing neither had responded.

    Dangerous Boat Journey

    Most of the 11 people interviewed who entered Saudi Arabia without documents described life-threatening boat journeys across the Red Sea from Djibouti, Somaliland, or Puntland to Yemen. They described severely overcrowded boats, beatings, and inadequate food or water on journeys that ranged from 4 to 24 hours. These problems were compounded by dangerous weather conditions or encounters with Saudi/Emirati-led coalition naval vessels patrolling the Yemeni coast.

    “Berhanu” said that Somali smugglers beat people on his boat crossing from Puntland: “They have a setup they use where they place people in spots by weight to keep the boat balanced. If you moved, they beat you.” He said that his trip was lengthened when smugglers were forced to turn the boat around after spotting a light from a naval vessel along the Yemeni coast and wait several hours for it to pass.

    Since March 26, 2015, Saudi Arabia has led a coalition of countries in a military campaign against the Houthi armed group in Yemen. As part of its campaign the Saudi/Emirati-led coalition has imposed a naval blockade on Houthi-controlled Yemeni ports, purportedly to prevent Houthi rebels from importing weapons by sea, but which has also restricted the flow of food, fuel, and medicine to civilians in the country, and included attacks on civilians at sea. Human Rights Watch previously documented a helicopter attack in March 2017 by coalition forces on a boat carrying Somali migrants and refugees returning from Yemen, killing at least 32 of the 145 Somali migrants and refugees on board and one Yemeni civilian.

    Exploitation and Abuses in Yemen

    Once in war-torn Yemen, Ethiopian migrants said they faced kidnappings, beatings, and other abuses by traffickers trying to extort ransom money from them or their family members back home.

    This is not new. Human Rights Watch, in a 2014 report, documented abuses, including torture, of migrants in detention camps in Yemen run by traffickers attempting to extort payments. In 2018, Human Rights Watch documented how Yemeni guards tortured and raped Ethiopian and other Horn of Africa migrants at a detention center in Aden and worked in collaboration with smugglers to send them back to their countries of origin. Recent interviews by Human Rights Watch indicate that the war in Yemen has not significantly affected the abuses against Ethiopians migrating through Yemen to Saudi Arabia. If anything, the conflict, which escalated in 2015, has made the journey more dangerous for migrants who cross into an area of active fighting.

    Seven of the 11 irregular migrants interviewed said they faced detention and extortion by traffickers in Yemen. This occurred in many cases as soon as they reached shore, as smugglers on boats coordinated with the Yemeni traffickers. Migrants said that Yemeni smuggling and trafficking groups always included Ethiopians, often one from each of Oromo, Tigrayan, and Amhara ethnic groups, who generally were responsible for beating and torturing migrants to extort payments. Migrants were generally held in camps for days or weeks until they could provide ransom money, or escape. Ransom payments were usually made by bank transfers from relatives and contacts back in Ethiopia.

    “Abebe” described his experience:

    When we landed… [the traffickers] took us to a place off the road with a tent. Everyone there was armed with guns and they threw us around like garbage. The traffickers were one Yemeni and three Ethiopians – one Tigrayan, one Amhara, and one Oromo…. They started to beat us after we refused to pay, then we had to call our families…. My sister [in Ethiopia] has a house, and the traffickers called her, and they fired a bullet near me that she could hear. They sold the house and sent the money [40,000 Birr, US $1,396].

    “Tesfalem”, said that he was beaten by Yemenis and Ethiopians at a camp he believes was near the port city of Aden:

    They demanded money, but I said I don’t have any. They told me to make a call, but I said I don’t have relatives. They beat me and hung me on the wall by one hand while standing on a chair, then they kicked the chair away and I was swinging by my arm. They beat me on my head with a stick and it was swollen and bled.

    He escaped after three months, was detained in another camp for three months more, and finally escaped again.

    “Biniam” said the men would take turns beating the captured migrants: “The [Ethiopian] who speaks your language beats you, those doing the beating were all Ethiopians. We didn’t think of fighting back against them because we were so tired, and they would kill you if you tried.”

    Two people said that when they landed, the traffickers offered them the opportunity to pay immediately to travel by car to the Saudi border, thereby avoiding the detention camps. One of them, “Getachew,” said that he paid 1,500 Birr (US $52) for the car and escaped mistreatment.

    Others avoided capture when they landed, but then faced the difficult 500 kilometer journey on foot with few resources while trying to avoid capture.

    Dangers faced by Yemeni migrants traveling north were compounded for those who ran into areas of active fighting between Houthi forces and groups aligned with the Saudi/Emirati-led coalition. Two migrants said that their journey was delayed, one by a week, the other by two months, to avoid conflict areas.

    Migrants had no recourse to local authorities and did not report abuses or seek assistance from them. Forces aligned with the Yemeni government and the Houthis have also detained migrants in poor conditions, refused access to protection and asylum procedures, deported migrants en masse in dangerous conditions, and exposed them to abuse. In April 2018, Human Rights Watch reported that Yemeni government officials had tortured, raped, and executed migrants and asylum seekers from the Horn of Africa in a detention center in the southern port city of Aden. The detention center was later shut down.

    The International Organization for Migration (IOM) announced in May that it had initiated a program of voluntary humanitarian returns for irregular Ethiopian migrants held by Yemeni authorities at detention sites in southern Yemen. IOM said that about 5,000 migrants at three sites were held in “unsustainable conditions,” and that the flights from Aden to Ethiopia had stalled because the Saudi/Emirati-led coalition had failed to provide the flights the necessary clearances. The coalition controls Yemen’s airspace.

    Crossing the Border; Abusive Detention inside Saudi Arabia

    Migrants faced new challenges attempting to cross the Saudi-Yemen border. The people interviewed said that the crossing points used by smugglers are in rural, mountainous areas where the border separates Yemen’s Saada Governorate and Saudi Arabia’s Jizan Province. Two said that smugglers separated Ethiopians by their ethnic group and assigned different groups to cross at different border points.

    Ethiopian migrants interviewed were not all able to identify the locations where they crossed. Most indicated points near the Yemeni mountain villages Souq al-Ragu and ‘Izlat Al Thabit, which they called Ragu and Al Thabit. Saudi-aligned media have regularly characterized Souq al-Ragu as a dangerous town from which drug smugglers and irregular migrants cross into Saudi Arabia.

    Migrants recounted pressures to pay for the crossing by smuggling drugs into Saudi Arabia. “Abdi” said he stayed in Souq al-Ragu for 15 days and finally agreed to carry across a 25 kilogram sack of khat in exchange for 500 Saudi Riyals (US$133). Khat is a mild stimulant grown in the Ethiopian highlands and Yemen; it is popular among Yemenis and Saudis, but illegal in Saudi Arabia.

    “Badessa” described Souq al-Ragu as “the crime city:”

    You don’t know who is a trafficker, who is a drug person, but everybody has an angle of some sort. Even Yemenis are afraid of the place, it is run by Ethiopians. It is also a burial place; bodies are gathered of people who had been shot along the border and then they’re buried there. There is no police presence.

    Four of the eleven migrants who crossed the border on foot said Saudi border guards shot at them during their crossings, sometimes after ordering them to stop and other times without warning. Some said they encountered dead bodies along the way. Six said they were apprehended by Saudi border guards or drug police at the border, while five were arrested later.

    “Abebe” said that Saudi border guards shot at his group as they crossed from Izlat Al Thabit:

    They fired bullets, and everyone scattered. People fleeing were shot, my friend was shot in the leg…. One person was shot in the chest and killed and [the Saudi border guards] made us carry him to a place where there was a big excavator. They didn’t let us bury him; the excavator dug a hole and they buried him.

    Berhanu described the scene in the border area: “There were many dead people at the border. You could walk on the corpses. No one comes to bury them.”

    Getachew added: “It is like a graveyard. There are no dogs or hyenas there to eat the bodies, just dead bodies everywhere.”

    Two of the five interviewees who crossed the border without being detained said that Saudi and Ethiopian smugglers and traffickers took them to informal detention camps in southern Saudi towns and held them for ransom. “Yonas” said they took him and 14 others to a camp in the Fayfa area of Jizan Province: “They beat me daily until I called my family. They wanted 10,000 Birr ($349). My father sold his farmland and sent the 10,000 Birr, but then they told me this isn’t enough, we need 20,000 ($698). I had nothing left and decided to escape or die.” He escaped.

    Following their capture, the migrants described abusive conditions in Saudi governmental detention centers and prisons, including overcrowding and inadequate food, water, and medical care. Migrants also described beatings by Saudi guards.

    Nine migrants who were captured while crossing the border illegally or living in Saudi Arabia without documentation spent up to five months in detention before authorities deported them back to Ethiopia. The three others were convicted of criminal offenses that included human trafficking and drug smuggling, resulting in longer periods in detention before being deported.

    The migrants identified about 10 prisons and detention centers where they were held for various periods. The most frequently cited were a center near the town of al-Dayer in Jizan Province along the border, Jizan Central Prison in Jizan city, and the Shmeisi Detention Center east of Jeddah, where migrants are processed for deportation.

    Al-Dayer had the worst conditions, they said, citing overcrowding, inadequate sanitation, food and water, and medical care. Yonas said:

    They tied our feet with chains and they beat us while chained, sometimes you can’t get to the food because you are chained. If you get chained by the toilet it will overflow and flow under you. If you are aggressive you get chained by the toilet. If you are good [behave well], they chain you to another person and you can move around.

    Abraham had a similar description:

    The people there beat us. Ethnic groups [from Ethiopia] fought with each other. The toilet was overflowing. It was like a graveyard and not a place to live. Urine was everywhere and people were defecating. The smell was terrible.

    Other migrants described similarly bad conditions in Jizan Central Prison. “Ibrahim” said that he was a legal migrant working in Saudi Arabia, but that he travelled to Jizan to help his sister, whom Saudi authorities had detained after she crossed from Yemen illegally. Once in Jizan, authorities suspected him of human trafficking and arrested him, put him on trial, and sentenced him to two years in prison, a sentenced he partially served in Jizan Central Prison:

    Jizan prison is so very tough…. You can be sleeping with [beside] someone who has tuberculosis, and if you ask an official to move you, they don’t care. They will beat you. You can’t change clothes, you have one set and that is it, sometimes the guards will illegally bring clothes and sell to you at night.

    He also complained of overcrowding: “When you want to sleep you tell people and they all jostle to make some room, then you sleep for a bit but you wake up because everyone is jostling against each other.”

    Most of the migrants said food was inadequate. Yonas described the situation in al-Dayer: “When they gave food 10 people would gather and fight over it. If you don’t have energy you won’t eat. The fight is over rice and bread.”

    Detainees also said medical care was inadequate and that detainees with symptoms of tuberculosis (such as cough, fever, night sweats, or weight loss) were not isolated from other prisoners. Human Rights Watch interviewed three former detainees who were being treated for tuberculosis after being deported, two of whom said they were held with other detainees despite having symptoms of active tuberculosis.

    Detainees described being beaten by Saudi prison guards when they requested medical care. Abdi said:

    I was beaten once with a stick in Jizan that was like a piece of rebar covered in plastic. I was sick in prison and I used to vomit. They said, ‘why do you do that when people are eating?’ and then they beat me harshly and I told him [the guard], ‘Please kill me.’ He eventually stopped.

    Ibrahim said he was also beaten when he requested medical care for tuberculosis:

    [Prison guards] have a rule that you aren’t supposed to knock on the door [and disturb the guards]. When I got sick in the first six months and asked to go to the clinic, they just beat me with electric wires on the bottom of my feet. I kept asking so they kept beating.

    Detainees said that the other primary impetus for beatings by guards was fighting between different ethnic groups of Ethiopians in detention, largely between ethnic Oromos, Amharas, and Tigrayans. Ethnic tensions are increasingly common back in Ethiopia.

    Detainees said that conditions generally improved once they were transferred to Shmeisi Detention Center, near Jeddah, where they stayed only a few days before receiving temporary travel documents from Ethiopian consular authorities and deported to Ethiopia. The migrants charged with and convicted of crimes had no opportunity to consult legal counsel.

    None of the migrants said they were given the opportunity to legally challenge their deportations, and Saudi Arabia has not established an asylum system under which migrants could apply for protection from deportation where there was a risk of persecution if they were sent back. Saudi Arabia is not a party to the 1951 Refugee Convention.

    Deportation and Future Prospects

    Humanitarian workers and diplomats told Human Rights Watch that since the beginning of Saudi Arabia’s deportation campaign, large numbers of Ethiopian deportees have been transported via special flights by Saudia Airlines to Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa and unloaded in a cargo area away from the main international terminal or at the domestic terminal. When Human Rights Watch visited in May, it appeared that the Saudi flights were suspended during the month of Ramadan, during which strict sunrise-to-sunset fasting is observed by Muslims. All interviewees who were deported in May said they had returned on regular Ethiopian Airlines commercial flights and disembarked at the main terminal with other passengers.

    All of those deported said that they returned to Ethiopia with nothing but the clothes they were wearing, and that Saudi authorities had confiscated their mobile phones and in some cases shoes and belts. “After staying in Jeddah … they had us make a line and take off our shoes,” Abraham said. “Anything that could tie like a belt we had to leave, they wouldn’t let us take it. We were barefoot when we went to the airport.”

    Deportees often have critical needs for assistance, including medical care, some for gunshot wounds. One returnee recovering from tuberculosis said that he did not have enough money to buy food and was going hungry. Abdi said that when he left for Saudi Arabia he weighed 64 kilograms but returned weighing only 47 or 48 kilograms.

    Aid workers and diplomats familiar with migration issues in Ethiopia said that very little international assistance is earmarked for helping deportees from Saudi Arabia for medical care and shelter or money to return and reintegrate in their home villages.

    Over 8 million people are in need of food assistance in Ethiopia, a country of over 100 million. It hosts over 920,000 refugees from neighboring countries and violence along ethnic lines produced over 2.4 internally displaced people in 2018, many of whom have now been returned.

    The IOM registers migrants upon arrival in Ethiopia and to facilitate their return from Saudi Arabia. Several hours after their arrival and once registered, they leave the airport and must fend for themselves. Some said they had never been to Addis before.

    In 2013 and 2014, Saudi Arabia conducted an expulsion campaign similar to the one that began in November 2017. The earlier campaign expelled about 163,000 Ethiopians, according to the IOM. A 2015 Human Rights Watch report found that migrants experienced serious abuses during detention and deportation, including attacks by security forces and private citizens in Saudi Arabia, and inadequate and abusive detention conditions. Human Rights Watch has also previously documented mistreatment of Ethiopian migrants by traffickers and government detention centers in Yemen.

    Aid workers and diplomats said that inadequate funding to assist returning migrants is as a result of several factors, including a focus of many of the European funders on stemming migration to and facilitating returns from Europe, along with competing priorities and the low visibility of the issue compared with migration to Europe.

    During previous mass returns from Saudi Arabia, there was more funding for reintegration and more international media attention in part because there was such a large influx in a short time, aid workers said.

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/08/15/ethiopians-abused-gulf-migration-route
    #migrations #asile #violence #réfugiés #réfugiés_éthiopiens #Ethiopie #pays_du_Golfe #route_du_Golfe #mer_Rouge #Golfe_d'Aden #Yémen #Arabie_Saoudite #frontières #violent_borders #torture #trafic_d'êtres_humains #exploitation #routes_migratoires

    signalé par @isskein

  • HumanRights360 | The Mistreatment of Asylum Seekers in Greece
    https://asile.ch/2019/08/26/humanrights360-the-mistreatment-of-asylum-seekers-in-greece

    Douze organisations de la société civile dénoncent dans un rapport récent des très graves violations de droits des demandeurs d’asile en Grèce. Les violations de droits de réfugiés peuvent aller jusqu’aux traitements cruels voire à la torture. Les violences sont particulièrement alarmantes vis-à-vis des femmes. La situation désespérante dans laquelle se trouvent les réfugiés en […]

  • L’#ONU cède à la polémique et délocalise d’#Egypte sa conférence sur la #torture | Africanews
    https://fr.africanews.com/2019/08/20/l-onu-cede-a-la-polemique-et-delocalise-d-egypte-sa-conference-sur-la

    Le constat des défenseurs égyptiens des #droits de l’homme est clair : il est scandaleux pour l’ONU d’organiser une conférence contre la torture dans un pays où cette pratique est monnaie courante. Le faisant, cela serait « blanchir à la chaux » les exactions du gouvernement égyptien, arguent-ils.

  • Eritrea in caduta libera sui diritti umani

    L’Eritrea di #Isaias_Afewerki è oggi uno dei peggiori regimi al mondo. Dove la guerra con l’Etiopia è usata per giustificare un servizio militare a tempo indeterminato. E dove avere un passaporto è quasi un miraggio. Gli ultimi attacchi sono stati rivolti agli ospedali cattolici.

    Il rispetto dei diritti umani in Eritrea è solo un ricordo che si perde nei tempi. La lista di violazioni è lunga e gli esempi recenti non mancano. L’ultima mossa del regime di Isaias Afewerki, al potere dal 1991, è stata quella di ordinare la chiusura dei centri sanitari gestiti dalla Chiesa cattolica nel paese, responsabile di una quarantina tra ospedali e scuole in zone rurali che garantiscono sanità e istruzione alle fette più povere della popolazione. Ebbene, qualche giorno fa in questi luoghi si sono presentati militari armati che hanno sfondato porte e cacciato fuori malati, vecchi e bambini. E preteso l’esproprio coatto degli immobili.

    Il 29 aprile, quattro vescovi avevano chiesto di aprire un dialogo con il governo per cercare una soluzione alla crescente povertà e mancanza di futuro per il popolo. Mentre il 13 giugno sono stati arrestati cinque preti ortodossi ultrasettantenni.

    Daniela Kravetz, responsabile dei rapporti tra Nazioni Unite e Africa, ha riportato che il 17 maggio «trenta cristiani sono stati arrestati durante un incontro di preghiera, mentre qualche giorno prima erano finiti in cella 141 fedeli, tra cui donne e bambini». L’Onu chiede ora che «con urgenza il Governo eritreo torni a permettere la libera scelta di espressione religiosa».

    Guerra Eritrea-Etiopia usata come scusa per il servizio militare a tempo indeterminato

    L’ex colonia italiana ha ottenuto di fatto l’indipendenza dall’Etiopia nel 1991, dopo un conflitto durato trent’anni. E nonostante la recente distensione tra Asmara e Addis Abeba, la guerra tra le due nazioni continua a singhiozzo lungo i confini.

    Sono ancora i rapporti con la vicina Etiopia, del resto, ad essere usati dal dittatore Afewerki per giustificare l’imposizione del servizio militare a tempo indeterminato. I ragazzi, infatti, sono arruolati verso i 17 anni e il servizio militare può durare anche trent’anni, con paghe miserabili e strazianti separazioni. Le famiglie si vedono portare via i figli maschi senza conoscerne la destinazione e i ragazzi spesso non tornano più.

    Le città sono prevalentemente abitate da donne, anziani e bambini. E per chi si oppone le alternative sono la prigione, se non la tortura. Uno dei sistemi più usati dai carcerieri è la cosiddetta Pratica del Gesù, che consiste nell’appendere chi si rifiuta di collaborare, con corde legate ai polsi, a due tronchi d’albero, in modo che il corpo assuma la forma di una croce. A volte restano appesi per giorni, con le guardie che di tanto in tanto inumidiscono le labbra con l’acqua.

    Eritrea: storia di un popolo a cui è vietato viaggiare

    l passaporto, che solo i più cari amici del regime ottengono una volta raggiunta la maggiore età, per la popolazione normale è un miraggio. Il prezioso documento viene consegnato alle donne quando compiono 40 anni e agli uomini all’alba dei 50. A quell’età si spera che ormai siano passate forza e voglia di lasciare il paese.

    Oggi l’Eritrea è un inferno dove tutti spiano tuttti. Un paese sospettoso e nemico d chiunque, diventato sotto la guida di Afewerki uno dei regimi più totalitari al mondo, dove anche parlare al telefono è rischioso.

    E pensare che negli anni ’90, quando l’Eritrea si separò dall’Etiopia, era vista come la speranza dell’Africa. Un paese attivo, pieno di potenziale, che si era liberato da solo senza chiedere aiuto a nessuno. Il mondo si aspettava che diventasse la Taiwan del Corno d’Africa, grazie anche a una cultura economica che gli altri stati se la sognavano.

    L’Ue investe in Etiopia ed Eritrea

    L’Unione europea sta per erogare 312 milioni di euro di aiuti al Corno d’Africa per la costruzione di infrastrutture che consentiranno di far transitare merci dall’Etiopia al mare, attraversando quindi l’Eritrea. Una decisione su cui ha preso posizione Reportes sans frontières, che chiede la sospensione di questo finanziamento ad un paese che, si legge in una nota, «continua a violare i diritti umani, la libertà di espressione e e di informazione e detiene arbitrariamente, spesso senza sottoporli ad alcun processo, decine di prigionieri politici, tra cui molti giornalisti».

    Cléa Kahn-Sriber, responsabile di Reporter sans frontières in Africa, ha dichiarato essere «sbalorditivo che l’Unione europea sostenga il regime di Afeweki con tutti questi aiuti senza chiedere nulla in cambio in materia di diritti umani e libertà d’espressione. Il regime ha più giornalisti in carcere di qualsiasi altro paese africano. Le condizioni dei diritti umani sono assolutamente vergognose».

    La Fondazione di difesa dei Diritti umani per l’Eritrea con sede in Olanda e composta da eritrei esiliati sta intraprendendo azioni legali contro l’Unione europea. Secondo la ricercatrice universitaria eritrea Makeda Saba, «l’Ue collaborerà e finanzierà la #Red_Sea_Trading_Corporation, interamente gestita e posseduta dal governo, società che il gruppo di monitoraggio dell’Onu su Somalia ed Eritrea definisce coinvolta in attività illegali e grigie nel Corno d’africa, compreso il traffico d’armi, attraverso una rete labirintica multinazionale di società, privati e conti bancari». Un bel pasticcio, insomma.

    Pericoloso lasciare l’Eritrea: il ruolo delle ambasciate

    Chi trova asilo in altre nazioni vive spiato e minacciato dai propri connazionali. Lo ha denunciato Amnesty International, secondo cui le nazioni dove i difensori dei diritti umani eritrei corrono i maggiori rischi sono Kenya, Norvegia, Olanda, Regno Unito, Svezia e Svizzera. Nel mirino del potere eritreo ora c’è anche un prete candidato al Nobel per la pace nel 2015, Mussie Zerai.

    «I rappresentanti del governo eritreo nelle ambasciate impiegano tutte le tattiche per impaurire chi critica l’amministrazione del presidente Afewerki, spiano, minacciano di morte. Chi è scappato viene considerato traditore della patria, sovversivo e terrorista».

    In aprile il ministro dell’Informazione, #Yemane_Gebre_Meskel, e gli ambasciatori di Giappone e Kenia hanno scritto su Twitter post minacciosi contro gli organizzatori e i partecipanti ad una conferenza svoltasi a Londra dal titolo “Costruire la democrazia in Eritrea”. Nel tweet, #Meskel ha definito gli organizzatori «collaborazionisti».

    Non va meglio agli esiliati in Kenya. Nel 2013, a seguito del tentativo di registrare un’organizzazione della società civile chiamata #Diaspora_eritrea_per_l’Africa_orientale, l’ambasciata eritrea ha immediatamente revocato il passaporto del presidente e co-fondatore, #Hussein_Osman_Said, organizzandone l’arresto in Sud Sudan. L’accusa? Partecipare al terrorismo, intento a sabotare il governo in carica.

    Amnesty chiede quindi «che venga immediatamente sospeso l’uso delle ambasciate all’estero per intimidire e reprimere le voci critiche».

    Parlando delle ragioni che hanno scatenato l’ultimo atto di forza contro gli ospedali, padre Zerai ha detto che «il regime si è giustificato facendo riferimento a una legge del 1995, secondo cui le strutture sociali strategiche come ospedali e scuole devono essere gestite dallo stato».

    Tuttavia, questa legge non era mai stata applicata e non si conoscono i motivi per cui all’improvviso è cominciata la repressione. Padre Zerai la vede così: «La Chiesa cattolica eritrea è indipendente e molto attiva nella società, offre supporto alle donne, sostegno ai poveri e ai malati di Aids ed è molto ascoltata». A preoccupare il padre, e non solo lui, sono ora «il silenzio dell’Unione europea e della comunità internzionale. Siamo davati a crimini gravissimi e il mondo tace».

    https://www.osservatoriodiritti.it/2019/07/04/eritrea-news-etiopia-guerra
    #droits_humains #Erythrée #COI #Afewerki #service_militaire #guerre #Ethiopie #religion #passeport #torture #totalitarisme #dictature #externalisation #UE #EU #aide_au_développement #coopération_au_développement #répression #Eglise_catholique

  • La vérité sanglante du goulag syrien
    Anne Barnard, The New-York Times, le 11 mai 2019
    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/saintupery/blog/010619/la-verite-sanglante-du-goulag-syrien

    Pendant sept ans, les journalistes du New York Times ont interviewé des dizaines de survivants des prisons syriennes et de parents des détenus et des disparus. Ils ont analysé les documents officiels du régime et examiné des centaines de pages de témoignages judiciaires ou provenant d’autres sources. Un portrait glaçant de la thanatocratie de Bashar al-Assad et de son univers de terreur.

    Traduction de :

    Inside Syria’s Secret Torture Prisons : How Bashar al-Assad Crushed Dissent
    Anne Barnard, The New-York Times, le 11 mai 2019
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/11/world/middleeast/syria-torture-prisons.html

    #Syrie #Prisons #Torture #Bachar_el-Assad

  • Selon l’#ONU, Julian #Assange présente des symptômes de « #torture #psychologique » - Le Point
    https://www.lepoint.fr/monde/selon-l-onu-julian-assange-presente-des-symptomes-de-torture-psychologique-3

    Le rapporteur de l’ONU sur la torture, qui a rencontré le #lanceur_d'alerte, estime qu’il a été « exposé à des formes graves de peines ou de traitements inhumains ».

    [...]

    En plus de maux physiques [...]

    #whistleblower

  • U.S. War_Crimes in #Afghanistan Won’t Be Investigated — The Spark #1080
    https://the-spark.net/np1080601.html #CPI #crime_de_guerre #violence_sexuelle

    In 2017, the prosecutor for the #International_Criminal_Court (#ICC), Fatou Bensouda, asked to open an investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity in Afghanistan. She said these were carried out by all sides, including the U.S. and the U.S.-backed government.

    She said, “There is reasonable basis to believe that, since May 2003, members of the U.S. armed forces and the #CIA have committed #war_crimes of #torture and #cruel_treatment, outrages upon personal dignity, and rape and other forms of #sexual_violence pursuant to a policy approved by U.S. authorities.” And she submitted more than 20,000 pages of evidence to back up her charges.

    But no surprise – the U.S. blocked this investigation. First, they revoked Bensouda’s visa, effectively kicking her out of the country. Then, in April of this year, the judges at the court rejected her request to investigate. They noted that they have been unable to get the U.S. to cooperate, and said the ICC should “use its resources prioritizing activities that would have a better chance to succeed.”

    Yes, the ICC has a better chance of “success” – but only if its investigations fit the interests of U.S. #imperialism!

  • Colonia Dignidad

    Prügel, Folter und Gesang

    Nach außen fromm, innen ein Alptraum: In der deutschen Enklave „Colonia Dignidad“ in Chile missbrauchte Sektenoberhaupt Paul Schäfer täglich Jungen und ließ Regimegegner verschwinden. Wie konnte sein Horrorreich über Jahrzehnte bestehen? Ein Besuch beim einzigen Täter, der dafür im Gefängnis sitzt

    #Colonia_Dignidad #Villa_Baviera #Chili #Gerhard_Mücke #Paul_Schäfer #prison_secrète #torture #abus #abus_sexuel #enlèvement_d'enfant

    https://correctiv.org/top-stories/2019/04/05/pruegel-folter-und-gesang

  • Schiavi di Riserva

    «In Libia, la schiavitù è stata ripristinata. L’Europa l’ha provocata, l’ha permessa e ne trae beneficio. In caso di necessità, l’UE ha i propri schiavi di riserva appena oltremare».
    Questo è il messaggio consegnatoci da 3 ragazzi africani appena sbarcati in Sicilia, dopo aver attraversato il deserto e il mare e soprattutto dopo essere stati usati come schiavi in Libia. La situazione sul terreno, fuori controllo e gestita da diverse bande armate locali, e la mancanza di un governo riconosciuto creano le condizioni perché la schiavitù sia comunemente accettata, diventando una parte reggente del sistema produttivo libico.
    Tuttavia, qual è il ruolo dell’UE in questo inferno?
    L’Italia ha finanziato le milizie libiche e i centri penitenziari (in realtà colonie di schiavi) con milioni di euro per combattere l’immigrazione.
    L’Italia ha venduto armi all’Arabia Saudita (500 milioni di euro negli ultimi 2 anni), ora finite nelle mani dei gruppi armati africani di Libia, Niger e Mali. L’Italia ha ora dispiegato 500 soldati italiani in Niger per opporsi a queste bande.
    L’Italia ha pagato la più grande tangente della storia (oltre 1 miliardo di euro pagati nel 2011 dall’ENI) agli allora primo ministro nigeriano e ministro del petrolio nigeriano per assicurarsi lo sfruttamento di un’area al largo della Nigeria.
    È un paradigma condiviso? Ci stiamo preparando ad accettare la schiavitù in tutto il mondo?


    https://www.cinemaitaliano.info/schiavidiriserva
    #film #Libye #esclavage_moderne #esclavage #externalisation #migrations #asile #réfugiés #torture #Michelangelo_Severgnini #documentaire

  • #Terrorisme, raison d’État (1/2) | ARTE
    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/064376-000-A/terrorisme-raison-d-etat-1-2

    Avant le 11-Septembre, quelque quatre cents personnes avaient prêté allégeance à #Al-Qaida. Seize ans plus tard, on compte des dizaines de milliers de militants djihadistes répartis sur plusieurs continents. Les attaques terroristes se sont multipliées à travers le monde, entraînant en Occident une tension des relations avec les minorités et les pays musulmans. En violant les valeurs démocratiques qu’elle prétendait défendre, la « guerre contre la terreur » lancée par l’administration Bush au lendemain du 11-Septembre a eu l’effet d’"un coup de marteau dans une fiole de mercure" : elle a fragmenté une menace autrefois circonscrite, et s’est muée en un conflit mondial et permanent, formidable terrain pour le recrutement djihadiste, mais aussi pour les groupes #xénophobes qui montent en puissance, en #Europe comme aux #États-Unis. Tel est le sombre bilan qu’établissent, face au réalisateur Ilan Ziv (#Capitalisme), des dirigeants politiques, des responsables de la sécurité et des généraux américains, britanniques, français et israéliens qui ont vécu les événements de l’intérieur et au plus haut niveau.

    Qu’ils restent fidèles à leurs actes passés, comme le #néoconservateur Richard Perle, ou qu’ils s’avouent hantés par la culpabilité, comme l’ancien bras droit de Colin Powell au secrétariat d’État, Lawrence Wilkerson, ils permettent de comprendre pourquoi cette #guerre qui a ravagé le #Moyen-Orient et causé des centaines de milliers de #morts constitue une impasse dont il est difficile de sortir. Du #mensonge délibéré qui a déclenché l’invasion de l’Irak aux « sites noirs » où les États-Unis ont pratiqué la #torture, Ilan Ziv décrypte les faits à l’aune du présent, pour montrer combien les concepts forgés par une administration pourtant discréditée restent plus que jamais agissants.

  • #Torture dans les centres rétention français : une #impunité d’Etat ?

    Une femme enceinte enfermée à l’#isolement, un homme déshabillé et attaché au sol plusieurs heures, un autre menotté puis tiré de forces aux chevilles et aux poignets jusqu’à lacération : bienvenu dans les centres de rétention français.

    Les récits de « violences » dans des centres de rétention français, rapportés par d’anciens retenus et des membres d’associations, font état de pratiques particulièrement cruelles commises par les officiers de police ou par certains membres de l’administration des centres de rétention administratives (CRA).

    Aux portes de Paris, à #Vincennes, au #Mesnil-Amelot, à #Oissel, à #Toulouse : leur multiplication et leur répartition témoigne d’une tendance qui tend à se systématiser en toute impunité, à l’abri de tout instance judiciaire effective. De la première arrestation jusqu’aux expulsions, la #violence qui se dévoile dans ces récits glaçants (pour la plupart issus de dépôts de plaintes ou de récits récents de retenus) mérite de faire disparaître tout euphémisme : une torture physique et psychologique est actuellement pratiquée à l’encontre des étrangers dans différents centre de rétention en France.

    http://www.regards.fr/societe/article/torture-dans-les-centres-retention-francais-une-impunite-d-etat
    #CRA #rétention #détention_administrative #asile #migrations #réfugiés #migrations #France

  • Pour le #TAF, s’opposer aux talibans n’est pas une #opinion_politique : asile refusé

    Parce qu’il refuse de commettre des violences pour le compte des talibans, « Qassim » est détenu et torturé. Il s’échappe et demande l’asile en Suisse. Son état de santé psychique atteste de son vécu traumatique mais le SEM rejette sa demande. Pour le TAF, le récit de « Qassim » est crédible et le risque de #persécution est vraisemblable, mais ne constitue pas un #motif_d’asile. « Qassim » se voit donc refuser l’asile et obtient une #admission_provisoire.

    https://odae-romand.ch/fiche/pour-le-taf-sopposer-aux-talibans-nest-pas-une-opinion-politique-asile-r
    #réfugiés_afghans #Afghanistan #Suisse #asile #migrations #réfugiés #talibans #torture #vraisemblance #statut_de_réfugié #droit_d'asile

  • Les #Emirats_arabes_unis, apôtres d’une #tolérance à géométrie très variable - Le Temps
    https://www.letemps.ch/monde/emirats-arabes-unis-apotres-dune-tolerance-geometrie-tres-variable

    Dans le domaine politique, les dirigeants émiratis font par exemple preuve d’une #intolérance absolue pour le #pluralisme. Tous les #dissidents du pays croupissent en prison, qu’il s’agisse d’islamistes membres du parti Islah, la déclinaison émiratie du mouvement des Frères musulmans, ou de libéraux partisans de l’instauration d’une monarchie constitutionnelle. La dernière voix libre du pays, celle du défenseur des droits de l’homme Ahmed Mansour, a été bâillonnée en mai 2018 au moyen d’une condamnation à 10 ans de prison.

    Les procès de la plupart de ces opposants, pour « subversion », « atteinte à l’unité nationale » ou encore « propagation de fausses nouvelles », ont été qualifiés de #parodie de #justice par Amnesty International et Human Rights Watch. Dans les #prisons émiraties, la #torture et les mauvais traitements sont fréquents, affirment ces ONG, qui dénoncent aussi de nombreux cas de disparitions forcées.

    Ces pratiques ultra­-répressives, qui se sont intensifiées à partir des Printemps arabes de 2011 – perçus par les #dynasties du #Golfe comme une menace –, s’étendent parfois aux étrangers. En novembre, un jeune thésard britannique, Matthew Hedges, qui menait des recherches sur la politique sécuritaire des EAU, avait été condamné à la prison à vie pour espionnage, avant d’être gracié, quelques jours plus tard, sous la pression de Londres.

    Dans son obsession de contrôler les activités de ses adversaires réels ou supposés, la monarchie a développé un empire de la #cybersurveillance et du piratage informatique, mis en évidence par l’agence Reuters. Un récent article, basé sur les témoignages d’ex-­analystes des services de renseignement américains, débauchés à prix d’or par Abu Dhabi, raconte comment l’émirat a espionné les communications de dissidents, comme Ahmed Mansour, de rivaux régionaux, comme le souverain du Qatar Tamim al­-Thani, et même de journalistes américains.

    L’« islam #modéré » à la mode émiratie est prié de coller à cette ligne politique. Dans ses prêches et ses tweets, le cheikh Wassim Youssef, l’un des prédicateurs les plus en vue du pays, relaie certes le credo anti-­extrémiste des autorités, en critiquant les outrances des salafistes, accusés de dénaturer la foi musulmane. Mais cet imam de la grande mosquée d’Abu Dhabi s’attaque aussi aux libéraux, à l’émir du Qatar et à la Turquie, les deux ennemis intimes des EAU avec l’Iran.

    Le cheikh Youssef n’est d’ailleurs pas exempt de dérapage : en 2015, il avait fustigé la décision de construire un temple pour les « infidèles » hindous, propos qui lui avaient valu une brève mise à pied. L’islam prôné par les autorités n’est donc pas tant éclairé que légitimiste, et l’obéissance prime sur la tolérance.

  • Pourquoi le ‘prince de la torture’ de Bahreïn est toujours bienvenu au Royaume-Uni malgré les appels à son arrestation · Global Voices en Français
    https://fr.globalvoices.org/2019/02/09/232970

    Ce cas flagrant d’impunité a renouvelé la question de savoir si le Royaume-Uni est à la hauteur de ses obligations internationales, résultant en particulier de la Convention de l’ONU contre la Torture et les autres traitements et châtiments cruels, inhumains et dégradants de 1987, qui dispose que les États doivent criminaliser la torture et poursuivre les agents publics des autres pays qui se trouvent présents sur le territoire des dits États”.

    #torture #Bahreïn #impunité

  • #Tortures en Arabie : nouveaux appels à une enquête indépendante | FranceSoir
    http://www.francesoir.fr/actualites-monde/tortures-en-arabie-nouveaux-appels-une-enquete-independante

    Dans un communiqué, Amnesty International, basée à Londres, a dit avoir obtenu de nouveaux rapports concernant dix militants pour les droits humains qui ont été « torturés, victimes de harcèlement sexuel et soumis à d’autres formes de maltraitance » au cours de leur détention.

    « La personne chargée d’interroger une militante lui a fait croire que des membres de sa famille étaient morts pendant un mois entier », tandis que d’autres « ont été forcés de s’embrasser devant les enquêteurs », a précisé l’organisation.

    « Nous sommes extrêmement soucieux de l’état de ces militants, arbitrairement détenus depuis environ neuf mois, simplement pour avoir défendu les droits humains », a déclaré Lynn Maalouf, directrice de recherches d’Amnesty pour le #Moyen-Orient.

    #arabie_saoudite

  • The Ghost of Brazil’s Military Dictatorship
    https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/brazil/2019-01-01/ghosts-brazils-military-dictatorship

    Brutal military dictatorships governed many Latin American countries during the 1970s and 1980s. But most of those countries—including Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay—established truth commissions in the aftermath of the #repression. Such reconciliation processes allowed successor governments to prosecute at least some human rights abusers, as well as to forge a national narrative that could begin to set the period’s #demons to rest.

    The Brazilian government took a different path. It waited until 2012 to establish its commission, never charged anyone with a #crime in connection with the dictatorship, and did not seriously encourage a national dialogue about the country’s authoritarian past. Rather than develop a politics of memory, as other Latin American countries have done, Brazil has chosen to pursue a politics of forgetting. This response may help explain how an apologist for #torture and dictatorship was able to rise to power in Brazil in 2018.

    #Travail_de_mémoire #Brésil #dictature #Bolsonaro #Amérique_latine