• The faces and names of a migration tragedy

    Italian newspaper identifies migrants who died on boat which drifted for days

    The Italian newspaper Avvenire has identified migrants who were “left to drown” before the boat they were in the central Mediterranean was taken back to Libya a few days after Easter.

    “The faces of silence: Here are the refugees who were left to drown,” the newspaper said in its headline on Wednesday.

    Times of Malta reported last week that a Libyan-registered fishing boat owned by a Maltese man had been directed by local authorities to help the migrants at sea. The vessel took migrants back to Libya.

    Five of the migrants aboard were found dead in the boat while another seven were missing when survivors were returned to Libya.

    “The victims of our indifference have names and faces like us,” Archbishop Charles Scicluna said in comments to Times of Malta.

    Avvenire said those who died on the boat were Nohom Mehari, Kidus Yohannes, Filmon Habtu, Filmon Desale and Debesay Rusom.

    The other seven missing were Filmon Mengstab, Mogos Tesfamichael, Hdru Yemane, Huruy Yohannes, Omer Seid, Hzqiel Erdom and Teklay Kinfe, it said

    They were aged between 18 and 25 and some were on their second attempt to cross into Europe.

    The newspaper says the migrants set sail from Sabratha in Libya between April 9 and 10 and drifted for days without food or water ’in an attempt to realise their dream of arriving in Christian Europe on Easter day."

    “They knew what it meant to be captured by the Libyans and returned to the hands of the torturers,” the newspaper adds.

    Their boat was spotted by a Frontex (European border agency) plane and their position was forwarded to the Italian and Maltese authorities

    “For five days they were left adrift, despite the desperate requests for help from (NGO) Alarm Phone and despite the appeals of the Maltese Church,” it adds.

    Italian and Maltese coordination centres reportedly argued over which area of responsibility the boat was in - Libyan, Maltese or Italian.

    “It was Good Friday, the Pilate’s day,” the newspaper remarks, a reference to Pontius Pilate having shirked responsibility.

    Two days after Easter the migrants’ boat was intercepted by a ’mysterious fishing boat’. Some of the migrants died when they jumped into the rough sea, trying to reach the fishing boat.

    The tragedy happened with Lampedusa just 30 miles away, and Malta 80 miles away.

    But the surviving migrants were taken back to Libya, ’fed to the Libyan torturers’.

    The newspaper said it hoped someone would show the faces of the migrants to investigators in Malta looking into the case.

    It quoted lawyer Giulia Tranchina insisting that “all the elements and evidence that have emerged so far indicate serious legal responsibilities on the part of the Maltese authorities,” the boat having drifted for days in the Malta search and rescue zone.

    The incident is now the subject of a magisterial inquiry.

    https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/the-faces-and-names-of-a-migration-tragedy.788723
    #identification #noms #nommer #identifier #13_avril_2020 #naufrage #Méditerranée #morts #décès #mourir_en_mer #morts_en_mer #tragédie_de_Pâques #Malte #Libye

    voir aussi:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/849512

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Latest Tactic to Push Migrants From Europe ? A Private, Clandestine Fleet

    The government of Malta enlisted three privately owned fishing trawlers to intercept migrants in the Mediterranean, and force them back to a war zone, officials and a boat captain say.

    With the onset of the coronavirus, Malta announced that it was too overwhelmed to rescue migrants making the precarious crossing of the Mediterranean Sea, where the tiny island nation has been on the front line of the maritime migration route over the past decade.

    In secret, however, the Maltese authorities have worked hard to make sure no migrants actually reach the island.

    It dispatched a small fleet of private merchant vessels in April to intercept migrants at sea and return them by force to a war zone in Libya, according to information provided by the captain of one of the boats, a senior commander in the Libyan Coast Guard, and a former Maltese official involved in the episode.

    The three repurposed fishing trawlers are privately owned, but acted on the instructions of the Armed Forces of Malta, the captain and the others said.

    The clandestine operation, which some experts consider illegal under international law, is just the latest dubious measure taken by European countries in recent years to stem the migration from Africa and the Middle East that has sown political chaos in Europe and fueled a populist backlash.

    Since 2017, European states, led by Italy, have paid the Libyan government to return more migrants to Libya, hassled the private rescue organizations that try to bring them to Europe, and asked passing merchant vessels to intercept them before they enter European waters.

    But Malta’s latest tactic may be among the most egregious, maritime experts say, because it involved a designated flotilla of private vessels, based in a European port, that intercepted and expelled asylum seekers from international waters that fall within the responsibility of European coast guards.

    “Against a pattern of increased abuses against asylum seekers in recent years, this newest approach stands out,” said Itamar Mann, an expert in maritime and refugee law at the University of Haifa in Israel. “Its methods chillingly resemble organized crime, and indeed the operations of people smugglers, which European policymakers so adamantly denounce.”

    “The facts available raise serious concerns that we are seeing the emergence of a novel systematic pattern, such that may even put Maltese state officials in danger of criminal liability, at home or abroad,” Dr. Mann added.

    The Maltese government did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

    The activity was first documented on the evening of April 12, when three aging blue trawlers left the Grand Harbour in Valletta, the Maltese capital, within an hour of each other. The three boats — the Dar Al Salam 1, the Salve Regina and the Tremar — departed at the request of the Maltese authorities, according to the captain of the Tremar, Amer Abdelrazek.

    A former Maltese official, Neville Gafa, said he was enlisted by the government that same night to use his connections in Libya to ensure the safe passage of the first two boats to Libya.

    The boats did not submit paperwork to the immigration police, and switched off their satellite tracking devices soon after leaving port, maritime databases show.

    But their mission had already been determined, said Mr. Gafa, who said he had been asked by the Maltese prime minister’s chief of staff, Clyde Caruana, to help coordinate the operation. Mr. Caruana did not respond to requests for comment, but a government spokesman told The Times of Malta that Mr. Gafa had been asked to liaise with Libya on a separate matter that was unconnected to the episode.

    The trawlers were sent to intercept a migrant vessel attempting to reach Malta from Libya — and which had been issuing mayday calls for some 48 hours — and then return its passengers to Libya, Mr. Gafa said.

    The stricken migrant vessel was still in international waters, according to coordinates provided by the migrants by satellite phone to Alarm Phone, an independent hotline for shipwrecked refugees. But it had reached the area of jurisdiction of Malta’s armed forces, making it Malta’s responsibility under international maritime law to rescue its passengers and provide them with sanctuary.

    Two of the trawlers — the Dar Al Salam 1 and the Tremar — reached the migrant vessel early on April 14, guided by a Maltese military helicopter, Mr. Abdelrazek said. Several of the migrants had already drowned, according to testimony later gathered by Alarm Phone.

    The roughly 50 survivors were taken aboard the Dar Al Salam 1, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    The Dar Al Salam 1 and the Salve Regina sailed to Tripoli on April 15, the former carrying the migrants and the latter carrying several tons of food and water, as a show of appreciation to the Libyan government, Mr. Abdelrazek and Mr. Gafa said. The Tremar waited in international waters, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    The Maltese authorities told their Libyan counterparts that the Dar Al Salam 1 was in fact a Maltese vessel called the Maria Cristina, said Commodore Masoud Abdalsamad, who oversees international operations at the Libyan Coast Guard. To further obscure its identity, the boat’s crew had also painted over the ship’s name and flew a Maltese flag to confuse the Libyan Coast Guard.

    Though based physically in Malta and owned by a Maltese shipowner, the vessel is legally registered in Tobruk, a port in east Libya controlled by opponents of the authorities in Tripoli. The crew did not want to risk upsetting the Tripoli government by broadcasting its links to Tobruk, leading it to hide its name and home port, Mr. Abdelrazek said.

    After disembarking, the migrants were taken to a notorious detention center run by a pro-government militia, where migrants are routinely tortured, held for ransom or sold to other militias. The detention cells stand close to an arms depot, and the surrounding area was hit by shelling in December.

    Conditions at the detention center are “utterly appalling,” said Safa Msehli, a spokeswoman for the International Organization for Migration, an arm of the United Nations. “People are caged in overcrowded hangars with barely any access to food or sanitation facilities.”

    “Many tell us of the abuse they endure and the inhumane ways in which they are exploited,’’ Ms. Msehli added. ‘‘Reports of migrants being used to load weapons, and the detention center’s proximity to a military facility, raise serious concerns over the safety of people detained there arbitrarily.”

    After departing Tripoli, the Dar Al Salam 1 turned its satellite identification system back on, and the boat resurfaced off the coast of Libya on the evening of April 15, data provided by Marine Traffic, a maritime database, shows.

    The owner of the Salve Regina, Dominic Tanti, declined to comment through an intermediary, and the owner of the Tremar, Yasser Aziz, did not return a message seeking comment.

    The owner of the Dar Al Salam 1, Carmelo Grech, did not to respond to multiple requests for comment sent by text, voice message and a letter hand-delivered to his apartment. But he has confirmed his boat’s involvement to a Maltese newspaper, and several outlets have already highlighted its role, including the Italian newspaper, Avvenire, and the Maltese blogger Manuel Delia.

    Mr. Grech and his boat have colorful histories, raising questions in Malta about why the government involved them in a state-led operation.

    Mr. Grech has previously recounted how he used the boat, then known as the Mae Yemanja, to bring supplies to Libyan rebels during the Libyan revolution in 2011. In 2012, court records show it was impounded after Mr. Grech was accused, though later acquitted, of smuggling contraband cigarettes from Libya to Malta.

    In 2015, Mr. Grech was detained by a Libyan faction for several days for what he later described as a misunderstanding over his visas.

    Maltese ship records obtained by The Times show that Mr. Grech canceled his boat’s registration in Malta last February, before repainting it to show it had been re-registered in Tobruk, for undisclosed reasons.

    Mr. Abdelrazek also has a criminal history, having been convicted in 2014 of forging documents, court records show.

    After appearing briefly in Malta last week, the Dar Al Salam 1 and the Salve Regina returned again to sea on Sunday.

    Their satellite trackers were once again switched off shortly afterward.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/30/world/europe/migrants-malta.html
    #privatisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Malte #Méditerranée #push-backs #refoulement #refoulements #Libye

    –—

    Commentaire de @isskein via la mailing-list Migreurop :

    Depuis avril fonctionne une méthode pro-active : une #flotte_privée de 3 bateaux qui se chargent d’arrêter les bateaux de migrants et de les renvoyer vers la Libye.

    Un ancien officiel maltais, #Neville_Gafà, a été engagé par le Premier Ministre pour monter l’affaire avec ses contacts libyens

    il est entre autres responsable de la #tragédie_de_Pâques : le gouvernement a ignoré durant 48h un bateau qui se trouvait dans sles eaux internationales (mais dans la juridiction des Forces armées maltaises) , puis envoyé sa flotte privée, qui a pris à son bord 51 migrants dont 8 femmes et 3 enfants, à bord 5 cadavres ; 7 migrants s’étaient noyés auparavant. Ils ont été ramenés à Tripolii
    voir https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/the-faces-and-names-of-a-migration-tragedy.788723

    #mourir_en_mer #morts #décès

    –---
    Dans le mail reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, Conni parle de #hotspot_mobile :

    Yesterday we got news from the Maltese media about a new strategy of the authorities to keep rescued migrants out: a floating hotspot on a cruise ship off their coast:
    https://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/national/102051/rescued_migrants_to_be_kept_on_captain_morgan_vessel_outside_territor

    https://www.tvm.com.mt/en/news/rescued-migrants-will-remain-on-vessel-13-miles-outside-maltese-territorial-

    via @isskein

    • Rappel de Sara Prestianni sur l’utilisation des #hotspots_mobiles en #Italie (via mailing-list Migreurop, 01.05.2020) :

      The “hotspot boat” is the same system , used by Italy from April 17 , only for migrants have been intercepted by ships flying foreign flags, as decided in the inter-ministerial decree of 7 April.
      On board of the ship “hotspot” Rubattino - positioned in front of Palermo - there are at this moment almost 200 migrants, of the two rescues carried out by the ships Alan Kurdi and Aita Mari. All of them were negative to the Covid test, but it is not clear how long they will have to stay on the ship and where they will be transferred (at the beginning of the procedure there was talk of a relocation to Germany).
      Yesterday the Guarantor for the Rights of Italian Prisoners, in his bulletin, expressed concern about the establishment of these “floating” hotspots.
      http://www.garantenazionaleprivatiliberta.it/gnpl

      “The implementation of quarantine measures in extraordinary and exceptional places cannot lead to a situation of ’limbo’: migrant people are under the jurisdiction of the Italian State for the purposes of the health measures imposed on them, but at the same time they do not have the possibility - and for a period of time not indifferent - to exercise the rights that our country recognizes and protects. They cannot apply for asylum, they are not de facto - and at least temporarily - protected as victims of trafficking or unaccompanied foreign minors, nor can they have timely access to procedures for family reunification under the Dublin Regulation. - procedures which, moreover, have their own intrinsic deadlines.”
      The Guarantor also indicated that the experience of the ship “Rubattino” would not seem to remain an isolated case as the Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport launched on 19 April a procedure for the chartering of vessels to be used for the assistance and health surveillance of migrants rescued at sea or arrived on the national territory as a result of autonomous boats.

      –---

      –-> sur les hotspots mobiles, voir aussi : https://seenthis.net/tag/hotspot_mobile

    • Abela admits coordinating private boats that returned migrants to Libya

      PM says Easter manoeuvre was a ’rescue’ not a pushback.

      Prime Minister Robert Abela has admitted commissioning a boat that returned migrants to war-torn Libya on Easter weekend but has insisted it was a rescue mission and not a pushback.

      A boat commissioned by Maltese authorities picked up a group of migrants in the search and rescue area earlier this month and returned them to the North African country.

      It is a crime under international law for states to return asylum seekers to a country where they are likely to face persecution.

      Speaking publicly about the controversy for the first time on Friday, Abela admitted the manoeuvre and defended the government’s actions.

      "There was no pushback,"he said.

      "There was a rescue of migrants. Had the Maltese government not coordinated, tens of lives would have died, because a [EU coastguard] Frontex plane just flew overhead and kept on going.

      “Malta’s ports are closed but it coordinated this rescue and ensured that the irregular migrants were taken to the port that was open.”

      The country, along with Italy, closed its ports, citing concerns about the spread of coronavirus.

      Former OPM official Neville Gafa claimed under oath this week that he had coordinated the pushback.

      Asked Gafa’s involvement, Abela said his only involvement was liaising with a contact he was claiming to have in Libya so that the rescue could be facilitated. He said Gafa was not paid or promised anything.

      Abela defended using a private boat, saying that a Search and Rescue convention stipulates the legal obligations of individual states that are not obliged to carry out the actual rescues but to coordinate such rescues.

      The obligations also state that countries can use their own assets or else send private assets to rescue boats in distress, he said.

      This week, Malta has commissioned a Captain Morgan tourist boat Europa II, to house migrants until a solution for their disembarkation is found.

      “We are ready to do anything to save lives. We have nothing to be ashamed of,” Abela said, adding that the cost for the Captain Morgan boat being used to temporarily house migrants outside Maltese waters will come from aid by the EU.

      “Malta’s position is clear and we know what our obligations are. We are going to remain firm on this. We are not a safe port and we cannot guarantee our resources for rescues.

      "We are duty bound to stick to this position. It is counterproductive to close port and airports to tourists but then open ports for irregular migrants. There are hundreds of thousands of people on the Libyan coast wanting to leave there and come to Lampedusa and Malta. We are obeying international rules,” he insisted.

      He said the migration problem should not be “Malta’s alone” and called for the EU to intervene.

      Earlier on Friday, Foreign Minister Evarist Bartolo told Times of Malta that “the EU was responsible for a huge push back of migrants to Malta”.

      He said its failure to set up an effective and fair solidarity mechanism to share the burden of welcoming irregular migrants means that Malta had borne a huge burden over the years.

      He quoted a letter from a United Nations official to him in which he admitted that Europe needed to adopt a more principled migration policy that will serve European needs, that does not penalise those seeking to cross, and that does not leave countries like Malta, which are trying to do the right thing, on their own.

      “If we continue to fail, more people, Libyans and non-Libyans, will be compelled to seek safety on the European side” because of the ongoing war and the economic consequences of Covid-19.

      Bartolo said that in the first three months of the year, 3,600 irregular migrants left the Libyan coast through the Central Mediterranean route. This is over 400 per cent more than in the same period in 2019. Some 1,200 came to Malta.

      He said Malta’s centres were “overflowing” and there is no room for more migrants.

      https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/abela-admits-coordinating-private-boats-that-returned-migrants-to.7893

    • Malte a affrété des navires privés pour renvoyer les embarcations de migrants vers la Libye

      Une enquête du New York Times révèle que les autorités maltaises ont affrété, depuis le mois d’avril, une flotte de navires privés afin d’empêcher les migrants d ’atteindre l’île et les renvoyer en Libye. Selon plusieurs experts, cette action est illégale.

      En pleine pandémie de coronavirus, Malte fait tout pour empêcher les embarcations de migrants d’atteindre l’île. A tel point que le gouvernement a discrètement dépêché en avril une flotte de navires marchands privés pour intercepter les migrants et les renvoyer en Libye, a révélé une enquête du New York Times publiée jeudi 30 avril.

      Selon le quotidien américain - qui s’appuie sur les témoignages d’un capitaine de l’un de ces bateaux, commandant en chef des garde-côtes libyens, et d’un ancien responsable maltais impliqué dans l’opération - les trois chalutiers de pêche affrétés appartiennent à des particuliers mais ont agi sur les instructions des forces armées maltaises.
      Une opération sur ordre du Premier ministre maltais

      L’opération a été documentée pour la première fois dans la soirée du 12 avril, écrit le New York Times, quand trois chalutiers ont quitté le port de la Valette, la capitale maltaise, sur ordre des autorités. Un ancien responsable maltais, Neville Gafa, a déclaré qu’il avait été enrôlé par le gouvernement le soir même pour utiliser ses relations en Libye et assurer le passage en toute sécurité des deux premiers chalutiers vers les ports libyens.

      Le Dar As Salam 1 et le Tremar, ont ainsi été envoyés pour intercepter une embarcation de migrants présente dans les eaux maltaises - qui avait émis des appels de détresse depuis deux jours - afin de les renvoyer en Libye, a précisé Neville Gafa. A bord du canot, se trouvait cinq cadavres.

      Le 15 avril, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) avait pourtant affirmé que les migrants avaient été interceptés par un navire marchand puis remis à des garde-côtes qui les avaient alors amenés au port de Tripoli.

      Le troisième chalutier, le Salve Regina, a quant à lui navigué vers Tripoli le 15 avril, transportant plusieurs tonnes de nourriture et d’eau, en guise de remerciement au gouvernement libyen, assure au quotidien américain le capitaine du Tremar, Amer Abdelrazek.

      Devant la justice maltaise, à la suite de la plainte lancée par plusieurs ONG contre le Premier ministre sur sa responsabilité dans la mort des cinq migrants, Neville Gafa a déclaré sous serment qu’il avait agi sur ordre du cabinet du Premier ministre.

      Une opération illégale

      « Dans une tendance à l’augmentation des abus contre les demandeurs d’asile ces dernières années, cette nouvelle approche se démarque », déclare au New York Times Itamar Mann, expert en droit maritime et des réfugiés à l’université de Haïfa, en Israël. « Ces méthodes ressemblent de façon effrayante au crime organisé, aux opérations de passeurs, que les décideurs européens dénoncent avec tant de fermeté », continue le chercheur pour qui cette opération est illégale eu égard au droit international.

      En effet, comme écrit le quotidien américain, une flotte de navires privées, basée dans un port européen, qui intercepte et expulse des demandeurs d’asile des eaux internationales relèvent de la responsabilité des garde-côtes européens.

      Cette opération « pourrait mettre les fonctionnaires de l’Etat maltais en danger de responsabilité pénale, dans le pays ou à l’étranger », signale encore Itamar Mann.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/24485/malte-a-affrete-des-navires-prives-pour-renvoyer-les-embarcations-de-m

    • Malta-Libya #deal sets up centres ’against illegal migration’

      Coastguard, UN centres, EU help among items discussed

      Malta and Libya will be setting up units to coordinate operations against illegal migration, the government said on Thursday.

      These centres are expected to start operating within the coming weeks, however, the government provided no additional information.

      The announcement followed an unannounced trip by Prime Minister Robert Abela, Home Affairs Minister Byron Camilleri and Foreign Affairs Minister Evarist Bartolo to Tripoli, where they discussed migration with the Libyan government.

      The three met Fayez al-Sarraj who heads the UN-backed Government of National Accord as well as Mohammed Sheibani, deputy minister responsible for migration at the meeting in Tripoli.

      It was Abela’s first trip to war-torn Libya as prime minister.

      Sources said the meeting was held on the back of a new wave of Malta-Libya relations, and a change in approach.

      Discussions revolved around the need to push the EU to help Libya to train its coastguard, obtain funding for reception camps manned by the UN, as well as to build a realistic strategy to slow down the flow of migrants into Libya.

      “It was a positive meeting, though of course that doesn’t mean we’ve resolved the migration issue,” a source told Times of Malta.

      “Malta could be Libya’s bridge to the EU. We need to stop human trafficking as well as save lives at sea,” the source said.

      Valletta, diplomatic sources say, has been trying to build new bridges with the Libyan authorities to stem the tide of migrants leaving the North African coast.
      800,000 migrants in Libya

      In a statement issued later on Thursday, the government said that during the meeting Abela reiterated Malta’s position on the need to address and stop human trafficking. Malta, he added, was facing unprecedented and disproportionate flows and burdens.

      Meanwhile, al-Sarraj said that 800,000 migrants were currently in Libya and the country needed an effective long-term and holistic approach.

      Both leaders spoke about the need to strengthen cooperation to ensure that lives are not lost at sea and to combat human traffickers on the ground and at sea.

      According to Abela, the solution lies in concrete action on Libyan shores and its southern border. This would be done through addressing and stopping human trafficking, rather than focusing just on relocation of migrants to other countries.

      Signing a #memorandum_of_understanding, Malta and Libya agreed to set up a coordination unit in each country to assist in operations against illegal migration.

      The agreement also stipulates that Malta supports Libya when it comes to financial assistance through the upcoming Multiannual Financial Framework.

      https://timesofmalta.com/articles/view/abela-ministers-return-from-libya-after-positive-migration-talks.79484

      #accord #centres

    • Mer méditerranée : Malte renforce sa coopération avec la Libye pour lutter contre « l’immigration illégale »

      Malte a signé un accord avec le gouvernement d’union nationale (GNA) libyen dans le but de renforcer « la lutte contre l’immigration illégale » en mer Méditerranée. Le texte prévoit la création de « centres de coordination » à Tripoli et La Valette qui seront opérationnels dès le mois de juillet.

      Malte tente par tous les moyens de limiter le flux de migrants qui débarquent sur ses côtes. Pour ce faire, les autorités maltaises et libyennes viennent d’acter la création de « centres de coordination » à Tripoli et à La Valette.

      Ces deux centres « offriront le soutien nécessaire à la lutte contre l’immigration illégale en Libye et dans la région méditerranéenne », selon un protocole d’accord entre Malte et le gouvernement d’union nationale (GNA) de Fayez al-Sarraj, et présenté au Parlement maltais mercredi 3 juin (https://www.independent.com.mt/file.aspx?f=206640).

      Financé par le gouvernement maltais, ces structures seront chacune dirigées par trois fonctionnaires et limiteront leur travail « au soutien et à la coordination », indique cet accord valable pour trois ans. Les centres devraient voir le jour dès le mois de juillet.
      « L’UE a la responsabilité de parvenir à un accord global avec la Libye »

      Malte, le plus petit État de l’Union européenne (UE), de par sa taille et sa population, se plaint depuis longtemps d’être obligé d’assumer à lui seul l’arrivée des migrants en provenance de la Libye, pays en guerre.

      Actuellement, plus de 400 migrants secourus en Méditerranée sont bloqués sur quatre navires touristiques affrétés par Malte juste à la limite de ses eaux territoriales, La Valette exigeant qu’ils soient ensuite pris en charge par d’autres pays européens.

      Le ministre maltais des Affaires étrangères, Evarist Bartolo, a déclaré au Parlement mercredi que « l’UE a la responsabilité de parvenir à un accord global avec la Libye afin de limiter l’immigration clandestine ».

      « Le nombre d’immigrants arrivant à Malte est disproportionné par rapport aux autres pays européens », a insisté le ministre. Selon lui, depuis 2005 l’Europe n’a accueilli que 1 700 migrants, tandis que 22 000 sont arrivés à Malte - seuls 8% des migrants en situation irrégulière sur l’île ont été relocalisés dans d’autres pays européens.

      Selon le protocole d’accord, Malte proposera à la Commission européenne une augmentation du soutien financier pour aider le GNA à sécuriser ses frontières sud et à démanteler les réseaux de trafiquants d’êtres humains.

      La Valette proposera également le financement de « moyens maritimes supplémentaires nécessaires » pour contrôler et intercepter les passeurs de migrants en Méditerranée.


      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/25175/mer-mediterranee-malte-renforce-sa-cooperation-avec-la-libye-pour-lutt

    • Accordo Malta-Libia: insieme daranno la caccia ai migranti. Con i soldi Ue

      Centrali operative e pattugliamenti congiunti. Fonti Onu: è una regolazione dei respingimenti illegali. Intanto Frontex smentisce l’inchiesta di Malta sulla “#Strage_di_Pasquetta

      Dopo la scoperta degli accordi segreti con Tripoli, siglati tre anni fa, Malta ha deciso di uscire allo scoperto negoziando un memorandum siglato dal premier Robert Abela, fresco di archiviazione per le accuse di respingimento, e il presidente libico Fayez al Sarraj.

      I due Paesi daranno insieme la caccia ai migranti nel Mediterraneo, ma con nuovi fondi Ue da destinare a Tripoli.

      SCARICA QUI IL DOCUMENTO COMPLETO: https://www.avvenire.it/c/attualita/Documents/MOU%20with%20Libya.pdf

      E’ prevista la creazione di «centri di coordinamento» nel porto di Tripoli e a La Valletta che saranno operativi da luglio. In realtà le operazioni congiunte andavano avanti da anni, ma adesso sono state ufficializzate. Le strutture congiunte «forniranno il sostegno necessario alla lotta contro l’immigrazione clandestina in Libia e nella regione del Mediterraneo», si legge. Inizialmente Malta finanzierà interamente l’attivazione delle centrali operative, ognuna delle quali sarà guidata da tre funzionari dei rispettivi governi. Fin da subito, però, il premier Abela si impegna a ottenere dall’Ue fondi aggiuntivi da destinare alla cosiddetta Guardia costiera libica, che verrà ulteriormente equipaggiata.

      Nessuna menzione si fa riguardo alla necessità di ristabilire il rispetto dei diritti umani nei campi di prigionia libici. L’unico scopo, come del resto è sempre stato in questi anni anche per Italia e Ue, è quello di trattenere i profughi in cattività, a qualunque costo. «L’UE ha la responsabilità di raggiungere un accordo globale con la Libia», c’è scritto nell’accordo che, di fatto, appalta a Malta e Libia il controllo dell’intero Canale di Sicilia, ad esclusione delle ultime 12 miglia territoriali dalla costa di Lampedusa. Malta, lo stato più piccolo dell’Unione Europea (Ue) per dimensioni e popolazione, si è lamentato da tempo di essere costretto ad assumere da solo la responsabilità dell’arrivo dei migranti dalla Libia, un paese in guerra che secondo l’Onu in alcun modo può essere ritenuto un “porto sicuro”.

      Nelle settimane scorse una nuova serie di inchieste giornalistiche internazionali ha permesso di accertare che non solo Malta ha messo in mare da tempo una flottiglia di “pescherecci fantasma” incaricati di intercettare i barconi e ricondurli in Libia, ma che spesso le Forze armate dell’isola equipaggiano i gommoni, anche con motori nuovi, affinché raggiungano le coste siciliane.

      Nei giorni scorsi il Tribunale dell’isola aveva archiviato il procedimento contro il premier laburista Robert Abela e il capo delle forze armate, accusati della morte di 12 migranti nella “strage di Pasquetta”. Forte di questa “assoluzione”, Abela si è recato a Tripoli per sigillare l’intesa con il presidente al-Sarraj. Ma proprio uno dei punti chiave utilizzati dal giudice Joe Mifsud per cestinare le accuse, ieri è stato categoricamente smentito dall’agenzia Ue Frontex che ha risposto per iscritto alle domande di Avvenire. Secondo il magistrato, infatti, il coordinamento dei soccorsi in qualche misura era attribuibile non a Malta ma a Frontex che aveva individuato con un suo aereo i barconi. Da Varsavia, rispondendo con una nota ad “Avvenire”, l’agenzia ha precisato che “è il centro di salvataggio appropriato, non Frontex, a decidere se chiedere assistenza a qualsiasi nave della zona. E Frontex non aveva navi vicino a quest’area”. La responsabilità di intervenire, dunque, era di innanzitutto di Malta che invece per giorni ha ignorato gli Sos e ha poi inviato un motopesca quando oramai 7 persone erano affogate e altre 5 sono morte di stenti durante il respingimento dalle acque maltesi verso la Libia.

      Nel fine settimana di Pasqua l’aeroobile Eagle 1, tracciato e segnalato dal giornalista Sergio Scandura di Radio Radicale “stava svolgendo - spiegano da Frontex - una missione di sorveglianza ben al di fuori dell’area operativa dell’Operazione Themis di Frontex”. Nella nota un portavoce dell’agenzia Ue precisa poi che “Frontex gestisce operazioni congiunte, nonché la sorveglianza pre-frontaliera, che veniva eseguita dall’aereo in questione”. Secondo questa ricostruzione, che avrebbe meritato maggiore puntiglio investigativo anche per accertare eventuali responsabilità esterne a Malta, “in linea con il diritto internazionale, Frontex ha avvisato i centri di soccorso competenti dell’avvistamento di una nave che riteneva necessitasse di assistenza”, si legge ancora. Parole che hanno un significato preciso e costituiscono un’accusa verso chi era stato informato e doveva prestare quell’assistenza negata per giorni. Le autorità italiane hanno apposto il segreto alle comunicazioni intercorse. Silenzio che potrebbe essere presto scardinato da indagini giudiziarie. Lo stesso per Malta, che neanche nell’atto conclusivo dell’inchiesta ha voluto rendere pubbliche le comunicazioni con Roma e con Frontex che a sua volta ribadisce ad Avvenire che “è il centro di salvataggio appropriato, non Frontex, a decidere se chiedere assistenza a qualsiasi nave della zona. Tuttavia, desidero sottolineare qui che Frontex non aveva navi vicino a quest’area”.

      Il memorandum sta creando non poco dibattito nei vertici della Marina militare italiana. A Tripoli, infatti, si trova la nave Gorgona, ufficialmente incaricata di assistere la cosiddetta guardia costiera libica per conto di Roma. E certo i marinai italiani non vogliono finire a fare gli addetti alla manutenzione delle motovedette donate dall’Italia ma che tra pochi giorni si coordineranno con Malta. «Mentre l’obiettivo dichiarato nell’accordo vi è il benessere del popolo libico e di quello maltese, il benessere delle principali vittime, cioè migranti, richiedenti asilo e rifugiati, non viene mai menzionato», ha commentato sul portale cattolico Newsbook il giudice maltese Giovanni Bonelli, già membro della Corte europea dei diritti dell’uomo. «Si potrebbe pensare - aggiunge - che questo memorandum si riferisca all’estrazione di minerali, non a degli esseri umani».Fonti delle Nazioni Unite contattate da “Avvenire” hanno reagito a caldo considerando l’intesa come una «regolamentazione di fatto dei respingimenti illegali».

      Negli anni scorsi più volte Avvenire ha documentato, anche con registrazioni audio, il collegamento diretto tra la Marina italiana e la Guardia costiera libica. Ma ora Malta si spinge oltre, ufficializzando una alleanza operativa che inoltre rischierà di causare conflitti con l’operazione navale europea Irini a guida italiana. Fonti delle Nazioni Unite contattate da Avvenire hanno reagito a caldo considerando l’intesa come una “regolamentazione di fatto dei respingimenti illegali”.

      https://www.avvenire.it/attualita/pagine/accordo-malta-libia-respingimento-migranti

  • #Tragédie humaine dans les #maisons_de_retraite en #Europe | Le Devoir
    https://www.ledevoir.com/monde/europe/577598/une-tragedie-humaine-inimaginable-dans-les-maisons-de-retraite

    Les ravages du #coronavirus dans les maisons de retraite, qui représentent jusqu’à la moitié des décès enregistrés dans certains pays européens, sont une « tragédie humaine inimaginable », a déploré jeudi le directeur Europe de l’OMS.

    Dans ces établissements, dont il veut voir le fonctionnement évoluer, la situation est « profondément inquiétante », a déclaré Hans Kluge lors d’une conférence de presse virtuelle organisée depuis Copenhague, siège de la branche Europe de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (#OMS).

    [...]

    Ainsi, au 13 avril, parmi les 444 décès enregistrés en Irlande, 55,2 % l’avaient été dans ce type d’établissements. Au 15 avril, la #France rapportait que 49,4 % des morts résidaient en #EHPAD (établissement d’hébergement pour personnes âgées dépendantes), selon les chiffres communiqués par l’OMS à l’AFP.

    Pour M. Kluge, « il existe un besoin immédiat et urgent de repenser et d’adapter le fonctionnement » de ces établissements face à l’épidémie.

    Il s’agit notamment d’y prioriser les dépistages, de bien équiper les soignants et d’organiser des unités spéciales pour les malades de la #COVID-19, avant même l’apparition de premiers cas.

    Car, a-t-il souligné, « même chez les personnes très âgées qui sont fragiles et vivent avec de multiples maladies chroniques, beaucoup ont de bonnes chances de se rétablir si elles sont bien soignées ».

    • Cette lettre, envoyée d’Italie, comme une bouteille à la mer...

      Lettre d’Italie,

      Il est 00h28 à Brescia.

      « Je vous écris d’Italie, je vous écris donc depuis votre futur. Nous sommes maintenant là où vous serez dans quelques jours. Les courbes de l’épidémie nous montrent embrassés en une danse parallèle dans laquelle nous nous trouvons quelques pas devant vous sur la ligne du temps, tout comme Wuhan l’était par rapport à nous il y a quelques semaines. Nous voyons que vous vous comportez comme nous nous sommes comportés. Vous avez les mêmes discussions que celles que nous avions il y a encore peu de temps, entre ceux qui encore disent « toutes ces histoires pour ce qui est juste un peu plus qu’une grippe », et ceux qui ont déjà compris.

      D’ici, depuis votre futur, nous savons par exemple que lorsqu’ils vous diront de rester confinés chez vous, d’aucuns citeront Foucault, puis Hobbes. Mais très tôt vous aurez bien autre chose à faire. Avant tout, vous mangerez. Et pas seulement parce que cuisiner est l’une des rares choses que vous pourrez faire. Sur les réseaux sociaux, naîtront des groupes qui feront des propositions sur la manière dont on peut passer le temps utilement et de façon instructive ; vous vous inscrirez à tous, et, après quelques jours, vous n’en pourrez plus. Vous sortirez de vos étagères La Peste de Camus, mais découvrirez que vous n’avez pas vraiment envie de le lire.

      Vous mangerez de nouveau.

      Vous dormirez mal.

      Vous vous interrogerez sur le futur de la démocratie.

      Vous aurez une vie sociale irrésistible, entre apéritifs sur des tchats, rendez-vous groupés sur Zoom, dîners sur Skype.

      Vous manqueront comme jamais vos enfants adultes, et vous recevrez comme un coup de poing dans l’estomac la pensée que, pour la première fois depuis qu’ils ont quitté la maison, vous n’avez aucune idée de quand vous les reverrez.

      De vieux différends, de vieilles antipathies vous apparaîtront sans importance. Vous téléphonerez pour savoir comment ils vont à des gens que vous aviez juré de ne plus revoir.

      Beaucoup de femmes seront frappées dans leur maison.

      Vous vous demanderez comment ça se passe pour ceux qui ne peuvent pas rester à la maison, parce qu’ils n’en ont pas, de maison.

      Vous vous sentirez vulnérables quand vous sortirez faire des courses dans des rues vides, surtout si vous êtes une femme. Vous vous demanderez si c’est comme ça que s’effondrent les sociétés, si vraiment ça se passe aussi vite, vous vous interdirez d’avoir de telles pensées.

      Vous rentrerez chez vous, et vous mangerez. Vous prendrez du poids.

      Vous chercherez sur Internet des vidéos de fitness.

      Vous rirez, vous rirez beaucoup. Il en sortira un humour noir, sarcastique, à se pendre.

      Même ceux qui prennent toujours tout au sérieux auront pleine conscience de l’absurdité de la vie.

      Vous donnerez rendez-vous dans les queues organisées hors des magasins, pour rencontrer en personne les amis - mais à distance de sécurité.

      Tout ce dont vous n’avez pas besoin vous apparaîtra clairement.

      Vous sera révélée avec une évidence absolue la vraie nature des êtres humains qui sont autour de vous : vous aurez autant de confirmations que de surprises.

      De grands intellectuels qui jusqu’à hier avaient pontifié sur tout n’auront plus de mots et disparaîtront des médias, certains se réfugieront dans quelques abstractions intelligentes, mais auxquelles fera défaut le moindre souffle d’empathie, si bien que vous arrêterez de les écouter. Des personnes que vous aviez sous-estimées se révéleront au contraire pragmatiques, rassurantes, solides, généreuses, clairvoyantes.

      Ceux qui invitent à considérer tout cela comme une occasion de renaissance planétaire vous aideront à élargir la perspective, mais vous embêteront terriblement, aussi : la planète respire à cause de la diminution des émissions de CO2, mais vous, à la fin du mois, comment vous allez payer vos factures de gaz et d’électricité ? Vous ne comprendrez pas si assister à la naissance du monde de demain est une chose grandiose, ou misérable.

      Vous ferez de la musique aux balcons. Lorsque vous avez vu les vidéos où nous chantions de l’opéra, vous avez pensé « ah ! les Italiens », mais nous, nous savons que vous aussi vous chanterez la Marseillaise. Et quand vous aussi des fenêtres lancerez à plein tube I Will Survive, nous, nous vous regarderons en acquiesçant, comme depuis Wuhan, où ils chantaient sur les balcons en février, ils nous ont regardés.

      Beaucoup s’endormiront en pensant que la première chose qu’ils feront dès qu’ils sortiront, sera de divorcer. Plein d’enfants seront conçus.

      Vos enfants suivront les cours en ligne, seront insupportables, vous donneront de la joie. Les aînés vous désobéiront, comme des adolescents ; vous devrez vous disputer pour éviter qu’ils n’aillent dehors, attrapent le virus et meurent. Vous essaierez de ne pas penser à ceux qui, dans les hôpitaux, meurent dans la solitude. Vous aurez envie de lancer des pétales de rose au personnel médical.

      On vous dira à quel point la société est unie dans un effort commun, et que vous êtes tous sur le même bateau. Ce sera vrai. Cette expérience changera à jamais votre perception d’individus. L’appartenance de classe fera quand même une très grande différence. Etre enfermé dans une maison avec terrasse et jardin ou dans un immeuble populaire surpeuplé : non, ce n’est pas la même chose. Et ce ne sera pas la même que de pouvoir travailler à la maison ou voir son travail se perdre. Ce bateau sur lequel vous serez ensemble pour vaincre l’épidémie ne semblera guère être la même chose pour tous, parce que ça ne l’est pas et ne l’a jamais été.
      À un certain moment, vous vous rendrez compte que c’est vraiment dur.

      Vous aurez peur. Vous en parlerez à ceux qui vous sont chers, ou alors vous garderez l’angoisse en vous, afin qu’ils ne la portent pas. Vous mangerez de nouveau.

      Voilà ce que nous vous disons d’Italie sur votre futur. Mais c’est une prophétie de petit, de très petit cabotage : quelques jours à peine. Si nous tournons le regard vers le futur lointain, celui qui vous est inconnu et nous est inconnu, alors nous ne pouvons vous dire qu’une seule chose : lorsque tout sera fini, le monde ne sera plus ce qu’il était. »

      #lettre #11_jours #futur #Italie #cuisiner #démocratie #vie_sociale #rire #humour_noir #confinement #monde_de_demain #balcons #unité_nationale #classe_sociale #inégalités #épidémie #travail #peur #prophétie

  • « Rester confiné chez soi, sur son canapé, n’a strictement rien à voir avec une période de #guerre »

    Les mots ont un sens. « La #pandémie à laquelle nous sommes confrontés exigent des mesures plutôt opposées à un temps de guerre » explique l’économiste et chroniqueur de Basta ! Maxime Combes dans cette tribune.

    Non, nous ne sommes pas en guerre. Nous sommes en pandémie

    « Nous sommes en guerre ». A six reprises, lors de son allocution, Emmanuel #Macron a utilisé la même expression, en essayant de prendre un #ton_martial. L’anaphore voulait marquer les esprits et provoquer un effet de #sidération. Avec deux objectifs sous-jacents. L’un sanitaire : s’assurer que les mesures de #confinement – mot non prononcé par le président de la République – soient désormais appliquées. L’autre politique : tenter d’instaurer une forme d’#union_nationale derrière le chef de l’Etat. Le tout également pour faire oublier les mesures contradictoires et les hésitations coupables de ces derniers jours.

    Pourtant les mots ont un sens. Et c’est non, mille fois non : nous ne sommes pas en guerre. Nous sommes en pandémie. C’est suffisant, et totalement différent. Aucun État, aucun groupe armé n’a déclaré la guerre à la France, ou à l’Union européenne. Pas plus que la France n’a déclaré la guerre (article 35 de la Constitution) à un autre État. Le #Covid-19 ne se propage pas en raison du feu de ses blindés, de la puissance de son aviation ou de l’habilité de ses généraux, mais en raison des mesures inappropriées, insuffisantes ou trop tardives prises par les pouvoirs publics.

    La pandémie à laquelle nous sommes confrontés exigent des #mesures plutôt opposées à un temps de guerre

    Non, le virus Covid-19 n’est pas un « #ennemi, invisible, insaisissable, et qui progresse » comme l’a affirmé Emmanuel Macron ce lundi 16 mars. C’est un #virus. Un virus qui se propage au sein d’une population non immunisée, porté par nombre d’entre nous et disséminé en fonction de l’intensité de nos relations sociales. Il est très contagieux, se propage vite et peut avoir des conséquences terribles si rien n’est fait. Mais c’est un virus. Pas une armée. On ne déclare pas la guerre à un virus : on apprend à le connaître, on tente de maîtriser sa vitesse de propagation, on établit sa sérologie, on essaie de trouver un ou des anti-viraux, voire un vaccin. Et, dans l’intervalle, on protège et on soigne celles et ceux qui vont être malades. En un mot, on apprend à vivre avec un virus.

    Oui, les mots ont un sens. Nous ne sommes pas en guerre car la pandémie à laquelle nous sommes confrontés exige des mesures plutôt opposées à celles prises en temps de guerre : ralentir l’activité économique plutôt que l’accélérer, mettre au #repos_forcé une part significative des travailleuses et travailleurs plutôt que les mobiliser pour alimenter un effort de guerre, réduire considérablement les #interactions_sociales plutôt qu’envoyer toutes les forces vives sur la ligne de front. Quitte à provoquer, disons-le ainsi : rester confiné chez soi, sur son canapé ou dans sa cuisine, n’a strictement rien à voir avec une période de guerre où il faut se protéger des bombes ou des snipers et tenter de survivre.

    Il n’est pas question de sacrifier le personnel médical, au contraire, il faut savoir les protéger

    Cette référence à la « guerre » convoque par ailleurs un #imaginaire_viril peuplé d’#héroïsme_masculin – bien que largement démenti par les faits – et du sacrifice qui n’a pas lieu d’être. Face au coronavirus – et à n’importe quelle pandémie – ce sont les #femmes qui sont en première ligne : 88 % des infirmières, 90 % des caissières, 82 % des enseignantes de primaire, 90 % du personnel dans les EHPAD sont des femmes. Sans même parler du personnel de crèche et de garderie mobilisés pour garder les enfants de toutes ces femmes mobilisées en première ligne. Le #personnel_médical le dit clairement : nous avons besoin de soutien, de #matériel_médical et d’être reconnus comme des #professionnels, pas comme des #héros. Il n’est pas question de les sacrifier. Au contraire, il faut savoir les protéger, en prendre soin pour que leurs compétences et leurs capacités puissent être mobilisés sur le long terme.

    Non, définitivement, nous ne sommes pas en guerre. Nous sommes face à une pandémie. Et c’est déjà bien assez. Nous ne sommes pas des soldats, mais des citoyennes et citoyens. Nous ne voulons pas être gouvernés comme en temps de guerre. Mais comme en temps de pandémie. Nous n’avons pas d’ennemi. Ni à l’extérieur, ni à l’intérieur des frontières. Confrontés pendant des semaines à l’incurie d’un gouvernement incapable de prononcer un discours clair et des #mesures cohérentes entre elles, nous sommes juste des citoyennes et citoyens progressivement en train de comprendre que la meilleure chose à faire est de rester confinés. A devoir apprendre à vivre au ralenti. Ensemble mais sans se rencontrer. A rebours de toutes les exigences de #compétitivité et de #concurrence qui nous ont été assénées depuis des dizaines d’années.

    Instituer la #solidarité et le soin comme principes cardinaux, pas les valeurs martiales et belliqueuses

    Lutter contre la pandémie du coronavirus n’est pas une guerre car il n’est pas question de sacrifier les plus vulnérables au nom de la raison d’État. Comme celles qui sont en première ligne, il nous faut au contraire les protéger, prendre soin d’eux et d’elles, y compris en se retirant physiquement pour ne pas les contaminer. SDF, migrant.e.s, les plus pauvres et plus précaires sont des nôtres : nous leur devons pleine et entière assistance pour les mettre à l’abri, autant que faire se peut : la #réquisition de logements vides n’est plus une option. Lutter contre le coronavirus c’est instituer la solidarité et le #soin comme les principes cardinaux de nos vies. La solidarité et le soin. Pas les valeurs martiales et belliqueuses.

    Ce principe de solidarité ne devrait d’ailleurs pas avoir de frontière, car le virus n’en a pas : il circule en France parce que nous circulons (trop) dans le pays. Aux mesures nationales, voire nationalistes, brandies ici et là, nous devrions collectivement étendre ce principe de solidarité à l’international et nous assurer que tous les pays, toutes les populations puissent faire face à cette pandémie. Oui, la mobilisation doit être générale : parce qu’une #crise_sanitaire mondiale l’exige, cette #mobilisation doit être généralisée à la planète entière. Pour que pandémie ne rime pas avec inégalités et carnages chez les pauvres. Ou simplement chez les voisins.

    Point besoin d’#économie_de_guerre, juste d’arrêter de naviguer à vue

    Alors, oui, sans doute faut-il prendre des mesures d’exception pour réorganiser notre système économique autour de quelques fonctions vitales, à commencer par se se nourrir et produire le matériel médical nécessaire. Deux mois après les premières contaminations, il est d’ailleurs incroyable qu’il y ait encore des pénuries de #masques pour protéger celles qui sont en première ligne : réorienter, par la réquisition si nécessaire, des moyens de production en ce sens aurait déjà dû être fait. Histoire de ne pas avoir à refuser d’exporter des masques comme l’UE le fait désormais, y compris avec la Serbie qui a pourtant entamé son processus d’adhésion : où est donc la solidarité européenne ?

    Point besoin d’économie de guerre pour cela. Juste besoin d’arrêter de naviguer à vue et d’enfin prendre les mesures cohérentes entre elles, fondées sur ce principe de solidarité, qui permettront que chaque population, riche ou pauvre, puisse faire face à la pandémie. La participation consciente et volontaire de l’ensemble de la population aux mesures de confinement nécessaires n’en sera que facilitée. Et la dynamique de l’épidémie d’autant plus facilement brisée. Le monde de demain se joue dans les mesures d’exception d’aujourd’hui.

    Maxime Combes, économiste et membre d’Attac.

    https://www.bastamag.net/pandemie-covid19-coronavirus-Macron-guerre-virus-confinement
    #épidémie #vocabulaire #terminologie #mots #coronavirus

    ping @mobileborders

    • Non Monsieur le Président de la République, nous ne sommes pas en guerre

      La déclaration du Chef de l’Etat qui amène un confinement général de la population et n’autorise les déplacements que par dérogation marque un véritable tournant dans la lutte contre l’épidémie généralisée en France. La guerre est déclarée ? Non Monsieur le Président, la Résistance collective est à l’ordre du jour pour sortir de cette épreuve.

      La déclaration du Chef de l’Etat ce 16 mars qui amène un confinement général de la population et n’autorise les déplacements que par dérogation marque un véritable tournant dans la lutte contre l’épidémie généralisée en France. Jusque-là des recommandations, des consignes, des prescriptions amenaient chacun à prendre sa part à la sûreté de contacts raréfiés. Point de contrôle, point de sanctions mais appel à prendre conscience des mesures d’hygiène à respecter puis du confinement.

      La crise sanitaire s’aggrave comme attendue. Les contaminations réalisées avant l’effectivité des mesures successives ne produisent leurs effets en terme de symptômes, qu’après le délai d’incubation de 5 à 14 jours comme nous pouvons le lire ici et là. Il y a donc mécaniquement une aggravation inévitable avant les possibles effets de ralentissement si ces mesures sont efficaces et suffisantes. Insuffisantes, à l’évidence les mesures prises jusqu’ici l’étaient, raison essentielle d’un strict confinement depuis ce 17 mars à midi.

      Crainte des autorités et politique de santé

      La crainte des autorités que partagent tous les observateurs attentifs - et ils sont nombreux - est la saturation des possibilités d’hospitalisation en réanimation pour les symptômes les plus graves qui menacent la vie même du patient avec une vulnérabilité particulière des personnes âgées ou des personnes souffrant de co-morbidités (affections chroniques ou déficiences organiques etc) sans exclure pour autant ces développements graves de la maladie respiratoire chez des sujets plus jeunes ou à l’occasion d’une « deuxième vague ».

      Cette crainte est d’autant plus vive que nos responsables gouvernementaux, le Chef de l’Etat lui-même, savent bien que les politiques de santé menées depuis des décennies, poursuivies et aggravées depuis la dernière présidentielle à coups d’économies budgétaires inconséquentes ont largement diminuées la capacité à faire face aux circonstances exceptionnelles que nous connaissons aujourd’hui. Les gouvernements successifs, et plus encore celui-ci, quand les économies en grattant toujours plus ont atteint l’os, sont restés sourds aux demandes, revendications, exhortations des professionnels de santé, de leurs organisations syndicales y compris même au début de cette épidémie. Quelle imprévoyance ! La préparation aux moyens de la protection elle-même est manifestement déficiente : les volumes des gels hydroalcooliques, masques, équipements divers sont largement insuffisants ou limites même pour les professionnels de santé, hôpitaux et médecine de ville, sont même menacés de pénurie dans des délais relativement brefs (déclaration Olivier Véran, ministre de la santé).

      Il faut l’abnégation de ceux et celles à qui on a refusé les moyens de soigner, pour faire face, héroïquement chaque jour, à cette montée des périls. La fermeture d’hôpitaux, de services et de lits, la fermeture de postes de soignants pèsent aujourd’hui dans cette lutte de résistance, jour après jour, pied à pied. Les encenser aujourd’hui ne disculpe pas de sa responsabilité, de ses choix politiques.

      Il faudra en rendre compte au peuple français après l’épreuve en changeant radicalement de politique de santé en associant les organisations syndicales et les forces vives du pays : la santé est un bien collectif pas seulement l’affaire du ministère et du gouvernement ! Il faut espérer que cet épisode douloureux amènera un changement complet de politique de santé pour faire face à d’autres épidémies qui ne manqueront pas d’arriver. Elles ne manquerons pas d’arriver dans un monde dominé par la recherche du profit à tout prix pesant en premier lieu sur la santé des populations qui ne pèse pas lourd face aux profits des firmes pharmaceutiques, phyto-sanitaires, tabagiques, agro-alimentaires et de toutes celles qui commercialisent ou utilisent des produits toxiques en semant le doute sur cette toxicité quand bien même ils ont les preuves – qu’ils cachent – d’effets graves sur la santé. Le profit d’abord et quand ce sont des milliards à la clef, on peut tout se permettre et tout maquiller.

      Malheureusement, pour le moment et dans les semaines qui viennent, nous voyons et verrons les résultats de cet abaissement des digues : l’affaiblissement des effectifs soignants et les nombreuses fermetures notamment des hôpitaux de proximité ont abaissé dramatiquement le seuil de saturation des services de réanimation qui prennent en charge les malades du CoVid-19. Nous, c’est-à-dire les citoyen.ne.s de ce pays, en feront les frais. Les petits hôpitaux aujourd’hui avec leurs soignants seraient une réserve de lits pour endiguer ce flot croissant comme autrefois les terrains ouverts sur le Rhône absorbaient les inondations périodiques.

      Nous ne sommes pas en guerre mais en Résistance

      Aujourd’hui si les soignants sont en première ligne y compris avec un risque pour leur propre santé, tous les professionnels de la logistique alimentaire, pharmaceutique, administrative sont à leur côté et assurent le service du public, au service de la Nation.

      La guerre est déclarée ? Non Monsieur le Président, nous ne sommes pas en guerre. Vous devez organiser la Résistance avec nous. Avec la guerre, le chef s’adjuge tous les pouvoirs pour vaincre, ne cherche aucunement à convaincre mais à imposer, à contraindre pour mener la bataille comme il l’entend et dans ce cas, les contestataires et les critiques sont traître et traîtrise à faire taire, vite et bien.

      La stigmatisation de groupes au contact vus à la télé sur les bords de Seine, dans des parcs amène un discours sur l’irresponsabilité de certain.e.s qui n’ont pas pris la mesure du danger pour eux et pour les autres, prétexte à introduire le contrôle et la sanction. C’est un peu facile ! Facile d’oublier son propre manque de responsabilité dans la politique de riches menée depuis son accession à la Présidence notamment la politique de santé qui a abaissé le niveau de protection, de l’assurance-chômage qui abaisse les droits et indemnisations des chômeurs, des chercheurs précarisés qui doivent plus chercher des financements que faire de la recherche. Etait-il bien responsable de matraquer et blesser ces Gilets Jaunes durant plus d’un an sans les entendre, de les poursuivre aujourd’hui pénalement pour se venger d’avoir eu peur et de s’être laissé déborder sur les Champs-Elysées ? Sans parler de bien des affaires qui ont amené certain.e.s à démissionner.

      Reconnaissons-le, la responsabilité n’est chose aisée pour personne surtout dans une société où l’enjeu est de passer la patate chaude de la responsabilité à un.e autre. La première intervention du chef de l’état du 12 mars a certainement manqué de punch pour responsabiliser. Les réactions dimanche sous le soleil sont aussi à inscrire, sans les excuser, à un déni d’ordre psychique d’entrée dans cette période de restriction, en gros, encore un dernier bol d’air avant le confinement. Après, il est possible de rappeler en direct le danger et le devoir. Pourquoi, in fine, et à peu près systématiquement - en acte contrairement aux paroles – devrait-on prendre la population pour non-responsable collectivement ? Individuellement, nous le sommes tour à tour pour, pour sujet plus ou moins important mais collectivement nous pouvons être sérieusement responsables (un peu comme la patience dans mille impatiences) surtout face à ce danger réel, palpable, identifié.

      Le confinement par la force ou la responsabilité ?

      Mais l’ennemi est là, l’invasion a eu lieu : le virus est partout. Oui, le cap doit être clair pour résoudre cette crise d’exception mais faire appel à 100.000 policiers et gendarmes c’est s’engager dans une voie où la coercition, la sanction dispensent de convaincre tout en faisant « comme si », double discours qui rappelle celui pour le premier tour des municipales. Dans ces conditions, la menace de sanction devient, de fait, la seule voie audible, choisie pour parvenir à maintenir le confinement, moyen pour stopper cette épidémie. Ce moyen n’est pas en cause. La contamination a lieu par contact : nécessité du confinement et des mesures-barrières.

      La question est la voie choisie pour parvenir à un confinement : le contrôle par les forces de Police et de Gendarmerie et la sanction financière (on imagine mal engorger les prisons déjà pleine – problème en soi - et propager le virus !). Cette voie prend le risque d’une escalade dans le contrôle de la population par des forces de l’ordre (largement utilisées depuis deux ans, sorte de réflexe) voire de déboucher sur des scènes de chaos plus ou moins localisées ou momentanées.

      Nous comprenons bien que légiférer par ordonnance n’est pas anodin et amorce une éventuelle escalade avec état de siège, intervention de l’Armée au maintien de l’ordre, pourquoi pas in fine l’article 16. Piège de l’escalade qui prend toujours le comportement marginal pour prétexte, piège aux conséquences lourdes et en quelque sorte mécaniques pour la démocratie.

      Sans protection ou avec des protections insuffisantes, les forces de l’ordre pourraient être affectées par l’épidémie. Elles pourraient l’être et affecter un volume plus ou moins important de policiers et gendarmes que leurs armes ne protègent pas comme dans une guerre, rendant impossible de remplir leur mission.

      La Résistance, au contraire, engage le peuple à entrer en Résistance conscient des enjeux pour la santé de tous. Vous n’avez pas vu que partout, à côté de contacts de moins en moins fréquents - aujourd’hui plus un seul – spontanément, les gens dans la rue, devant les magasins, tiennent leurs distances, ne s’affolent pas et s’ils parlent, c’est à distance et pas en face à face. La Résistance c’est avant tout engager chacun à devenir responsable pour devenir collectivement responsable. Et devenir collectivement responsable, c’est non seulement éviter les contacts qui transmettent le virus, mais encore organiser des réseaux de solidarités de proximité pour l’alimentation, la pharmacie etc... en respectant les consignes d’hygiène et de contacts. Tout le monde ne peut pas se déplacer. C’est bien au-delà de la peur du gendarme.

      A défaut, en durcissant encore le confinement, il faudrait organiser un réseau national de distribution à domicile ! Les forces de l’ordre pourraient-elles s’y employer ? Là encore, ce serait faire sans la population quand il s’agit de résister avec la population.

      Organiser la Résistance et mobiliser par des actes

      Il n’y a pas possibilité de résistance si la population n’est pas incitée à s’associer à cette résistance, chacun à sa mesure. La Résistance c’est le peuple et ses dirigeants, quand ceux-ci savent impulser et non seulement commander, contrôler, sanctionner. Les forces de l’ordre plutôt que sanctionner ce qui peut amener à la clandestinité des déplacements devenus illicites, pourraient se transformer en agent de persuasion en rappelant les consignes, en écoutant les nécessités explicitées sans chercher à sanctionner bref... discernement. La campagne c’est pas la ville et chacun ne va pas faire du jogging autour de sa maison ou de son pâté d’immeubles. En Auvergne, balader sur un des Puys en solitaire ou en couple de retraités est sans risque plutôt que rester aux abords de la maison et rencontrer des connaissances ! Les services de santé seront d’autant moins débordés (ou moins vite !) que chacun se sentira, se sent responsable des soignants, en actes et pas seulement en paroles.

      Sans association et conscience de la population, il n’y a en effet que la guerre et son cortège d’oeufs cassés toujours justifiés en toute bonne foi.

      Pour associer le peuple, la suspension des réformes en cours est enfin une mesure de sagesse et d’apaisement. De toutes façons, le calendrier de la réforme des retraites ne peut plus être tenu. Avant l’été c’est râpé ! Le report de la mise en place de la réforme de l’assurance-chômage est aussi la démonstration en creux de revenus dramatiquement insupportables pour quantités de chômeurs, à repousser hors cette période exceptionnelle. Seraient-ils véritablement plus supportables après un retour à la normale ? Revoir la copie.

      Il faut aller plus loin. Pour une adhésion et une responsabilité de la population, Il faut permettre un minimum de confiance quand celle-ci a été dilapidée par une attitude intransigeante toujours dans le sens des riches en pompant l’argent des autres. Il faut annoncer quelles réformes deviennent prioritaires, quel cap social et sociétal elles prendront, avec qui et comment elles seront travaillées (pas seulement une concertation sur un texte à trous béants comme celui des retraites).

      L’indemnisation du chômage partiel prise actuellement pour garder les moyens de subsistance n’illustre-t-elle pas la nécessité de la mise en place d’un revenu universel ? Ce pourrait être un dispositif qui l’initie à élargir et pérenniser.

      Une mesure forte immédiate qui ne coûte pas un euro mais vaudra crédit : arrêter toutes les poursuites pour fait social, grèves et manifestations. La paix sociale ne s’achète pas, elle s’obtient avec des actes.

      La guerre alors n’aura pas lieu

      Vaincre l’épidémie c’est engager la population dans la Résistance et non la délégation aux chefs de mener une guerre qui n’existe pas, même si l’économie s’en rapproche, si l’organisation du fonctionnement en société s’en rapproche. C’est apporter un tournant social à ce quinquennat de riches, non pas le passer au Ripolin vaguement rose mais s’engager à des réformes nécessaires et identifiées dès maintenant avec les moyens d’une co-construction postérieure chacun à sa place. Alors les forces vives de la nation seront mobilisées pour vaincre par la responsabilité et la solidarité. La guerre alors n’aura pas lieu !

      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/georges-andre/blog/170320/non-monsieur-le-president-de-la-republique-nous-ne-sommes-pas-en-gue

    • #Rony_Brauman répond à Macron : « La #métaphore de la guerre sert à disqualifier tout débat »

      Rony Brauman, ancien président de Médecins sans frontières, approuve les mesures de confinement, mais dénonce la #rhétorique_martiale du chef de l’Etat : « Qualifier les soignants de "#héros", c’est gommer les raisons de la crise sanitaire. »

      Médecin, diplômé de médecine tropicale et épidémiologie, Rony Brauman a été président de Médecins sans frontières (MSF) de 1982 à 1994. Il est aujourd’hui directeur d’études à la fondation de l’ONG. Son dernier livre, « Guerres humanitaire ? Mensonges et intox », conversation avec Régis Meyran, est paru aux éditions Textuel en 2018.
      Interview.

      Comment analysez-vous l’épidémie du #Covid-19 et sa gestion par les autorités françaises ?
      Cette épidémie n’avait pas été prévue, mais elle avait été prédite. De nombreux épidémiologistes avaient anticipé l’apparition d’un nouveau virus se répandant à la faveur de l’accroissement démographique, de l’accélération des voyages internationaux, de l’urbanisation, du changement climatique. Cette crainte, déjà ancienne, s’était renforcée avec les épidémies de sida, le Sras, le Mers, le Zika, le chikungunya, Ebola. Nous savions que le rêve d’un monde débarrassé d’un risque infectieux était une #illusion et les gouvernements successifs ne pouvaient méconnaître ces analyses. Cela ne les a pas empêchés, depuis des années, de réduire les capacités des hôpitaux, avec les effets que l’on voit aujourd’hui. Plus de 4 000 lits ont été supprimés ces trois dernières années, mais c’est depuis trente ans que gagne une #logique_comptable, entrepreneuriale (notamment la loi Hôpital, Patient, Santé, Territoire de 2009, qui concrétise la notion d’« #hopital-entreprise », introduite par #Claude_Evin dès 1989). Pourtant, aujourd’hui, Emmanuel Macron ne tarit pas d’éloge sur le personnel hospitalier... Ses propos qualifiant les soignants de « héros » me semblent particulièrement mal venus. Cette qualification a quelque chose de pervers, parce qu’elle gomme les raisons de la #crise_sanitaire. Outre qu’elle oubliait les autres professions qui continuent à travailler pour que notre vie soit encore vivable (éboueurs, policiers, livreurs, caissières, producteurs, distributeurs de produits essentiels), elle met les soignants dans une position délicate. Un héros, ça ne demande pas des journées de récupération pour s’occuper de ses enfants, de prime de risque, un salaire décent. On sait bien qu’une partie du vidage des hôpitaux vient de ce qu’on paye les gens de façon indécente. Brandir la figure du héros, c’est sous-entendre par contraste la médiocrité de revendiquer des #conditions_de_travail correctes.

      Pourtant, quand les gens applaudissent à leurs fenêtres à #20_heures, n’est-ce pas aussi une façon de saluer dans les soignants des figures héroïques ?
      Si, bien sûr, et je m’y associe. Ces applaudissements constituent un rite de reconnaissance collective vis-à-vis d’une catégorie qui s’expose de façon constante, quotidienne. Mais ils ne doivent pas être séparés d’une interrogation politique sur les #restrictions_budgétaires imposées depuis des années à ceux qui sont considérés aujourd’hui comme les sauveurs de la nation.
      J’ajoute que, dans les propos d’Emmanuel Macron, cette #héroïsation n’est que le complètement logique du discours de la guerre, la métaphore du combat engagé contre l’#ennemi_invisible. Cette notion ne me semble pas la bonne. Nous sommes face à une #catastrophe. Au moment où nous parlons, des structures de soins sont débordées et l’on voit réapparaître les méthodes de la #médecine_de_catastrophe, mises au point, il est vrai, par la #médecine_militaire mais élargies aux situations de crises majeures, notamment de catastrophes naturelles : les techniques de #triage séparant les gens qu’on va pouvoir aider à sortir et ceux pour lequel le pronostic est trop mauvais, relèvent typiquement de la médecine de catastrophe. De façon plus générale, cette métaphore est trompeuse, en ce qu’elle laisse entendre que la #santé passe par la défaite de la maladie. Mais la maladie fait partie de la vie et l’on devrait parler de #droit_à_la_maladie, plutôt que de #droit_à_la santé. Je pense au philosophe #Georges_Canguilhem observant que pour la plupart des gens, la santé, ce n’est pas l’#absence_de_maladie mais la possibilité de tomber malade et de s’en relever.

      Mais n’est-il pas vrai que nous combattons un ennemi : le #virus ?
      Un point, encore : depuis #Pasteur, le germe infectieux place les sociétés dans une situation complexe. Dès lors que nous sommes tous potentiellement vecteurs de #contagion, chaque individu devient une #menace pour la collectivité, chaque voisin est un risque potentiel. Et inversement, l’individu se sent menacé par le groupe, qui peut cacher des malades, et il va donc chercher à s’en isoler. Le #confinement nous demande d’être à la fois solidaires et individualistes. C’est le #paradoxe de l’#épidémie, que dissimule la métaphore de la guerre. Dire qu’on mène une guerre contre un virus, c’est prendre le risque d’alimenter la #guerre_de_tous_contre_tous, chacun étant potentiellement le vecteur de l’ennemi invisible.
      Quand j’entends le président conclure son discours de Mulhouse, le 25 mars, par un martial « Nous ne céderons rien ! », je suis abasourdi. Céder quoi, à qui ? Craignez-vous la restriction des libertés liée au confinement ? J’approuve le confinement et des mesures actuellement en vigueur, à défaut d’autres moyens de protection pour l’instant. Ces mesures sont le résultat, forcément instable, de la recherche d’un équilibre entre trois exigences : la #sécurité_sanitaire, la #liberté des individus et la continuité de la machine économique. La liberté peut être restreinte, mais il est impossible de confiner tout le monde, car une partie l’#activité_économique doit se poursuivre, sous peine d’une morte lente générale. Je rappelle qu’une épidémie peut faire plus de #victimes_indirectes que directes, comme cela a été probablement le cas d’#Ebola : je pense aux malades qui n’ont pas pu se soigner, qui ont été conduits à une issue fatale à cause de la paralysie des régions frappées par la maladie.
      Pour ma part, je comprends le retard de confinement mis en oeuvre en France : l’exigence de #santé_publique était en balance avec l’exigence de liberté et l’exigence de #continuité_économique. Prenons garde à ne pas porter sur les mesures du gouvernement Philippe un regard anachroniquement sévère ! Reste que je m’inquiète de l’empilement des #mesures_autoritaires. N’oublions pas que des dispositions de l’#état_d'urgence antiterroriste ont été intégrées à la #loi_ordinaire et appliquées contre des militants écolos et syndicalistes. On doit craindre une reproduction de ce précédent.

      Portez-vous le même regard compréhensif sur la stratégie de la France en matière de #masques et de #tests ?
      Non ! Ce sont clairement deux loupés de la politique et de la communication gouvernementales. Autant j’apprécie les points quotidiens de #Jérôme_Salomon, le directeur général de la Santé, et son ministre #Olivier_Véran, qui sont très pédagogiques, didactiques, non arrogants, autant la question des masques et des tests a été traitée de façon extrêmement grossière, là encore infantilisante comme l’est la métaphore de la guerre. Ils auraient pu reconnaître qu’il y avait un retard à rattraper - retard imputable aux gouvernements successifs et non au seul gouvernement Philippe - et qu’il fallait plus de masques et plus de tests. Ils pouvaient expliquer que le #rationnement ne durerait pas, qu’ils y travaillaient, bref traiter leurs concitoyens en adultes. Au lieu de cela, ils ont choisi de tenir un discours de #déni. « Pourquoi ne pas faire plus de tests ? - Parce que c’est inutile ! » « Pourquoi ne pas distribuer pas plus de masques ? - Parce que c’est inutile ! » Et ce n’est pas vrai... Oui, c’est mensonger et ce point-là n’a rien à voir avec les choix difficiles, évolutifs, du confinement et de ses limites. Les masques sont indispensables pour les personnels soignants et pour les professions exposées au public. Quant au test, on nous explique qu’il n’est utile que pour les cas graves. Ce n’est pas vrai ! Dans les cas graves, il ne fait que confirmer le #diagnostic_clinique, alors que dans les cas moins graves ou bénins, il permet de connaître le #statut_sérologique des individus. On peut alors choisir pour chacun la solution adaptée : confinement à la maison, isolement dans des structures médicalisées (pour ne pas engorger l’hôpital) et hôpital (si nécessaire). Je suis consterné que les porte-parole du gouvernement se soient cramponnés à cette #pseudoscience. Un tel manquement est très contre-productif car il vient affaiblir la #confiance que l’opinion peut avoir dans d’autres mesures gouvernementales, qui, elles, sont tout à fait argumentables, tel que le confinement.

      Derrière ce loupé, y a-t-il des dissensions internes au champ médical ? Certains scientifiques ont-ils sous-estimé l’épidémie ?
      La #médecine n’est pas une science, c’est une #pratique_scientifiquement_informée. On le voit à l’échelle d’un organisme individuel : le corps n’est pas une matière inerte qui répondrait toujours de la même façon aux mêmes actions. Pour les questions de #santé_publique, c’est encore plus net, car la médecine est alors confrontée à toutes sortes d’événements inattendus et d’une variabilité extrême. La science aide à prendre les décisions, mais elle ne sait pas tout et, dans l’incertitude, ce sont les politiques qui doivent trancher.

      Sur cette épidémie, il n’y a pas de #consensus_médical ?
      Non, pour les raisons que je viens de dire. De plus, la familiarité des médecins avec les réalités épidémiologiques est très limitée. Le métier des médecins est de soigner les pathologies, mais pas forcément de connaître leur diffusion. Cela relève d’un autre type de savoir : l’épidémiologie. Il y a les épidémiologistes médecins, bien sûr, mais aussi des épidémiologistes non-médecins, notamment les statisticiens, les modélisateurs, qui n’ont pas la même approche que les médecins. Il peut y avoir des désaccords et c’est alors au politique de trancher, et de s’en expliquer. Néanmoins, sur la question de l’intérêt des masques et des tests pour gérer l’épidémie au mieux, il y a un consensus quasi-total.

      Mais alors, pourquoi les principaux responsables de la santé en France ont-ils dit le contraire ? Après tout, Jérôme Salomon et Olivier Véran, ainsi que sa prédécesseure #Agnès_Buzyn, sont tous des médecins...
      C’est un mystère. Mon hypothèse, toute personnelle, est qu’il s’agit d’un effet de la propension des responsables politiques à la rigidité comme preuve de leur détermination. En toutes circonstances, ils veulent afficher leur assurance et voient dans toute remise en question un affaiblissement de leur #autorité. Le fantasme de #toute-puissance est à l’oeuvre ! C’est ce que nous disait encore Macron, qualifiant de « polémiques », forcément stériles, et de tentatives de « fracture » de la société, forcément dangereuses, les critiques qui lui sont adressées. Il faut « #faire_bloc », c’est-à-dire marcher au pas, fleur au fusil. Où l’on voit que la métaphore de la guerre sert à disqualifier toute mise en #débat.

      Vous-même, avez-vous changé d’avis sur l’épidémie ?
      J’ai hésité en janvier, mais j’ai été assez rapidement convaincu que le #risque_pandémique était bien réel, tout en considérant la réaction des pouvoirs publics en France était correcte, et que par exemple on n’avait pas de raison de coller immédiatement à ce que faisait l’Italie. Il y a eu des discussions, y compris au sein de Médecins sans frontière, où certains étaient très sceptiques. Dès le début février, il a été clair que la cinétique de l’épidémie était inquiétante, en découvrant que des patients asymptomatiques pouvaient être transmetteurs du virus. Dans une épidémie, ce n’est pas le chiffre de mortalité à un instant T qui importe. On peut toujours comparer ces chiffres à bien d’autres, comme l’ont fait trop longtemps les « corona-sceptiques ». C’est le #temps_de_doublement des cas qu’il faut regarder attentivement : 2,5 jours pour le Covid-19. Là, on comprend assez rapidement que la progression est effrayante, surtout si on le rapporte aux mesures de confinement, qui mettent quinze jours à commencer à produire de l’effet : en quinze jours, on a six fois le doublement des cas, ce qui signifie qu’un porteur contamine 64 personnes en quinze jours, 244 en un mois.

      Que pensez-vous de la polémique sur la #chloroquine ? N’est-ce pas affligeant, dans une telle période ?
      La forme a été parfois affligeante, mais pas la controverse elle-même. Ce qui donne le caractère polémique à cette discussion, c’est le sentiment de vivre une #tragédie_collective dans laquelle tout #désaccord prend une dimension énorme. Mais, en temps normal, c’est le lot commun du travail médical. Pour des #pathologies_émergentes et même pour des pathologies déjà connues, il faut des années d’essais cliniques et de traitement pour obtenir un #consensus. Regardez les médicaments contre le cholestérol, qui font l’objet d’une controverse très vive depuis plusieurs années. Ce n’est pas parce qu’on est en période d’état d’urgence sanitaire qu’il faudrait fermer la porte aux discussions contradictoires, aux critiques. Surtout pas. Nous avons besoin de cette pluralité d’avis. Cela étant dit, la façon dont #Didier_Raoult a présenté la chloroquine comme un médicament miracle appartient plus à un prophète qu’à un spécialiste de santé.

      Il n’y aura pas de médicament miracle pour le Covid-19 ?
      Non, pas plus qu’il n’y en a eu pour les autres infections. Cela me rappelle l’annonce faite en 1985 par le professeur #Andrieux, accompagné de la ministre de la Santé d’alors, #Georgina_Dufoix, donnant la #cyclosporine comme le médicament qui allait tout changer à partir d’un essai sur quelques cas. Pour ce qui est de la chloroquine, ses effets antiviraux et antibactériens sont bien connus, mais l’essai de Marseille n’a rien de concluant, contrairement à ce qu’en disent certains, y compris des politiques qui se croient autorisés à avoir un avis sur cette question totalement technique. C’est une ressource possible, il faut la tester. Le bon côté de cette controverse, c’est que la chloroquine va être jointe aux nombreux essais cliniques en cours. Mais il ne faut pas créer de #faux_espoirs. Didier Raoult a un passé de chercheur sérieux, mais son personnage de génie autoproclamé n’incite pas à la confiance. Quant à la validité de son essai, elle a été très précisément analysée.

      Parmi les multiples réflexions suscitées par l’épidémie, il y a cette idée que la nature malmenée par la #mondialisation serait en train de se venger avec ces différents virus venus du monde animal. Qu’en pensez-vous ?
      Le point commun du Covid, du Sras, du Mers et d’Ebola est que ces maladies sont le fruit d’un passage de la #barrière_virale_d'espèces entre les #animaux et les hommes. L’extension des certaines mégapoles entraîne une interpénétration entre #ville et #forêts : c’est le cas d’Ebola, qui trouve son origine dans la présence des #chauves-souris en ville et qui mangeaient par des humains. Mais ce paramètre, s’il faut avoir à l’esprit, est à manier avec une certaine retenue. Car il s’agit d’une constance dans l’histoire des épidémies : la plupart, à commencer par la #peste, sont liées à ce franchissement. L’homme vit dans la compagnie des animaux depuis le néolithique, notre existence est rendue possible par cette coexistence. Mais la peste avait été importée par la puce du rat qui était disséminé sur les bateaux et les caravanes ; pour le corona, ce sont les #avions qui ont fait ce travail. La spécificité du Covid-19, c’est sa vitesse de #diffusion. Le professeur Sansonnetti, infectiologue et professeur au Collège de France, parle d’une « maladie de l’#anthropocène » : en superposant la carte de l’extension du virus et celle des déplacements aériens, il montre que les deux se recouvrent parfaitement.

      L’enjeu est donc moins la façon dont la #mondialisation malmène la nature, mais dont elle ouvre des avenues à des germes. Faut-il refermer ces avenues ?
      Le propre du vivant, c’est de chercher à répandre ses gènes et le virus obéit à une logique de vie, qui s’inscrit dans une dialectique entre #contagiosité et #mortalité. Il lui faut trouver des #vecteurs - des organismes vivants - qui lui permettent de se répandre. Mais s’il tue trop vite ces vecteurs ou s’il ne trouve pas de nouveaux organismes à contaminer, il arrive à une impasse et meurt. Ce que vise le confinement, c’est à mettre le virus dans une impasse : chacun doit être le cimetière du virus. C’est ici que l’on voit la limite de la méthode : cet isolement total serait notre cimetière à tous, pas seulement celui du virus.
      A quoi cela sert de "gagner du temps" face au coronavirus ?
      #Mutation. Le mot, lorsqu’il est associé au coronavirus, fait peur. Surtout depuis que des chercheurs chinois ont affirmé que le virus avait déjà muté en une variante plus agressive.

      Alors, faut-il redouter ses prochaines transformations ?
      #Luc_Perino, médecin diplômé d’épidémiologie et auteur du livre "Patients zéro" (La Découverte), explique qu’un virus mute en permanence... et pas nécessairement d’une manière défavorable à l’être humain. "Dans la majorité des épidémies, le virus évolue vers moins de #virulence, et vers plus de #diffusion." C’est-à-dire qu’il tend à se propager plus vite... mais en devenant moins mortel.

      https://www.nouvelobs.com/coronavirus-de-wuhan/20200327.OBS26690/rony-brauman-repond-a-macron-la-metaphore-de-la-guerre-sert-a-disqualifie
      #solidarité #individualisme #autoritarisme #mensonge #mensonges #épidémiologie

    • Parler de l’héroïsme des soignants c’est une excision symbolique du corps médical. Les soignants sont des femmes en grande majorité. Les soignantEs ont pour travail de prendre soin, pas de trucider, étriper et violer comme le font les soldats, ni même se sacrifier.
      Les soldat(e)s ne soignent pas.
      Les soignantEs ne tuent pas.

      A la guerre il y a des héros or la racine latine « vir » de viril, virilité, virilisme et aussi vértu viens du sanskrit HERO. L’héroisme c’est ce qui fait l’homme et donc certainement pas les femmes. Traiter les soignantes de héro ou même héroïnes c’est les affubler de virilité.

      #invisibilisation_des_femmes #virilisme #inversion_patriarcale #excision_symbolique

    • La guerre est toujours un beau #prétexte pour imposer la #répression

      « Et nous voilà en dictature ?

      La guerre est toujours un beau prétexte pour imposer la répression.

      Guerre contre les pauvres, contre les travailleur.e.s précarisé.e.s, contre les personnes entassées dans des squats, contre les enfants des quartiers dits « prioritaires », contre les « migrants » comme ils aiment les appeler…Ah, veuillez m’excuser, je n’avais pas compris que notre aimable président parlait de guerre contre un virus…

      Il est vrai qu’en observant le confinement prendre la pelle (l’appel) pour creuser, creuser et creuser encore le gouffre qui sépare les bien loti.e.s des plus précarisé.e.s, je n’avais pas compris qu’il parlait d’une guerre contre la nature… Pourtant, j’aurais dû m’en douter, car il est bien évident que notre président a toujours voué un grand amour pour notre environnement… Mais non, je pensais bêtement que la guerre avait été déclarée. Que l’on nous avait encore pris pour des dindes, en nous faisant par exemple copier deux fois de suite « l’article 3 du décret du 23 mars 2020 prescrivant les mesures générales nécessaires pour faire face à… » blablabla. Et si tu n’as pas de papier pour écrire, tant pis pour toi ! De toute façon, on est en guerre, gamin.e, alors pourquoi veux-tu te promener dans les rues ? Ah ? La rue est ta maison ? Quelle sombre idée… De toute façon, on est en guerre, alors qui se soucie de savoir si tu vis à la rue, hein ?

      Oui, je n’ai pas réussi à entendre le mot virus quand notre cher président a répété six fois que nous étions en guerre…

      Et il est vrai que quand les jeunes avec qui je travaille m’ont transmis leurs angoisses de « ne pas réussir », avec la peur d’être encore mis de côté, exclus dans leur quartier alors même qu’elles et ils me faisaient part il y a peu de leur désir de « bien s’en sortir » pour montrer à leurs pairs que personne n’est éternellement assigné au quartier, je n’ai pas pensé au virus… Mais à la violence de l’Education Nationale.

      Quand mon amie du Sud de la France m’a quant à elle parlé de son combat éreintant pour récupérer son jeune garçon de 5 ans, confiné chez son père violent et fiché S à Paris, je n’ai pas pensé au virus… Mais à l’horreur du confinement.

      Quand une autre m’a parlé de sa colère en tant qu’infirmière de voir tant de gens ne pas respecter leur investissement/épuisement en continuant à vivre « comme si de rien n’était », je n’ai pas pensé au virus… Mais à la stupidité et l’égoïsme qui animent mes « compatriotes ».

      Et enfin, quand mes collègues m’ont fait part au début du confinement des difficultés à trouver des volontaires pour garder les enfants des soignants, je n’ai pas pensé au virus… Mais à la fameuse « Fraternité » oubliée de la devise française.

      Dites-moi qu’au moins, cela servira de prise de conscience ? Car qui tient donc le pays en ce moment ? Qui le fait (sur)vivre ? Ni moi, ni peut-être vous. Mais celles et ceux que l’on a invisibilisé depuis bien trop longtemps. Et si je dois donc applaudir, j’applaudirais tout autant les agriculteurs/trices, les vendeurs/euses en magasin, les bénévoles (devraient-ils vraiment être bénévoles ?), les professeur.e.s et toutes celles et ceux qui nous permettent de continuer à vivre. En fait, qui nous ont toujours permis de continuer à vivre…

      Alors maintenant, je me demande, que pouvons-nous faire de tout ce temps pour celles et ceux qui en ont plus que d’habitude… N’est-il pas le moment de le « prendre ce temps » pour réfléchir à de nouveaux systèmes ? Puisque dans nos vies à 100 à l’heure, celui-ci manque toujours…

      Qu’a-t-on de fait à proposer ? Comment peut-on imaginer une plateforme pour échanger sur de nouveaux modèles ? Sur la manière de visibiliser ces réalités mais également de contribuer à les changer ? Comment peut-on se servir de ce temps pour ne plus panser les blessures de notre système mais bien penser de nouvelles perspectives ? Si tout le monde est davantage connecté, c’est donc l’occasion de toucher de nouveaux publics, de faire connaitre des réalités, de proposer des formations et de construire quelque chose de nouveau…

      Je sais que certain.e.s s’y attellent depuis bien longtemps. Mais n’est-ce pas alors l’occasion de joindre nos forces pour penser collectivement ? Utiliser le confinement pour se mettre davantage en lien et penser autrement ? Servons-nous de cette colère. Transformons-là. »
      Coline

      https://www.modop.org/se-relier/#3avril

    • « De la #guerre_sanitaire à la guerre économique et sociale »

      A la « guerre sanitaire » aujourd’hui déclarée, risque de succéder une « guerre économique et sociale » impitoyable pour les salariés, les fonctionnaires et les habitants des quartiers populaires. J’ai imaginé ce que pourrait être le discours du président de la République...

      La première victime de la guerre, c’est toujours la vérité

      La deuxième victime de la guerre, ce sont les conquis sociaux

      La troisième victime de la guerre, ce sont les droits et libertés démocratiques

      A la manière d’un certain président de la République.

      « Françaises, Français, mes chers compatriotes. Depuis le déclenchement de la crise sanitaire, je me suis plusieurs fois adressé à vous pour évoquer les épreuves que nous avons traversées, pour annoncer les mesures indispensables afin de juguler l’épidémie d’abord et d’en venir à bout ensuite. Ces circonstances exceptionnelles m’ont conduit à prendre, avec le gouvernement, en accord avec l’Assemblée nationale et le Sénat, des mesures elles aussi exceptionnelles sans lesquelles nous n’aurions pu gagner cette bataille décisive contre le Covid-19. Tout d’abord, je veux, au nom de la nation, saluer toutes celles et tous ceux qui, médecins, infirmiers, personnels hospitaliers, ont été aux avant-postes de ce combat, avec un dévouement et un courage exemplaires, et pour certains, hélas, au péril de leur vie. Ils méritent notre reconnaissance. C’est pourquoi j’ai décidé qu’un hommage national leur sera rendu à une date qui sera précisée. Plus encore, toutes et tous recevront, à titre collectif, la légion d’honneur.

      Ensuite, je veux avoir une pensée pour vous, Françaises et Français, qui avez perdu un parent, un proche, un ami. Je sais votre peine infinie et nous la partageons tous. Dans ces moments que je sais ô combien douloureux, soyez assurés que votre deuil est aussi le nôtre, et jamais nous n’oublierons vos chers disparus. Enfin, je veux également saluer celles et ceux qui, envers et contre tout, ont continué de travailler sans se laisser détourner de leurs tâches indispensables au pays par des revendications aussi démagogiques qu’irresponsables. C’est grâce à eux qu’il n’y a pas eu de pénurie et que les approvisionnements n’ont jamais cessé en dépit des difficultés qu’ils ont eux aussi surmontées avec une ténacité et une résilience remarquables. Françaises, Français, mes chers compatriotes, suite aux décisions que j’ai prises, vous avez, vous aussi, consenti de nombreux sacrifices en respectant un confinement toujours plus strict, en bouleversant vos habitudes, en renonçant à bien des loisirs et à bien des plaisirs : ceux de se réunir en famille, entre amis, de dîner au restaurant, d’aller au cinéma, au théâtre, d’écouter des concerts, de faire du sport, de se promener. Qui, en ville, qui à la campagne pour pêcher ou chasser, qui à la mer ou à la montage. Je sais que les décisions prises ont bouleversé vos vies mais elles étaient indispensables pour sauver le plus grand nombre de nos ainés et de nos concitoyens. Vous l’avez assez vite compris et vous l’avez donc accepté. Toutes et tous, vous avez fait la démonstration remarquable que nous sommes un grand peuple et que la France est une nation à nulle autre pareille qui, dans les épreuves, sait se retrouver pour les affronter dans l’unité, la solidarité et la fraternité.

      Nous venons de gagner une bataille majeure mais nous n’avons pas encore gagné la guerre. La crise sanitaire est certes derrière nous mais nous devons, dès maintenant, mener d’autres combats et relever d’autres défis. Ils sont économiques et sociaux. Ceux d’hier étaient immenses, ceux qui nous attendent ne le sont pas moins. Mes chers compatriotes, je vous le dis avec solennité et gravité, nous sommes toujours en guerre. L’ennemi n’est plus invisible, il n’est plus insidieux mais il n’en est pas moins présent, puissant et menaçant. Cet ennemi, il se nomme récession, régression, faillites en série et reprise possible de la hausse du chômage. Celui que nous venons de terrasser, nous menaçait tous, celui qui se présente maintenant agit de même. Je veux dire par là qu’il peut, lui aussi, bouleverser nos vies en frappant partout et dans toutes les catégories de la population. Nos grandes, moyennes et petites entreprises sont menacées. De même nos admirables artisans qui, partout en France, maintiennent vivantes d’anciennes traditions d’excellence. Je n’oublie pas nos agriculteurs, nos pêcheurs, nos viticulteurs, nos artistes et nos libraires.

      Hier, Françaises, Français, mes chers compatriotes, vous avez consenti de nombreux sacrifices. Je m’adresse à vous tous pour vous en demander de nouveaux car cette situation économique et sociale est elle aussi exceptionnelle. Elle n’est pas sans rappeler celle que nos ainés ont dû affronter au sortir de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Ils avaient un pays à reconstruire, nous avons une économie à rebâtir et pour y parvenir au plus vite, il faut être capable de se hisser à la hauteur des tâches multiples et difficiles qui nous attendent. Lorsque je me suis adressé à vous au début de l’épidémie le 16 mars dernier, je vous avais dit qu’après les épreuves traversées, plus rien ne serait comme avant. Ce jour est arrivé et il nous faut maintenant en tirer toutes les conséquences.

      Nous sommes en guerre. Aussi, notre code du travail, conçu dans et pour une autre conjoncture, est-il parfaitement inadapté à celle que nous allons affronter. Il est trop lourd et compliqué. De là d’innombrables lenteurs qui sont autant d’obstacles à la reprise que nous appelons tous de nos vœux. C’est pourquoi je vais demander au gouvernement d’adopter une loi d’urgence économique qui permettra à toutes et à tous de travailler au-delà des 35 heures, de travailler le dimanche si nécessaire et d’étendre le travail de nuit aux secteurs économiques particulièrement fragiles et/ou particulièrement affectés par le confinement auquel notre pays a été soumis. De plus, de nouveaux contrats d’embauche, moins contraignants et plus souples seront mis en place pour permettre de répondre dans les meilleures conditions aux défis multiples et variés que nos entreprises et nos artisans vont devoir relever dans les semaines et les mois à venir. Nous devons travailler plus et plus longtemps, c’est pourquoi la réforme des retraites, suspendue pour les raisons que vous savez, sera enfin adoptée. Et je souhaite qu’elle soit elle aussi assouplie pour permettre à celles et ceux qui veulent continuer à travailler de le faire en toute liberté. Toutes ces mesures s’imposent car il y va de notre place en Europe, de notre place dans le monde, de votre avenir personnel et professionnel, et de celui de vos enfants et de vos petits-enfants.

      Oui, nous sommes en guerre. C’est pourquoi, afin de favoriser au mieux la croissance indispensable aux progrès de notre pays, au relèvement de notre économie et à l’amélioration de vos conditions de vie, je demanderai également au gouvernement de bloquer les salaires pour une durée qui reste à déterminer, de réduire les congés et de permettre aux employeurs de les fixer à leur convenance, après consultation des salariés. Il en sera évidemment de même dans toute la fonction publique à l’exception de la fonction publique hospitalière où des postes seront créés et de nouveaux moyens accordés. En même temps, nous poursuivrons la modernisation indispensable de nos hôpitaux afin d’augmenter là aussi leur compétitivité et donc leur efficacité au service du plus grand nombre. Mes chers compatriotes, je sais votre attachement à notre système de santé qui suscite l’admiration de beaucoup à l’étranger, c’est aussi pour répondre à vos attentes que je vous demande ces efforts. Efforts également dans l’éducation nationale et dans l’enseignement supérieur où, jusqu’à nouvel ordre, aucun recrutement ne sera effectué. Cette situation n’empêchera nullement les écoles, les collèges, les lycées et les universités d’embaucher, de façon temporaire et pour une durée limitée, le personnel enseignant et administratif nécessaire à l’accomplissement de leurs missions. Là aussi, la modernisation doit être impérativement poursuivie car nous pouvons et nous devons faire mieux. Les temps présents comme de nombreux parents l’exigent et personne ne comprendrait, à l’heure où je vous parle, que les fonctionnaires précités désertent cette formidable bataille économique et sociale qu’il nous faut remporter au plus vite.

      C’est parce qu’elle est terrible que nous devons mobiliser toutes les énergies, stimuler tous les talents, libérer toutes les volontés et toutes les ambitions en donnant à chacune et à chacun l’opportunité de s’y associer. A vous Françaises et Français d’abord car, en ces circonstances exceptionnelles il n’est plus acceptable que d’autres, arrivés depuis peu dans notre pays et sans intention d’y faire souche, accèdent rapidement à des emplois qui pourraient être occupés par vous. C’est pourquoi je vais demander au gouvernement de préparer un projet de loi destiné, non à fermer complètement l’immigration, ce serait aussi vain qu’inutile, mais à la limiter au strict nécessaire sur la base de quotas régulièrement révisés, comme cela se fait déjà dans de nombreux Etats développés et démocratiques. De même, il faut rapatrier dans notre pays des activités essentielles à notre indépendance sanitaire, industrielle et économique pour renforcer ainsi notre souveraineté en produisant français avec des travailleuses et des travailleurs français. L’union nationale nous a permis de vaincre l’épidémie hier, elle nous permettra, demain, de renouer avec la prospérité dont vous serez toutes et tous les heureux bénéficiaires.

      Nous sommes en guerre, et cette nouvelle guerre nous ne la gagnerons qu’en étant capables de nous affranchir d’habitudes parfois désuètes et, dans tous les cas, inadaptées aux exigences qui s’imposent désormais à tous. J’ai bien dit à tous, c’est pourquoi, un nouveau gouvernement, plus resserré, sera bientôt formé et les traitements des uns et des autres réduits. De même, le nombre des membres de cabinet. D’ores et déjà, et pour apporter ma contribution à cet effort national sans précédent, je vous annonce que je renonce à mon traitement jusqu’à la fin de ce quinquennat. Mais il faut aller plus loin en poursuivant la réforme de nos institutions ce qui passe, entre autres, par la réduction du nombre de députés et de sénateurs afin que les premiers comme les seconds participent pleinement à cette réduction indispensable, vitale même de nos dépenses publiques. Au cours de ces derniers mois, comme je l’ai dit, l’Etat a payé sans compter pour lutter contre l’épidémie et soutenir les secteurs économiques particulièrement affectés par la crise sanitaire. Ces temps sont désormais révolus et chacun comprendra qu’il n’est pas possible de poursuivre plus longtemps dans cette voie sauf à s’engager de nouveau dans la spirale ruineuse de l’endettement dont les effets retomberont lourdement sur les générations à venir. Cela, je ne le veux pas et je ne le permettrai pas car ce serait trahir les espoirs de notre jeunesse, et je sais que nul, dans ce pays, ne le souhaite.

      Mes chers compatriotes, je vous le dis et je le répète, nous sommes toujours en guerre. Je vous demande donc d’être responsables, de ne céder à aucune surenchère partisane et syndicale, de refuser le repli corporatiste qui a fait tant de mal à notre pays, et de vous élever à la hauteur des tâches exigées par cette situation exceptionnelle. N’écoutez pas celles et ceux qui se complaisent dans la critique mais qui n’ont rien de concret et de sérieux à proposer. Evitons cette démagogie et ces exaltations aussi puériles que mortifères. Unis, chacun fidèle à son poste et à sa place, nous gagnerons. Vive la République ! Vive la France ! »

      https://blogs.mediapart.fr/olivier-le-cour-grandmaison/blog/230320/de-la-guerre-sanitaire-la-guerre-economique-et-sociale

      –---

      Lecture de ce texte :
      #Fin_de_l'épidémie : le discours d’Emmanuel #Macron

      Texte : #Olivier_Le_Cour_Grandmaison
      Lecture : Nicolas Mourer
      Réalisation Christiane Passevant

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBd5yLA-c-8&feature=share


      #déconfinement #coronavirus #covid-19

      Message de Olivier Le Cour Grandmaison via Facs et Labos en lutte :

      Texte que j’ai rédigé en imaginant le #discours_de_Jupiter au sortir du confinement

  • La tragedia del #Mattmark

    Il bel sole volgeva al tramonto
    tra le cime deserte e ghiacciate
    già le squadre eran tutte tornate
    da un infido e pesante lavor

    era gente di varie nazioni
    ma in gran parte era gente italiana
    che lasiata la casa lontana
    a Mattmark lor trovaron lavor

    la montagna a vederla era imensa
    la oservan gli adetti al cantiere
    a ciascuno sembrava vedere
    un gigante forgiato di acciar

    dopo il turno di dura fatica
    si lasiavan gli arnesi a riposo
    e si andava con anim gioioso
    alla mensa dov’era pronto il cenar

    chi pensava alla casa natia
    alla moglie ai figli adorati
    ai parenti al paese lasiati
    fiduciosi di un lieto avenir

    chi pensava al denar guadagnato
    e a quello che risparmiato aveva
    i progetti da solo faceva
    fiducioso d’un lieto avenir

    ad un tratto si è sentito un ronzio
    che diventò man mano stridore
    poi sembrò di tuono un fragore
    che dall’alto veloce arrivò

    non si ebbe il tempo nemen di parlare
    o di corere a qualche riparo
    prima ancora che il peril fosse chiaro
    la tragedia si volse al final

    giunse alora la morte veloce
    sivolando il ghiacciaio falciava
    e sicura rovina portava
    né una forma fermarlo poté

    un boato tremar fe’ le valli
    poi tornò il silenzio assoluto
    il tremendo destin fu compiuto
    nello spazio di un attimo sol

    ancor ogi una coltre ricopre
    operai ch’eran pieni di vita
    è una bara di neve indurita
    dove salvarli nessuno riuscì

    passa il tempo e forse per sempre
    resteranno dei corpi nel ghiaccio
    la montagna col bianco suo abracio
    se li tiene li prese con sé.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3ei56Ta_R4


    #chanson #musique #Suisse #travailleurs_étrangers #Italiens #travailleurs_italiens #Valais #histoire #barrage_hydroélectrique #montagne

    Sur la #tragédie, voir :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/402405

    ping @sinehebdo

  • #Camion_de_la_honte : les 39 victimes sont chinoises

    L’enquête semble se diriger vers un nouveau drame d’esclavage moderne, avec la révélation de la nationalité chinoise des 39 victimes, 8 femmes et 31 hommes.

    Ils n’ont pas encore de noms, d’âge et encore moins de sépultures. Mais on sait déjà que leur voyage cauchemardesque a commencé loin, très loin, à l’autre bout du monde. Les 39 personnes retrouvées sans vie dans la nuit de mardi à mercredi dans le conteneur d’un camion réfrigéré sur une zone industrielle de l’Essex, à l’est de l’Angleterre, venaient de Chine. Il y avait 8 femmes, dont une très jeune adulte, et 31 hommes, a confirmé jeudi la police d’Essex.

    L’ambassade de Chine au Royaume-Uni a immédiatement réagi. « C’est avec un cœur lourd que nous lisons ces informations », a tweeté un porte-parole en indiquant « travailler avec la police pour éclaircir et confirmer la situation ». Ce n’est pas la première fois, sans doute pas la dernière, que des Chinois sont les victimes d’un drame de l’esclavage moderne au Royaume-Uni, les otages de gangs ultra-organisés, aux ramifications mondiales, des triades chinoises aux réseaux criminels d’Europe centrale et à ceux d’Europe occidentale. Ces criminels vendent, très cher et sans scrupule, la promesse d’un eldorado qui n’existe pas.

    L’enquête le confirmera, mais la National Crime Agency (NCA), qui travaille en coordination avec la police de l’Essex et celle d’Irlande du Nord d’où est originaire le chauffeur du camion, a indiqué chercher à identifier « des groupes de crime organisé qui pourraient avoir joué un rôle » dans cette tragédie. La garde à vue du chauffeur, un homme de 25 ans, a été prolongée de vingt-quatre heures et des perquisitions étaient en cours dans trois résidences en Irlande du Nord, dans le comté d’Armagh. Selon le Daily Mail, qui cite un proche, le jeune homme aurait lui-même prévenu les secours après avoir ouvert l’arrière du camion pour y récupérer des papiers. La police n’a pas confirmé ces informations.
    En 2000, 58 Chinois retrouvés morts dans un camion

    Le 18 juin 2000 déjà, 58 Chinois avaient été retrouvés morts asphyxiés à l’arrière d’un camion, dans le port de Douvres. Seules 2 personnes avaient survécu. Grâce à elles, le périple infernal des victimes avait été retracé. Partis de la province chinoise de Fujian, sur le littoral du sud-est de la Chine, en face de l’île de Taiwan, ils avaient pris un avion depuis Pékin, avec leurs passeports légaux, jusqu’à Belgrade en Yougoslavie.

    Des passeports volés, coréens pour la plupart, leur avaient alors été fournis. De Belgrade, ils avaient été acheminés par petits groupes dans des camionnettes vers la Hongrie, puis l’Autriche et la France. De là, ils avaient pris un train vers les Pays-Bas où ils avaient été « cueillis » par la branche européenne du gang de trafiquants, à Rotterdam. Enfermés à 60 dans un camion, dont le sas de ventilation avait été fermé, avec seulement quatre seaux d’eau, ils étaient morts étouffés lors de la traversée de Zeebruges en Belgique à Douvres. Le chauffeur, un Néerlandais, et une interprète chinoise, le contact des immigrés au Royaume-Uni, avaient été condamnés respectivement à seize et six ans de prison.
    « On coule »

    C’est aussi de la province de Fujian que venaient la plupart des 23 immigrés illégaux chinois, retrouvés noyés quatre ans plus tard, le 5 février 2004, dans la baie de Morecambe, dans le Lincolnshire (nord-ouest de l’Angleterre). Ils avaient été embauchés pour pêcher à marée basse des coques. Payés la misérable somme de 5 pounds (6 euros) pour 25 kg de coquillages. Cette baie est immense, sujette à de grands mouvements de marée. Les Chinois ne parlaient pas ou très peu anglais, ne connaissaient pas le coin, le danger de l’eau montante.

    C’était l’hiver, ils étaient à pied d’œuvre dans la soirée, dans l’obscurité. Un pêcheur chinois avait donné l’alerte en appelant les secours sur son téléphone portable et en criant, dans un anglais approximatif : « On coule, on coule dans l’eau, beaucoup, beaucoup, on coule dans l’eau. » 23 personnes s’étaient noyées. Le crâne d’une femme avait été rejeté sur la plage six ans plus tard. Le corps d’une des victimes n’a jamais été retrouvé.

    Un seul homme, Li Hua, a survécu. Dix ans plus tard, en 2014, il se confiait à la BBC. « Il faisait un noir d’encre et j’étais terrifié. Je me suis dit que je n’avais plus qu’à me laisser mourir et puis, je ne sais pas, une vague m’a retourné… J’étais seul et soudain, un hélicoptère m’a repéré. » Son témoignage avait permis la condamnation d’un trafiquant, Lin Liang Ren, à quatorze ans de prison. Pour éviter toutes représailles, Li Hua avait été placé sous la protection spéciale du gouvernement britannique. « Nous sommes tous venus ici pour la même raison. Nous avons laissé derrière nous nos familles pour construire une vie meilleure. Et tous ont disparu d’un coup, juste comme ça. J’ai juste eu de la chance. »
    L’identification de chacun « pourrait prendre du temps »

    Jeudi en milieu de journée, le camion et ses 39 victimes étaient dissimulés dans un hangar du port de Tilbury Docks, à quelques centaines de mètres de là où le conteneur a été débarqué mardi dans la nuit en provenance de Zeebruges. Les autorités belges ont précisé que le conteneur était arrivé dans le port ce même mardi, à 14h29, avant d’être embarqué sur un ferry dans la soirée. Pour le moment, les enquêteurs ne savent pas à quel moment, ni où exactement les victimes ont été enfermées dans le conteneur.

    A l’abri des regards, les médecins légistes ont entrepris la lourde tâche d’examiner les corps un à un pour déterminer les causes du décès. Ensuite, les autorités tenteront « d’établir l’identité de chacun, une opération qui pourrait prendre du temps », a précisé la police. Alors, ces âmes auront peut-être enfin un nom, un visage et quelqu’un pour les pleurer, loin très loin de ce triste hangar.

    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2019/10/24/camion-de-la-honte-les-39-victimes-sont-chinoises_1759507

    –-> On sait depuis que probablement les victimes ne sont pas chinoises, mais vietnamiennes...

    #UK #Angleterre #Essex #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #Manche #La_Manche #22_octobre_2019 #camion #décès #morts #mourir_dans_la_forteresse_Europe

    • #Pham_Thi_Trà_My

      “Mi dispiace mamma. Il mio viaggio all’estero non è riuscito. Mamma ti voglio tanto bene!
      Sto morendo perché non riesco a respirare …
      Vengo da Nghen, Can Loc, Ha Tinh, Vietnam …
      Mi dispiace, mamma.”

      Questo è l’ultimo, straziante, SMS che una ragazza ventiseienne vietnamita, di nome Pham Thi Trà My ha inviato, presumibilmente dall’interno del TIR dell’orrore, martedì scorso, 22 Ottobre 2019.

      Un messaggio carico di disperazione, un ultimo pensiero per la persona a lei più cara, la mamma.

      La sua mamma.

      E’ drammatico questo messaggio, perché ci fa comprendere che quei 39 migranti asiatici hanno sentito giungere la loro morte; ne hanno sofferto; hanno pensato; hanno avuto tutto il tempo per comprendere che la loro fine si andava, inesorabilmente, avvicinando.

      E tutto questo è terribile. Terribile. Terribile.

      Non sopporto più questa disumanità, non sopporto chi continua a dire aiutiamoli a casa loro, non sopporto chi continua a gioire (ma come cazzo si fa a gioire?) di questi tragici eventi.

      Io, lo dico francamente, sto imparando ad odiare!

      Ad odiare voi indifferenti, voi complici, voi misera gente che vi girate dall’altra parte.

      Ci state riuscendo.

      State riuscendo a trasformarmi, piano piano.

      State riuscendo a trasmettermi il vostro odio ma, sappiate, lo utilizzerò solo contro voi.

      Contro voi che pensate di essere gli unici ad avere diritto alla vita e spero, per questo, un giorno siate puniti!

      Perdonaci, se puoi, Pham Thi Trà My…


      https://eliminiamolapostrofo.wordpress.com/2019/10/25/pham-thi-tra-my
      #migrants_vietnamiens #Vietnam #22_octobre_2019

    • Essex lorry deaths: Vietnamese families fear relatives among dead

      At least six of the 39 people found dead in a lorry trailer in Essex may have been from Vietnam.

      The BBC knows of six Vietnamese families who fear their relatives are among the victims.

      They include Pham Thi Tra My, 26, who has not been heard from since she sent text messages on Tuesday saying she could not breathe.

      A man was earlier arrested at Stansted Airport on suspicion of manslaughter and conspiracy to traffic people.

      The 48-year-old from Northern Ireland is the fourth person to be arrested in connection with the investigation.

      Two people from Warrington are being held on suspicion of manslaughter and conspiracy to traffic people and the lorry driver is in custody on suspicion of murder.

      Ms Tra My’s brother, Pham Ngoc Tuan, said some of the £30,000 charge for getting his sister to the UK had been paid to people smugglers and her last-known location had been Belgium.

      The smugglers are understood to have returned money to some families.

      Meanwhile, relatives of Nguyen Dinh Luong, 20, have also said they fear he is among the 39 victims.

      Ms Tra My’s brother told the BBC: "My sister went missing on 23 October on the way from Vietnam to the UK and we couldn’t contact her. We are concerned she may be in that trailer.

      “We are asking the British police to help investigate so that my sister can be returned to the family.”

      The last message received from Ms Tra My was at 22:30 BST on Tuesday - two hours before the trailer arrived at the Purfleet terminal from Zeebrugge in Belgium.

      Her family have shared texts she sent to her parents which translated read: "I am really, really sorry, Mum and Dad, my trip to a foreign land has failed.

      “I am dying, I can’t breathe. I love you very much Mum and Dad. I am sorry, Mother.”

      Ms Tra My’s brother told the BBC her journey to the UK had begun on 3 October. She had told the family not to contact her because “the organisers” did not allow her to receive calls.

      “She flew to China and stayed there for a couple days, then left for France,” he said.

      “She called us when she reached each destination. The first attempt she made to cross the border to the UK was 19 October, but she got caught and turned back. I don’t know for sure from which port.”

      The BBC has passed details of Ms Tra My, who is from Nghen town in Can Loc district of Ha Tinh province area of Vietnam, to Essex Police, along with details of other people claiming to have information.

      The BBC also knows of two other Vietnamese nationals who are missing - a 26-year-old man and a 19-year-old woman.

      The brother of the 19-year-old said his sister called him at 07:20 Belgian local time (06:20 BST) on Tuesday, saying she was getting into a container and was turning off her phone to avoid detection.

      He has not heard from her since.

      He said a people smuggler returned money to the family overnight, and the family of the 26-year-old who she was travelling with also received money back.

      A spokesman from the Vietnamese Embassy in London confirmed they had been in contact with Essex police since Thursday.

      They said Vietnamese families had appealed to them for help finding out if their relatives were among the victims but added they had not yet received any official confirmation.

      The victims of the trailer were 31 men and eight women and Essex Police initially said they were all believed to be Chinese.

      They were found at an industrial estate in Grays at 01:40 BST on Wednesday.

      At a press conference on Friday evening Deputy Chief Constable Pippa Mills said the force was working with the National Crime Agency, the Home Office, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Border Force and Immigration Enforcement.

      She said she would not be drawn on any further detail about the nationalities of the victims until formal identification processes had taken place.

      “We gave an initial steer on Thursday on nationality, however, this is now a developing picture,” she said.

      Police have confirmed the scene at Waterglade Industrial Estate in Eastern Avenue was closed on Friday.

      Essex Police also urged anyone fearing their loved ones may have been in the lorry to get in touch.

      “I can’t begin to comprehend what some of you must be going through right now. You have my assurance that Essex Police will be working tirelessly to understand the whole picture to this absolute tragedy,” said Det Ch Con Mills.

      She also urged anyone living illegally in the UK who may have information to come forward, without fear of criminal action being taken against them.

      GPS data shows the refrigerated container trailer crossed back and forth between the UK and Europe in the days before it was found.

      It was leased from the company Global Trailer Rentals on 15 October. The company said it was “entirely unaware that the trailer was to be used in the manner in which it appears to have been”.

      Essex Police said the tractor unit (the front part of the lorry) had entered the UK via Holyhead - an Irish Sea port in Wales - on Sunday 20 October, having travelled over from Dublin.

      Police believe the tractor unit collected the trailer in Purfleet on the River Thames and left the port shortly after 01:05 on Thursday. Police were called to the industrial park where the bodies were discovered about half an hour later.

      Temperatures in refrigerated units can be as low as -25C (-13F). The lorry now is at a secure site in Essex.

      A spokesman for the UN International Organization for Migration said the discovery of bodies in Essex did not necessarily indicate a major shift in migration patterns.

      “These are the kind of random crimes that occur every day in the world somewhere,” he said. “They get huge attention when they do but they don’t necessarily indicate a big shift in migration or patterns in any place in particular. It’s just the condition of what happens when this many people are engaging this many criminal groups to reach a destination, which of course we deplore.”

      Detectives are still questioning the lorry driver, Mo Robinson, of County Armagh in Northern Ireland, on suspicion of murder. He was arrested on Wednesday.

      Two other people were also earlier arrested on suspicion of manslaughter.

      The man and woman, both 38, from Warrington, Cheshire, are also being held on suspicion of conspiracy to traffic people.

      Police officers were seen at the couple’s home address in Warrington, with a police van and two squad cars parked outside.

      Sources say the GPS data shows it left Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland on 15 October before crossing over to Northern Ireland and then returning south to Dublin
      From Dublin, it crossed over to Holyhead in Wales overnight on 16 October
      That evening, it travelled to continental Europe from Dover to Calais in France
      Between 17 and 22 October, it moved between various cities in Belgium and France, including Dunkirk, Bruges and Lille
      On 22 October, it made its final crossing from #Zeebrugge to #Purfleet

      https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-50185788

    • *Essex lorry deaths: The Vietnamese risking it all to get to the

      UK*

      An hour’s drive inland from the French coast, a dozen Vietnamese men nurse tea over a smoking campfire, as they wait for a phone call from the man they call “the boss”. An Afghan man, they say, who opens trailers in the lorry-park nearby and shuts them inside.

      Duc paid €30,000 ($33,200; £25,000) for a prepaid journey from Vietnam to London - via Russia, Poland, Germany and France. It was organised, he says, by a Vietnamese contact back home.

      “I have some Vietnamese friends in UK, who will help me find jobs when I get there,” he told me. “These friends help me get on lorries or container trucks to go across the border.”

      Security is much less tight in the nearby lorry park than around the ports further north. But few people here have managed to get past the border controls.

      We were told there is a two-tier system in operation here; that those who pay more for their passage to Britain don’t have to chance their luck in the lorries outside, but use this base as a transit camp before being escorted on the final leg of their journey.

      A Vietnamese smuggler, interviewed by a French paper several years ago, reportedly described three levels of package. The top level allowed migrants to ride in the lorry cab and sleep in hotels. The lowest level was nicknamed “air”, or more cynically “CO2” - a reference to the lack of air in some trailers.

      A local volunteer in the camp told us that they’d seen Vietnamese and British men visiting migrants here in a Mercedes. And that once migrants arrived in the UK, some went to work in cannabis farms, after which all communication stopped.

      Duc tells me he needs a job in the UK to pay back the loan for his journey.

      “We can do anything,” he says, “construction work, nail bars, restaurants or other jobs.”

      A report by one of France’s biggest charities described smugglers telling Vietnamese migrants that refrigerated lorries gave them more chance of avoiding detection, and giving each of them an aluminium bag to put over their heads while passing through scanners at the border.

      No one here had heard about the 39 people found dead this week.

      This journey is about freedom, one said.

      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-50190199

    • More Vietnamese families fear relatives are among the 39 UK truck victims

      Two Vietnamese families have said they are scared relatives may be among the dead. Both of the suspected victims come from Ha Tinh, an impoverished province where many of the country’s illegal migrants come from.

      More Vietnamese families came forward Saturday saying their relatives may be among the 39 people found dead in a container truck east of London.

      Police initially believed all victims were Chinese but later announced this may not be accurate and that investigations were still a “developing picture.”

      At least two Vietnamese families have now said they are worried their relatives, who may have been carrying falsified Chinese passports, are among the dead.

      The Vietnamese Embassy in London said Friday it contacted police about a missing woman believed to be one of the dead after a family in Vietnam informed them about their daughter who had been missing since the lorry was found.

      The Embassy said it was working with British authorities over the case, Vietnamese media reported.

      Up to 10 of the victims may have originally come from Vietnam, according to unconfirmed reports. The BBC reported it had been in contact with six Vietnamese families, all who believe their relatives are among the 39 victims found in Grays, Essex on Wednesday.

      Read more: Opinion: It’s time to end human trafficking

      ’Something unexpected happened’

      The father of a 20-year-old Vietnamese man said he is scared his son is among the dead. He told the Associated Press that he had not been able to reach his son Nguyen Dinh Luong since last week.

      “He often called home but I haven’t been able to reach him since the last time we talked last week,” Nguyen Dinh Gia said. “I told him that he could go to anywhere he wants as long as it’s safe. He shouldn’t be worry about money, I’ll take care of it.”

      Gia said his son left home in Ha Tinh province, central Vietnam, to work in Russia in 2017 then on to Ukraine. He arrived in Germany in April 2019 before making his way to France. He had been living in France illegally since 2018.

      The 20-year-old told his family he wanted to go to the United Kingdom (UK), and that he would pay £11,000 (€12,700). Last week, he told his father he wanted to join a group in Paris that was trying to enter England.

      Several days ago, his father received a call from a Vietnamese man saying, “Please have some some sympathy, something unexpected happened,” Gia told AFP.

      “I fell to the ground when I heard that,” Gia said. “It seemed that he was in the truck with the accident, all of them dead.”

      The family said they shared the information with Vietnamese authorities.

      Read more: Opinion: EU’s immigration policy is stuck in a rut

      ’I’m dying because I can’t breathe’

      Hoa Nghiem, a human rights activist from Vietnamese civic network, Human Rights Space, said on Friday one of the victims may have been 26-year-old Pham Thi Tra My.

      Tra My had sent a text message to her mother saying she was struggling to breathe at around the same time as the truck was en route from Belgium to the UK.

      “I’m so sorry mom and dad....My journey abroad doesn’t succeed,” she wrote. “Mom, I love you and dad very much. I’m dying because I can’t breathe .... Mom, I’m so sorry,” she said in a message confirmed by her brother Pham Manh Cuong.

      Cuong had received a message from his sister on Wednesday saying, “Please try to work hard to pay the debt for mummy, my dear.”

      No confirmation

      Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a press briefing Friday in Beijing that Britain has not officially confirmed the identities or nationalities of the victims. She added that China is also working with Belgium police since the shipping container in which the bodies were found was sent from England to the Belgian port of Zeebrugge.

      “The police said that they were urgently carrying out the verification work and the identities of the victims cannot be confirmed at present,” said Tong Xuejun, a Chinese consular official in London.

      Both suspected victims come from the impoverished province of Ha Tinh where many of the country’s illegal migrants come from. Many who try to reach the UK end up working in nail salons or cannabis farms.

      https://www.dw.com/en/more-vietnamese-families-fear-relatives-are-among-the-39-uk-truck-victims/a-50997473

    • Vietnamese woman suspected killed in UK truck disaster

      A father has reported to Vietnamese authorities that his 26-year-old daughter may have been one of the 39 found dead in a container truck in England.

      #Pham_Van_Thin, of Can Loc District in the central Ha Tinh Province, sent a letter Friday to the People’s Committee of Nghen Town, saying his daughter was likely one of the 39 people found dead in a container truck in the Waterglade Industrial Park, Grays Town.

      “My daughter, Pham Thi Tra My, left Vietnam on October 3, 2019, then travelled to China, France and England,” Thin wrote in the letter, which had My’s photo attached. She was described as 1.5 meters tall and weighing around 46 kilograms.

      Thin asked the Nghen People’s Committee to verify that he is My’s father, in order to initiate legal procedures to identify and bring his daughter’s body back to Vietnam.

      At his home in Nghen Town, Thin’s family members confirmed that he had indeed submitted an application to the authorities to verify that My was missing, but refused to provide further information on her overseas travel.

      The Nghen Town People’s Committee has passed on Thin’s letter to the Can Loc District’s Department of Labor, Invalids and Social Affairs, which, in turn, will report to authorities with jurisdiction over the matter, said Bui Viet Hung, Vice Chairman of the committee.

      “Thin’s family has three children, of which My is the youngest. My had worked overseas in Japan for three years, and only last month completed procedures to go to China,” Hung said.

      A senior official of the Ha Tinh Provincial Department of Foreign Affairs, who did not wish to be named, said Friday afternoon that he had received a phone call from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Consular Department asking to verify the case of a Vietnamese worker from Ha Tinh Province suspected missing in the UK.

      The Ha Tinh Provincial Department of Foreign Affairs has contacted authorities of Can Loc District, where a person has allegedly been reported missing, to verify the information.

      According to an authorized source, My had used an emigration ring led by a resident of Nghe An Province to go to China. After getting there, she obtained forged Chinese citizenship documents and left for Europe.

      One of My’s relatives has reportedly contacted the Vietnamese Association in the U.K., a non-profit organization, to request their assistance in bringing her body home.

      In the early hours of Wednesday morning, U.K. emergency services discovered the bodies of 38 adults and one teenager, suspected immigrants, after being alerted that there were people in a refrigerated container truck at the Waterglade Industrial Park in Grays, Essex County, east of London.

      Staff of the Chinese Embassy in London have arrived at the scene to help police verify whether the victims were Chinese citizens.

      Three people, including truck driver, were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to traffic people and manslaughter, the British police said on Friday, the first indication from officials that the deaths were linked to human smuggling.

      In 2000, 58 Chinese migrants were found dead in a refrigerated truck in Dover, Britain’s busiest port. The authorities said they had asphyxiated in the container, in which cooling and ventilation were switched off.

      https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vietnamese-woman-suspected-killed-in-uk-truck-disaster-4002594.html


    • https://www.facebook.com/ndt105/posts/10218065950232006

      Traduction et commentaire d’une étudiante de mon master, vietnamienne :

      He said: "It is possible that all 39 “Chinese-like-people” who were suffocated in the car in the UK were Vietnamese. Even the majority of them are probably Nghe An-Ha Tinh by participating in a smuggling transfer service. If they send a message to their family, the family will pay about 1 billion VND (35.000£) for the Vietnamese smugglers. If they NEVER text again, it looks like family members get a refund for the deposit. A terrible contract."
      The photos are captured in a Facebook group for recruiting and supporting Vietnamese in a foreign country (maybe England, I’m not sure). People are posting information of their relatives who left at the same time with the lorry and didn’t contact anymore. All of them were born in 1999, 2000 and from Ha Tinh, Nghe Anh (2 poor cities in the center of Vietnam). The last photo is a message of a woman saying that she has people in contact with the invesgators and there are already 20 people identified as Vietnamese.

    • Majority of 39 UK truck victims likely from Vietnam - priest

      YEN THANH, Vietnam (Reuters) - The majority of the 39 people found dead in the back of a truck near London were likely from Vietnam, a community leader from the rural, rice-growing community where many of the victims are believed to have come from told Reuters on Saturday.

      The discovery of the bodies - 38 adults and one teenager - was made on Wednesday after emergency services were alerted to people in a truck container on an industrial site in Grays, about 32km (20 miles) east of central London.

      Police have said they believe the dead were Chinese but Beijing said the nationalities had not yet been confirmed. Chinese and Vietnamese officials are now both working closely with British police, their respective embassies have said.

      Father Anthony Dang Huu Nam, a catholic priest in the remote town of Yen Thanh in northern-central Vietnam’s Nghe An province, 300km (180 miles) south of Hanoi, said he was liaising with family members of the victims.

      “The whole district is covered in sorrow,” Nam said, as prayers for the dead rang out over loudspeakers throughout the misty, rain-soaked town on Saturday.

      “I’m still collecting contact details for all the victim’s families, and will hold a ceremony to pray for them tonight.”

      “This is a catastrophe for our community.”

      Nam said families told him they knew relatives were travelling to the UK at the time and had been unable to contact their loved ones.

      Vietnam’s foreign ministry said in a statement on Saturday that it had instructed its London embassy to assist British police with the identification of victims.

      The ministry did not respond to a request for further comment regarding the nationalities of the dead.

      Essex Police declined to elaborate as to how they first identified the dead as Chinese.
      ‘BEAUTIFUL DAY’

      In Yen Thanh, Nghe An province, dozens of worried relatives of 19-year-old Bui Thi Nhung gathered in the family’s small courtyard home where her worried mother has been unable to rise from her bed.

      “She said she was in France and on the way to the UK, where she has friends and relatives,” said Nhung’s cousin, Hoang Thi Linh.

      “We are waiting and hoping it’s not her among the victims, but it’s very likely. We pray for her everyday. There were two people from my village travelling in that group”.

      In comments under a photo uploaded to Nhung’s Facebook account on Monday, two days before the doomed truck was discovered, one friend asked how her journey was going.

      “Not good,” Nhung replied. “Almost spring,” she said, using a term in Vietnamese meaning she had almost reached her destination.

      Other photos on her account show her sightseeing in Brussels on Oct. 18.

      “Such a beautiful day,” Nhung posted.

      Nghe An is one of Vietnam’s poorest provinces, and home to many victims of human trafficking who end up in Europe, according to a March report by the Pacific Links Foundation, a U.S.-based anti-trafficking organisation.

      Other victims are believed to come from the neighbouring province of Ha Tinh, Nam said, where in the first eight months of this year, 41,790 people left looking for work elsewhere, including overseas, according to state media.

      The province was ravaged by one of Vietnam’s worst environmental disasters in 2016 when a steel mill owned by Taiwan’s Formosa Plastics contaminated coastal waters, devastating local fishing and tourism industries and sparking widespread protests.

      Another suspected victim from Ha Tinh, 26-year-old Pham Thi Tra My, had sent a text message to her mother saying she could not breathe at about the time the truck container was en route from Belgium to Britain.

      “That girl who said in her message that she couldn’t breathe in the truck? Her parents can’t breathe here at home,” Nam said.

      https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-bodies/majority-of-39-uk-truck-victims-likely-from-vietnam-priest-idUKKBN1X503M

    • « Désolée maman, je suis en train de mourir, je ne peux plus respirer » : les SMS déchirants d’une jeune victime à l’agonie dans le camion de l’Essex

      La jeune vietnamienne Pham Thi Tra My, 26 ans, avait parcouru la Chine puis la France dans ses tentatives pour atteindre la Grande Bretagne. Son périple se terminera dans le camion de Mo Robinson, comme celui de 38 autres ressortissants asiatiques.


      https://www.sudinfo.be/id148457/article/2019-10-25/desolee-maman-je-suis-en-train-de-mourir-je-ne-peux-plus-respirer-les-sms

    • UK police: man arrested in Ireland is of interest in truck death investigation

      British police said a man arrested in Dublin on Saturday is a person of interest in their investigation into the deaths of 39 people who were found in a truck container.

      “A man arrested by the Garda at Dublin Port on Saturday 26 October is a person of interest in our murder investigation regarding the 39 people found dead in a lorry in Purfleet on Wednesday 23 October,” Essex Police said.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-bodies-ireland-idUSKBN1X70FX

    • The 39 people who died in the lorry were victims. Why does the law treat them as criminals?

      As long as the justice system is focused on immigration status, not on ending modern-day slavery, desperate people will suffer.

      What leads someone down the route where they find themselves locked into the back of a lorry, a beating heart in a metal box? What choices – or lack of them – have led someone to be reduced to a piece of human cargo? Can anyone who read the story of the 39 bodies found in the back of a lorry last week not feel the visceral terror of that cold, dark death and wonder at how we live in a world where a business model exists that thrives off this level of human desperation?

      At the moment it is unclear whether this tragedy is the work of smuggling gangs – who are in a transactional arrangement with the people they are moving from place to place – or human traffickers, who are exploiting and profiting from their human cargo. In the end, does it even matter? Both are looking to profit from the very human desire to not only survive but to thrive. Across the world, trafficking and smuggling gangs are flogging promises and dreams and then using fear – of pain, of the authorities, of their debts, of their failure – to make vast amounts of money in the knowledge that they’re unlikely to get caught, and in the certainty that their victims are expendable.

      One Vietnamese teenager I interviewed last year had, like last week’s victims, crossed the Channel in the back of a lorry. He described the experience to me: the pain of the jolting metal that tore into his skin; the stench of other silent bodies he was pressed up against; the poisonous diesel fumes; and the hunger and thirst that gnawed at his insides.

      His journey towards that point had begun with a childhood of crippling and monotonous poverty and the belief that the only way to escape and honour his filial responsibility to provide for his parents was to follow the promise of work in the UK. He embarked on an overland journey across Europe where he was smuggled from safe house to safe house, fell under the control of criminal gangs and was raped, beaten and brutalised. By the time he reached France, he was told he had to pay back £20,000 – an amount he couldn’t even comprehend. His parents would be the ones who would suffer if he didn’t pay them back.

      By his point his life was not in his hands. A chain of events had been set in motion that he had no control over. There was no way back: his only future was one where his sole reason for survival was to pay off his debts. He ended up being trafficked into a cannabis farm in Derbyshire.

      In the eyes of the law there is a distinction between illegal work and modern slavery – with the former you are a criminal, and the latter a victim – but in reality the line is not so clearly defined. Many who are here to work move between the two. Across the UK, thousands end up being exploited and unpaid in our restaurants, car washes, agricultural fields, care homes, hotels and nail bars – visible but unseen.

      Official statistics say up to 15,000 people are trapped in a form of modern slavery in the UK – although those working on the frontline believe this figure to be a huge underestimate. Our government says that with the 2015 Modern Slavery Act it is a global leader in cracking down on this practice, yet prosecutions remain low. In 2017-18 there were only 185 convictions for slavery and trafficking crimes – a fraction of the cases reported to the authorities.

      Crucially, prosecutions require victims to come forward and testify. Yet their immigration status is often considered more of a priority than their exploitation. Traffickers tell their victims if they go to the police they will be arrested and detained, and more often than not they’re right. Recent research found over 500 victims of trafficking were arrested and sent to immigration detention centres last year. Even though police guidance tells officers how to identify cases of modern slavery, Vietnamese children found in nail bars or cannabis farms are still routinely arrested, charged and detained.

      Even those who are recognised as victims of trafficking by the authorities are in for a rough ride. The government’s national referral mechanism, the framework for identifying and protecting victims of slavery, is sometimes considered by victims to be as traumatising as their trafficking. They can find themselves trapped in a legal limbo in a complex and under-resourced system for years at a time. And in the end victims are probably going to be removed back to the country where they were trafficked: according to the government’s own figures only 12% of victims of slavery are granted discretionary leave to remain.

      All of this matters because it creates an environment in which the business of exploiting the desperation of human beings can thrive. Where the gangs know that British people will pay £8 in cash for a pedicure, or to get our car hand washed, without thinking too much about why. It’s a business model where people can be exploited for profit over and over again with the near certainty that in the end it will be the victim who the system comes down upon, for making the journey in the first place.

      In 2004 the death of 23 Chinese cockle pickers in Morecambe Bay was a moment of reckoning – a human tragedy that, for many people, raised the spectre of modern slavery in the UK for the first time. Today, 15 years later, maybe these 39 deaths might do the same and remind us that our only chance of beating the business in flogging human lives is to try to understand how people come to be locked inside the backs of lorries in the first place.

      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/29/39-people-lorry-victims-law-criminals-immigration-slavery?CMP=share_btn

    • En route vers le Royaume-Uni, enquête de terrain auprès des migrants vietnamiens

      #France_terre_d'asile a réalisé une enquête de terrain auprès des migrants vietnamiens en transit dans le département du Pas-de-Calais, dans le cadre du projet d’aide aux victimes de traite des êtres humains mené par l’association.

      L’étude analyse les parcours migratoires de ces migrants, les raisons de leur départ, leurs profils, leurs relations avec les réseaux de passeurs, les moyens d’emprise et de coercition exercés sur eux et leurs besoins afin d’améliorer leur accompagnement en France et en Europe.

      https://www.france-terre-asile.org/toutes-nos-publications/details/1/209-en-route-vers-le-royaume-uni,-enqu%C3%AAte-de-terrain-aupr%C
      #rapport

    • Precarious journeys: Mapping vulnerabilities of victims of trafficking from Vietnam to Europe

      New research by ECPAT UK, Anti-Slavery International and Pacific Links Foundation traces the journeys made by Vietnamese children and adults migrating irregularly from Vietnam to the UK via Europe. The report, Precarious Journeys: Mapping Vulnerabilities of Victims of Trafficking from Vietnam to Europe, finds that the governments of countries on key trafficking routes routinely fail to protect Vietnamese children from trafficking, leaving them vulnerable to continued exploitation and abuse.


      https://www.ecpat.org.uk/precarious-journeys

    • Vietnamese migrants are not ‘lured’ by traffickers. They just want a better future

      The risks are known and won’t deter people. There will be more deaths in lorries unless Britain changes its immigration policy.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/05ed4f7268ba39f63a3d283434f6a7c153c96150/0_0_3600_2160/master/3600.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=479e7dd01a75bb999e8d74

      Thirty-nine bodies found in the back of a refrigerated lorry in an Essex industrial park. Apart from shock and rage, this tragic news feels like deja vu. Almost two decades ago, in 2000, 58 Chinese people were found suffocated to death in Dover, in similar horrific circumstances. Those men and women banged on doors and screamed for their lives, the only two survivors revealed. The tragic deaths left families behind and communities back in Fujian province devastated.

      Today, many of the 39 people, eight women and 31 men, are believed to have come from Vietnam, as families there desperately look for their missing loved ones.
      The 39 people who died in the lorry were victims. Why does the law treat them as criminals?
      Annie Kelly
      Read more

      I also felt deja vu listening to the response from British politicians and media. “Stop evil human traffickers”; “Stop international criminal networks”. I heard such phrases two decades ago from the home secretary, Jack Straw, and today his successor, Priti Patel, repeats the sentiment. While formal identification of the victims continues, Vietnamese people have mostly been portrayed as “unaware” trafficking victims sent to fill the nail bars and cannabis factories – as having no agency of their own and no control over their migratory decisions.

      In reality, the Vietnamese young men and women who choose to travel on these dangerous routes only do so when they cannot come to Britain in formal ways. Having no alternatives, they contact “snakeheads” (smugglers), who are often perceived as “migration brokers” rather than criminals, who organise their transportation to Britain.

      It appears that many of the 39 people may have come from the Nghe An and Ha Tinh provinces of Vietnam, which have been hit by economic reforms. Three decades ago, in 1986, the Vietnamese government launched the Doi Moi economic reforms, which aimed to facilitate a transition from a centralised planning to a “socialist-oriented” market economy. From the 1990s onwards, the government boasted of Vietnam’s rise in GDP – what was not said was that the growth was built upon the low-cost labour of millions of Vietnamese, toiling in processing factories and assembling products for overseas companies. The inflow of foreign investment has been a big part of Vietnam’s economic liberalisation. In recent years, it has brought cash to the high-tech processing, manufacturing, agriculture, education and healthcare sectors. Since the start of this year, Vietnam has attracted foreign direct investment of more than $1.1bn (£850m), China alone bringing in $222m.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0437ed70716e77799c71a362955e1e1ce116355b/0_175_5568_3341/master/5568.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=97d294bd0eb6ec60a2715d

      Many of these changes have not been popular: large waves of anti-China protests happened in May 2014, in Ha Tinh and other places. And in 2018 there was popular opposition to legislation enabling special economic zones to grant land leases to foreign businesses for up to 99 years.

      In 2016 Ha Tinh was also the site of the country’s worst environmental disaster, caused by a chemical spill from a steel factory, owned by a Taiwanese company, Formosa Plastics, that poisoned up to 125 miles of the northern coastline and ruined the fishing industry. Formosa Plastics was fined $500m by the Vietnamese government, but much of the compensation did not reach the affected fishermen.

      The low labour cost in these provinces is the main attraction for Chinese and other foreign investors. For instance, a factory worker here earns around two-thirds of what a similar worker earns in China, and half the local population are under the age of 30.

      Rather than wealth, foreign investment has brought mainly dead-end, low-paid jobs with few long-term prospects for young locals. The average wage in Vietnam is around $150 a month; in these provinces many don’t even earn that. Besides, unemployment is severe. Last year, GDP per capita in both Nhge An ($1,600) and Ha Tinh ($2,200) fell below the national average of $2,500. This is the context compelling tens of thousands of Vietnamese from these impoverished provinces to choose to migrate, to seek livelihoods for themselves and their families.

      Families often depend on sons and daughters to find their way into advanced capitalist countries in the west, to work and be the breadwinners. Remittances from abroad also help sustain communities – Nghe An, for instance, brought in $225m a year, according to official estimates.

      The 39 people were not “unthinking migrants” lured by traffickers, as the media has suggested. They were fighting for a future for their families, and lost their precious lives as Britain firmly kept its doors locked shut.

      If the tragic deaths of these men and women truly sadden you, the best thing to do is oppose Britain’s anti-migrant policies. We need to dismantle the false categories of “economic migrants” and “genuine refugees”. Let our fellow human beings have the opportunity to live and work in the open – that is the only way forward.

      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/30/vietnamese-migrants-traffickers-deaths-lorries-britain-immigration-poli

    • Essex lorry deaths should be wake-up call for ministers, MPs say

      Policies focused on closing borders counterproductive, says foreign affairs committee

      The deaths of 39 people found in the back of a lorry in Essex should be wake-up call for the government to rethink its approach to migration, MPs have said.

      Policies focused on closing borders will drive migrants to take more dangerous routes and push them into the hands of smugglers, the foreign affairs select committee says in a new report.

      The human cost of irregular migration made international partnerships essential, including with the EU, the committee said.

      The report comes just over a week after 39 people, now understood to be Vietnamese nationals, were found dead in the back of a lorry that had arrived in the UK via the port of Zeebrugge.

      The driver, Maurice Robinson, has been charged with manslaughter and trafficking offences, and a police investigation into a suspected wider trafficking network continues.

      Tom Tugendhat, the chair of the influential committee, said that until the UK left the EU it should continue to attend EU meetings on migration.

      “The case of 39 people found dead in a lorry in Essex shocked us all. The full story won’t be clear for some time but this tragedy is not alone,” he said.

      “Today, hundreds of families across the world are losing loved ones who felt driven to take the fatal gamble to entrust their lives to smugglers. This case should serve as a wake-up call to the Foreign Office and to government.

      “The UK has been relatively isolated from the different migrant crises in recent years, but it’s wrong to assume that we are protected from their impact. The UK has a proud history of helping those fleeing conflict and persecution and cooperating with others to protect human rights. We should lead by example.”

      The report also raised concern that deals with countries such as Libya, Niger and Sudan to limit migration risked fuelling human rights abuses.

      It said such deals could be used as leverage by partner governments, as the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, had done recently when he threatened to “reopen the gates”.

      The committee also said the fact that the Home Office was responsible for the UK’s response to irregular migration could lead to the “error of focusing on preventing migration to the exclusion of other goals such as preventing conflict and promoting stability and respect for fundamental human rights”.

      It called for more effort to negotiate future close cooperation on migration policy with the EU and an immediate return of UK officials to EU-level meetings where irregular migration is discussed.

      Other recommendations included the expansion of legal pathways to apply for asylum outside Europe and robust monitoring and safeguards to ensure UK funding for migration programmes in Libya did not contribute to human rights abuses.

      Tugendhat said the committee’s inquiry had been cut short by the “uncertain nature of parliamentary business”, but that it hoped to return to the issues in the future.

      Irregular migration is defined by the International Organization for Migration as the “movement of persons that takes place outside the laws, regulations, or international agreements governing the entry into or exit from the state of origin, transit or destination”.

      https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/nov/04/essex-lorry-deaths-should-be-wake-up-call-for-ministers-mps-say?CMP=Sha

    • France: Dozens of migrants found in back of truck near Italian border

      The truck had been carrying 31 people, reportedly from Pakistan, when it was inspected by authorities in southern France. The latest discovery comes after dozens of migrants were found dead in a truck near London.

      Officers carrying out a routine traffic check in southern France uncovered dozens of migrants in the back of a truck on Saturday, the public prosecutor’s office in Nice said.

      Some 31 people, including three unaccompanied minors, were found in the truck during a vehicle spot-check at a toll booth near La Turbie, near the border with Italy.

      Prosecutors said that all 31 people on board were Pakistani nationals. The driver of the truck, who is also from Pakistan, was arrested by French authorities.

      The migrants were handed over to Italian authorities, the Nice-Matin newspaper reported.

      Prosecutors will now try to determine whether a human smuggling ring is behind the operation. Should that prove not to be the case, the driver of the truck will be charged with aiding and abetting illegal immigration, news agency AFP reported.

      Concerns after UK migrant truck deaths

      The discovery comes just days after French authorities in the northern port city of Calais pulled over a refrigerated truck carrying eight migrants. All those inside the truck, including four children, were taken to the hospital after exhibiting signs of hypothermia.

      Border control agencies have been on high alert following the deaths of 39 migrants in the UK on October 23.

      The migrants, who were determined to be Vietnamese nationals, had also been transported in a refrigerated truck when the vehicle was found east of London.

      The alleged driver of the truck, a 25-year-old from Northern Ireland, has already been charged over the deaths. He faces 39 counts of manslaughter as well as human trafficking and immigration offenses.

      https://www.dw.com/en/france-dozens-of-migrants-found-in-back-of-truck-near-italian-border/a-51094985
      #ceux_qui_restent #vidéo #celles_qui_restent

    • #Spare_me_the_tears - Britain would have treated the Vietnamese nationals as criminals if they had not died in the lorry

      Had the police found the desperate migrants in the back of the truck they would have been arrested and deported

      I waited a while before writing this column. The deferral was out of respect for the dead, grieving relatives and the shocked Essex officers who discovered the bodies.

      But now it is time for uncomfortable, troublesome, questions: What if those thirty nine Vietnamese migrants found in the back of truck had been discovered still alive?

      Would the tabloids have published those tender pictures of young victims, smiling, buoyant, sons and daughters, grandsons and granddaughters, nieces and nephews, fathers and mothers?

      Would Boris Johnson and Home Secretary Priti Patel have been as compassionate as they have been?

      Would nationalist Brits have held back from their usual bellyaches about ‘uncontrolled migration’? Let’s not belabour the obvious. We know the answers.

      It is believed that all of those who were found were Vietnamese. On Saturday, around one hundred people attended the service at the Church of the Holy Name and Our Lady of the Sacred Heart in east London.

      The Reverend Simon Nguyen remembered the 39 who were ‘seeking freedom, dignity and happiness’. Such a low attendance is indicative. The victims are only numbers in the current news cycle.

      In 2000 when 58 bodies of Chinese migrants were found in the back of a lorry in Dover, some of us journalists and concerned actors such as Corin Redgrave and Frances de la Tour organised a vigil near Downing St. We wanted to remind people that behind the numbers were names, individual, special lives.

      Nothing has been learnt since then. One Vietnamese contact tells me her people are now petrified: ‘Police will come to ask us questions maybe. We know nothing. We are the children of the boat people. Mrs Thatcher asked them to come during the war. Now we are afraid again’.

      Thatcher did indeed invite these migrants to settle in Britain and made sure that the tabloids ran their arrival as a good news story. It was a strategic move, her way of winning the PR battle against Vietnamese communists.

      The refugees were welcomed and helped to settle. That was the only time I praised the iron lady. No Tory PM would dare to be that bold today.

      In the UK, Australia, the US, many eastern European and EU nations too, most citizens and politicians feel for refugees, asylum seekers and migrants only when they perish at sea or in airless, light-less vehicles.

      Alive they are a pestilence, dead they become pitiful innocents preyed on by traffickers. There are of course kind and generous people too, who do what they can, for the global wanderers desperately seeking a better life. But millions of others can only raise sympathy for bodies and really get exercised about the crimes, not the victims.

      Journalists, politicians and commentators are now well into the whodunnit, madly exhilarating murder mystery, identifying the traffickers, the arrests and extraditions. They are sniffing around for other ploys that could be being used by criminal people smugglers.

      A Times investigation this week revealed that at least 15 pupils from Vietnam had vanished after enrolling at private schools. Apparently, this is something that the Human Trafficking Foundation is worried about too.

      It fell upon Catherine Baker, the senior campaigns officer at Every Child Protected Against Trafficking to challenge the narrative: ‘ Victims are often criminalised instead of being protected and a hostile environment for people in the UK without immigration status makes those still trapped in exploitative situations nervous to seek help’.

      Mercy is in short supply at the Home Office and Ms Patel, utterly benighted and scarily ideological, wants officials to get even tougher because she thinks suffering helps to deter others.

      Charities are raising concerns about some devious new tactics being used by the Home office to catch and repatriate undocumented men and women.

      Rapar, a Manchester based human rights charity has just discovered that minority community groups are being co-opted and paid thousands of pounds to help find and expel illegal migrants.

      Fizza Qureshi, co-chief executive of the Migrants Rights Networks rightly warns that ‘these kinds of practices destroy trust within and between communities. It will leave many marginalised people wondering who they can turn to and trust in their time of need’.

      Had the police found the distressed 39 in the back of the truck before they expired, they would all have been treated as criminals, interrogated, detained in abominable centres and sent back.

      Few legal options are available to them. People will keep on trying and these inconvenient truths will continue to be avoided by Britain and other receiving nations.

      And so the tragedies will go on.

      https://inews.co.uk/opinion/uk-would-have-treated-vietnamese-migrants-as-criminals-if-they-had-lived-82

    • Grieve the Essex 39, but recognise the root causes

      In the wake of the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry container, daikon*’s Kay Stephens writes on the global structures of capitalism and imperialism and the deadly border regimes that led to their deaths.

      On 24 October, daikon*, a group of anti-racist creatives of east and south east Asian descent, organised a vigil outside the Home Office with SOAS Detainee Support and members of the Chinese community to grieve for the 39 people found dead in a truck container in Essex – 39 people who died horrific deaths in miserable conditions in a desperate attempt to reach the UK.

      These deaths are no accident, but the direct result of global structures of capitalism and imperialism that marginalise, if not violently exclude, working-class undocumented migrants and people of colour. The mainstream’s response – calling for harsher borders, criminal justice for ‘greedy and unscrupulous’ traffickers and safe passage for ‘genuine’ refugees –fails to interrogate the global conditions that lead people to risk dangerous travel, and the deadly effects of border controls on all migrants.

      The global context

      Although initially identified as Chinese nationals, news is emerging that the majority of victims were from the neighbouring Vietnamese provinces of Nghệ An and Hà Tĩnh, both amongst the poorest regions in the country. In 2016, Hà Tĩnh suffered a water pollution disaster affecting over 200km of coastline, resulting in at least 70 tonnes of dead fish washing up on local shores. It was found that the Hà Tĩnh steel plant – a joint venture between the Taiwanese company Formosa, China Steel Corporation and Japan’s JFE Steel – had been discharging toxic waste into the ocean, devastating local marine life and directly affecting some 40,000 workers who relied on fishing and tourism for their livelihood. The affected communities have faced crackdowns on protest and are still seeking justice. Today, the region is a key site of people-smuggling to the UK.

      We can see neo-colonial dynamics playing out here. Big corporations from richer countries come in to exploit resources and low labour costs to produce wealth for themselves. When they cut corners to maximise profit, local working-class communities bear the brunt of the fallout, often in the form of irreparable environmental damage. These same countries then benefit from a hyper-exploitable migrant workforce: Taiwan and Japan, for instance, are on the receiving end of Vietnamese labour export programmes. These are effectively systems of debt servitude, whereby migrants work long hours for low pay in often poor conditions in order to send remittances to support their families back home, on top of repaying debts incurred to obtain work abroad. In Taiwan, low wages and rampant abuse drive many workers to break away from their contracts and seek criminalised forms of work. In Japan, Vietnamese workers commonly report experiences of racism and social exclusion, with many even dying of overwork.


      This year, we also saw the inclusion of an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) style mechanism in EU-Vietnam trade deals. This effectively gives foreign investors the power to sue host governments when their court rulings, laws and regulations – many of which serve the public interest – undermine their investments. Globally, ISDS has been used by corporations to sue governments when hard-won social and environmental protections negatively impact their production and profits. Currently, two British oil firms are using ISDS to sue the Vietnamese government to avoid paying taxes in the country. With the EU-Vietnam trade deal, we can expect European corporations to continue to exploit this mechanism at the expense of the local environment and people, who may increasingly seek to build their lives elsewhere.

      The UK response

      It is in this context that smuggling networks develop and operate. Those seeking the prospect of a better life abroad may hire the services of smugglers who facilitate illegalised movement across borders. Many will incur debts to finance their journeys, and expect to undertake difficult work upon arrival at their destination. One response of the UK Home Office is to support IOM (International Organization for Migration) Vietnam, both in delivering propaganda campaigns that attempt to deter people from illegalised migration, and in criminal investigations aimed at prosecuting smugglers and traffickers – policies that do nothing to address the conditions that lead people to migrate. Politicians and commentators are also insisting that to avoid tragedies like the Essex 39, we need increased border security and continued collaboration with EU law enforcement and anti-trafficking units. Yet we have witnessed the prosecution of aid workers helping migrants to safety under EU trafficking laws, and there are countless reports of police brutality against migrants in EU border enforcement operations. In reality, tougher borders only lead migrants and smugglers to risk increasingly deadly and secretive migration routes in order to evade detection by improved security technology. Securitised responses also shift the smuggling industry away from community-based networks towards increasingly violent and highly organised criminal networks that are able to maximally exploit migrants’ vulnerability to increase their profit margins. In short, borders kill. If we want to prevent migrant deaths, we need to work towards the abolition of borders, starting with practical solidarity resisting borders in public life and our communities – refusing complicity in the hostile environment, visiting people in detention, and resisting immigration raids.

      The impact of criminalisation

      We should also be concerned about how an increased emphasis on anti-trafficking legislation may further endanger precarious migrant workers in the UK. In 2016, we saw ‘anti-trafficking’ police raids on massage parlours in Soho and Chinatown lead to the violent arrest of many migrant sex workers on immigration grounds. Whilst ostensibly aimed at addressing exploitation, these kinds of ‘rescue’ raids on brothels, nail bars and cannabis farms are basically indistinguishable from immigration raids, leading as they often do to the detention of migrant workers, who then either face deportation or a protracted legal battle to remain. Often underlying such operations are gendered and racialised assumptions of Asian migrant women as passive and helpless victims in need of rescue, and Asian men as unscrupulous and predatory traffickers, who control and exploit those helpless victims. The reality is that in the context of border regimes that push them into debt and underground economies, many migrants make a constrained choice to work under conditions that are to varying degrees exploitative or abusive in order to pay off debts to smugglers, send money to dependants, and indeed, to survive. The fact that the British state does not guarantee indefinite leave to remain, nor adequate social support to those it identifies as survivors of trafficking shows its fundamental failure to grasp the central role that borders and capitalism, rather than individual traffickers, play in producing conditions for exploitation and abuse.

      Whatever their circumstances, we need to ensure migrants are able to assert labour rights and access safe housing, work, healthcare and other public, legal and social services – all without fear of immigration sanctions or criminal convictions. At a minimum, this means ending the ‘hostile environment’ which embeds immigration checks throughout public life, and decriminalising industries such as sex work whose criminalisation only pushes undocumented workers deeper into secrecy and silence.

      As heart-breaking stories of victims continue to emerge, we must recognise that such deaths are an inevitability of the neo-colonial, securitised regimes being built globally, designed to marginalise working-class migrants and people of colour, who are rendered exploitable or disposable. Systemic analyses that centre anti-capitalism, no borders, building migrant workers’ rights globally, and the decriminalisation of sex work are not distractions but central to bringing an end to senseless deaths such as those of the Essex 39.

      http://www.irr.org.uk/news/grieve-the-essex-39-but-recognise-the-root-causes

    • Lorry driver pleads guilty over role in Essex deaths

      #Maurice_Robinson, 25, admits plotting to assist illegal immigration
      A lorry driver charged with the manslaughter of 39 Vietnamese migrants found dead in a refrigerated trailer has pleaded guilty to plotting to assist illegal immigration.

      Maurice Robinson, 25, who is known as Mo, was allegedly part of a global smuggling ring. He was arrested shortly after the bodies of eight females and 31 males were found in a trailer attached to his Scania cab in an industrial park in Grays, Essex, on 23 October.

      The victims were identified later as Vietnamese nationals, with the youngest being two boys aged 15.

      Robinson appeared at the Old Bailey in London via video link from Belmarsh prison for a plea hearing. He spoke to confirm his identity and British nationality.

      Robinson admitted conspiracy to assist unlawful immigration between 1 May 2018 and 24 October 2019. The charge states that he plotted with others to do “an act or series of acts which facilitated the commission of a breach of immigration law by various persons”.

      During the hearing before Mr Justice Edis, Robinson also admitted acquiring criminal property – namely cash – on the same dates. He was not asked to enter pleas to other charges, including 39 counts of manslaughter.

      Police formally identified all 39 victims this month and informed their families. It has emerged, however, that relatives of the migrants found dead were told that neither the British nor Vietnamese governments would bear the costs of repatriating the bodies.

      Police in Vietnam have arrested eight people suspected of being part of a ring responsible for smuggling Vietnamese people to Britain.

      Essex police have launched extradition proceedings to bring Eamonn Harrison, 22, from Ireland to the UK. He appeared at Dublin’s central criminal court last Thursday after he was arrested on a European arrest warrant in respect of 39 counts of manslaughter, one count of a human trafficking offence and one count of assisting unlawful immigration.

      Harrison is accused of driving the lorry with the refrigerated container to Zeebrugge in Belgium before it was collected in Essex by Robinson.

      Robinson was remanded into custody until a further hearing on 13 December.

      https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/nov/25/lorry-driver-pleads-guilty-in-essex-deaths-case?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Tw

    • Don’t call the Essex 39 a ‘tragedy’

      Jun Pang on why the deaths of 39 undocumented migrants were entirely avoidable, and why borders are to blame.

      On 23 October, 39 people were found dead in the back refrigerated lorry in Essex, South East England, with media outlets reporting that the victims may have frozen to death in temperatures as low as -25°C.

      The truck had crossed The Channel from Belgium, a route that has been used increasingly by migrants after the French government tightened restrictions on departures from Calais.

      These 39 deaths were not a ‘tragedy’. They were not unavoidable. They were the direct result of British government policies that have made it impossible to enter the country using safe and legal means.

      The conditions that produced these 39 deaths emerge from the same set of policies that deny asylum, justify indefinite immigration detention, charter deportation flights, and restrict migrants’ access to fundamental rights – that is, the so-called ‘Hostile Environment’.

      The aim is to make the UK so inhospitable for migrants that they will not make the effort to try to enter. They are also the conditions that allow the Global North to continue to thrive off the exploitation of undocumented migrant workers.

      ‘The brutality of capitalism’

      When I first heard of the deaths, I was reminded of the 2004 Morecambe Bay disaster, when 23 undocumented Chinese workers drowned while picking cockles off the Lancashire coast. These workers did not die of ‘natural causes’, they died because their gangmaster did not give them any information about how to work safely in the notoriously dangerous bay. He was willing to sacrifice these undocumented workers’ lives for the sake of a higher yield.

      Chinese workers were described by one gangmaster as ‘a half-price... more punctual and productive workforce’. Did their employers imagine that Chinese people’s racialized ‘productivity’ somehow meant that they were also immune to the elements? One Morecambe Bay cockler later told journalist Hsiao-Hung Pai (who later wrote a book about Chinese migrant workers’ lives in the UK) that ‘he blamed the brutality of capitalism for the tragedy’.

      At the end of 2018, China was one of the countries with the highest numbers of citizens in UK detention centres. Earlier this year, I visited a Chinese man in detention, who had come to the UK with the help of so-called ‘snakehead’ smugglers, who are often blamed for the deaths of undocumented migrants like the Essex 39. The man had fled to the UK for fear that he would be killed; he did not know how else he could enter.

      The Home Office rejected his refugee application, detained him for more than a year (despite bundles of evidence from experts on his situation) and ended up deporting him – but not before first mistakenly deporting another man with the same surname.

      One of the most heartbreaking things he had said to me was that he would rather work for £1 an hour in the detention centre for the rest of his life, than go home and face persecution.
      Hierarchy of ‘desert’

      It is not useful to speculate on the reasons why these 39 Vietnamese nationals decided to try to enter the UK. More important is to recognize that the UK border has long been a site of racialized, classed, and gendered violence for all migrants, regardless of the reasons for entering. In 1998, the New Labour government published ‘Fairer, Faster, and Firmer – A Modern Approach to Immigration and Asylum’, a White Paper which warned that ‘economic migrants will exploit whatever route offers the best chance of entering or remaining within the UK’. Two years later, in 2000, 58 Chinese nationals were found dead, having suffocated in the back of a lorry at Dover docks.

      States often attempt to distinguish ‘economic migrants’ from ‘real refugees’ as a way to restrict legal entry at the border. Such categorization creates an arbitrary hierarchy of entitlement to international protection, absent of any consideration of the unequal distribution of resources across the Global North and Global South that often makes seeking employment overseas the only way that some people – and their families – can survive.

      In theory, this hierarchy of ‘desert’ is illegitimate because human rights violations, including deprivation of socioeconomic rights, are not subject to ranking. In practice, the hierarchy also fails to give ‘priority’ to ‘real refugees’ due to the culture of disbelief around asylum applications. So migrants are forced to rely on smugglers to gain entry.

      Smugglers facilitate the entry of migrants through different pathways. This entails significant risks, as states establish stronger barriers to entry, including visa restrictions, carrier sanctions, and interceptions at sea. The journeys do not stop; the conditions simply become more and more deadly.

      Smuggling is different to trafficking, which is the forced movement of a person for the purpose of exploitation, including labour and sexual exploitation. Anti-trafficking policies, however, are often criticized for failing to protect, and sometimes causing direct harm to, undocumented migrants. In the UK survivors of trafficking are detained and in some cases deported; even after being recognized as survivors, they often do not receive adequate social support.

      Part of the ‘anti-trafficking’ movement is also rooted in an anti-sex work politics that conflates sex work with sexual exploitation. This perspective presents all migrant sex workers as ‘victims’ requiring ‘saving’. In the end, this only pushes migrant sex workers into more insecure working conditions, subjecting them to the threat of arrest, detention, and deportation.

      States often conflate smuggling and trafficking to introduce blanket restrictions on entry and to criminalize particular forms of work in order to eject unwanted migrants. But blaming migrants’ deaths on smugglers and traffickers does nothing but mask the structures of racism and capitalism that both restrict the movement of, and exploit, undocumented workers.

      We do not at the time of writing know if the 39 people in the back of the lorry were hoping to come to the UK as workers; or whether they were being trafficked into labour exploitation. But the objectification of their ‘bodies’ reminded me of the way that migrants are only useful until they are not; and then, they are, quite literally, disposable.

      A man is being questioned in connection with the murder of the Essex 39; but the blood is ultimately on the hands of the British state, and the global system of borders that entrenches exploitative and deadly relations of power.

      https://newint.org/features/2019/10/25/dont-call-essex-39-tragedy
      #terminologie #vocabulaire #mots #tragédie #pouvoir #capitalisme

    • "Pray for Me"

      In October 2019, British police discovered a truck with 39 dead bodies. All from Vietnam. Who were they? How did they get there? The story of twins, one of whom died.

      The father is sitting hunched over at the table, a lanky, 50-year-old farmer with leathery skin and hair that is more gray than it is black. It’s late January, the air is warm and dry. Light filters in through the grated window, as do sounds: the crowing of a rooster, the lowing of a cow. The father wipes his nose on his sleeve and takes another drag from his cigarette. There have been a great number of cigarettes since the large, white altar appeared in the house entry bearing the photo of a smiling, 19-year-old girl in a white blouse and a red-and-gold scarf draped around her neck. Her name was Mai. She was his daughter.

      An acquaintance drops by, reaches for a stick of incense from the tray next to the altar, lights it and mumbles an Our Father. “Ah! You!” says the father in greeting and pours a glass of green tea. The guest sits down and says what everyone has been saying these days.

      “My condolences.”

      “Mai was such a good girl. It must be so deeply painful.”

      “I wish for you and your family that you may one day overcome this pain.”

      “May God help you.”

      The father nods and the visitor puts on his motorcycle helmet and drives off.

      The man and his wife cultivate two rice fields in addition to keeping three cows and a dozen chicken behind the house. The mother also distills liquor and the father used to take side jobs in construction – drilling wells or lugging sacks of cement. But since his daughter’s death, he has stopped taking any jobs, and his wife takes care of the fields and the animals on her own.

      The father can no longer handle much more than receiving guests dropping by to express their sympathies. Even eating is a challenge.

      Mai and her twin sister Lan had a dream: They wanted to get out of Vietnam and head to the West, to America or Europe. Two girls with the same round nose, the same high forehead and the same weakness for flannel shirts and jeans. Two girls who had shared a bed their entire lives, dyed their hair and put on red lipstick like popstars from South Korea. Two girls hoping for a better life.

      The father says he understood the dream of his daughters. Here, in the countryside of central Vietnam, all the young people want to leave. But in the big cities of Vietnam, they are ridiculed as rubes with a funny accent, so they head overseas. His brother’s children are living in America; he has cousins in South Korea. Classmates of his daughters have made their way to Japan, Germany and England.

      After finishing school, Mai and Lan applied to two American universities, but they were rejected. Then, a cousin put them in touch with a man from a neighboring village who was now living overseas. A smuggler.

      The father was worried. He had heard how dangerous it could be to travel to the West illegally, especially for women. On the evening before their departure, he took them aside.

      “I won’t let you go,” he said. “I can’t allow it.”

      The sisters protested. “If we don’t go now, we might never get away.”

      The father relented. When he thinks back to that discussion today, tears run down his face. He reaches for a cigarette.

      Mai’s and Lan’s journey to a better life ended in a news report that circled the globe. On 23rd of October 2019, British police officers discovered 39 dead bodies in a container on the back of a truck in the county of Essex east of London. Mai was one of them.

      Court documents show that a Northern Irish truck driver had hauled the container through France and Belgium before it was loaded onto a ferry in Zeebrugge for the crossing to England, disguised as a delivery of biscuits. Upon arrival in the port of Purfleet in Essex County, a second driver, also from Northern Ireland, picked up the container at 1:08 a.m. on that October night. A short time later, he turned into an industrial park, where he opened the container door.

      According to the London daily Evening Standard, the driver passed out after opening the refrigerator unit and discovering the bodies, although that suggestion remained unverified. The Daily Mail quotes emergency teams who said there were bloodied handprints. At 1:38 a.m., the ambulance was called.

      Post-mortem examinations have come to the conclusion that the victims died of suffocation and overheating, likely during the nine-hour crossing to England. The container’s refrigeration system had been switched off.

      The two truck drivers and three accomplices are now in custody, with their trial set to begin in Britain this autumn. Eight more suspects have been charged in Vietnam. Investigations into the unlawful migration network are continuing in both countries, but already it seems clear that the authorities have not managed to track down the leaders of the network. Only the foot soldiers will be hauled into court.

      Reports of people who die on their way to Europe are usually about migrants from Africa or civil war refugees from the Middle East who drown in the Mediterranean. But the Essex tragedy is different.

      All of the 39 people who died were from Vietnam, a country that has been at peace for decades – a place that is popular as a vacation destination and which is growing more prosperous by the year.

      Still, the twin sisters Mai and Lan took off on this dangerous journey. What were they hoping for once they arrived in England? And was the container disaster in Essex an isolated case, or was it part of a dangerous migration movement that had managed to stay under the radar until then?

      This article was researched over the course of several months. The ZEIT reporters traveled to Vietnam, England and Spain, with much of their reporting taking place long before SARS-CoV-2 arrived in these countries. Like so many other things, the virus has also slowed down irregular migration, and only in the coming weeks will it become clear what is stronger – the pandemic or the desire for millions of people to leave their homeland.
      Spain

      Around 9,900 kilometers from her parents’ home in Vietnam, Lan is sitting in a nail salon in a Spanish city not far from the Mediterranean. To protect their identities, the names of both Lan and her deceased twin sister Mai have been changed for this story, also Lan’s employer will not be identified. Lan, wearing jeans and a black hoodie, is filing a customer’s nails. She has a blue-and-white plaid fabric mask wrapped around her face, as do all of the workers here to protect themselves from the fumes and the fingernail dust. Winter is just coming to an end and the coronavirus has yet to arrive.

      Lan bends silently over the left hand belonging to a young Spanish woman with dark brown hair and a cheek piercing, her fingers spread wide. Lan’s workspace is in the back, next to the massage chair with the footbath. On her table is a fan and a clamp-on desk lamp, from which a small electric nail file is hanging. On the wall is a poster of a woman naked from the waist up, her arms crossed to cover her breasts. Next to it are the words “Beauty Nails.”

      Spain. Lan is stuck here. The Vietnamese smuggler who organized the sisters’ trip last summer – he’ll be called Long – told them all about the wonders of England. He told them he lived there himself, though it would later turn out that he really lives in Germany.

      Mai and Lan didn’t know much about England. They didn’t have a specific idea of the kind of life they wanted to live or the jobs they wanted to have, but they figured they would be granted residency and make lots of money. Then, they would return to Vietnam, get married and have children. That was the plan.

      Long, the smuggler, told the girls that the trip he was organizing for them would be almost as comfortable as vacation. They would only have to make a choice regarding the last leg of the journey, from France to England. Would they rather travel in the cab of a truck, in a horse trailer or in a container?

      The father chose the truck cab, the safest and most expensive method. The price: 1.1 billion Vietnamese Dong per sister, for a total equal to almost 88,000 euros. To get ahold of that much money, the father decided to take out a loan, with his property and that of his siblings as collateral.

      It was a good investment, Long promised. He would take care of everything, including forged passports. And once they arrived in England, he said, one of his contacts would pick up the girls and help them find jobs. Jobs that would lead to a better life.

      In the nail studio, Lan stands up from her stool and asks the customer to follow her and the two then sit down at a table near the entrance. The customer spreads her fingers out again and Lan walks over to a shelf where small, colorful bottles of nail polish are lined up. She pulls out two bottles, one white and one clear. The Spanish woman has requested a French manicure: clear nails with white tips.

      The nail studio where Lan works is no different from thousands of others just like it in Europe. It is located in a shopping mall with glass entry doors and faux-marble floors. On the ground floor, young shoppers push past H&M while families eat pizza up in the food court. At Beauty Nails, a manicure and pedicure with no polish costs 32 euros. The husbands sit on chairs near the door, fiddling with their smartphones.

      What remains invisible from the outside is the world that keeps the business going, the continued arrival of migrants who enter the country illegally. In many Western countries, nail studios are run by the Vietnamese, though the reason is more by chance than by design: In the 1970s, the Hollywood actress Tippi Hedren visited a Vietnamese refugee camp in California. To help the people there build up new lives for themselves, she set up courses in nail care and even flew in her own manicurist to help teach them. That was how the first Vietnamese began filing and polishing nails for a living. They were so successful, that many of their compatriots followed their example, first in the United States and then in Europe. And they are still expanding the business, with the necessary personnel coming from their former homeland.

      Only two of the five Vietnamese who are working in the nail studio on this day have valid residency papers, the boss and his longest-serving employee, both of whom have lived in Spain for a long time. The other three – a young man in his early 20s, a woman of the same age and Lan – are in the country without permission.

      It’s not easy to trace the circuitous path the two sisters took on their way to Europe. Lan has only faint memories of the many people and places they encountered, while some of the details regarding the smugglers and their methods cannot be adequately verified. The ZEIT reporters tried to corroborate the stories told by the young woman by looking at passport stamps, pictures and social media posts. They compared Lan’s account with those from the families of other victims and discussed them with migration experts. They have come to the conclusion that Lan’s story is credible.
      The Path to the West: Malaysia

      The two sisters began their trip in late August of last year at the airport in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi, 300 kilometers from their home village. Their mother had stayed home, with Long, the smuggler, insisting that there be no intimate hugs or even tears as the parents bid farewell. He was concerned that such scenes could have attracted the attention of the police. Only their father had joined them on the trip to the airport.

      Mai and Lan had two, small trolley cases with them, one brown and the other white, in which they had packed T-shirts, collared shirts and a few articles of warm clothing. They also each had 500 USD and 700 euros in cash. Their plan was to pose as tourists heading off on a trip with their partners. At the terminal, they met two young Vietnamese men who were also on their way to the West. The twins were to fly with the two men to Malaysia. Their father thought they looked decent, and the fact that they were Catholic put his mind at ease.

      The sisters left Vietnam with the feeling that a grand adventure lay ahead of them.

      At the airport in Kuala Lumpur, the group was received by a Chinese woman, who drove them to a hotel outside of the city. Mai and Lan went out to eat and to have a look around, feeling like a couple of tourists. Later, the Chinese woman returned with red passports, telling the girls that they were to say they were from China from then on.

      Mai and Lan learned a few sentences in Chinese from the woman and had to memorize their new names and places of birth. Mai’s new name was “Lili,” but Lan has forgotten hers. “It was so long,” she says.

      The very next day, Lan had to continue the journey without her sister, with the smugglers saying that their identical dates of birth threatened to attract unwanted attention.

      So, she flew with three or four other Vietnamese and the Chinese woman to the Azerbaijan capital of Baku. There, they boarded a plane bound for Istanbul. When they arrived, Lan presented her Chinese passport. Mai arrived two days later with a different group.

      Spain

      At Beauty Nails, the hum of nail filers competes with the rattling of shopping carts outside in the mall. Every now and then, a customer walks in, triggering a flurry of orders from the boss in Vietnamese and the customer is taken to a free table.

      Vietnamese acquaintances of Vietnamese acquaintances helped Lan get the job in the nail studio and she now spends six days a week here, from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., with only Sundays off. It’s of no consequence to her whether it is cold and wintery outside or whether the sun warms the colorful building facades as it does on this spring-like Saturday. All Lan sees are broken nails, split nails, torn nails, nails with chipped polish and unpainted nails that are waiting to be filed and painted.

      Lan guesses that she serves 20 customers a day, not many compared to the others, she says. She has been working here for more than two months, but she still hasn’t been paid. “It’s like an apprenticeship,” she later says after the workday is over and she can speak freely. “Plus, they take care of my lodging and food.”

      Lan lives in a four-room flat on the fifth floor of an apartment building together with eight other Vietnamese, seven men and a woman. She and the other woman share a room in the apartment and sleep in the same bed. The apartment belongs to her boss and everyone who lives here works in one of his two nail studios. Late in the evening, once the workday is over, they cook together.

      Lan speaks in short, hesitant sentences, frequently looking away in embarrassment. She says she doesn’t know how long her purported training program will last and she hasn’t yet managed to muster up the courage to ask.

      She leaves her own nails unpainted. Polished nails aren’t particularly practical in her line of work, nor does she like the look of colored fingernails. In the first week, her fingers turned red and scaly, but now she washes her hands after every customer and uses lotion, which has helped.
      The Path to the West: Turkey

      In Istanbul, the sisters stayed in an old hotel. Along with the rooms for normal guests, there were hidden rooms in the basement and in the attic, Lan says, adding that around 30 Vietnamese and 20 people from China were staying in the hotel, migrants passing through. They all contributed money for the shopping and then cooked together in a kitchen in the attic. After just over a week in Turkey, they made their first attempt to leave the country. The smugglers drove them into a forest, but they were taken into custody by the Turkish police and brought to a police station, where they were held for around four hours. The Turks were friendly, Lan recalls. “We even taught them a bit of Vietnamese.”

      Back in the city, Lan and the others waited a few days. Then they tried again.

      The vehicle was a minivan, designed for seven people, but the seats had been removed and that evening, 27 people crammed inside: Vietnamese, Chinese, Iraqis and Iranians. Mai and Lan had to leave their suitcases back in the hotel and were only allowed to bring along plastic bags with a bit of food and clothing. After about three hours, they again reached the forest, where they proceeded to wait. At around 2 a.m., two Turkish men showed up with two folded up inflatable rafts. The group then walked for around four hours until they reached a river that was just a few meters wide. The Turks pumped up the boats and brought Lan and the others across to the other side. It only took a couple of minutes. And then, they were in Greece.
      Vietnam

      Nghe An, the home province of the two sisters in Vietnam, is neither particularly rich nor is it extremely poor. The life that Mai and Lan led there was largely confined to just a few square kilometers: There was their parents’ two-story home with its red roof; there was the Catholic church where the family – the twins, their parents and their two younger siblings – would worship; and there were the rice fields everywhere.

      Sometimes, their father would drive Mai and Lan to the seaside, a 15-minute trip on the moped. At others, the twins would head out without him, driving around for a couple of hours on their own.

      During their excursions, the sisters could see how their region was changing. In many villages, there were hardly any traditional, dark farmhouses with moss covering the walls. Most families have built multi-story homes in recent years, painted in bright colors like lemon yellow or sky blue. Surrounded by banana trees and high fences, stucco-decorated gables jut upward with Greek columns out front and wooden shutters on the windows. Money left over after the homes are complete tends to be spent on air conditioning.

      The prosperity here comes from relatives living abroad, as everyone here knows. Mai and Lan were well aware of it too. There is even a term for these people who live somewhere in the West: Viet-Kieu, overseas Vietnamese.

      Emigration has long been a feature of life in Vietnam. After communist North Vietnam won the war against the Americans in the mid-1970s and took over South Vietnam, hundreds of thousands of people fled the country in boats and were taken in primarily by France and the U.S. Later, many Vietnamese traveled as contract workers to socialist “brother states,” like the Soviet Union, East Germany, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia. More recently, migrant workers have followed, most of them young and from rural areas. People like Mai and Lan.

      Today, almost every Vietnamese family has relatives living overseas, who regularly send money back home. According to the World Bank, remittances worth $16.7 billion were sent back to Vietnam from abroad last year, a total that is many times what the country received in official development assistance.

      If the mother has to go to the hospital; if the son is to be sent to university; if the grandfather can no longer work: Many Vietnamese families are dependent on money from abroad. Those who earn that money thousands of kilometers away are smiling down from pictures hung in living rooms across the country – proud emigrants posing in front of famous Western tourist attractions like Big Ben, the Eiffel Tower and the Brandenburg Gate.

      What you don’t see in the pictures are the dangers encountered by many of the migrants who have left Vietnam in recent years.

      On that October night in the English county of Essex, 31 men and eight women from several central Vietnamese provinces died in the white metal container. The ZEIT reporters were able to speak with the families of 38 of the 39 victims.

      Such as the parents of 26-year-old Pham Thi Tra My. In the final minutes of her life, she was able to write her parents a text message. But only when the doors of the container were finally opened – long after all its occupants had died – did Tra My’s mobile phone once again find a signal and send her words to her family: “Mom and dad, I’m so sorry (…). I didn’t make it. Mom. I love you both. I’m dying because I can’t breathe (…). Mom, I’m so sorry.”

      The dead body of Dang Huu Tuyen, 22, was also lying in the container. His parents had sent him to Laos to make money, but the wages paid at the construction sites there were too low, so Tuyen headed off to Europe. Even now, after the death of his son, Tuyen’s father says heading abroad is the best thing a young man can do.

      Tran Hai Loc and his wife Nguyen Thi Van, both 35, also died in the container. In contrast to most parents, they decided to head abroad together to make more money so they could quickly return to their children in Vietnam. In the grandparents’ home, there is now an altar bearing a photo of the couple. The children, two and four years old, sometimes gaze at it uncomprehendingly.
      The Path to the West: Greece

      On the Greek side of the border, Lan says, they saw bushes with white tufts on them. Cotton. They reached a clearing that looked as though someone had just been camping there and the Turkish smugglers spread out a blanket for them to sit on.

      The smugglers told the group they had to wait in the clearing until evening and that they had to stay as quiet as possible because of the possibility of police roaming through the forest. It was a chilly evening, Lan recalls, and Mai was shivering because she had left her warm clothing back at the hotel. They passed Lan’s jacket back and forth and embraced to keep warm. At around 7 p.m., they headed off again and kept going until midnight, when they stopped. The smugglers passed out bags of food and drinks, then they all stretched out on the ground and went to sleep.

      When they woke up, they were picked up by a truck that had been modified for its very specific purpose. From the outside, Lan recalls, it looked just like a normal truck, with a cab up front and a large container in the back. But there was actually a hidden compartment, reachable through a metal hatch underneath. “We had to crawl under the truck so that we could climb in,” Lan says.

      Around four hours later, they had to climb back out of the truck on a country road. From here, the smugglers said, it’s about 10 kilometers to the train station, and the group set out on foot. The Vietnamese, says Lan, stopped at a small bistro they passed for a bite to eat and they asked someone to call a taxi for them. The Chinese, though, she says, walked the entire way and were exhausted when they arrived.

      “We Vietnamese,” Lan says, “are very smart.”

      They took the train to Athens and separated into smaller groups, with the twins staying together with the two young Vietnamese men with whom they had flown to Malaysia. An accomplice of their smuggler picked them up at the train station in Athens and brought them to his apartment. Here, they had to wait two or three weeks until their new forged passports were ready, this time from China and South Korea.

      It was a pleasant time for Mai and Lan. Mai posted a picture to her Facebook page showing the girls in front of the Academy of Athens, the setting sun shining on the building’s white columns and the twins smiling in each other’s arms. They were wearing T-shirts and jeans, both with belt bags slung over their shoulders. “This is the life,” Mai wrote, including a smiley.
      Spain

      It’s Sunday, Lan’s day off, and she wants to head out to the beach for the first time since arriving in Spain. Lan has lived in this city for several months, but still lives the life of a stranger. The language, the food, the streets, the buildings – none of it is familiar to her.

      In the old city center, she climbs into a green-and-white electric bus that is so full on this summery spring day that she is only just able to find a seat. The bus drives through a suburb with broad streets and lush palms. Even though the sun is shining outside and it is 20 degrees Celsius, Lan is wearing a woolen roll neck sweater and a black-and-white plaid winter coat.

      She begins talking about her apartment and about the eight other Vietnamese she lives with, saying she isn’t particularly interested in speaking or doing much with any of them, aside from church on Sunday, which they sometimes attend together. Her apartment mates offered to celebrate her birthday with her, but she declined. Her birthday reminds her too much of her twin sister, she says.

      She gets off the bus at the last stop and follows three young Spaniards carrying a blanket and a ball. They walk past a white casino and a park full of picnicking families. Lan walks up a small embankment until the air begins to smell of salt and the ground gives way to damp sand, the waves splashing onto the shore. The sky is so blue it could have been painted.

      “Just like the beach in Vietnam!” Lan yells.

      A couple of young people in swimming suits bat a volleyball back and forth. Lan, though, pulls her coat up over her head: Like many Vietnamese women, she finds tanned skin to be ugly.

      She stops, sits down in the sand and pulls her knees to her chin. When asked if she would like to return to Vietnam, she says that she regrets not having listened to her father’s warnings. “The price to come here was too high,” she says.

      Still, she doesn’t want to give up and go back. Her sister, she believes, would have wanted her to bring her journey to a successful conclusion, making it all the way to England to make enough money to help support her family.

      It’s quite possible that Lan would also be working in a nail salon had she made it to England, though some Vietnamese migrants also end up at the illegal cannabis farms there. Experts have compiled reports about young men being locked into buildings for months on end so they can monitor the heat lamps and fertilize and water the plants. The only food that the drug dealers give them are frozen meals they can heat up in the microwave. In many instances, says the British Home Office, these migrants live in a form of “modern slavery.”

      It seems likely, in other words, that Lan’s life in England would be no better than the one she has found in Spain. But at least she knows a few people in England who could help her. More than anything, though, Lan seems intent on reaching the goal that she and her sister had set for themselves.

      “If I were to return to Vietnam now, I would just be a burden to my parents,” Lan says. “I would have to find a secure, well-paid job. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have enough money to feed my siblings and send them to school.”

      In the months following the death of her sister, it seems almost as though Lan has packed up her feelings and set them aside. It’s as though she is bearing her pain just as disciplined as she is bearing her work at the nail salon. In her discussions with ZEIT about her journey and the death of her sister, she only began crying on one single occasion – when she was speaking about Mai dying in the container. “I can actually feel it when I think about her gasping for breath,” she says. “I can feel it with my own body.”
      The Path to the West: Separation

      In Athens, the smugglers once again wanted Mai to fly onward on her own. Mai resisted, afraid to be without her sister, but Lan reassured her, saying: “Go on ahead.” So, Mai flew to Palermo in Italy, where she looked around in the old town and went to the beach, before then boarding a plane to Spain and then a train to France.

      In the meantime, Lan tried to leave Athens with a South Korean passport. She managed to make it through the security check at the airport, but she was detained on the plane. A customs official took her forged passport, leaving Lan to call her parents in tears. “If you have to, go to the police and come home,” her father told her. But after 24 hours, the Greek authorities let her go, though they held onto the fake passport.

      A few days later, she spoke with her sister on the phone for the last time. It was the evening of Oct. 21 and Lan was still stuck in Athens. Mai, though, was at a train station in France, waiting for a man who was supposed to bring her to Belgium. From there, her smuggler had told her, she could head onward to England. Mai was thinking about staying in Belgium until Lan caught up with her, but Lan pushed her to keep going. It could be awhile until she got another forged passport, she said.

      “Pray for me,” Mai said.

      “I’m praying for you,” Lan responded.

      That was the last time they spoke. Shortly before the crossing to England, Mai wrote her sister one last time via Facebook.

      Oct. 22, 7:48 a.m.: “Lan, I’m leaving at 8.”

      8:49 a.m.: “I’m leaving at 9.”

      Mai’s father spent that day in Vietnam waiting for his daughter to get in touch after arriving in England. In vain. So, he tried calling her himself. And couldn’t reach her. Her father recalls that Long, the smuggler, tried to reassure him, saying that Mai had arrived safely in England and that he didn’t need to worry and that the father only had to hand over the money and Mai would be picked up and taken to an apartment.

      The father tried to believe him and even told Lan. But then, on Oct. 23, news suddenly began spreading in the village. There had been an accident in England. Thirty-nine dead bodies in a truck. All of them Asian.

      The father again called the smuggler. Is Mai really in England, he demanded? What about that container? Again, the father says, Long tried to convince him that everything was just fine. Mai had booked the most expensive of the travel options, after all, a seat in the cab. There was room for just two in the cab, not 39.

      In the hours that followed, the father says, he paced in the living room like a madman. Only two, not 39 – that thought kept going through his head, he says. He told Lan the same thing. But why wasn’t he able to reach Mai? And why had Long also stopped answering his phone?

      Lan says she could also feel that something wasn’t right. She laid in bed without being able to sleep. She says she prayed and read the bible.

      Days later, still in the dark about her sister’s fate, Lan flew from Greece to Spain with a forged South Korean passport, the next leg of the journey to England. After her arrival in Spain, Lan again wrote her sister over Facebook.

      5:25 p.m.: “Don’t leave me alone.”

      “We have to make it to make mom and dad happy.”

      5:53 p.m.: “Call me.”

      “Try your best to get me to England, too, so that we can see each other again.”

      6:53 p.m.: “Call me and I’ll come to you.”

      “We have to do all we can for our parents and our family.”

      That night, Lan spoke with her mother on the phone. Her mother told her: “Leave your phone camera on so that I can watch over you as you sleep.”

      It would take until Nov. 8 until the police in Essex brought an end to their uncertainty and released the names of the 39 people who had suffocated in the back of the truck.
      Vietnam

      For 40 days, Mai’s body lay in a wooden casket in England, the country where she so badly wanted to live. Then it was flown to Vietnam. On the morning of Dec. 2, 2019, a white ambulance brought the body to Mai’s hometown. Everyone was waiting for its arrival: parents, siblings, relatives, neighbors, former classmates, teachers and other members of the community. On videos of that day, you can see villagers crouched on their mopeds with colorful flags. When the ambulance finally arrived, they crowded around its tinted windows and pressed their hands against them – as if they were trying to grasp something that could no longer be grasped.

      In the videos, you can also see Mai’s father standing silently to the side. All around him are the sounds of drumming, rattling, mourning and singing, but it looks as though he’s not making a sound. His mouth is open, his face frozen in place as he walks to his home in the middle of the funeral march – losing strength as he goes, until a relative has to pull him for the last few steps through the crowd.

      Spain

      The sun has already set on the beach when Lan’s phone rings and a photo of her father pops up on the screen. “Dad?” she says. “Are you still awake? It’s late over there.”

      Lan and her father frequently talk on the phone several times a day. He always asks how she is doing and whether she has eaten. And he tells her she shouldn’t climb into a truck bound for England, and she shouldn’t go anywhere on her own.

      On this day, too, Lan’s father had tried to reach her several times, but because she was speaking with a reporter, Lan didn’t want to stop to pick up the phone. He was worried.

      “Everything is fine,” she says. “I’m at the beach.”

      They talk for a few minutes and then she sets her phone aside. It has grown chilly and Lan has wrapped herself in her coat. Later, she will say that it was her birthday. She is now 20 years old.

      She looks out at the sea as though she is looking for a ship to take her to the other side. “A Vietnamese friend who I met in Greece recently called me,” she says. “He’s in England. He crossed over in the truck, in the cab. He says it was quite comfortable.”
      Vietnam

      At the edge of the village that she had wanted to leave, just a few hundred meters from her childhood home, is Mai’s grave. The air is still, as is the sky. A low cement wall marks the area belonging to Mai’s family. Her grave is set slightly apart from those of her forbears, who lie close together. It’s also bigger, mightier, more admonishing. A small stone covering protects her photo from the sun and rain. The grave is surrounded by white flowers.
      Spain

      Lan receives her first wages at the nail salon after three months: 500 euros in addition to room and board. She is set to earn more money in the months to come: 600, 700, maybe even 1,000 euros. Finally, she will be able to send money home.

      But then the pandemic arrives. And Beauty Nails has to close its doors.

      A lockdown is imposed across Spain and Lan spends her days in the apartment with the other Vietnamese migrants. She sleeps, she cooks, she eats and she talks to her parents on the phone or exchanges messages with them. But really, she is waiting. Waiting for the country to reawaken so she can go back to fixing and polishing nails. And she is waiting for the borders to reopen so she can finish her journey to England.

      https://www.zeit.de/gesellschaft/zeitgeschehen/2020-05/migration-vietnamese-dead-bodies-lorry-essex-grossbritannien-english

      #parcours_migratoires #itinéraires_migratoires

    • Camion charnier en Angleterre : les 13 suspects interpellés en France mis en examen

      Les 13 personnes arrêtées mardi en France lors d’un coup de filet lié à l’enquête sur la mort de 39 migrants vietnamiens dans un camion frigorifique en octobre en Grande-Bretagne ont été mises en examen, a-t-on appris samedi de source judiciaire.

      Elles ont toutes été mises en examen vendredi pour « traite des êtres humains en bande organisée », « aide à l’entrée ou au séjour en bande organisée » et « association de malfaiteurs ». Six d’entre elles sont également poursuivies pour « homicide involontaire ».

      Sur les treize, douze ont été placées en détention provisoire et une sous contrôle judiciaire.

      Ces suspects, majoritairement des Vietnamiens et des Français, ont été interpellés mardi en divers lieux de la région parisienne. Au même moment, treize autres personnes ont aussi été arrêtées en Belgique dans le cadre d’une opération de police internationale, coordonnée par l’organisme de coopération judiciaire Eurojust.

      En Belgique, 11 personnes ont été écrouées après leur inculpation pour « trafic d’êtres humains avec circonstances aggravantes, appartenance à une organisation criminelle et faux et usages de faux », selon le parquet fédéral belge. Deux autres, inculpées des mêmes chefs, ont été remises en liberté.

      Selon plusieurs sources proches de l’enquête, un homme soupçonné d’être un organisateur du réseau de trafic de migrants a par ailleurs été interpellé mercredi en Allemagne, dans le cadre d’un mandat d’arrêt européen émis par la France.

      Le 23 octobre, les cadavres de 31 hommes et de huit femmes de nationalité vietnamienne, dont deux adolescents de 15 ans, avaient été découverts dans un conteneur dans la zone industrielle de Grays, à l’est de Londres. Le conteneur provenait du port belge de Zeebruges.

      Selon une source judiciaire française, les enquêteurs ont pu déterminer grâce à des investigations techniques et des surveillances physiques que les migrants partaient de Bierne, dans le Nord de la France, vers Zeebruges.

      Les personnes interpellées en Ile-de-France sont soupçonnées d’avoir hébergé et transporté des migrants par taxi entre la région parisienne et le Nord, selon cette source.

      Le réseau a continué à oeuvrer après le drame, ainsi que pendant le confinement. Pendant cette période, les trafiquants se sont adaptés en aménageant les cabines des camions pour y dissimuler les candidats à la traversée de la Manche, à raison de trois ou quatre par voyage.

      Le mois dernier, une arrestation avait déjà eu lieu en Irlande : celle du présumé organisateur de la rotation des chauffeurs participant au trafic.

      Par ailleurs, dans l’enquête britannique, cinq personnes ont déjà été inculpées, dont Maurice Robinson, 25 ans, le chauffeur du camion intercepté à Grays. Début avril, ce dernier avait plaidé coupable d’homicides involontaires devant un tribunal londonien.

      https://www.courrierinternational.com/depeche/camion-charnier-en-angleterre-les-13-suspects-interpelles-en-

  • The Race to Develop the Moon | The New Yorker
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/05/06/the-race-to-develop-the-moon

    The guiding laws of space are defined by the Outer Space Treaty, from 1967, which has been signed by a hundred and eight countries, including all those with substantial space programs. “Laws that govern outer space are similar to the laws for the high seas,” Alain Berinstain, the vice-president of global development at the lunar-exploration company Moon Express, explained. “If you are two hundred miles away from the continental shelf, those waters don’t belong to anybody—they belong to everybody.” Moon Express describes the moon as the eighth continent. The company, which is based in Florida, is hoping to deliver its first lander to the moon in 2020; on board will be telescopes and the Celestis cremains. “If you look down at the waters from your ship and see fish, those fish belong to everybody,” Berinstain continued. “But, if you put a net down and pull those fish onto the deck of the ship, they’re yours. This could change, but right now that is how the U.S. is interpreting the Outer Space Treaty.”

    Individual countries have their own interpretations of the treaty, and set up their own regulatory frameworks. Luxembourg promotes itself as “a unique legal, regulatory and business environment” for companies devoted to space resources, and is the first European country to pass legislation similar to that of the U.S., deeming resources collected in space to be ownable by private entities.

    It’s not difficult to imagine moon development, like all development, proceeding less than peacefully, and less than equitably. (At least, unlike with colonization on Earth, there are no natives whose land we’re taking, or so we assume.) Philip Metzger, a planetary physicist at the University of Central Florida, said, “I’m really glad that all these countries, all these companies, are going to the moon. But there will be problems.” Any country can withdraw from the Outer Space Treaty by giving a year’s notice. “If any country feels it has a sufficient lead in space, that is a motivation to withdraw from the treaty,” he said.

    So there is a tacit space race already. On the one hand, every national space agency applauded the success of the Chang’e-4 lander. The mission had science partnerships with Germany, the Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, and Sweden. NASA collaborates with many countries in space, sharing data, communications networks, and expertise. Russian rockets bring American astronauts to the International Space Station. When, in response to economic sanctions, the head of the Russian space agency said that maybe the American astronauts could get to the I.S.S. by trampoline, the comment was dismissed as posturing. Still, NASA has contracted with Boeing and SpaceX, Elon Musk’s rocket company, to begin taking astronauts to the I.S.S. this year—which means the U.S. will no longer rely on Russia for that. Russia and China say they will work together on a moon base. NASA used to collaborate with the China National Space Administration; in 2011, six months after members of NASA visited the C.N.S.A., Congress passed a bill that effectively prohibited collaboration.

    It’s natural to want to leave the moon undisturbed; it’s also clear that humanity will disturb it. But do we need to live there? Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, envisages zoning the moon for heavy industry, and Earth for light industry and residential purposes. Bezos’s company Blue Origin is developing reusable rockets intended to bring humans reliably back and forth from space, with the long-term goal of creating manufacturing plants there, in zero gravity. Earth would be eased of its industrial burden, and the lower-gravity conditions would be beneficial for making certain goods, such as fibre-optic cables.

    “There’s the argument that we’ve destroyed the Earth and now we’re going to destroy the moon. But I don’t see it that way,” Metzger said. “The resources in space are billions of times greater than on Earth. Space pretty much erases everything we do. If you crush an asteroid to dust, the solar wind will blow it away. We can’t really mess up the solar system.”

    #Espace #Communs #Tragédie_communs #Idéologie_californienne #Géopolitique

  • « Laurenzaccio » la Bande-annonce

    Voici elle est arrivée et est postée sur PeerTube. J’ai nommé la Bande-annonce de « Laurenzaccio », tragédie clownesque mise en scène par Mario Gonzalez. Elle a été montée et filmée par Jean-Pierre Villaret et Bruno Souverbie (Phase-B). C’est une captation de la première représentation au Théâtre de Chaoué Port Belle Eau d’Allonnes. Je vous laisse l’admirer : https://www.philippepillavoine.com/leblog/2019/03/01/laurenzaccio-la-bande-annonce

    #spectacle #création #bande_annonce #teaser #trailer #laurenzaccio #musset #sand #gonzalez #pillavoine #clown #tragédie #villaret #souverbie #captation #allonnes

  • A priori sauvage

    Un film de Romain André avec des fouines dedans. Et puis de la ville. Et puis de la nuit. Et puis de la douceur-douleur...

    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/077279-000-A/a-priori-sauvage

    La nuit, des fouines rôdent en ville. Jean-Marc, promeneur solitaire insomniaque, s’en inquiète auprès de la mairie. Aurélie, une employée municipale, tente de l’apaiser par voie électronique : elle prend cette histoire très à cœur.

    Si tu veux aller plus loin, y’a la rencontre de Arte avec Romain André (aka Victor Baton ailleurs) mais je te conseille de surtout pas la regarder avant : ça s’rait dommage !
    https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/088581-000-A/rencontre-avec-romain-andre
    Y’a même une page facebook dédiée au film, mais je te laisse chercher, hein ;)

    #film #documentaire #animalier #sauvagerie #ce_qui_échappe_au_capitalisme

    • #fouine (Quand elles ont décidé de squatter votre grenier, c’est très difficile de les faire changer d’avis).

      Étonnant #court-métrage qui met en évidence le rapport pas forcément très sain que nous humains entretenons avec les animaux dits « sauvages ». L’histoire de cette rencontre entre un homme et « sa » fouine est une mise en abyme des relations qui s’établissent entre humains : inquiétude, curiosité, attachement puis ... fin de l’histoire. #Tragédie ?

  • Le choc
    http://otir.net/dotclear/index.php/post/2019/01/12/Le-choc

    Angle rues Bergère/Rue de Trévise- Paris 9e - Photo © A.Fredaigue/Facebook

    Je me suis réveillée très tôt ce matin et lorsque j’ai vu qu’il y avait eu une explosion à Paris, j’ai immédiatement voulu savoir où c’était arrivé : je ne peux jamais m’empêcher de penser à tous les miens. Paris est ma ville après tout, même si je n’y vis plus depuis vingt ans.

    C’est l’immeuble d’Alain et Odette qui a explosé.

    Quel choc.

    Je me suis précipitée sur Facebook en espérant qu’ils auraient déjà pu donner de leurs nouvelles.

    Ils sont sains et saufs.

    Ont évacué et n’ont plus d’appartement, dont toutes les fenêtres et boiseries seraient pulvérisées.

    L’explosion serait suite à une importante fuite de gaz survenue dans la grande boulangerie de l’angle de la rue de Trévise et de la rue Bergère.

    La photo publiée par Alain sur (...)

    #Tronches_de_vie #informations #tragédie

  • « On joue les rapaces » : on a discuté avec un chargeur de trottinettes électriques Lime et Bird - - Numerama
    https://www.numerama.com/tech/425113-on-joue-les-rapaces-on-a-discute-avec-un-chargeur-de-trottinettes-e

    David est ce qu’on appelle, dans le jargon de l’ubérisation, un « Juicer » : un chargeur de trottinettes électriques. Il n’est pas employé par Lime, pas plus qu’il ne l’est par Bird. Pourtant, ce sont bien les trottinettes de ces deux sociétés qu’il s’occupe de recharger presque quotidiennement, une fois sa (première) journée de travail achevée. David est autoentrepreneur : il a passé un contrat avec les deux entreprises qui le rémunèrent à chaque fois qu’il charge une nouvelle trottinette à Paris.

    « J’ai commencé en juillet dernier, un peu par hasard. J’ai utilisé une trottinette électrique », entame David au téléphone. Dans l’application Lime, qu’il est en train d’utiliser, il tombe sur l’option permettant de devenir chargeur. « Au début, j’ai essayé par curiosité. Avec l’entreprise que j’ai, dans le secteur événementiel, c’était facile de renseigner un numéro SIRET. Puis je me suis aperçu que cela permettait d’ajouter un peu de beurre dans les épinards », raconte-t-il.

    « En juillet, quand j’ai commencé, c’était bien plus facile de charger les trottinettes. Depuis septembre, les choses se compliquent. Il y a plus de chargeurs, donc de capacité de chargement que de trottinettes disponibles. Sur l’application, il n’est pas possible de réserver la trottinette que l’on repère. Avec le temps, cela risque de devenir de plus en plus compliqué », s’avance David.
    Les points rouges représentent les trottinettes introuvables, probablement cachées par des utilisateurs. // Source : Capture d’écran de l’application Bird utilisée par un juicer.

    Le fait que certains usagers cachent les trottinettes électriques complique aussi le travail des chargeurs. David nous a envoyé une capture d’écran de son application Bird, dans laquelle une carte permet d’identifier les trottinettes à récupérer. Plus elles sont difficiles à atteindre, plus la somme allouée pour leur rechargement est élevée.

    #Uberisation #Nouvelle_domesticité #Tragédie_communs #Travail

  • « Laurenzaccio » à Saint-Louis (68)

    Mario Gonzalez (metteur en scène), Philippe Pillavoine (interprète) et Anne-Marie Laussat (Régisseur Général) seront du 02 au 10 octobre 2018 en résidence de création du décor de Laurenzaccio. « Le Bateau Ivre » porte ce projet de tragédie clownesque depuis 2012.... https://www.silencecommunity.com/events/event/view/46978/« laurenzaccio »-a-saint-louis-68

    #Eléonara_Rossi #Rossi #Mario_Gonzalez #Gonzalez #Philippe_Pillavoine #Pillavoine #Sand #Musset #spectacle #création #adaptation #décor #résidence #alsace #Tragédie #clown #lorenzaccio #Théâtre #La_Coupole #Saint-Louis

  • Scooter use is rising in major cities. So are trips to the emergency room. - The Washington Post
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/scooter-use-is-rising-in-major-cities-so-are-trips-to-the-emergency-room/2018/09/06/53d6a8d4-abd6-11e8-a8d7-0f63ab8b1370_story.html?noredirect=on

    Attention aux faux-amis, ici scooter veut dire trottinettes electriques.

    Il faudra un jour repenser la question de ces systèmes qui n’ont pas de points fixes (dont qui encombrent les villes, sont moins biens réparés et plus abîmés). Ce modèle est une certaine idée du partage qui en réalité est ouverte... à la « tragédie des communs ». Effectivement, dans ce modèle, le partage et la conservation du système devient second par rapport à l’utilité pour chaque usager. Les conditions de la tragédie des communs sont alors réunies : il n’y a pas de communauté pour « se parler » (communs, communautés et communication viennent de la même racine latine) et donc régler les problèmes.

    They have been pouring into emergency rooms around the nation all summer, their bodies bearing a blend of injuries that doctors normally associate with victims of car wrecks — broken noses, wrists and shoulders, facial lacerations and fractures, as well as the kind of blunt head trauma that can leave brains permanently damaged.

    When doctors began asking patients to explain their injuries, many were surprised to learn that the surge of broken body parts stemmed from the latest urban transportation trend: shared electric scooters.

    In Santa Monica, Calif. — where one of the biggest electric-scooter companies is based — the city’s fire department has responded to 34 serious accidents involving the devices this summer. The director of an emergency department there said his team treated 18 patients who were seriously injured in electric-scooter accidents during the final two weeks of July. And in San Francisco, the doctor who runs the emergency room at a major hospital said he is seeing as many as 10 severe injuries a week.

    As the injuries pile up in cities across the country, the three largest scooter companies — operating under the names Bird, Lime and Skip — have seen their values soar as they attempt to transform urban transit, following the successes of ride-hailing and bike-sharing companies. The scooter start-ups have attracted massive investments from Uber, the prominent technology venture capital firm Sequoia Capital and Alphabet, Google’s parent company, with some analysts estimating that some of the privately held companies might be worth more than $1 billion.

    A commuter rides a scooter on 15th Street NW in Washington. (Robert Miller/The Washington Post)

    But a growing number of critics — including doctors, former riders, scooter mechanics and personal injury lawyers — say the devices may look like toys but inflict the same degree of harm as any other motorized vehicle on the road, only without having to comply with safety regulations. These critics add that some ­electric-scooter fleets are poorly maintained by a loose-knit flock of amateur mechanics, making them prone to dangerous mechanical failures.

    Bird and Skip have programs that give helmets to riders who request them, and Lime notes that riders must go through an “in-app tutorial” on helmet safety to unlock one of the company’s scooters for the first time.

    “We also strive to reduce injuries though our vehicle design and include key safety features such as headlights and taillights, independent suspension, and a wider and higher footboard to improve stability,” a statement from Skip said.

    But Bird is also lobbying against legislation in California that would require users to wear helmets.

    The injured might quickly discover that their ability to sue the scooter industry is limited.

    Bird and Lime, the two biggest companies, require consumers to agree to not sue — either individually or as part of a class-action suit — and instead turn to a form of mediation known as “binding arbitration” as a condition of using their scooters. They both name specific arbitration companies, while Bird also names a preferred location for arbitration and Lime requires users to first engage in a 60-day “dialogue” with the company.

    Bird says its user agreement “represents an industry standard” among “transportation technology companies.”

    Skip recently informed users that its arbitration agreement would be binding for users beginning Friday. Skip said the company is adding the arbitration provision as part of a revamp of its user agreement as the firm expands across the country. In a statement, Skip said the changes “make the terms and conditions more clear, more informative, and more efficient.”

    Consumer advocates have long criticized binding arbitration as putting consumers at a disadvantage. Arbitration clauses — often appearing as fine print in user agreements and employee contracts — have become a defining feature of corporate contracts used by many of the nation’s most recognizable brands across multiple industries.

    #Véhicules_partagés #Tragédie_des_communs #Accidents #Economie_collaborative(_mon_c..)

  • "Laurenzaccio" en mai 2018… Un Livre et une représentation exceptionnelle !

    Tragédie clownesque (préconisée pour les plus de 16 ans) produite par la compagnie « Le Bateau Ivre », mise en scène par Mario Gonzalez et jouée par Philippe Pillavoine.... https://www.larevueduspectacle.fr/Laurenzaccio-en-mai-2018-Un-Livre-et-une-representation-exception

    #presse #revue_de_presse #laurenzaccio #mai_2018 #poissy #représentation #paris #livre #création #clown #tragédie #musset #sand #gonzalez #pillavoine #la_revue_du_spectacle

  • « Laurenzaccio » à Poissy (78)

    En mars 2016, « Le Bateau Ivre » organisait une lecture intimiste de « Laurenzaccio » de George Sand et Alfred de Musset, à Paris dans la salle la Verrière de la Maison des Auteurs de la SACD. Roger Jouan et Rémi Le Roux chargés des projets culturels de la ville de Poissy (78) étaient présents. Ils avaient énormément apprécié ce texte qui n’était alors qu’une étape dans la création. Nous étions un an avant la première représentation... https://www.silencecommunity.com/events/event/view/46871/« laurenzaccio »-a-poissy-78

    La bande annonce de la représentation : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orOaRHxZTf0

    #tragédie #clown #représentation #spectacle #poissy #yvelines #ile-de-france #gonzalez #pillavoine #sand #de_musset #musset #laurenzaccio #roger_jouan #jouan #Rémi_Le_Roux #Le_Roux #Blanche_de_Castille #Théâtre #Théâtre_Blanche_de_Castille #mai_2018 #2018 #teaser #bande_annonce

  • « Laurenzaccio » le Livre, Dédicace et pré-achat

    Une séance de présentation du Livre de « Laurenzaccio » avec Monique de Montremy des Éditions Les Cygnes, ainsi qu’une dédicace des deux adaptateurs Mario Gonzalez et Philippe Pillavoine aura lieu le mercredi 02 mai 2018, de 16h30 à 18h00, dans l’Auditorium de la Maison des Auteurs de la SACD, à Paris (75009). L’entrée est libre dans la limite des places disponibles (70 places)... https://www.silencecommunity.com/events/event/view/46869/« laurenzaccio »-le-livre-dedicace-et-pre-achat

    #les_cygnes #éditions_les_cygnes #livre #publication #dédicace #présentation #mai_2018 #2018 #maison_des_auteurs #sacd #paris #musset #sand #gonzalez #pillavoine #théâtre #tragédie #clown

  • On est arrivé à Beaugency

    Nous voilà arrivés à Beaugency pour répéter pendant deux jours la future représentation de « Laurenzaccio » au Théâtre le Puits-Manu de Beaugency (45)... https://www.silencecommunity.com/blog/view/46840/on-est-arrive-a-beaugency

    #création #tragédie #clown #musset #sand #gonzalez #pillavoine #spectacle #théâtre #loiret #beaugency #lbi1718

  • « Laurenzaccio » à Beaugency

    Le vendredi 23 février prochain, à 20h30, je serai en clown Laurent sur la scène du Théâtre le Puits-Manu de Beaugency (45) pour jouer « Laurenzaccio ». Répondant à l’invitation de Christian Sterne le directeur de la compagnie Les fous de Bassan !, Mario Gonzalez me fera répéter à partir du mercredi 21 février... https://www.philippepillavoine.com/leblog/2018/02/06/laurenzaccio-a-beaugency

    #spectacle #représentation #loiret #beaugency #création #théâtre #clown #tragédie #musset #sand

  • Bonne Année 2018 !

    2017 a été pour nous une très belle Année. Elle a été celle de la concrétisation de cinq années de travail. Vous avez pendant tout ce temps été à nos côtés à nous lire, à suivre pas à pas le long processus qu’a été la création de ce spectacle, qui nous est si cher. Vous nous avez aidé... https://www.silencecommunity.com/blog/view/46824/bonne-annee-2018

    #blog #newsletter #laurenzaccio #création #spectacle #tragédie #clown #théâtre #voeux #2018 #sand #musset #beaugency #poissy

  • Facebook faces the tragedy of the commons – Financial Times – Medium
    https://medium.com/financial-times/facebook-faces-the-tragedy-of-the-commons-4124e774f5f4

    Même si l’article se méprend sur ce que sont les communs (il y a une co-gouvernance par les acteurs), il pointe du doigt un problème sur la tragédie du domaine public.

    Et si la réelle solution venait de la construction d’un commun des médias sociaux, dans lequel les usagers seraient responsabilisés sur leurs propres usages ? Mais cela voudrait dire aussi en finir avec la pub qui ne profite qu’à la plateforme. Nouvelle quadrature à résoudre... par la socialisation des plateformes, en créant un « index indépendant du web » comme le demande Olivier Ertzscheid.

    Ou d’autres solutions de contrôle collectif à imaginer.

    Au fait, a-t-on besoin d’une plateforme de 2 milliards d’utilisateurs pour simplement connecter quelques centaines d’ami·e·s ?

    Each scandal produces fresh calls for networks to be treated like publishers of news, who are responsible for everything that appears under their names. Each one forces them further to tighten their “community standards” and hire more content checkers. By next year, Facebook intends to employ 20,000 people in “community operations”, its censorship division.

    A better way to think of Russian political ads, extremist videos, fake news and all the rest is as the polluters of common resources, albeit ones that are privately owned. The term for this is the tragedy of the commons. Open ecosystems that are openly shared by entire communities tend to get despoiled.

    Every time a scandal occurs, they have to reinforce their editorial defences and come closer to the kind of content monitoring that would change their nature

    Here lies the threat to social networks. They set themselves up as commons, offering open access to hundreds of millions to publish “user-generated content” and share photos with others. That in turn produced a network effect: people needed to use Facebook or others to communicate.

    But they attract bad actors as well — people and organisations who exploit free resources for money or perverted motives. These are polluters of the digital commons and with them come over-grazers: people guilty of lesser sins such as shouting loudly to gain attention or attacking others.

    As Hardin noted, this is inevitable. The digital commons fosters great communal benefits that go beyond being a publisher in the traditional sense. The fact that YouTube is open and free allows all kinds of creativity to flourish in ways that are not enabled by the entertainment industry. The tragedy is that it also empowers pornographers and propagandists for terror.

    Hardin was a pessimist about commons, arguing that there was no technical solution and that the only remedy was “mutual coercion, mutually agreed upon by the majority”. The equivalent for Facebook, Twitter and YouTube would be to become much more like publishers, imposing tight rules about entry and behaviour rather than their current openness.

    They resist this partly because it would bring stricter legal liability and partly because they want to remain as commons. But every time a scandal occurs, they have to reinforce their editorial defences and come closer to the kind of content monitoring that would change their nature.

    It would cross the dividing line if they reviewed everything before allowing it to be published, rather than removing offensive material when alerted.

    More than 75 per cent of extremist videos taken down by YouTube are identified by algorithms, while Facebook now finds automatically 99 per cent of the Isis and al-Qaeda material it removes. It is like having an automated fence around a territory to sort exploiters from legitimate entrants.

    #Facebook #Communs #Tragedie_des_communs

  • Facebook faces the tragedy of the commons
    https://www.ft.com/content/ec74ce54-d3e1-11e7-8c9a-d9c0a5c8d5c9
    http://prod-upp-image-read.ft.com/f1542870-d52b-11e7-ae3e-563c04c5339a

    It is hard to keep up with the stream of scandals, big and small, involving social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. From unwittingly aiding Russian efforts to subvert elections to finding themselves exploited by extremists and pornographers, they are constantly in trouble.

    The latest is YouTube failing to stop videos of children being commented on by paedophiles, while letting advertisements appear alongside them. Only months after Alphabet’s video platform faced an advertiser boycott over extremist videos and had to apologise humbly, companies such as Diageo and Mars are again removing ads.

    Each scandal produces fresh calls for networks to be treated like publishers of news, who are responsible for everything that appears under their names. Each one forces them further to tighten their “community standards” and hire more content checkers. By next year, Facebook intends to employ 20,000 people in “community operations”, its censorship division.

    Tempting as it is for publications that have lost much of their digital advertising to internet giants to believe they should be treated as exact equivalents, it is flawed: Facebook is not just a newspaper with 2.1bn readers. But being a platform does not absolve them of responsibility. The opposite, in fact — it makes their burden heavier.

    Here lies the threat to social networks. They set themselves up as commons, offering open access to hundreds of millions to publish “user-generated content” and share photos with others. That in turn produced a network effect: people needed to use Facebook or others to communicate.

    But they attract bad actors as well — people and organisations who exploit free resources for money or perverted motives. These are polluters of the digital commons and with them come over-grazers: people guilty of lesser sins such as shouting loudly to gain attention or attacking others.

    As Hardin noted, this is inevitable. The digital commons fosters great communal benefits that go beyond being a publisher in the traditional sense. The fact that YouTube is open and free allows all kinds of creativity to flourish in ways that are not enabled by the entertainment industry. The tragedy is that it also empowers pornographers and propagandists for terror.

    #Médias_sociaux #Facebook #Fake_news #Communs #Tragédie_des_communs

  • La végétalisation des villes et la tragi-comédie des Communs | Calimaq
    https://scinfolex.com/2017/08/15/la-vegetalisation-des-villes-et-la-tragi-comedie-des-communs

    Au début du mois d’août, une nouvelle plateforme « Végétalisons Paris » a été lancée par la municipalité de la capitale. Le site rassemble les informations concernant les différentes initiatives de la mairie de Paris visant à inciter les habitants à investir les espaces publics pour y planter des végétaux. Chacun peut y effectuer les démarches nécessaires… Source : : : S.I.Lex : :

    • Le permis de végétaliser permet à un ou des habitants d’une ville de solliciter une autorisation pour utiliser une portion d’espace public afin d’y faire pousser des plantes. Juridiquement, il s’analyse comme une autorisation d’occupation temporaire (AOT) du domaine public, qui a grosso-modo la même nature que celles que sollicitent les cafetiers pour installer une terrasse empiétant sur un trottoir ou des manifestants qui veulent défiler dans la rue.

      #Tragédie_des_Communs (vandalisme des ressources communes)

      Si le système de l’occupation temporaire du domaine public comporte certains aspects intéressants, il est peut-être nécessaire d’aller plus loin et de couper les ponts avec cette philosophie des usages « octroyés » par la puissance publique pour aller vers la mise en place de véritables Communs urbains.