• Les Oubliés de #Cassis

    Ils ont construit le Cassis moderne, mais dorment dans des cabanes en bois. Des tunisiens venus dans les années 70, un contrat en main pour construire les villas de la cité balnéaire. Ils vivent oubliés depuis quarante ans au milieu d’une carrière de calcaire en bordure de la ville de Cassis, dans l’un des derniers bidonvilles de France. Des hommes fragilisés par des années d’exil, de sacrifices, d’abnégation de leur vie pour subvenir aux besoins de leurs familles restées au pays. La perspective du nouvel habitat est pour eux un deuxième déracinement... Le documentaire de Sonia Kichah raconte la vie, la mémoire de ces hommes en marge.

    https://www.film-documentaire.fr/4DACTION/w_fiche_film/21157_0

    #film #documentaire #film_documentaire
    #France #migrants_tunisiens #travailleurs_étrangers #bidonville #migrations #maçons #logement #cabanes #Mareth #relogement #exil #retraités #Quartier_Fontblanche

  • The plight of sub-Saharan domestic workers in Morocco: ’I was told I would not be paid for the first few months while I paid off my plane ticket’

    Female workers, most of them from Côte d’Ivoire and Senegal, find themselves in jobs that amount to modern slavery, without the official status necessary to defend themselves.

    When she arrived in Tangier in early 2021, a car arrived to pick her up at the train station. She was taken to a house without being told the address. Her passport was confiscated, her belongings were taken away and she was put to work. Housework, cooking, ironing, childcare... She was expected to do everything. She could not leave the house. She would have no days off, no vacations. She would start her days at 6am and could only go to bed when her bosses were asleep.

    After three months, Awa* fled. “I no longer had the strength,” said the 33-year-old woman from Côte d’Ivoire, who has been living in Casablanca ever since. Her migration dream has turned into a nightmare. A year and a half after she arrived in Morocco, she decided to go back home and approached the International Organization for Migration (IOM), which has an assisted voluntary return program.

    Awa’s story is tragic, but it is not unique. Many West African women, mostly Ivorian and Senegalese, go to Morocco to become domestic workers. Most come via human trafficking networks. Some arrive through more informal networks, family or friends, operating by word of mouth. Some also come on their own. Without the appropriate papers, they are often exploited and mistreated, without the ability to defend themselves. This type of “modern slavery” has been condemned by human rights associations in Morocco.

    While it is impossible to know how many workers in this position there are – since their work is mainly informal – everything seems to suggest that the market for foreign maids is robust. On social networks, multiple ads relayed by so-called “agencies” offer the services of African or Asian women, even though this “intermediary activity” is prohibited by Moroccan law.

    These “agencies” offer “catalogs” of available women. “Sub-Saharan women” are recommended for their “flexibility.” One such entry reads: “Because they are not at home, they are more committed, more docile. They are also reliable. And they speak good French.” They are also touted as “cheaper” than Moroccan and Asian women.
    No entry visa required

    For these women, everything starts with the lure of a good salary. In Côte d’Ivoire, Awa was a receptionist, earning 230 euros per month. She recalled: “One day I met someone who told me that he could put me in touch with a Moroccan woman and that this woman would pay my airfare, provide me with lodging and give me 450,000 CFA francs a month [686 euros] to do the housework.” This seemed like a godsend for Awa, who had many projects in mind, such as investing in an “ointment store” in Abidjan. The offer was all the more appealing because she did not need a visa to enter Morocco – both Ivorian and Senegalese nationals are exempt from this requirement.

    When she arrived, “it was the opposite.” She continued: “I was told that I would get 1,300 dirhams a month [123 euros] and that I would not be paid for the first few months while I paid off my plane ticket.” Her passport was taken away – a common practice, according to Mamadou Bhoye Diallo of the Collectif des Communautés Subsahariennes au Maroc (CCSM, Collective of Sub-Saharan Communities in Morocco), to ensure the employee cannot escape, especially before the cost of the trip is recovered from her wages.

    “The person can work up to a year without pay to repay the employer or agency,” continued Mr. Diallo. “After a year, she can still receive nothing if the agency decides to pay the money directly to her family in the country.”

    With no papers or points of reference, they find themselves effectively “taken hostage” and “have no choice but to remain at the mercy of their employers,” added Patrick Kit Bogmis of the Association Lumière Sur l’Emigration au Maroc (ALECMA, Shining a Light on Emigration in Morocco). In 2016, ALECMA published a damning report on sub-Saharan domestic work, noting a long list of human rights violations.

    There is a spectrum of relationships between employees and employers, depending on the attitude of the latter: at one end of it, some workers are given some rights. At the other is a situation that is effectively slavery, where bosses behave as “masters” and employ “exploitative techniques, racism, violence and all kinds of abuse.”

    The first family 39-year-old Yasmine* worked for when she arrived in Casablanca, almost three years ago, made her sleep on the floor in the children’s room. Instead of proper meals, she was given leftovers. “Every two weeks, I was supposed to have a weekend off, but it never happened,” said this Ivorian woman, who was at the time willing to do anything to pay for her three daughters’ education back home.

    After relentless housework and looking after the three children, including a newborn, night and day, she ended up falling ill. “I slept very little. I had headaches, dizziness, pain in my arm. When I asked for some rest, the man yelled at me. He insulted me.”

    With her second family, things were even worse. “I was cleaning, cooking, cleaning the pool. I also had to play with the dog,” continued Yasmine. “The woman was always on my back – why are you sitting? You have to do this... When the children broke things, they said it was my fault. The husband never said a word to me.” Overnight, for no reason, they ordered her to leave. “They wouldn’t give me my stuff back. I had to leave everything there.”
    National preference

    There is a law regulating domestic work in Morocco, which came into force in 2018 after 10 years of debate and was hailed as a big step forward. It states that an employment contract providing access to social protection is required. Yet four years later, this law remains very rarely enforced.

    “Just over 5,000 female workers have been declared to date, out of a population we estimate at 1 million,” stressed Nadia Soubate, a member of the Confédération Démocratique du Travail (CDT, Democratic Confederation of Labor), who was involved in a study published in late 2021 on domestic employment in Morocco.

    Foreign domestic workers, who do not escape the rule of “national preference” in force in the country, are even less protected. “To recruit them, the employer must prove that they have skills that do not exist in the Moroccan labor market. This certificate is necessary to get a foreign employment contract,” explained Camille Denis of the Groupe Antiraciste d’Accompagnement et de Défense des Etrangers et Migrants (GADEM, Antiracist Group for the Support and Defense of Foreigners and Migrants). “This is an extremely cumbersome and costly process – 6,000 dirhams (573 euros) – which must be done within three months of entering the territory. Very few employers are committed to it.”

    Once these three months have passed, “[the women] find themselves in an undocumented situation and there is nothing more they can do,” explained Franck Iyanga, secretary general of the Organisation Démocratique des Travailleurs Immigrés au Maroc (ODTI, Democratic Organization of Immigrant Workers in Morocco) – the only union representing these foreign workers.

    He explains: “You need a foreign work contract to have a residence permit and vice versa. This is an inextricable situation. [Despite this] many people accept suffering this abuse to support themselves and their families. Those who have given up often find themselves working as street vendors.”

    In Casablanca, Yasmine was recruited a few months ago by employers who tried to declare her to make her status official. “But we have not found a solution,” she lamented. “Having no papers puts you at a dead end: you can’t take out a lease in your name, open a bank account, or file a complaint if something happens... You have no rights.”

    Today, Yasmine manages to send her daughters more than half of her salary each month. Once they are grown up, she will return to Abidjan and tell anyone who will listen not to go through what she experienced. “It’s too hard. You have to have a strong heart. This kind of life lacks humanity.”

    https://www.lemonde.fr/en/international/article/2022/07/28/the-plight-of-sub-saharan-domestic-workers-in-morocco-i-was-told-i-would-not

    #Maroc #asile #migrations #réfugiés #travail_domestique #femmes #exploitation #conditions_de_travail #travail #travailleurs_étrangers #travailleuses_étrangères #néo-esclavage #esclavage_moderne

    ping @isskein @_kg_

  • Bosnia Erzegovina: la corsa ai lavoratori stranieri in Republika Srpska
    https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Bosnia-Erzegovina/Bosnia-Erzegovina-la-corsa-ai-lavoratori-stranieri-in-Republika-Srps

    La Bosnia Erzegovina sta perdendo la propria popolazione e vi è una mancanza cronica di manodopera in molti settori. Ma la Republika Srpska ha trovato una soluzione: far entrare lavoratori stranieri semplificando le norme sui permessi di lavoro

  • La #Hongrie, entre #xénophobie officielle et recours aux #travailleurs_immigrés

    Comment pallier la #décroissance_démographique et la pénurie de main-d’œuvre sans faire appel à de la #main-d’œuvre_étrangère qui serait trop visible ? C’est le #dilemme auquel est confronté le parti de Viktor Orbán. Les élections législatives ont lieu dimanche.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/020422/la-hongrie-entre-xenophobie-officielle-et-recours-aux-travailleurs-immigre

    #travailleurs_étrangers #main_d'oeuvre #pénurie #travail

  • Roumanie : pénurie de main-d’œuvre, les travailleurs asiatiques à la rescousse

    Quatre millions de Roumains ont émigré à l’étranger depuis l’intégration à l’UE en 2007 et les entreprises peinent à recruter. La solution ? Faire venir des travailleurs d’Asie. Dans la région de #Cluj-Napoca, ils viennent du #Sri_Lanka et du #Vietnam pour travailler dans l’#hôtellerie ou l’#industrie. Reportage.

    « Nous sommes partis à cause de la chute de l’activité touristique. Il y avait eu les attentats en 2018, puis avec la pandémie de covid-19, c’est devenu encore plus difficile », raconte Ravindu Wanigathunga. Le jeune homme de 26 ans originaire du Sri Lanka, est aujourd’hui chef pâtissier dans un complexe hôtelier de Cluj-Napoca. « Ici, je gagne un peu plus que chez moi et le coût de la vie n’est pas trop élevé. Si j’étais parti en Europe de l’Ouest, je gagnerais plus, mais le coût de la vie serait très élevé, voilà pourquoi j’ai préféré la Roumanie. » Ravindu est arrivé en Transylvanie il y a quelques mois. « Je me suis trouvé une bonne place, les gens sont corrects, mais le Sri Lanka me manque. »
    Comme lui, ils sont des dizaines de milliers à être venus de pays asiatiques – Sri Lanka, mais aussi #Népal, Vietnam, #Philippines, #Bangladesh, #Inde et #Pakistan – pour travailler en Roumanie. Depuis 2007 et l’intégration européenne, le pays a vu quatre millions de ses habitants partir vers les pays de de l’Ouest et du Nord chercher une vie meilleure. Aujourd’hui, selon le ministère roumain du Travail, on compte 480 000 #emplois_vacants et 200 000 demandeurs d’emploi. La solution : faire venir des travailleurs étrangers non européens. Depuis un an, la Roumanie a quadruplé le quota des visas travail pour les travailleurs étrangers hors UE : fixé à 25 000 début 2021, il est passé à 50 000 en juillet 2021, puis à 100 000 début 2022. Principalement à destination du secteur du bâtiment et de l’hôtellerie-restauration.
    Un tremplin vers l’Europe de l’Ouest ?
    Ils sont quinze Sri-lankais à travailler avec Rovindu dans le complexe hôtelier de Cluj-Napoca. Shen BasNayake, 24 ans, est moins nostalgique de son pays natal, probablement parce qu’il n’est arrivé qu’il y a deux mois et demi et que sa mère, Renuka, est aussi en Roumanie. Arrivée il y a trois ans, celle-ci travaille comme femme de chambre. C’est en Roumanie que Shen et Renuka ont vu la neige pour la première fois.
    Leur collègue Salindu a 29 ans et dix années d’expérience dans une chaîne hôtelière internationale à Tangalle, dans son île natale. Le fait que la Roumanie soit un État membre de l’UE était un argument suffisant pour qu’il accepte l’offre, dans un contexte de déclin de l’activité touristique au Sri Lanka. Gamimi Gulathunga, 57 ans, est le vétéran du groupe. Il n’en est pas à sa première expérience à l’étranger, lui qui a déjà travaillé à Dubaï et en Arabie Saoudite. Mais son cœur est « toujours au Sri Lanka », assure-t-il.
    Janith Kalpa considère cette expérience de travail en Roumanie comme un potentiel tremplin vers un pays d’Europe de l’Ouest. Du moins, ce jeune serveur l’espère. De toute façon, la Roumanie est membre de l’UE, donc « sur le CV, ça ne fera pas de mal », estime-t-il. Il a également travaillé à Dubaï, mais il préfère les clients roumains. « Les gens ici sont polis, ils nous demandent d’où nous venons, comment nous allons. Le pourboire est plus généreux aussi. » Et puis, il dit qu’il aime les femmes roumaines et raconte qu’un ancien employé sri lankais a même fondé une famille ici. Pourquoi pas lui ?

    “Je ne trouvais tout simplement personne à embaucher, aussi je me suis tourné vers une agence à Bucarest et j’ai choisi cette option.”

    « Je ne trouvais tout simplement personne à embaucher, aussi je me suis tourné vers une agence à Bucarest et j’ai choisi cette option », confie Eugen Tușa, le propriétaire du complexe hôtelier de Cluj Napoca. « Je leur ai préparé un logement, je sais que je peux compter sur eux. On a des gens qui sont là depuis trois ans, certains sont partis, d’autres sont venus, mais dans l’ensemble, je suis satisfait. » « Ils sont très responsables, souriants et les clients apprécient ça », ajoute Teona Tușa. « Avec les Roumains, on s’est parfois heurté à un manque de sérieux ou à des exigences diverses, mais même quand on les remplissait, ce n’était quand même pas bien. »

    Les quinze travailleurs sri-lankais de cet hôtel ne représentent qu’une petite fraction du contingent de travailleurs asiatiques installés dans la région de Cluj-Napoca. L’une des entreprises qui en compte le plus est le fabricant italien d’appareils électroménagers De’Longhi, implanté dans la zone industrielle de Jucu, à 20 kilomètres de Cluj-Napoca, là où se trouvait l’usine Nokia jusqu’à sa fermeture en 2011. Sur les 3000 employés de l’usine italienne, 330 sont Sri-lankais.

    Trente Sri-lankais avaient d’abord été embauchés, qui en ont ensuite recommandé 300 autres. « Nous les avons embauchés et cela s’est avéré réussi, car les gens étaient reconnaissants et l’absentéisme et le pourcentage de départs parmi eux étaient extrêmement faibles », explique Florina Cicortaș, directrice des ressources humaines de l’entreprise. En récompense de ces bonnes recommandations, les employés de la première phase ont reçu des primes. L’entreprise a des coûts supplémentaires car elle fournit aussi les logements, mais ces coûts sont compensés par le fait que l’absentéisme et le pourcentage de départ sont faibles, relativise la DRH.

    “On travaille pour pouvoir envoyer de l’argent à la famille au pays, pour les enfants, ma femme et mes parents.”

    Il y a quatre ans, c’était les Vietnamiens qui représentaient le principal contingent de travailleurs non européens en Roumanie. Sur la centaine d’employés de l’entreprise de fabrication d’armoires métalliques d’Adrian Kun, elle aussi établie dans la zone industrielle de Cluj-Napoca, ils représentent même la majorité des travailleurs. « Je n’arrivais et n’arrive toujours pas à trouver des travailleurs ici, donc nous avons contacté une agence de recrutement directement au Vietnam, nos représentants s’y sont rendus et nous avons fait la sélection », explique Adrian Kun.

    De manière informelle, les travailleurs roumains de l’entreprise se disent parfois mécontents du fait que les travailleurs étrangers sont logés et nourris gratuitement, voire qu’ils gagneraient plus qu’eux. Mais s’ils bénéficient effectivement d’un logement inclus dans leur contrat de travail, dans des espaces aménagés à proximité de l’usine, « les travailleurs étrangers ne sont pas avantagés par rapport aux Roumains », se défend le chef d’entreprise. Un travailleur vietnamien gagnerait environ 500 euros – 2 à 3 fois plus que dans son pays d’origine – alors qu’un Roumain se voit offrir 800 euros. Mais même avec ce salaire, Adrian Kun a du mal à attirer les travailleurs roumains.

    Minh Van, 41 ans, travaille dans l’entreprise depuis trois ans. Il est contrôleur qualité. Il n’est pas rentré chez lui depuis tout ce temps et n’a pu pris des vacances qu’à l’automne dernier. « J’avais un salaire assez bas au Vietnam, aujourd’hui j’ai un bon revenu. On travaille pour pouvoir envoyer de l’argent à la famille au pays, pour les enfants, ma femme et mes parents », explique-t-il. Entre-temps, il est devenu un intermédiaire pour faire venir de nouveaux travailleurs du Vietnam, afin de remplacer ceux qui terminent leur contrat et souhaitent retourner dans leur pays natal.

    “La pénurie de main-d’oeuvre en Roumanie est telle que pour beaucoup d’employeurs, il n’y a pas d’alternative.”

    Recourir à des travailleurs étrangers présente des difficultés en termes de démarches administratives – qui prennent du temps avant de rendre l’embauche possible – et de communication entre collègues, mais aussi parce que beaucoup n’ont pas de qualification dans le domaine dans lequel ils viennent travailler, il faut donc les former. « Mais la pénurie de main-d’oeuvre en Roumanie est telle que pour beaucoup d’employeurs, il n’y a pas d’alternative », reconnaît Augustin Feneșan, président de l’Association des employeurs et artisans de Cluj.

    Encore faut-il que les quotas de visa travail établis par le gouvernement le leur permettent. Pour l’instant, la législation du travail donne la priorité aux Roumains et aux travailleurs de l’UE et de nombreux employeurs n’obtiennent pas l’autorisation d’aller chercher des travailleurs dans les pays asiatiques. Mais la récente et forte augmentation des #quotas de #visa travail par les autorités roumaines laissent entrevoir une arrivée de plus en plus massives de travailleurs étrangers en Roumanie.

    https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Penurie-de-main-d-oeuvre-en-Roumanie-les-travailleurs-asiatiques-

    #travailleurs_étrangers #main_d'oeuvre #pénurie #travail #main-d’œuvre_étrangère

  • Le quartier #Chaffit à #Valence, une histoire à l’écart (1950-1990)

    Chaffit, c’est au sud de Valence : 30 hectares bordés par l’A7, le Rhône, qui abritent la caserne des pompiers, la Clinique générale et l’aire des gens du voyage. On pourrait presque croire que ce quartier n’a pas d’identité, pas de #mémoire. Et pourtant… L’historienne Linda Guerry nous présente son histoire après la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

    https://lecpa.hypotheses.org/1961
    #histoire #gens_du_voyage #aire_d'accueil #village_chaffit #marginalisation #stigmatisation #nationalisme #xénophobie #travailleurs_étrangers #travailleurs_algériens

  • #Travailleurs_détachés : #condamnations à répétition pour #Bouygues

    En un an, le géant du #BTP a été condamné trois fois pour avoir eu recours illégalement à des ouvriers roumains et polonais sur le site de l’#EPR à #Flamanville, de 2009 à 2011. Des décisions de #justice passées inaperçues.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/economie/091121/travailleurs-detaches-condamnations-repetition-pour-bouygues
    #France #condamnation #travail #exploitation #travailleurs_étrangers

    ping @karine4

  • Le #Royaume-Uni va accorder 10.500 #visas post-Brexit face aux pénuries de #main-d'oeuvre

    Le Royaume-Uni va accorder jusqu’à 10.500 visas de travail provisoires en réponse à des pénuries de main-d’oeuvre, un virage inattendu en matière d’immigration après le Brexit, pris samedi par le gouvernement.

    Ces permis de trois mois, d’octobre à décembre, doivent pallier un manque criant de #chauffeurs routiers mais aussi de personnel dans des secteurs clés de l’#économie britannique, comme les #élevages de volailles.

    Ces derniers jours et malgré des appels du gouvernement à ne pas paniquer, les #stations-service ont été prises d’assaut en raison de ruptures de stocks qui touchent aussi les rayons de produits agroalimentaires.

    Pour l’instant, le gouvernement n’a pas donné suite aux appels l’exhortant à déployer des soldats pour aider à la distribution du #carburant.

    Cette décision de rouvrir les vannes de l’#immigration_professionnelle va à l’encontre de la ligne défendue par le Premier ministre Boris Johnson, dont le gouvernement ne cesse d’insister pour que le Royaume-Uni ne dépende plus de la #main-d'oeuvre_étrangère.

    Pendant des mois, le gouvernement a essayé d’éviter d’en arriver là, malgré les avertissements de nombreux secteurs économiques et le manque estimé de 100.000 #chauffeurs_routiers.

    Outre ces #visas_de_travail, d’autres mesures exceptionnelles doivent permettre d’assurer l’approvisionnement avant les fêtes de #Noël, a mis en avant le secrétaire aux Transports, Grant Shapps.

    Les examinateurs du ministère de la Défense seront mobilisés pour faire passer des milliers de #permis_poids-lourds dans les semaines qui viennent.

    – « Insuffisant » -

    Le ministère de l’Education et ses agences partenaires vont débloquer des millions de livres sterling pour former 4.000 #camionneurs en mettant sur pied des camps de formation afin d’accélérer le rythme.

    M. Shapps a aussi appelé les employeurs à jouer le jeu « en continuant d’améliorer les #conditions_de_travail et les #salaires pour retenir de nouveaux chauffeurs ».

    Sous pression, le gouvernement va battre le rappel de tous les détenteurs du permis #poids-lourds : un million de lettres doivent partir pour demander à ceux qui ne conduisent pas de retourner au travail.

    Toutefois, la présidente de la Chambre de commerce britannique Ruby McGregor-Smith a estimé que le nombre de visas était « insuffisant » et « pas assez pour régler un problème d’une telle ampleur ».

    « Cette annonce équivaut à vouloir éteindre un feu de camp avec un verre d’eau », a-t-elle déclaré.

    Boris Johnson faisait face à une pression croissante. La crise du Covid-19 et les conséquences du Brexit ont accentué les #pénuries, qui se conjuguent à une envolée des #prix de l’énergie.

    Des usines, des restaurants, des supermarchés sont affectés par le manque de chauffeurs routiers depuis des semaines, voire des mois.

    Le groupe de produits surgelés Iceland et la compagnie de vente au détail Tesco ont mis en garde contre des pénuries à l’approche de Noël.

    La chaîne de restauration rapide McDonald’s s’est trouvée en rupture de milkshakes et de boissons le mois dernier. Son concurrent KFC a été contraint de retirer des articles de son menu, tandis que la chaîne Nando’s a fermé provisoirement des douzaines de restaurants faute de poulets.

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/depeche/le-royaume-uni-va-accorder-10500-visas-post-brexit-face-aux-p
    #post-brexit #Brexit #travail #pénurie_de_main-d'oeuvre #travailleurs_étrangers #UK #Angleterre #transport_routier

    ping @karine4

    • Hauliers and poultry workers to get temporary visas

      Up to 10,500 lorry drivers and poultry workers can receive temporary UK visas as the government seeks to limit disruption in the run-up to Christmas.

      The government confirmed that 5,000 fuel tanker and food lorry drivers will be eligible to work in the UK for three months, until Christmas Eve.

      The scheme is also being extended to 5,500 poultry workers.

      The transport secretary said he did not want to “undercut” British workers but could not stand by while queues formed.

      But the British Chambers of Commerce said the measures were the equivalent of “throwing a thimble of water on a bonfire”.

      And the Road Haulage Association said the announcement “barely scratches the surface”, adding that only offering visas until Christmas Eve “will not be enough for companies or the drivers themselves to be attractive”.

      Marc Fels, director of the HGV Recruitment Centre, said visas for lorry drivers were “too little” and “too late”.

      However, the news was welcomed by freight industry group Logistics UK, which called the policy “a huge step forward in solving the disruption to supply chains”.

      A shortage of lorry drivers has caused problems for a range of industries in recent months, from supermarkets to fast food chains.

      In recent days, some fuel deliveries have been affected, leading to lengthy queues at petrol stations - despite ministers insisting the UK has plenty of fuel.

      There are reports of dozens of cars queuing in London by 07:00 BST on Sunday morning, while many filling stations had signs up saying they had no fuel.

      Transport Secretary Grant Shapps told the BBC’s Andrew Marr that there was enough fuel in the country and that if people were “sensible” and only filled up when they needed to there would not be shortages.

      As well as allowing more foreign workers, other measures include using Ministry of Defence examiners to increase HGV (heavy goods vehicle) testing capacity, and sending nearly one million letters to drivers who hold an HGV licence, encouraging them back into the industry.

      Officials said the loan of MoD examiners would help put on “thousands of extra tests” over the next 12 weeks.

      Recruitment for additional short-term HGV drivers and poultry workers will begin in October.

      Mr Shapps said: “We are acting now, but the industries must also play their part with working conditions continuing to improve and the deserved salary increases continuing to be maintained in order for companies to retain new drivers.”
      Survey findings about why there are driver shortages

      Logistics UK estimates that the UK is in need of about 90,000 HGV drivers - with existing shortages made worse by the pandemic, tax changes, Brexit, an ageing workforce, and low wages and poor working conditions.

      The British Poultry Council has previously warned it may not have the workforce to process as many turkeys as normal this Christmas because it has historically relied on EU labour - but after Brexit it is now more difficult and expensive to use non-UK workers.

      The Department for Transport said it recognised that importing foreign labour “will not be the long-term solution” to the problem and that it wanted to see employers invest to build a “high-wage, high-skill economy”.

      It said up to 4,000 people would soon be able to take advantage of training courses to become HGV drivers.

      This includes free, short, intensive courses, funded by the Department for Education, to train up to 3,000 new HGV drivers.

      These new “skills bootcamps” will train drivers to be road ready and gain a Cat C or Cat C&E license, helping to tackle the current HGV driver shortage.

      The remaining 1,000 drivers will be trained through courses accessed locally and funded by the government’s adult education budget, the DfT said.

      Fuel tanker drivers need additional safety qualifications and the government said it was working with the industry to ensure drivers can access these as quickly as possible.

      Mr Fels said many young people were “desperate” to get into the industry but couldn’t afford the thousands of pounds it costs to get a HGV license.

      He called for the government to recognise the industry as a “vocation” and offer student loans to help fund training.

      Sue Terpilowski, from the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, said conditions for drivers also needed to improve, pointing out that facilities such as overnight lorry parks were much better on the continent.

      Richard Walker, managing director at supermarket Iceland, said it was “about time” ministers relaxed immigration rules in a bid to solve the HGV driver shortage and called for key workers, including food retail workers, to be prioritised at the pumps.

      On Saturday the BBC spoke to a number of drivers who had queued or struggled to get fuel.

      Jennifer Ward, a student paramedic of three years for Medicare EMS, which provides 999 frontline support to the East of England Ambulance Service, said she had to travel to five stations to get diesel for her ambulance.

      Matt McDonnell, chief executive of Medicare EMS, said a member of staff cancelled their shift because they had been unable to get fuel and said he was waiting to see if the government would introduce measures to prioritise key workers, like they had for shopping during the pandemic.
      ’Thimble of water on a bonfire’

      Industry groups the Food and Drink Federation and Logistics UK both welcomed the visa changes, with federation chief Ian Wright calling the measures “pragmatic”.

      But the British Retail Consortium said the number of visas being offered would “do little to alleviate the current shortfall”.

      It said supermarkets alone needed an additional 15,000 HGV drivers to operate at full capacity ahead of Christmas.

      Labour’s shadow foreign secretary Lisa Nandy said the changes were needed but described them as “a sticking plaster at the eleventh hour”.

      “Once again the government has been caught asleep at the wheel when they should have been planning for months for this scenario,” she told the BBC.

      https://www.bbc.com/news/business-58694004

  • #Bella_Ciao

    « Bella ciao, c’est un chant de révolte, devenu un hymne à la résistance dans le monde entier…
    En s’appropriant le titre de ce chant pour en faire celui de son récit, en mêlant saga familiale et fiction, réalité factuelle et historique, tragédie et comédie, Baru nous raconte une histoire populaire de l’immigration italienne.
    Bella ciao, c’est pour lui une tentative de répondre à la question brûlante de notre temps : celle du prix que doit payer un étranger pour cesser de l’être, et devenir transparent dans la société française. L’étranger, ici, est italien. Mais peut-on douter de l’universalité de la question ? »

    https://www.futuropolis.fr/9782754811699/bella-ciao.html

    #livre #BD #bande_dessinée
    #Aigues-Mortes #salines #sel #travailleurs_étrangers #italiens #France #Ardèche #FAngouse #Goujouse #1893 #histoire #massacre #Compagnie_des_salines_du_Midi

  • Beyond gratitude : lessons learned from migrants’ contribution to the Covid-19 response

    This report recognises and values the fundamental contribution of migrant workers to our societies and economies throughout the Covid-19 pandemic. Over the past year we have leaned heavily on ‘key workers’. Migrants account for a large share of these frontline workers and figure heavily amongst the multiple occupations we now classify as essential. Yet their jobs have often been labelled as ‘low-skilled’ and their work undervalued. As a result, many have risked their lives on the Covid-19 frontline while lacking the basic social protections enjoyed by other workers.

    A desire to capture the contribution of migrants during the pandemic inspired us to begin the systematic tracking of events across the globe over the past year. We wanted to make migrants’ essential work more visible, track the innovations and reforms that have enhanced their contribution during the emergency, and draw lessons from these experiences to inform long-term reforms and policies. We have observed many national and local governments relaxing migration regulations and creating new incentives for migrant workers in essential services, demonstrating that migration policies – regardless of today’s increasingly polarised debates – can and do change when necessary. This matters for the post-pandemic recovery, given that countries will continue to rely on migrant workers of all skill levels. We all must ensure that these changes are lasting.

    The following policy recommendations emerge from our research:

    - Enhance routes to regularisation, in recognition of migrants’ vital contribution to essential services.
    - Expand legal migration pathways, ensuring safe working conditions for all, to support post-Covid-19 global recovery, tackle shortages in essential workforces and fill skills gaps.
    - Ensure that migrants, whatever their status, have access to key basic services and social protection.
    - Detach immigration policies from inflexible ‘low’ and ‘high’ skills classifications. Workers of all skill levels will be essential in the long path to recovery.

    https://www.odi.org/publications/17963-beyond-gratitude-lessons-learned-migrants-contribution-covid-19-response

    #travail #covid-19 #coronavirus #travailleurs_étrangers #migrations #apport #bénéfices #économie #essentiel #politique_migratoire #recommandations #pandémie #odi #rapport #voies_légales #conditions_de_travail #accès_aux_droits #protection_sociale

    Pour télécharger le rapport :
    https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/resource-documents/hmi-migrant_key_workers-working_paper-final_0.pdf

    #visualisation :


    https://www.odi.org/migrant-key-workers-covid-19

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Des #livres sur l’émigration de travail italienne.

    Livres citées dans le livre « Cacciateli ! Quando i migranti eravamo noi » de #Concetto Vecchio :

    James Schwarzenbach, un editore colto e raffinato di Zurigo, rampollo di una delle famiglie industriali più ricche della Svizzera, cugino della scrittrice Anne Marie Schwarzenbach, a metà degli anni sessanta entra a sorpresa in Parlamento a Berna, unico deputato del partito di estrema destra Nationale Aktion, e come suo primo atto promuove un referendum per espellere dalla Svizzera trecentoquarantamila stranieri, perlopiù italiani. È l’inizio di una campagna di odio contro gli emigrati italiani che dura anni e che sfocerà nel referendum del 7 giugno 1970, quando #Schwarzenbach, solo contro tutti (giornali, establishment, Confindustria sono schierati su posizioni opposte), perderà la sua sfida solitaria per un pelo. Com’è stato possibile? Cosa ci dice del presente questa storia dimenticata? E come si spiega il successo della propaganda xenofoba, posto che la Svizzera avrà dal 1962 al 1974 un tasso di disoccupazione inesistente e sono stati proprio i lavoratori italiani, i Gastarbeiter richiamati in massa dal boom economico, a proiettare il paese in un benessere che non ha eguali nel mondo? Eppure Schwarzenbach, a capo del primo partito antistranieri d’Europa, con toni e parole d’ordine che sembrano usciti dall’odierna retorica populista, fa presa su vasti strati della popolazione spaesata dalla modernizzazione, dalle trasformazioni economiche e sociali e dal ’68. Schwarzenbach fiuta le insicurezze identitarie e le esaspera. “Svizzeri svegliatevi! Prima gli svizzeri!” sono i suoi slogan, mentre compaiono le inserzioni “Non si affitta a cani e italiani”.

    https://www.lafeltrinelli.it/libri/concetto-vecchio/cacciateli/9788807111525?productId=9788807111525

    #migrations #émigrants #travailleurs_étrangers #Suisse #histoire

    • Per cercare lavoro. Donne e uomini dell’emigrazione italiana in Svizzera

      Negli anni della guerra fredda, più di seicentomila immigrati vennero schedati e sorvegliati dalla polizia segreta svizzera. Una larga maggioranza di quegli immigrati, sospettati di attività sovversive, era composta da lavoratrici e lavoratori italiani che avevano scelto la Svizzera come terra promessa. Nella Confederazione elvetica, infatti, gli emigrati italiani furono un importante segmento sociale che per molto tempo coincise con il proletariato locale. Si unirono in associazioni a sfondo politico come le #Colonie_libere, a sfondo religioso come le #Missioni_cattoliche, ma fecero anche parte di semplici realtà aggregative, sportive, per il tempo libero, spesso organizzate su base regionale. Gli italiani diventarono presto uno dei principali problemi politici e temi di dibattito del paese, generando forti tensioni sociali dalle quali scaturirono formazioni xenofobe come l’Azione nazionale contro l’inforestierimento. Il libro intende raccontare questa storia dalle mille sfumature attraverso un ampio uso di fonti orali e di scritture di gente comune, tra cui scambi epistolari e testimonianze scolastiche dei figli di italiani, e attraverso numerosi materiali selezionati da archivi privati e pubblici. In particolare, le fonti orali consentono, da un lato, di restituire la complessità di un fenomeno migratorio prodotto al crocevia di tanti diversi vissuti e percorsi e, dall’altro, di non perdere mai il punto di vista degli stessi emigrati, per comprendere meglio le loro esperienze e le sfide quotidiane che hanno dovuto affrontare.

      https://www.donzelli.it/libro/9788868437893

  • Les secrets d’une puissance invisible

    Derrière une propagande bien rôdée, la #Suisse fait partie des grandes nations impérialistes de ce monde. L’historien #Sébastien_Guex expose les stratégies mises en place pour parvenir à déployer un impérialisme helvétique « masqué ou feutré », ainsi que les dégâts, inhérents à une politique capitaliste, que ce modèle a causé et continue de causer.

    Proportionnellement à sa taille, mais aussi dans l’absolu, la Suisse fait partie des principales puissances impérialistes du monde depuis longtemps. J’y reviendrai. Mais il n’existe guère en Suisse, y compris au sein du mouvement ouvrier ou de la gauche, de conscience directe de ce phénomène. Plusieurs raisons contribuent à l’absence de cette conscience.

    Tout d’abord, la Suisse n’a jamais eu de véritables colonies et n’a donc pas été directement engagée dans la manifestation la plus claire du colonialisme ou de l’impérialisme, c’est-à-dire la guerre coloniale ou la guerre impérialiste.

    Au contraire, la bourgeoisie industrielle et bancaire suisse s’est depuis très longtemps avancée de manière masquée : derrière la neutralité politique, c’est-à-dire avançant dans l’ombre des grandes puissances coloniales et impérialistes (Grande-Bretagne, France, Allemagne, Etats-Unis) ; masquée aussi derrière un discours propagandiste omniprésent essayant et réussissant souvent à faire passer la Suisse pour le pays de la politique humanitaire, à travers la Croix-Rouge, les Bons offices, la philanthropie, etc. ; enfin, masquée par un discours, complémentaire au précédent, que j’ai appelé la « rhétorique de la petitesse » 1, présentant toujours la Suisse comme un David s’affrontant à des Goliath, un petit Etat faible et inoffensif.2

    Pour ces différentes raisons, certains auteurs ont caractérisé l’impérialisme suisse d’impérialisme secondaire. Mais l’expression me semble mal choisie, car elle entretient l’idée que l’impérialisme suisse serait de peu de poids, marginal, bref, beaucoup moins important que l’impérialisme des autres pays. Or la Suisse est une importante puissance impérialiste. Je préfère donc l’expression d’impérialisme masqué ou feutré.

    Au cœur des impérialismes européens

    Depuis des siècles, le capitalisme suisse est au cœur du développement du capitalisme européen. Au XVIe siècle déjà, les grands marchands et banquiers de Genève, Bâle, Zurich, sont au cœur des réseaux internationaux de circulation des marchandises et des crédits. Dès le XVIIe siècle, et surtout au XVIIIe, jusqu’au milieu du XIXe siècle, les milieux capitalistes bâlois, genevois, neuchâtelois, saint-gallois, zurichois, bernois, etc., participent de manière dense à cette immense opération d’exploitation et d’oppression du reste du monde par le capitalisme ouest et sud-européen en plein essor, soit le commerce triangulaire. L’origine de la fortune de la grande famille bourgeoise des de Pury, l’un des inspirateurs du fameux Livre blanc de 1993, vient de l’exploitation de centaines d’esclaves importés de force d’Afrique vers d’immenses domaines agricoles en Amérique.

    En 1900, la Suisse est le pays qui compte le plus de multinationales au monde par milliers d’habitants. Nestlé est probablement la multinationale la plus internationalisée au monde, c’est-à-dire qui compte le plus de filiales à l’étranger. Mais de l’autre côté, les milieux industriels et bancaires suisses sont entravés dans la course à la colonisation du monde par un gros obstacle : ils ne disposent que d’une puissance militaire relativement faible, et surtout, ils n’ont pas d’accès direct aux océans, à la différence de la Hollande ou de la Belgique, pays comparables dont le débouché sur la mer leur a permis de se lancer dans la conquête coloniale.

    Durant la période qui va de la guerre franco-prussienne de 1870 aux débuts de la Première Guerre mondiale, les cercles dirigeants de la Suisse rêvent d’un agrandissement territorial de la Confédération, soit du côté italien soit du côté français, qui leur donnerait accès à la mer (Gênes ou Toulon). En 1914 et 1915 par exemple, ils envisagent sérieusement d’abandonner la neutralité et d’entrer en guerre aux côtés de l’impérialisme allemand dans l’espoir d’obtenir, en cas de victoire, une part du butin, c’est-à-dire un couloir vers la Méditerranée, accompagné de quelques colonies en Afrique.3 Mais ils jugent finalement l’aventure trop risquée, sur le plan intérieur et extérieur, et choisissent de poursuivre dans la voie de la neutralité. Ce choix se révélera rapidement extrêmement payant, puisqu’il permettra aux industriels et banquiers helvétiques de faire de formidables affaires avec les deux camps belligérants.
    Dans l’ombre des puissants

    C’est cette position particulière qui va marquer les formes et aussi le contenu de l’impérialisme suisse depuis la fin du XIXe siècle jusqu’à aujourd’hui : comme la grande bourgeoisie industrielle et bancaire helvétique ne peut pas miser sur l’atout militaire, elle va apprendre et devenir virtuose dans l’art de jouer sur les contradictions entre grandes puissances impérialistes afin d’avancer ses propres pions. Dans ce sens, elle utilise de manière combinée deux atouts :

    - La politique de neutralité, alliée à celle des Bons offices et à la politique humanitaire (Croix-Rouge, etc.) permettent à l’impérialisme suisse de ne pas apparaître comme tel aux yeux de très larges pans de la population mondiale, ce qui lui confère une forte légitimité. Elles lui permettent aussi d’être fréquemment choisie pour jouer les arbitres ou les intermédiaires entre les grandes puissances impérialistes. Camille Barrère, Ambassadeur de France à Berne de 1894 à 1897, avait déjà compris cette stratégie lorsqu’il écrivait : « La marine de la Suisse, c’est l’arbitrage ».4
    – La bourgeoisie industrielle et bancaire suisse est capable d’offrir une série de services spécifiques (secret bancaire, fiscalité plus que complaisante, extrême faiblesse des droits sociaux, etc.), dont les classes dominantes des grandes puissances impérialistes ont fortement besoin, mais qu’elles peuvent difficilement garantir dans leur propre pays, généralement pour des raisons politiques internes. L’impérialisme helvétique ne leur apparaissant pas comme un rival trop dangereux, en raison de sa faiblesse militaire notamment, ces puissances accepteront que le pays s’installe et se spécialise durablement dans plusieurs niches hautement profitables (celle de paradis fiscal et de place financière internationale, en particulier).

    Les exemples qui illustrent la manière et la précocité avec laquelle la bourgeoisie suisse a su avancer ses propres intérêts dans le sillage des grandes puissances impérialistes, en jouant au besoin sur leurs contradictions, sont nombreux. Prenons-en deux :

    - Dès 1828, des Missionnaires bâlois, rapidement suivis par les commerçants d’une société, la Basler Handelsgesellschaft, fondée par le cœur de l’oligarchie bâloise (les familles Burckhardt, Merian, Iselin, Ehinger, Vischer), s’installent sur la côte de l’actuel Ghana. Ils vont jouer un rôle décisif dans la colonisation de cette région par la Grande-Bretagne. Dans les années 1860, ils entreprennent dans ce sens un véritable travail de lobbying, couronné de succès, auprès du Parlement anglais et ils participeront directement à la longue guerre coloniale menée par l’Angleterre contre le Royaume Achanti.5
    - En récompense, les négociants bâlois verront leurs affaires facilitées dans le Ghana placé sous tutelle britannique, de telle sorte que la Basler Handelsgesellschaft devient au début du XXesiècle l’une des plus grandes sociétés au monde d’exportation de cacao (le taux de profit net qu’elle dégage au Ghana atteint 25% en moyenne annuelle entre 1890 et 1910). Une anecdote permet à elle seule de mesurer l’influence acquise dans le pays par les négociants suisses et de montrer à quel point ils le considèrent comme leur pré carré. En mars 1957, le Ghana est la première colonie européenne d’Afrique à conquérir son indépendance. L’événement est historique. Cela n’empêche pas, quatre mois plus tard, lors de la fête organisée par les expatriés helvétiques pour le 1er août 1957, l’orateur suisse de conclure son discours devant des centaines d’invités par ces mots : « Vive le canton suisse Ghana ! ».6
    – Mais en parallèle à la carte anglaise, le capitalisme helvétique sait aussi jouer de la carte allemande ou française. Les Suisses vont même jouer un rôle de premier plan dans la politique coloniale allemande en Afrique, ce qui leur permettra, en retour, de disposer de la bienveillance des autorités coloniales et de développer de florissantes affaires.

    La stratégie évoquée ci-dessus s’est révélée particulièrement efficace, de sorte que la Suisse s’est transformée, au cours du XXe siècle, en une puissance impérialiste de moyenne importance, voire même, dans certains domaines, de tout premier plan. En voici deux illustrations :

    – Les multinationales suisses appartiennent au tout petit nombre des sociétés qui dominent le monde dans une série de branches, que ce soit dans la machinerie industrielle (ABB : 2erang mondial), de la pharmacie (Roche : 2e rang ; Novartis : 4e rang), du ciment et des matériaux de construction (LafargeHolcim : 1er rang), de l’agroalimentaire (Nestlé : 1er rang), de l’horlogerie (Swatch : 1er rang), de la production et de la commercialisation de matières premières (Glencore : 1er rang ; Vitol : 2e rang), de l’assurance (Zurich : 10e rang) ou encore de la réassurance (Swiss Re : 2e rang).
    – Dès la Première Guerre mondiale, la Suisse est également devenue une place financière internationale de premier plan, qui est aujourd’hui la quatrième ou cinquième plus importante au monde. Mais sur le plan financier, l’impérialisme helvétique présente à nouveau une spécificité. Les banques suisses occupent en effet une position particulière dans la division du travail entre centres financiers : elles sont le lieu de refuge de prédilection de l’argent des capitalistes et des riches de la planète entière et se sont donc spécialisées dans les opérations liées à la gestion de fortune.

    Exploitation massive

    Reste à souligner un dernier aspect, très important, de l’impérialisme suisse. Le rapport impérialiste ne consiste pas seulement à aller, comme cela a été dit plus haut, vers la main-d’œuvre taillable et corvéable à merci des pays pauvres. Il consiste aussi à faire venir sur place des travailleur-ses étranger-ères dans des conditions telles qu’ils et elles peuvent être exploité-e-s à peu près aussi férocement. Dans ce domaine également, le patronat helvétique s’est distingué en important massivement une main-d’œuvre immigrée, fortement discriminée par un savant système de permis de séjour axé sur le maintien de la plus grande précarité et par l’absence de droits politiques. Bref, il s’est distingué par l’ampleur de la politique de « délocalisation sur place », selon l’expression parlante d’Emmanuel Terray, qu’il a menée depuis très longtemps. Dès la fin du XIXe siècle, les travailleur-ses étranger-ères en Suisse représentent plus de 10% de la population (16% en 1913). Aujourd’hui, ils/elles constituent environ 25% de la population résidant en Suisse, soit plus de deux millions de personnes, la plupart salariées et n’ayant pas le droit vote fédéral, auxquelles il faut rajouter environ 200 000 travailleur-ses clandestin-e-s exploité-e-s.

    Notes
    1. ↑ Sébastien Guex, « De la Suisse comme petit Etat faible : jalons pour sortir d’une image en trompe-l’œil », in S. Guex (éd.), La Suisse et les Grandes puissances 1914-1945, Genève, Droz, 1999, p. 12.
    2. ↑ Cf. par exemple Documents diplomatiques suisses, vol. 6, pp. 146-148, 166-167 et 240-243.
    3. ↑ Lire Hans-Ulrich Jost, « Le Sonderfall, un mythe bien pratique », Moins ! n°49.
    4. ↑ Cité dans Jean-Claude Allain, « La politique helvétique de la France au début du XXe siècle (1899-1912) », in R. Poidevin, L.-E. Roulet (Dir.), Aspects des rapports entre la France et la Suisse de 1843 à 1939, Neuchâtel, La Baconnière, 1982, p. 99.
    5. ↑ Sébastien Guex, « Le négoce suisse en Afrique subsaharienne : le cas de la Société Union Trading Company (1859-1918) », in H. Bonin, M. Cahen (Dir.), Négoce blanc en Afrique noire, Bordeaux, Société française d’histoire d’outre-mer, 2001, p. 237.
    6. ↑ H. W. Debrunner, Schweizer im kolonialen Afrika, Basel, Basler Afrika Bibliographien, 1991, p. 19.

    https://lecourrier.ch/2020/12/06/les-secrets-dune-puissance-invisible

    #colonialisme #colonialisme_sans_colonies #impérialisme #capitalisme #guerres_coloniales #guerres_impérialistes #bourgeoisie_industrielle #bourgeoisie_bancaire #neutralité #discours #propagande #rhétorique_de_la_petitesse #impérialisme_secondaire #impérialisme_masqué #impérialisme_feutré #banquiers #banques #commerce_triangulaire #histoire #esclavage #de_Pury #multinationales #accès_à_la_mer #industrie #Bons_offices #humanitaire #politique_humanitaire #légitimité #arbitrage #paradis_fiscal #Basler_Handelsgesellschaft #Burckhardt #Merian #Iselin #Ehinger #Vischer #Ghana #Afrique #lobbying #Royaume_Achanti #cacao #finance #délocalisation_sur_place #Pury #Neuchâtel

    ping @cede

    • Intéressant le lien que l’auteur fait entre l’impérialisme suisse dans l’histoire et l’#exploitation des #travailleurs_étrangers sans droits politiques voire sans papiers plus contemporaine :

      Reste à souligner un dernier aspect, très important, de l’impérialisme suisse. Le rapport impérialiste ne consiste pas seulement à aller, comme cela a été dit plus haut, vers la main-d’œuvre taillable et corvéable à merci des pays pauvres. Il consiste aussi à faire venir sur place des travailleur-ses étranger-ères dans des conditions telles qu’ils et elles peuvent être exploité-e-s à peu près aussi férocement. Dans ce domaine également, le patronat helvétique s’est distingué en important massivement une main-d’œuvre immigrée, fortement discriminée par un savant système de permis de séjour axé sur le maintien de la plus grande précarité et par l’absence de droits politiques. Bref, il s’est distingué par l’ampleur de la politique de « délocalisation sur place », selon l’expression parlante d’Emmanuel Terray, qu’il a menée depuis très longtemps. Dès la fin du XIXe siècle, les travailleur-ses étranger-ères en Suisse représentent plus de 10% de la population (16% en 1913). Aujourd’hui, ils/elles constituent environ 25% de la population résidant en Suisse, soit plus de deux millions de personnes, la plupart salariées et n’ayant pas le droit vote fédéral, auxquelles il faut rajouter environ 200 000 travailleur-ses clandestin-e-s exploité-e-s.

      #sans-papiers #droits_politiques #saisonniers

  • Au #Tigré_éthiopien, la #guerre « sans pitié » du prix Nobel de la paix

    Le premier ministre éthiopien #Abyi_Ahmed oppose une fin de non-recevoir aux offres de médiation de ses pairs africains, alors que les combats entre l’armée fédérale et les forces de la province du Tigré ne cessent de prendre de l’ampleur.

    Le gouvernement d’Addis Abéba continue de parler d’une simple opération de police contre une province récalcitrante ; mais c’est une véritable guerre, avec blindés, aviation, et des dizaines de milliers de combattants, qui oppose l’armée fédérale éthiopienne aux forces de la province du Tigré, dans le nord du pays.

    Trois semaines de combats ont déjà provoqué l’afflux de 30 000 #réfugiés au #Soudan voisin, et ce nombre pourrait rapidement grimper après l’ultimatum lancé hier soir par le gouvernement aux rebelles : 72 heures pour se rendre. L’#armée demande aussi à la population de la capitale tigréenne, #Makelle, de se « libérer » des dirigeants du #Front_de_libération_du_peuple_du_Tigré, au pouvoir dans la province ; en cas contraire, a-t-elle prévenu, « il n’y aura aucune pitié ».

    Cette escalade rapide et, en effet, sans pitié, s’accompagne d’une position inflexible du premier ministre éthiopien, Abyi Ahmed, vis-à-vis de toute médiation, y compris celle de ses pairs africains. Addis Abéba a opposé une fin de non-recevoir aux tentatives de médiation, celle des voisins de l’Éthiopie, ou celle du Président en exercice de l’Union africaine, le sud-africain Cyril Ramaphosa. Ils seront poliment reçus à Addis Abéba, mais pas question de les laisser aller au Tigré ou de rencontrer les leaders du #TPLF, le front tigréen considéré comme des « bandits ».

    Pourquoi cette position inflexible ? La réponse se trouve à la fois dans l’histoire particulièrement violente de l’Éthiopie depuis des décennies, et dans la personnalité ambivalente d’Abyi Ahmed, le chef du gouvernement et, ne l’oublions pas, prix Nobel de la paix l’an dernier.

    L’histoire nous donne des clés. Le Tigré ne représente que 6% des 100 millions d’habitants de l’Éthiopie, mais il a joué un rôle historique déterminant. C’est du Tigré qu’est partie la résistance à la sanglante dictature de Mengistu Haile Mariam, qui avait renversé l’empire d’Haile Selassie en 1974. Victorieux en 1991, le TPLF a été au pouvoir pendant 17 ans, avec à sa tête un homme fort, Meles Zenawi, réformateur d’une main de fer, qui introduira notamment le fédéralisme en Éthiopie. Sa mort subite en 2012 a marqué le début des problèmes pour les Tigréens, marginalisés après l’élection d’Abyi Ahmed en 2018, et qui l’ont très mal vécu.

    La personnalité d’Abyi Ahmed est aussi au cœur de la crise actuelle. Encensé pour ses mesures libérales, le premier ministre éthiopien est également un ancien militaire inflexible, déterminé à s’opposer aux forces centrifuges qui menacent l’unité de l’ex-empire.

    Ce contexte laisse envisager un #conflit prolongé, car le pouvoir fédéral ne renoncera pas à son offensive jusqu’à ce qu’il ait, au minimum, repris Mekelle, la capitale du Tigré. Or cette ville est à 2500 mètres d’altitude, dans une région montagneuse où les avancées d’une armée régulière sont difficiles.

    Quant au front tigréen, il a vraisemblablement envisagé une position de repli dans la guerrilla, avec des forces aguerries, dans une région qui lui est acquise.

    Reste l’attitude des pays de la région, qui risquent d’être entrainés dans cette #guerre_civile, à commencer par l’Érythrée voisine, déjà touchée par les hostilités.

    C’est une tragédie pour l’Éthiopie, mais aussi pour l’Afrique, car c’est le deuxième pays le plus peuplé du continent, siège de l’Union africaine, l’une des locomotives d’une introuvable renaissance africaine. L’Afrique doit tout faire pour mettre fin à cette guerre fratricide, aux conséquences dévastatrices.

    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/geopolitique/geopolitique-23-novembre-2020

    #Ethiopie #Tigré #Corne_de_l'Afrique #Tigray

    • Conflict between Tigray and Eritrea – the long standing faultline in Ethiopian politics

      The missile attack by the Tigray People’s Liberation Front on Eritrea in mid-November transformed an internal Ethiopian crisis into a transnational one. In the midst of escalating internal conflict between Ethiopia’s northernmost province, Tigray, and the federal government, it was a stark reminder of a historical rivalry that continues to shape and reshape Ethiopia.

      The rivalry between the Tigray People’s Liberation Front and the movement which has governed Eritrea in all but name for the past 30 years – the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front – goes back several decades.

      The histories of Eritrea and Ethiopia have long been closely intertwined. This is especially true of Tigray and central Eritrea. These territories occupy the central massif of the Horn of Africa. Tigrinya-speakers are the predominant ethnic group in both Tigray and in the adjacent Eritrean highlands.

      The enmity between the Tigray People’s Liberation Front and the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front dates to the mid-1970s, when the Tigrayan front was founded in the midst of political turmoil in Ethiopia. The authoritarian Marxist regime – known as the Derg (Amharic for ‘committee’) – inflicted violence upon millions of its own citizens. It was soon confronted with a range of armed insurgencies and socio-political movements. These included Tigray and Eritrea, where the resistance was most ferocious.

      The Tigrayan front was at first close to the Eritrean front, which had been founded in 1970 to fight for independence from Ethiopia. Indeed, the Eritreans helped train some of the first Tigrayan recruits in 1975-6, in their shared struggle against Ethiopian government forces for social revolution and the right to self-determination.

      But in the midst of the war against the Derg regime, the relationship quickly soured over ethnic and national identity. There were also differences over the demarcation of borders, military tactics and ideology. The Tigrayan front eventually recognised the Eritreans’ right to self-determination, if grudgingly, and resolved to fight for the liberation of all Ethiopian peoples from the tyranny of the Derg regime.

      Each achieved seminal victories in the late 1980s. Together the Tigrayan-led Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front and the Eritrean front overthrew the Derg in May 1991. The Tigrayan-led front formed government in Addis Ababa while the Eritrean front liberated Eritrea which became an independent state.

      But this was just the start of a new phase of a deep-rooted rivalry. This continued between the governments until the recent entry of prime minister Abiy Ahmed.

      If there’s any lesson to be learnt from years of military and political manoeuvrings, it is that conflict in Tigray is unavoidably a matter of intense interest to the Eritrean leadership. And Abiy would do well to remember that conflict between Eritrea and Tigray has long represented a destabilising fault line for Ethiopia as well as for the wider region.
      Reconciliation and new beginnings

      In the early 1990s, there was much talk of reconciliation and new beginnings between Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia and Isaias Afeworki of Eritrea. The two governments signed a range of agreements on economic cooperation, defence and citizenship. It seemed as though the enmity of the liberation war was behind them.

      Meles declared as much at the 1993 Eritrean independence celebrations, at which he was a notable guest.

      But deep-rooted tensions soon resurfaced. In the course of 1997, unresolved border disputes were exacerbated by Eritrea’s introduction of a new currency. This had been anticipated in a 1993 economic agreement. But in the event Tigrayan traders often refused to recognise it, and it caused a collapse in commerce.

      Full-scale war erupted over the contested border hamlet of Badme in May 1998. The fighting swiftly spread to other stretches of the shared, 1,000 km long frontier. Air strikes were launched on both sides.

      It was quickly clear, too, that this was only superficially about borders. It was more substantively about regional power and long standing antagonisms that ran along ethnic lines.

      The Eritrean government’s indignant anti-Tigray front rhetoric had its echo in the popular contempt for so-called Agame, the term Eritreans used for Tigrayan migrant labourers.

      For the Tigray front, the Eritrean front was the clearest expression of perceived Eritrean arrogance.

      As for Isaias himself, regarded as a crazed warlord who had led Eritrea down a path which defied economic and political logic, it was hubris personified.

      Ethiopia deported tens of thousands of Eritreans and Ethiopians of Eritrean descent.

      Ethiopia’s decisive final offensive in May 2000 forced the Eritrean army to fall back deep into their own territory. Although the Ethiopians were halted, and a ceasefire put in place after bitter fighting on a number of fronts, Eritrea had been devastated by the conflict.

      The Algiers Agreement of December 2000 was followed by years of standoff, occasional skirmishes, and the periodic exchange of insults.

      During this period Ethiopia consolidated its position as a dominant power in the region. And Meles as one of the continent’s representatives on the global stage.

      For its part Eritrea retreated into a militaristic, authoritarian solipsism. Its domestic policy centred on open-ended national service for the young. Its foreign policy was largely concerned with undermining the Ethiopian government across the region. This was most obvious in Somalia, where its alleged support for al-Shabaab led to the imposition of sanctions on Asmara.

      The ‘no war-no peace’ scenario continued even after Meles’s sudden death in 2012. The situation only began to shift with the resignation of Hailemariam Desalegn against a backdrop of mounting protest across Ethiopia, especially among the Oromo and the Amhara, and the rise to power of Abiy.

      What followed was the effective overthrow of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front which had been the dominant force in the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front coalition since 1991.

      This provided Isaias with a clear incentive to respond to Abiy’s overtures.
      Tigray’s loss, Eritrea’s gain

      A peace agreement between Ethiopia and Eritrea, was signed in July 2018 by Abiy and Eritrean President Isaias Afeworki. It formally ended their 1998-2000 war. It also sealed the marginalisation of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front. Many in the Tigray People’s Liberation Front were unenthusiastic about allowing Isaias in from the cold.

      Since the 1998-2000 war, in large part thanks to the astute manoeuvres of the late Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, Eritrea had been exactly where the Tigray People’s Liberation Front wanted it: an isolated pariah state with little diplomatic clout. Indeed, it is unlikely that Isaias would have been as receptive to the deal had it not involved the further sidelining of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, something which Abiy presumably understood.

      Isaias had eschewed the possibility of talks with Abiy’s predecessor, Hailemariam Desalegn. But Abiy was a different matter. A political reformer, and a member of the largest but long-subjugated ethnic group in Ethiopia, the Oromo, he was determined to end the Tigray People’s Liberation Front’s domination of Ethiopian politics.

      This was effectively achieved in December 2019 when he abolished the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front and replaced it with the Prosperity Party.

      The Tigray People’s Liberation Front declined to join with the visible results of the current conflict.

      À lire aussi : Residual anger driven by the politics of power has boiled over into conflict in Ethiopia

      Every effort to engage with the Tigrayan leadership – including the Tigray People’s Liberation Front – in pursuit of a peaceful resolution must also mean keeping Eritrea out of the conflict.

      Unless Isaias is willing to play a constructive role – he does not have a good track record anywhere in the region in this regard – he must be kept at arm’s length, not least to protect the 2018 peace agreement itself.

      https://theconversation.com/conflict-between-tigray-and-eritrea-the-long-standing-faultline-in-

      #Derg #histoire #frontières #démarcation_des_frontières #monnaie #Badme #Agame #travailleurs_étrangers #Oromo #Ethiopian_People’s_Revolutionary_Democratic_Front #Prosperity_Party

      –—

      #Agame , the term Eritreans used for Tigrayan migrant labourers.

      –-> #terminologie #vocabulaire #mots
      ping @sinehebdo

    • Satellite Images Show Ethiopia Carnage as Conflict Continues
      – United Nations facility, school, clinic and homes burned down
      – UN refugee agency has had no access to the two camps

      Satellite images show the destruction of United Nations’ facilities, a health-care unit, a high school and houses at two camps sheltering Eritrean refugees in Tigray, northern Ethiopia, belying government claims that the conflict in the dissident region is largely over.

      The eight Planet Labs Inc images are of Hitsats and the Shimelba camps. The camps hosted about 25,000 and 8,000 refugees respectively before a conflict broke out in the region two months ago, according to data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

      “Recent satellite imagery indicates that structures in both camps are being intentionally targeted,” said Isaac Baker, an analyst at DX Open Network, a U.K. based human security research and analysis non-profit. “The systematic and widespread fires are consistent with an intentional campaign to deny the use of the camp.”

      DX Open Network has been following the conflict and analyzing satellite image data since Nov. 7, three days after Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed declared war against a dissident group in the Tigray region, which dominated Ethiopian politics before Abiy came to power.

      Ethiopia’s government announced victory against the dissidents on Nov. 28 after federal forces captured the regional capital of Mekelle. Abiy spoke of the need to rebuild and return normalcy to Tigray at the time.

      Calls and messages to Redwan Hussein, spokesman for the government’s emergency task force on Tigray and the Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s Spokeswoman Billene Seyoum were not answered.

      In #Shimelba, images show scorched earth from apparent attacks in January. A World Food Programme storage facility and a secondary school run by the Development and Inter-Aid Church Commission have also been burned down, according to DX Open Network’s analysis. In addition, a health facility run by the Ethiopian Agency for Refugees and Returnees Affairs situated next to the WFP compound was also attacked between Jan. 5 and Jan. 8.

      In #Hitsats camp, about 30 kilometers (19 miles) away, there were at least 14 actively burning structures and 55 others were damaged or destroyed by Jan. 5. There were new fires by Jan. 8, according to DX Open Network’s analysis.

      The UN refugee agency has not had access to the camps since fighting started in early November, according to Chris Melzer, a communications officer for the agency. UNHCR has been able to reach its two other camps, Mai-Aini and Adi Harush, which are to the south, he said.

      “We also have no reliable, first-hand information about the situation in the camps or the wellbeing of the refugees,” Melzer said in reference to Hitsats and Shimelba.

      Eritrean troops have also been involved in the fighting and are accused of looting businesses and abducting refugees, according to aid workers and diplomats briefed on the situation. The governments of both Ethiopia and Eritrea have denied that Eritrean troops are involved in the conflict.

      The UN says fighting is still going on in several Tigray areas and 2.2 million people have been displaced in the past two months. Access to the region for journalists and independent analysts remains constrained, making it difficult to verify events.

      https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-01-09/satellite-images-show-destruction-of-refugee-camps-in-ethiopia?srnd=premi

      #images_satellitaires #camps_de_réfugiés #réfugiés

    • Ethiopia’s government appears to be wielding hunger as a weapon

      A rebel region is being starved into submission

      ETHIOPIA HAS suffered famines in the past. Many foreigners know this; in 1985 about one-third of the world’s population watched a pop concert to raise money for starving Ethiopians. What is less well understood is that poor harvests lead to famine only when malign rulers allow it. It was not the weather that killed perhaps 1m people in 1983-85. It was the policies of a Marxist dictator, Mengistu Haile Mariam, who forced peasants at gunpoint onto collective farms. Mengistu also tried to crush an insurgency in the northern region of Tigray by burning crops, destroying grain stores and slaughtering livestock. When the head of his own government’s humanitarian agency begged him for cash to feed the starving, he dismissed him with a memorably callous phrase: “Don’t let these petty human problems...consume you.”

      https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/01/23/ethiopias-government-appears-to-be-wielding-hunger-as-a-weapon

      #famine #faim
      #paywall

    • Amnesty International accuses Eritrean troops of killing hundreds of civilians in the holy city of #Axum

      Amnesty International has released a comprehensive, compelling report detailing the killing of hundreds of civilians in the Tigrayan city of Axum.

      This story has been carried several times by Eritrea Hub, most recently on 20th February. On 12 January this year the Axum massacre was raised in the British Parliament, by Lord David Alton.

      Gradually the picture emerging has been clarified and is now unambiguous.

      The Amnesty report makes grim reading: the details are horrifying.

      Human Rights Watch are finalising their own report, which will be published next week. The Ethiopian Human Rights Commission is also publishing a report on the Axum massacre.

      The Ethiopian government appointed interim administration of Tigray is attempting to distance itself from the actions of Eritrean troops. Alula Habteab, who heads the interim administration’s construction, road and transport department, appeared to openly criticise soldiers from Eritrea, as well as the neighbouring Amhara region, for their actions during the conflict.

      “There were armies from a neighbouring country and a neighbouring region who wanted to take advantage of the war’s objective of law enforcement,” he told state media. “These forces have inflicted more damage than the war itself.”

      The full report can be found here: The Massacre in Axum – AFR 25.3730.2021. Below is the summary (https://eritreahub.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/The-Massacre-in-Axum-AFR-25.3730.2021.pdf)

      https://eritreahub.org/amnesty-international-accuses-eritrean-troops-of-killing-hundreds-of-civ

      #rapport #massacre

    • Ethiopia’s Tigray crisis: How a massacre in the sacred city of #Aksum unfolded

      Eritrean troops fighting in Ethiopia’s northern region of Tigray killed hundreds of people in Aksum mainly over two days in November, witnesses say.

      The mass killings on 28 and 29 November may amount to a crime against humanity, Amnesty International says in a report.

      An eyewitness told the BBC how bodies remained unburied on the streets for days, with many being eaten by hyenas.

      Ethiopia and Eritrea, which both officially deny Eritrean soldiers are in Tigray, have not commented.

      The Ethiopian Human Rights commission says it is investigating the allegations.

      The conflict erupted on 4 November 2020 when Ethiopia’s government launched an offensive to oust the region’s ruling TPLF party after its fighters captured federal military bases in Tigray.

      Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, told parliament on 30 November that “not a single civilian was killed” during the operation.

      But witnesses have recounted how on that day they began burying some of the bodies of unarmed civilians killed by Eritrean soldiers - many of them boys and men shot on the streets or during house-to-house raids.

      Amnesty’s report has high-resolution satellite imagery from 13 December showing disturbed earth consistent with recent graves at two churches in Aksum, an ancient city considered sacred by Ethiopia’s Orthodox Christians.

      A communications blackout and restricted access to Tigray has meant reports of what has gone on in the conflict have been slow to emerge.

      In Aksum, electricity and phone networks reportedly stopped working on the first day of the conflict.
      How was Aksum captured?

      Shelling by Ethiopian and Eritrea forces to the west of Aksum began on Thursday 19 November, according to people in the city.

      “This attack continued for five hours, and was non-stop. People who were at churches, cafes, hotels and their residence died. There was no retaliation from any armed force in the city - it literally targeted civilians,” a civil servant in Aksum told the BBC.
      1px transparent line

      Amnesty has gathered similar and multiple testimonies describing the continuous shelling that evening of civilians.

      Once in control of the city, soldiers, generally identified as Eritrean, searched for TPLF soldiers and militias or “anyone with a gun”, Amnesty said.

      “There were a lot of... house-to-house killings,” one woman told the rights group.

      There is compelling evidence that Ethiopian and Eritrean troops carried out “multiple war crimes in their offensive to take control of Aksum”, Amnesty’s Deprose Muchena says.
      What sparked the killings?

      For the next week, the testimonies say Ethiopia troops were mainly in Aksum - the Eritreans had pushed on east to the town of Adwa.

      A witness told the BBC how the Ethiopian military looted banks in the city in that time.

      he Eritrean forces reportedly returned a week later. The fighting on Sunday 28 November was triggered by an assault of poorly armed pro-TPLF fighters, according to Amnesty’s report.

      Between 50 and 80 men from Aksum targeted an Eritrean position on a hill overlooking the city in the morning.

      A 26-year-old man who participated in the attack told Amnesty: “We wanted to protect our city so we attempted to defend it especially from Eritrean soldiers... They knew how to shoot and they had radios, communications... I didn’t have a gun, just a stick.”
      How did Eritrean troops react?

      It is unclear how long the fighting lasted, but that afternoon Eritrean trucks and tanks drove into Aksum, Amnesty reports.

      Witnesses say Eritrean soldiers went on a rampage, shooting at unarmed civilian men and boys who were out on the streets - continuing until the evening.

      A man in his 20s told Amnesty about the killings on the city’s main street: “I was on the second floor of a building and I watched, through the window, the Eritreans killing the youth on the street.”

      The soldiers, identified as Eritrean not just because of their uniform and vehicle number plates but because of the languages they spoke (Arabic and an Eritrean dialect of Tigrinya), started house-to-house searches.

      “I would say it was in retaliation,” a young man told the BBC. “They killed every man they found. If you opened your door and they found a man they killed him, if you didn’t open, they shoot your gate by force.”

      He was hiding in a nightclub and witnessed a man who was found and killed by Eritrean soldiers begging for his life: “He was telling them: ’I am a civilian, I am a banker.’”

      Another man told Amnesty that he saw six men killed, execution-style, outside his house near the Abnet Hotel the following day on 29 November.

      “They lined them up and shot them in the back from behind. Two of them I knew. They’re from my neighbourhood… They asked: ’Where is your gun’ and they answered: ’We have no guns, we are civilians.’”
      How many people were killed?

      Witnesses say at first the Eritrean soldiers would not let anyone approach the bodies on the streets - and would shoot anyone who did so.

      One woman, whose nephews aged 29 and 14 had been killed, said the roads “were full of dead bodies”.

      Amnesty says after the intervention of elders and Ethiopian soldiers, burials began over several days, with most funerals taking place on 30 November after people brought the bodies to the churches - often 10 at a time loaded on horse- or donkey-drawn carts.

      At Abnet Hotel, the civil servant who spoke to the BBC said some bodies were not removed for four days.

      "The bodies that were lying around Abnet Hotel and Seattle Cinema were eaten by hyenas. We found only bones. We buried bones.

      “I can say around 800 civilians were killed in Aksum.”

      This account is echoed by a church deacon who told the Associated Press that many bodies had been fed on by hyenas.

      He gathered victims’ identity cards and assisted with burials in mass graves and also believes about 800 people were killed that weekend.

      The 41 survivors and witnesses Amnesty interviewed provided the names of more than 200 people they knew who were killed.
      What happened after the burials?

      Witnesses say the Eritrean soldiers participated in looting, which after the massacre and as many people fled the city, became widespread and systematic.

      The university, private houses, hotels, hospitals, grain stores, garages, banks, DIY stores, supermarkets, bakeries and other shops were reportedly targeted.

      One man told Amnesty how Ethiopian soldiers failed to stop Eritreans looting his brother’s house.

      “They took the TV, a jeep, the fridge, six mattresses, all the groceries and cooking oil, butter, teff flour [Ethiopia’s staple food], the kitchen cabinets, clothes, the beers in the fridge, the water pump, and the laptop.”

      The young man who spoke to the BBC said he knew of 15 vehicles that had been stolen belonging to businessmen in the city.

      This has had a devastating impact on those left in Aksum, leaving them with little food and medicine to survive, Amnesty says.

      Witnesses say the theft of water pumps left residents having to drink from the river.
      Why is Aksum sacred?

      It is said to be the birthplace of the biblical Queen of Sheba, who travelled to Jerusalem to visit King Solomon.

      They had a son - Menelik I - who is said to have brought to Aksum the Ark of the Covenant, believed to contain the 10 commandments handed down to Moses by God.

      It is constantly under guard at the city’s Our Lady Mary of Zion Church and no-one is allowed to see it.

      A major religious celebration is usually held at the church on 30 November, drawing pilgrims from across Ethiopia and around the world, but it was cancelled last year amid the conflict.

      The civil servant interviewed by the BBC said that Eritrean troops came to the church on 3 December “terrorising the priests and forcing them to give them the gold and silver cross”.

      But he said the deacons and other young people went to protect the ark.

      “It was a huge riot. Every man and woman fought them. They fired guns and killed some, but we are happy as we did not fail to protect our treasures.”

      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-56198469

  • Les grévistes de l’IBIS Batignolles lancent leur clip musical ! (par mel)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okqQnJvTbgE&feature=youtu.be

    Les femmes de chambre de l’IBIS Batignolles sont en lutte depuis plus de 15 mois pour exiger l’embauche directe par l’établissement où elles travaillent, la baisse de leurs cadences et l’augmentation de leurs salaires. Leur lutte est devenue en quelques mois, un symbole de résistance pour des milliers de femmes et d’hommes qui font le ménage en France. 19 femmes de chambres et un équipier font face au géant hôtelier, le multimilliardaire groupe #ACCOR.

    Dans le secteur du nettoyage, les salarié-e-s sont soumis à des conditions de travail extrêmement difficiles, des harcèlements, voire même des agressions par les directions voyous des entreprises de « la propreté ». Des dizaines de milliers de travailleurs et travailleuses souvent étrangers sont réduits au silence. Cette chanson ce veut être un hymne pour celles et ceux qui choisissent de résister, elle reprend le principal slogan de manifestation du personnel de nettoyage dans l’hôtellerie depuis des années : « Frotter, frotter, il faut payer » .

    La chanson et le clip sont interprétés par Bobbyodet, le mari d’une des leadeuses (Rachel Keke) des femmes de chambre de l’hôtel #IBIS Batignolles. Chanteur, chorégraphe, compositeur, Bobbyodet a mis ses talents à contribution pour soutenir sa femme et ses collègues de travail, pour parler de leur quotidien et des difficultés qu’elles traversent. Le clip a été réalisé grâce à un financement collaboratif sur la plateforme Kickstarter et réalisé par « Sébastien » un syndicaliste de la CGT HPE.

    CAISSE DE SOUTIEN À LA LUTTE IBIS BATIGNOLLES
    https://www.papayoux-solidarite.com/fr/collecte/caisse-de-soutien-a-la-lutte-ibis-batignolles

    #femmes_de_chambre #nettoyage #grève #salaire #conditions_de_travail #travailleurs_étrangers #travailleuses_étrangères #caisse_de_grève

  • Bangladesh: Hundreds of arbitrarily detained migrant workers must be released

    The Bangladeshi authorities must immediately release at least 370 Bangladeshi migrant workers who were arbitrarily detained between July and September following their return to the country, said Amnesty International.

    In the fourth of a series of mass arrests of migrant workers for alleged criminal activity abroad, 32 people were detained in Dhaka on Sunday 28 September for “tarnishing the image of the country”, due to their alleged imprisonment in Syria from where they had been deported. In this, as with three other cases, no credible evidence of criminal wrongdoing has been shown nor have any charges been brought.

    These men and women are being arbitrarily detained in clear violation of Bangladesh’s human rights obligations
    David Griffiths, Director of the Office of the Secretary General

    The arbitrary detention of the workers violates the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), to which Bangladesh is a state party.

    “Not only have the Bangladeshi authorities failed to present any credible evidence of these workers’ supposed crimes, they have failed to specify any criminal charges. These men and women are being arbitrarily detained in clear violation of Bangladesh’s human rights obligations,” said David Griffiths, Director of the Office of the Secretary General.

    “With many now held in detention for several months, there is no time for further delay. The Bangladeshi authorities must either bring charges for internationally recognised criminal offences or release them immediately.”

    The 32 workers were initially jailed in Syria while trying to reach Italy and other European countries. They returned to Bangladesh on 13 September and were placed in quarantine for two weeks prior to their arrest, after the Syrian government commuted their jail terms.

    Between July and September, Bangladeshi police have jailed at least 370 returning migrant workers under section 54 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, which allows for arrest on the basis of having “reasonable suspicion” that a person may have been involved in a criminal offence outside Bangladesh.

    On 5 July 2020, 219 Bangladeshi workers who had returned from Kuwait, Qatar and Bahrain since May were arrested and detained. According to the police application to a court in Dhaka, the returnees were in jails in those countries for committing “various offences”, which were not specified. The workers were deported to Bangladesh after their sentences were commuted. A police request to detain the 219 for as long as an investigation continued to determine their offence was granted by the court.

    This was followed on 21 July by the arrest of another 36 migrant workers who had returned from Qatar and, on 1 September, by the arrest of 81 migrant workers who had returned to the country from Vietnam and 2 others from Qatar, after being exploited by traffickers.

    “The Bangladeshi police have effectively been given court permission to keep these workers in detention for as long as they like. There is no telling how long an investigation into hundreds of cases involving multiple countries may take. To keep people imprisoned without charge for such an indeterminate length of time is completely unacceptable,” said David Griffiths.

    Background

    Article 9 of the ICCPR safeguards the right to liberty and security of person and explicitly provides that “Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest or detention. No one shall be deprived of his liberty except on such grounds and in accordance with such procedure as are established by law.”

    https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2020/10/bangladesh-hundreds-of-arbitrarily-detained-migrant-workers-must-be-release
    #Bangladesh #retour #renvois #expulsions #détention #travailleurs_étrangers #migrants_bangladais

  • Organizing amidst Covid-19


    Organizing amidst Covid-19: sharing stories of struggles
    Overviews of movement struggles in specific places

    Miguel Martinez
    Mutating mobilisations during the pandemic crisis in Spain (movement report, pp. 15 – 21)

    Laurence Cox
    Forms of social movement in the crisis: a view from Ireland (movement report, pp. 22 – 33)

    Lesley Wood
    We’re not all in this together (movement report, pp. 34 – 38)

    Angela Chukunzira
    Organising under curfew: perspectives from Kenya (movement report, pp. 39 – 42)

    Federico Venturini
    Social movements’ powerlessness at the time of covid-19: a personal account (movement report, pp. 43 – 46)

    Sobhi Mohanty
    From communal violence to lockdown hunger: emergency responses by civil society networks in Delhi, India (movement report, pp. 47 – 52)
    Feminist and LGBTQ+ activism

    Hongwei Bao
    “Anti-domestic violence little vaccine”: a Wuhan-based feminist activist campaign during COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 53 – 63)

    Ayaz Ahmed Siddiqui
    Aurat march, a threat to mainstream tribalism in Pakistan (movement report, pp. 64 – 71)

    Lynn Ng Yu Ling
    What does the COVID-19 pandemic mean for PinkDot Singapore? (movement report, pp. 72 – 81)

    María José Ventura Alfaro
    Feminist solidarity networks have multiplied since the COVID-19 outbreak in Mexico (movement report, pp. 82 – 87)

    Ben Trott
    Queer Berlin and the Covid-19 crisis: a politics of contact and ethics of care (movement report, pp. 88 – 108)
    Reproductive struggles

    Non Una Di Meno Roma
    Life beyond the pandemic (movement report, pp. 109 – 114)
    Labour organising

    Ben Duke
    The effects of the COVID-19 crisis on the gig economy and zero hour contracts (movement report, pp. 115 – 120)

    Louisa Acciari
    Domestic workers’ struggles in times of pandemic crisis (movement report, pp. 121 – 127)

    Arianna Tassinari, Riccardo Emilia Chesta and Lorenzo Cini
    Labour conflicts over health and safety in the Italian Covid19 crisis (movement report, pp. 128 – 138)

    T Sharkawi and N Ali
    Acts of whistleblowing: the case of collective claim making by healthcare workers in Egypt (movement report, pp. 139 – 163)

    Mallige Sirimane and Nisha Thapliyal
    Migrant labourers, Covid19 and working-class struggle in the time of pandemic: a report from Karnataka, India (movement report, pp. 164 – 181)
    Migrant and refugee struggles

    Johanna May Black, Sutapa Chattopadhyay and Riley Chisholm
    Solidarity in times of social distancing: migrants, mutual aid, and COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 182 – 193)

    Anitta Kynsilehto
    Doing migrant solidarity at the time of Covid-19 (movement report, pp. 194 – 198)

    Susan Thieme and Eda Elif Tibet
    New political upheavals and women alliances in solidarity beyond “lock down” in Switzerland at times of a global pandemic (movement report, pp. 199 – 207)

    Chiara Milan
    Refugee solidarity along the Western Balkans route: new challenges and a change of strategy in times of COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 208 – 212)

    Marco Perolini
    Abolish all camps in times of corona: the struggle against shared accommodation for refugees* in Berlin (movement report, pp. 213 – 224)
    Ecological activism

    Clara Thompson
    #FightEveryCrisis: Re-framing the climate movement in times of a pandemic (movement report, pp. 225 – 231)

    Susan Paulson
    Degrowth and feminisms ally to forge care-full paths beyond pandemic (movement report, pp. 232 – 246)

    Peterson Derolus [FR]
    Coronavirus, mouvements sociaux populaires anti-exploitation minier en Haïti (movement report, pp. 247 – 249)

    Silpa Satheesh
    The pandemic does not stop the pollution in River Periyar (movement report, pp. 250 – 257)

    Ashish Kothari
    Corona can’t save the planet, but we can, if we listen to ordinary people (movement report, pp. 258 – 265)
    Food sovereignty organising

    Dagmar Diesner
    Self-governance food system before and during the Covid-crisis on the example of CampiAperti, Bologna (movement report, pp. 266 – 273)

    URGENCI
    Community Supported Agriculture is a safe and resilient alternative to industrial agriculture in the time of Covid-19 (movement report, pp. 274 – 279)

    Jenny Gkougki
    Corona-crisis affects small Greek farmers who counterstrike with a nationwide social media campaign to unite producers and consumers on local level! (movement report, pp. 280 – 283)

    John Foran
    Eco Vista in the quintuple crisis (movement report, pp. 284 – 291)
    Solidarity and mutual aid

    Michael Zeller
    Karlsruhe’s “giving fences”: mobilisation for the needy in times of COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 292 – 303)

    Sergio Ruiz Cayuela
    Organising a solidarity kitchen: reflections from Cooperation Birmingham (movement report, pp. 304 – 309)

    Clinton Nichols
    On lockdown and locked out of the prison classroom: the prospects of post-secondary education for incarcerated persons during pandemic (movement report, pp. 310 – 316)

    Micha Fiedlschuster and Leon Rosa Reichle
    Solidarity forever? Performing mutual aid in Leipzig, Germany (movement report, pp. 317 – 325)
    Artistic and digital resistance

    Kerman Calvo and Ester Bejarano
    Music, solidarities and balconies in Spain (movement report, pp. 326 – 332)

    Neto Holanda and Valesca Lima [PT]
    Movimentos e ações político-culturais do Brasil em tempos de pandemia do Covid-19 (movement report, pp. 333 – 338)

    Margherita Massarenti
    How Covid-19 led to a #Rentstrike and what it can teach us about online organizing (movement report, pp. 339 – 346)

    Dounya
    Knowledge is power: virtual forms of everyday resistance and grassroots broadcasting in Iran (movement report, pp. 347 – 354)
    Imagining a new world

    Donatella della Porta
    How progressive social movements can save democracy in pandemic times (movement report, pp. 355 – 358)

    Jackie Smith
    Responding to coronavirus pandemic: human rights movement-building to transform global capitalism (movement report, pp. 359 – 366)

    Yariv Mohar
    Human rights amid Covid-19: from struggle to orchestration of tradeoffs (movement report, pp. 367 – 370)

    Julien Landry, Ann Marie Smith, Patience Agwenjang, Patricia Blankson Akakpo, Jagat Basnet, Bhumiraj Chapagain, Aklilu Gebremichael, Barbara Maigari and Namadi Saka,
    Social justice snapshots: governance adaptations, innovations and practitioner learning in a time of COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 371 – 382)

    Roger Spear, Gulcin Erdi, Marla A. Parker and Maria Anastasia
    Innovations in citizen response to crises: volunteerism and social mobilization during COVID-19 (movement report, pp. 383 – 391)

    Breno Bringel
    Covid-19 and the new global chaos (movement report, pp. 392 – 399)

    https://www.interfacejournal.net/interface-volume-12-issue-1

    #mouvements_sociaux #résistance #covid-19 #confinement #revue #aide_mutuelle #Espagne #résistance #Irlande #Kenya #impuissance #sentiment_d'impuissance #faim #violence #Delhi #Inde #féminisme #Wuhan #Pakistan #PinkDot #LGBT #Singapour #solidarité_féministe #solidarité #Mexique #care #Berlin #Allemagne #queer #gig_economy #travail #travail_domestique #travailleurs_domestiques #Italie #Egypte #travailleurs_étrangers #Karnataka #distanciation_sociale #migrations #Suisse #route_des_Balkans #Balkans #réfugiés #camps_de_réfugiés #FightEveryCrisis #climat #changement_climatique #décroissance #Haïti #extractivisme #pollution #River_Periyar #Periyar #souveraineté_alimentaire #nourriture #alimentation #CampiAperti #Bologne #agriculture #Grèce #Karlsruhe #Cooperation_Birmingham #UK #Angleterre #Leipzig #musique #Brésil #Rentstrike #Iran #droits_humains #justice_sociale #innovation #innovation_sociale

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Covid-19, la #frontiérisation aboutie du #monde

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur. La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli. Par Adrien Delmas, historien et David Goeury, géographe.

    La #chronologie ci-dessus représente cartographiquement la fermeture des frontières nationales entre le 20 janvier et le 30 avril 2020 consécutive de la pandémie de Covid-19, phénomène inédit dans sa célérité et son ampleur. Les données ont été extraites des déclarations gouvernementales concernant les restrictions aux voyages, les fermetures des frontières terrestres, maritimes et aériennes et des informations diffusées par les ambassades à travers le monde. En plus d’omissions ou d’imprécisions, certains biais peuvent apparaitre notamment le décalage entre les mesures de restriction et leur application.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=64&v=mv-OFB4WfBg&feature=emb_logo

    En quelques semaines, le nouveau coronavirus dont l’humanité est devenue le principal hôte, s’est propagé aux quatre coins de la planète à une vitesse sans précédent, attestant de la densité des relations et des circulations humaines. Rapidement deux stratégies politiques se sont imposées : fermer les frontières nationales et confiner les populations.

    Par un processus de #mimétisme_politique global, les gouvernements ont basculé en quelques jours d’une position minimisant le risque à des politiques publiques de plus en plus drastiques de contrôle puis de suspension des mobilités. Le recours systématique à la fermeture d’une limite administrative interroge : n’y a-t-il pas, comme répété dans un premier temps, un décalage entre la nature même de l’#épidémie et des frontières qui sont des productions politiques ? Le suivi de la diffusion virale ne nécessite-t-il un emboîtement d’échelles (famille, proches, réseaux de sociabilité et professionnels…) en deçà du cadre national ?

    Nous nous proposons ici de revenir sur le phénomène sans précédent d’activation et de généralisation de l’appareil frontalier mondial, en commençant par retrouver la chronologie précise des fermetures successives. Bien que resserrée sur quelques jours, des phases se dessinent, pour aboutir à la situation présente de fermeture complète.

    Il serait vain de vouloir donner une lecture uniforme de ce phénomène soudain mais nous partirons du constat que le phénomène de « frontiérisation du monde », pour parler comme Achille Mbembe, était déjà à l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique, avant de nous interroger sur son accélération, son aboutissement et sa réversibilité.

    L’argument sanitaire

    Alors que la présence du virus était attestée, à partir de février 2020, dans les différentes parties du monde, la fermeture des frontières nationales s’est imposée selon un principe de cohérence sanitaire, le risque d’importation du virus par des voyageurs était avéré. Le transport aérien a permis au virus de faire des sauts territoriaux révélant un premier archipel économique liant le Hubei au reste du monde avant de se diffuser au gré de mobilités multiples.

    Pour autant, les réponses des premiers pays touchés, en l’occurrence la Chine et la Corée du Sud, se sont organisées autour de l’élévation de barrières non-nationales : personnes infectées mises en quarantaine, foyers, ilots, ville, province etc. L’articulation raisonnée de multiples échelles, l’identification et le ciblage des clusters, ont permis de contrôler la propagation du virus et d’en réduire fortement la létalité. A toutes ces échelles d’intervention s’ajoute l’échelle mondiale où s‘est organisée la réponse médicale par la recherche collective des traitements et des vaccins.

    Face à la multiplication des foyers de contamination, la plupart des gouvernements ont fait le choix d’un repli national. La fermeture des frontières est apparue comme une modalité de reprise de contrôle politique et le retour aux sources de l’État souverain. Bien que nul dirigeant ne peut nier avoir agi « en retard », puisque aucun pays n’est exempt de cas de Covid-19, beaucoup d’États se réjouissent d’avoir fermé « à temps », avant que la vague n’engendre une catastrophe.

    L’orchestration d’une réponse commune concertée notamment dans le cadre de l’OMS est abandonnée au profit d’initiatives unilatérales. La fermeture des frontières a transformé la pandémie en autant d’épidémies nationales, devenant par là un exemple paradigmatique du nationalisme méthodologique, pour reprendre les termes d’analyse d’Ulrich Beck.

    S’impose alors la logique résidentielle : les citoyens présents sur un territoire deviennent comptables de la diffusion de l’épidémie et du maintien des capacités de prise en charge par le système médical. La dialectique entre gouvernants et gouvernés s’articule alors autour des décomptes quotidiens, de chiffres immédiatement comparés, bien que pas toujours commensurables, à ceux des pays voisins.

    La frontiérisation du monde consécutive de la pandémie de coronavirus ne peut se résumer à la seule somme des fermetures particulières, pays par pays. Bien au contraire, des logiques collectives se laissent entrevoir. A défaut de concertation, les gouvernants ont fait l’expérience du dilemme du prisonnier.

    Face à une opinion publique inquiète, un chef de gouvernement prenait le risque d’être considéré comme laxiste ou irresponsable en maintenant ses frontières ouvertes alors que les autres fermaient les leurs. Ces phénomènes mimétiques entre États se sont démultipliés en quelques jours face à la pandémie : les États ont redécouvert leur maîtrise biopolitique via les mesures barrières, ils ont défendu leur rationalité en suivant les avis de conseils scientifiques et en discréditant les approches émotionnelles ou religieuses ; ils ont privilégié la suspension des droits à grand renfort de mesures d’exception. Le risque global a alors légitimé la réaffirmation d’une autorité nationale dans un unanimisme relatif.

    Chronologie de la soudaineté

    La séquence vécue depuis la fin du mois janvier de l’année 2020 s’est traduite par une série d’accélérations venant renforcer les principes de fermeture des frontières. Le développement de l’épidémie en Chine alarme assez rapidement la communauté internationale et tout particulièrement les pays limitrophes.

    La Corée du Nord prend les devants dès le 21 janvier en fermant sa frontière avec la Chine et interdit tout voyage touristique sur son sol. Alors que la Chine développe une stratégie de confinement ciblé dès le 23 janvier, les autres pays frontaliers ferment leurs frontières terrestres ou n’ouvrent pas leurs frontières saisonnières d’altitude comme le Pakistan.

    Parallèlement, les pays non frontaliers entament une politique de fermeture des routes aériennes qui constituent autant de points potentiels d’entrée du virus. Cette procédure prend des formes différentes qui relèvent d’un gradient de diplomatie. Certains se contentent de demander aux compagnies aériennes nationales de suspendre leurs vols, fermant leur frontière de facto (Algérie, Égypte, Maroc, Rwanda, France, Canada, entre autres), d’autres privilégient l’approche plus frontale comme les États-Unis qui, le 2 février, interdisent leur territoire au voyageurs ayant séjournés en Chine.

    La propagation très rapide de l’épidémie en Iran amène à une deuxième tentative de mise en quarantaine d’un pays dès le 20 février. Le rôle de l’Iran dans les circulations terrestres de l’Afghanistan à la Turquie pousse les gouvernements frontaliers à fermer les points de passage. De même, le gouvernement irakien étroitement lié à Téhéran finit par fermer la frontière le 20 février. Puis les voyageurs ayant séjourné en Iran sont à leur tour progressivement considérés comme indésirables. Les gouvernements décident alors de politiques d’interdiction de séjour ciblées ou de mises en quarantaine forcées par la création de listes de territoires à risques.

    Le développement de l’épidémie en Italie amène à un changement de paradigme dans la gestion de la crise sanitaire. L’épidémie est dès lors considérée comme effectivement mondiale mais surtout elle est désormais perçue comme incontrôlable tant les foyers de contamination potentiels sont nombreux.

    La densité des relations intra-européennes et l’intensité des mobilités extra-européennes génèrent un sentiment d’anxiété face au risque de la submersion, le concept de « vague » est constamment mobilisé. Certains y ont lu une inversion de l’ordre migratoire planétaire. Les pays aux revenus faibles ou limités décident de fermer leurs frontières aux individus issus des pays aux plus hauts revenus.

    Les derniers jours du mois de février voient des gouvernements comme le Liban créer des listes de nationalités indésirables, tandis que d’autres comme Fiji décident d’un seuil de cas identifiés de Covid-19. Les interdictions progressent avec le Qatar et l’Arabie Saoudite qui ferment leur territoire aux Européens dès le 9 mars avant de connaître une accélération le 10 mars.

    Les frontières sont alors emportées dans le tourbillon des fermetures.

    La Slovénie débute la suspension de la libre circulation au sein de l’espace Schengen en fermant sa frontière avec l’Italie. Elle est suivie par les pays d’Europe centrale (Tchéquie, Slovaquie). En Afrique et en Amérique, les relations avec l’Union européenne sont suspendues unilatéralement. Le Maroc ferme ses frontières avec l’Espagne dès le 12 mars. Ce même jour, les États-Unis annonce la restriction de l’accès à son territoire aux voyageurs issu de l’Union européenne. La décision américaine est rapidement élargie au monde entier, faisant apparaitre l’Union européenne au cœur des mobilités planétaires.

    En quelques jours, la majorité des frontières nationales se ferment à l’ensemble du monde. Les liaisons aériennes sont suspendues, les frontières terrestres sont closes pour éviter les stratégies de contournements.

    Les pays qui échappent à cette logique apparaissent comme très minoritaires à l’image du Mexique, du Nicaragua, du Laos, du Cambodge ou de la Corée du Sud. Parmi eux, certains sont finalement totalement dépendants de leurs voisins comme le Laos et le Cambodge prisonniers des politiques restrictives du Vietnam et de la Thaïlande.

    Au-delà de ces gouvernements qui résistent à la pression, des réalités localisées renseignent sur l’impossible fermeture des frontières aux mobilités quotidiennes. Ainsi, malgré des discours de fermeté, exception faite de la Malaisie, des États ont maintenus la circulation des travailleurs transfrontaliers.

    Au sein de l’espace Schengen, la Slovénie maintient ses relations avec l’Autriche, malgré sa fermeté vis-à-vis de l’Italie. Le 16 mars, la Suisse garantit l’accès à son territoire aux salariés du Nord de l’Italie et du Grand Est de la France, pourtant les plus régions touchées par la pandémie en Europe. Allemagne, Belgique, Norvège, Finlande, Espagne font de même.

    De l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, malgré la multiplication des discours autoritaires, un accord est trouvé le 18 mars avec le Canada et surtout le 20 mars avec le Mexique pour maintenir la circulation des travailleurs. Des déclarations conjointes sont publiées le 21 mars. Partout, la question transfrontalière oblige au bilatéralisme. Uruguay et Brésil renoncent finalement à fermer leur frontière commune tant les habitants ont développé un « mode de vie binational » pour reprendre les termes de deux gouvernements. La décision unilatérale du 18 mars prise par la Malaisie d’interdire à partir du 20 mars tout franchissement de sa frontière prend Singapour de court qui doit organiser des modalités d’hébergement pour plusieurs dizaines de milliers de travailleurs considérés comme indispensables.

    Ces fermetures font apparaitre au grand jour la qualité des coopérations bilatérales.

    Certains États ferment d’autant plus facilement leur frontière avec un pays lorsque préexistent d’importantes rivalités à l’image de la Papouasie Nouvelle Guinée qui ferme immédiatement sa frontière avec l’Indonésie pourtant très faiblement touchée par la pandémie. D’autres en revanche, comme la Tanzanie refusent de fermer leurs frontières terrestres pour maintenir aux États voisins un accès direct à la mer.

    Certains observateurs se sont plu à imaginer des basculements dans les rapports de pouvoirs entre l’Afrique et l’Europe notamment. Après ces fermetures soudaines, le bal mondial des rapatriements a commencé, non sans de nombreuses fausses notes.

    L’accélération de la frontiérisation du monde

    La fermeture extrêmement rapide des frontières mondiales nous rappelle ensuite combien les dispositifs nationaux étaient prêts pour la suspension complète des circulations. Comme dans bien des domaines, la pandémie s’est présentée comme un révélateur puissant, grossissant les traits d’un monde qu’il est plus aisé de diagnostiquer, à présent qu’il est suspendu.

    Ces dernières années, l’augmentation des mobilités internationales par le trafic aérien s’est accompagnée de dispositifs de filtrage de plus en plus drastiques notamment dans le cadre de la lutte contre le terrorisme. Les multiples étapes de contrôle articulant dispositifs administratifs dématérialisés pour les visas et dispositifs de plus en plus intrusifs de contrôle physique ont doté les frontières aéroportuaires d’une épaisseur croissante, partageant l’humanité en deux catégories : les mobiles et les astreints à résidence.

    En parallèle, les routes terrestres et maritimes internationales sont restées actives et se sont même réinventées dans le cadre des mobilités dites illégales. Or là encore, l’obsession du contrôle a favorisé un étalement de la frontière par la création de multiples marches frontalières faisant de pays entiers des lieux de surveillance et d’assignation à résidence avec un investissement continu dans les dispositifs sécuritaires.

    L’épaisseur des frontières se mesure désormais par la hauteur des murs mais aussi par l’exploitation des obstacles géophysiques : les fleuves, les cols, les déserts et les mers, où circulent armées et agences frontalières. À cela s’est ajouté le pistage et la surveillance digitale doublés d’un appareil administratif aux démarches labyrinthiques faites pour ne jamais aboutir.

    Pour décrire ce phénomène, Achille Mbembe parlait de « frontiérisation du monde » et de la mise en place d’un « nouveau régime sécuritaire mondial où le droit des ressortissants étrangers de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire devient de plus en plus procédural et peut être suspendu ou révoqué à tout instant et sous n’importe quel prétexte. »

    La passion contemporaine pour les murs relève de l’iconographie territoriale qui permet d’appuyer les représentations sociales d’un contrôle parfait des circulations humaines, et ce alors que les frontières n’ont jamais été aussi polymorphes.

    Suite à la pandémie, la plupart des gouvernements ont pu mobiliser sans difficulté l’ingénierie et l’imaginaire frontaliers, en s’appuyant d’abord sur les compagnies aériennes pour fermer leur pays et suspendre les voyages, puis en fermant les aéroports avant de bloquer les frontières terrestres.

    Les réalités frontalières sont rendues visibles : la Norvège fait appel aux réservistes et retraités pour assurer une présence à sa frontière avec la Suède et la Finlande. Seuls les pays effondrés, en guerre, ne ferment pas leurs frontières comme au sud de la Libye où circulent armes et combattants.

    Beaucoup entretiennent des fictions géographiques décrétant des frontières fermées sans avoir les moyens de les surveiller comme la France en Guyane ou à Mayotte. Plus que jamais, les frontières sont devenues un rapport de pouvoir réel venant attester des dépendances économiques, notamment à travers la question migratoire, mais aussi symboliques, dans le principe de la souveraineté et son autre, à travers la figure de l’étranger. Classe politique et opinion publique adhèrent largement à une vision segmentée du monde.

    Le piège de l’assignation à résidence

    Aujourd’hui, cet appareil frontalier mondial activé localement, à qui l’on a demandé de jouer une nouvelle partition sanitaire, semble pris à son propre piège. Sa vocation même qui consistait à décider qui peut se déplacer, où et dans quelles conditions, semble égarée tant les restrictions sont devenues, en quelques jours, absolues.

    Le régime universel d’assignation à résidence dans lequel le monde est plongé n’est pas tant le résultat d’une décision d’ordre sanitaire face à une maladie inconnue, que la simple activation des dispositifs multiples qui préexistaient à cette maladie. En l’absence d’autres réponses disponibles, ces fermetures se sont imposées. L’humanité a fait ce qu’elle savait faire de mieux en ce début du XXIe siècle, sinon la seule chose qu’elle savait faire collectivement sans concertation préalable, fermer le monde.

    L’activation de la frontière a abouti à sa consécration. Les dispositifs n’ont pas seulement été activés, ils ont été renforcés et généralisés. Le constat d’une entrave des mobilités est désormais valable pour tous, et la circulation est devenue impossible, de fait, comme de droit. Pauvres et riches, touristes et hommes d’affaires, sportifs ou diplomates, tout le monde, sans exception aucune, fait l’expérience de la fermeture et de cette condition dans laquelle le monde est plongé.

    Seuls les rapatriés, nouveau statut des mobilités en temps de pandémie, sont encore autorisés à rentrer chez eux, dans les limites des moyens financiers des États qu’ils souhaitent rejoindre. Cette entrave à la circulation est d’ailleurs valable pour ceux qui la décident. Elle est aussi pour ceux qui l’analysent : le témoin de ce phénomène n’existe pas ou plus, lui-même pris, complice ou victime, de cet emballement de la frontiérisation.

    C’est bien là une caractéristique centrale du processus en cours, il n’y a plus de point de vue en surplomb, il n’y a plus d’extérieur, plus d’étranger, plus de pensée du dehors. La pensée est elle-même confinée. Face à la mobilisation et l’emballement d’une gouvernementalité de la mobilité fondée sur l’entrave, l’abolition pure et simple du droit de circuler, du droit d’être étranger, du droit de franchir les frontières d’un autre pays et d’entrer sur son territoire n’est plus une simple fiction.

    Les dispositifs de veille de ces droits, bien que mis à nus, ne semblent plus contrôlables et c’est en ce sens que l’on peut douter de la réversibilité de ces processus de fermeture.

    Réversibilité

    C’est à l’aune de ce constat selon lequel le processus de frontiérisation du monde était à déjà l’œuvre au moment de l’irruption épidémique que l’on peut interroger le caractère provisoire de la fermeture des frontières opérée au cours du mois de mars 2020.

    Pourquoi un processus déjà enclenché ferait machine arrière au moment même où il accélère ? Comme si l’accélération était une condition du renversement. Tout se passe plutôt comme si le processus de frontiérisation s’était cristallisé.

    La circulation internationale des marchandises, maintenue au pic même de la crise sanitaire, n’a pas seulement permis l’approvisionnement des populations, elle a également rappelé que, contrairement à ce que défendent les théories libérales, le modèle économique mondial fonctionne sur l’axiome suivant : les biens circulent de plus en plus indépendamment des individus.

    Nous venons bien de faire l’épreuve du caractère superflu de la circulation des hommes et des femmes, aussi longtemps que les marchandises, elles, circulent. Combien de personnes bloquées de l’autre côté d’une frontière, dans l’impossibilité de la traverser, quand le moindre colis ou autre produit traverse ?

    Le réseau numérique mondial a lui aussi démontré qu’il était largement à même de pallier à une immobilité généralisée. Pas de pannes de l’Internet à l’horizon, à l’heure où tout le monde est venu y puiser son travail, ses informations, ses loisirs et ses sentiments.

    De là à penser que les flux de data peuvent remplacer les flux migratoires, il n’y qu’un pas que certains ont déjà franchi. La pandémie a vite fait de devenir l’alliée des adeptes de l’inimitié entre les nations, des partisans de destins et de développement séparés, des projets d’autarcie et de démobilité.

    Alors que le virus nous a rappelé la condition de commune humanité, les frontières interdisent plus que jamais de penser les conditions du cosmopolitisme, d’une société comme un long tissu vivant sans couture à même de faire face aux aléas, aux zoonoses émergentes, au réchauffement climatique, aux menaces à même d’hypothéquer le futur.

    La réponse frontalière n’a ouvert aucun horizon nouveau, sinon celui du repli sur des communautés locales, plus petites encore, formant autant de petites hétérotopies localisées. Si les étrangers que nous sommes ou que nous connaissons se sont inquiétés ces dernières semaines de la possibilité d’un retour au pays, le drame qui se jouait aussi, et qui continue de se jouer, c’est bien l’impossibilité d’un aller.

    https://blogs.mediapart.fr/adrien-delmas/blog/280520/covid-19-la-frontierisation-aboutie-du-monde
    #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières #migrations #covid-19 #coronavirus #immobilité #mobilité #confinement #cartographie #vidéo #animation #visualisation #nationalisme_méthodologique #ressources_pédagogiques #appareil_frontalier_mondial #cohérence_sanitaire #crise_sanitaire #transport_aérien #Hubei #clusters #échelle #repli_national #contrôle_politique #Etat-nation #unilatéralisme #multilatéralisme #dilemme_du_prisonnier #mesures_barrière #rationalité #exceptionnalité #exceptionnalisme #autorité_nationale #soudaineté #routes_aériennes #Iran #Italie #Chine #vague #nationalités_indésirables #travailleurs_étrangers #frontaliers #filtrage #contrôles_frontaliers #contrôle #surveillance #marches_frontalières #assignation_à_résidence #pistage #surveillance_digitale #circulations #imaginaire_frontalier #ingénierie_frontalière #compagnies_aériennes #frontières_terrestres #aéroports #fictions_géographiques #géographie_politique #souveraineté #partition_sanitaire #rapatriés #gouvernementalité #droit_de_circuler #liberté_de_circulation #liberté_de_mouvement #réversibilité #irréversibilité #provisoire #définitif #cristallisation #biens #marchandises #immobilité_généralisée #cosmopolitisme #réponse_frontalière

    ping @mobileborders @karine4 @isskein @thomas_lacroix @reka

    • Épisode 1 : Liberté de circulation : le retour des frontières

      Premier temps d’une semaine consacrée aux #restrictions de libertés pendant la pandémie de coronavirus. Arrêtons-nous aujourd’hui sur une liberté entravée que nous avons tous largement expérimentée au cours des deux derniers mois : celle de circuler, incarnée par le retour des frontières.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/emissions/cultures-monde/droits-et-libertes-au-temps-du-corona-14-liberte-de-circulation-le-ret

    • #Anne-Laure_Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders) : « Nous avons eu l’impression que nous pouvions effectivement fermer les frontières »

      En Europe, les frontières rouvrent en ordre dispersé, avec souvent le 15 juin pour date butoir. Alors que la Covid-19 a atteint plus de 150 pays, la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary analyse les nouveaux enjeux autour de ces séparations, nationales mais aussi continentales ou sanitaires.

      https://www.franceculture.fr/geopolitique/anne-laure-amilhat-szary-nous-avons-eu-limpression-que-nous-pouvions-e

    • « Nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un #repli à l’intérieur de #frontières_nationales »
      Interview avec Anne-Laure Amilhat-Szary (@mobileborders)

      Face à la pandémie de Covid-19, un grand nombre de pays ont fait le choix de fermer leurs frontières. Alors que certains célèbrent leurs vertus prophylactiques et protectrices, et appellent à leur renforcement dans une perspective de démondialisation, nous avons interrogé la géographe Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary, auteure notamment du livre Qu’est-ce qu’une frontière aujourd’hui ? (PUF, 2015), sur cette notion loin d’être univoque.

      Usbek & Rica : Avec la crise sanitaire en cours, le monde s’est soudainement refermé. Chaque pays s’est retranché derrière ses frontières. Cette situation est-elle inédite ? À quel précédent historique peut-elle nous faire penser ?

      Anne-Laure Amilhat Szary : On peut, semble-t-il, trouver trace d’un dernier grand épisode de confinement en 1972 en Yougoslavie, pendant une épidémie de variole ramenée par des pèlerins de La Mecque. 10 millions de personnes avaient alors été confinées, mais au sein des frontières nationales… On pense forcément aux grands confinements historiques contre la peste ou le choléra (dont l’efficacité est vraiment questionnée). Mais ces derniers eurent lieu avant que l’État n’ait la puissance régulatrice qu’on lui connaît aujourd’hui. Ce qui change profondément désormais, c’est que, même confinés, nous restons connectés. Que signifie une frontière fermée si l’information et la richesse continuent de circuler ? Cela pointe du doigt des frontières aux effets très différenciés selon le statut des personnes, un monde de « frontiérités » multiples plutôt que de frontières établissant les fondements d’un régime universel du droit international.

      Les conséquences juridiques de la fermeture des frontières sont inédites : en supprimant la possibilité de les traverser officiellement, on nie l’urgence pour certains de les traverser au péril de leur vie. Le moment actuel consacre en effet la suspension du droit d’asile mis en place par la convention de Genève de 1951. La situation de l’autre côté de nos frontières, en Méditerranée par exemple, s’est détériorée de manière aiguë depuis début mars.

      Certes, les populistes de tous bords se servent de la menace que représenteraient des frontières ouvertes comme d’un ressort politique, et ça marche bien… jusqu’à ce que ces mêmes personnes prennent un vol low-cost pour leurs vacances dans le pays voisin et pestent tant et plus sur la durée des files d’attentes à l’aéroport. Il y a d’une part une peur des migrants, qui pourraient « profiter » de Schengen, et d’autre part, une volonté pratique de déplacements facilités, à la fois professionnels et de loisirs, de courte durée. Il faut absolument rappeler que si le coronavirus est chez nous, comme sur le reste de la planète, c’est que les frontières n’ont pas pu l’arrêter ! Pas plus qu’elles n’avaient pu quelque chose contre le nuage de Tchernobyl. L’utilité de fermer les frontières aujourd’hui repose sur le fait de pouvoir soumettre, en même temps, les populations de différents pays à un confinement parallèle.

      Ne se leurre-t-on pas en croyant assister, à la faveur de la crise sanitaire, à un « retour des frontières » ? N’est-il pas déjà à l’œuvre depuis de nombreuses années ?

      Cela, je l’ai dit et écrit de nombreuses fois : les frontières n’ont jamais disparu, on a juste voulu croire à « la fin de la géographie », à l’espace plat et lisse de la mondialisation, en même temps qu’à la fin de l’histoire, qui n’était que celle de la Guerre Froide.

      Deux choses nouvelles illustrent toutefois la matérialité inédite des frontières dans un monde qui se prétend de plus en plus « dématérialisé » : 1) la possibilité, grâce aux GPS, de positionner la ligne précisément sur le terrain, de borner et démarquer, même en terrain difficile, ce qui était impossible jusqu’ici. De ce fait, on a pu régler des différends frontaliers anciens, mais on peut aussi démarquer des espaces inaccessibles de manière régulière, notamment maritimes. 2) Le retour des murs et barrières, spectacle de la sécurité et nouvel avatar de la frontière. Mais attention, toute frontière n’est pas un mur, faire cette assimilation c’est tomber dans le panneau idéologique qui nous est tendu par le cadre dominant de la pensée contemporaine.

      La frontière n’est pas une notion univoque. Elle peut, comme vous le dites, se transformer en mur, en clôture et empêcher le passage. Elle peut être ouverte ou entrouverte. Elle peut aussi faire office de filtre et avoir une fonction prophylactique, ou bien encore poser des limites, à une mondialisation débridée par exemple. De votre point de vue, de quel type de frontières avons-nous besoin ?

      Nous avons besoin de frontières filtres, non fermées, mais qui soient véritablement symétriques. Le problème des murs, c’est qu’ils sont le symptôme d’un fonctionnement dévoyé du principe de droit international d’égalité des États. À l’origine des relations internationales, la définition d’une frontière est celle d’un lieu d’interface entre deux souverainetés également indépendantes vis-à-vis du reste du monde.

      Les frontières sont nécessaires pour ne pas soumettre le monde à un seul pouvoir totalisant. Il se trouve que depuis l’époque moderne, ce sont les États qui sont les principaux détenteurs du pouvoir de les fixer. Ils ont réussi à imposer un principe d’allégeance hiérarchique qui pose la dimension nationale comme supérieure et exclusive des autres pans constitutifs de nos identités.

      Mais les frontières étatiques sont bien moins stables qu’on ne l’imagine, et il faut aujourd’hui ouvrir un véritable débat sur les formes de frontières souhaitables pour organiser les collectifs humains dans l’avenir. Des frontières qui se défassent enfin du récit sédentaire du monde, pour prendre véritablement en compte la possibilité pour les hommes et les femmes d’avoir accès à des droits là où ils vivent.

      Rejoignez-vous ceux qui, comme le philosophe Régis Debray ou l’ancien ministre socialiste Arnaud Montebourg, font l’éloge des frontières et appellent à leur réaffirmation ? Régis Débray écrit notamment : « L’indécence de l’époque ne provient pas d’un excès mais d’un déficit de frontières »…

      Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, et nous avons toujours été mondialisés, cette mondialisation se réalisant à l’échelle de nos mondes, selon les époques : Mer de Chine et Océan Indien pour certains, Méditerranée pour d’autres. À partir des XII-XIIIe siècle, le lien entre Europe et Asie, abandonné depuis Alexandre le Grand, se développe à nouveau. À partir du XV-XVIe siècle, c’est l’âge des traversées transatlantiques et le bouclage du monde par un retour via le Pacifique…

      Je ne suis pas de ces nostalgiques à tendance nationaliste que sont devenus, pour des raisons différentes et dans des trajectoires propres tout à fait distinctes, Régis Debray ou Arnaud Montebourg. Nous avons toujours eu des frontières, elles sont anthropologiquement nécessaires à notre constitution psychologique et sociale. Il y en a même de plus en plus dans nos vies, au fur et à mesure que les critères d’identification se multiplient : frontières de race, de classe, de genre, de religion, etc.

      Nos existences sont striées de frontières visibles et invisibles. Pensons par exemple à celles que les digicodes fabriquent au pied des immeubles ou à l’entrée des communautés fermées, aux systèmes de surveillance qui régulent l’entrée aux bureaux ou des écoles. Mais pensons aussi aux frontières sociales, celles d’un patronyme étranger et racialisé, qui handicape durablement un CV entre les mains d’un.e recruteur.e, celles des différences salariales entre femmes et hommes, dont le fameux « plafond de verre » qui bloque l’accès aux femmes aux fonctions directoriales. Mais n’oublions pas les frontières communautaires de tous types sont complexes car mêlant à la fois la marginalité choisie, revendiquée, brandie comme dans les « marches des fiertés » et la marginalité subie du rejet des minorités, dont témoigne par exemple la persistance de l’antisémitisme.

      La seule chose qui se transforme en profondeur depuis trente ans et la chute du mur de Berlin, c’est la frontière étatique, car les États ont renoncé à certaines des prérogatives qu’ils exerçaient aux frontières, au profit d’institutions supranationales ou d’acteurs privés. D’un côté l’Union Européenne et les formes de subsidiarité qu’elle permet, de l’autre côté les GAFAM et autres géants du web, qui échappent à la fiscalité, l’une des raisons d’être des frontières. Ce qui apparaît aussi de manière plus évidente, c’est que les États puissants exercent leur souveraineté bien au-delà de leurs frontières, à travers un « droit d’ingérence » politique et militaire, mais aussi à travers des prérogatives commerciales, comme quand l’Arabie Saoudite négocie avec l’Éthiopie pour s’accaparer ses terres en toute légalité, dans le cadre du land grabbing.

      Peut-on croire à l’hypothèse d’une démondialisation ? La frontière peut-elle être précisément un instrument pour protéger les plus humbles, ceux que l’on qualifie de « perdants de la mondialisation » ? Comment faire en sorte qu’elle soit justement un instrument de protection, de défense de certaines valeurs (sociales notamment) et non synonyme de repli et de rejet de l’autre ?

      Il faut replacer la compréhension de la frontière dans une approche intersectionnelle : comprendre toutes les limites qui strient nos existences et font des frontières de véritables révélateurs de nos inégalités. Conçues comme des instruments de protection des individus vivant en leur sein, dans des périmètres où l’Etat détenteur du monopole exclusif de la violence est censé garantir des conditions de vie équitables, les frontières sont désormais des lieux qui propulsent au contraire les personnes au contact direct de la violence de la mondialisation.

      S’il s’agit de la fin d’une phase de la mondialisation, celle de la mondialisation financière échevelée, qui se traduit par une mise à profit maximalisée des différenciations locales dans une mise en concurrence généralisée des territoires et des personnes, je suis pour ! Mais au vu de nos technologies de communication et de transports, nous sommes très loin d’aller vers un repli à l’intérieur de frontières nationales. Regardez ce que, en période de confinement, tous ceux qui sont reliés consomment comme contenus globalisés (travail, culture, achats, sport) à travers leur bande passante… Regardez qui consomme les produits mondialisés, du jean à quelques euros à la farine ou la viande produite à l’autre bout du monde arrivant dans nos assiettes moins chères que celle qui aurait été produite par des paysans proches de nous… Posons-nous la question des conditions dans lesquelles ces consommateurs pourraient renoncer à ce que la mondialisation leur offre !

      Il faut une approche plus fine des effets de la mondialisation, notamment concernant la façon dont de nombreux phénomènes, notamment climatiques, sont désormais établis comme étant partagés - et ce, sans retour possible en arrière. Nous avons ainsi besoin de propositions politiques supranationales pour gérer ces crises sanitaires et environnementales (ce qui a manqué singulièrement pour la crise du Cocid-19, notamment l’absence de coordination européenne).

      Les frontières sont des inventions humaines, depuis toujours. Nous avons besoin de frontières comme repères dans notre rapport au monde, mais de frontières synapses, qui font lien en même temps qu’elles nous distinguent. De plus en plus de personnes refusent l’assignation à une identité nationale qui l’emporterait sur tous les autres pans de leur identité : il faut donc remettre les frontières à leur place, celle d’un élément de gouvernementalité parmi d’autres, au service des gouvernants, mais aussi des gouvernés. Ne pas oublier que les frontières devraient être d’abord et avant tout des périmètres de redevabilité. Des espaces à l’intérieur desquels on a des droits et des devoirs que l’on peut faire valoir à travers des mécanismes de justice ouverts.

      https://usbeketrica.com/article/on-ne-va-pas-vers-repli-a-interieur-frontieres-nationales

  • Transnatinal Statement on Migrants’ Struggles in Pandemic Times

    Collectif des #Travailleurs_sans-papiers de Vitry
    Coordinamento Migranti Bologna

    in these months of pandemic we never stopped fighting against racism and exploitation. We are protesting the miserable life conditions in reception and detention centers, in ghettoes and camps where we are highly exposed to the risk of contagion. Many of us are refusing to go to work without protections. Others are going back to their countries. Others are refusing to become disposable workforce for companies, as established by international agreements between European and non-EU countries aimed at recruiting seasonal workers. Many of us are striking in factories and warehouses in Europe and beyond. Countries like France and Portugal are recruiting exclusively refugees or regularizing all or some of them in order to make them work in the farms; other countries are organizing charter flights for seasonal workers and special corridors for farmers and care-workers; several governments announced migrants’ regularizations in order to cope with production demands. This is not the solution for us! We do not want a paper which legalizes the right to exploit us! We want freedom of movement, freedom from institutional racism and exploitation. Our life cannot be at the mercy of the link between documents and work or family status.

    The global pandemic is showing that, while migrant labor is considered essential, the same doesn’t hold for migrants’ lives. We, migrant women and men, can be left to die in the sea or on the European borders; we can be shut in detention or reception centers; we can be fired and become illegal; we can be left on the streets without a home. But migrant labor is constantly necessary for the care of the elderly, kids and sick people; to clean houses and offices; to pick fruit and vegetables before they rot in the fields; to keep things going in factories and warehouses where the production is hastily restarting. In Europe as elsewhere States are using the pandemic to turn migrant labor into a mere instrument to save profits and to be moved wherever it is necessary and only for the time necessary. Our lives matter only if we enrich someone other than us: this is what national laws on immigration, European policies and international agreements say.

    Today more than ever our struggles cannot stop at the borders and be limited to contest national laws which tie us to employers, income or family reunifications. Therefore we need to break the isolation of our struggles. We crossed the borders and we challenge them every day: we cannot be at the mercy of every single government’s calculations. We have already gone on strike and protested together in France, Italy and other European countries. Today, when the EU states are negotiating to intensify the exploitation of migrant labor and the institutional racism which sustains it, it is even more urgent that we speak with one voice. For those who have been living under the blackmail of residence permit for years; for those who are still undocumented after many years; for those who will become illegal because of the pandemic; for those who have just arrived and saw their asylum application denied; for those who are fighting against borders’ violence inside and outside of Europe; for those who suffered and are still suffering sexual violence in the Libyan camps and elsewhere: we claim an unconditional and unlimited European residence permit, which is not linked to family status, income and labor. Against racist policies which constantly demand us to provide essential labor whereas are lives can always be sacrificed, it is time to organize across and beyond the borders: it is time to assert out freedom against exploitation.


    http://www.laboursolidarity.org/Transnatinal-Statement-on-Migrants?lang=en
    #régularisation #covid-19 #coronavirus #sans-papiers #travailleurs_étrangers #migrations #exploitation #travail #racisme #xénophobie

    ping @isskein @karine4

  • Crise pétrolière et Covid-19 dans les États du Golfe : les travailleurs migrants dans l’étau

    Une fois de plus, de nombreux travailleurs migrants sud-asiatiques dans le Golfe se trouvent plongés dans des situations extrêmement précaires, provoquées par les convulsions économiques mondiales. Au cours des dernières semaines, j’ai parlé, par téléphone et messagerie, avec des travailleurs indiens travaillant dans le Golfe pour savoir comment la pandémie mondiale de coronavirus affecte leur vie. Avec l’arrêt des projets pétroliers, en raison de la baisse de la demande et des précédentes guerres de prix entre l’Arabie saoudite et la Russie, les travailleurs migrants d’Asie du Sud craignent de plus en plus de ne pas être payés pour leur travail et que leurs entreprises ne paient plus pour leur logement dans les camps.

    Ces inquiétudes sont loin d’être exagérées, surtout si l’on considère l’expérience d’un grand nombre de travailleurs qui ont été abandonnés à la suite de la récession de 2008. Les circonstances sont aujourd’hui plus difficiles. Avec l’isolement forcé pour contenir la propagation du virus et les restrictions de mouvement entre les camps pour travailleurs, on ne sait pas comment ceux qui sont abandonnés en vertu des restrictions de quarantaine actuelles pourront satisfaire leurs besoins quotidiens. Ils font face à l’incertitude, s’inquiètent pour la santé de leur famille et se demandent comment eux et leur famille survivront s’ils perdent leur emploi.

    En 2009, je me suis assise avec un groupe de travailleurs migrants sud-asiatiques qui vivaient dans un camp abandonné à Sharjah, dans les Émirats arabes unis (EAU)1. Alors que j’écoutais ces hommes raconter leurs expériences, un musulman indien, Aijaz, s’est tourné vers moi et m’a demandé en hindi : « Nous n’avons pas de diplôme, aucun de nous ne sait lire. Pourquoi ne nous donnent-ils pas l’argent qu’ils nous doivent ? … Pourquoi personne ne nous aide ? » Aijaz et les autres résidents du camp abandonné ne sont que quelques-uns parmi des Sud-Asiatiques que j’ai rencontrés lors de mes recherches en 2009 et 2010 aux EAU. À cette époque, le Golfe était encore sous le choc de la Grande Récession de 2008 et de nombreux projets pétroliers étaient au point mort. Les entreprises ont fait faillite et les propriétaires de sociétés ont fui les EAU par crainte de la prison pour dette.

    Les travailleurs abandonnés me disaient souvent qu’ils n’étaient jamais payés pour le travail qu’ils avaient accompli avant la fermeture de leur entreprise. Non seulement ils n’étaient pas payés, mais les hommes de ces camps n’avaient pas accès à l’eau, à la nourriture et à l’électricité. Les travailleurs abandonnés étaient dépendants de ceux employés vivant dans les camps voisins, qui partageaient leur nourriture et leur eau. Un groupe de volontaires sud-asiatiques des classes moyennes et supérieures a également apporté son aide en procurant de la nourriture pour l’iftar [repas qui est pris chaque soir] pendant le Ramadan et en fournissant des articles de toilette. Finalement, ces volontaires ont organisé une collecte de fonds et, avec les recettes, ont acheté des billets d’avion pour le retour d’Aijaz et de ses camarades de camp.

    Aujourd’hui, dans le contexte de la pandémie, les travailleurs migrants d’Asie du Sud sont captifs des décisions des gouvernements et des entreprises. Ils n’ont guère la possibilité de faire leurs propres choix et n’ont pas de bonnes solutions. Les travailleurs craignent que, s’ils restent dans le Golfe, ils soient abandonnés par leurs employeurs et infectés par le coronavirus en raison de l’exiguïté des habitats dans lesquels ils sont reclus. S’ils retournent en Inde en étant confinés, ils craignent la famine, l’endettement croissant, le chômage, la perte éventuelle de la toute petite propriété foncière et la campagne anti-musulmans du gouvernement de Narendra Modi.

    Covid-19 et confinement dans le Golfe

    Les travailleurs migrants sud-asiatiques, même avant la pandémie de coronavirus, vivent dans des camps surpeuplés, largement isolés du reste des résidents du Golfe. Aujourd’hui, ces lieux surpeuplés et isolés impliquent qu’ils sont également de plus en plus menacés de contracter le Covid-19. Comme les pauvres dans une grande partie du monde, les travailleurs migrants contractent la maladie et en meurent à un taux plus élevé que le reste de la population.

    L’infection dans le Golfe est en pleine croissance. Le 14 avril 2020, les États du Golfe ont signalé collectivement 16’613 cas de Covid-19. Au 29 avril, les États du Golfe comptaient 50’572 cas. Le Qatar a le taux d’infection le plus élevé, avec 4361 cas pour 1 million. La majorité des personnes infectées sont des travailleurs migrants vivant dans un camp de travail en dehors de Doha. Le 11 avril, le Bahreïn a déclaré que 45 des 47 personnes nouvellement diagnostiquées étaient des travailleurs étrangers et, le 23 avril, des centaines de travailleurs migrants ont été mis en quarantaine après qu’un nombre inconnu a contracté la maladie. L’agence de presse saoudienne a indiqué le 5 avril que 53% des cas en Arabie saoudite étaient des migrants et le ministère de la Santé a indiqué le 16 avril que les travailleurs étrangers représentaient 80% des nouveaux cas de Covid-19 dans le pays.

    Bien que les rapports soient fragmentaires, dans l’ensemble du Golfe, on pense que les travailleurs étrangers représentent la majorité des infections et des décès par Covid-19. L’accès des travailleurs aux ressources médicales semble toutefois dépendre en grande partie des politiques des employeurs. Selon les travailleurs migrants d’Asie du Sud avec lesquels je me suis entretenue, ils font également face à des difficultés lorsqu’ils cherchent à se faire soigner. Cela s’explique, en partie, par leur connaissance limitée des ressources médicales dans le Golfe.

    En outre, les migrants doivent subir des examens médicaux avant de s’installer dans le Golfe, ce que beaucoup trouvent désagréable, peu familier et intrusif. Les migrants sont dissuadés de chercher à se faire soigner en raison de cette expérience limitée et négative des soins de santé et du fait que de nombreux parmi eux connaissent des collègues qui ont été renvoyés chez eux – et ont perdu leur emploi – pour cause de maladie.

    Malgré ces préoccupations, lorsqu’une clinique d’Abu Dhabi a proposé un test Covid-19, elle a attiré des centaines de personnes, pour la plupart des travailleurs à bas salaire. En outre, des employeurs m’ont dit qu’ils avaient emmené des employés présentant de graves symptômes dans les hôpitaux locaux. Tous les travailleurs n’ont pas le même accès aux soins de santé. Récemment, un groupe d’ouvriers indiens travaillant à Ajman [capitale de l’émirat d’Ajman] et qui sont malades du Covid-19 ont envoyé un message par Twitter au ministre en chef de l’État de Telangana en Inde et au Times of India pour dire qu’ils étaient maintenus en quarantaine et qu’on ne leur fournissait pas de médicaments.

    Le retour en Inde – avant d’être en mesure de payer leurs dettes – signifie que les migrants ne peuvent pas subvenir aux besoins de leur famille. En outre, cette dette fait courir le risque que les quelques actifs de leur famille, comme leurs petites exploitations agricoles, soient saisis par les prêteurs. Par exemple, Raj, qui travaillait à Charjah, aux Émirats arabes unis, mais qui était en congé bisannuel dans son village du sud de l’Inde lorsque des restrictions de voyage ont été mises en place, m’a dit qu’il était « désespéré » de retourner à son travail à Charjah parce qu’il n’y a « ni argent ni nourriture » dans son village. Il craint de perdre son emploi aux Émirats arabes unis et, par conséquent, d’être incapable de payer ses dettes. Prévoyant un avenir sombre, Raj pense qu’il sera bientôt « sans emploi et sans terre ».

    La montée du « sentiment anti-musulman » en Inde freine également les retours

    Les migrants indiens expliquent qu’ils n’ont guère le choix de rester dans le Golfe ou de retourner en Inde, mais qu’aucune de ces options n’est « bonne ». Lorsque je demande ce qui va se passer ensuite, certains répondent en utilisant une expression arabe, tawakkaltu ala-Allah, indiquant qu’ils « ont confiance en Dieu ». D’autres me répondent en me demandant simplement en hindi, kya karo ? ou « que dois-je faire ? » Les deux réponses soulignent le fait que les travailleurs migrants intérimaires sont extrêmement limités pour décider de leur propre avenir. À la merci des décisions du gouvernement et des entreprises, ils s’inquiètent de la suite des événements. S’ils sont contraints de rester dans le Golfe, ils risquent leur santé et leur emploi, tandis que leur retour en Inde comporte ses propres risques.

    De nombreux migrants craignent que la discrimination religieuse qu’ils subissent régulièrement en Inde, en tant que musulmans, ne s’aggrave à l’heure actuelle. Un nombre disproportionné de migrants indiens dans le Golfe sont musulmans. En Inde, les musulmans sont confrontés à toute une série d’inégalités sociales et économiques. Faiz, un musulman indien travaillant à Abu Dhabi, a expliqué comment la discrimination religieuse a contribué à sa décision d’émigrer :

    « Les hindous trouvent plus facilement du travail [en Inde]. Nous [les Indiens] avons un gouvernement laïc, mais en fait, la plupart des non-musulmans sont favorisés… Lorsqu’il y a un nom musulman [sur une demande d’emploi ou un CV], ils [les employeurs] ont une attitude différente, et cela s’applique presque toujours au gouvernement, à l’éducation et aux affaires. »

    Selon un rapport publié en 2006 par le gouvernement indien, les musulmans indiens vivent dans des zones où les infrastructures sont médiocres et ils sont régulièrement victimes de discrimination dans la sphère publique2. Les musulmans indiens sont également désavantagés par des taux d’alphabétisation plus faibles, un accès inégal aux institutions éducatives et gouvernementales et une représentation biaisée dans les médias. Ces désavantages convergent souvent avec les disparités économiques régionales pour accentuer les inégalités auxquelles les musulmans sont confrontés.

    Il y a de fréquents rapports de violences visant les musulmans en Inde, qui sont en étroite corrélation avec les politiques nationalistes hindoues qui excluent politiquement les musulmans. Un exemple récent est la loi d’amendement de la citoyenneté, adoptée en 2019, qui accélère la procédure de citoyenneté pour les Sud-Asiatiques de toutes religions qui entrent en Inde, à l’exception des musulmans. Suite à l’adoption de cette loi, des protestations sur l’exclusion des musulmans ont éclaté dans toute l’Inde.

    Fin février 2020, des manifestations dans la capitale New Delhi ont conduit à de violents affrontements entre hindous (y compris des membres des forces de police) et musulmans. Les émeutes ont fait au moins 53 morts, dont deux tiers de musulmans3. Pendant ces émeutes, un groupe criant « L’Inde aux hindous » et d’autres slogans nationalistes hindous a défilé autour d’une mosquée en feu et a placé un drapeau de dieu hindou sur le minaret de la mosquée4.

    Aujourd’hui, le coronavirus ne fait qu’attiser la violence anti-musulmane en Inde. Au cours des dernières semaines, les médias sociaux en Inde ont fait circuler de fausses accusations selon lesquelles les musulmans indiens diffusent le Covid-19, et ces rumeurs sont ensuite utilisées pour inciter à la violence contre les musulmans. Le 7 avril, par exemple, des hindous ont attaqué un groupe d’hommes musulmans au Jharkhand [Etat indien qui a été séparé du Bihar] et ont tué une personne après que des rumeurs se sont répandues selon lesquelles des musulmans « crachaient » afin d’infecter délibérément des hindous avec le coronavirus5.

    Les travailleurs migrants ont besoin de garanties internationales

    La discrimination, la violence et le manque de ressources en Inde font que le rapatriement des travailleurs migrants ne répond pas aux crises des droits de l’homme qui sont exacerbées par la pandémie mondiale. Les mêmes inégalités sociales et économiques qui ont influencé le choix des migrants de se rendre dans le Golfe pour y travailler entraîneront des taux de famine plus élevés pendant le confinement de l’Inde et des taux de mortalité plus élevés en raison de la Covid-19.

    De même, il est également insupportable pour les migrants sans emploi de rester dans le Golfe sans garanties et surveillance supplémentaires. Les expériences des travailleurs abandonnés à la suite de la récession mondiale de 2008, les conditions de vie actuellement déplorables des travailleurs et les ressources limitées signifient que les migrants dans le Golfe vivent dans des circonstances extrêmement dangereuses.

    Si nombre de ces problèmes peuvent sembler propres au Golfe, les expériences des travailleurs migrants dans le monde entier démontrent les connexions mondiales et les défis que représente la résolution des crises dans les cadres nationaux. Les prochaines mesures prises par les gouvernements et les organisations internationales doivent envisager des réponses au coronavirus à une échelle qui dépasse les frontières nationales afin de développer des garanties pour protéger la vie et les moyens de subsistance de ceux qui sont les plus vulnérables au virus et aux vicissitudes du capitalisme.

    https://www.contretemps.eu/travailleurs-migrants-golfe-covid19
    #pays_du_golfe #travailleurs_étrangers #covid-19 #coronavirus #migrations #travail #pétrole #crise_pétrolière

    ping @tony_rublon @thomas_lacroix

    • What does the COVID-19 crisis mean for #aspiring_migrants who are planning to leave home?

      In late April 2020, I decided to document the experiences of aspiring nurse migrants from the Philippines, where the government had imposed a one-month quarantine in many parts of the country. With two colleagues based in Manila, we recruited interviewees through Facebook, and then spoke to Filipino nurses “stranded” in different provinces within the Philippines – all with pending contracts in the UK, Singapore, Germany, and Saudi Arabia.

      Initially, we thought that our project would help paint a broader picture of how #COVID-19 creates an “unprecedented” form of immobility for health workers (to borrow the language of so many news reports and pundits in the media). True enough, our interviewees’ stories were marked with the loss of time, money, and opportunity.

      Lost time, money, opportunity

      Most striking was the case of Mabel in Cebu City. Mabel began to worry about her impending deployment to the UK when the Philippine government cancelled all domestic trips to Manila, where her international flight was scheduled to depart. Her Manila-based agency tried to rebook her flight to leave from Cebu to the UK. Unfortunately, the agency had taken Mabel’s passport when processing her papers, which is a common practice among migration agencies, and there was no courier service that could deliver it to her in time. Eventually, Mabel’s British employers put her contract on hold because the UK had gone on lockdown as well.

      As nurses grapple with disrupted plans, recruitment agencies offer limited support. Joshua, a nurse from IloIlo, flew to Manila with all his belongings, only to find out that his next flight to Singapore was postponed indefinitely. His agent refunded his placement fee but provided no advice on what to do next. “All they said was, ‘Umuwi ka nalang’ (Just go home),” Joshua recalled. “I told them that I’m already here. I resigned from my job…Don’t tell me to go home.” With 10 other nurses, Joshua asked the agency to appeal for financial assistance from their employer in Singapore. “We signed a contract. Aren’t we their employees already?” They received no response from either party.

      Mabel and Joshua’s futile efforts to get through the closing of both internal and international borders reflects the unique circumstances of the pandemic. However, as we spoke to more interviewees about their interrupted migration journeys, I couldn’t help but wonder: how different is pandemic-related immobility from the other forms of immobility that aspiring nurse migrants have faced in the past?

      Pandemic as just another form of immobility?

      Again, Mabel’s story is illuminating. Even before she applied to the UK, Mabel was no stranger to cancelled opportunities. In 2015, she applied to work as a nurse in Manitoba, Canada. Yet, after passing the necessary exams, Mabel was told that Manitoba’s policies had changed and her work experiences were no longer regarded to be good enough for immigration. Still hoping for a chance to leave, Mabel applied to an employer in Quebec instead, devoting two years to learn French and prepare for the language exam. However, once again, her application was withdrawn because recruiters decided to prioritize nurses with “more experience.”

      One might argue that the barriers to mobility caused by the pandemic is incomparable to the setbacks created by shifting immigration policies. However, in thinking through Mabel’s story and that of our other interviewees, it seems that the emotional distress experienced in both cases are not all that different.

      As migration scholars now reflect more deeply on questions of immobility, it might be useful to consider how the experiences of immobility are differentiated. Immobility is not a single thing. How does a virus alter aspiring migrants’ perception about their inability to leave the country? As noted in a previous blog post from Xiao Ma, the COVID-19 pandemic may bring about new regimes of immobility, different from the immigration regimes that have blocked nurses’ plans in the past. It might also lead to more intense moral judgments on those who do eventually leave.

      April, a nurse bound for Saudi Arabia, recounted a conversation with a neighbor who found out that she was a “stranded” nurse. Instead of commiserating, the neighbor told April, “Dito ka nalang muna. Kailangan ka ng Pilipinas” (Well you should stay here first. Your country needs you). April said she felt a mixture of annoyance and pity. “I feel sorry for Filipino patients. I do want to serve…But I also need to provide for my family.”

      Now, my collaborators and I realized that our ongoing research must also work to differentiate pandemic-related immobility from the barriers that nurse migrants have faced in the past. For our interviewees, the pandemic seems more unpredictable and limits the options they can take. For now, all of our interviewees have been resigned to waiting at home, in the hope of borders opening up once again.

      Immobility among migration scholars

      More broadly, perhaps this is also a time to reflect on our own immobility as scholars whose travels for field work and conferences have been put on hold. Having the university shut down and international activity frozen is truly unprecedented. However, in some ways, many scholars have long experienced other forms of immobility as well.

      While the COVID-19 crisis had forced me to cancel two conferences in the last two months, one of my Manila-based collaborators has never attended an academic event beyond Asia because his applications for tourist visas have always been rejected (twice by the Canadian embassy, once by the US embassy). Another friend, a Filipino PhD student, had to wait two months for approval to conduct research in Lebanon, prompting her to write a “back-up proposal” for her dissertation in case her visa application was declined.

      Browsing through social media, it is interesting for me to observe an increasing number of American and British scholars ruminating on their current “immobility.” Living in this moment of pandemic, I can understand that it is tempting to think of our current constraints as exceptional. However, we also need to pause and consider how immobility is not a new experience for many others.

      #immobilité #Philippines #infirmières #migrations #fermeture_des_frontières #travailleurs_étrangers #futurs_migrants

      @sinehebdo —> nouveau mot

      #aspiring_migrants (qui peut ressembler un peu à #candidats_à_l'émigration qu’on a déjà, mais c’est pas tout à fait cela quand même... #futurs_migrants ?)
      #vocabulaire #mots #terminologie #agences #contrat #travail #coronavirus #stranded #blocage

    • Les chercheurs distinguent les personnes qui asiprent à migrer, c’est-à-dire qui déclare la volonté de partir, des personnes qui ont entamé des démarches effectives pour partir au cours des dernières semaines (demande de visa, envoi de CV, demande d’un crédit bancaire, etc.). Les enquêtes montrent que la différence entre les deux groupes est quantitativement très importante.

  • Malaysia’s rush to reopen risks a viral revival - Asia Times
    https://asiatimes.com/2020/05/malaysias-rush-to-reopen-risks-a-viral-revival

    Hundreds of undocumented migrants and refugees, who are not recognized under Malaysian law, were detained in Kuala Lumpur in a controversial Labor Day raid that police said was aimed at preventing them from travelling while movement curbs remain in place.Human rights groups condemned the raid as a clampdown under the guise of coronavirus-curbing measures. The United Nations, moreover, has warned that fears of arrest and detention could push vulnerable groups into hiding and prevent them from seeking treatment, raising the risks of new community transmission.

    #Covid-19#migrant#migration#Malaisie#travailleurs-migrants#réfugiés#détention#vulnérabilité#risques#transmission#santé#droits

  • En Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie et dans le Schleswig-Holstein, des centaines d’employé·es des abattoirs sont contaminé·es par le corona. Or le seuil de reconfinement a été fixé à 50 cas pour 100 000 habitant·es pour une région donnée.
    La question est : le déconfinement était-il prématuré en Allemagne ou la misère sociale de ces personnes venant d’Europe de l’Est pour faire des sales boulots sous-payés explique-t-elle ces foyers de contamination ?

    Le ministre de la santé de Rhénanie-du-Nord-Westphalie « a mentionné l’hébergement du personnel des abattoirs, provenant pour la plupart de Roumanie et de Bulgarie, dans des logements collectifs comme une raison possible de l’apparition de l’épidémie. Il se peut que ces foyers ne répondent pas aux normes d’hygiène requises en cas de pandémie. Il faut maintenant examiner cette question. »
    https://www.tagesschau.de/wirtschaft/coronavirus-fleischbetrieb-101.html
    #Allemagne #corona #abattoirs #migration #Europe_de_l'Est #salariat #précarité #exploitation

  • En #France, l’État appelé à « moderniser » sa #politique_migratoire

    #Travail, #asile, #expulsions... La #Cour_des_comptes préconise, dans un rapport publié ce mardi 5 mai, une « #modernisation » de la politique migratoire française, réhabilitant au passage les #quotas.

    Les expulsions ? « Peu efficaces. » L’enregistrement de la demande d’asile ? Trop lente. L’immigration de travail ? Doit s’inspirer du modèle canadien. Le rapport de la Cour des comptes utilise trente fois le mot « modernisation » pour revoir la politique migratoire française.

    Dans ce document intitulé « L’entrée, le séjour et le premier accueil des personnes étrangères » (https://www.ccomptes.fr/fr/publications/lentree-le-sejour-et-le-premier-accueil-des-personnes-etrangeres), la Cour dresse l’état des lieux d’une politique dont le triptyque, maîtrise de l’immigration, garantie du droit d’asile et intégration, nécessite « des objectifs plus tangibles, plus précis et plus réalistes ».

    À commencer par ceux impartis aux délais d’#enregistrement des #demandes_d'asile. « Depuis plusieurs années, les cibles de délais assignées par l’État sont plus strictes que les obligations légales, car elles sont en partie conçues comme des signaux supposés décourager les #demandes_infondées », relève l’autorité administrative indépendante, pointant en particulier les procédures dites « accélérées », qui doivent être traitées en 15 jours mais dont les délais réels constatés sont de 121 jours.

    Allonger la durée de certains titres de séjour

    Parmi ses 14 recommandations pour la France, qui « accueille sensiblement moins de personnes étrangères que les autres grands pays occidentaux par la voie de l’immigration régulière », la juridiction financière suggère également de « simplifier le régime du séjour en allongeant la durée de certains titres, en automatisant le renouvellement de ceux qui s’y prêtent et en allégeant les formalités procédurales ».

    En 2018, selon le rapport, plus des trois quarts des premiers titres avaient une validité d’un an, sans que ce ne soit « le gage d’une plus grande sélectivité », avec des refus de renouvellement de 1% seulement.

    Modèle canadien pour l’immigration professionnelle

    La filière d’immigration professionnelle, elle, « pourrait être modernisée et diversifiée en s’inspirant du modèle canadien, fondé sur des cibles quantitatives pluriannuelles » et « un système de sélection individuel ». La Cour reprend à son compte la notion controversée de quotas pour la migration de travail, qui s’était effondrée en France entre 2011 et 2017, avant de se redresser.

    Elle rappelle que la liste des « métiers en tension », censée déterminer les professions pour lesquelles l’immigration professionnelle est ouverte, est « aujourd’hui dépassée ». Une obsolescence qui fait consensus jusqu’au gouvernement, qui a prévu de la réviser.

    Scepticisme au ministère de l’Intérieur

    Dans une réponse à la Cour des comptes, le ministère de l’Intérieur s’est montré sceptique, évoquant une hypothèse « avant tout adaptée à un pays ayant d’importants besoins de main-d’œuvre sans possibilité de mobiliser des actifs déjà installés » sur le territoire. « Cette situation n’est pas celle de la France [...] qui doit parallèlement assurer l’insertion dans l’emploi de personnes résidant en France, qu’elles soient Françaises ou étrangères. »

    Par ailleurs, l’autorité administrative a jugé « peu efficace » la politique d’éloignement du gouvernement, lui suggérant de « mettre en place les moyens nécessaires à l’augmentation du nombre de départs aidés ». Sur ce point, la Place Beauvau n’a pas repris la Cour.

    http://www.rfi.fr/fr/france/20200505-%C3%A9tat-appel%C3%A9-moderniser-politique-migratoire-cour-comptes-rapp
    #procédure_accélérée #découragement #dissuasion #droit_d'asile #migrations #réfugiés #titres_de_séjour #renouvellement #étrangers #modèle_canadien #travailleurs_étrangers #immigration_professionnelle #sélection_individuelle #métiers_en_tension #renvois #départs_aidés #sans-papiers #efficacité

    Renvois peu efficaces ? La solution envisagée par la cour des comptes, des "renvois aidés" (au lieu de papiers !) :

    l’autorité administrative a jugé « peu efficace » la politique d’éloignement du gouvernement, lui suggérant de « mettre en place les moyens nécessaires à l’augmentation du nombre de départs aidés ».

    Lien pour télécharger le #rapport :


    https://www.ccomptes.fr/system/files/2020-05/20200505-rapport-entree-sejour-premier-accueil-personnes-etrangeres.pdf

    ping @karine4 @isskein