• The big wall


    https://thebigwall.org/en

    An ActionAid investigation into how Italy tried to stop migration from Africa, using EU funds, and how much money it spent.

    There are satellites, drones, ships, cooperation projects, police posts, repatriation flights, training centers. They are the bricks of an invisible but tangible and often violent wall. Erected starting in 2015 onwards, thanks to over one billion euros of public money. With one goal: to eliminate those movements by sea, from North Africa to Italy, which in 2015 caused an outcry over a “refugee crisis”. Here we tell you about the (fragile) foundations and the (dramatic) impacts of this project. Which must be changed, urgently.

    –---

    Ready, Set, Go

    Imagine a board game, Risk style. The board is a huge geographical map, which descends south from Italy, including the Mediterranean Sea and North Africa and almost reaching the equator, in Cameroon, South Sudan, Rwanda. Places we know little about and read rarely about.

    Each player distributes activity cards and objects between countries and along borders. In Ethiopia there is a camera crew shooting TV series called ‘Miraj’ [mirage], which recounts the misadventures of naive youth who rely on shady characters to reach Europe. There is military equipment, distributed almost everywhere: off-road vehicles for the Tunisian border police, ambulances and tank trucks for the army in Niger, patrol boats for Libya, surveillance drones taking off from Sicily.

    There is technology: satellite systems on ships in the Mediterranean, software for recording fingerprints in Egypt, laptops for the Nigerian police. And still: coming and going of flights between Libya and Nigeria, Guinea, Gambia. Maritime coordination centers, police posts in the middle of the Sahara, job orientation offices in Tunisia or Ethiopia, clinics in Uganda, facilities for minors in Eritrea, and refugee camps in Sudan.

    Hold your breath for a moment longer, because we still haven’t mentioned the training courses. And there are many: to produce yogurt in Ivory Coast, open a farm in Senegal or a beauty salon in Nigeria, to learn about the rights of refugees, or how to use a radar station.

    Crazed pawns, overlapping cards and unclear rules. Except for one: from these African countries, more than 25 of them, not one person should make it to Italy. There is only one exception allowed: leaving with a visa. Embassy officials, however, have precise instructions: anyone who doesn’t have something to return to should not be accepted. Relationships, family, and friends don’t count, but only incomes, properties, businesses, and titles do.

    For a young professional, a worker, a student, an activist, anyone looking for safety, future and adventure beyond the borders of the continent, for people like me writing and perhaps like you reading, the only allies become the facilitators, those who Europe calls traffickers and who, from friends, can turn into worst enemies.

    We called it The Big Wall. It could be one of those strategy games that keeps going throughout the night, for fans of geopolitics, conflicts, finance. But this is real life, and it’s the result of years of investments, experiments, documents and meetings. At first disorderly, sporadic, then systematized and increased since 2015, when United Nations agencies, echoed by the international media, sounded an alarm: there is a migrant crisis happening and Europe must intervene. Immediately.

    Italy was at the forefront, and all those agreements, projects, and programs from previous years suddenly converged and multiplied, becoming bricks of a wall that, from an increasingly militarized Mediterranean, moved south, to the travelers’ countries of origin.

    The basic idea, which bounced around chancelleries and European institutions, was to use multiple tools: development cooperation, support for security forces, on-site protection of refugees, repatriation, information campaigns on the risks of irregular migration. This, in the language of Brussels, was a “comprehensive approach”.

    We talked to some of the protagonists of this story — those who built the wall, who tried to jump it, and who would like to demolish it — and we looked through thousands of pages of reports, minutes, resolutions, decrees, calls for tenders, contracts, newspaper articles, research, to understand how much money Italy has spent, where, and what impacts it has had. Months of work to discover not only that this wall has dramatic consequences, but that the European – and Italian – approach to international migration stems from erroneous premises, from an emergency stance that has disastrous results for everyone, including European citizens.
    Libya: the tip of the iceberg

    It was the start of the 2017/2018 academic year and Omer Shatz, professor of international law, offered his Sciences Po students the opportunity to work alongside him on the preparation of a dossier. For the students of the faculty, this was nothing new. In the classrooms of the austere building on the Rive Gauche of Paris, which European and African heads of state have passed though, not least Emmanuel Macron, it’s normal to work on real life materials: peace agreements in Colombia, trials against dictators and foreign fighters. Those who walk on those marble floors already know that they will be able to speak with confidence in circles that matter, in politics as well as diplomacy.

    Shatz, who as a criminal lawyer in Israel is familiar with abuses and rights violations, launched his students a new challenge: to bring Europe to the International Criminal Court for the first time. “Since it was created, the court has only condemned African citizens – dictators, militia leaders – but showing European responsibility was urgent,” he explains.

    One year after first proposing the plan, Shatz sent an envelope to the Court’s headquarters, in the Dutch town of The Hague. With his colleague Juan Branco and eight of his students he recounted, in 245 pages, cases of “widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population”, linked to “crimes against humanity consciously committed by European actors, in the central Mediterranean and in Libya, in line with Italian and European Union policies”.

    The civilian population to which they refer comprises migrants and refugees, swallowed by the waves or intercepted in the central Mediterranean and brought back to shore by Libyan assets, to be placed in a seemingly endless cycle of detention. Among them are the 13.000 dead recorded since 2015, in the stretch of sea between North Africa and Italy, out of 523.000 people who survived the crossing, but also the many African and Asian citizens, who are rarely counted, who were tortured in Libya and died in any of the dozens of detention centers for foreigners, often run by militias.

    “At first we thought that the EU and Italy were outsourcing dirty work to Libya to block people, which in jargon is called ‘aiding and abetting’ in the commission of a crime, then we realized that the Europeans were actually the conductors of these operations, while the Libyans performed”, says Shatz, who, at the end of 2020, was preparing a second document for the International Criminal Court to include more names, those of the “anonymous officials of the European and Italian bureaucracy who participated in this criminal enterprise”, which was centered around the “reinvention of the Libyan Coast Guard, conceived by Italian actors”.

    Identifying heads of department, office directors, and institution executives in democratic countries as alleged criminals might seem excessive. For Shatz, however, “this is the first time, after the Nuremberg trials, after Eichmann, that Europe has committed crimes of this magnitude, outside of an armed conflict”. The court, which routinely rejects at least 95 percent of the cases presented, did not do so with Shatz and his students’ case. “Encouraging news, but that does not mean that the start of proceedings is around the corner”, explains the lawyer.

    At the basis of the alleged crimes, he continues, are “regulations, memoranda of understanding, maritime cooperation, detention centers, patrols and drones” created and financed by the European Union and Italy. Here Shatz is speaking about the Memorandum of Understanding between Italy and Libya to “reduce the flow of illegal migrants”, as the text of the document states. An objective to be achieved through training and support for the two maritime patrol forces of the very fragile Libyan national unity government, by “adapting” the existing detention centers, and supporting local development initiatives.

    Signed in Rome on February 2, 2017 and in force until 2023, the text is grafted onto the Treaty of Friendship, Partnership and Cooperation signed by Silvio Berlusconi and Muammar Gaddafi in 2008, but is tied to a specific budget: that of the so-called Africa Fund, established in 2016 as the “Fund for extraordinary interventions to relaunch dialogue and cooperation with African countries of priority importance for migration routes” and extended in 2020 — as the Migration Fund — to non-African countries too.

    310 million euros were allocated in total between the end of 2016 and November 2020, and 252 of those were disbursed, according to our reconstruction.

    A multiplication of tools and funds that, explains Mario Giro, “was born after the summit between the European Union and African leaders in Malta, in November 2015”. According to the former undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, from 2013, and Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs between 2016 and 2018, that summit in Malta “sanctioned the triumph of a European obsession, that of reducing migration from Africa at all costs: in exchange of this containment, there was a willingness to spend, invest”. For Giro, the one in Malta was an “attempt to come together, but not a real partnership”.

    Libya, where more than 90 percent of those attempting to cross the central Mediterranean departed from in those years, was the heart of a project in which Italian funds and interests support and integrate with programs by the European Union and other member states. It was an all-European dialogue, from which powerful Africans — political leaders but also policemen, militiamen, and the traffickers themselves — tried to obtain something: legitimacy, funds, equipment.

    Fragmented and torn apart by a decade-long conflict, Libya was however not alone. In October 2015, just before the handshakes and the usual photographs at the Malta meeting, the European Commission established an Emergency Trust Fund to “address the root causes of migration in Africa”.

    To do so, as Dutch researcher Thomas Spijkerboer will reconstruct years later, the EU executive declared a state of emergency in the 26 African countries that benefit from the Fund, thus justifying the choice to circumvent European competition rules in favor of direct award procedures. However “it’s implausible – Spijkerboeker will go on to argue – that there is a crisis in all 26 African countries where the Trust Fund operates through the duration of the Trust Fund”, now extended until the end of 2021.

    However, the imperative, as an advisor to the Budget Commission of the European Parliament explains, was to act immediately: “not within a few weeks, but days, hours“.

    Faced with a Libya still ineffective at stopping flows to the north, it was in fact necessary to intervene further south, traveling backwards along the routes that converge from dozens of African countries and go towards Tripolitania. And — like dominoes in reverse — raising borders and convincing, or forcing, potential travelers to stop in their countries of origin or in others along the way, before they arrived on the shores of the Mediterranean.

    For the first time since decolonization, human mobility in Africa became the keystone of Italian policies on the continent, so much so that analysts began speaking of migration diplomacy. Factors such as the number of migrants leaving from a given country and the number of border posts or repatriations all became part of the political game, on the same level as profits from oil extraction, promises of investment, arms sales, or trade agreements.

    Comprising projects, funds, and programs, this migration diplomacy comes at a cost. For the period between January 2015 and November 2020, we tracked down 317 funding lines managed by Italy with its own funds and partially co-financed by the European Union. A total of 1.337 billion euros, spent over five years and destined to eight different items of expenditure. Here Libya is in first place, but it is not alone.

    A long story, in short

    For simplicity’s sake, we can say that it all started in the hot summer of 2002, with an almost surrealist lightning war over a barren rock on the edge of the Mediterranean: the Isla de Persejil, the island of parsley. A little island in the Strait of Gibraltar, disputed for decades between Morocco and Spain, which had its ephemeral moment of glory when in July of that year the Moroccan monarchy sent six soldiers, some tents and a flag. Jose-Maria Aznar’s government quickly responded with a reconquista to the sound of fighter-bombers, frigates, and helicopters.

    Peace was signed only a few weeks later and the island went back to being a land of shepherds and military patrols. Which from then on, however, were joint ones.

    “There was talk of combating drug trafficking and illegal fishing, but the reality was different: these were the first anti-immigration operations co-managed by Spanish and Moroccan soldiers”, explains Sebastian Cobarrubias, professor of geography at the University of Zaragoza. The model, he says, was the one of Franco-Spanish counter-terrorism operations in the Basque Country, exported from the Pyrenees to the sea border.

    A process of externalization of Spanish and European migration policy was born following those events in 2002, and culminating years later with the crisis de los cayucos, the pirogue crisis: the arrival of tens of thousands of people – 31,000 in 2006 alone – in the Canary Islands, following extremely dangerous crossings from Senegal, Mauritania and Morocco.

    In close dialogue with the European Commission, which saw the Spanish border as the most porous one of the fragile Schengen area, the government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero reacted quickly. “Within a few months, cooperation and repatriation agreements were signed with nine African countries,” says Cobarrubias, who fought for years, with little success, to obtain the texts of the agreements.

    The events of the late 2000s look terribly similar to what Italy will try to implement a decade later with its Mediterranean neighbors, Libya first of all. So much so that in 2016 it was the Spanish Minister of the Interior himself, Jorge Fernández Díaz, who recalled that “the Spanish one is a European management model, reproducible in other contexts”. A vision confirmed by the European Commission officials with whom we spoke.

    At the heart of the Spanish strategy, which over a few short years led to a drastic decrease of arrivals by sea, was the opening of new diplomatic offices in Africa, the launch of local development projects, and above all the support given to the security forces of partner countries.

    Cobarrubias recounts at least four characteristic elements of the Madrid approach: the construction of new patrol forces “such as the Mauritanian Coast Guard, which did not exist and was created by Spain thanks to European funds, with the support of the newly created Frontex agency”; direct and indirect support for detention centers, such as the infamous ‘Guantanamito’, or little Guantanamo, denounced by civil society organizations in Mauritania; the real-time collection of border data and information, carried out by the SIVE satellite system, a prototype of Eurosur, an incredibly expensive intelligence center on the EU’s external borders launched in 2013, based on drones, satellites, airplanes, and sensors; and finally, the strategy of working backwards along migration routes, to seal borders, from the sea to the Sahara desert, and investing locally with development and governance programs, which Spain did during the two phases of the so-called Plan Africa, between 2006 and 2012.

    Replace “Spain” with “Italy”, and “Mauritania” with “Libya”, and you’ll have an idea of what happened years later, in an attempt to seal another European border.

    The main legacy of the Spanish model, according to the Italian sociologist Lorenzo Gabrielli, however, is the negative conditionality, which is the fact of conditioning the disbursement of these loans – for security forces, ministries, trade agreements – at the level of the African partners’ cooperation in the management of migration, constantly threatening to reduce investments if there are not enough repatriations being carried out, or if controls and pushbacks fail. An idea that is reminiscent both of the enlargement process of the European Union, with all the access restrictions placed on candidate countries, and of the Schengen Treaty, the attempt to break down internal European borders, which, as a consequence, created the need to protect a new common border, the external one.
    La externalización europea del control migratorio: ¿La acción española como modelo? Read more

    At the end of 2015, when almost 150,000 people had reached the Italian coast and over 850,000 had crossed Turkey and the Balkans to enter the European Union, the story of the maritime migration to Spain had almost faded from memory.

    But something remained of it: a management model. Based, once again, on an idea of crisis.

    “We tried to apply it to post-Gaddafi Libya – explains Stefano Manservisi, who over the past decade has chaired two key departments for migration policies in the EU Commission, Home Affairs and Development Cooperation – but in 2013 we soon realized that things had blown up, that that there was no government to talk to: the whole strategy had to be reformulated”.

    Going backwards, through routes and processes

    The six-month presidency of the European Council, in 2014, was the perfect opportunity for Italy.

    In November of that year, Matteo Renzi’s government hosted a conference in Rome to launch the Khartoum Process, the brand new initiative for the migration route between the EU and the Horn of Africa, modeled on the Rabat Process, born in 2006, at the apex of the crisis de los cayucos, after pressure from Spain. It’s a regional cooperation platform between EU countries and nine African countries, based on the exchange of information and coordination between governments, to manage migration.
    Il processo di Khartoum: l’Italia e l’Europa contro le migrazioni Read more

    Warning: if you start to find terms such as ‘process’ and ‘coordination platform’ nebulous, don’t worry. The backbone of European policies is made of these structures: meetings, committees, negotiating tables with unattractive names, whose roles elude most of us. It’s a tendency towards the multiplication of dialogue and decision spaces, that the migration policies of recent years have, if possible, accentuated, in the name of flexibility, of being ready for any eventuality. Of continuous crisis.

    Let’s go back to that inter-ministerial meeting in Rome that gave life to the Khartoum Process and in which Libya, where the civil war had resumed violently a few months earlier, was not present.

    Italy thus began looking beyond Libya, to the so-called countries of origin and transit. Such as Ethiopia, a historic beneficiary of Italian development cooperation, and Sudan. Indeed, both nations host refugees from Eritrea and Somalia, two of the main countries of origin of those who cross the central Mediterranean between 2013 and 2015. Improving their living conditions was urgent, to prevent them from traveling again, from dreaming of Europe. In Niger, on the other hand, which is an access corridor to Libya for those traveling from countries such as Nigeria, Gambia, Senegal, and Mali, Italy co-financed a study for a new law against migrant smuggling, then adopted in 2015, which became the cornerstone of a radical attempt to reduce movement across the Sahara desert, which you will read about later.

    A year later, with the Malta summit and the birth of the EU Trust Fund for Africa, Italy was therefore ready to act. With a 123 million euro contribution, allocated from 2017 through the Africa Fund and the Migration Fund, Italy became the second donor country, and one of the most active in trying to manage those over 4 billion euros allocated for five years. [If you are curious about the financing mechanisms of the Trust Fund, read here: https://thebigwall.org/en/trust-fund/].

    Through the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS), born in 2014 as an operational branch of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Italy immediately made itself available to manage European Fund projects, and one idea seemed to be the driving one: using classic development programs, but implemented in record time, to offer on-site alternatives to young people eager to leave, while improving access to basic services.

    Local development, therefore, became the intervention to address the so-called root causes of migration. For the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the newborn AICS, it seemed a winning approach. Unsurprisingly, the first project approved through the Trust Fund for Africa was managed by the Italian agency in Ethiopia.

    “Stemming irregular migration in Northern and Central Ethiopia” received 19.8 million euros in funding, a rare sum for local development interventions. The goal was to create job opportunities and open career guidance centers for young people in four Ethiopian regions. Or at least that’s how it seemed. In the first place, among the objectives listed in the project sheet, there is in fact another one: to reduce irregular migration.

    In the logical matrix of the project, which insiders know is the presentation – through data, indicators and figures – of the expected results, there is no indicator that appears next to the “reduction of irregular migration” objective. There is no way, it’s implicitly admitted, to verify that that goal has been achieved. That the young person trained to start a micro-enterprise in the Wollo area, for example, is one less migrant.

    Bizarre, not to mention wrong. But indicative of the problems of an approach of which, an official of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs explains to us, “Italy had made itself the spokesperson in Europe”.

    “The mantra was that more development would stop migration, and at a certain point that worked for everyone: for AICS, which justified its funds in the face of political landscape that was scared by the issue of landings, and for many NGOs, which immediately understood that migrations were the parsley to be sprinkled on the funding requests that were presented”, explains the official, who, like so many in this story, prefers to remain anonymous.

    This idea of the root causes was reproduced, as in an echo chamber, “without programmatic documents, without guidelines, but on the wave of a vague idea of political consensus around the goal of containing migration”, he adds. This makes it almost impossible to talk about, so much so that a proposal for new guidelines on immigration and development, drawn up during 2020 by AICS, was set aside for months.

    Indeed, if someone were to say, as evidenced by scholars such as Michael Clemens, that development can also increase migration, and that migration itself is a source of development, the whole ‘root causes’ idea would collapse and the already tight cooperation budgets would risk being cut, in the name of the same absolute imperative as always: reducing arrivals to Italy and Europe.

    Maintaining a vague, costly and unverifiable approach is equally damaging.

    Bram Frouws, director of the Mixed Migration Center, a think-tank that studies international mobility, points out, for example, how the ‘root cause’ approach arises from a vision of migration as a problem to be eradicated rather than managed, and that paradoxically, the definition of these deep causes always remains superficial. In fact, there is never talk of how international fishing agreements damage local communities, nor of land grabbing by speculators, major construction work, or corruption and arms sales. There is only talk of generic economic vulnerability, of a country’s lack of stability. An almost abstract phenomenon, in which European actors are exempt from any responsibility.

    There is another problem: in the name of the fight against irregular migration, interventions have shifted from poorer and truly vulnerable countries and populations to regions with ‘high migratory rates’, a term repeated in dozens of project descriptions funded over the past few years, distorting one of the cardinal principles of development aid, codified in regulations and agreements: that of responding to the most urgent needs of a given population, and of not imposing external priorities, even more so if it is countries considered richer are the ones doing it.

    The Nigerien experiment

    While Ethiopia and Sudan absorb the most substantial share of funds destined to tackle the root causes of migration — respectively 47 and 32 million euros out of a total expenditure of 195 million euros — Niger, which for years has been contending for the podium of least developed country on the planet with Central African Republic according to the United Nations Human Development Index — benefits from just over 10 million euros.

    Here in fact it’s more urgent, for Italy and the EU, to intervene on border control rather than root causes, to stop the flow of people that cross the country until they arrive in Agadez, to then disappear in the Sahara and emerge, days later — if all goes well — in southern Libya. In 2016, the International Organization for Migration counted nearly 300,000 people passing through a single checkpoint along the road to Libya. The figure bounced between the offices of the European Commission, and from there to the Farnesina, the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: faced with an uncontrollable Libya, intervening in Niger became a priority.

    Italy did it in great style, even before opening an embassy in the country, in February 2017: with a contribution to the state budget of Niger of 50 million euros, part of the Africa Fund, included as part of a maxi-program managed by the EU in the country and paid out in several installments.

    While the project documents list a number of conditions for the continuation of the funding, including increased monitoring along the routes to Libya and the adoption of regulations and strategies for border control, some local and European officials with whom we have spoken think that the assessments were made with one eye closed: the important thing was in fact to provide those funds to be spent in a country that for Italy, until then, had been synonymous only with tourism in the Sahara dunes and development in rural areas.

    Having become a priority in the New Partnership Framework on Migration, yet another EU operational program, launched in 2016, Niger seemed thus exempt from controls on the management of funds to which beneficiaries of European funds are normally subject to.

    “Our control mechanisms, the Court of Auditors, the Parliament and the anti-corruption Authority, do not work, and yet the European partners have injected millions of euros into state coffers, without imposing transparency mechanisms”, reports then Ali Idrissa Nani , president of the Réseau des Organizations pour la Transparence et l’Analyse du Budget (ROTAB), a network of associations that seeks to monitor state spending in Niger.

    “It leaves me embittered, but for some years we we’ve had the impression that civil liberties, human rights, and participation are no longer a European priority“, continues Nani, who —- at the end of 2020 — has just filed a complaint with the Court of Niamey, to ask the Prosecutor to open an investigation into the possible disappearance of at least 120 million euros in funds from the Ministry of Defense, a Pandora’s box uncovered by local and international journalists.

    For Nani, who like other Nigerien activists spent most of 2018 in prison for encouraging demonstrations against high living costs, this explosion of European and Italian cooperation didn’t do the country any good, and in fact favoured authoritarian tendencies, and limited even more the independence of the judiciary.

    For their part, the Nigerien rulers have more than others seized the opportunity offered by European donors to obtain legitimacy and support. Right after the Valletta summit, they were the first to present an action plan to reduce migration to Libya, which they abruptly implemented in mid-2016, applying the anti-trafficking law whose preliminary study was financed by Italy, with the aim of emptying the city of #Agadez of migrants from other countries.

    The transport of people to the Libyan border, an activity that until that point happened in the light of day and was sanctioned at least informally by the local authorities, thus became illegal from one day to the next. Hundreds of drivers, intermediaries, and facilitators were arrested, and an entire economy crashed

    But did the movement of people really decrease? Almost impossible to tell. The only data available are those of the International Organization for Migration, which continues to record the number of transits at certain police posts. But drivers and foreign travelers no longer pass through them, fearing they will be arrested or stopped. Routes and journeys, as always happens, are remodeled, only to reappear elsewhere. Over the border with Chad, or in Algeria, or in a risky zigzagging of small tracks, to avoid patrols.

    For Hamidou Manou Nabara, a Nigerien sociologist and researcher, the problems with this type of cooperation are manifold.

    On the one hand, it restricted the free movement guaranteed within the Economic Community of West African States, a sort of ‘Schengen area’ between 15 countries in the region, making half of Niger, from Agadez to the north, a no-go areas for foreign citizens, even though they still had the right to move throughout the national territory.

    Finally, those traveling north were made even more vulnerable. “The control of borders and migratory movements was justified on humanitarian grounds, to contrast human trafficking, but in reality very few victims of trafficking were ever identified: the center of this cooperation is repression”, explains Nabara.

    Increasing controls, through military and police operations, actually exposes travelers to greater violations of human rights, both by state agents and passeurs, making the Sahara crossings longer and riskier.

    The fight against human trafficking, a slogan repeated by European and African leaders and a central expenditure item of the Italian intervention between Africa and the Mediterranean — 142 million euros in five years —- actually risks having the opposite effect. Because a trafiicker’s bread and butter, in addition to people’s desire to travel, is closed borders and denied visas.

    A reinvented frontier

    Galvanized by the activism of the European Commission after the launch of the Trust Fund but under pressure internally, faced with a discourse on migration that seemed to invade every public space — from the front pages of newspapers to television talk-shows — and unable to agree on how to manage migration within the Schengen area, European rulers thus found an agreement outside the continent: to add more bricks to that wall that must reduce movements through the Mediterranean.

    Between 2015 and 2016, Italian, Dutch, German, French and European Union ministers, presidents and senior officials travel relentlessly between countries considered priorities for migration, and increasingly for security, and invite their colleagues to the European capitals. A coming and going of flights to Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Tunisia, Senegal, Chad, Guinea, to make agreements, negotiate.

    “Niamey had become a crossroads for European diplomats”, remembers Ali Idrissa Nani, “but few understood the reasons”.

    However, unlike the border with Turkey, where the agreement signed with the EU at the beginning of 2016 in no time reduced the arrival of Syrian, Afghan, and Iraqi citizens in Greece, the continent’s other ‘hot’ border, promises of speed and effectiveness by the Trust Fund for Africa did not seem to materialize. Departures from Libya, in particular, remained constant. And in the meantime, in the upcoming election in a divided Italy, the issue of migration seemed to be tipping the balance, capable of shifting votes and alliances.

    It is at that point that the Italian Ministry of the Interior, newly led by Marco Minniti, put its foot on the accelerator. The Viminale, the Italian Ministry of the Interior, became the orchestrator of a new intervention plan, refined between Rome and Brussels, with German support, which went back to focusing everything on Libya and on that stretch of sea that separates it from Italy.

    “In those months the phones were hot, everyone was looking for Marco“, says an official of the Interior Ministry, who admits that “the Ministry of the Interior had snatched the Libyan dossier from Foreign Affairs, but only because up until then the Foreign Ministry hadn’t obtained anything” .

    Minniti’s first move was the signing of the new Memorandum with Libya, which gave way to a tripartite plan.

    At the top of the agenda was the creation of a maritime interception device for boats departing from the Libyan coast, through the reconstruction of the Coast Guard and the General Administration for Coastal Security (GACS), the two patrol forces belonging to the Ministry of Defense and that of the Interior, and the establishment of a rescue coordination center, prerequisites for Libya to declare to the International Maritime Organization that it had a Search and Rescue Area, so that the Italian Coast Guard could ask Libyan colleagues to intervene if there were boats in trouble.

    Accompanying this work in Libya is a jungle of Italian and EU missions, surveillance systems and military operations — from the European Frontex, Eunavfor Med and Eubam Libya, to the Italian military mission “Safe Waters” — equipped with drones, planes, patrol boats, whose task is to monitor the Libyan Sea, which is increasingly emptied by the European humanitarian ships that started operating in 2014 (whose maneuvering spaces are in the meantime reduced to the bone due to various strategies) to support Libyan interception operations.

    The second point of the ‘Minniti agenda’ was to progressively empty Libya of migrants and refugees, so that an escape by sea would become increasingly difficult. Between 2017 and 2020, the Libyan assets, which are in large part composed of patrol boats donated by Italy, intercepted and returned to shore about 56,000 people according to data released by UN agencies. The Italian-European plan envisages two solutions: for economic migrants, the return to the country of origin; for refugees, the possibility of obtaining protection.

    There is one part of this plan that worked better, at least in terms of European wishes: repatriation, presented as ‘assisted voluntary return’. This vision was propelled by images, released in October 2017 by CNN as part of a report on the abuse of foreigners in Libya, of what appears to be a slave auction. The images reopened the unhealed wounds of the slave trade through Atlantic and Sahara, and helped the creation of a Joint Initiative between the International Organization for Migration, the European Union, and the African Union, aimed at returning and reintegrating people in the countries of origin.

    Part of the Italian funding for IOM was injected into this complex system of repatriation by air, from Tripoli to more than 20 countries, which has contributed to the repatriation of 87,000 people over three years. 33,000 from Libya, and 37,000 from Niger.

    A similar program for refugees, which envisages transit through other African countries (Niger and Rwanda gave their availability) and from there resettlement to Europe or North America, recorded much lower numbers: 3,300 evacuations between the end of 2017 and the end of 2020. For the 47,000 people registered as refugees in Libya, leaving the country without returning to their home country, to the starting point, is almost impossible.

    Finally, there is a third, lesser-known point of the Italian plan: even in Libya, Italy wants to intervene on the root causes of migration, or rather on the economies linked to the transit and smuggling of migrants. The scheme is simple: support basic services and local authorities in migrant transit areas, in exchange for this transit being controlled and reduced. The transit of people brings with it the circulation of currency, a more valuable asset than usual in a country at war, and this above all in the south of Libya, in the immense Saharan region of Fezzan, the gateway to the country, bordering Algeria, Niger, and Chad and almost inaccessible to international humanitarian agencies.

    A game in which intelligence plays central role (as also revealed by the journalist Lorenzo D’Agostino on Foreign Policy), as indeed it did in another negotiation and exchange of money: those 5 million euros destined — according to various journalistic reconstructions — to a Sabratha militia, the Anas Al-Dabbashi Brigade, to stop departures from the coastal city.

    A year later, its leader, Ahmed Al-Dabbashi, will be sanctioned by the UN Security Council, as leader for criminal activities related to human trafficking.

    The one built in record time by the ministry led by Marco Minniti is therefore a complicated and expensive puzzle. To finance it, there are above all the Trust Fund for Africa of the EU, and the Italian Africa Fund, initially headed only by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and unpacked among several ministries for the occasion, but also the Internal Security Fund of the EU, which funds military equipment for all Italian security forces, as well as funds and activities from the Ministry of Defense.

    A significant part of those 666 million euros dedicated to border control, but also of funds to support governance and fight traffickers, converges and enters this plan: a machine that was built too quickly, among whose wheels human rights and Libya’s peace process are sacrificed.

    “We were looking for an immediate result and we lost sight of the big picture, sacrificing peace on the altar of the fight against migration, when Libya was in pieces, in the hands of militias who were holding us hostage”. This is how former Deputy Minister Mario Giro describes the troubled handling of the Libyan dossier.

    For Marwa Mohamed, a Libyan activist, all these funds and interventions were “provided without any real clause of respect for human rights, and have fragmented the country even more, because they were intercepted by the militias, which are the same ones that manage both the smuggling of migrants that detention centers, such as that of Abd el-Rahman al-Milad, known as ‘al-Bija’ ”.

    Projects aimed at Libyan municipalities, included in the interventions on the root causes of migration — such as the whole detention system, invigorated by the introduction of people intercepted at sea (and ‘improved’ through millions of euros of Italian funds) — offer legitimacy, when they do not finance it directly, to the ramified and violent system of local powers that the German political scientist Wolfram Lacher defines as the ‘Tripoli militia cartel‘. [for more details on the many Italian funds in Libya, read here].
    Fondi italiani in Libia Read more

    “Bringing migrants back to shore, perpetuating a detention system, does not only mean subjecting people to new abuses, but also enriching the militias, fueling the conflict”, continues Mohamed, who is now based in London, where she is a spokesman of the Libyan Lawyers for Justice organization.

    The last few years of Italian cooperation, she argues, have been “a sequence of lost opportunities”. And to those who tell you — Italian and European officials especially — that reforming justice, putting an end to that absolute impunity that strengthens the militias, is too difficult, Mohamed replies without hesitation: “to sign the Memorandum of Understanding, the authorities contacted the militias close to the Tripoli government one by one and in the meantime built a non-existent structure from scratch, the Libyan Coast Guard: and you’re telling me that you can’t put the judicial system back on its feet and protect refugees? ”

    The only thing that mattered, however, in that summer of 2017, were the numbers. Which, for the first time since 2013, were falling again, and quickly. In the month of August there were 80 percent fewer landings than the year before. And so it would be for the following months and years.

    “Since then, we have continued to allocate, renewing programs and projects, without asking for any guarantee in exchange for the treatment of migrants”, explains Matteo De Bellis, researcher at Amnesty International, remembering that the Italian promise to modify the Memorandum of Understanding, introducing clauses of protection, has been on stop since the controversial renewal of the document, in February 2020.

    Repatriations, evacuations, promises

    We are 1500 kilometers of road, and sand, south of Tripoli. Here Salah* spends his days escaping a merciless sun. The last three years of the life of the thirty-year-old Sudanese have not offered much else and now, like many fellow sufferers, he does not hide his fatigue.

    We are in a camp 15 kilometers from Agadez, in Niger, in the middle of the Sahara desert, where Salah lives with a thousand people, mostly Sudanese from the Darfur region, the epicenter of one of the most dramatic and lethal conflicts of recent decades.

    Like almost all the inhabitants of this temporary Saharan settlement, managed by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and — at the end of 2020 — undergoing rehabilitation also thanks to Italian funds, he passed through Libya and since 2017, after three years of interceptions at sea and detention, he’s been desperately searching for a way out, for a future.

    Salah fled Darfur in 2016, after receiving threats from pro-government armed militias, and reached Tripoli after a series of vicissitudes and violence. In late spring 2017, he sailed from nearby Zawiya with 115 other people. They were intercepted, brought back to shore and imprisoned in a detention center, formally headed by the government but in fact controlled by the Al-Nasr militia, linked to the trafficker Al-Bija.

    “They beat us everywhere, for days, raped some women in front of us, and asked everyone to call families to get money sent,” Salah recalls. Months later, after paying some money and escaping, he crossed the Sahara again, up to Agadez. UNHCR had just opened a facility and from there, as rumour had it, you could ask to be resettled to Europe.

    Faced with sealed maritime borders, and after experiencing torture and abuse, that faint hope set in motion almost two thousand people, who, hoping to reach Italy, found themselves on the edges of the Sahara, along what many, by virtue of investments and negotiations, had started to call the ‘new European frontier’.

    Three years later, a little over a thousand people remain of that initial group. Only a few dozen of them had access to resettlement, while many returned to Libya, and to all of its abuses.

    Something similar is also happening in Tunisia, where since 2017, the number of migrants and refugees entering the country has increased. They are fleeing by land and sometimes by sea from Libya, going to crowd UN structures. Then, faced with a lack of real prospects, they return to Libya.

    For Romdhane Ben Amor, spokesman for the Tunisian Federation for Economic and Social Rights, “in Tunisia European partners have financed a non-reception: overcrowded centers in unworthy conditions, which have become recruitment areas for traffickers, because in fact there are two options offered there: go home or try to get back to the sea “.

    In short, even the interventions for the protection of migrants and refugees must be read in a broader context, of a contraction of mobility and human rights. “The refugee management itself has submitted to the goal of containment, which is the true original sin of the Italian and European strategy,” admits a UNHCR official.

    This dogma of containment, at any cost, affects everyone — people who travel, humanitarian actors, civil society, local governments — by distorting priorities, diverting funds, and undermining future relationships and prospects. The same ones that European officials call partnerships and which in the case of Africa, as reiterated in 2020 by President Ursula Von Der Leyen, should be “between equals”.

    Let’s take another example: the Egypt of President Abdel Fetah Al-Sisi. Since 2016, it has been increasingly isolated on the international level, also due to violent internal repression, which Italy knows something about. Among the thousands of people who have been disappeared or killed in recent years, is researcher Giulio Regeni, whose body was thrown on the side of a road north of Cairo in February 2016.

    Around the time of the murder, in which the complicity and cover-ups by the Egyptian security forces were immediately evident, the Italian Ministry of the Interior restarted its dialogue with the country. “It’s absurd, but Italy started to support Egypt in negotiations with the European Union,” explains lawyer Muhammed Al-Kashef, a member of the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Right and now a refugee in Germany.

    By inserting itself on an already existing cooperation project that saw italy, for example, finance the use of fingerprint-recording software used by the Egyptian police, the Italian Ministry of the Interior was able to create a police academy in Cairo, inaugurated in 2018 with European funds, to train the border guards of over 20 African countries. Italy also backed Egyptian requests within the Khartoum Process and, on a different front, sells weapons and conducts joint naval exercises.

    “Rome could have played a role in Egypt, supporting the democratic process after the 2011 revolution, but it preferred to fall into the migration trap, fearing a wave of migration that would never happen,” says Al-Kashef.

    With one result: “they have helped transform Egypt into a country that kills dreams, and often dreamers too, and from which all young people today want to escape”. Much more so than in 2015 or that hopeful 2011.

    Cracks in the wall, and how to widen them

    If you have read this far, following personal stories and routes of people and funds, you will have understood one thing, above all: that the beating heart of this strategy, set up by Italy with the participation of the European Union and vice versa, is the reduction of migrations across the Mediterranean. The wall, in fact.

    Now try to add other European countries to this picture. Since 2015 many have fully adopted — or returned to — this process of ‘externalization’ of migration policies. Spain, where the Canary Islands route reopened in 2019, demonstrating the fragility of the model you read about above; France, with its strategic network in the former colonies, the so-called Françafrique. And then Germany, Belgium, Holland, United Kingdom, Austria.

    Complicated, isn’t it? This great wall’s bricks and builders keep multiplying. Even more strategies, meetings, committees, funds and documents. And often, the same lack of transparency, which makes reconstructing these loans – understanding which cement, sand, and lime mixture was used, i.e. who really benefited from the expense, what equipment was provided, how the results were monitored – a long process, when it’s not impossible.

    The Pact on Migration and Asylum of the European Union, presented in September 2020, seems to confirm this: cooperation with third countries and relaunching repatriations are at its core.

    Even the European Union budget for the seven-year period 2021-2027, approved in December 2020, continues to focus on this expenditure, for example by earmarking for migration projects 10 percent of the new Neighborhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument, equipped with 70 billion euros, but also diverting a large part of the Immigration and Asylum Fund (8.7 billion) towards support for repatriation, and foreseeing 12.1 billion euros for border control.

    While now, with the new US presidency, some have called into question the future of the wall on the border with Mexico, perhaps the most famous of the anti-migrant barriers in the world, the wall built in the Mediterranean and further south, up to the equator, has seemingly never been so strong.

    But economists, sociologists, human rights defenders, analysts and travelers all demonstrate the problems with this model. “It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it,” says David Kipp, a researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs, a government-funded think-tank.

    For Kipp, however, we must begin to deflate this migration bubble, and go back to addressing migration as a human phenomenon, to be understood and managed. “I dream of the moment when this issue will be normalized, and will become something boring,” he admits timidly.

    To do this, cracks must be opened in the wall and in a model that seems solid but really isn’t, that has undesirable effects, violates human rights, and isolates Europe and Italy.

    Anna Knoll, researcher at the European Center for Development Policy Management, explains for example that European policies have tried to limit movements even within Africa, while the future of the continent is the freedom of movement of goods and people, and “for Europe, it is an excellent time to support this, also given the pressure from other international players, China first of all”.

    For Sabelo Mbokazi, who heads the Labor and Migration department of the Social Affairs Commission of the African Union (AU), there is one issue on which the two continental blocs have divergent positions: legal entry channels. “For the EU, they are something residual, we have a much broader vision,” he explains. And this will be one of the themes of the next EU-AU summit, which was postponed several times in 2020.

    It’s a completely flawed approach, and there are no quick fixes to change it
    David Kipp - researcher at the German Institute for International Affairs

    Indeed, the issue of legal access channels to the Italian and European territory is one of the most important, and so far almost imperceptible, cracks in this Big Wall. In the last five years, Italy has spent just 15 million euros on it, 1.1 percent of the total expenditure dedicated to external dimensions of migration.

    The European Union hasn’t done any better. “Legal migration, which was one of the pillars of the strategy born in Valletta in 2015, has remained a dead letter, but if we limit ourselves to closing the borders, we will not go far”, says Stefano Manservisi, who as a senior official of the EU Commission worked on all the migration dossiers during those years.

    Yet we all know that a trafficker’s worst enemy are passport stamps, visas, and airline tickets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=HmR96ySikkY

    Helen Dempster, who’s an economist at the Center for Global Development, spends her days studying how to do this: how to open legal channels of entry, and how to get states to think about it. And there is an effective example: we must not end up like Japan.

    “For decades, Japan has had very restrictive migration policies, it hasn’t allowed anyone in”, explains Dempster, “but in recent years it has realized that, with its aging population, it soon won’t have enough people to do basic jobs, pay taxes, and finance pensions”. And so, in April 2019, the Asian country began accepting work visa applications, hoping to attract 500,000 foreign workers.

    In Europe, however, “the hysteria surrounding migration in 2015 and 2016 stopped all debate“. Slowly, things are starting to move again. On the other hand, several European states, Italy and Germany especially, have one thing in common with Japan: an increasingly aging population.

    “All European labor ministries know that they must act quickly, but there are two preconceptions: that it is difficult to develop adequate projects, and that public opinion is against it.” For Dempster, who helped design an access program to the Belgian IT sector for Moroccan workers, these are false problems. “If we want to look at it from the point of view of the security of the receiving countries, bringing a person with a passport allows us to have a lot more information about who they are, which we do not have if we force them to arrive by sea”, she explains.

    Let’s look at some figures to make it easier: in 2007, Italy made 340,000 entry visas available, half of them seasonal, for non-EU workers, as part of the Flows Decree, Italy’s main legal entry channel adopted annually by the government. Few people cried “invasion” back then. Ten years later, in 2017, those 119,000 people who reached Italy through the Mediterranean seemed a disproportionate number. In the same year, the quotas of the Flow decree were just 30,000.

    Perhaps these numbers aren’t comparable, and building legal entry programs is certainly long, expensive, and apparently impractical, if we think of the economic and social effects of the coronavirus pandemic in which we are immersed. For Dempster, however, “it is important to be ready, to launch pilot programs, to create infrastructures and relationships”. So that we don’t end up like Japan, “which has urgently launched an access program for workers, without really knowing how to manage them”.

    The Spanish case, as already mentioned, shows how a model born twenty years ago, and then adopted along all the borders between Europe and Africa, does not really work.

    As international mobility declined, aided by the pandemic, at least 41,000 people landed in Spain in 2020, almost all of them in the Canary Islands. Numbers that take us back to 2006 and remind us how, after all, this ‘outsourcing’ offers costly and ineffective solutions.

    It’s reminiscent of so-called planned obsolescence, the production model for which a technological object isn’t built to last, inducing the consumer to replace it after a few years. But continually renewing and re-financing these walls can be convenient for multinational security companies, shipyards, political speculators, authoritarian regimes, and international traffickers. Certainly not for citizens, who — from the Italian and European institutions — would expect better products. May they think of what the world will be like in 10, 30, 50 years, and avoid trampling human rights and canceling democratic processes in the name of a goal that — history seems to teach — is short-lived. The ideas are not lacking. [At this link you’ll find the recommendations developed by ActionAid: https://thebigwall.org/en/recommendations/].

    https://thebigwall.org/en
    #Italie #externalisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #migrations #frontières #business #Afrique #budget #Afrique_du_Nord #Libye #chiffres #Niger #Soudan #Ethiopie #Sénégal #root_causes #causes_profondes #contrôles_frontaliers #EU_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Trust_Fund #propagande #campagne #dissuasion

    –—

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et plus précisément :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765328

    ping @isskein @karine4 @rhoumour @_kg_

  • Feminist City. Claiming Space in a Man-Made World

    Feminist City is an ongoing experiment in living differently, living better, and living more justly in an urban world

    We live in the city of men. Our public spaces are not designed for female bodies. There is little consideration for women as mothers, workers or carers. The urban streets often are a place of threats rather than community. Gentrification has made the everyday lives of women even more difficult. What would a metropolis for working women look like? A city of friendships beyond Sex and the City. A transit system that accommodates mothers with strollers on the school run. A public space with enough toilets. A place where women can walk without harassment.

    In Feminist City, through history, personal experience and popular culture Leslie Kern exposes what is hidden in plain sight: the social inequalities built into our cities, homes, and neighborhoods. Kern offers an alternative vision of the feminist city. Taking on fear, motherhood, friendship, activism, and the joys and perils of being alone, Kern maps the city from new vantage points, laying out an intersectional feminist approach to urban histories and proposes that the city is perhaps also our best hope for shaping a new urban future. It is time to dismantle what we take for granted about cities and to ask how we can build more just, sustainable, and women-friendly cities together.

    https://www.versobooks.com/books/3227-feminist-city

    #féminisme #femmes #villes #urban_matter #TRUST #master_TRUST #livre #Leslie_Kern #espace_public #ressources_pédagogiques #gentrification #travail #maternité #toilettes #harcèlement_de_rue #inégalités #intersectionnalité

  • #Banco_Palmas

    In 1998, residents from the impoverished Palmeira neighborhood of Fortaleza, Brazil, decided to take their economic future into their own hands. The strategy they took would soon spread to other communities around Brazil: creating a community development bank, governed and managed by local residents, for local needs. Banco Palmas’ founding mission was to help revitalize the local economy, create badly needed jobs, and increase the collective self-reliance of the Palmeira district. The bank’s activities are guided by the principles of solidarity economics.

    One of Banco Palmas’ key innovations has been to issue a neighborhood-scale alternative currency called the “Palma”. Like other local currencies, the Palma was designed to support local commerce by restricting its circulation to the Palmeira neighborhood, preventing money from leaking out of the community.

    The result has been impressive. To date, hundreds of local businesses have signed up to accept Palmas, while the currency has helped strengthen or create thousands of local livelihoods. Moreover, the neighborhood’s spending patterns have seen a dramatic shift since the bank’s founding and the release of the currency. According to one estimate, “In 1997, 80% of [Palmeira] inhabitants’ purchases were made outside the community; by 2011, 93% were made in the district” (from People Money, The Promise of Regional Currencies).

    Another key purpose of Banco Palmas has been to extend basic financial services and access to credit to people excluded from – or exploited by – the conventional banking system. The bank provides micro-credit loans for local production and consumption in either Palmas or the national currency (the Brazilian real). Importantly, loans issued in Palmas are interest free, while others are offered at very low interest rates, providing a much-needed alternative to the kind of predatory lenders that exploit people and businesses in other money-poor communities around the world.

    What’s more, rather than awarding loans based on credit history, proof of income, or collateral – something many people in Palmeira lack – many are issued using a neighbor guarantee system. Banco Palma has been so successful that it has inspired the creation of over 60 similar initiatives throughout Brazil, and spurred the development of the Brazilian Network of Community Banks.

    https://www.localfutures.org/programs/global-to-local/planet-local/local-business-finance/banco-palmas
    #économie #banque #finance #alternative #Brésil #Palmeira #Fortaleza #community_development_bank #économie_locale #travail #emploi #économie_solidaire #monnaie_locale #monnaie_alternative #Palma #crédit #micro-crédit #TRUST #Master_TRUST #banque_communautaire

  • Mon engagement à l’extrémité de la science (citoyenne)

    En tant qu’étudiant, je voudrais ici dire pourquoi je me suis engagé en thèse de doctorat en science citoyenne.

    Durant ma dernière année d’étude de master j’ai co-écrit un petit livre intitulé « Nos liens au monde : penser la complexité ». Il examine ce qui n’est pas enseigné à l’école. Il n’est jamais mentionné à l’école que chaque pensée prend forme à partir d’une certaine conception du monde. Ce n’est pas un hasard si au niveau politique, économique et écologique le discours proposé aux citoyens soit globalement homogène. C’est le symptôme d’un large éventail de pensées reposant sur un mode de pensée particulier, basé sur la simplicité. Au prisme de la simplicité, l’être humain, la société, la nature apparaissent comme des entités séparées.

    En tant que jeune, que faire face à ce constat ? Plutôt que d’entrer directement dans l’arène politique et in fine très probablement reproduire à l’identique ce qui est déjà fait, il apparaît plus sage au préalable d’interroger ce qui pourrait redonner du sens, à savoir de développer une conception du monde capable d’aligner à la fois la nature, la société et l’être humain. C’est une question que se posent beaucoup les jeunes, surtout par les temps qui courent. C’est une question fondamentale. Elle en ouvre beaucoup d’autres : comment redonner du sens à l’école ? Comment y insuffler la créativité ? Comment penser au-delà des carcans disciplinaires ? Comment considérer que l’enfant et l’étudiant sont porteurs de germes d’avenir ? Comment penser la grande histoire qui nous relie tous, celle qui contient tout à la fois le Big Bang, les étoiles, l’apparition de la vie, l’émergence des sociétés humaines ? Autant de questions qui tiennent en une seule : comment penser la complexité ?

    Voici ce qui n’est pas enseigné à l’école, ni même à l’université. Cela repose sur une question apparemment très simple : comment penser la complexité ? Penser la complexité nécessite toutes formes de regards et d’intelligences. Mais il faut d’abord comprendre comment les rassembler. C’est là qu’intervient la science citoyenne. Il n’y a pas de définition précise à la science citoyenne. C’est peut-être mieux ainsi car elle reste par conséquent ouverte à de nouvelles contributions innovantes. Globalement, la science citoyenne peut se définir comme un éventail d’activités où les scientifiques professionnels et non-professionnels travaillent ensemble pour répondre à une question posée par un scientifique professionnel.

    L’équipe de recherche ExCiteS de University College London (UCL) pousse ce concept de science citoyenne à ses limites en postulant que tout le monde, y compris les personnes analphabètes ou les personnes marginalisées, peuvent prendre part à la science en posant eux-mêmes une question qu’ils veulent résoudre. Par exemple, les chasseurs-cueilleurs des forêts humides du Congo ont choisi de résoudre les problèmes liés au braconnage illégal. Une fois que la communauté indigène a décidé d’une question de recherche, les scientifiques professionnels lui donnent les moyens de résoudre cette question en récoltant des données, et en les analysant au moyen de cartes (voir ici 7 autres cas d’étude).

    Pourquoi me suis-je engagé en thèse de doctorat dans ce formidable projet ? Parce qu’il constitue une expérimentation pratique qui teste une solution à l’un des plus grands défis du 21e siècle : comment faire face à la complexité du monde ? Si aujourd’hui, la tâche nous apparaît par trop hardie, c’est certainement parce qu’on demeure encore dans un modèle du passé dans lequel seule une minorité d’intelligences a voix au chapitre. Nous pouvons pourtant facilement dépasser ce modèle dès l’instant où le critère de sélection n’est plus « je suis le meilleur » mais « je reconnais que chacun sait quelque chose et que l’on peut construire à partir de ce savoir ». La science citoyenne entreprend l’étape suivante, à savoir, comprendre comment co-produire des connaissances ensemble ?

    Pourquoi me suis-je engagé à l’extrémité de la science (citoyenne) Parce que si l’on démontre que les citoyens peuvent efficacement faire face aux problèmes sociaux, économiques et environnementaux dès lors qu’on part de leurs besoins et qu’on leur donne les moyens de prendre part à la science, alors on change de conception du monde. On passe d’un monde basé sur la compétition à un monde basé sur la coopération. Et c’est tout notre modèle politique qui s’en voit bouleversé. Pour moi, la science est avant tout un engagement politique, vers plus d’#égalité sociale.

    https://uclexcites.blog/2020/09/09/mon-engagement-a-lextremite-de-la-science-citoyenne

    #TRUST #master_TRUST #transformative_studies #justice_sociale #science_citoyenne #sciences_citoyennes #université #Fabien_Moustard

  • Atlas del cambio

    Este Atlas del Cambio es una herramienta que permite visibilizar la transformación política y territorial que se está produciendo a escala estatal, hacia unas ciudades y pueblos municipalistas radicalmente democráticas y feministas. Incluye un repositorio pionero de las políticas realizadas desde mayo de 2015 por las #Ciudades_del_Cambio y dibuja la ciudad municipalista en construcción: valiente, democrática, habitable, que cuida y colabora. El mapa, en continuo desarrollo, es muestra de un espacio político que abarca desde ciudades globales hasta municipios rurales.

    http://ciudadesdelcambio.org
    #cartographie #alternatives #Espagne #municipalisme #changement
    #TRUST #master_TRUST

    –—

    Initiative citée dans l’article :
    L’expérience municipaliste. Un autre possible politique depuis les villes et les villages
    https://www.cairn.info/revue-du-mauss-2019-2-page-69.htm

    –---

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur le (néo-)muncipalisme :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/897300

  • Des #expulsions en Amérique. La production de la #pauvreté par le #logement

    Avis d’expulsion de Matthew Desmond met en lumière le rôle central du #marché_du_logement et des #expulsions_locatives dans la formation de la #pauvreté_urbaine à Milwaukee aux États-Unis.

    Parallèlement au coronavirus, une autre épidémie secoue depuis plusieurs années les États-Unis : les expulsions locatives. Ces dernières sont au cœur de l’ouvrage de Matthew Desmond, Avis d’expulsion, qui, paru initialement en 2016 et récemment traduit en français par Lux Éditeur, fait déjà figure de classique de la sociologie urbaine et de la pauvreté

    . L’étude porte sur Milwaukee, capitale du Wisconsin et ville emblématique de la désindustrialisation, de l’hyper-ségrégation économique et raciale et du démantèlement de l’État social aux États-Unis. Cette étude s’inscrit dans une vaste enquête, détaillée dans la postface du livre, qui mêle des analyses quantitatives (données du recensement, questionnaire et échantillon de jugements d’expulsion prononcés par les tribunaux du comté, etc.) et une enquête ethnographique de grande ampleur menée dans deux quartiers pauvres où l’auteur a séjourné plusieurs mois : le North Side, où se situe le ghetto africain-américain composé de logements privés dégradés, et un quartier de 131 mobile homes (trailer park), majoritairement blanc, situé au sud de la ville. Le cœur de l’ouvrage se focalise sur l’enquête de terrain et propose de suivre la vie quotidienne et la trajectoire d’une douzaine de locataires (Arleen, Lamar, Larraine, Doreen et Patrice, Pam et Ned, Scott, etc.) et de deux ménages propriétaires (Sherrena et Quentin, un couple africain-américain qui possède une quarantaine de logements dans le ghetto, et Tobin, un homme blanc qui possède le parc de mobile homes et en délègue la gestion à Lenny et Susie).

    La force du livre est soutenue par le choix d’une écriture narrative et documentaire, caractérisée par l’effacement du narrateur-ethnographe (choix inhabituel en ethnographie, mais justifié dans la postface du livre). Il privilégie ainsi la description minutieuse des trajectoires accidentées et des situations de pauvreté des locataires endetté·e·s, de leurs stratégies de débrouille et de leurs interactions avec les propriétaires et les institutions au cours de leur procédure d’expulsion. Accompagné d’un important appareil de notes (permettant de mettre en perspective historique et sociologique les scènes décrites), l’ouvrage met en lumière le rôle central du marché du logement et des expulsions locatives dans la production de la pauvreté urbaine, ainsi que la relation d’exploitation économique sur laquelle repose cette dernière.
    Un phénomène d’ampleur et inégalitaire

    L’ouvrage révèle tout d’abord l’ampleur des expulsions locatives à Milwaukee, où environ 16 000 adultes et enfants sont expulsés par les tribunaux en moyenne chaque année, soit 3,5 % des ménages locataires de la ville. Ce chiffre ne compte pas les nombreuses expulsions informelles qu’entreprennent les propriétaires à l’écart des institutions. La banalité des expulsions dans les quartiers pauvres et ségrégués, qui rappelle celle des saisies immobilières suite à la crise des subprimes, se constate dans d’autres villes, comme Cleveland ou Chicago (dont respectivement 11 % et 7 % des locataires ont par exemple été assignés en justice pour expulsion en 2012). À titre de comparaison, en France métropolitaine, près de 150 000 affaires d’expulsion pour dette sont instruites chaque année par les tribunaux d’instance (soit environ 1 % de l’ensemble des ménages locataires), et près de 15 500 ménages avaient été expulsés manu militari suite à l’intervention de la force publique en 2017

    .

    Malgré leur nombre, les expulsions ne frappent pas les quartiers et les ménages au hasard. Matthew Desmond montre que le taux d’expulsion est sensiblement plus élevé dans les quartiers à majorité africaine-américaine et hispanique, dont respectivement 7,5 % et 4 % des ménages locataires sont en moyenne expulsés chaque année (contre 1,5 % dans les quartiers à majorité blanche). L’auteur met notamment en lumière la très forte surreprésentation d’une catégorie de ménages parmi les locataires en proie à l’expulsion : les femmes africaines-américaines. Ces femmes vivant dans les quartiers noirs représentent seulement 9,6 % de la population de Milwaukee mais près de 30 % des locataires expulsés. Sur ce point, Matthew Desmond avance une thèse aussi forte qu’intéressante : dans le cadre du gouvernement néolibéral des quartiers pauvres et hyper-ségrégés, marqué par la substitution de l’État pénal à l’État social (Wacquant 2007), les expulsions locatives sont pour les femmes africaines-américaines l’équivalent structural de ce que représente l’incarcération de masse pour les jeunes hommes africains-américains, à savoir le mécanisme principal de leur entrée durable dans la pauvreté

    . Ces deux processus sont aussi liés en pratique, au sens où, comme le rappelle Desmond après d’autres travaux (Goffman 2014), la condamnation pénale des hommes noirs les empêche bien souvent de devenir titulaires d’un contrat de location et fait peser un risque accru d’expulsion sur les femmes les hébergeant.
    L’expulsion entre structure et interactions sociales

    Comment expliquer l’ampleur et le caractère inégalitaire des expulsions locatives ? L’auteur avance un premier ensemble de facteurs structurels, comme l’équation impossible entre la pénurie chronique de revenus des locataires (liée à un licenciement, un handicap, etc.) et l’augmentation tendancielle des loyers (la « première bouche à nourrir » du foyer, qui absorbe jusqu’à trois quarts des revenus domestique) et du coût des biens de première nécessité, pour lesquels de nombreux travaux statistiques montrent que les « pauvres paient plus » (Caplovitz 1967) (en raison par exemple de la rareté et de la segmentation de l’offre commerciale située dans le périmètre qui leur est accessible sans transport). Mais l’apport le plus original de l’ouvrage réside dans l’analyse de deux autres facteurs : les dynamiques interactionnelles (interactional patterns) entre propriétaires et locataires, et les effets pervers du recours aux institutions. À l’échelle des interactions, Matthew Desmond compare par exemple dans le chapitre 9 les cas de deux locataires blancs du parc à caravanes de Tobin : Larraine, une ancienne stripteaseuse de 54 ans au chômage qui vit avec ses deux filles adultes et son petit-fils, et Jerry, un homme blanc de 42 ans vivant dans le mobile home à proximité. L’auteur montre comment la distance et les normes de genre séparant Larraine de son propriétaire limitent ses possibilités de négocier ou de rembourser sa dette locative sous forme de travail informel, à la différence de son homologue de sexe masculin, Jerry – qui réalise des travaux de réparation pour Tobin, et privilégie les affinités ou l’explication viriles plutôt que l’évitement de ce dernier.

    Plutôt que l’offre de travail informel, les femmes tendent à privilégier les solidarités familiales ou le recours aux institutions publiques pour faire valoir leurs droits : services d’aide sociale, d’inspection et d’hygiène des logements, de police, etc. Or – et c’est là l’un des résultats majeurs de l’enquête – le recours aux institutions tend à se retourner contre les locataires, au sens où il précipite la décision des propriétaires de demander l’expulsion. L’auteur prend l’exemple du « choix douloureux » des femmes battues (chap. 15), pour qui la dénonciation des violences de leur conjoint auprès des services de police accroît leur risque d’expulsion. Ainsi, Sherrena décide de faire expulser Arleen (une mère célibataire noire vivant avec ses deux fils) et sa colocataire Crystal (une jeune fille noire de 18 ans souffrant de troubles bipolaires), après que la première a été agressée physiquement par son conjoint Chris et que la seconde a appelé les forces de police – l’intervention des forces de police étant synonyme de contravention (pour « propriété nuisible ») et faisant craindre à la propriétaire l’intervention d’autres services institutionnels auprès de son parc immobilier. Dans le même ordre d’idées, Matthew Desmond montre comment la présence d’enfants au domicile augmente à la fois les difficultés à trouver un logement et la probabilité individuelle des ménages d’être expulsés par le juge – la présence d’enfants suscitant la méfiance et la sévérité accrue des propriétaires en leur faisant craindre la visite des services de protection de l’enfance et de l’inspection des logements.
    Une théorie de la pauvreté

    Le cas des expulsions locatives permet plus largement de renouveler la sociologie de la pauvreté sur quatre aspects. L’auteur souligne tout d’abord la rationalité des comportements et des stratégies économiques des locataires pauvres, dont certaines dépenses apparaissent incohérentes et condamnables aux yeux de la majorité. Le chapitre 18, l’un des plus forts et emblématiques de l’ouvrage, relate par exemple comment Larraine, peu après avoir récupéré ses 80 dollars de bons alimentaires mensuels, décide de dépenser l’intégralité de ces derniers en achetant du homard et des pattes de crabe royal. Loin de constituer un acte insensé, Desmond montre que cet achat n’est pas la cause mais la conséquence de la pauvreté, et qu’il constitue un acte cohérent dans ce cadre : l’ampleur des dettes et de la pénurie d’argent annule en effet le bénéfice de toute forme d’épargne ou de privation supplémentaire, dont aucune ne permettrait aux pauvres de sortir de leur condition. « Alors ils choisissent de ne pas le faire. Ils essaient de survivre avec panache et d’agrémenter de plaisirs la souffrance. Ils se défoncent un petit peu, boivent un coup, jouent de temps en temps ou s’offrent une télévision. Ou ils achètent du homard avec des bons alimentaires » (p. 286).

    L’ouvrage rappelle, deuxièmement, l’hétérogénéité sociale des ménages pauvres, et notamment l’importance de la division et de la ségrégation raciales qui traversent ces derniers, en dépit de la proximité objective de leurs conditions de vie. Ce clivage racial est illustré par le cas de Pam et Ned, un couple d’ouvriers blancs expulsé par Tobin de leur mobile home, et qui, après avoir été hébergés par leurs voisins toxicomanes (Scott et Teddy) et en dépit de leurs difficultés à se reloger (près de quarante visites sans succès), refusent catégoriquement d’étendre leurs recherches d’appartement à proximité des quartiers noirs. Cette hétérogénéité n’exclut toutefois pas l’exercice de solidarités de famille, de voisinage ou d’églises. De ce point de vue, Desmond analyse dans le chapitre 12 un type particulier de ressources relationnelles que mobilisent les locataires pauvres : les « liens jetables » (disposable ties), liens éphémères noués à l’occasion d’une rencontre épisodique et qui jouent un rôle crucial dans les quartiers pauvres, à l’image de la proposition faite par Crystal à Arleen d’emménager ensemble suite à leur rencontre lors de la visite de l’appartement de cette dernière, alors en attente d’expulsion.

    L’enquête de Matthew Desmond montre, troisièmement, les effets néfastes et durables de l’expulsion sur l’ensemble de la trajectoire des ménages (perte d’emploi, mal-logement, suspension des aides sociales, santé mentale, scolarité des enfants, etc.), qui amènent l’auteur à inverser la causalité des phénomènes : les expulsions sont en vérité moins la conséquence que la cause de la pauvreté urbaine. Cette entrée durable dans la pauvreté apparaît tout au long de la troisième partie de l’ouvrage, qui est rythmée par les efforts et les difficultés des expulsé·e·s à retrouver un logement, à l’image des 86 candidatures déposées sans succès par Arleen, après son expulsion par Sherrena et sa colocation de fortune avec Crystal. Ce reclassement est notamment rendu difficile par une institution particulière : les agences de données personnelles (les « credit bureaus »), comme le Rent Recovery Service ou le Consolited Court Automation Programs, qui permettent aux propriétaires de se renseigner sur les antécédents de crédit, d’expulsion ou pénaux de n’importe quel ménage, et favorisent ainsi l’exclusion prolongée des locataires ayant connu une expulsion.

    En définitive, le cas des expulsions locatives conduit l’auteur à formuler une nouvelle théorie sociologique de la pauvreté, qui se distingue des conceptions habituelles de cette dernière (Duvoux et Papuchon 2018). À l’issue de l’ouvrage, la pauvreté apparaît moins comme une inégalité de revenus, comme une privation de consommation, comme une relation d’assistance, ou comme une culture spécifique, que comme le fruit d’une relation d’exploitation économique, dont la propriété et le marché du logement constituent un pilier. Cette relation d’exploitation apparaît tout d’abord à travers le contraste que met en scène l’ouvrage entre les situations des locataires et des propriétaires, que Matthew Desmond observe également de près. L’auteur suit par exemple Sherrena lors de ses tournées de collecte et de recouvrement des loyers, au tribunal, mais également lors des réceptions luxueuses et des conférences des associations de propriétaires (le Milwaukee Real Estate Investor Networking Group, le Landlord Training Program), ou lors de sa soirée du Nouvel An (pendant laquelle un incendie embrase l’immeuble où réside Lamar).

    L’exploitation se révèle ainsi dans les profits

    que tirent les propriétaires de la perception de loyers en moyenne plus élevés dans les quartiers pauvres et les logements dégradés et des bénéfices du travail informel de leurs locataires, deux facteurs qui font du ghetto « une affaire en or » (titre du chapitre 11). Elle apparaît également à travers les activités économiques indirectes que génère le délogement, qui forment un véritable marché de l’expulsion : entreprises de déménagement et de garde-meubles (comme la Eagle Moving and Storage, à laquelle Larraine et Arleen paient un loyer pour stocker leurs biens après leur expulsion), ou activités informelles de récupération des matériaux dans les logements vides (sur lesquelles les propriétaires perçoivent une commission, à l’image des 60 dollars que verse le ferrailleur Rufus à Tobin après l’expulsion de Théo). En conclusion, même s’il ne définit pas cette notion et n’en discute pas les usages en études urbaines (par exemple dans les travaux de David Harvey et de la géographie radicale), l’auteur déplore que le concept d’exploitation ait été « effacé du débat sur la pauvreté », alors que cette dernière « n’est pas uniquement le produit de faibles revenus, mais […] aussi un produit de marchés extractifs » (p. 399). Il plaide ainsi pour la mise en place de politiques publiques limitant cette logique en matière de logement et d’expulsion : encadrement des loyers, révision des règles d’attribution des logements sociaux dont sont exclus les plus pauvres, système de bons d’attribution et d’allocation pour le logement (housing vouchers), aide juridictionnelle permettant d’assurer une meilleure défense des locataires au tribunal.

    Bien qu’il ait été critiqué pour son usage « spontanéiste » de l’ethnographie – un usage hyper-descriptif et inductif laissant penser que les faits se présentent de manière exhaustive et univoque à un observateur extérieur et neutre, et ne sont pas filtrés par une théorisation préalable (Burawoy 2017) – l’ouvrage de Matthew Desmond souffre de peu de limites. Mon seul regret porte peut-être sur les acteurs régaliens de l’expulsion (les juges et les forces de police) dont l’auteur, focalisé sur les propriétaires et les locataires, ne décrit que brièvement les logiques d’action

    . Or, l’ampleur et l’augmentation des expulsions ne sont pas qu’une cause et une conséquence mécanique de la paupérisation et des dettes des locataires, ni des recours judiciaires des propriétaires : elles reposent également sur les contraintes spécifiques et le pouvoir discrétionnaire des institutions d’État décidant, en dernière instance, d’user ou non de la violence physique légitime à l’encontre des locataires. Cet argument éclaire également le cas français où, entre 2010 et 2017, le nombre d’affaires d’expulsion pour impayés portées devant les tribunaux par les propriétaires a augmenté (+4 %) moins fortement que les décisions de justice prononçant l’expulsion et que les interventions effectives de la force publique pour déloger manu militari les locataires (+11 % et +33 %). Un tel « durcissement de la réponse régalienne » (François 2017), sur lequel le livre reste muet, explique certainement une part significative de l’accroissement des expulsions aux États-Unis. Cette critique n’enlève rien à la force et à la rigueur de l’ouvrage de Matthew Desmond, ni à l’actualité de ses préconisations face à la crise économique et sociale que laisse déjà entrevoir la crise sanitaire actuelle.

    https://metropolitiques.eu/Des-expulsions-en-Amerique.html
    #USA #Etats-Unis #urban_matter

    signalé aussi par @monolecte
    https://seenthis.net/messages/898324

    • Avis d’expulsion. Enquête sur l’exploitation de la pauvreté urbaine

      Plongée dans le quotidien disloqué de huit foyers des quartiers pauvres de #Milwaukee, au #Wisconsin, où chaque jour, des dizaines de ménages sont expulsés de leurs maisons. Arleen élève ses garçons avec les 20 dollars qui lui restent pour tout le mois, après avoir payé le loyer. Lamar, amputé des jambes, s’occupe des gamins du quartier en plus d’éduquer ses deux fils. Scott, infirmier devenu toxicomane après une hernie discale, vit dans un mobile home insalubre. Tous sont pris dans l’engrenage de l’endettement et leur sort est entre les mains de leurs propriétaires, que l’on suit aussi au fil du récit.

      Fruit de longues années de terrain, ce livre montre comment la dégradation des #politiques_du_logement et la #déréglementation du marché de l’immobilier fabriquent et entretiennent l’#endettement chronique et la pauvreté, une violente épidémie qui s’avère très rentable pour certains et qui frappe surtout les plus vulnérables, en l’occurrence les #femmes_noires. Ouvrage magistral et captivant qui offre un regard précis et juste sur la pauvreté et un implacable plaidoyer pour le droit à un habitat digne pour tous.

      https://luxediteur.com/catalogue/avis-dexpulsion
      #droit_au_logement #TRUST #Master_TRUST

      #livre

  • #EcoMobility_Alliance

    The transportation sector has a significant impact on both the local and global environment. Transportation contributes approximately 25 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, and has a significant impact on local air quality and equity. Fortunately, cities are constantly finding new and innovative ways to mitigate that impact. Founded by #ICLEI in 2011, the EcoMobility Alliance is a network of ambitious local and regional governments, supported by experts and businesses, aiming to become ecomobility frontrunners by prioritizing people and the environment when it comes to transport planning. The EcoMobility Alliance offers a platform through which local and regional governments share the latest policy and technology developments in their cities and regions, with the goal of making effective reforms to their own transportation networks.

    https://www.iclei.org/en/EcoMobility_Alliance.html

    #mobilité #éco-mobilité #TRUST #Master_TRUST #réseau #réseau_international #mobilité_douce #plateforme #transports

  • QUANTO E’ PESA L’ARIA A SCUOLA ?

    La prima mappa partecipata realizzata a Febbraio sull’inquinamento da No2 fa emergere dati critici anche nelle aree in prossimità delle scuole di Bologna.
    I genitori vogliono approfondire e insieme ad #Ariapesa promuovono una nuova campagna di rilevazione in tutte le scuole.

    Alla luce dei dati sull’inquinamento da biossido di azoto rilevati dalla rete civica Aria Pesa nel mese di febbraio 2018 attraverso 317 campionatori posti su tutto il territorio della città di Bologna (scarica il report qui: https://ariapesa.org/docs/report_AriaPesa.pdf), i genitori osservano con crescente attenzione il quadro complessivo che emerge sulla qualità dell’aria che si respira in città. Prendendo a riferimento Piazza di Porta San Felice in cui Arpae nel 2017 aveva rilevato uno sforamento del 15% della media annuale consentita per legge, dalle elaborazioni di Aria Pesa emerge che il 53% dei rilevatori posti nella città di Bologna avrebbe superato gli stessi limiti.

    Tra i dati raccolti, emergono in modo puntuale anche quelli rilevati vicino alle aree scolastiche. Sebbene la collocazione rispetto ai plessi varia da caso a caso e spesso si tratta di campionatori in prossimità delle scuole posti autonomamente dai cittadini, tuttavia emerge chiaramente un dato significativo e problematico: un numero significativo di scuole ha una qualità dell’aria simile o peggiore (in due casi è peggiore) a quella di Porta San Felice.

    La tematica, alla luce dei dati attualmente disponibili, suggerisce la necessità di un approfondimento e una campagna specifica.

    In questo senso, in collaborazione con Aria Pesa, i comitati dei genitori delle scuole di Bologna promuovono e finanziano l’iniziativa di una nuova rilevazione del biossido di azoto mediante campionatori posti all’interno di tutte le aree scolastiche cittadine e che permetteranno di avere una fotografia precisa e completa sulla qualità dell’aria che respirano tutti i giorni gli alunni.

    A partire dunque dall’inizio del prossimo anno scolastico, partirà la campagna “Quanto è pesa l’aria a scuola?” con diversi incontri pubblici nei quartieri della città in cui sarà possibile avere tutte le informazioni e già nelle prossime settimane verranno comunicate le modalità di adesione ed i canali a cui rivolgersi.

    Tutti i dati raccolti verranno poi analizzati, illustrati e resi pubblici attraverso i canali della rete civica Aria Pesa.

    https://ariapesa.org

    #pollution_atmosphérique #air #cartographie #cartographie_participative #NO2 #Bologne #écoles #mensuration #données

    #TRUST #master_TRUST

  • #Jane's_Walk

    We walk our cities to honor and activate the ideas of Jane Jacobs. Jane’s Walk is a community-based approach to city building that uses volunteer-led walking tours to make space for people to observe, reflect, share, question and re-imagine the places in which they live, work and play.

    https://janeswalk.org

    #urbanisme #balades_urbaines #Jane_Jacobs
    #TRUST #master_TRUST #ressources_pédagogiques

    –—

    Ainsi baptisées en hommage à l’urbaniste Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), les

    « Promenades de Jane » ont lieu chaque année, le premier week-end de mai. Il s’agit de visites piétonnes organisées par des citoyens à la découverte de la beauté des bijoux architecturaux de l’#espace_public, mais aussi des enjeux liés à la #culture, à la #mémoire, à l’#histoire et aux #luttes_sociales. L’objectif est d’encourager les gens à partager des #anecdotes sur leur #quartier, à découvrir des facettes inconnues de leur communauté et à faire de la #marche un moyen de communication avec leurs voisins. Depuis sa création en 2007, des milliers de personnes ont participé à ce festival mondial de l’espace public. En 2017,des marches ont été organisées dans plus de 200 villes de 41 pays.

    (source : Barcelona en Comù, 2019, Guide du municipalisme, p.121)

    ping @cede

  • Mapas de los Puntos críticos - carte des #points_critiques

    Una ciudad diferente para hombres y para mujeres

    Mujeres y hombres no vivimos la ciudad de la misma manera. La división sexual del trabajo hace que la forma y frecuencia de los desplazamientos, por ejemplo, sean diferentes. En cuanto a la seguridad también hay diferencias: según el Diagnóstico de situación de Mujeres y Hombres en Donostia elaborado por el Ayuntamiento en 2013, hay el doble de mujeres (62%) que de hombres (32%) que se sienten inseguras en la ciudad, y lo hacen con una frecuencia tres veces mayor que los hombres; sobre todo en su barrio (35%), pero también en otros; en pasadizos (39%), parkings (17%), paradas de autobus (12%), y en su propio hogar (11%). Muchas mujeres se sienten inseguras por ir solas (47%), por salir de noche (44%), por la falta de iluminación (35%), por ser mujeres (27%), por su edad (10%)...

    Aunque hablemos de percepción de seguridad, esta tiene consecuencias en la libertad de movimientos de las personas y en especial de las mujeres. Por eso decimos que mujeres y hombres no vivimos la ciudad de la misma forma.

    Los grupos feministas fueron pioneros en poner de manifiesto esta realidad. En 1996, el grupo Plazandreok y el Foro Mujeres y Ciudad publicaron el Mapa de la Ciudad Prohibida, donde visibilizaban los lugares más problemáticos de la ciudad. En 2013, el Ayuntamiento de Donostia creó un grupo interdepartamental para actualizar el mapa.

    Mapa de Puntos Críticos

    El grupo interdepartamental lo forman los siguientes departamentos: Urbanismo, Bienestar Social, Participación, Infraestructuras Urbanas, Proyectos y Obras, Guardia Municipal, Movilidad e Igualdad. El grupo puso un nuevo nombre al mapa: mapa de puntos críticos, y empezó por definir los criterios para considerar un lugar como punto crítico. Después, el grupo recopiló información de los departamentos municipales y de la ciudadanía para la actualización del mapa. Para dar a conocer el mapa de los puntos críticos se repartió este documento en todas las viviendas de Donostia. Haz clic en la imagen para verlo.

    https://www.donostia.eus/info/ciudadano/igualdad_plan.nsf/voWebContenidosId/NT000009AE?OpenDocument&idioma=cas&id=A374066376363&cat=&doc=D
    https://www.donostia.eus/app/berdintasuna/PuntuKritiko.nsf/fwLugares?ReadForm&idioma=cas&id=A374066376363

    #cartographie #cartographie_critique #femmes #espace_public #sécurité #féminisme #sécurité #genre #Donostia #Espagne

    #TRUST #Master_TRUST

    ping @reka @cede @_kg_

  • ATLAS D’UTOPIES. LES VILLES TRANSFORMATRICES ONT PRÉSENTÉ DES INITIATIVES

    À propos de l’Atlas des utopies

    « L’utopie est à l’horizon. Je fais deux pas en avant, elle s’éloigne de deux pas. Je fais dix pas de plus, l’horizon s’éloigne de dix pas. J’aurai beau marcher, je ne l’atteindrai jamais. A quoi sert l’utopie ? Elle sert à ça : à avancer. »
    – Fernando Birri, cité par Eduardo Galeano

    L’#Atlas_des_Utopies présente des #transformations collectives qui garantissent l’accès aux #droits_fondamentaux : #eau, #énergie, #logement et #alimentation.

    L’Atlas des Utopies rassemble les finalistes des trois éditions du Concours du Choix du Public des Villes Transformatrices qui vise à illustrer les villes et les collectifs travaillant sur des #solutions pour garantir l’accès à l’eau, à la #nourriture, à l’énergie et au logement.

    L’Atlas n’est en aucun cas une #cartographie exhaustive des #pratiques_transformatrices, mais un échantillon représentatif, résultat d’un processus d’évaluation effectué par des pairs, et mené par une équipe interdisciplinaire de chercheurs et chercheuses, de militant-e-s, de responsables politiques et de représentant-e-s d’ONG internationales.

    Partant de la conviction qu’il existe de nombreuses tentatives de transformation en cours - contrairement au mantra néolibéral d’ « il n’y a pas d’#alternative » - l’objectif de l’Atlas est de présenter celles qui, selon les critères d’évaluation du #Concours_des_Villes_Transformatrices, sont considérées comme uniques et particulièrement inspirantes. Tout comme un télescope se concentre sur certaines constellations au cœur de l’univers infini, l’Atlas signale certaines initiatives dans l’intention d’aider les technicien-ne-s et les étudiant-e-s à voguer sur les flots d’alternatives remarquables et stimulantes déjà en cours, afin de les découvrir.

    Les cas dévoilent comment les solutions publiques, fondées sur les principes de #coopération et de #solidarité plutôt que sur la concurrence et le profit privé, ont mieux réussi à répondre aux besoins fondamentaux des personnes et, ce qui est peut-être tout aussi important, à créer un esprit de #confiance et d’#autonomisation qui consolide les communautés pour de nombreux autres défis. Ces cas présentent des mouvements de la communauté de base à #Cochabamba et en #Palestine, mais aussi au cœur de villes mondiales comme #Paris ou #Barcelone, et ont vaincu les sociétés transnationales et les gouvernements nationaux hostiles pour apporter des solutions démocratiques, centrées sur la population, pour l’accès des communautés aux besoins fondamentaux, quelles que soient les différences de culture ou d’échelle entre les contextes géographiques variés. Tous les êtres humains ont besoin d’eau, de nourriture, d’énergie et de logement pour survivre, et l’Atlas montre des exemples extraordinaires d’organisations qui garantissent l’accès aux droits fondamentaux de leur intégrant-e-s.

    Ces initiatives démontrent en pratique qu’un autre monde est non seulement possible, mais qu’il est déjà en processus de réalisation !

    L’initiative Villes Transformatrices et Atlas des Utopies vise à attirer l’attention d’une ample gamme de groupes et d’organisations qui explorent ce qui fonctionne en termes de transformation des relations de pouvoir afin de garantir la justice sociale et écologique, et favoriser un apprentissage mutuel et une coopération à grande échelle.

    https://transformativecities.org/fr/atlas-of-utopias

    #atlas #utopie #villes #urban_matter #TRUST #Master_TRUST #droits_humains

  • #Urbanisme. Dans les #villes sud-africaines, les fantômes de l’#apartheid

    Jusque dans leur #architecture et leur organisation, les villes sud-africaines ont été pensées pour diviser #Noirs et #Blancs. Vingt ans après la fin de l’apartheid, des activistes se battent pour qu’elles soient enfin repensées.

    Lors de la dernière nuit que Sophie Rubins a passée dans son taudis de tôle rouillée, au début du mois de septembre, la première pluie du printemps s’est abattue sur son toit. De son lit, elle l’a regardée s’infiltrer dans les interstices des parois. Les fentes étaient si grandes qu’on pouvait « voir les étoiles », dit-elle, et en entrant, l’eau faisait des flaques sur le sol, comme à chaque fois qu’il avait plu durant les trente dernières années.

    Mme Rubins avait passé la majeure partie de sa vie dans ce « zozo » - une bicoque en tôle - situé dans une arrière-cour d’Eldorado Park. Ce #township de la banlieue sud de #Johannesburg avait été construit pour abriter un ensemble de minorités ethniques désigné dans la hiérarchie raciale de l’apartheid sous le nom de « communauté de couleur ». Les emplois et les services publics y étaient rares. La plupart des postes à pourvoir se trouvaient dans les secteurs « blancs » de la ville, où l’on parvenait après un long trajet en bus.

    Mais cette nuit était la dernière qu’elle y passait, car, le lendemain matin, elle déménageait de l’autre côté de la ville, dans un appartement qui lui avait été cédé par le gouvernement. Cela faisait vingt-quatre ans qu’elle figurait sur une liste d’attente.

    Je pensais avoir ce logement pour y élever mes enfants, soupire-t-elle, mais je suis quand même contente car j’aurai un bel endroit pour mourir."

    Construits pour diviser

    Quand la #ségrégation a officiellement pris fin en Afrique du Sud au milieu des années 1990, les urbanistes ont été confrontés à une question existentielle : comment réunir les communautés dans des villes qui avaient été construites pour les séparer ?? Pendant des décennies, ils l’avaient esquivée pour se concentrer sur une question plus vaste encore : comment fournir un #logement décent à des gens entassés dans des quartiers pauvres, isolés et dépourvus de services publics ?? Depuis la fin de l’apartheid, le gouvernement a construit des logements pour des millions de personnes comme Mme Rubins.

    Mais la plupart sont situés en #périphérie, dans des quartiers dont l’#isolement contribue à accroître les #inégalités au lieu de les réduire. Ces dernières années, des militants ont commencé à faire pression sur les municipalités pour qu’elles inversent la tendance et construisent des #logements_sociaux près des #centres-villes, à proximité des emplois et des écoles. D’après eux, même s’ils ne sont pas gratuits, ces logements à loyer modéré sont un premier pas vers l’intégration de la classe populaire dans des secteurs de la ville d’où elle était exclue.

    Le 31 août, un tribunal du Cap a donné gain de cause à ces militants en décrétant que la ville devait annuler la vente d’un bien immobilier qu’elle possédait près du quartier des affaires et y construire des logements sociaux. « Si de sérieux efforts ne sont pas faits par les autorités pour redresser la situation, stipule le jugement, l’#apartheid_spatial perdurera. » Selon des experts, cette décision de justice pourrait induire une réaction en chaîne en contraignant d’autres villes sud-africaines à chercher à rééquilibrer un statu quo très inégalitaire.

    Ce jugement est important car c’est la première fois qu’un tribunal estime qu’un logement abordable et bien placé n’est pas quelque chose qu’il est bon d’avoir, mais qu’il faut avoir", observe Nobukhosi Ngwenya, qui poursuit des recherches sur les inégalités de logements à l’African Centre for Cities [un centre de recherches sur l’urbanisation] du Cap.

    Près de la décharge

    Cet avis va à contre-courant de l’histoire mais aussi du présent. L’appartement dans lequel Mme Rubins a emménagé au début de septembre dans la banlieue ouest de Johannesburg a été construit dans le cadre du #Programme_de_reconstruction_et_de_développement (#PRD), un chantier herculéen lancé par le gouvernement dans les années 1990 pour mettre fin à des décennies - voire des siècles en certains endroits - de ségrégation et d’#expropriation des Noirs. Fondé sur l’obligation inscrite dans la Constitution sud-africaine d’"assurer de bonnes conditions de logement" à chaque citoyen, ce programme s’engageait à fournir un logement gratuit à des millions de Sud-Africains privés des services essentiels et de conditions de vie correctes par le gouvernement blanc.

    Le PRD a été dans une certaine mesure une réussite. En 2018, le gouvernement avait déjà livré quelque 3,2 millions de logements et continuait d’en construire. Mais pour réduire les coûts, la quasi-totalité de ces habitations ont été bâties en périphérie des villes, dans les secteurs où Noirs, Asiatiques et métis étaient naguère cantonnés par la loi.

    Le nouvel appartement de Mme Rubins, par exemple, jouxte la décharge d’une mine, dans un quartier d’usines et d’entrepôts construits de manière anarchique. Le trajet jusqu’au centre-ville coûte 2 dollars, soit plus que le salaire horaire minimum.

    Cet #éloignement du centre est aussi un symbole d’#injustice. Sous l’apartheid, on ne pouvait accéder à ces #banlieues qu’avec une autorisation de la municipalité, et il fallait souvent quitter les lieux avant le coucher du soleil.

    « Il y a eu beaucoup de luttes pour l’accès à la terre dans les villes sud-africaines et elles ont été salutaires », souligne Mandisa Shandu, directrice de Ndifuna Ukwazi, l’association de défense des droits au logement qui a lancé l’action en #justice au Cap pour que la vente immobilière de la municipalité soit annulée. « Ce que nous avons fait, c’est réclamer que l’#accès mais aussi l’#emplacement soient pris en considération. »

    Au début de 2016, l’association a appris que la municipalité du Cap avait vendu une propriété située dans le #centre-ville, [l’école] Tafelberg, à une école privée locale. Alors que l’opération avait déjà eu lieu, l’association a porté l’affaire devant les tribunaux en faisant valoir que ce bien n’était pas vendable car la ville était tenue d’affecter toutes ses ressources à la fourniture de #logements_sociaux.

    Après quatre ans de procédure, le tribunal a décidé d’invalider la vente. Les autorités ont jusqu’à la fin de mai 2021 pour présenter un plan de logements sociaux dans le centre du Cap. « Je pense que ce jugement aura une influence majeure au-delà du Cap, estime Edgar Pieterse, directeur de l’African Centre for Cities. Il redynamisera le programme de logements sociaux dans tout le pays. »

    Fin de « l’#urbanisme_ségrégationniste »

    Cependant, même avec cette nouvelle impulsion, le programme ne répondra qu’à une partie du problème. Selon M. Pieterse, le gouvernement doit trouver des moyens pour construire des #logements_gratuits ou à #loyer_modéré pour faire des villes sud-africaines des endroits plus égalitaires.

    Ainsi, à Johannesburg, la municipalité a passé ces dernières années à améliorer le réseau des #transports_publics et à promouvoir la construction le long de liaisons qui avaient été établies pour faciliter les déplacements entre des quartiers coupés du centre-ville par un urbanisme ségrégationniste.

    Quand Mme Rubins a emménagé dans son nouvel appartement, elle ne pensait pas à tout cela. Pendant que l’équipe de déménageurs en salopette rouge des services publics déposait ses étagères et ses armoires, dont les pieds en bois étaient gauchis et gonflés par trente ans de pluies torrentielles, elle a jeté un coup d’oeil par la fenêtre de sa nouvelle chambre, qui donnait sur un terrain jonché de détritus.

    Sa nièce, June, qui avait emménagé à l’étage au-dessus une semaine plus tôt, l’aidait à trier les sacs et les cartons. Mme Rubins s’est demandé à haute voix s’il y avait de bonnes écoles publiques dans le coin et si les usines embauchaient. Elle l’espérait, car le centre-ville était à trente minutes en voiture.

    Si tu es désespérée et que Dieu pense à toi, tu ne dois pas te plaindre. Tu dois juste dire merci", lui a soufflé June.

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/article/urbanisme-dans-les-villes-sud-africaines-les-fantomes-de-lapa
    #Afrique_du_Sud #division #séparation #Segregated_By_Design #TRUST #master_TRUST

    ping @cede

  • Verso un Ente di Decolonizzazione

    Alla Quadriennale d’Arte 2020 a Roma la nuova installazione di Decolonizing Architecture Art Research con dossier fotografico di Luca Capuano.

    Nel 1940 il regime fascista istituì l’Ente di Colonizzazione del Latifondo Siciliano, seguendo il modello dell’Ente di Colonizzazione della Libia, e delle architetture coloniali in Eritrea e in Etiopia, e di quanto già sperimentato con i piani di bonifica integrale e di “colonizzazione interna” dell’Agro Pontino negli anni trenta. Utilizzando diverse forme di violenza e oppressione, forme genocidiarie nei confronti dei popoli colonizzati e ingegneria sociale e violenza di classe sul fronte italiano, il fascismo aveva individuato in questi “territori”, uno spazio geografico astratto, uniforme e omogeneo da “modernizzare” e “ripopolare”, in quanto considerato “vuoto”, “sottosviluppato” e “arretrato”. A tale scopo la Sicilia era diventata agli occhi del fascismo, l’ultimo fronte della modernizzazione, il cui mondo rurale, in contrapposizione alla città, era considerato un terreno “vergine” da occupare.

    Prima che il conflitto mondiale lo impedisse il fascismo inaugurò fino al 1943 otto borghi siciliani, mentre altri rimasero incompiuti. Seguendo i principi dell’estetica e di planimetrie moderniste, dell’architettura coloniale fascista, i borghi venivano costruiti attorno al vuoto della piazza, “centro civico” delle istituzioni dello Stato atte a “civilizzare” campagne considerate vuote e senza vita: la Casa del fascio, l’Ente della Colonizzazione, la Chiesa, le Poste, la Scuola sono soltanto alcune delle istituzioni designate a forgiare l’educazione culturale, politica e spirituale del “nuovo colono fascista”. I nuovi borghi di fondazione avrebbero cosi “connesso” tra di loro le varie parti del nuovo Impero italiano.

    Per celebrare questa unità fittizia, molti dei villaggi siciliani tra cui Borgo Bonsignore, Borgo Fazio e Borgo Giuliano presero il nome di martiri fascisti, camice nere, soldati e coloni morti in Etiopia durante la guerra coloniale di occupazione. Allo stesso tempo, il fascismo aveva continuato la “colonizzazione interna” come strumento e strategia di oppressione del dissenso interno. Se da un lato i borghi erano stati pensati come strumento e spazio di trasformazione agricola delle campagne siciliane in chiave estensiva, estrattiva e capitalista, i piani di migrazione forzate verso Sud servivano al regime ad impedire rivolte nelle campagne del Nord, spezzare i legami tra i lavoratori agricoli con i movimenti antifascisti, e trasformare i braccianti in piccoli proprietari terrieri.

    Oggi la maggior parte di questi borghi sono caduti in rovina. Il depopolamento e le migrazioni delle campagne siciliane nel dopoguerra, con il tempo hanno fatto si che gli edifici che ospitavano le istituzioni fasciste cadessero in abbandono, o in alcuni casi venissero trasformate dai residenti in abitazioni. Questi villaggi sono oggi la materializzazione di una sospensione, non la definitiva eliminazione di un percorso storico e politico. Nonostante la caduta del fascismo e la fine del colonialismo storico, la de-fascistizzazione e la decolonizzazione dell’Italia rimangono processi purtroppo incompiuti. Ad oggi il mancato processo di revisione critica ha fatto si che l’apparato culturale e politico del colonialismo e fascismo sia sopravvissuto: tra questi il razzismo istituzionale e un sentimento diffuso della presunta superiorità della civiltà europea, la conseguente deumanizzazione delle popolazioni proveniente dal mondo (post)coloniale, il sopravvivere di monumenti e strade che celebrano l’ideologia e la storia fascista e coloniale, e la carenza di un’educazione alla conoscenza critica del passato all’interno del sistema educativo italiano.

    In Italia, come dimostrato dai villaggi siciliani, questa impasse politica e culturale di lunga durata è molto visibile attraverso la normalizzazione o la noncuranza dell’architettura fascista. Come è stato dibattuto dalla critica e letteratura postcoloniale negli ultimi anni e contestato a gran voce nel 2020 sull’onda dei moti globali contro la presenza dei simboli che celebrano le violenze imperiali e coloniali negli spazi urbani dell’emisfero Nord, in Italia è molto comune trovare edifici coloniali/fascisti (oltre a monumenti, targhe, memoriali e toponomastica) che piuttosto che essere rimossi, smantellati o distrutti, sono stati lasciati intatti. Sin dalla conclusione della Seconda Guerra mondiale, l’architettura fascista (e progetti urbanistici) sono stati riutilizzati o sviluppati dai governi repubblicani per dare una casa alle nuove istituzioni liberal democratiche italiane. Le reliquie del fascismo e del colonialismo sono state progressivamente normalizzate all’interno dei paesaggi urbani, sfuggendo allo sguardo critico della cultura e della politica antifascista.

    Ad oggi, con il “ritorno” dei fascismi su scala globale e il crescente arrivo negli ultimi decenni dei migranti dall’ex mondo coloniale, la necessità di riaprire i processi di decolonizzazione e defascistizzazione si è resa più che mai urgente. E con essi, nuove domande sul “che fare” del “patrimonio” architettonico coloniale fascista. È possibile immaginare un ri-uso, senza correre il rischio di perpetuare eternamente questa stessa ideologia, e contro il pericolo dell’autoassoluzione e della nostalgia?

    Nel 2017 Asmara la capitale dell’Eritrea è stata nominata patrimonio dell’umanità dall’UNESCO. La nomina, intitolata “Asmara – Citta modernista d’Africa”, fa riferimento alla trasformazione architettonica e urbana coloniale fascista e modernista di Asmara avvenuta durante l’occupazione coloniale italiana. Non esente da critiche, l’iscrizione di Asmara pone una serie di elementi problematici: dal rischio di presentare la città coloniale costruita dagli italiani come il modello di patrimonio urbano del continente africano, al pericolo di rinforzare impulsi nostalgici o costituire uno strumento di propaganda per il regime eritreo, fino al rischio di cedere ai paradigmi di conservazione dei beni architettonici e culturali eurocentrici imposti dall’UNESCO.

    Nonostante queste controversie, la nomina di Asmara ha comunque posto per la prima volta una serie di domande fondamentali che riguardano e accomunano entrambi ex-colonizzati ed ex-colonizzatori: chi ha il diritto a preservare, riutilizzare e ri-narrare l’architettura coloniale fascista?

    L’installazione presentata per la Quadriennale d’arte 2020 – FUORI a Palazzo delle Esposizioni a Roma, sede della Prima mostra internazionale d’arte coloniale (1931) e di altre mostre di propaganda del regime, propone di ripensare i borghi costruiti dal fascismo in Sicilia a partire dalla nomina di Asmara come patrimonio dell’umanità. L’installazione è il primo intervento verso la creazione di un Ente di Decolonizzazione che sarà aperto a coloro che avvertono l’urgenza di mettere in discussione un’ampia eredità storica, culturale e politica intrisa di colonialismo e fascismo, ed iniziare dunque un percorso comune verso nuove pratiche di decolonizzazione e defascistizzazione[1].

    L’occasione della mostra vuole dunque contribuire ad ampliare il raggio critico, a partire dal cosiddetto “patrimonio” architettonico. L’architettura a differenza di monumenti e targhe, si erge su delle fondamenta, ponendo cosi questioni di fondazione e di profondità. In questo senso, l’architettura si occupa di un problema strutturale, dando una forma alle fondamenta coloniali e fasciste sui cui si costruisce l’Italia contemporanea, a testimonianza di una continuità storica e politica tra passato e presente. Ora che molti di questi edifici coloniali e fascisti sono in buona parte in rovina, si corre il rischio che cadendo a pezzi, si portino via la memoria, ma lasciando le fondamenta di una lunga storia di violenza, oppressioni e discriminazione, come ultimo atto dell’amnesia italiana.

    Verso un Ente di Decolonizzazione presentato a Roma, è il primo atto di un lungo percorso che intende coinvolgere coloro che sentono l’urgenza di mettere in discussione concetti e pratiche ereditate dal passato e di costruire oggi spazi critici in cui incontrarsi tra uguali. Il secondo atto si svolgerà la prossima estate in Sicilia, nell’ex-ente di colonizzazione di Borgo Rizza, nel comune di Carlentini, dove cittadini, politici, studiosi, artisti e studenti cercheranno di fare i conti con la difficile eredità´ del patrimonio dell’architettura fascista e coloniale.

    La formazione di un Ente della Decolonizzazione vuole così porre la questione della riappropriazione e ri-narrazione degli spazi e simboli del colonialismo e del fascismo all’interno di un ampio percorso decoloniale, e cosi contribuire a invertire la tendenza italiana al racconto auto-assolutorio di un colonialismo “meno peggio” degli altri. In un contesto internazionale in cui le rivendicazioni degli ex-colonizzati ad una vera riparazione e al risarcimento per i crimini del colonialismo e della schiavitù si fanno sempre più forti e trascinanti, l’Ente della Decolonizzazione intende partire da semplici domande che permettano di rivendicare il diritto a re-inquadrare la narrazione storica, cominciando dalla presenza dell’eredità architettonica coloniale e fascista: dato che i borghi sono stati costruiti per dare forma e corpo alla ideologia fascista, in che modo è possibile sovvertirne i principi fondanti, partendo da questi stessi luoghi come nuovo “centro” della lotta ai fascismi contemporanei? Come trasformare questi borghi in un antidoto al fascismo? Chi ha il diritto a ri-narrare e al ri-uso di questi villaggi che vennero costruiti per celebrare i martiri fascisti nelle guerre di occupazione in Africa? È possibile immaginare un ri-uso critico di questi luoghi, che si faccia alleato di un percorso di riparazione dei crimini del passato? È ipotizzabile un ri-uso inteso come riparazione? È forse possibile un percorso di riparazione che vada oltre la sfera dei trattati bilaterali tra governi e stati? In quali forme questa riparazione o risarcimento può prendere forma? Può l’eredità architettonica giocare un ruolo in tutto ciò?

    https://www.lavoroculturale.org/verso-un-ente-di-decolonizzazione/alessandro-petti

    #décolonial #Italie #colonisation #colonialisme #architecture #fascisme #histoire #Ente_di_Colonizzazione_del_Latifondo_Siciliano #Ente di_Colonizzazione_della_Libia #Erythrée #Ethiopie #Agro_Pontino #ingéniérie_sociale #violence #oppression #vide #géographie_du_vide #ressources_pédagogiques #modernisation #Sicile #toponymie #toponymie_politique #colonisation_interne #espace #racisme_institutionnel #monuments #architecture_fasciste #normalisation #patrimoine #Asmara #UNESCO

    #photographie #Luca_Capuano

    #TRUST #master_TRUST

    –—

    ajouté à la métaliste sur le #colonialisme_italien:
    https://seenthis.net/messages/871953

  • Sur les nouvelles formes d’inégalités urbaines #post-Covid

    Quel sera le visage de la #ville_post-Covid ? Le sociologue italien Giovanni Semi partage ses premières réflexions sur le futur de la gentrification et des espaces publics, à l’heure de la distanciation sociale, de l’effondrement du tourisme et du renforcement probable du rôle des plateformes en ligne.

    La crise que nous sommes en train de vivre pose différentes questions sur la ville post-Covid, notamment sur les modes de relations sociales, et de manière plus générale sur ce que sera la vie urbaine. Beaucoup pensent que la pandémie va marquer une rupture nette entre tout ce qui s’est passé avant février-mars 2020 et ce qui se passera dans un « après » difficile à déterminer. Il y a pourtant de nombreuses raisons de penser que la discontinuité ne sera pas si radicale, et que l’on ne repartira pas d’une tabula rasa mais au contraire d’un modèle profondément ancré dans l’histoire (et à historiciser) et dans l’espace (et à spatialiser), qui continuera donc à agir dans le futur. Je veux dire par là que les événements passés et leurs effets spatiaux ne seront pas complètement effacés par la pandémie : s’ils seront dans certains cas profondément perturbés, ils risquent d’être accentués dans d’autres.

    En partant de cette idée que le passé n’est jamais complètement effacé mais qu’il continue à agir dans le présent et même dans le futur, je vais essayer de définir certains éléments de ce passé, puis d’esquisser ce qui nous attend.
    Le monde urbain dont nous avons hérité

    Deux éléments sont centraux dans le monde que nous avons reçu en héritage. D’un côté, ce que Neil Brenner et d’autres ont appelé l’« urbanisation planétaire », c’est-à-dire l’extension d’infrastructures et de logiques capitalistes sur toute la surface de la terre (Brenner et Schmid 2013 ; Brenner 2018). C’est Saskia Sassen qui me semble avoir le mieux décrit la logique de cette diffusion mondiale de l’urbanisation, fondée sur des « formations prédatrices », c’est-à-dire des assemblages autour d’instruments financiers d’acteurs variés comme les États et les entreprises globales (Sassen 2014). Le second élément concerne les modalités opératoires de ces formations prédatrices, et en particulier le lien entre les instruments financiers (et les logiques de financiarisation) et les mécanismes d’extraction de la valeur, qu’il s’agisse de la rente foncière ou de ressources naturelles.

    Pour le dire de manière plus simple, les vingt dernières années nous ont montré de différentes manières comment la relation entre homme, société et environnement s’articule de plus en plus autour de pratiques d’extraction. Les citadins ont désespérément besoin de revenus pour pouvoir se sentir intégrés, et pour cette raison se louent eux-mêmes, ainsi que leurs propriétés, pour obtenir un salaire qui provenait autrefois de rapports de travail (Boltanski et Chiapello 1999). Les populations habitent toujours davantage en milieu urbain, où le maintien des organisations est là aussi lié à des impératifs d’extraction et de concurrence entre territoires (Boltanski et Esquerre 2017). Leurs pratiques de vie et de consommation, à leur domicile mais aussi en déplacement lorsqu’ils deviennent des touristes, s’orientent toujours davantage vers l’extraction d’expériences que vers la production de nouvelles formes de vivre ensemble.

    Avant février-mars 2020, la géographie des villes était caractérisée par des phénomènes que nous avons appris à bien connaître, comme la gentrification, la stigmatisation territoriale des espaces dont les marges d’extraction sont faibles, et de manière plus générale des formes de ségrégation variées, notamment de classe et de race (Arbaci 2019). Même les plus critiques d’entre nous s’étaient habitués à un modèle d’apartheid soft, souvent masqué par le rideau de fumée de la méritocratie et des responsabilités individuelles, et par un darwinisme social dans le cadre duquel il était devenu presque impossible de débattre du caractère normal et naturel des inégalités sociales. Les répertoires de légitimité et d’illégitimité diffèrent selon les sociétés nationales, mais le profil social des gagnants et des perdants reste grosso modo toujours le même.

    Dans mon pays, l’Italie, il y avait une acceptation diffuse de l’immobilité sociale, et il était presque impossible de lancer un débat public sur la rente, sur la propriété, sur toutes les ressources qui par définition biaisent les règles du jeu et permettent à certains de partir largement avantagés. Il était ainsi « naturel » que quelqu’un puisse naître en disposant de deux, trois, quatre appartements de famille, par exemple dans les centres historiques des plus belles villes touristiques italiennes, comme il était « naturel » que les habitants des quartiers populaires de Milan, Naples ou Palerme « méritent » de vivre dans des quartiers sans infrastructures ni services, et où l’État ne se montre qu’en uniforme ou en tenue de travailleur social. Souvent, les premiers étaient aussi ceux qui, comme dans le célèbre roman dystopique de Young sur la méritocratie (1958), parlaient de cosmopolitisme, de démocratie et de révolution digitale, accusant les seconds d’être analphabètes, incivils et réactionnaires.

    Voilà le monde que nous avons, selon moi, laissé derrière nous. Un monde confortable pour certains mais dramatique pour la majorité, dans lequel les scénarios pour la suite étaient tout sauf rassurants. Il serait ainsi dangereux d’oublier que, sur de larges portions du territoire italien, nous nous étions habitués à cohabiter avec la sécheresse, interrompue par des phénomènes brefs et violents d’inondations, mais aussi à des niveaux élevés de pollution de l’air qui se maintenaient pendant plusieurs semaines et même parfois plusieurs mois, n’en déplaise aux négationnistes climatiques ou aux pragmatiques du type TINA (There is No Alternative), nombreux chez les industriels.

    Et puis la pandémie est arrivée. Je laisse aux climatologues, aux virologues et aux autres experts la lourde tâche de nous dire quelles sont les interactions entre l’homme et son environnement susceptibles d’expliquer la diffusion du Covid-19. Mais je peux essayer d’identifier quelques lignes de tension héritées du passé et autour desquelles se construira l’avenir des villes.
    Quel futur pour la gentrification ?

    Le débat sur la gentrification est désormais bien établi aussi bien en France qu’en Italie, et il n’est pas nécessaire de le synthétiser ici (voir notamment Chabrol et al. 2016, Semi 2015). On peut seulement rappeler qu’au cours des deux dernières années une thèse s’est diffusée selon laquelle la dernière vague de gentrification aurait été caractérisée par la financiarisation et par l’économie du tourisme, et donc marquée par le phénomène des locations de court terme symbolisées par la plateforme américaine Airbnb.

    Défendue notamment par Manuel Aalbers (2019), cette thèse nous disait que la nouvelle frontière d’expulsion et d’inégalité spatiale se situait sur le marché locatif, et que les nouveaux perdants étaient tous les ménages qui avaient besoin de se loger pour une durée supérieure à une semaine. L’industrie du tourisme et l’impressionnante accélération de l’usage temporaire de la ville avaient soustrait des logements aux résidents, rendu encore plus rigide le marché locatif, augmenté les loyers et contraint de nombreux ménages à s’éloigner des zones présentant la marge d’extraction la plus élevée. Cette forme de gentrification s’ajoute à toutes les précédentes, stade ultime d’un long processus d’éloignement des classes populaires vers les espaces les moins recherchés des grandes aires urbaines.

    Si cette thèse est assez crédible, avec plus ou moins de validité selon les lieux, le business des logements temporaires pour touristes a été rayé de la carte entre la fin du mois de février 2020 et le moment où j’écris ces lignes. Vols annulés, frontières fermées, populations immobilisées : les appartements concernés sont vides et une niche entière de l’économie a été interrompue en quelques jours.

    Que penser de cette tempête ? On débat depuis des semaines autour du caractère plus ou moins démocratique du virus, mais il ne fait aucun doute que les effets qu’il provoque ne le sont pas. Si on regarde le monde des plateformes de logement on observe que, même si elles ont subi un coup dur, ces dernières sont par nature très résistantes, qu’il s’agisse de Booking ou d’Airbnb. Leurs coûts fixes sont très bas, elles ont un nombre limité d’employés, et leur capacité de réaction est telle qu’entre mars et avril un colosse comme Airbnb a déjà pu compter sur deux augmentations de capital rapidement trouvées sur le marché international.

    Du côté des propriétaires de logements des plateformes, les grands investisseurs immobiliers ont tous les instruments légaux et financiers pour encaisser le coup, mais ce n’est pas le cas des particuliers qui affrontent la tempête dépourvus de moyens (Semi et Tonetta 2019). Les effets sont aussi très différents en fonction des échelles, selon qu’on se situe dans un appartement vide, à l’échelle d’un quartier, ou celle d’une ville entière. Les quartiers dont l’unique fonction était de servir des touristes qui ne restaient que quelques nuits se retrouvent ainsi aujourd’hui totalement vides. Au cours des deux prochaines années, la récession dans laquelle nous sommes déjà entrés se traduira par un choc de liquidités qui empêchera la renaissance du tourisme dans la forme que nous lui connaissions jusqu’ici, et aura des conséquences difficiles à prévoir aujourd’hui.

    On peut penser, en faisant preuve d’optimisme, que ce stock de logements retournera sur le marché locatif traditionnel. Mais la crise de liquidité concernera tout autant les touristes que les résidents (il s’agit souvent des mêmes personnes) et il n’est pas facile de savoir qui pourra se permettre de payer un loyer (et quel loyer ?) dans un quartier touristique sans touristes. Il est probable que les inégalités sociales et spatiales héritées du passé s’en trouvent pour certaines congelées, notamment dans les quartiers les plus riches, où les propriétaires aisés pourront retirer leurs biens du marché et conserver leur valeur, quand d’autres seront renforcées dans les quartiers les plus pauvres, où les petits propriétaires seront contraints de vendre, parfois à perte.
    Quel futur pour l’espace public ?

    Au cours des deux dernières décennies, l’espace public a suscité un regain d’intérêt, favorisé par les désirs et les angoisses produits par le néolibéralisme. L’espace public, tel qu’il était conçu jusqu’en février 2020, était principalement un lieu ouvert à des activités de consommation conviviales et non conflictuelles (Sorkin 1992, Mitchell 2003), très éloigné donc de la théorie de l’espace public élaborée par la philosophie politique et par la théorie sociale du XXe siècle (Habermas, Arendt, Sennett, Calhoun). L’espace public dont on parlait était en somme celui des places, avec leurs bars et restaurants en plein air, celui des waterfronts rénovés, celui des parcs aménagés pour des activités de plein air (celui des centres commerciaux, quoique très diffusé, était déjà en crise avant le Covid). Il s’agissait d’un vaste territoire de la ville où les architectes et les designers avaient dicté leur loi, imaginant des territoires conviviaux, smart, parfois soutenables, souvent très recherchés d’un point de vue esthétique (Semi et Bolzoni 2020). On pourrait discuter longuement des expérimentations politiques qui y ont été réalisées, comme dans le cas des POPS (Privately Owned Public Spaces), et de manière plus générale des accords néolibéraux dans le cadre desquels des acteurs privés se substituent aux acteurs publics pour assurer la gestion et l’exploitation de ces espaces. On pense par exemple aux Business Improvement Districts (BID), contrats de gestion d’espaces publics où l’acteur public attribue pour un temps déterminé toutes les fonctions de collecte des taxes, le contrôle de police et des normes d’hygiène à des unions de propriétaires (Zukin 2009).

    La logique organisationnelle de ces espaces était la suivante : leur fonction principale réside dans des formes de consommation légitimes et pacifiées, chapeautées par un fort contrôle social interpersonnel. Un peu comme dans les recettes de bon sens de Jane Jacobs (1961), le contrôle social reposait surtout sur la bonne éducation de consommateurs civils, ce qui permet facilement de comprendre qui étaient les exclus de ce modèle de vie urbaine : les sans-domicile, les toxicomanes, les Roms, les immigrés pauvres, les activistes et tous ceux qui n’étaient pas en mesure de consommer de façon adéquate. Cette logique s’enrayait parfois, comme dans le cas des conflits locaux générés par la vie nocturne dans de nombreuses villes européennes, ou dans celui des conflits entre touristes et populations locales.

    Quoi qu’il en soit, cet espace public fonctionnait et avait du succès car les personnes pouvaient se rassembler en grand nombre : le rassemblement de personnes a été un des moyens d’extraction urbaine les plus efficaces des dernières décennies.

    On comprend donc que le monde post-Covid, dans lequel la proximité physique entre les personnes est devenue, au moins de manière temporaire, l’ennemi public numéro un, met en crise de manière radicale ce type d’espace public. Il n’est pas possible de savoir aujourd’hui pour combien de temps, ni quel succès connaîtront les solutions que l’on évoque ces jours-ci (comme rouvrir les bars et les restaurants en respectant scrupuleusement les consignes de distanciation sociale), mais il est certain que nous allons assister à un renouvellement profond de ces espaces.
    Scénarios

    Il est possible que, dans un premier temps, l’espace public néolibéral redevienne plus semblable à celui que nous avons connu tout au long du XXe siècle, c’est-à-dire plus ouvert à la diversité des usages et à la conflictualité sociale. Il sera sans doute moins pacifié. Je laisse le lecteur décider du fait qu’il s’agisse d’un mal ou d’un bien, mais l’espace public sera probablement plus démocratique.

    Une autre voie, bien moins démocratique mais qui sera sans doute celle que l’on empruntera, concerne un secteur économique qui trouve son débouché physique dans l’espace public : l’offre commerciale, et en particulier la restauration. Ce monde dominait l’espace public néolibéral, notamment à travers ce que certains ont appelé la foodification, la gentrification alimentaire. Il s’agit d’un secteur très dynamique et constitué d’une grande variété d’acteurs qui ont durement lutté pour des marges de profit toujours plus limitées : un véritable marché caractérisé par une innovation faible et une concurrence forte. Un marché qui, comme celui des locations de court terme, s’est effondré au cours des deux derniers mois. En Italie, comme dans beaucoup d’autres pays occidentaux, ce secteur était lui aussi lié à la logistique des plateformes qui s’occupaient de la distribution par l’intermédiaire de cyclistes, comme Deliveroo, Glovo, Foodora, Uber Eats et d’autres. Là aussi, les plateformes se sont montrées plus flexibles et plus résistantes (elles ont été aidées en ce sens par des décisions politiques) et ont continué à fonctionner en dépit du lockdown. Elles seront des acteurs de premier plan du scénario post-Covid, sûrement plus centrales encore qu’avant, notamment car ce seront probablement elles qui maintiendront en vie un certain nombre de restaurants dont la clientèle ne pourra pas renoncer aux petits plats chinois ou mexicains à toute heure. Là encore, il y aura des perdants, sans doute surtout les restaurants traditionnels dont les produits et la clientèle ne passent pas à travers le filtre de la plateforme. Après une phase au cours de laquelle le restaurant traditionnel avait dû lutter contre le restaurant cosmopolite ou à la mode, ce protagoniste majeur de la culture urbaine occidentale, tout comme les cafés, va devoir affronter une épreuve majeure.
    Accélération ou refondation ?

    Il me semble que la pandémie va agir à la fois comme un accélérateur et comme une solution pour une série de conflits déjà visibles au cours des dernières décennies. Il s’agit de conflits organisationnels internes au capitalisme, où les plateformes, certaines plus que d’autres, vont se substituer à des filières de distribution traditionnelles et fourniront des services sur de nombreux marchés.

    Il s’agit d’une transformation qui ne frappera pas seulement les villes, même si elle y sera plus visible qu’ailleurs, mais qui agira sur l’ensemble de l’urbanisation planétaire. Beaucoup de commentateurs soutiennent que cette crise va mettre un frein à la globalisation. Je ne le crois pas. Je pense qu’aux côtés de dynamiques nationalistes, elles aussi déjà visibles au cours des vingt dernières années, nous assisterons à de nouvelles accélérations globales, en particulier du fait de l’action des plateformes.

    La logique prédatrice de fond du capitalisme est intacte, et n’est pas mise en discussion, même s’il est probable que beaucoup des formes qu’elle avait revêtues au tournant du XXIe siècle soient destinées à évoluer. Il y a du travail en perspective pour les chercheurs en sciences sociales, mais encore davantage pour les activistes et pour tous ceux qui croient que ce moment représente une opportunité pour repenser de manière radicale le monde dont nous avons hérité.

    https://metropolitiques.eu/Sur-les-nouvelles-formes-d-inegalites-urbaines-post-Covid.html

    #inégalités #inégalités_urbaines #covid-19 #coronavirus #villes #géographie_urbaine #urban_matter #gentrification #espaces_publics #tourisme #distanciation_physique #distanciation_sociale #TRUST #mater_TRUST #ressources_pédagogiques

    #ressources_pédagogiques

  • EU pays for surveillance in Gulf of Tunis

    A new monitoring system for Tunisian coasts should counter irregular migration across the Mediterranean. The German Ministry of the Interior is also active in the country. A similar project in Libya has now been completed. Human rights organisations see it as an aid to „#pull_backs“ contrary to international law.

    In order to control and prevent migration, the European Union is supporting North African states in border surveillance. The central Mediterranean Sea off Malta and Italy, through which asylum seekers from Libya and Tunisia want to reach Europe, plays a special role. The EU conducts various operations in and off these countries, including the military mission „#Irini“ and the #Frontex mission „#Themis“. It is becoming increasingly rare for shipwrecked refugees to be rescued by EU Member States. Instead, they assist the coast guards in Libya and Tunisia to bring the people back. Human rights groups, rescue organisations and lawyers consider this assistance for „pull backs“ to be in violation of international law.

    With several measures, the EU and its member states want to improve the surveillance off North Africa. Together with Switzerland, the EU Commission has financed a two-part „#Integrated_Border_Management Project“ in Tunisia. It is part of the reform of the security sector which was begun a few years after the fall of former head of state Ben Ali in 2011. With one pillar of this this programme, the EU wants to „prevent criminal networks from operating“ and enable the authorities in the Gulf of Tunis to „save lives at sea“.

    System for military and border police

    The new installation is entitled „#Integrated_System_for_Maritime_Surveillance“ (#ISMariS) and, according to the Commission (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2020-000891-ASW_EN.html), is intended to bring together as much information as possible from all authorities involved in maritime and coastal security tasks. These include the Ministry of Defence with the Navy, the Coast Guard under the Ministry of the Interior, the National Guard, and IT management and telecommunications authorities. The money comes from the #EU_Emergency_Trust_Fund_for_Africa, which was established at the Valletta Migration Summit in 2015. „ISMariS“ is implemented by the Italian Ministry of the Interior and follows on from an earlier Italian initiative. The EU is financing similar projects with „#EU4BorderSecurity“ not only in Tunisia but also for other Mediterranean countries.

    An institute based in Vienna is responsible for border control projects in Tunisia. Although this #International_Centre_for_Migration_Policy_Development (ICMPD) was founded in 1993 by Austria and Switzerland, it is not a governmental organisation. The German Foreign Office has also supported projects in Tunisia within the framework of the #ICMPD, including the establishment of border stations and the training of border guards. Last month German finally joined the Institute itself (https://www.andrej-hunko.de/start/download/dokumente/1493-deutscher-beitritt-zum-international-centre-for-migration-policy-development/file). For an annual contribution of 210,000 euro, the Ministry of the Interior not only obtains decision-making privileges for organizing ICMPD projects, but also gives German police authorities the right to evaluate any of the Institute’s analyses for their own purposes.

    It is possible that in the future bilateral German projects for monitoring Tunisian maritime borders will also be carried out via the ICMPD. Last year, the German government supplied the local coast guard with equipment for a boat workshop. In the fourth quarter of 2019 alone (http://dipbt.bundestag.de/doc/btd/19/194/1919467.pdf), the Federal Police carried out 14 trainings for the national guard, border police and coast guard, including instruction in operating „control boats“. Tunisia previously received patrol boats from Italy and the USA (https://migration-control.info/en/wiki/tunisia).

    Vessel tracking and coastal surveillance

    It is unclear which company produced and installed the „ISMariS“ surveillance system for Tunisia on behalf of the ICPMD. Similar facilities for tracking and displaying ship movements (#Vessel_Tracking_System) are marketed by all major European defence companies, including #Airbus, #Leonardo in Italy, #Thales in France and #Indra in Spain. However, Italian project management will probably prefer local companies such as Leonardo. The company and its spin-off #e-GEOS have a broad portfolio of maritime surveillance systems (https://www.leonardocompany.com/en/sea/maritime-domain-awareness/coastal-surveillance-systems).

    It is also possible to integrate satellite reconnaissance, but for this the governments must conclude further contracts with the companies. However, „ISMariS“ will not only be installed as a Vessel Tracking System, it should also enable monitoring of the entire coast. Manufacturers promote such #Coastal_Surveillance_Systems as a technology against irregular migration, piracy, terrorism and smuggling. The government in Tunisia has defined „priority coastal areas“ for this purpose, which will be integrated into the maritime surveillance framework.

    Maritime „#Big_Data

    „ISMariS“ is intended to be compatible with the components already in place at the Tunisian authorities, including coastguard command and control systems, #radar, position transponders and receivers, night vision equipment and thermal and optical sensors. Part of the project is a three-year maintenance contract with the company installing the „ISMariS“.

    Perhaps the most important component of „ISMariS“ for the EU is a communication system, which is also included. It is designed to improve „operational cooperation“ between the Tunisian Coast Guard and Navy with Italy and other EU Member States. The project description mentions Frontex and EUROSUR, the pan-European surveillance system of the EU Border Agency, as possible participants. Frontex already monitors the coastal regions off Libya and Tunisia (https://insitu.copernicus.eu/FactSheets/CSS_Border_Surveillance) using #satellites (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-003212-ASW_EN.html) and an aerial service (https://digit.site36.net/2020/06/26/frontex-air-service-reconnaissance-for-the-so-called-libyan-coast-guar).

    #EUROSUR is now also being upgraded, Frontex is spending 2.6 million Euro (https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:109760-2020:TEXT:EN:HTML) on a new application based on artificial intelligence. It is to process so-called „Big Data“, including not only ship movements but also data from ship and port registers, information on ship owners and shipping companies, a multi-year record of previous routes of large ships and other maritime information from public sources on the Internet. The contract is initially concluded for one year and can be extended up to three times.

    Cooperation with Libya

    To connect North African coastguards to EU systems, the EU Commission had started the „#Seahorse_Mediterranean“ project two years after the fall of North African despots. To combat irregular migration, from 2013 onwards Spain, Italy and Malta have trained a total of 141 members of the Libyan coast guard for sea rescue. In this way, „Seahorse Mediterranean“ has complemented similar training measures that Frontex is conducting for the Coastal Police within the framework of the EU mission #EUBAM_Libya and the military mission #EUNAVFOR_MED for the Coast Guard of the Tripolis government.

    The budget for „#Seahorse_Mediterranean“ is indicated by the Commission as 5.5 million Euro (https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2020-000892-ASW_EN.html), the project was completed in January 2019. According to the German Foreign Office (http://dipbt.bundestag.de/doc/btd/19/196/1919625.pdf), Libya has signed a partnership declaration for participation in a future common communication platform for surveillance of the Mediterranean. Tunisia, Algeria and Egypt are also to be persuaded to participate. So far, however, the governments have preferred unilateral EU support for equipping and training their coastguards and navies, without having to make commitments in projects like „Seahorse“, such as stopping migration and smuggling on the high seas.

    https://digit.site36.net/2020/06/28/eu-pays-for-surveillance-in-gulf-of-tunis

    #Golfe_de_Tunis #surveillance #Méditerranée #asile #migrations #réfugiés #militarisation_des_frontières #surveillance_des_frontières #Tunisie #externalisation #complexe_militaro-industriel #Algérie #Egypte #Suisse #EU #UE #Union_européenne #Trust_Fund #Emergency_Trust_Fund_for_Africa #Allemagne #Italie #gardes-côtes #gardes-côtes_tunisiens #intelligence_artificielle #IA #données #Espagne #Malte #business

    ping @reka @isskein @_kg_ @rhoumour @karine4

    –—

    Ajouté à cette métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765330

    Et celle-ci sur le lien entre développement et contrôles frontaliers :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701

  • #EU #Development #Cooperation with #Sub-Saharan #Africa 2013-2018: Policies, funding, results

    How have EU overall development policies and the EU’s overall policies vis-à-vis Sub-Saharan Africa in particular evolved in the period 2013-2018 and what explains the developments that have taken place?2. How has EU development spending in Sub-Saharan Africa developed in the period 2013-2018 and what explains these developments?3.What is known of the results accomplished by EU development aid in Sub-Saharan Africa and what explains these accomplishments?

    This study analyses these questions on the basis of a comprehensive desk review of key EU policy documents, data on EU development cooperation as well as available evaluation material of the EU institutionson EU external assistance. While broad in coverage, the study pays particular attention to EU policies and development spending in specific areas that are priority themes for the Dutch government as communicated to the parliament.

    Authors: Alexei Jones, Niels Keijzer, Ina Friesen and Pauline Veron, study for the evaluation department (IOB) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, May 2020

    = https://ecdpm.org/publications/eu-development-cooperation-sub-saharan-africa-2013-2018-policies-funding-resu

  • Esternalizzazione e diritto d’asilo, un approfondimento dell’ASGI

    Con il documento che si pubblica l’ASGI, facendo uso delle analisi, delle azioni e delle discussioni prodotte nel corso degli ultimi anni, offre una lettura del fenomeno dell’esternalizzazione delle frontiere e del diritto di asilo focalizzando la propria attenzione in particolare sulle politiche di esternalizzazione volte ad impedire o limitare l’accesso delle persone straniere attraverso la rotta del Mare Mediterraneo centrale, nonché nell’ottica della verifica del rispetto delle norme costituzionali, europee ed internazionali che tutelano i diritti fondamentali delle persone e della conseguente ricerca di strumenti giuridici di contrasto alle violazioni verificate.

    L’esternalizzazione del controllo delle frontiere e del diritto dei rifugiati viene definita come l’insieme delle azioni economiche, giuridiche, militari, culturali, prevalentemente extraterritoriali, poste in essere da soggetti statali e sovrastatali, con il supporto indispensabile di ulteriori attori pubblici e privati, volte ad impedire o ad ostacolare che i migranti (e, tra essi, i richiedenti asilo) possano entrare nel territorio di uno Stato al fine di usufruire delle garanzie, anche giurisdizionali, previste in tale Stato, o comunque volte a rendere legalmente e sostanzialmente inammissibili il loro ingresso o una loro domanda di protezione sociale e/o giuridica.

    Nell’ambito del documento è considerato prima il contesto storico della esternalizzazione, dunque quello geopolitico più recente, attinente la rotta del mar Mediterraneo centrale, infine il contesto giuridico nazionale ed internazionale che si ritiene leso da tali politiche. Vengono, dunque, indicate alcune tra le possibili strade affinché sia individuata la responsabilità dei soggetti che determinano la violazione dei diritti umani delle persone conseguenti alle politiche in materia.

    Il documento intende porsi quale strumento di dibattito nell’ambito dell’ evoluzione dell’analisi del diritto di asilo per fornire adeguati strumenti di comprensione e contrasto di un fenomeno che si ritiene particolarmente insidioso e tale da inficiare sostanzialmente la rilevanza di diritti, tra cui innanzitutto il diritto di asilo, pur formalmente riconosciuti alle persone da parte dell’Italia e degli Stati membri dell’Unione europea.

    https://www.asgi.it/asilo-e-protezione-internazionale/asilo-esternalizzazione-approfondimento
    #ASGI #rapport #externalisation #Méditerranée_centrale #asile #migrations #réfugiés #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Mer_Méditerranée #droits_fondamentaux #droit_d'asile #Libye #Italie #Trust_Fund #HCR #relocalisation #fonds_fiduciaire_d’urgence #Trust_Fund_for_Africa

    Pour télécharger le rapport:


    https://www.asgi.it/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/2020_1_Documento-Asgi-esternalizzazione.pdf

    ping @isskein

  • La politique des putes

    Océan réalise, avec « La #Politique_des_putes », une enquête en immersion dans laquelle il tend le micro à des travailleuses·rs du sexe. Elles disent le stigmate, la marginalisation, la précarité, les violences systémiques mais aussi les ressources et l’empowerment. Pour elles, l’intime est résistance. Dix épisodes de 30 mn pour briser les préjugés.



    La Politique des putes (1/10) - Travailler
    La Politique des putes (2/10) - Stigmatiser
    La Politique des putes (3/10) - Militer
    La Politique des putes (4/10) - Choisir
    La Politique des putes (5/10) - Désirer
    La Politique des putes (6/10) - Migrer
    La Politique des putes (7/10) - Soigner
    La Politique des putes (8/10) - S’échapper
    La Politique des putes (9/10) - Agir
    La Politique des putes (10/10) - Construire

    http://www.nouvellesecoutes.fr/podcasts/intime-politique

    #sex_work #prostitution #patriarchy #capitalism #feminism #wage_labor #whorephobe #whorephobia #pimping #stigma #bias #prejudice #stigmatization #discrimination #systemic_violence #instiutional_violence #heterosexual_concept #sexual_education #normalisation #abolotionism #black_and_white #subventions #decriminalisation #penalty #laws #rights #transphobia #domination #marginalisation #vulnerability #invisbility #undocumented #isolation #fear #police_harassment #physical_violence #rape #precarity #affirmation #empowerment #dignity #trust #solidarity #network #community #choice #perception #society #associations #seropositive #access_to_healthcare #suicidal_thought #debt #menace #voodoo #exploitation #trafficking #migration #borders #family_pressure #clients_image #mudered #testimony #interview #podcast #audio #France #Paris

    “sex work is not dirty - dirty are all the representations about sex work” (La politique des putes 7/10, min 7).

  • Antiviral

    Tu bosses dans ton salon en slip t’es en télétravail
    Tu masques ton visage, distanciation sociale
    Tu marches tel un robot dans les rayons de Casino
    Les gens ne te touchent pas, y’a plus de Barilla
    Tu ne peux dialoguer qu’avec ton animal
    Impossible de poursuivre ta vie sentimentale
    Il faudrait faire du sport pour pas que tu grossisses
    Impossible de sortir sans voir la police

    https://www.invidio.us/watch?v=Zs6owPWjMDI

  • #Philanthropie : Le #capital se fout de la #charité - #DATAGUEULE 93 - DataGueule
    https://peertube.datagueule.tv/videos/watch/554be54b-fd91-4e89-bddf-119813b64e73

    Ah les belles fortunes de ce monde et leur immense générosité ! L’éducation, l’art, la faim dans le monde : rien n’est trop beau, rien n’est trop grand. À condition d’y gagner en visibilité… Et de pouvoir faire une belle opération fiscale au passage. Et si parfois, ces opérations sentent bon le #conflit_d’intérêt, il ne faudrait tout de même pas cracher dans la soupe. La #générosité ça ne se discute pas. Mais au fait, elle vient d’où cette richesse ?

    #fiscalité #défiscalisation #trust #social-washing #image #philantrocapitalisme #bill_gates #mécénat_d'entreprise #fondation_louis_vuitton #contreparties #loi_Aillagon #niche_fiscale

  • ICE Contract With GitHub Sparks Developer Protests - The Atlantic
    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2020/01/ice-contract-github-sparks-developer-protests/604339

    Developers are protesting after revelations that the source-code repository GitHub contracted with ICE. But if you restrict access to open-source code, is it still open ? For the past two years, software engineers and systems administrators from San Jose to Seattle have engaged in the tech industry’s latest rite of passage : reading the news to discover that their employer contributed to something they find unethical. In 2018, Google workers learned of the company’s secret U.S. military (...)

    #Google #ICE #Microsoft #Facebook #GitHub #militaire #algorithme

  • Outrage over reports EU-funding linked to forced labour in Eritrea

    Human Rights Watch (HRW) has criticised the European Union over its funding of an infrastructure project in the brutal dictatorship of Eritrea.

    The scheme, which received €20 million from Brussels, was partially built by forced labour, according to the New York Times (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/08/world/europe/conscription-eritrea-eu.html).

    The newspaper also claimed the EU had no way of monitoring the project.

    “For the EU to rely on the government to do its monitoring, I think it is incredibly problematic, especially when obviously some of the issues the EU will be discussing with the government are around labour force,” said Laetitia Bader from HRW.

    “And as we know the government has quite bluntly said that it will continue to rely on national service conscripts.”

    The funding of the road project in Eritrea is part of the EU Trust Fund for Africa, created to address the #root_causes of migration.

    Yet Eritrea has an elaborate system of indefinite forced “national service” that makes people try to flee, especially youngsters.

    For the EU, democratic reforms are no longer a condition for financial aid.

    “The EU has made support for democracy a more prominent objective in its relations with African countries since the early 2000s, I would say,” said Christine Hackenesch from the German Development Institute.

    “And the EU has put more emphasis on developing its instruments to support democratic reforms. But the context now for democracy support in Africa and globally is a very different one because there is more of a competition of political models with China and other actors.”

    The EU Commission said that it was aware that conscripts were used for the road project - but that Brussels funded only material and equipment, not labour.

    https://www.euronews.com/2020/01/10/outrage-over-reports-eu-funding-linked-to-forced-labour-in-eritrea
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Trust_Fund #Erythrée #EU #UE #Trust_Fund_for_Africa #dictatures #travail_forcé #aide_au_développement #développement

    Ajouté à la métaliste externalisation :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749#message765340

    Et à la métaliste migrations/développement :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768702

    ping @isskein @karine4

    @simplicissimus : j’ai fait un petit tour sur internet à la recherche du communiqué/rapport de HRW concernant cette histoire, mais j’ai pas trouvé... pas le temps de chercher plus... si jamais tu as un peu de temps pour voir ça serait très bienvenu... merci !

    • Sur la page officielle du Trust Fund for Africa... voici ce qui est marqué pour l’Erythrée...

      Eritrea is a major source of asylum seekers, who either remain in neighbouring countries of the region or move onwards towards Europe and elsewhere. Our main aim in the country is to create an enabling environment that improves economic opportunities available to young people, including through education, incentives for private entrepreneurship, vocational training or apprenticeship programmes.

      https://ec.europa.eu/trustfundforafrica/region/horn-africa/eritrea_en

    • Érythrée : une #plainte contre l’UE, complice de « travail forcé »

      Une plainte a été déposée ce mercredi, par un collectif d’Érythréens en exil, contre plusieurs institutions de l’Union européenne. En cause : le financement par l’UE, depuis l’année dernière, de la construction en Érythrée de routes pour lesquels sont employés, en toute connaissance de cause, des appelés du très controversé service militaire obligatoire.

      Les avocats de la Fondation droits de l’homme pour les Erythréens, basée aux Pays-Bas, avaient mis en garde l’Union européenne l’année dernière. Cette fois, face à l’indifférence des institutions de Bruxelles envers leurs arguments, ils sont passés à l’acte. Selon nos informations, une plainte d’une trentaine de pages a été déposée ce mercredi matin auprès du tribunal de grande instance d’Amsterdam. Cette plainte demande deux choses au tribunal : d’abord qu’il déclare le financement européen des chantiers de routes soutenus en Érythrée comme « illégal » ; ensuite, qu’il enjoigne l’Union européenne de le stopper.

      Dans leur plainte contre la Commission européenne et son Service d’action extérieure, les avocats Emil Jurjens et Tamilla Abdul-Alyeva s’appuient évidemment sur le droit international, qui sanctionne l’usage du travail forcé. Mais aussi sur les textes de l’UE elle-même, qui s’est engagée à refuser tout soutien à d’éventuelles « violations des droits de l’homme » dans sa coopération internationale. Et ce alors même que, dans son projet d’appui aux chantiers érythréens rendu public en 2018, elle a reconnu, noir sur blanc, que des conscrits du « service national » seraient bien employés sur les chantiers qu’elle finance, à hauteur de 20 millions d’euros en 2019 et de 60 millions d’euros en 2020.

      Pour sa défense, l’UE avait répondu par lettre, l’année dernière, à la mise en demeure des plaignants. Pour elle, d’une part l’Érythrée refuse toute « condition » préalable à sa coopération. Et d’autre part, elle fait valoir que ses financements ne sont pas destinés au gouvernement d’Asmara, mais à des sous-traitants, en l’occurrence des sociétés de construction érythréennes chargées de la mise en œuvre des travaux. Et elle assure qu’une « rémunération » est bel et bien versée aux employés.

      Les terribles conditions d’emploi des conscrits de l’armée érythréenne

      Mais pour prouver sa bonne foi, soulignent les plaignants, elle s’appuie sur la communication du gouvernement érythréen. Les avocats de la Fondation droits de l’homme pour les Erythréens ajoutent enfin que les sous-traitants érythréens sont des sociétés appartenant au parti unique érythréen, le Front populaire pour la démocratie et la justice (FPDJ) ou, tout simplement, au ministère de la Défense.

      Or, les terribles conditions d’emploi des conscrits de l’armée érythréenne ont été abondamment documentées par plusieurs enquêtes, journalistiques, universitaires ou d’institutions comme le Bureau international du travail (BIT). Mais aussi par la Rapporteure spéciale de l’ONU sur les droits de l’homme en Érythrée et, surtout, la Commission d’enquête du Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU en 2015, qui les a inscrit sur une liste de « possibles crimes contre l’humanité ».

      Les appelés sur « service national » érythréens sont en effet soumis à la vie, la discipline et la hiérarchie militaire. Après avoir été enrôlés avant leur dernière année de lycée, ils sont envoyés pendant 18 mois dans l’académie militaire de Sawa, dans le désert près de la frontière soudanaise, où ils sont soumis à des mauvais traitements, surtout les jeunes filles. Les réfractaires sont enrôlés de force au cours de giffas, ces rafles organisées par l’armée dans les campagnes et dans les villes pour capturer les jeunes qui se seraient soustraits à l’appel obligatoire sous les drapeaux ou qui auraient profité d’une permission pour déserter. Officiellement, il n’existe pas de limite à ce service, maintenant tous les Érythréens entre 18 ans et la cinquantaine à la disposition de l’armée, y compris lorsqu’ils sont nommés à des emploi civils.

      Hasard du calendrier : jeudi, le Parlement européen doit également se prononcer sur le sujet. Une résolution est proposée au vote par la députée française Michèle Rivasi (Verts), appelant la Commission européenne à « reporter » tout financement de tels projets, jusqu’à ce qu’une mission d’information du Parlement puisse se rendre en Érythrée. Mission parlementaire dont le principe avait été accepté en novembre, mais qui n’a pas encore eu lieu.

      http://www.rfi.fr/fr/afrique/20200513-erythr%C3%A9e-une-plainte-contre-l-ue-complice-travail-forc%C3%A9
      #justice

    • Eritrean organisation summons the EU for use of forced labour

      A case is being launched today in the court of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, that demands a halt to the European Union (EU) aid worth 80 million EUR being sent to Eritrea. The Foundation Human Rights for Eritreans has observed that the aid project financed by the EU aid relies on forced labour. The EU acknowledges this. This contradicts the most fundamental principles of international law and is unlawful towards the Foundation, which defends the fundamental rights of Eritreans in Eritrea and in the diaspora.

      The Foundation issued a summons to the European Union in April 2019 and asked the EU to end the project, which looks to rehabilitate the roads between Eritrea and Ethiopia. However, the EU refused to stop the project, even as it recognises that forced labour was (and is) used in the context of this project. At the end of 2019, the EU announced that it would provide further funding to the project. The EU funding goes to Eritrean state companies, which use it to procure materials.

      The Eritrean regime makes use of labourers in the Eritrean national service to construct the roads under the project. The circumstances under which the Eritrean population is forced to work in the national service have been described by the United Nations Human Rights Commission in detail: “Thousands of conscripts are subjected to forced labour that effectively abuses, exploits and enslaves them for years.”

      This form of national service has been described as “enslavement” and a “crime against humanity” by the United Nations. The European Parliament has denounced it as “forced labour” and “a form of slavery”. The EU was asked by the European Parliament in January 2020 to “avoid situations where the EU could indirectly finance projects that violate human rights” with specific reference to the Eritrean road building project.

      The EU claims that it has no responsibility for the forced labourers, as it “does not pay for labor under this project”, according to the European Commission. “The project only covers the procurement of material and equipment to support the rehabilitation of roads.”

      The Foundation states that the support to a project which uses forced labour is clearly in contradiction to international law and asks the Amsterdam court that the project is stopped.

      Documents relating to this case

      Press release EN
      https://kvdl.com/uploads/PRESS-RELEASE_KennedyvdLaan_FIN_13May2020.pdf

      Case summary EN
      https://kvdl.com/uploads/Case-Summary_Eritrea-Road-building_FIN_13May2020.pdf

      Writ of summons (‘dagvaarding’) EN
      https://kvdl.com/uploads/Writ-of-Summons-Foundation-HRfE-EU.pdf

      https://kvdl.com/en/articles/eritrean-organisation-summons-the-eu-for-use-of-forced-labour

    • Érythrée | L’Europe accusée de financer le travail forcé

      La Fondation des droits de l’homme pour les Érythréens, basée aux Pays-Bas, a déposé une plainte contre l’Union européenne (UE) en mai 2020, l’incriminant de financer le travail forcé en Érythrée. En cause : les investissements du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique dans des chantiers majoritairement menés par des personnes enrôlées de force pour un service militaire indéfini, avec des salaires quasi inexistants. La Suisse est associée à ce fonds d’urgence pour l’Afrique, qui a comme but premier de freiner la migration africaine vers l’Europe. Or, le règlement de l’UE interdit « tout soutien à d’éventuelles violations des droits humains ». La plainte demande aux organes concernés de l’UE de reconnaître ces financements comme illégaux et de les stopper. Les justifications, que les dirigeants européens invoquent en réponse aux critiques déjà émises, semblent jusqu’ici hasardeuses.

      Depuis quelques années l’Érythrée a entamé un mouvement d’ouverture vis-à-vis des soutiens extérieurs au sein de ce pays africain en main du même régime dictatorial depuis son indépendance. Des délégations européennes se sont rendues sur place pour négocier et contempler dans des circuits très contrôlés par les autorités l’état actuel des choses. L’Union européenne soutient financièrement des projets sur place à travers l’utilisation du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique, doté de 4,6 milliards. Conçu en 2015 lors d’une augmentation du nombre de demandes d’asile en Europe, ce fonds a comme finalité une réduction des migrations vers l’Europe. Selon Radio France International (RFI), concernant l’Érythrée spécifiquement, les chantiers dévoilés en 2018 sont financés à hauteur de 20 millions de francs en 2019, et 60 millions en 2020.

      Une sommation en 2019, puis une plainte contre l’UE en 2020

      Or pour la Fondation des droits de l’homme pour les Érythréens, cette aide finance des chantiers où travailleraient des conscrits enrôlés de force et mal (ou non) rémunérés. Malgré les changements récents, le régime autoritaire d’Issayas Afewerki ne donne pas de signe de relâchement envers sa population. Le rapport 2019 de Human Rights Watch énumère encore de nombreuses exactions contre les droits humains et dénonce également le financement de ces chantiers par l’UE. En particulier à travers ce système de milice forcé qui enrôle hommes et femmes dès leur majorité, et parfois plus jeunes, pour des travaux nationaux sans véritable compensation financière ni limite de temps formelle. Les figures opposantes au régime sont muselées, emprisonnées ou trouvent comme seule échappatoire la fuite du territoire. Un reportage auprès de l’énorme diaspora érythréenne vivant de l’autre côté de la frontière en Éthiopie, paru dans Mondiaal Niews (01.11.2019) estime que « l’argent européen maintient simplement la dictature en place ». Autrement dit : « l’Europe n’arrête pas la migration d’Érythrée, elle [en] prépare le terrain ».

      Selon la Fondation, ce sont précisément des personnes enrôlées contre leur gré qui travaillent sur des chantiers titanesques, cofinancés par l’Union européenne dans le cadre de ce fonds fiduciaire d’urgence de l’UE pour l’Afrique. Elle s’était déjà adressée aux autorités européennes en avril 2019 pour dénoncer ces faits (RFI). L’UE s’était alors défendue de toute responsabilité. Reconnaissant « que l’Érythrée n’accepte aucune condition sur l’octroi des fonds », elle estimait que les salaires étaient versés, vu que l’argent était touché par des entreprises érythréennes directement. Or, ces arguments ont comme source directe le gouvernement érythréen. Selon les informations invoquées par la Fondation, les sous-traitants érythréens en charge des chantiers sont des sociétés appartenant au parti unique érythréen. Ce qui permet de mettre en doute leur indépendance.
      Restés lettre morte, les arguments de la Fondation ont cette fois été formulés sous forme de plainte déposée le 13 mai 2020 auprès du tribunal de grande instance d’Amsterdam. Un dossier de 30 pages demande à l’UE de reconnaître ce soutien comme illégal et de le stopper.

      La Suisse y est associée

      Un article paru dans Le Temps le 22 janvier 2020 révélait que la Suisse était associée à ce fonds. Si les autorités helvétiques disent avoir émis des critiques sur le programme érythréen, insistant sur la nécessité d’une surveillance étroite, leur contribution participe dans les faits à ces chantiers ayant potentiellement recours au travail forcé. L’article évoque celui nommé « de la route de la paix » permettant d’améliorer l’accès à la mer pour la très enclavée Érythrée. Le responsable de ce fonds pour la Suisse affirmait ne « financer que le matériel ».
      Une assurance peu fiable, si l’on en croit l’UNOPS, un bureau onusien chargé par l’UE de contrôler l’utilisation du fonds, pour qui il n’est pas possible d’effectuer la surveillance de manière indépendante. Selon l’article du Temps, des membres de la Commission européenne avaient finalement rétorqué : « Le gouvernement a indiqué qu’il était prêt à démobiliser les conscrits une fois que les conditions le permettront. Il faut que la création d’emplois soit suffisante. Cela ne peut se produire du jour au lendemain. Se retirer serait contre-productif […] »
      On le voit, les arguments avancés par les représentant-e-s de la Suisse ou de l’Union européenne ne tiennent pas la route. Et leur responsabilité reste entière. Pensaient-ils, pensaient-elles, que la crainte de l’arrivée de nouveaux ressortissant-e-s érythréen-ne-s en quête de protection suffirait à faire tolérer des alliances et financements inavouables ? C’était faire fi d’une diaspora érythréenne intimement soudée et organisée pour faire front face à un régime totalitaire qui rend exsangue tout un peuple encore à sa merci. Cette plainte vient rappeler leur présence essentielle et leur ténacité exemplaire.

      –—

      Documents clés
      • 13.05.2020 Communiqué de presse relatif au dépôt de la plainte par Foundation Human Rights for Erythreans : « Eritrean organisation summons the EU for use of forced labour » (https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/PRESS-RELEASE_KennedyvdLaan_FIN_13May2020.pdf)
      • 14.01.2020 Rapport publié par Human Rights Watch « Eritrea : Events of 2019 » (https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2020/country-chapters/eritrea)
      • 01.04.2019 Lettre de sommation envoyée à l’Union européenne « Foundation Human Rights for Eritreans / European Union » (https://asile.ch/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Letter-of-Summons-EU-Emergency-Trust-Fund-for-Africa-1.pdf)

      https://asile.ch/2020/08/24/erythree-leurope-accusee-de-financer-le-travail-force

  • Europe spends billions stopping migration. Good luck figuring out where the money actually goes

    How much money exactly does Europe spend trying to curb migration from Nigeria? And what’s it used for? We tried to find out, but Europe certainly doesn’t make it easy. These flashy graphics show you just how complicated the funding is.
    In a shiny new factory in the Benin forest, a woman named Blessing slices pineapples into rings. Hundreds of miles away, at a remote border post in the Sahara, Abubakar scans travellers’ fingerprints. And in village squares across Nigeria, Usman performs his theatre show about the dangers of travelling to Europe.

    What do all these people have in common?

    All their lives are touched by the billions of euros European governments spend in an effort to curb migration from Africa.

    Since the summer of 2015,
    Read more about the influx of refugees to Europe in 2015 on the UNHCR website.
    when countless boats full of migrants began arriving on the shores of Greece and Italy, Europe has increased migration spending by billions.
    Read my guide to EU migration policy here.
    And much of this money is being spent in Africa.

    Within Europe, the political left and right have very different ways of framing the potential benefits of that funding. Those on the left say migration spending not only provides Africans with better opportunities in their home countries but also reduces migrant deaths in the Mediterranean. Those on the right say migration spending discourages Africans from making the perilous journey to Europe.

    However they spin it, the end result is the same: both left and right have embraced funding designed to reduce migration from Africa. In fact, the European Union (EU) plans to double migration spending under the new 2021-2027 budget, while quadrupling spending on border control.

    The three of us – journalists from Nigeria, Italy and the Netherlands – began asking ourselves: just how much money are we talking here?

    At first glance, it seems like a perfectly straightforward question. Just add up the migration budgets of the EU and the individual member states and you’ve got your answer, right? But after months of research, it turns out that things are nowhere near that simple.

    In fact, we discovered that European migration spending resembles nothing so much as a gigantic plate of spaghetti.

    If you try to tease out a single strand, at least three more will cling to it. Try to find where one strand begins, and you’ll find yourself tangled up in dozens of others.

    This is deeply concerning. Though Europe maintains a pretence of transparency, in practice it’s virtually impossible to hold the EU and its member states accountable for their migration expenditures, let alone assess how effective they are. If a team of journalists who have devoted months to the issue can’t manage it, then how could EU parliament members juggling multiple portfolios ever hope to?

    This lack of oversight is particularly problematic in the case of migration, an issue that ranks high on European political agendas. The subject of migration fuels a great deal of political grandstanding, populist opportunism, and social unrest. And the debate surrounding the issue is rife with misinformation.

    For an issue of this magnitude, it’s crucial to have a clear view of existing policies and to examine whether these policies make sense. But to be able to do that, we need to understand the funding streams: how much money is being spent and what is it being spent on?

    While working on this article, we spoke to researchers and officials who characterised EU migration spending as “opaque”, “unclear” and “chaotic”. We combed through countless websites, official documents, annual reports and budgets, and we submitted freedom of information requests
    in a number of European countries, in Nigeria, and to the European commission. And we discovered that the subject of migration, while not exactly cloak-and-dagger stuff, is apparently sensitive enough that most people preferred to speak off the record.

    Above all, we were troubled by the fact that no one seems to have a clear overview of European migration budgets – and by how painfully characteristic this is of European migration policy as a whole.
    Nigeria – ‘a tough cookie’

    It wasn’t long before we realised that mapping out all European cash flows to all African countries would take us years. Instead, we decided to focus on Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country and the continent’s strongest economy, as well as the country of origin of the largest group of African asylum seekers in the EU. “A tough cookie” in the words of one senior EU official, but also “our most important migration partner in the coming years”.

    But Nigeria wasn’t exactly eager to embrace the role of “most important migration partner”. After all, migration has been a lifeline for Nigeria’s economy: last year, Nigerian migrants living abroad sent home $25bn – roughly 6% of the country’s GNP.

    It took a major European charm offensive to get Nigeria on board – a “long saga” with “more than one tense meeting”, according to a high-ranking EU diplomat we spoke to.

    The European parliament invited Muhammadu Buhari, the Nigerian president, to Strasbourg in 2016. Over the next several years, one European dignitary after another visited Nigeria: from Angela Merkel,
    the German chancellor, to Matteo Renzi,
    the Italian prime minister, to Emmanuel Macron,
    the French president, to Mark Rutte,

    the Dutch prime minister.

    Three guesses as to what they all wanted to talk about.
    ‘No data available’

    But let’s get back to those funding streams.

    The EU would have you believe that everything fits neatly into a flowchart. When asked to respond to this article, the European commission told us: “We take transparency very seriously.” One spokesperson after another, all from various EU agencies, informed us that the information was “freely available online”.

    But as Wilma Haan, director of the Open State Foundation, notes: “Just throwing a bunch of stuff online doesn’t make you transparent. People have to be able to find the information and verify it.”

    Yet that’s exactly what the EU did. The EU foundations and agencies we contacted referred us to dozens of different websites. In some cases, the information was relatively easy to find,
    but in others the data was fragmented or missing entirely. All too often, our searches turned up results such as “data soon available”
    or “no data available”.

    The website of the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) – worth around €3.1bn – is typical of the problems we faced. While we were able to find a list of projects funded by AMIF online,

    the list only contains the names of the projects – not the countries in which they’re carried out. As a result, there’s only one way to find out what’s going on where: by Googling each of the project names individually.

    This lack of a clear overview has major consequences for the democratic process, says Tineke Strik, member of the European parliament (Green party). Under the guise of “flexibility”, the European parliament has “no oversight over the funds whatsoever”. Strik says: “In the best-case scenario, we’ll discover them listed on the European commission’s website.”

    At the EU’s Nigerian headquarters, one official explained that she does try to keep track of European countries’ migration-related projects to identify “gaps and overlaps”. When asked why this information wasn’t published online, she responded: “It’s something I do alongside my daily work.”
    Getting a feel for Europe’s migration spaghetti

    “There’s no way you’re going to get anywhere with this.”

    This was the response from a Correspondent member who researches government funding when we announced this project several months ago. Not exactly the most encouraging words to start our journey. Still, over the past few months, we’ve done our best to make as much progress as we could.

    Let’s start in the Netherlands, Maite’s home country. When we tried to find out how much Dutch tax money is spent in Nigeria on migration-related issues, we soon found ourselves down yet another rabbit hole.

    The Dutch ministry of foreign affairs, which controls all funding for Dutch foreign policy, seemed like a good starting point. The ministry divides its budget into centralised and decentralised funds. The centralised funds are managed in the Netherlands administrative capital, The Hague, while the decentralised funds are distributed by Dutch embassies abroad.

    Exactly how much money goes to the Dutch embassy in the Nigerian capital Abuja is unclear – no information is available online. When we contacted the embassy, they weren’t able to provide us with any figures, either. According to their press officer, these budgets are “fragmented”, and the total can only be determined at the end of the year.

    The ministry of foreign affairs distributes centralised funds through its departments. But migration is a topic that spans a number of different departments: the department for stabilisation and humanitarian aid (DSH), the security policy department (DVB), the sub-Saharan Africa department (DAF), and the migration policy bureau (BMB), to name just a few. There’s no way of knowing whether each department spends money on migration, let alone how much of it goes to Nigeria.

    Not to mention the fact that other ministries, such as the ministry of economic affairs and the ministry of justice and security, also deal with migration-related issues.

    Next, we decided to check out the Dutch development aid budget
    in the hope it would clear things up a bit. Unfortunately, the budget isn’t organised by country, but by theme. And since migration isn’t one of the main themes, it’s scattered over several different sections. Luckily, the document does contain an annex (https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/documenten/begrotingen/2019/09/17/hgis---nota-homogene-groep-internationale-samenwerking-rijksbegroting-) that goes into more detail about migration.

    In this annex, we found that the Netherlands spends a substantial chunk of money on “migration cooperation”, “reception in the region” and humanitarian aid for refugees.

    And then there’s the ministry of foreign affairs’ Stability Fund,
    the ministry of justice and security’s budget for the processing and repatriation of asylum seekers, and the ministry of education, culture and science’s budget for providing asylum seekers with an education.

    But again, it’s impossible to determine just how much of this funding finds its way to Nigeria. This is partly due to the fact that many migration projects operate in multiple countries simultaneously (in Nigeria, Chad and Cameroon, for example). Regional projects such as this generally don’t share details of how funding is divided up among the participating countries.

    Using data from the Dutch embassy and an NGO that monitors Dutch projects in Nigeria, we found that €6m in aid goes specifically to Nigeria, with another €19m for the region as a whole. Dutch law enforcement also provides in-kind support to help strengthen Nigeria’s border control.

    But hold on, there’s more. We need to factor in the money that the Netherlands spends on migration through its contributions to the EU.

    The Netherlands pays hundreds of millions into the European Development Fund (EDF), which is partly used to finance migration projects. Part of that money also gets transferred to another EU migration fund: the EUTF for Africa.
    The Netherlands also contributes directly to this fund.

    But that’s not all. The Netherlands also gives (either directly or through the EU) to a variety of other EU funds and agencies that finance migration projects in Nigeria. And just as in the Netherlands, these EU funds and agencies are scattered over many different offices. There’s no single “EU ministry of migration”.

    To give you a taste of just how convoluted things can get: the AMIF falls under the EU’s home affairs “ministry”

    (DG HOME), the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) falls under the “ministry” for international cooperation and development (DG DEVCO), and the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP) falls under the European External Action Service (EEAS). The EU border agency, Frontex, is its own separate entity, and there’s also a “ministry” for humanitarian aid (DG ECHO).

    Still with me?

    Because this was just the Netherlands.

    Now let’s take a look at Giacomo’s country of origin, Italy, which is also home to one of Europe’s largest Nigerian communities (surpassed only by the UK).

    Italy’s ministry of foreign affairs funds the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS), which provides humanitarian aid in north-eastern Nigeria, where tens of thousands of people have been displaced by the Boko Haram insurgency. AICS also finances a wide range of projects aimed at raising awareness of the risks of illegal migration. It’s impossible to say how much of this money ends up in Nigeria, though, since the awareness campaigns target multiple countries at once.

    This data is all available online – though you’ll have to do some digging to find it. But when it comes to the funds managed by Italy’s ministry of the interior, things start to get a bit murkier. Despite the ministry having signed numerous agreements on migration with African countries in recent years, there’s little trace of the money online. Reference to a €92,000 donation for new computers for Nigeria’s law enforcement and immigration services was all we could find.

    Things get even more complicated when we look at Italy’s “Africa Fund”, which was launched in 2017 to foster cooperation with “priority countries along major migration routes”. The fund is jointly managed by the ministry of foreign affairs and the ministry of the interior.

    Part of the money goes to the EUTF for Africa, but the fund also contributes to United Nations (UN) organisations, such as the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), as well as to the Italian ministry of defence and the ministry of economy and finance.

    Like most European governments, Italy also contributes to EU funds and agencies concerned with migration, such as Frontex, Europol, and the European Asylum Support Office (EASO).

    And then there are the contributions to UN agencies that deal with migration: UNHCR, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), IOM, the UN Development Programme (UNDP), and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), to name just a few.

    Now multiply all of this by the number of European countries currently active in Nigeria. Oh, and let’s not forget the World Bank,

    which has only recently waded into the waters of the migration industry.

    And then there are the European development banks. And the EU’s External Investment Plan, which was launched in 2016 with the ambitious goal of generating €44bn in private investments in developing countries, with a particular focus on migrants’ countries of origin. Not to mention the regional “migration dialogues”
    organised in west Africa under the Rabat Process and the Cotonou Agreement.

    This is the European migration spaghetti.
    How we managed to compile a list nonetheless

    By now, one thing should be clear: there are a staggering number of ministries, funds and departments involved in European migration spending. It’s no wonder that no one in Europe seems to have a clear overview of the situation. But we thought that maybe, just maybe, there was one party that might have the overview we seek: Nigeria. After all, the Nigerian government has to be involved in all the projects that take place there, right?

    We decided to ask around in Nigeria’s corridors of power. Was anyone keeping track of European migration funding? The Ministry of Finance? Or maybe the Ministry of the Interior, or the Ministry of Labour and Employment?

    Nope.

    We then tried asking Nigeria’s anti-trafficking agency (NAPTIP), the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS), the Nigerians in Diaspora Commission, and the National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (NCFRMI).

    No luck there, either. When it comes to migration, things are just as fragmented under the Nigerian government as they are in Europe.

    In the meantime, we contacted each of the European embassies in Nigeria.
    This proved to be the most fruitful approach and yielded the most complete lists of projects. The database of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI)
    was particularly useful in fleshing out our overview.

    So does that mean our list is now complete? Probably not.

    More to the point: the whole undertaking is highly subjective, since there’s no official definition of what qualifies as a migration project and what doesn’t.

    For example, consider initiatives to create jobs for young people in Nigeria. Would those be development projects or trade projects? Or are they actually migration projects (the idea being that young people wouldn’t migrate if they could find work)?

    What about efforts to improve border control in northern Nigeria? Would they fall under counterterrorism? Security? Institutional development? Or is this actually a migration-related issue?

    Each country has its own way of categorising projects.

    There’s no single, unified standard within the EU.

    When choosing what to include in our own overview, we limited ourselves to projects that European countries themselves designated as being migration related.

    While it’s certainly not perfect, this overview allows us to draw at least some meaningful conclusions about three key issues: where the money is going, where it isn’t going, and what this means for Nigeria.
    1) Where is the money going?

    In Nigeria, we found

    If you’d like to work with the data yourself, feel free to download the full overview here.
    50 migration projects being funded by 11 different European countries, as well as 32 migration projects that rely on EU funding. Together, they amount to more than €770m in funding.

    Most of the money from Brussels is spent on improving Nigerian border control:
    more than €378m. For example, the European Investment Bank has launched a €250m initiative

    to provide all Nigerians with biometric identity cards.

    The funding provided by individual countries largely goes to projects aimed at creating employment opportunities

    in Nigeria: at least €92m.

    Significantly, only €300,000 is spent on creating more legal opportunities to migrate – less than 0.09% of all funding.

    We also found 47 “regional” projects that are not limited to Nigeria, but also include other countries.
    Together, they amount to more than €775m in funding.
    Regional migration spending is mainly focused on migrants who have become stranded in transit and is used to return them home and help them to reintegrate when they get there. Campaigns designed to raise awareness of the dangers of travelling to Europe also receive a relatively large proportion of funding in the region.

    2) Where isn’t the money going?

    When we look at the list of institutions – or “implementing agencies”, as they’re known in policy speak – that receive money from Europe, one thing immediately stands out: virtually none of them are Nigerian organisations.

    “The EU funds projects in Nigeria, but that money doesn’t go directly to Nigerian organisations,” says Charles Nwanelo, head of migration at the NCFRMI.

    See their website here.
    “Instead, it goes to international organisations, such as the IOM, which use the money to carry out projects here. This means we actually have no idea how much money the EU is spending in Nigeria.”

    We hear the same story again and again from Nigerian government officials: they never see a cent of European funding, as it’s controlled by EU and UN organisations. This is partially a response to corruption within Nigerian institutions – Europe feels it can keep closer tabs on its money by channelling it through international organisations. As a result, these organisations are growing rapidly in Nigeria. To get an idea of just how rapidly: the number of people working for the IOM in Nigeria has more than quadrupled over the past two years.

    Of course, this doesn’t mean that Nigerian organisations are going unfunded. Implementing agencies are free to pass funding along to Nigerian groups. For example, the IOM hires Nigerian NGOs to provide training for returning migrants and sponsors a project that provides training and new software to the Nigerian immigration service.

    Nevertheless, the system has inevitably led to the emergence of a parallel aid universe in which the Nigerian government plays only a supporting role. “The Nigerian parliament should demand to see an overview of all current and upcoming projects being carried out in their country every three months,” says Bob van Dillen, migration expert at development organisation Cordaid.

    But that would be “difficult”, according to one German official we spoke to, because “this isn’t a priority for the Nigerian government. This is at the top of Europe’s agenda, not Nigeria’s.”

    Most Nigerian migrants to Europe come from Edo state, where the governor has been doing his absolute best to compile an overview of all migration projects. He set up a task force that aims to coordinate migration activities in his state. The task force has been largely unsuccessful because the EU doesn’t provide it with any direct funding and doesn’t require member states to cooperate with it.

    3) What are the real-world consequences for Nigeria?

    We’ve established that the Nigerian government isn’t involved in allocating migration spending and that local officials are struggling to keep tabs on things. So who is coordinating all those billions in funding?

    Each month, the European donors and implementing agencies mentioned above meet at the EU delegation to discuss their migration projects. However, diplomats from multiple European countries have told us that no real coordination takes place at these meetings. No one checks to see whether projects conflict or overlap. Instead, the meetings are “more on the basis of letting each other know”, as one diplomat put it.

    One German official noted: “What we should do is look together at what works, what doesn’t, and which lessons we can learn from each other. Not to mention how to prevent people from shopping around from project to project.”

    Other diplomats consider this too utopian and feel that there are far too many players to make that level of coordination feasible. In practice, then, it seems that chaotic funding streams inevitably lead to one thing: more chaos.
    And we’ve only looked at one country ...

    That giant plate of spaghetti we just sifted through only represents a single serving – other countries have their own versions of Nigeria’s migration spaghetti. Alongside Nigeria, the EU has also designated Mali, Senegal, Ethiopia and Niger as “priority countries”. The EU’s largest migration fund, the EUTF, finances projects in 26 different African countries. And the sums of money involved are only going to increase.

    When we first started this project, our aim was to chart a path through the new European zeal for funding. We wanted to track the flow of migration money to find answers to some crucial questions: will this funding help Nigerians make better lives for themselves in their own country? Will it help reduce the trafficking of women? Will it provide more safe, legal ways for Nigerians to travel to Europe?

    Or will it primarily go towards maintaining the international aid industry? Does it encourage corruption? Does it make migrants even more vulnerable to exploitation along the way?

    But we’re still far from answering these questions. Recently, a new study by the UNDP

    called into question “the notion that migration can be prevented or significantly reduced through programmatic and policy responses”.

    Nevertheless, European programming and policy responses will only increase in scope in the coming years.

    But the more Europe spends on migration, the more tangled the spaghetti becomes and the harder it gets to check whether funds are being spent wisely. With the erosion of transparency comes the erosion of democratic oversight.

    So to anyone who can figure out how to untangle the spaghetti, we say: be our guest.

    https://thecorrespondent.com/154/europe-spends-billions-stopping-migration-good-luck-figuring-out-where-the-money-actually-goes/171168048128-fac42704
    #externalisation #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Nigeria #EU #EU #Union_européenne #externalisation #frontières #contrôles_frontaliers #Frontex #Trust_fund #Pays-Bas #argent #transparence (manque de - ) #budget #remittances #AMIF #développement #aide_au_développement #European_Development_Fund (#EDF) #EUTF_for_Africa #European_Neighbourhood_Instrument (#ENI) #Development_Cooperation_Instrument (#DCI) #Italie #Banque_mondiale #External_Investment_Plan #processus_de_rabat #accords_de_Cotonou #biométrie #carte_d'identité_biométrique #travail #développement #aide_au_développement #coopération_au_développement #emploi #réintégration #campagnes #IOM #OIM

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur l’externalisation des frontières :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/731749
    Et ajouté à la métaliste développement/migrations :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358

    ping @isskein @isskein @pascaline @_kg_

    • Résumé en français par Jasmine Caye (@forumasile) :

      Pour freiner la migration en provenance d’Afrique les dépenses européennes explosent

      Maite Vermeulen est une journaliste hollandaise, cofondatrice du site d’information The Correspondent et spécialisée dans les questions migratoires. Avec deux autres journalistes, l’italien Giacomo Zandonini (Italie) et le nigérian Ajibola Amzat, elle a tenté de comprendre les raisons derrières la flambée des dépenses européennes sensées freiner la migration en provenance du continent africain.

      Depuis le Nigéria, Maite Vermeulen s’est intéressée aux causes de la migration nigériane vers l’Europe et sur les milliards d’euros déversés dans les programmes humanitaires et sécuritaires dans ce pays. Selon elle, la politique sécuritaire européenne n’empêchera pas les personnes motivées de tenter leur chance pour rejoindre l’Europe. Elle constate que les fonds destinés à freiner la migration sont toujours attribués aux mêmes grandes organisations gouvernementales ou non-gouvernementales. Les financements européens échappent aussi aux évaluations d’impact permettant de mesurer les effets des aides sur le terrain.

      Le travail de recherche des journalistes a duré six mois et se poursuit. Il est financé par Money Trail un projet qui soutient des journalistes africains, asiatiques et européens pour enquêter en réseau sur les flux financiers illicites et la corruption en Afrique, en Asie et en Europe.

      Les Nigérians ne viennent pas en Europe pour obtenir l’asile

      L’équipe a d’abord tenté d’élucider cette énigme : pourquoi tant de nigérians choisissent de migrer vers l’Europe alors qu’ils n’obtiennent quasiment jamais l’asile. Le Nigéria est un pays de plus de 190 millions d’habitants et l’économie la plus riche d’Afrique. Sa population représente le plus grand groupe de migrants africains qui arrivent en Europe de manière irrégulière. Sur les 180 000 migrants qui ont atteint les côtes italiennes en 2016, 21% étaient nigérians. Le Nigéria figure aussi régulièrement parmi les cinq premiers pays d’origine des demandeurs d’asile de l’Union européenne. Près de 60% des requérants nigérians proviennent de l’Etat d’Edo dont la capitale est Bénin City. Pourtant leurs chance d’obtenir un statut de protection sont minimes. En effet, seuls 9% des demandeurs d’asile nigérians reçoivent l’asile dans l’UE. Les 91% restants sont renvoyés chez eux ou disparaissent dans la nature.

      Dans l’article Want to make sense of migration ? Ask the people who stayed behind, Maite Vermeulen explique que Bénin City a été construite grâce aux nigérians travaillant illégalement en Italie. Et les femmes sont peut-être bien à l’origine d’un immense trafic de prostituées. Elle nous explique ceci :

      “Pour comprendre le présent, il faut revenir aux années 80. À cette époque, des entreprises italiennes étaient établies dans l’État d’Edo. Certains hommes d’affaires italiens ont épousé des femmes de Benin City, qui sont retournées en Italie avec leur conjoint. Ils ont commencé à exercer des activités commerciales, à commercialiser des textiles, de la dentelle et du cuir, de l’or et des bijoux. Ces femmes ont été les premières à faire venir d’autres femmes de leur famille en Italie – souvent légalement, car l’agriculture italienne avait cruellement besoin de travailleurs pour cueillir des tomates et des raisins. Mais lorsque, à la fin des années 80, la chute des prix du pétrole a plongé l’économie nigériane à l’arrêt, beaucoup de ces femmes d’affaires ont fait faillite. Les femmes travaillant dans l’agriculture ont également connu une période difficile : leur emploi est allé à des ouvriers d’Europe de l’Est. Ainsi, de nombreuses femmes Edo en Italie n’avaient qu’une seule alternative : la prostitution. Ce dernier recours s’est avéré être lucratif. En peu de temps, les femmes ont gagné plus que jamais auparavant. Elles sont donc retournées à Benin City dans les années 1990 avec beaucoup de devises européennes – avec plus d’argent, en fait, que beaucoup de gens de leur ville n’en avaient jamais vu. Elles ont construit des appartements pour gagner des revenus locatifs. Ces femmes étaient appelées « talos », ou mammas italiennes. Tout le monde les admirait. Les jeunes femmes les considéraient comme des modèles et voulaient également aller en Europe. Certains chercheurs appellent ce phénomène la « théorie de la causalité cumulative » : chaque migrant qui réussit entraîne plus de personnes de sa communauté à vouloir migrer. A cette époque, presque personne à Benin City ne savait d’où venait exactement l’argent. Les talos ont commencé à prêter de l’argent aux filles de leur famille afin qu’elles puissent également se rendre en Italie. Ce n’est que lorsque ces femmes sont arrivées qu’on leur a dit comment elles devaient rembourser le prêt. Certaines ont accepté, d’autres ont été forcées. Toutes gagnaient de l’argent. Dans les premières années, le secret des mammas italiennes était gardé au sein de la famille. Mais de plus en plus de femmes ont payé leurs dettes – à cette époque, cela prenait environ un an ou deux – et elles ont ensuite décidé d’aller chercher de l’argent elles-mêmes. En tant que « Mamas », elles ont commencé à recruter d’autres femmes dans leur ville natale. Puis, lentement, l’argent a commencé à manquer à Benin City : un grand nombre de leurs femmes travaillaient dans l’industrie du sexe en Italie.”

      Aujourd’hui, l’Union européenne considère le Nigéria comme son plus important “partenaire migratoire”et depuis quelques années les euros s’y déversent à flots afin de financer des programmes des sécurisation des frontières, de création d’emploi, de lutte contre la traite d’être humains et des programmes de sensibilisation sur les dangers de la migration vers l’Europe.
      Le “cartel migratoire” ou comment peu d’organisation monopolisent les projets sur le terrain

      Dans un autre article intitulé A breakdown of Europe’s € 1.5 billion migration spending in Nigeria, les journalistes se demandent comment les fonds européens sont alloués au Nigéria. Encore une fois on parle ici des projets destinés à freiner la migration. En tout ce sont 770 millions d’euros investis dans ces “projets migration”. En plus, le Nigéria bénéficie d’autres fonds supplémentaires à travers les “projets régionaux” qui s’élèvent à 775 millions d’euros destinés principalement à coordonner et organiser les retours vers les pays d’origines. Mais contrairement aux engagements de l’Union européenne les fonds alloués aux projets en faveur de la migration légale sont très inférieurs aux promesses et représentent 0.09% des aides allouées au Nigéria.

      A qui profitent ces fonds ? Au “cartel migratoire” constitué du Haut Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), de l’Organisation internationale des migrations (OIM), de l’UNICEF, de l’Organisation internationale du travail (OIL), de l’Organisation internationale des Nations Unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC). Ces organisations récoltent près de 60% des fonds alloués par l’Union européenne aux “projets migration” au Nigéria et dans la région. Les ONG et les consultants privés récupèrent 13% du total des fonds alloués, soit 89 millions d’euros, le double de ce qu’elles reçoivent en Europe.
      Les montants explosent, la transparence diminue

      Où va vraiment l’argent et comment mesurer les effets réels sur les populations ciblées. Quels sont les impacts de ces projets ? Depuis 2015, l’Europe a augmenté ses dépenses allouées à la migration qui s’élèvent désormais à plusieurs milliards.

      La plus grande partie de ces fonds est attribuée à l’Afrique. Dans l’article Europe spends billions stopping migration. Good luck figuring out where the money actually goes, Maite Vermeulen, Ajibola Amzat et Giacomo Zandonini expliquent que l’UE prévoit de doubler ces dépenses dans le budget 2021-2027 et quadrupler les dépenses sur le contrôle des frontières.

      Des mois de recherche n’ont pas permis de comprendre comment étaient alloués les fonds pour la migration. Les sites internet sont flous et de nombreux bureaucrates européens se disent incapables concilier les dépenses car la transparence fait défaut. Difficile de comprendre l’allocation précise des fonds de l’Union européenne et celle des fonds des Etats européens. Le tout ressemble, selon les chercheurs, à un immense plat de spaghettis. Ils se posent une question importante : si eux n’y arrivent pas après des mois de recherche comment les députés européens pourraient s’y retrouver ? D’autres chercheurs et fonctionnaires européens qualifient les dépenses de migration de l’UE d’opaques. La consultation de nombreux sites internet, documents officiels, rapports annuels et budgets, et les nombreuses demandes d’accès à l’information auprès de plusieurs pays européens actifs au Nigéria ainsi que les demandes d’explications adressées à la Commission européenne n’ont pas permis d’arriver à une vision globale et précise des budgets attribués à la politique migratoire européenne. Selon Tineke Strik, député vert au parlement européen, ce manque de clarté a des conséquences importantes sur le processus démocratique, car sans vision globale précise, il n’y a pas vraiment de surveillance possible sur les dépenses réelles ni sur l’impact réel des programmes sur le terrain.

      https://thecorrespondent.com/154/europe-spends-billions-stopping-migration-good-luck-figuring-out-where-the-money-actually-goes/102663569008-2e2c2159

  • Why return from Europe is causing problems for The Gambia

    Roughly 38,500 Gambians left the country through ‘irregular’ means between 2013 and 2017. Today, almost every family has ties abroad. The influx of immigrants to Europe and elsewhere was caused by political oppression under the long-serving former president Yahya Jammeh. His oppressive politics also severely affected the economic prospects of The Gambia’s young population.

    As a result, a large number of citizens, mostly young men, sought asylum in Europe. But very few have been allowed to stay. Even more were turned away when Jammeh was toppled after elections in 2017 and the country returned to democracy. More recently, there has been a big push from European Union (EU) member states to return failed asylum seekers back home to The Gambia.

    The question of returns is particularly volatile in the west African nation of 2 million people, reflected in the country’s and European press.

    A slight increase in Gambian deportations began in November 2018 after the EU and the government agreed on a ‘good practice’ agreement for efficient return procedures.

    This intensified cooperation became possible due to the governmental change in 2017, with President Adama Barrow becoming President after the elections, as we found in our research on the political economy of migration governance in The Gambia.

    Despite initial cooperation with the EU on returns, in March 2019 Barrow’s government imposed a moratorium on any further deportations of its nationals from the EU. After a standoff of several months, the moratorium has now been lifted. Though only temporary, the moratorium was an important tool for the government to manage problems with its domestic legitimacy.
    Relationship challenges

    Jammeh’s ousting ended years of severe repression and corruption that had discouraged donor countries from cooperating with The Gambia. When he left, the country quickly established positive relations with the EU which has become its most important development partner. It provides €55 million in budgetary support and runs three projects to address the root causes of destabilisation, forced displacement and irregular migration. But the moratorium was a stress test for this new relationship.

    Before the moratorium was imposed in March 2019, the government had started to tentatively cooperate with the EU on return matters. For example, it sent regular missions to Europe to issue nationals with identification documents to facilitate their return.

    Relations began to sour when European governments increased returns in a way that authorities in The Gambia viewed as inconsistent with the ‘good practice’ agreement. The agreement stipulates that return numbers should not overstretch the country’s capacity to receive returnees. It also states that adequate notice must be given before asylum seekers are returned. Both of these provisions were allegedly breached.
    Problems at home

    The incoming returns quickly led to heated debates among the population and on social media. The rumblings peaked in February 2019 with one particular return flight from Germany. Authorities in Banjul claimed they had not been well informed about it and initially refused entry. Public demonstrations followed in March. The moratorium, which European partners had already been notified about, was declared shortly afterwards.

    The moratorium can be linked to diplomatic and technical inefficiencies, but it is also based on a more fundamental problem for Barrow’s government. By cooperating with the EU on returns, they risk their domestic legitimacy because by and large, most Gambians in Europe do not want to return home.

    The initial euphoria that surrounded the democratic transition is wearing off. Many reform processes such as in the security sector and in the media environment are dragging. The economic situation of many has not improved. Allowing more deportations from the EU is perceived as betrayal by many migrants and their families.

    The government is frequently suspected to play an active role in returns and is accused of witholding information about their dealings with the EU and member states like Germany. Incidentally, President Barrow is currently seeking to extend his rule beyond the three-year transition period originally agreed upon, ending in January 2020. Opposition to these plans is widespread.

    In these politically tense times, pressing a pause button on returns fulfilled a symbolic function by defending Gambians against foreign national interests. The recent lifting of the moratorium is politically very risky. It paves the way for more of the deeply unpopular chartered return operations.

    What next?

    On the whole, The Gambia has little room to manoeuvre. It is highly dependent on the EU’s goodwill and financial support for its reforms process. In line with the development focus of the EU, the position of the government is to prepare the ground for more “humane” repatriations, which will need more time and joint efforts.

    This would include better and more comprehensive reintegration opportunities for returned migrants. Reintegration is already the focus of various projects funded by the European Union Trust Fund. Programmes like the International Organisation for Migration’s ‘Post-Arrival Reintegration Assistance’ for returnees from Europe are up and running. However, they only serve a limited number of returnees and cannot meet all their needs.

    It is important to note that the role of the Gambian state in providing reintegration support has been marginal.

    With the lifting of the moratorium EU-Gambia cooperation stands at a crossroads. If EU member states maintain their hardline returnee approach The Gambia’s new government will continue to struggle with its legitimacy challenges. This could potentially jeopardise democratisation efforts.

    In the alternative, the EU could take a more cooperative stance by working on more holistic, development-oriented solutions. A starting point would be to move away from plans to return high numbers of failed asylum seekers. Sending back large numbers of migrants has never been feasible.

    The Gambian government will be more honest about its migration dealings with the EU if the agreements are fair and practical. Most importantly, if Gambians had access to fair and practical migration pathways this would lessen cases of irregular migration, which continue to remain high.

    Without a greater share of legal migration, the issue of return will continue to be particularly contentious.

    https://theconversation.com/why-return-from-europe-is-causing-problems-for-the-gambia-124036
    #Gambie #retour #renvois #expulsions #réfugiés_gambiens #développement #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #conditionnalité_de_l'aide #Allemagne #moratoire #réintégration #European_Union_Trust_Fund #Trust_Fund #Post-Arrival_Reintegration_Assistance #OIM #IOM
    ping @karine4 @_kg_

    J’ai ajouté « #deportees » dans la liste des #mots autour de la migration :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/414225
    Et plus précisément ici : https://seenthis.net/messages/414225#message812066
    #terminologie #vocabulaire
    ping @sinehebdo

    Ajouté à la métaliste développement-migrations, autour de la conditionnalité de l’aide :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733358#message768701