#velika_kladuša

  • Liste sur les morts aux #frontières des #Alpes

    Première décompte des morts, à ma connaissance, celui de Médecins Sans Frontières, dans un rapport de 2018 :
    https://fuoricampo.medicisenzafrontiere.it/Fuoricampo2018.pdf
    A la page 17, on peut lire : plus de 20 cadavres retrouvés aux frontières alpines, dont 15 entre l’Italie et la France

    Quand j’aurai le temps, je chercherais les références des cas antérieures que j’ai répertoriés sur seenthis par le passé...

    #frontière_sud-alpine #montagne #mourir_aux_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #décès #morts #frontières

    J’ajoute à la #métaliste sur la frontière sud-alpine :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/733721

    Voir aussi ces articles consacrés aux morts aux frontières à Vintimille, Brenner et Côme :
    https://openmigration.org/analisi/i-morti-di-confine-a-ventimiglia
    https://openmigration.org/analisi/morire-di-confine-al-brennero
    https://openmigration.org/analisi/morire-di-confine-a-como

    ping @reka @isskein


  • Bosnian police block 100 migrants from reaching Croatia

    Bosnian border police on Monday stopped about 100 migrants from reaching the border with European Union member Croatia amid a rise in the influx of people heading through the Balkans toward Western Europe.

    Police blocked the migrants near the Maljevac border crossing in northwestern Bosnia, which was briefly closed down. The group has moved toward Croatia from the nearby town of #Velika_Kladusa, where hundreds have been staying in makeshift camps while looking for ways to move on.

    Migrants have recently turned to Bosnia in order to avoid more heavily guarded routes through the Balkans. Authorities in the war-ravaged country have struggled with the influx of thousands of people from the Mideast, Africa and Asia.

    Peter Van der Auweraert, from the International Organization for Migration, tweeted the attempted group crossing on Monday was a “very worrying development that risks” creating a backlash.

    Van der Auweraert told The Associated Press that the migrant influx has already put pressure on Bosnia and any incidents could further strain the situation, making Bosnians view migrants as “troublemakers” rather than people in need of help, he said.

    Migrants arrive in Bosnia from Serbia or Montenegro after traveling from Greece to Albania, Bulgaria or Macedonia.

    Also Monday, a migrant was stabbed in a fight with another migrant in an asylum center in southern Bosnia, police said.

    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said Monday that more than 5,600 migrants have reached Bosnia and Herzegovina so far this year, compared with only 754 in all of 2017.

    Hundreds of thousands of people passed through the Balkans toward Europe at the peak of the mass migration in 2015. The flow eased for a while but has recently picked up a bit with the new route through Bosnia.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/article213373449.html
    #Bosnie #fermeture_des_frontières #asile #migrations #réfugiés #Croatie #frontières #route_des_Balkans #Bosnie-Herzégovine

    • Migrants en Croatie : « on ne nous avait encore jamais tiré dessus »

      Le 30 mai, la police croate ouvrait le feu sur une camionnette qui venait de forcer un barrage près de la frontière avec la Bosnie-Herzégovine. À l’intérieur, 29 migrants. Bilan : deux enfants et sept adultes blessés. Reportage sur le lieu du drame, nouvelle étape de la route de l’exil, où des réfugiés désœuvrés errent dans des villages désertés par l’exode.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Migrants-en-Croatie-nulle-part-ailleurs-on-ne-nous-avait-tire-des
      #police #violences_policières

    • Refugees stranded in Bosnia allege Croatian police brutality

      Croatian officers accused of physical and verbal abuse, along with harassment including theft, but deny all allegations.

      Brutally beaten, mobile phones destroyed, strip-searched and money stolen.

      These are some of the experiences refugees and migrants stranded in western Bosnia report as they describe encounters with Croatian police.

      The abuse, they say, takes place during attempts to pass through Croatia, an EU member, with most headed for Germany.

      Bosnia has emerged as a new route to Western Europe, since the EU tightened its borders. This year, more than 13,000 refugees and migrants have so far arrived in the country, compared with only 755 in 2017.

      In Velika Kladusa, Bosnia’s most western town beside the Croatian border, hundreds have been living in makeshift tents on a field next to a dog kennel for the past four months.

      When night falls, “the game” begins, a term used by refugees and migrants for the challenging journey to the EU through Croatia and Slovenia that involves treks through forests and crossing rivers.

      However, many are caught in Slovenia or Croatia and are forced to return to Bosnia by Croatian police, who heavily patrol its EU borders.

      Then, they have to start the mission all over again.

      Some told Al Jazeera that they have attempted to cross as many as 20 times.

      The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration

      All 17 refugees and migrants interviewed by Al Jazeera said that they have been beaten by Croatian police - some with police batons, others punched or kicked.

      According to their testimonies, Croatian police have stolen valuables and money, cut passports, and destroyed mobile phones, hindering their communication and navigation towards the EU.

      “Why are they treating us like this?” many asked as they narrated their ordeals.

      “They have no mercy,” said 26-year-old Mohammad from Raqqa, Syria, who said he was beaten all over his body with batons on the two occasions he crossed into the EU. Police also took his money and phone, he said.

      “They treat babies and women the same. An officer pressed his boot against a woman’s head [as she was lying on the ground],” Mohammad said. “Dogs are treated better than us … why are they beating us like this? We don’t want to stay in Croatia; we want to go to Europe.”

      Mohammad Abdullah, a 22-year-old Algerian, told Al Jazeera that officers laughed at a group of migrants as they took turns beating them.

      "One of them would tell the other, ’You don’t know how to hit’ and would switch his place and continue beating us. Then, another officer would say, ’No, you don’t know how to hit’ and would take his place.

      “While [one of them] was beating me, he kissed me and started laughing. They would keep taking turns beating us like this, laughing,” Abdullah said.

      Croatia’s Interior Ministry told Al Jazeera that it “strongly dismisses” allegations of police brutality.

      In an emailed statement, it said those attempting to cross borders know they are acting outside of the law, and claimed that “no complaint so far has proved to be founded.”

      At a meeting in late August with Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic, German Chancellor Angela Merkel praised Croatia for its control over its borders.

      “You are doing a great job on the borders, and I wish to commend you for that,” Merkel said.

      But according to a new report, the UNHCR received information about 1,500 refugees being denied access to asylum procedures, including over 100 children. More than 700 people reported violence and theft by Croatian police.

      Al Jazeera was unable to independently verify all of the claims against police, because many of the refugees and migrants said their phones - which held evidence - were confiscated or smashed. However, the 17 people interviewed separately reported similar patterns of abuse.

      Shams and Hassan, parents of three, have been trying to reach Germany to apply for asylum, but Croatian authorities have turned them back seven times over the past few months.

      Four years ago, they left their home in Deir Az Zor, Syria, after it was bombed.

      Shams, who worked as a lawyer in Syria, said Croatian policemen strip-searched her and her 13-year-old daughter Rahma on one occasion after they were arrested.

      The male officers handled the women’s bodies, while repeating: “Where’s the money?”

      They pulled off Shams’ headscarf, threw it on the ground and forced her to undress, and took Rahma into a separate room.

      “My daughter was very afraid,” Shams said. "They told her to take off all her clothes. She was shy, she told them, ’No.’

      "They beat her up and stripped her clothes by force, even her underwear.

      “She kept telling them ’No! No! There isn’t [any money]!’ She was embarrassed and was asking them to close the window and door so no one would see her. [The officer] then started yelling at her and pulled at her hair. They beat her up.”

      Rahma screamed for her mother but Shams said she couldn’t do anything.

      “They took 1,500 euros ($1,745) from me and they took my husband’s golden ring. They also broke five of our mobiles and took all the SIM cards … They detained us for two days in prison and didn’t give us any food in the beginning,” Shams said, adding they cut her Syrian passport into pieces.

      “They put my husband in solitary confinement. I didn’t see him for two days; I didn’t know where he was.”

      A senior policeman told Shams that she and her children could apply for asylum, but Hassan would have to return to Bosnia.

      When she refused, she said the police drove the family for three hours to a forest at night and told them to walk back to Bosnia.

      They did not have a torch or mobile phone.

      She said they walked through the forest for two days until they reached a small town in western Bosnia.

      “No nation has the right to treat people this way,” Shams said.

      In another instance, they said they were arrested in a forest with a group of refugees and migrants. All 15 of them were forced into a van for two hours, where it was difficult to breathe.

      “It was closed like a box, but [the officer] refused to turn on the air conditioning so we could breathe. My younger son Mohammad - he’s eight years old - he has asthma and allergies, he was suffocating. When we knocked on the window to ask if he could turn on the air conditioning, [the officer] beat my husband with the baton,” Shams said.

      No Name Kitchen, a volunteer organisation that provides assistance to refugees and migrants on the Balkan route, has been documenting serious injuries on Instagram.

      In one post, the group alleges that Croatian police twice crushed a refugee’s orthopaedic leg.

      Peter Van der Auweraert, the Western Balkans coordinator for the International Organization for Migration, says he has heard stories of police brutality, but called for an independent investigation to judge how alleged victims sustained injuries.

      “Given the fact that there are so many of these stories, I think it’s in everyone’s interest to have an independent inquiry to see what is going on, on the other side of the border,” Van der Auweraert said.

      “The use of violence is clearly not acceptable. It’s not acceptable under European human rights law, it’s not acceptable under international human rights law and it is to my mind also, not necessary. It is possible to control borders in a strict matter without violence.”

      Shams’ family journey from Syria was traumatic from the get-go, and they have spent and lost several thousand euros.

      While travelling in dinghies from Turkey to Greece, they saw dead bodies along the way.

      “We call upon Merkel to help us and open the borders for us. At least for those of us stuck at the borders,” she said. “Why is the EU paying Croatia to prevent our entry into the EU, yet once we reach Germany, after spending a fortune with lives lost on the way, we’ll be granted asylum?”

      “We have nothing,” said her husband Hassan. “Our houses have been destroyed. We didn’t have any problems until the war started. We had peace in our homes. Is there a single country that accepts refugees?”

      “There are countries but there’s no way to reach them,” Shams replied. “This is our misery.”


      https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/refugees-stranded-bosnia-report-campaign-police-brutality-180915100740024

    • Le Conseil de l’Europe somme la Croatie d’enquêter sur les violences policières

      Le Commissariat aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe a appelé la Croatie à ouvrir rapidement des enquêtes sur les allégations de violences policières et de vol à l’encontre de « demandeurs d’asile et autres migrants », ainsi que sur les cas d’expulsions collectives.

      Dans un courrier publié vendredi 5 octobre et adressé au Premier ministre croate Andrej Plenkovic, la commissaire aux droits de l’Homme du Conseil de l’Europe, Dunja Mijatovic, a déclaré être « préoccupée » par les informations « cohérentes et corroborées » fournies par plusieurs organisations attestant « d’un grand nombre d’expulsions collectives de la Croatie vers la Serbie et vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine de migrants en situation irrégulière, dont de potentiels demandeurs d’asile ».

      Elle s’inquiète particulièrement du « recours systématique à la violence des forces de l’ordre croates à l’encontre de ces personnes », y compris les « femmes enceintes et les enfants ». La responsable s’appuie sur les chiffres du Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU aux réfugiés (UNHCR), selon lesquels sur 2 500 migrants expulsés par la Croatie, 700 ont accusé la police de violences et de vols.

      « Consciente des défis auxquels la Croatie est confrontée dans le domaine des migrations », Dunja Mijatovic souligne cependant que les « efforts pour gérer les migrations » doivent respecter les principes du droit international. « Il s’agit notamment de l’interdiction absolue de la torture et des peines ou traitements inhumains prévue à l’article 3 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme et l’interdiction des expulsions collectives », qui s’appliquent « aux demandeurs d’asile comme aux migrants en situation irrégulière », écrit-elle.

      Une « violence systématique » selon les associations

      Pour la commissaire, Zagreb doit « entamer et mener rapidement à leur terme des enquêtes rapides, efficaces et indépendantes sur les cas connus d’expulsions collectives et sur les allégations de violence contre les migrants ». Elle somme également le gouvernement croate de « prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour mettre fin à ces pratiques et éviter qu’elles ne se reproduisent ».

      « Aucun cas de mauvais de traitement policier à l’encontre de migrants (...) ni aucun vol n’ont été établis », s’est défendu le ministre croate de l’Intérieur Davor Bozinovic dans une lettre de réponse au Conseil de l’Europe.

      Pourtant, dans un rapport intitulé « Games of violence », l’organisation Médecins sans frontières MSF alertait déjà en octobre 2017 sur les violences perpétrées par les polices croates, hongroises et bulgares envers les enfants et les jeunes migrants.

      Sur sa page Facebook, l’association No Name Kitchen a également rappelé qu’elle documentait les cas de violences aux frontières croates depuis 2017 sur le site Border violence.
      En août dernier, cette association qui aide les réfugiés à Sid en Serbie et dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie expliquait à InfoMigrants que la violence était « systématique » pour les migrants expulsés de Croatie. « Il y a un ou deux nouveaux cas chaque jour. Nous n’avons pas la capacité de tous les documenter », déclarait Marc Pratllus de No Name Kitchen.


      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/12518/le-conseil-de-l-europe-somme-la-croatie-d-enqueter-sur-les-violences-p

    • Bosnie-Herzégovine : des réfugiés tentent de passer en force en Croatie

      Alors que les températures ont brutalement chuté ces derniers jours, des réfugiés bloqués en Bosnie-Herzégovine ont tenté de franchir la frontière croate. Des rixes ont éclaté, des policiers croates ont été blessés, des réfugiés aussi.

      Environ 150 à 200 réfugiés ont essayé, mercredi après-midi, de traverser en force le pont reliant la Bosnie-Herzégovine au poste-frontière croate de Mlajevac. Des échauffourées ont éclaté entre la police et les réfugiés, parmi lesquels des femmes et des enfants. Au moins deux policiers croates ont été blessés par des jets de pierres, selon le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. Les réfugiés ont depuis organisé un sit-in devant la frontière, dont ils demandent l’ouverture.

      « Les réfugiés se sont déplacés jusqu’à la frontière croate où la police leur a refusé l’entrée, illégale et violente, sur le territoire », a rapporté le ministère croate de l’Intérieur. « Les réfugiés ont ensuite jeté des pierres sur les agents de la police croate, dont deux ont été légèrement blessé et ont demandé une aide médicale. »

      Après avoir passé la nuit près de la frontière de Velika Kalduša – Maljevac, les réfugiés s’attendaient à pouvoir entrer en Croatie depuis la Bosnie-Herzégovine et ont franchi un premier cordon de la police bosnienne aux frontières. « La police croate n’a pas réagi après que les réfugiés eurent passé le premier cordon de police en direction de la Croatie, car il y avait un second cordon de la police bosnienne », a déclaré la cheffe du département des relations publiques du ministère croate de l’Intérieur, Marina Mandić, soulignant que la police croate, en poste à la frontière, n’est intervenue à aucun moment et n’a donc pas pénétré sur le territoire de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, comme l’ont rapporté certains médias.

      Selon l’ONG No Name Kitchen, la police bosnienne aurait fait usage de gaz lacrymogènes. Au moins trois réfugiés ont été blessés et pris en charge par Médecins sans frontières.

      Mardi, plus de 400 réfugiés sont arrivés à proximité de la frontière où la police a déployé une bande jaune de protection pour les empêcher de passer en Croatie. Parmi les réfugiés qui dorment dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées, on compte beaucoup de femmes et d’enfants. Ils ont ramassé du bois et allumé des feux, alors que la température atteint à peine 10°C.

      Le commandant de la police du canton d’Una-Sana, en Bosnie-Herzégovine, Mujo Koričić, a confirmé mercredi que des mesures d’urgence étaient entrées en vigueur afin d’empêcher l’escalade de la crise migratoire dans la région, notamment l’afflux de nouveaux réfugiés.

      Mise à jour, jeudi 25 octobre, 17h – Environ 120 réfugiés stationnent toujours près du poste-frontière de Velika Kalduša–Maljevac après avoir passé une deuxième nuit sur place, dehors ou dans des tentes improvisées. La police aux frontières de Bosnie-Herzégovine assure que la situation est sous contrôle et pacifiée. La circulation est toujours suspendue. Des enfants portent des banderoles avec des inscriptions demandant l’ouverture de la frontière.

      En réaction, le secrétaire général aux Affaires étrangères de l’UE, l’autrichien Johannes Peterlik, a déclaré jeudi 25 octobre en conférence de presse : « Les migrations illégales ne sont pas la voie à suivre. Il y a des voies légales et cela doit être clair ».

      Le nombre de migrants dans le canton d’Una-Sana est actuellement estimé à 10500.


      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-Herzegovine-des-refugies-tentent-un-passage-en-force-en-Cr
      #violence

      v. aussi :

      Sulla porta d’Europa. Scontri e feriti oggi alla frontiera fra Bosnia e Croazia. Dove un gruppo di 200 migranti ha cercato di passare il confine. Foto Reuters/Marko Djurica

      https://twitter.com/NiccoloZancan/status/1055070667710828545

    • Bleak Bosnian winter for migrants camped out on new route to Europe

      Shouting “Open borders!”, several dozen migrants and asylum seekers broke through a police cordon last week at the Maljevac border checkpoint in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina and tried to cross into Croatia.

      After being forced back by Croatian police with teargas, they set up camp just inside Bosnian territory. They are in the vanguard of a new wave of migrants determined to reach wealthier European countries, often Germany. Stalled, they have become a political football and face winter with little assistance and inadequate shelter.

      The old Balkan route shut down in 2016 as a raft of European countries closed their borders, with Hungary erecting a razor-wire fence. But a new route emerged this year through Bosnia (via Albania and Montenegro or via Macedonia and Serbia) and on to Croatia, a member of the EU. The flow of travellers has been fed by fresh streams of people from the Middle East and Central and South Asia entering Greece from Turkey, notably across the Evros River.

      By the end of September, more than 16,000 asylum seekers and migrants had entered Bosnia this year, compared to just 359 over the same period last year, according to official figures. The real number is probably far higher as more are smuggled in and uncounted. Over a third of this year’s official arrivals are Pakistani, followed by Iranians (16 percent), Syrians (14 percent), and Iraqis (nine percent).

      This spike is challenging Bosnia’s ability to provide food, shelter, and other aid – especially to the nearly 10,000 people that local institutions and aid organisations warn may be stranded at the Croatian border as winter begins. Two decades after the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the situation is also heightening tensions among the country’s Muslim, Serb, and Croat communities and its often fraught tripartite political leadership.

      How to respond to the unexpected number of migrants was a key issue in the presidential election earlier this month. Nationalist Bosnian Serb leader Milorad Dodik, who won the Serb seat in the presidency, charged that it was a conspiracy to boost the country’s Muslim population. The outgoing Croat member of the presidency, Dragan Čović, repeatedly called for Bosnia’s borders to be closed to stem the migrant flow.

      Maja Gasal Vrazalica, a left-wing member of parliament and a refugee herself during the Bosnian wars, accuses nationalist parties of “misusing the topic of refugees because they want to stoke up all this fear through our nation.”
      “I’m very scared”

      Most migrants and asylum seekers are concentrated around two northwestern towns, Bihać and nearby Velika Kladuša. Faris Šabić, youth president of the Bihać Red Cross, organises assistance for the some 4,000 migrants camped in Bihać and others who use the town as a way station.

      Since the spring and throughout the summer, as arrivals spiked, several local volunteers joined his staff to provide food, hygiene items, and first aid. But now, as winter draws in, they fear the scale of the crisis is becoming untenable.

      “I have to be honest, I’m very scared,” Šabić told IRIN, examining a notebook filled with the names of new arrivals. “Not only for migrants, I’m scared for my locals as well. We are a generous and welcoming people, but I fear that we will not be able to manage the emergency anymore.”

      The Bihać Red Cross, along with other aid organisations and human rights groups, is pushing the government to find long-term solutions. But with an economy still recovering from the legacy of the war and a youth unemployment rate of almost 55 percent, it has been hard-pressed to find answers.

      Hope that the end of the election season might improve the national debate around migration appears misguided. Around 1,000 Bihać locals staged protests for three consecutive days, from 20-22 October, demanding the relocation of migrants outside the town centre. On the Saturday, Bihać residents even travelled to the capital, Sarajevo, blocking the main street to protest the inaction of the central government.

      The local government of the border district where most migrants and asylum seekers wait, Una-Sana, complains of being abandoned by the central government in Sarajevo. “We do not have bad feelings towards migrants, but the situation is unmanageable,” the mayor of Bihać, Šuhret Fazlić, told IRIN.

      To begin with most residents openly welcomed the migrants, with volunteers providing food and medical help. But tensions have been growing, especially as dozens of the latest newcomers have started occupying the main public spaces in the town.

      “They turned our stadium into a toilet and occupied children’s playgrounds,” said Fazlić. “I would like to understand why they come here, but what is important at the moment is to understand where to host them in a dignified manner.”
      Beatings and abuse

      Those camped near the Croatian border have all entered Bosnia illegally. Each night, they wait to enter “The Game” – as they refer to attempts to cross the frontier and strike out into dense forests.

      Most are detained and pushed back into Bosnia by the Croatian police. Some reach Slovenia before being deported all the way back. Abuse is rife, according to NGOs and human rights groups. Those who have attempted to cross say Croatian police officers destroy their phones to prevent them from navigating the mountains, beat them with electric batons, unleash dogs, steal their money, and destroy their documents and personal belongings. Croatia’s interior ministry has strongly denied allegations of police brutality.

      No Name Kitchen, a group of activists that provides showers, soap, and hygiene products to migrants in Velika Kladuša, has been documenting cases of violence allegedly committed by the Croatian police. In August alone the organisation collected accounts from 254 deportees. Most claimed to have suffered physical violence. Of those cases, 43 were minors.

      Croatian media has reported cases of shootings, too. In late May, a smuggler’s van bringing migrants and asylum seekers from Bosnia was shot at and three people including a boy and a girl, both 12, were wounded.

      A report earlier this year from the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, collated accounts from 2,500 refugees and migrants allegedly pushed back from Croatia to Serbia and Bosnia. In more than 1,500 cases – 100 of them relating to children – asylum procedures were denied, and over 700 people made allegations of violence or theft.
      Winter housing needed

      In Velika Kladuša, two kilometres from the Maljevac border checkpoint, around 1,000 people live in a makeshift tent camp that turns into a swamp every time it rains. Temperatures here will soon plummet below zero at night. Finding a new place for them "is a race against time and the key challenge,” said Stephanie Woldenberg, senior UNHCR protection officer.

      Already, life is difficult.

      “Nights here are unsustainable,” Emin, a young Afghan girl who tried twice to cross the border with her family and is among those camped in Velika Kladuša, told IRIN. “Dogs in the kennel are treated better than us.”

      Bosnian police reportedly announced last week that migrants are no longer allowed to travel to the northwest zone, and on 30 October said they had bussed dozens of migrants from the border camps to a new government-run facility near Velika Kladuša. Another facility has been set up near Sarajevo since the election. Together, they have doubled the number of beds available to migrants to 1,700, but it’s still nowhere near the capacity needed.

      The federal government has identified a defunct factory, Agrokomerc, once owned by the mayor of Velika Kladuša, Fikret Abdić, as a potential site to house more migrants. Abdić was convicted on charges of war crimes during the Balkan wars and sentenced to 20 years imprisonment. He became mayor in 2016, after his 2012 release. His local government is strongly opposed to the move and counters that the migrants and asylum seekers should be equally distributed throughout Bosnia.

      For now, around 800 people live inside a former student dormitory in Velika Kladuša that is falling apart due to damage sustained during the Bosnian wars. Holes in the floor and the absence of basic fixtures and of a proper heating system make it highly unsuitable to house migrants this winter. Clean water and bathing facilities are scarce, and the Red Cross has registered several cases of scabies, lice, and other skin and vector-borne diseases.

      Throughout the three-storey building, migrants and asylum seekers lie sprawled across the floor on mattresses, waiting their turn to charge their phones at one of the few electrical sockets. Many are young people from Lahore, Pakistan who sold their family’s homes and businesses to pay for this trip. On average they say they paid $10,000 to smugglers who promised to transport them to the EU. Several display bruises and abrasions, which they say were given to them by Croatian border patrol officers as they tried to enter Croatia.

      The bedding on one mattress is stained with blood. Witnesses told IRIN the person who sleeps there was stabbed by other migrants trying to steal his few belongings. “It happens frequently here,” one said.


      https://www.irinnews.org/news-feature/2018/10/31/bleak-bosnian-winter-migrants-camped-out-new-route-europe

    • ’They didn’t give a damn’: first footage of Croatian police ’brutality’

      Migrants who allegedly suffer savage beatings by state officials call it ‘the game’. But as shocking evidence suggests, attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border is far from mere sport.

      As screams ring out through the cold night air, Sami, hidden behind bushes, begins to film what he can.

      “The Croatian police are torturing them. They are breaking people’s bones,’’ Sami whispers into his mobile phone, as the dull thumps of truncheons are heard.

      Then silence. Minutes go by before Hamdi, Mohammed and Abdoul emerge from the woods, faces bruised from the alleged beating, mouths and noses bloody, their ribs broken.

      Asylum seekers from Algeria, Syria and Pakistan, they had been captured by the Croatian police attempting to cross the Bosnia-Croatia border into the EU, and brutally beaten before being sent back.

      Sami, 17, from Kobane, gave the Guardian his footage, which appears to provide compelling evidence of the physical abuses, supposedly perpetrated by Croatian police, of which migrants in the Bosnian cities of Bihac and Velika Kladusa have been complaining.

      The EU border agency, Frontex, announced on Wednesday that this year is likely to produce the lowest number of unauthorised migrants arriving into Europe in five years.

      Frontex said that approximately 118,900 irregular border crossings were recorded in the first 10 months of 2018, roughly 31% lower than the same period in 2017.
      Advertisement

      Despite this steady decline in numbers, many states remain embroiled in political disputes that fuel anti-migrant sentiment across Europe.

      Frontex also noted that, while entries are declining, the number of people reaching Europe across the western Mediterranean, mostly through Spain from Morocco, continues to rise. Nearly 9,400 people crossed in October, more than double the number for the same month last year.

      But the brutality of what is happening on Europe’s borders is not documented. Every night, migrants try to cross into Croatia. And, according to dozens of accounts received by the Guardian and charities, many end up in the hands of police, who beat them back to Bosnia.

      No Name Kitchen (NNK), an organisation consisting of volunteers from several countries that distributes food to asylum seekers in Serbia, Bosnia and Italy, registers 50-100 people a week who have been pushed back by the Croatian authorities. Roughly 70% of them claim to have been beaten.

      “In the last months our team in Bosnia and Herzegovina has regularly treated patients – sometimes even women and small children – with wounds allegedly inflicted by state authorities when attempting to cross into Croatia and Slovenia, where, according to their testimonies, their claims for asylum and protection are regularly ignored,” says Julian Koeberer, humanitarian affairs officer in the northern Balkans for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).
      Advertisement

      Since the turn of the year, the Bosnian authorities have registered the entry of about 21,000 people, coming from Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran or Syria. Of these, an estimated 5,000 remain in the country.

      Of 50 people to whom the Guardian spoke, mostly from Pakistan, 35 said they had been attacked by Croatian police. The majority of them arrived in Bosnia through Turkey, hoping to reach Slovenia, a Schengen country, before heading to Italy, Austria or Germany.

      ‘‘The Iranian police broke all my teeth, the Croatian ones broke my nose and ribs,” says Milad, 29, an Iranian asylum seeker who since September has lived in Bihac. “Yet everyone talks about the violence in Iran and nobody talks about the violence perpetrated by a European country.”

      Adeel, 27, from Pakistan, claims he had his ankle broken with a truncheon. ‘‘Where are the human rights?” he asks.

      Anees, 43, also from Pakistan, says he begged the police not to beat him after he was stopped in the woods on the border with Velika Kladusa. ‘‘I have a heart disease, I told them to stop because they could have killed me,’’ explains Anees, whose medical conditions are detailed in a clinical file.

      On 9 June 2018, he had heart surgery at the Zdravstveni centre hospital in the Serbian city of Uzice. After the operation, he continued his journey. He struggles to breathe as he tells his story: ‘‘I told him I was sick, I showed them the clinical file. They did not give a damn. They started beating me and sent us back to Bosnia. But it does not matter. Tomorrow I will try the game again.’’

      That’s what migrants call it: ‘the game”. But there is nothing fun about it. They set off in groups: 70 or 80 people, or sometimes as few as five to 10. Police, armed with truncheons, pistols and night vision goggles, patrol Europe’s longest border between Bosnia and Croatia. According to accounts provided by more than 10 migrants, some officers wear paramilitary uniforms with a badge depicting a sword upraised by two lightning bolts. This is the badge of Croatian special police.

      “They stop us and, before beating us, they frisk us”, says Hamdi, 35, An Algerian language teacher. “If they find money, they steal it. If they find mobile phones, they destroy them to avoid being filmed or simply to stop us from contacting our friends. And then they beat us, four or five against one. They throw us to the ground, kick us, and beat us with their truncheons. Sometimes their dogs attack us. To them, we probably don’t seem much different from their dogs.”

      Hamdi is one of three men traveling with Sami. The screams in the video are his. His face is covered in blood when he reaches his friends. His nose is broken, his lips swollen.

      “After repeatedly being pushed back or forced to return to Bosnia on their own, asylum seekers find themselves in unsanitary, improvised settlements such as open fields and squats while formal government camps are full,” says Koeberer.

      “Those sites still offer alarmingly inadequate conditions due to only slow improvement in provision of winter shelter (food, hygiene, legal status and medical care), and these inhumane living conditions have severe impact on people’s physical and mental health. In winter, the lives of those who are forced to remain outside will seriously be at risk.’’

      At the camp in Velika Kladusa, where Hamdi lives, dozens of people sit in the mud and on piles of rubbish, awaiting the arrival of the doctors. On man has a cast on his arm and leg, the result, he says, of a police beating. Others show black eyes, bruises on their backs and legs, lumps and wounds on their heads, split lips, and scars on their legs.

      ‘‘There have been cases in which migrants claimed to have been stripped and forced to walk barefoot with temperatures below freezing,” said Stephane Moissaing, MSF’s head of mission in Serbia. “Cases where asylum seekers have told how police would beat children in front of their parents. From the information we have, up until now, it is a systematic and planned violence.”

      Karolina Augustova, an NKK volunteer, says violence has increased since October protests in which hundreds of asylum seekers marched from the north-western town of Velika Kladusa towards Croatia to object against pushbacks that violate the rights of people to seek asylum in Europe.

      The Bosnian police appear to be aware of the assaults. A Bosnian police agent guarding the camp in Velika Kladusa, who prefers to remain anonymous, points out a bruise on a boy’s leg. “You see this bruise?” he says. “It was the Croatian police. The Bosnian police know, but there is no clear and compelling evidence, just the accounts of the refugees and their wounds.”

      The majority of Bosnians live in peace with migrants and view them as refugees. The scars from the war that ravaged this area in the early 1990s are everywhere, in the abandoned homes riddled with machine gun fire and in the collective memory of Bosnians. People from Bihac and Velika Kladusa know what it means to flee from war. The minarets of the numerous mosques along the border are a reminder that Bosnia is the closest Muslim community in Europe.

      “I feel sorry for these people,’’ says the policeman on guard. ‘‘They remind me of the Bosnians when the war devastated our country.’’

      MSF, NNK and a number of other organisations have repeatedly reported and denounced violence perpetrated by the security forces in the Balkans, but Croatian police deny all the allegations.

      The Guardian has contacted the Croatian interior minister, the police and the Croatian government for comment, but has received no response.

      Abdul, 33, recently arrived in Velika Klaudusa after a journey that lasted over a year. He comes from Myanmar and has lost everything: his wife and children were killed, and he has no news of his father, mother and sisters. Abdul has heard about the violence and is worried. The migrants around him, with bandaged legs and noses and bleeding mouths, cause fear.

      “I lost everything, yes, it’s true,” he says. “But I have to get to Europe, one way or another. To make sense of what I lost. I owe it to my dead children. To my wife who was killed. To those who have not had the good fortune to have arrived here safe and sound.”

      https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/nov/14/didnt-give-a-damn-refugees-film-croatian-police-brutality-bosnia

    • A la frontière bosno-croate, des matraques pour les migrants

      Les policiers croates violentent les exilés bloqués entre les deux pays, nouveau point de passage de la route des Balkans. Mais dans la région, la #solidarité s’organise.

      L’intervention de la police bosnienne est fixée à 18 heures au poste frontière de Maljevac, entre la Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Croatie. Des dizaines de riverains s’y sont massées, ce jour-là, pour assister à cette opération qui va déloger les migrants qui campent depuis une semaine à 300 mètres de la douane. « Je n’ai rien contre les réfugiés, mais 200 personnes ne peuvent pas bloquer toute une ville », explique un Bosnien d’une cinquantaine d’années. Deux heures plus tard le passage est rouvert. Nous sommes à Velika Kladusa, dans le canton d’Una-Sana, dans le nord-ouest de la Bosnie, le long de la dernière déviation de la « route des Balkans ». Depuis le début de l’année, plus de 21 000 personnes (venant du Pakistan, d’Afghanistan ou encore d’Iran) ont choisi de traverser la Bosnie-Herzégovine dans l’espoir d’atteindre l’ouest de l’Europe. Et alors que 5 000 d’entre eux seraient toujours bloqués dans le pays, Sarajevo a enregistré ces dernières semaines une hausse des arrivées, avec environ 1 000 nouvelles entrées hebdomadaires.

      Sachets à emporter

      Dans ce petit bourg, la situation a dégénéré fin octobre lorsque des centaines de migrants ont tenté d’entrer de force en Croatie, avant d’être repoussés par les policiers. A la suite de ces heurts qui ont fait plusieurs blessés, Zagreb a décidé de suspendre pendant une semaine le transit à Maljevac : une très mauvaise nouvelle pour cette ville qui vit du commerce avec la Croatie et dont les habitants commencent à s’agacer d’une situation qui s’enlise. « La Croatie est à moins de 2 kilomètres dans cette direction », indique Asim Latic en pointant du doigt la plaine qui s’étend derrière les buissons. Avant d’ajouter : « Mais les réfugiés, eux, passent par les bois, et cela prend plusieurs jours de marche. » Ce restaurateur de Velika Kladusa, propriétaire de la pizzeria Teferic, fait partie des habitants qui se sont engagés dans l’aide aux migrants dès février, lorsque des dizaines, puis des centaines de personnes sont arrivées dans ce coin de la Bosnie.

      Pendant neuf mois, il a offert chaque jour 400 repas à autant d’exilés. Début novembre, après une chute des dons de la communauté locale, il a bien cru devoir mettre la clé sous la porte. « Les Bosniens ont aussi connu la guerre, mais ils sont fatigués », explique ce grand gaillard que les réfugiés appellent « papa ». De temps en temps, il leur prépare de la nourriture dans des sachets à emporter, « pour qu’ils survivent dans la forêt ». Le chemin des bois est emprunté par tous ceux qui ne peuvent pas se permettre les tarifs des passeurs : 2 000 euros ou plus pour aller en voiture à Trieste en Italie, 1 200 euros pour descendre à Split en Croatie. A pied, il faut marcher environ une semaine, assurent les migrants : 80 kilomètres en Croatie, puis, une fois entrés en Slovénie, on se dirige vers l’Italie ou l’Autriche. Mais c’est sans compter sur l’intervention de la police croate, véritable inconnue dans le game - nom donné ici aux tentatives de passage de la frontière.

      Non loin de la séparation bosno-croate, Aadi a décidé de planter sur sa tente le drapeau bleu et jaune de la Bosnie-Herzégovine. « Les Bosniens sont des gens accueillants. Ce sont les policiers croates qui nous posent problème », dit-il. « Les policiers m’ont violemment frappé avec une matraque. Les conditions hygiéniques de ce camp ont fait le reste », renchérit Gabdar, un jeune Irakien qui arbore une plaie infectée à la main droite, où du pus s’est formé sous les croûtes. Youssef, un Tunisien trentenaire, se plaint que la police croate n’a pas seulement détruit son smartphone, mais aussi la powerbank, cette batterie externe indispensable à ceux qui passent de longs mois sur les routes.

      Ecrans brisés

      « Police, problem » est un refrain mille fois entendu. Dès que l’on mentionne les forces de l’ordre croates, les migrants sortent leurs portables. La multitude d’écrans brisés et les connecteurs d’alimentation rendus inutilisables avec des tournevis sont la preuve - disent-ils - des abus des policiers. Une accusation difficile à prouver, mais qui a attiré l’attention du Conseil de l’Europe (CoE). Début octobre, la commissaire aux droits de l’homme Dunja Mijatovic a invité Zagreb à faire la lumière sur ces allégations.

      D’après le CoE et le Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés, la Croatie aurait expulsé collectivement 2 500 migrants depuis le début de 2018, « parmi eux, 1 500 personnes ont affirmé n’avoir pas pu soumettre une demande d’asile, tandis que 700 disent avoir été victimes de violences ou de vols de la part des policiers croates ». Joint par mail, le ministère de l’Intérieur de Zagreb assure que la police agit « dans le respect de la loi et des traités internationaux » et que « les vérifications effectuées jusque-là n’ont prouvé aucun cas de violence ».

      Au centre de Bihac, à 60 kilomètres au sud de Velika Kladusa, Ali, un Pakistanais de 17 ans se jette dans l’eau glaciale de la rivière Una et entreprend de se savonner les cheveux. Sur les bancs du parc alentour, d’autres migrants tuent le temps, cigarette ou smartphone à la main. La scène est devenue courante dans cette ville de 60 000 habitants, et la situation qui s’éternise agace certains locaux. Plusieurs pétitions ont fait leur apparition et quelques manifestations ont rassemblé un millier de personnes à Bihac, demandant aux autorités de trouver une solution à la présence des migrants en centre-ville.

      « Je n’ai rien contre les réfugiés, mais ces gens ne viennent pas de pays en guerre, ce sont des migrants économiques », affirme Sej Ramic, conseiller municipal à Bihac et professeur d’art, modérateur du groupe Facebook « Stop invaziji migranata ! Udruženje gradjana Bihaća » (« Stop à l’invasion des migrants ! Collectif de citoyens de Bihac »). Un argumentaire devenu habituel au sein de l’Union européenne, mais qu’on avait moins l’habitude d’entendre en Bosnie, pays lui-même marqué par une forte émigration.

      Face à cette opposition grandissante, le gouvernement du canton a entrepris d’arrêter les bus et les trains en provenance de Sarajevo et de renvoyer vers la capitale tous les migrants qui en descendent. Et dans le centre-ville de Biha, les policiers renvoient les migrants qui traînent vers le Dacki Dom. Cet ancien dortoir étudiant abandonné, dont la carcasse de béton nu se dresse au milieu des bois, héberge environ 1 000 personnes dans des conditions très précaires. Des centaines d’autres sont logées dans les environs, dans une ancienne usine de réfrigérateurs et dans un hôtel fermé depuis de nombreuses années. D’autres campent ou squattent des maisons abandonnées des alentours. L’objectif de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) est « d’atteindre, dans les prochains jours, une capacité d’hébergement de 5 000 personnes sur l’ensemble du territoire bosnien », indique Peter Van der Auweraert, coordinateur de l’OIM pour les Balkans occidentaux. Cependant, « si le flux actuel de 1 000 entrées par semaine devait continuer, nous serons bientôt dans une situation très compliquée », poursuit-il, et note qu’avec l’hiver qui arrive, « ce qui coince, c’est le timing ».

      L’UE a récemment débloqué 7,2 millions d’euros pour aider la Bosnie, l’un des pays les plus pauvres des Balkans, à gérer le flux migratoire. Alors qu’à Bihac les ouvriers s’affairent à sécuriser les bâtiments et que les ONG tentent de reloger les centaines de personnes toujours dans des tentes, Van der Auweraert souligne le manque de volonté politique des autorités locales. L’imbroglio institutionnel bosnien, hérité des accords de Dayton, complique davantage le processus décisionnel.

      Il est midi à Velika Kladusa, et la pizzeria Teferic est en pleine distribution. Des dizaines de migrants patientent pour s’asseoir devant une assiette de macaronis. Dans la cuisine, Halil et Refik - « c’est lui qui a arrêté le chauffeur de Mladic pendant la guerre », nous glisse Asim - s’affairent autour d’une énorme casserole. Deux jeunes Indiens et un Pakistanais de passage prêtent main forte à la petite équipe. Après neuf mois de travail bénévole dans la pizzeria, Asim est fatigué « physiquement et mentalement ». S’il a trouvé de l’aide auprès de l’association néerlandaise Lemon Foundation, l’avenir de leur activité reste fragile. Tout en contemplant le va-et-vient des migrants à l’extérieur, il secoue la tête : « Mais que vont faire ces gens ? »

      https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/11/20/a-la-frontiere-bosno-croate-des-matraques-pour-les-migrants_1693271

    • Croatia: Migrants Pushed Back to Bosnia and Herzegovina

      Croatian police are pushing migrants and asylum seekers back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, in some cases violently, and without giving them the possibility to seek asylum, Human Rights Watch said.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 20 people, including 11 heads of families and 1 unaccompanied boy, who said that Croatian police deported them to Bosnia and Herzegovina without due process after detaining them deep inside Croatian territory. Sixteen, including women and children, said police beat them with batons, kicked and punched them, stole their money, and either stole or destroyed their mobile phones.

      “Croatia has an obligation to protect asylum seekers and migrants,” said Lydia Gall, Balkans and Eastern EU researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Instead, the Croatian police viciously beat asylum seekers and pushed them back over the border.”

      All 20 interviewees gave detailed accounts of being detained by people who either identified themselves as Croatian police or wore uniforms matching those worn by Croatian police. Seventeen gave consistent descriptions of the police vans used to transport them to the border. One mother and daughter were transported in what they described as a police car. Two people said that police had fired shots in the air, and five said that the police were wearing masks.

      These findings confirm mounting evidence of abuse at Croatia’s external borders, Human Rights Watch said. In December 2016, Human Rights Watch documented similar abuses by Croatian police at Croatia’s border with Serbia. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported in August 2018 that it had received reports Croatia had summarily pushed back 2,500 migrants and asylum seekers to Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina since the beginning of the year, at times accompanied by violence and theft.

      In response to a call by the Council of Europe’s human rights commissioner to investigate the allegations, Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic in September denied any wrongdoing and questioned the sources of the information. Police in Donji Lapac, on the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina, refused to provide Croatia’s ombudswoman, Lora Vidović, access to police records on treatment of migrants and told her that police are acting in accordance with the law.

      In a December 4 letter, Interior Minister Davor Bozinovic responded to a detailed description of the Human Rights Watch findings. He said that the evidence of summary returns and violence was insufficient to bring criminal prosecutions, that the allegations could not be confirmed, and that migrants accuse Croatian police in the hope that it will help them enter Croatia. He said that his ministry does not support any type of violence or intolerance by police officers.

      Croatia has a bilateral readmission agreement with Bosnia and Herzegovina that allows Croatia to return third-country nationals without legal permission to stay in the country. According to the Security Ministry of Bosnia and Herzegovina, under the agreement, between January and November 27, Croatia returned 493 people to Bosnia and Herzegovina, 265 of whom were Turkish nationals. None of the people Human Rights Watch interviewed underwent any formal return procedure before being forced back over the border.

      The summary return of asylum seekers without consideration of their protection needs is contrary to European Union asylum law, the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, and the 1951 Refugee Convention.

      Croatian authorities should conduct thorough and transparent investigations of abuse implicating their officials and hold those responsible to account, Human Rights Watch said. They should ensure full cooperation with the Ombudswoman’s inquiry, as required by national law and best practice for independent human rights institutions. The European Commission should call on Croatia, an EU member state, to halt and investigate summary returns of asylum seekers to Bosnia and Herzegovina and allegations of violence against asylum seekers. The Commission should also open legal proceedings against Croatia for violating EU laws, Human Rights Watch said.

      As a result of the 2016 border closures on the Western Balkan route, thousands of asylum seekers were stranded, the majority in Serbia, and found new routes toward the EU. In 2018, migrant and asylum seeker arrivals increased in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from fewer than 1,000 in 2017 to approximately 22,400, according to the European Commission. The Commission estimates that 6,000 migrants and asylum seekers are currently in the country. Bosnia and Herzegovina has granted international protection to only 17 people since 2008. In 2017, 381 people applied for asylum there.

      Bosnia and Herzegovina has only one official reception center for asylum seekers near Sarajevo, with capacity to accommodate just 156 people. Asylum seekers and migrants in the border towns of Bihac and Velika Kladusa, where Human Rights Watch conducted the interviews, are housed in temporary facilities managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) – a dilapidated building, a refurbished warehouse, and former hotels – or they sleep outdoors. The IOM and UNHCR have been improving the facilities. The EU has allocated over €9 million to support humanitarian assistance for asylum seekers and migrants in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      “Just because the EU is sending humanitarian aid to refugees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, that does not justify turning a blind eye to violence at the Croatian border,” Gall said. “Brussels should press Zagreb to comply with EU law, investigate alleged abuse, and provide fair and efficient access to asylum.”

      For detailed accounts by the people interviewed, please see below.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed 13 men, 6 women, and one 15-year-old unaccompanied boy. All interviewees’ names have been changed in order to protect their security and privacy. All interviews were conducted in English or with the aid of a Persian or Arabic speaking interpreter. Human Rights Watch informed interviewees of the purpose of the interview and its voluntary nature, and they verbally consented to be interviewed.

      Denied Access to Asylum Procedure, Summarily Returned

      All 20 people interviewed said that people who identified themselves as Croatian police or whom they described as police detained them well inside Croatian territory and subsequently returned them to Bosnia and Herzegovina without any consideration of asylum claims or human rights obstacles to their return.

      Nine said that police detained them and others and took them to a police station in Croatia. The others said that police officers took them directly to the border with Bosnia-Herzegovina and made them cross.

      Those taken to police stations said they were searched, photographed, and questioned about details such as their name, country of origin, age, and their route entering Croatia. They were not given copies of any forms. They said they were held there in rooms with limited or no seating for between 2 and 24 hours, then taken to the border. Three people said they asked for asylum at the police station but that the police ignored or laughed at them. Six others said they dared not speak because police officers told them to remain quiet.

      Faven F. and Kidane K., a married couple in their thirties from Eritrea, said they had been walking for seven days when they were detained on November 9, close to Rijeka, 200 kilometers from the border. They said that four men in green uniforms detained them in the forest and took them in a windowless white van without proper seats to a police station in Rijeka:

      They delivered us to new police. One was in plain clothes, the other one in dark blue uniform that said “Policija” on it…. At the station, they gave us a paper in English where we had to fill in name, surname, and place of birth…. A lady officer asked us questions about our trip, how we got there, who helped us. We told them that if Croatia can give us asylum, we would like to stay. The lady officer just laughed. They wrote our names on a white paper and some number and made us hold them for a mug shot. Then they kept us in the cell the whole night and didn’t give us food, but we could drink tap water in the bathroom.

      Yaran Y., a 19-year-old from Iraq, was carrying his 14-year old sister Dilva, who has a disability and uses a wheelchair, on his back when they were detained along with at least five others at night in the forest. Yaran Y. said he told officers he wanted asylum for his sister, but that the police just laughed. “They told us to go to Brazil and ask for asylum there,” Yaran Y. said.

      Ardashir A., a 33-year-old Iranian, was travelling with his wife and 7-year-old daughter in a group of 18 people, including 3 other children, the youngest of whom is under age 2. He said that Croatian police detained the group 12 kilometers inside Croatian territory on November 15 and took them to a police station:

      They [Croatian police] brought us to a room, like a prison. They took our bags and gave us only a few slices of bread. There were no chairs, we sat on the floor. Two people in civilian clothes came after a while, I don’t know if they were police, but they took a group picture of us and refused to let us go to the toilet. A 10-year-old child really needed to go but wasn’t allowed so he had to endure. After two hours they took us … to the border.

      Adal A., a 15-year-old boy from Afghanistan traveling on his own said that he was detained on November 15 near Zagreb and taken in a white windowless van to a police station:

      They searched us at the police station and took our phones, power banks, bags, and everything we had. They took three kinds of pictures: front, side, and back. We had to hold a paper with a number. I was asked questions about my name, where I am from, my age, and about the smuggler. I told them I’m 15. We then sat in a room for 24 hours and received no food but could get water from the tap in the toilet.

      Palmira P., a 45-year-old Iranian, said that a female police officer mistreated Palmira’s 11-year-old daughter during a body search in a police station courtyard on the outskirts of Rijeka in early November: “She pulled my daughter’s pants down in front of everyone. My daughter still has nightmares about this policewoman, screaming out in the middle of the night, ‘Don’t do it, don’t do it!’”

      Everyone interviewed said that Croatian police confiscated and never returned or destroyed their phones and destroyed power banks and phone chargers. Four people said that Croatian police forced them to unlock their phones before stealing them.

      Madhara M., a 32-year-old from Iran, said a police officer found a €500 bill in his pocket on November 15: “He looked at it, inspected it, and admired it and then demonstratively put it in his pocket in front of me.”

      Accounts of Violence and Abuse

      Seventeen people described agonizing journeys ranging from 15 minutes to five hours in windowless white police vans to the border. In two cases, people described the vans with a deep dark blue/black stripe running through the middle and a police light on top. A Human Rights Watch researcher saw a police van matching that description while driving through Croatia.

      Croatian roads close to the border with Bosnia and Herzegovina cross windy, mountainous terrain. People interviewed said they had experienced nausea, vomited, or felt extreme cold or heat in the van. A 23-year-old Syrian woman said she believed the difficult van ride and pushback caused her to miscarry her 7-week pregnancy. Amez A., a 28-year-old Iraqi, said police sprayed what he thought was teargas into the van before closing the back doors and driving off, making everyone in the car vomit and have difficulty breathing.

      Sixteen people, including women and children, said that they were slapped, pummelled with fists, beaten with police batons made of rubber or wood, or kicked by people they described as or who identified themselves as Croatian police during the pushbacks.

      In many cases, the violence was accompanied by abusive language in English. Human Rights Watch observed marks and bruises on nine people and viewed photographs of injuries on four more who said they were the result of beatings by Croatian police officers. Four people said that they required treatment at Bosnian hospitals.

      Adal A., the 15-year-old unaccompanied boy, described a particularly vicious beating on November 16:

      They wore dark blue uniforms with masks, and as I exited the van, both police hit me with their batons. I felt a blow to my neck and I fell forward and wanted to get up. At that point, I was on the Bosnian side of the border stones, where another six Croatian police officers stood waiting. They were all over me, beating me. I don’t know how they beat me, but it was hard and strong, and I tried to protect my face. I was so badly beaten on my back that I still can’t sleep on it properly because of the pain. When they saw that my nose was bleeding, and that my hand was injured and that I couldn’t walk, they stopped…. They yelled “Go!” and as I was trying to leave, they fired guns in the air.

      Human Rights Watch interviewed Adal A. four days after he said this had happened and observed marks and bruises on his legs and arms.

      Aftab A., 37, from Iran, said that police officers in dark blue uniforms beat him and his 12-year-old son in what he called the “Tunnel of Death:”

      They [police] make this tunnel [lined up on each side] and you have to pass. They took us out of the van one by one and they started beating me with batons from both sides. I was beaten on my arm, shoulder, and on my knee with batons. My son was beaten with batons on his back and on his head…We kept screaming ‘my son my son!’ or ‘my dad my dad!’ but they didn’t care. They kept beating at us until we crossed the border. Even my wife was struck across her back with a baton. The child was so scared and was crying for half an hour and then wouldn’t speak for a long time.

      Madhara M., 32, from Iran, was taken to the border on November 15 along with four others, including a married couple. He said that Croatian police beat him and then threw him into a ditch he said separates Croatia from Bosnia and Herzegovina:

      There were about eight police officers in front of the van. But there were more behind them making sure we can’t run away. The first punch broke my tooth… I fell, and the officer rolled me over, and punched me in the eye. It was so painful, I tried to escape by crawling, but the police struck me with the baton on my back. Suddenly, I received a second blow on the same eye. Then the police officers grabbed me and threw me into the ditch. All along, they were laughing and swearing in English, things like ‘I will fuck your mother.’

      Bahadur B. and Nabila N., both 32 and from Iran, are a married couple who were traveling with Madhara M. Nabila N., who was three-months’ pregnant at the time, described the violence at the border:

      They [Croatian police] were standing four on one side and four on the other side. We call it the ‘terror tunnel.’ They told us to get out. Bahadur tried to help me down from the van, as I was stiff from the ride. When he did, the police started beating him…I turned and screamed at them to stop beating my husband, but…. I stumbled on a bag in the darkness…When I got up, I was face-to-face with a police officer who was wearing a mask. I kept screaming, “Please don’t do it, we will leave” but he deliberately hit me hard with his baton across my hand. I kept screaming “baby, baby!” during the whole ordeal but they didn’t listen, they just laughed.

      Both Yaran Y., 19, and his sister Dilva, 14, who has a physical disability, said they required medical treatment after Croatian police used physical force during the pushback in early July. Yaran Y. said:

      I was carrying Dilva on my back the whole way while others pushed her wheelchair. Our family travelled with five other people. It was dark, when the police surprised us by firing shots in the air. They police wore dark or black color uniforms and there were six or seven of them. I asked one of the police officers for asylum but he harshly pushed me so I fell with my sister on my back. In the fall, my sister and I landed on a sharp wooden log which severely injured her foot and my hand.

      A Human Rights Watch researcher observed scars on Dilva’s foot and Yaran’s hand and saw pictures of the fresh injuries.

      Sirvan S., 38, from Iraq, said Croatian police in dark blue uniforms beat him and his youngest son, age 6, during a pushback on November 14: “My son and I were beaten with a rubber baton. I was beaten in the head and on my leg. My son was beaten with a baton on his leg and head as well as he was running from the police.” Sirvan’s wife, 16-year-old daughter, and 14-year-old son witnessed the violence.

      Gorkem G., 30, travelling with his 25-year-old pregnant wife, 5-year-old son, and 2-year-old daughter, said that Croatian police pushed his son, so he fell hard to the ground. “He only wanted to say “hi” to the police,” Gorkem G. said

      Family members described the anger, frustration, and trauma they experienced seeing the police officers beat their loved ones. A 10-year-old Yazidi boy from Iraq said, “I saw how police kicked my father in his back and how they beat him all over. It made me angry.” His father, Hussein H., said that police officers had dragged him out of the van at the border and kicked and punched him when he was on the ground.

      Fatima F., 34, a Syrian mother of six, travelled with her husband’s 16-year-old brother and three of her children, ages 2, 4, and 10. She said that three police officers in dark uniforms beat her husband’s brother in front of her and her children:

      They were merciless […] One officer was by the van, one in the middle of the line of people, and one close to the path [into Bosnia and Herzegovina]. They kept beating the others with batons, and kicking. They [the officers] saw me and the kids but they just kept beating the men despite the kids crying. They didn’t beat me or the children, but the children were very afraid when they saw the men being beaten. My oldest girl kept screaming when she saw my husband’s brother get beaten…[she] screams out in the middle of the night.

      In three cases, people said they were forced to cross ice-cold rivers or streams even though they were near a bridge.

      Thirty-year-old Abu Hassan A. from Iran, travelling in a group of seven other single men, said:

      They [police] were wearing masks. There was a bridge about 50-60 meters away. More than six police were guarding the bridge. It [the stream] was about 5-6 meters wide and waist high and muddy. They told us we have to cross. Then the police… beat me with batons and kicked me, and the first handed me over to the second police who did the same thing, and then handed me over to the third, who did the same thing. After that, I was close to the riverbank, where two other police were waiting. The first one beat me again with baton and pushed me toward the other. They beat me on the legs, hands, arms, shoulders. This is what they did to force us to go into the water and across. I could barely stand or walk for a week after.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/11/croatia-migrants-pushed-back-bosnia-and-herzegovina

    • Why are police in Croatia attacking asylum seekers trapped in the Balkans?

      Hearing increasing reports of police brutality against refugees on the Croatia-Bosnia border, Human Rights Watch is demanding action from Zagreb and the EU Commission.

      In November, I spent four days talking to migrants, including asylum seekers, in dilapidated, freezing buildings in Bihac and Velika Kladusa in Bosnia Herzegovina, an area close to the Croatian border. I heard the same story over and over: Croatian police officers beat and robbed them before illegally forcing them over the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      Unfortunately, in my work as the Eastern Europe and Balkans researcher at Human Rights Watch, these stories are not new to me. But what really struck me this time around was the sheer brutality and cruelty of the police assaults.

      “They are merciless,” 34-year-old Fatima*, from Syria, said of Croatian police officers. She and her three young children, the youngest only two years old, were forced to watch Croatian police officers beat her 16-year-old brother-in-law. “My 10-year-old daughter suffered psychologically since it happened, having nightmares,” Fatima said.

      Nabila*, an Iranian woman who was three months pregnant at the time, told me a police officer struck her on her hand with a baton though she told him and other officers repeatedly that she was pregnant.

      Sirvan*, from Iraq, said a Croatian police officer beat his six-year-old son with a baton on his leg and his head as he was trying to run away from the police beatings.

      Yaran*, also from Iraq, was carrying his 14-year-old sister, Dilva*, who has a physical disability and uses a wheelchair, when Croatian police officers manhandled them. “When they captured us, I immediately told them ‘asylum’ but one police officer just pushed me hard so I fell backwards with my sister on my back.” They both required medical treatment after they were forced back to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

      Croatia’s interior ministry has denied any wrongdoing but testimonies from migrants continue to emerge.

      Since March 2016, when the Western Balkan route was closed, many people have found themselves stuck in the Balkans. After fleeing countries such as Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Eritrea, Pakistan and Bangladesh, people had travelled through Turkey to Greece or Bulgaria, and onwards to Macedonia and Serbia.

      There are now between 6,000 and 8,000 people trapped in Serbia and around 6,000 in Bosnia and Herzegovina, who want to move onwards to EU states and particularly to Western Europe.

      Many have tried to cross to Hungary and Croatia but are met with violence from border guards. Most of the people I talked to had been walking for days inside Croatia by the time police detained them.

      Some were taken to police stations, where they were denied food for up to 24 hours; others were taken directly to the border. They were transported in windowless locked vans on winding mountainous roads on trips of up to five hours. People kept sliding off the narrow benches, bumping into each other, and throwing up.

      At the border, a “Tunnel of Terror” – as some called it — greeted them. A gauntlet of police officers beat them, pushing each person to the next officer and then to the next, laughing and mocking them on the way.

      Tired and beaten, migrants and asylum seekers were then chased down a slippery slope or thrown into a ditch four to five meters deep that is the de facto border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina or made to wade across an ice-cold stream.

      Most of the 20 people I interviewed, including parents with their children, the girl with a disability, and pregnant women, said they were brutally forced across the border in the cold of dark winter nights.

      Every person I interviewed also said that Croatian police robbed them of their phones and money. They kept the good phones, forcing people to surrender their passcodes, and smashed the rest. Money, if found, was stolen too.

      All this is going on at the EU’s borders. With total impunity.

      And it has been going on for some time. I documented similar abuses on Croatia’s border with Serbia two years ago. The government rejected our allegations and the EU didn’t act. In two years, rather than improving, the situation has got worse.

      More recently, the Croatian government dismissed concerns raised by UN refugee agency UNHCR and the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights and told us they didn’t have enough evidence to bring prosecutions and that allegations can’t be confirmed.

      The EU provides funds for humanitarian assistance to migrants and asylum seekers in Bosnia and Herzegovina that, while helpful, cannot justify turning a blind eye to neighbouring member state, Croatia, blatantly breaking EU laws and ignoring violence committed against those same people.

      Croatian authorities need to take these allegations seriously. They need to immediately open an investigation into the summary returns and violence by Croatian police against migrants and asylum seekers. And they need to hold those responsible to account.

      It’s also well past time for EU institutions to break their silence and send a strong message to Zagreb that pushbacks and violence flies in the face of Croatia’s legal obligations. The EU should make failure by Zagreb to address this issue come at a serious cost.

      *Names have been changed to protect identities.

      https://lacuna.org.uk/migration/why-police-croatia-attacking-asylum-seekers-trapped-in-the-balkans

      #Velika_Kladusa

    • Croatia violating EU law by sending asylum seekers back to Bosnia

      Hidden cameras capture apparent expulsions by Croatian border police in forest.

      Croatian police are returning groups of asylum seekers across the EU’s external border with Bosnia, a video obtained by the Guardian suggests, in an apparent breach of EU law.

      Footage shared by the watchdog organisation Border Violence Monitoring (BVM) shows a number of alleged collective expulsions or “pushbacks” of migrants in a forest near Lohovo, in Bosnian territory.

      The videos, filmed on hidden cameras between 29 September and 10 October, capture 54 incidents of people being pushed back in groups from Croatia into Bosnia with 368 people in total returned, according to the footage.

      Bosnia-Herzegovina’s security minister, Dragan Mektić, told the news channel N1 the behaviour of the Croatian police was “a disgrace for an EU country”.

      Croatian police are returning groups of asylum seekers across the EU’s external border with Bosnia, a video obtained by the Guardian suggests, in an apparent breach of EU law.

      Footage shared by the watchdog organisation Border Violence Monitoring (BVM) shows a number of alleged collective expulsions or “pushbacks” of migrants in a forest near Lohovo, in Bosnian territory.

      The videos, filmed on hidden cameras between 29 September and 10 October, capture 54 incidents of people being pushed back in groups from Croatia into Bosnia with 368 people in total returned, according to the footage.

      Bosnia-Herzegovina’s security minister, Dragan Mektić, told the news channel N1 the behaviour of the Croatian police was “a disgrace for an EU country”.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAmdAjzcrcA


      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/17/croatia-violating-eu-law-by-sending-back-asylum-seekers-to-bosnia?CMP=s

    • ‘Unverifiable information from unknown migrants’? – First footage of push-backs on the Croatian-Bosnian border

      By now our database contains more than 150 push-back reports from the Bosnian-Croatian border. In light of this figure it seems hard to deny this illegal practice of collective expulsions of people seeking protection, perpetrated by the Croatian police and often accompanied by violence. The people returning from the border with broken arms or legs, or showing bloodshot eyes and marks of beatings with batons on their backs, are no isolated cases. Their injuries and testimonies prove irrefutably institutionalised and systematically applied practices – even if the Croatian Minister of the Interior [1] continues to deny these accusations and instead prefers to accuse refugees of self-injury [2]. Meanwhile, various large international media have taken up the topic and report on developments at the Bosnian-Croatian border. The Guardian, for example, recently published a video showing a refugee bleeding from several wounds just after a pushback [3]. Yet, for some reason, up to now the available evidence has not been enough to hold the responsible persons and institutions accountable. New video material provided to BVM by an anonymous group should now close this gap in evidence.

      VIDEO MATERIAL PROVES ILLEGAL PUSH-BACKS FROM CROATIA

      On 20 November we received a letter containing extensive video footage from the Bosnian-Croatian border area. For security reasons, the informants themselves prefer to remain anonymous; yet for the extensiveness and level of detail of the material in concordance with other reports, we consider it authentic. The footage was filmed by hidden cameras in a forest near Lohovo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, (Coordinates 44.7316124, 15.9133454) between 29 September and 10 October 2018 and show 54 push-backs.

      At least 350 refugees, including small children, minors and women, can clearly be seen on the video recordings as victims of these pushbacks, which take place several times a day and at night. Should they occur just as frequently as during the filmed period, the number of push-backs at this border crossing alone exceeds 150 per month. For the first time, the material can unambiguously prove that the Croatian police systematically conducts collective expulsions on Bosnian territory.

      The group’s report accompanying the material reads:

      “These push-backs are not conducted at an official border checkpoint and without the presence of Bosnian officials and are therefore illegal. In addition, documentation by various NGOs suggests that asylum applications by refugees were previously disregarded.”

      These expulsions over the green border do not follow formal return procedures [4] and can thus not be justified with the 2007 readmission agreement between the EU and Bosnia. The only legal way to return people would be through the readmission process at the official border crossing after a readmission application has been made to the Bosnian authorities.

      PROOF OF MULTIPLE CRIMINAL OFFENCES

      In not complying with these procedures, the police officers involved violate international law, in particular the prohibition of collective expulsions laid down in Article 4 of the Fourth Additional Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights [5] and Article 19 of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights [6]. Similarly, the right to asylum, as agreed in the Geneva Convention on Refugees [7] and Article 18 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, is not granted.

      “According to first-hand accounts, the officials inflict violence during approximately one in five push-backs in Lohovo, which is considerably less than on other push-back locations on the Bosnian-Croatian border. Here as in other locations, mobile phones are almost always destroyed and returned in a yellow plastic bag.”

      In the videos themselves, the violence becomes apparent in the form of kicks and insults. Shots and screams that can be heard at close range indicate that the beatings and humilliations which are extensively documented by various NGOs [8], take place nearby.

      Interestingly enough, the group seems to be planning to release even more video material from the border:

      “We already have more recordings from other locations and will publish them as soon as we have collected enough material. Since push-backs at other locations often take place at night, we work here with thermal cameras and other special equipment.”

      With their work, the group aims to contribute to the end of push-backs and police violence in Croatia, they state:

      “We demand that the human rights violations at the Bosnian-Croatian border stop immediately. For this it is necessary that they are examined in an official investigation both internally, by the Croatian Minister of the Interior, and by the European Commission, which co-finances Croatian border security from the Internal Security Fund (ISF).”

      BVM supports these demands. Now more than ever, the evidence is calling for immediate investigations by the Croatian authorities as well as by the European Union of which Croatia is a member state and which co-funds Croatian border security. The European Commission should call on Croatia to stop and investigate collective expulsions of asylum seekers to Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as allegations of violence perpetrated by Croatian officers. The EU Commission should also open legal proceedings against Croatia for violating EU laws.

      We would like to make the material that was sent to us available to the general public, in order to make them visible as evidence of the everyday events at the borders of the European Union.

      The data package, including the report, an overview of the content of the material and all the videos, can be accessed or downloaded here:

      https://files.borderviolence.eu/index.php/s/EYZdTo0OeGXrCqW

      In case of queries we can establish encrypted communication with the anonymous group.


      https://www.borderviolence.eu/proof-of-push-backs

    • Human rights group files complaint against Croatian police

      A Croatian NGO working with migrants has filed a complaint against police who it claims used excessive force and violence against migrants, illegally pushing them back at the border with Bosnia.
      A human rights organization in Croatia on Wednesday filed a complaint against several Croatian police officers, whose identities are unknown. The organization claims that they are guilty of using excessive force, violence and other illegal behavior against migrants and refugees that were pushed back at the border with Bosnia.

      The complaint by the Center for Peace Studies (CMS), a Zagreb-based NGO, is based on footage published in recent days by Border Violence Monitoring (BVM), an international organization that collects evidence of abuse and illegal push-backs against migrants on the Balkan route.

      Video and witness statements

      BVM received the footage from an anonymous source in November. The organization said that it had verified that the videos were credible. They also argued that the footage was in line with hundreds of witness statements from migrants collected over the past year, according to which Croatian police systematically push back migrants towards Bosnia.

      The footage was reportedly filmed in September and allegedly shows a group of migrants lined up and Croatian police forcing them to return to Bosnia, without giving them the possibility to ask for asylum or international humanitarian protection. BVM said that this was against international law, because the incidents occurred in the so-called “green zone,” in the forest between the two countries, not at border crossings, and without the presence of Bosnian border guards.

      The footage also shows some incidents of Croatian police kicking, threatening and insulting migrants.

      Collective forced push-backs

      The Center for Peace Studies said that, for the first time, the footage offers undeniable proof corroborating the many complaints against Croatian police presented in recent months by international organizations including the Council of Europe, UNHCR, and Human Rights Watch. “The footage shows collective forced push-backs and the use of unjustified violence,” CMS said.

      The NGO has asked for an investigation by the judiciary as well as the resignation of the interior minister and some high-ranking members of Croatian police.

      Croatian Interior Minister Davor Bozinovic said that he had not seen any video in which Croatian police made use of violence and that there was no substantial evidence that showed illegal conduct by the police. Croatia has always rejected accusations that its police engage in illegal behavior against migrants.

      http://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/14039/human-rights-group-files-complaint-against-croatian-police

    • En Bosnie, des milliers de réfugiés sont bloqués dans la neige aux frontières de l’Union européenne

      La Bosnie-Herzégovine est devenue un cul-de-sac aux portes de l’Union européenne, où sont bloqués plusieurs milliers d’exilés. Malgré les violences de la police croate et une neige redoutable, ils cherchent à continuer leur route vers l’Ouest.

      Depuis l’été, les témoignages et les rapports des organisations internationales s’accumulent : la police croate maltraite systématiquement les migrants et les réfugiés, et procède à des rapatriements forcés extra-légaux en Bosnie-Herzégovine. Le 16 décembre, le réseau Border violence monitoring a ainsi publié d’accablantes vidéos montrant comment les forces de l’ordre regroupaient des réfugiés arrêtés alors qu’ils tentaient d’entrer en Croatie et les forçaient à reprendre la route de la Bosnie-Herzégovine.

      Ces vidéos, réalisées en caméra cachée, documentent 54 cas de refoulement, effectués entre le 29 septembre et le 10 octobre dans la forêt de Lehovo, dans les régions montagneuses et très peuplées de Krajina, qui marquent la frontière entre les deux pays. Sur les vidéos, on peut dénombrer au moins 350 réfugiés, dont des femmes et des enfants. « Pour la première fois, des documents prouvent que la police croate mène systématiquement des expulsions collectives sur le territoire bosnien, note Border Violence Monitoring. Ces refoulements ne sont pas menés à un poste-frontière et ont lieu sans présence de représentants légaux de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, ils sont donc contraires au droit international. »

      https://twitter.com/Border_Violence/status/1074178137217478656

      Deux jours plus tôt, Human Rights Watch publiait un rapport accablant sur les actes de violence et de torture commis par la police croate. Zagreb interdit bien souvent aux réfugiés de déposer une demande d’asile, contrevenant ainsi à ses obligations internationales. L’organisation internationale affirme avoir recueilli les témoignages de 20 personnes, dont 16 évoquaient des brutalités systématiques, voire de véritables actes de torture commis par les forces de l’ordre croates, ainsi que des vols d’argent et de téléphones portables.

      Le Commissaire des Nations unies pour les réfugiés confirmait de son côté en août 2018 avoir reçu des rapports qui soulignaient que la Croatie avait illégalement refoulé 2 500 migrants et demandeurs d’asile vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine et la Serbie depuis le début de l’année dernière. Ces accusations ont été réfutées par le premier ministre croate Andrej Plenković, dans une réponse à une interpellation du Conseil de l’Europe.

      Depuis plusieurs mois, les associations et les collectifs croates de soutien aux réfugiés font d’ailleurs l’objet d’un véritable harcèlement : attaques de leurs locaux ou de leurs véhicules par des « inconnus », poursuites judiciaires contre plusieurs militants. Ces collectifs viennent d’ailleurs de publier une « Lettre ouverte aux citoyens de l’Union européenne depuis la périphérie », soulignant que les politiques de fermeture des frontières pourraient faire basculer tous ces pays de la périphérie européenne – membres ou non de l’Union – dans des régimes de plus en plus autoritaires.

      Dragan Mektić, le ministre de la sécurité de Bosnie-Herzégovine, a pourtant confirmé à la télévision N1 la réalité de ces mauvais traitements. « Le comportement de la police croate est une honte pour un pays membre de l’Union européenne. Les policiers se font les complices des trafiquants, en poussant les migrants dans les mains des réseaux criminels », a-t-il expliqué. Depuis la fermeture de la « route des Balkans », au printemps 2016, et l’édification d’un mur de barbelés le long de la frontière hongroise, les candidats à l’exil empruntent de nouvelles routes depuis la Grèce, transitant par l’Albanie, le Monténégro et la Bosnie-Herzégovine, ou directement depuis la Serbie vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine, devenue une étape obligatoire sur la route vers l’Union européenne.

      La région de Bihać constitue effectivement un cul-de-sac. Selon les chiffres officiels, 18 628 réfugiés ont été enregistrés en Bosnie-Herzégovine en 2018. Au 18 décembre, 5 300 se trouvaient dans le pays, dont au moins 4 000 dans le canton de Bihać, les autres étant répartis dans des centres d’accueil à proximité de la capitale Sarajevo ou de la ville de Mostar. La majorité d’entre eux ne fait que transiter, alors que des températures polaires et de fortes neiges se sont abattues sur la Bosnie-Herzégovine depuis la fin du mois de décembre.

      À Velika Kladuša, une petite ville coincée à la frontière occidentale du pays, le camp de Trnovi a été évacué mi-décembre et tous ses habitants relogés dans l’ancienne usine Miral, aménagée en centre d’hébergement d’urgence par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM). « Les conditions sont très précaires, mais au moins, il y a du chauffage », se réjouit Husein Kličić, président du Comité cantonal de la Croix-Rouge.

      Les entrées en Bosnie-Herzégovine se sont ralenties avec l’arrivée de l’hiver, 450 par semaine en novembre contre 1 200 un mois plus tôt, selon Peter Van der Auweraert, directeur de l’OIM dans le pays, mais les flux ne se sont pas taris : en ce début janvier, de nouveaux groupes arrivent tous les jours au Monténégro, explique Sabina Talovic, volontaire dans la ville de Pljevlja, proche des frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine. Ces flux devraient recommencer à enfler une fois le printemps revenu.

      L’urgence est désormais de passer l’hiver. Selon Damir Omerdić, ministre de l’éducation du canton d’Una-Sana, une trentaine d’enfants installés avec leurs familles dans l’ancien hôtel Sreda, dans la ville de Cazin, devraient même pouvoir intégrer l’école primaire d’un petit village voisin et des négociations sont en cours avec un autre établissement. « Ils passeront deux ou trois heures par jour à l’école. Notre but est de leur permettre de faire connaissance avec d’autres enfants », explique-t-il à Radio Slobodna Evropa.

      La police du canton d’Una-Sana a observé, courant décembre, plusieurs groupes de réfugiés en train de s’engager dans le massif de Plješevica, qui fait frontière avec la Croatie. Non seulement, des secteurs n’ont toujours pas été déminés depuis la fin de la guerre, mais seuls des montagnards expérimentés et bien équipés peuvent s’engager en plein hiver dans ces montagnes dont les sommets culminent à plus de 1 600 mètres. Les policiers bosniens n’ont aucun mandat pour stopper les réfugiés qui prennent cette route dangereuse – mais si jamais ils parviennent à franchir ces montagnes, on peut hélas gager que la police croate les arrêtera.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/130119/en-bosnie-des-milliers-de-refugies-sont-bloques-dans-la-neige-aux-frontier

    • Entre violences et désespoir, le quotidien des migrants oubliés en Bosnie-Herzégovine

      Ils sont plus de 3 500 dans les #camps surpeuplés à la frontière avec la Croatie, des centaines dans les squats insalubres à Sarajevo, et bien d’autres encore dans le reste du pays. Depuis plus d’un an, la Bosnie-Herzégovine subit afflux massif de migrants, auquel les autorités ont toutes les peines de faire face. Pour ces candidats à l’exil bloqués à la lisière de l’Union européenne, l’espoir de passer se fait de plus en plus ténu. « Entre violences et désespoir, le quotidien des migrants oubliés en Bosnie-Herzégovine », un Grand reportage de Jean-Arnault Dérens et Simon Rico.


      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/15228/entre-violences-et-desespoir-le-quotidien-des-migrants-oublies-en-bosn
      #campement


  • Croatian media report new ‘Balkan route’

    Croatian media have reported the emergence of a new ’Balkan route’ used by migrants to reach western Europe without passing through Macedonia and Serbia.

    Middle Eastern migrants have opened up a new ’Balkan route’ in their attempt to find a better life in western Europe after the traditional route through Macedonia and Serbia was closed. This is according to a report by Zagreb newspaper Jutarnji list.

    From Greece, the new route takes them through Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia.

    http://www.infomigrants.net/en/post/7522/croatian-media-report-new-balkan-route?ref=tw
    #parcours_migratoires #route_migratoire #Balkans #ex-Yougoslavie #route_des_balkans #Albanie #Monténégro #Bosnie #Croatie #Slovénie #migrations #asile #réfugiés

    • Bosnia and the new Balkan Route: increased arrivals strain the country’s resources

      Over the past few months, the number of refugees and asylum seekers arriving to Bosnia has steadily increased. Border closures – both political and physical – in other Balkan states have pushed greater numbers of people to travel through Bosnia, in their attempt to reach the European Union.

      In 2017, authorities registered 755 people; this year, in January and February alone, 520 people arrived. The trend has continued into March; and in the coming weeks another 1000 people are expected to arrive from Serbia and Montenegro. Resources are already strained, as the small country struggles to meet the needs of the new arrivals.

      https://helprefugees.org/bosnia-new-balkan-route

    • Le Monténégro, nouveau pays de transit sur la route des migrants et des réfugiés

      Ils arrivent d’#Albanie et veulent passer en #Bosnie-Herzégovine, étape suivante sur la longue route menant vers l’Europe occidentale, mais des milliers de réfugiés sont ballotés, rejetés d’une frontière à l’autre. Parmi eux, de nombreuses familles, des femmes et des enfants. Au Monténégro, la solidarité des citoyens supplée les carences de l’État. Reportage.

      Au mois de février, Sabina Talović a vu un groupe de jeunes hommes arriver à la gare routière de Pljevlja, dans le nord du Monténégro. En s’approchant, elle a vite compris qu’il s’agissait de réfugiés syriens qui, après avoir traversé la Turquie, la Grèce et l’Albanie, se dirigeaient vers la Bosnie-Herzégovine en espérant rejoindre l’Europe occidentale. Elle les a conduits au local de son organisation féministe, Bona Fide, pour leur donner à manger, des vêtements, des chaussures, un endroit pour se reposer, des soins médicaux. Depuis la fin du mois d’avril, 389 personnes ont trouvé un refuge temporaire auprès de Bona Fide. L’organisation travaille d’une manière indépendante, mais qu’après quatre mois de bénévolat, Sabina veut faire appel aux dons pour pouvoir nourrir ces migrants. Elle ajoute que le nombre de migrants au Monténégro est en augmentation constante et qu’il faut s’attendre à un été difficile.

      Au cours des trois premiers mois de l’année 2018, 458 demandes d’asiles ont été enregistrées au Monténégro, plus que la totalité des demandes pour l’année 2016 et plus de la moitié des 849 demandes enregistrées pour toute l’année 2017. Il est peu vraisemblable que ceux qui demandent l’asile au Monténégro veuillent y rester, parce le pays offre rarement une telle protection. En 2017, sur 800 demandes, seules sept personnes ont reçu un statut de protection et une seule a obtenu le statut de réfugié. Cette année, personne n’a encore reçu de réponse positive. Il suffit néanmoins de déposer une demande pour avoir le droit de séjourner à titre provisoire dans le pays. C’est un rude défi pour le Monténégro de loger tous ces gens arrivés depuis le mois d’août 2017, explique Milanka Baković, cadre du ministère de l’Intérieur. Les capacités d’accueil du pays sont largement dépassées. Selon les sources du ministère, un camp d’accueil devrait bientôt ouvrir à la frontière avec l’Albanie.

      “Nous prenons un taxi pour passer les frontières. Ensuite, nous marchons. Quand nous arrivons dans un nouveau pays, nous demandons de l’aide à la Croix Rouge.”

      Ali a quitté la Syrie il y a trois mois avec sa femme et ses enfants mineurs. Ils vivent maintenant à Spuž, dans un centre pour demandeurs d’asile établi en 2015. Avant d’arriver au Monténégro, la famille a traversé quatre pays et elle est bien décidée à poursuivre sa route jusqu’en Allemagne, pour rejoindre d’autres membres de leur famille. « Nous prenons un taxi pour passer les frontières. Ensuite, nous marchons. Quand nous arrivons dans un nouveau pays, nous demandons de l’aide à la Croix Rouge ou à qui peut pour trouver un endroit où nous pouvons rester quelques jours… Nous avons peur de ce qui peut nous arriver sur la route mais nous sommes optimistes et, si Dieu le veut, nous atteindrons notre but. »

      Comme tant d’autres avant eux, Ali et sa famille ont traversé la Grèce. Certains ont franchi la frontière entre l’Albanie et le Monténégro en camionnette en payant 250 euros des passeurs. Les autres ont emprunté une route de montagnes sinueuse et des chemins de traverse difficiles avant de traverser la frontière et de redescendre jusqu’à la route de Tuzi, sur les bords du lac de Skadar. Là, il y a une mosquée où les voyageurs peuvent passer la nuit. Certains poursuivent leur route et tentent de traverser les frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, en évitant de se faire enregistrer.

      S’ils sont appréhendés par la police, les migrants et réfugiés peuvent demander l’asile et le Monténégro, comme n’importe quel autre pays, est obligé d’accueillir dans des conditions correctes et en sécurité tous les demandeurs jusqu’à ce qu’une décision finale soit prise sur leur requête. Dejan Andrić, chef du service des migrations illégales auprès de la police des frontières, pense que la police monténégrine a réussi à enregistrer toutes les personnes entrées sur le territoire. « Ils restent ici quelques jours, font une demande d’asile et peuvent circuler librement dans le pays », précise-t-il. Toutefois des experts contestent que tous les migrants traversant le pays puissent être enregistrés, ce qui veut dire qu’il est difficile d’établir le nombre exact de personnes traversant le Monténégro. La mission locale du Haut commissariat des Nations Unies aux réfugiés (UNHCR) se méfie également des chiffres officiels, et souligne « qu’on peut s’attendre à ce qu’un certain nombre de personnes traversent le Monténégro sans aucun enregistrement ».

      Repoussés d’un pays à l’autre

      Z. vient du Moyen-Orient, et il a entamé son voyage voici cinq ans. Il a passé beaucoup de temps en Grèce, mais il a décidé de poursuivre sa route vers l’Europe du nord. Pour le moment, il vit au centre d’hébergement de Spuž, qui peut recevoir 80 personnes, ce qui est bien insuffisant pour accueillir tous les demandeurs d’asile. Z. a essayé de passer du Monténégro en Bosnie-Herzégovine et en Croatie mais, comme beaucoup, il a été repoussé par la police. Selon la Déclaration universelle des droits humains, chaque individu a pourtant le droit de demander l’asile dans un autre pays. Chaque pays doit mettre en place des instruments pour garantir ce droit d’asile, les procédures étant laissées à la discrétion de chaque Etat. Cependant, les accords de réadmission signés entre Etats voisins donnent la possibilité de renvoyer les gens d’un pays à l’autre.

      Dejan Andrić affirme néanmoins que beaucoup de migrants arrivent au Monténégro sans document prouvant qu’ils proviennent d’Albanie. « Dans quelques cas, nous avons des preuves mais la plupart du temps, nous ne pouvons pas les renvoyer en Albanie, et même quand nous avons des preuves de leur passage en Albanie, les autorités de ce pays ne répondent pas de manière positive à nos demandes. » Ceux qui sont repoussés en tentant de traverser la frontière de Bosnie-Herzégovine finissent par échouer à Spuž, mais plus souvent dans la prison de la ville qu’au centre d’accueil. « Si les réfugiés sont pris à traverser la frontière, ils sont ramenés au Monténégro selon l’accord de réadmission. Nous notifions alors au Bureau pour l’asile que cette personne a illégalement essayé de quitter le territoire du Monténégro », explique Dejan Andrić.

      Selon la loi, en tel cas, les autorités monténégrines sont dans l’obligation de verbaliser les personnes pour franchissement illégal de la frontière. Cela se termine devant le Tribunal, qui inflige une amende d’au moins 200 euros. Comme les gens n’ont pas d’argent pour payer l’amende, ils sont expédiés pour trois ou quatre jours dans la prison de Spuž, où les conditions sont très mauvaises. Des Algériens qui se sont retrouvés en prison affirment qu’on ne leur a donné ni lit, ni draps. En dépit de ces accusations portées par plusieurs demandeurs d’asile, le bureau monténégrin du HCR réfute toutes les accusations de mauvais traitements. « Le HCR rend visite à ces gens et les invite à déposer une demande d’asile pour obtenir de l’aide, jamais nous n’avons eu de plainte concernant la façon dont ils étaient traités. »

      Néanmoins, un grand nombre de personnes qui veulent poursuivre leur route parviennent à gagner la Bosnie-Herzégovine. La route la plus fréquentée passe entre les villes de Nikšić et Trebinje. Du 1er janvier au 31 mars, la police a intercepté 92 personnes qui avaient pénétré dans la zone frontalière orientale en provenant du Monténégro, alors que 595 personnes ont été empêchées d’entrer en Bosnie par la frontière sud du pays. Des Monténégrins affirment avoir vu des gens qui marchaient vers la frontière durant les mois d’hiver, cherchant à se protéger du froid dans des maisons abandonnées. La police des frontières de Bosnie-Herzégovine explique que depuis le début de l’année 2018, les familles, les femmes et les enfants sont de plus en plus nombreux à pénétrer dans le pays, alors qu’auparavant, il s’agissait principalement de jeunes hommes célibataires.

      Violences sur les frontières croates

      Farbut Farmani vient d’Iran, il que son ami a tenté à cinq ou six reprises de franchir la frontière de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, et lui-même deux fois. « Une fois en Bosnie, j’ai contacté le bureau du HCR. Ils m’ont dit qu’ils allaient m’aider. J’étais épuisé parce que j’avais marché 55 kms dans les bois et la neige, c’était très dur. Le HCR de Sarajevo a promis qu’il allait s’occuper de nous et nous emmener à Sarajevo. Au lieu de cela, la police est venue et nous a renvoyé au Monténégro ». Parmi les personnes interpelées, beaucoup viennent du Moyen Orient et de zones touchées par la guerre, mais aussi d’Albanie, du Kosovo ou encore de Turquie.

      La police des frontières de Croatie affirme qu’elle fait son devoir conformément à l’accord avec l’accord passé entre les gouvernements de Croatie et du Monténégro. Pourtant, depuis l’été dernier, les frontières monténégrino-croates ont été le théâtre de scènes de violences. Des volontaires ont rapporté, documents à l’appui, des scènes similaires à celles que l’on observe aux frontières serbo-croates ou serbo-hongroises, alors que personne n’a encore fait état de violences à la frontière serbo-monténégrine.

      La frontière croate n’est d’ailleurs pas la seule à se fermer. En février, l’Albanie a signé un accord avec Frontex, l’agence européenne pour la protection des frontières, qui doit entrer en vigueur au mois de juin. L’accord prévoit l’arrivée de policiers européens, des formation et de l’équipement supplémentaire pour la police locale, afin de mieux protéger les frontières. Pour sa part, le gouvernement hongrois a annoncé qu’il allait offrir au Monténégro des fils de fer barbelés afin de protéger 25 kilomètres de frontière – on ne sait pas encore quel segment de la frontière sera ainsi renforcé. Selon le contrat, le fil de fer sera considéré comme un don, exempté de frais de douanes et de taxes, et la Hongrie enverra des experts pour l’installer.

      Pratiquement aucun migrant n’imagine son avenir dans les Balkans, mais si les frontières se ferment, ils risquent d’être bloqués, et pourraient connaître le même sort que les réfugiés du Kosovo qui sont venus au Monténégro pendant les bombardements de l’OTAN en 1999. D’ailleurs, beaucoup de Roms, d’Egyptiens ou d’Ashkali du Kosovo vivent toujours à Podgorica, souvent dans des conditions abominables comme à Vrela Ribnička, près de la décharge de la ville. L’été risque de voir beaucoup de réfugiés affluer dans les Balkans. Il est donc urgent de créer des moyens d’accueil dignes de ce nom.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Migrants-le-trou-noir-des-Balkans

    • Cittadini di Bosnia Erzegovina: solidali coi migranti

      La nuova ondata di migranti che passano dalla Bosnia Erzegovina per poter raggiungere l’UE ha trovato riluttanti e impreparate le autorità ma non la gente. I bosniaco-erzegovesi, memori del loro calvario, si sono subito prodigati in gesti di aiuto


      https://www.balcanicaucaso.org/aree/Bosnia-Erzegovina/Cittadini-di-Bosnia-Erzegovina-solidali-coi-migranti-188155
      #solidarité

    • La Bosnie-Herzégovine s’indigne des réfugiés iraniens qui arrivent de Serbie

      Les autorités de Sarajevo ne cachent pas leur colère. Depuis que Belgrade autorise l’entrée des Iraniens sur son sol sans visas, ceux-ci sont de plus en plus nombreux à passer illégalement par la Bosnie-Herzégovine pour tenter de rejoindre l’Union européenne.

      Par la rédaction

      (Avec Radio Slobodna Evropa) - Selon le Commissaire serbe aux migrations, Vladimir Cucić, à peine quelques centaines de réfugiés en provenance d’Iran auraient « abusé » du régime sans visa introduit en août 2017 pour quitter la Serbie et tenter de rejoindre l’Europe occidentale. « Environ 9000 Iraniens sont entrés légalement en Serbie depuis le début de l’année 2018. Il n’agit donc que d’un petit pourcentage », explique-t-il à Radio Slobodna Evropa.

      Pourtant, selon le ministre bosnien de la Sécurité, le nombre d’Iraniens arrivant en Bosnie-Herzégovine a considérablement grimpé après l’abolition par Belgrade du régime des visas avec Téhéran. Le 31 mai, Dragan Mektić a mis en garde contre un nombre croissant d’arrivées clandestines d’Iraniens en Bosnie-Herzégovine via la frontière serbe, dans la région de Zvornik et de Višegrad.

      Depuis le mois de mars 2018, quatre vol hebdomadaires directs relient Téhéran et Belgrade. Pour Vladimir Cucić, la plupart des visiteurs iraniens sont des touristes à la découverte de la Serbie. « Les Iraniens figurent à la septième place des nationalités représentées dans les centres d’accueils serbes », ajoute-t-il, où sont hébergées 3270 personnes. « Nous comptons actuellement un peu moins de 400 réfugiés iraniens dans les camps d’accueil. Rien de dramatique ».

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-Herzegovine-de-plus-en-plus-de-refugies-iraniens-en-proven
      #Iran #réfugiés_iraniens

    • Bosnie : à Sarajevo, des migrants épuisés face à des bénévoles impuissants (1/4)

      Depuis plusieurs mois, des dizaines de migrants affluent chaque jour en Bosnie, petit État pauvre des Balkans. En traversant le pays, les exilés entendent gagner la Croatie tout proche, et ainsi rejoindre l’Union européenne. L’État bosnien se dit dépassé et peu armé pour répondre à ce défi migratoire. Les ONG et la société civile craignent une imminente « crise humanitaire ». InfoMigrants a rencontré de jeunes bénévoles à Sarajevo, devant la gare centrale, unique lieu de distribution de repas pour les migrants de passage dans la capitale bosnienne.


      http://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/10148/bosnie-a-sarajevo-des-migrants-epuises-face-a-des-benevoles-impuissant

    • Réfugiés : bientôt des centres d’accueil en Bosnie-Herzégovine ?

      Au moins 5000 réfugiés sont présents en Bosnie-Herzégovine, principalement à Bihać et Velika Kladuša, dans l’ouest du pays, et leur nombre ne cesse d’augmenter. Débordés, les autorités se renvoient la patate chaude, tandis que l’Union européenne songe à financer des camps d’accueil dans le pays.

      La Fédération de Bosnie-Herzégovine possède à ce jour trois centres d’accueils, à Sarajevo, Delijaš, près de Trnovo, et Salakovac, près de Mostar, mais leur capacité d’accueil est bien insuffisante pour répondre aux besoins. Pour sa part, la Republika Sprska a catégoriquement affirmé qu’elle s’opposait à l’ouverture du moindre centre sur son territoire.

      Les réfugiés se concentrent principalement dans le canton d’Una-Sava, près des frontières (fermées) de la Croatie, où rien n’est prévu pour les accueillir. Jeudi, le ministre de la Sécurité de l’État, le Serbe Dragan Mektić (SDS), a rencontré à Bihać le Premier ministre du canton, Husein Rošić, ainsi que les maires de Bihać et de Cazin, tandis que celui de Velika Kladuša a boycotté le rencontre. Aucun accord n’a pu être trouvé.

      La mairie de Velika Kladuša, où 2000 réfugiés au moins séjournent dans des conditions extrêmement précaires, s’oppose en effet à l’édification d’un centre d’accueil sur son territoire. Pour leur part, les autorités centrales envisageaient d’utiliser à cette fin les anciens bâtiments industriels du groupe Agrokomerc, mais l’Union européenne refuse également de financer un tel projet, car ce centre d’accueil se trouverait à moins de cinq kilomètres des frontières de l’Union.

      « Nous allons quand même ouvrir ce centre », a déclaré aux journalistes le ministre Mektić. « Et ce sera à l’Union européenne de décider si elle veut laisser mourir de faim les gens qui s’y trouveront ». Pour Dragan Mektić, l’objectif est que la Bosnie-Herzégovine demeure un pays de transit. « Nous ne voulons pas que la Bosnie devienne un hot spot, et les routes des migrants sont telles qu’il faut que les centres d’accueil soient près des frontières, car c’est là que les migrants se dirigent », explique-t-il.

      “Nous ne voulons pas que la Bosnie devienne un hot spot, et les routes des migrants sont telles qu’il faut que les centres d’accueil soient près des frontières.”

      Une autre option serait de loger les familles avec enfants dans l’hôtel Sedra de Cazin, mais les autorités locales s’y opposent, estimant que cela nuirait au tourisme dans la commune. Une manifestation hostile à ce projet, prévue vendredi, n’a toutefois rassemblé qu’une poignée de personnes. Les autorités municipales et cantonales de Bihać demandent l’évacuation du pensionnat où quelques 700 personnes ont trouvé un refuge provisoire, dans des conditions totalement insalubres, mais avec un repas chaud quotidien servi par la Croix-Rouge du canton. Elles réclament également la fermeture des frontières de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, qui serait, selon elles, la seule manière de dissuader les réfugiés de se diriger vers le canton dans l’espoir de passer en Croatie.

      Le président du Conseil des ministres de Bosnie-Herzégovine, Denis Zvizdić (SDA), a lui aussi mis en garde contre tout projet « de l’Union européenne, notamment de la Croatie », de faire de la Bosnie-Herzégovine « une impasse pour les migrants ». Les réfugiés continuent néanmoins à affluer vers ce pays depuis la Serbie, et surtout depuis le Monténégro. Pour sa part, le gouvernement autrichien a annoncé l’envoi de 56 tentes en Bosnie-Herzégovine.

      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Crise-des-migrants-bientot-des-centres-d-accueil-en-Bosnie-Herzeg

    • Migrants : la Bosnie refuse de devenir la sentinelle de l’Europe

      La Bosnie refuse de devenir la sentinelle de l’Union européenne, qui ferme ses frontières aux milliers de migrants bloqués sur son territoire.

      Le ministre de la Sécurité de ce pays pauvre et fragile Dragan Mektic, a du mal à cacher son agacement face à Bruxelles.

      « Nous ne pouvons pas transformer la Bosnie en +hotspot+. Nous pouvons être uniquement un territoire de transit », a-t-il averti lors d’une visite la semaine dernière à Bihac (ouest).

      La majorité des migrants bloqués en Bosnie se regroupent dans cette commune de 65.000 habitants, proche de la Croatie, pays membre de l’UE.

      Le ministre a récemment regretté le refus de Bruxelles de financer un centre d’accueil dans une autre commune de l’ouest bosnien, Velika Kladusa. Selon lui, l’UE le juge trop proche de sa frontière et souhaite des centres plus éloignés, comme celui prévu près de Sarajevo.

      Le Premier ministre Denis Zvizdic a lui mis en garde contre tout projet « de l’Union européenne, notamment de la Croatie », de faire de la Bosnie « une impasse pour les migrants ».

      Ceux-ci « pourront entrer en Bosnie proportionnellement au nombre de sorties dans la direction de l’Europe », a-t-il encore prévenu.

      – ’Finir le voyage’ -

      Malgré des conditions de vie « très mauvaises » dans le campement de fortune où il s’est installé à Velika Kladusa, Malik, Irakien de 19 ans qui a quitté Bagdad il y a huit mois avec sa famille, n’ira pas dans un camp l’éloignant de la frontière : « Les gens ne veulent pas rester ici, ils veulent finir leur voyage. »

      Dans ce camp, chaque jour des tentes sont ajoutées sur l’ancien marché aux bestiaux où plus de 300 personnes survivent au bord d’une route poussiéreuse, à trois kilomètres d’une frontière que Malik et sa famille ont déjà tenté deux fois de franchir.

      La municipalité a installé l’eau courante, quelques robinets, mis en place un éclairage nocturne et posé quelques toilettes mobiles.

      Pour le reste, les gens se débrouillent, explique Zehida Bihorac, directrice d’une école primaire qui, avec plusieurs enseignants bénévoles, organise des ateliers pour les enfants, aide les femmes à préparer à manger.

      « C’est une situation vraiment désespérée. Personne ne mérite de vivre dans de telles conditions. Il y a maintenant beaucoup de familles avec des enfants, entre 50 et 60 enfants, dont des bébés qui ont besoin de lait, de nourriture appropriée », dit-elle.

      « Ces gens sont nourris par les habitants, mais les habitants ne pourront pas tenir encore longtemps parce qu’ils sont de plus en plus nombreux », met-elle en garde, déplorant l’absence de l’État.

      Selon le ministère de la Sécurité, plus de 7.700 migrants ont été enregistrés en Bosnie depuis le début de l’année. Plus de 3.000 seraient toujours dans le pays, la majorité à Bihac, où l’un d’eux s’est noyé dans l’Una la semaine dernière.

      Dans cette ville, 800 à 900 déjeuners sont désormais servis chaque jour dans la cité universitaire désaffectée investie par les migrants depuis plusieurs mois, selon le responsable local de la Croix Rouge Selam Midzic.

      Le bâtiment étant désormais trop petit, des tentes sont plantées dans un bosquet proche. D’autres squats sont apparus. « Le nombre de migrants augmente chaque jour », dit Selam Midzic.

      – Motif supplémentaire de zizanie -

      Le maire, Suhret Fazlic, accuse le gouvernement de l’abandonner. « Nous ne voulons pas être xénophobes, nous souhaitons aider les gens, et c’est ce qu’on fait au quotidien. Mais cette situation dépasse nos capacités », dit-il.

      La question s’est invitée dans la campagne des élections générales d’octobre, dans un pays divisé aux institutions fragiles. Le chef politique des Serbes de Bosnie, Milorad Dodik, a plusieurs fois prévenu que son entité n’accueillerait pas de migrants.

      Il a même accusé des dirigeants Bosniaques (musulmans) de vouloir modifier l’équilibre démographique du pays en y faisant venir 150.000 migrants pour la plupart musulmans.

      La Bosnie est peuplée pour moitié de Bosniaques musulmans, pour un tiers de Serbes orthodoxes et pour environ 15% de Croates catholiques.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/09/migrants-la-bosnie-refuse-de-devenir-la-sentinelle-de-l-europe_1665144

    • Migrants : en Bosnie, la peur de « devenir Calais »

      De plus en plus de #réfugiés_pakistanais, afghans et syriens tentent de rejoindre l’Europe en passant par la frontière bosno-croate. Alors que les structures d’accueil manquent, cet afflux ravive des tensions dans un pays divisé en deux sur des bases ethniques.

      Le soir tombé, ils sont des dizaines à arriver par bus ou taxi. Samir Alicic, le tenancier du café Cazablanka à Izacic, un petit village situé à la frontière entre la Bosnie et la Croatie, les observe depuis trois mois faire et refaire des tentatives pour passer côté croate dans l’espoir de rejoindre l’Europe de l’Ouest. En 2017, ces voyageurs clandestins en provenance du Pakistan, de la Syrie et de l’Afghanistan étaient seulement 755 en Bosnie-Herzégovine, selon les chiffres officiels. Ils sont plus de 8 000 à la mi-juillet 2018 et leur nombre va sans doute exploser : d’après les autorités, ils pourraient être plus de 50 000 à tenter de transiter par le pays dans les prochains mois.

      Depuis le début de l’année, un nouvel itinéraire les a menés en Bosnie, un pays pauvre au relief accidenté qu’ils évitaient jusqu’ici et qui ne dispose que de deux centres d’accueil officiels, saturés, près de Sarajevo et de Mostar. Désormais, ils arrivent - chose inédite - par l’Albanie et le Monténégro. La route des Balkans par laquelle plus d’un million de migrants sont passés en 2015 et 2016 est fermée depuis mars 2016. Et les frontières entre la Serbie et la Hongrie et la Serbie et la Croatie sont devenues infranchissables.

      Catastrophe humanitaire

      Le nouvel itinéraire est ardu. D’abord, il faudrait franchir la frontière bosno-croate. Elle s’étale sur plus de 1 000 kilomètres, mais on y est facilement repérable. Plusieurs centaines de migrants auraient été renvoyés de Croatie vers la Bosnie sans même avoir pu déposer une demande d’asile. « On les voit revenir le visage tuméfié. Ils nous racontent qu’ils ont été tabassés et volés par les flics croates », raconte Alija Halilagic, un paysan dont la maison se trouve à quelques encablures de la frontière. Ici, ils essaient de passer par les champs, la forêt, la rivière ou même par une ancienne douane éloignée seulement d’une cinquantaine de mètres de l’actuelle. Pour qu’ils ne tombent pas sur les champs de mines, encore nombreux en Bosnie, la Croix-Rouge leur distribue un plan.

      Entre la Croatie et la Slovénie, la frontière est une bande étroite : la franchir sans être repéré est quasi impossible. Ce qui fait le jeu des passeurs qui demandent jusqu’à 5 000 euros pour faire l’itinéraire depuis la Bosnie, selon des sources rencontrées à Sarajevo. Parmi ces migrants bloqués en Bosnie, seuls 684 ont demandé l’asile politique depuis le début de l’année. Les Etats balkaniques restent perçus comme des pays de transit.

      La majorité s’est massée dans le nord-ouest du pays. Surtout à Bihac, une ville de 60 000 habitants à une dizaine de kilomètres d’Izacic, où sont concentrés 4 000 migrants. Ils sont rejoints par une cinquantaine de nouveaux arrivants chaque jour.

      Sur les hauteurs de la ville, ce jour-là à 13 heures passées, des centaines de personnes patientent sous un soleil de plomb. La distribution du repas durera deux heures et demie. Ils sont plus d’un millier à être hébergés dans cet ancien internat sans toit ni fenêtre. Le sol boueux, jonché de détritus, est inondé par endroits par l’eau de pluie. Le bâtiment désaffecté sent l’urine. Entre 15 et 40 personnes dorment dans chaque pièce, sur des matelas, des couvertures, quelques lits superposés. De grandes tentes sont installées dans un champ boisé, à côté du bâtiment. « Cet endroit n’est pas safe la nuit, raconte un migrant kurde. Il y a des bagarres, des couteaux qui circulent. La police refuse d’intervenir. » Une centaine d’enfants et une cinquantaine de femmes sont hébergés ici. Le lendemain, huit familles seront relogées dans un hôtel de la région.

      « Nous manquons de tout : de vêtements, de chaussures, de couvertures, de sacs de couchage, de tentes, de lits de camp. Chaque jour, nous courons pour aller chercher et rendre aux pompiers de la ville le camion qu’ils nous prêtent pour qu’on puisse livrer les repas », raconte le responsable de la Croix-Rouge locale, Selam Midzic. Les ONG craignent que le prochain hiver ne tourne à la catastrophe humanitaire. Pour tenter de l’éviter, le bâtiment devrait être rénové à l’automne. Les migrants pourraient être déplacés vers un centre d’accueil qui serait monté dans la région. Mais aucune ville des alentours n’en veut pour l’instant.

      L’afflux de migrants, souvent en provenance de pays musulmans, ravive des tensions. Depuis la fin de la guerre, la Bosnie est divisée sur des bases ethniques en deux entités : la République serbe de Bosnie (la Republika Srpska, RS) et la Fédération croato-musulmane. Elle est composée de trois peuples constituants : les Bosniaques musulmans (50 % de la population), les Serbes orthodoxes (30 %) et les Croates catholiques (15 %). Des migrants, le président de l’entité serbe, qui parle d’« invasion », n’en veut pas. « En Republika Srpska, nous n’avons pas d’espace pour créer des centres pour les migrants. Mais nous sommes obligés de subir leur transit. Nos organes de sécurité font leur travail de surveillance », a déclaré Milorad Dodik dans une interview au journal de référence serbe, Politika.

      Vols par effraction

      « La police de la République serbe expulse vers la Fédération tous ces gens dès qu’ils arrivent. Il y a des villes de la RS qui sont aussi frontalières avec la Croatie. Et pourtant, tout le monde vient à Bihac », s’indigne le maire de la ville, Suhret Fazlic. L’élu local estime que les institutions centrales sont trop faibles pour faire face à l’afflux de migrants. En outre, le gouvernement, via son ministère de la Sécurité, « se défausse sur les autorités locales. Et les laisse tous venir à Bihac en espérant qu’ils vont réussir à passer en Croatie. Nous avons peur de devenir Calais, d’être submergés ».

      A Izacic, les esprits sont échauffés. On reproche à des migrants de s’être introduits par effraction dans plusieurs maisons, appartenant souvent à des émigrés bosniens installés en Allemagne ou en Autriche. Ils y auraient pris des douches et volé des vêtements. Quelques dizaines d’hommes se sont organisés pour patrouiller la nuit. Des migrants auraient également menacé les chauffeurs de taxi qui les conduisaient jusqu’au village et tabassé un groupe qui descendait du bus, la semaine dernière. « Moi, ils ne m’embêtent pas. Mais ce qui me dérange, c’est qu’ils détruisent nos champs de maïs, de pommes de terre, de haricots quand ils les traversent à trente ou à cinquante. On en a besoin pour vivre. Ma mère âgée de 76 ans, elle les a plantés, ces légumes », se désole Alija Halilagic, attablé au Cazablanka. Certains habitants, comme Samir Alicic, aimeraient voir leurs voisins relativiser. « Les années précédentes, les récoltes étaient détruites par la sécheresse et la grêle. A qui pourrait-on le faire payer ? » fait mine de s’interroger le patron du bar.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/29/migrants-en-bosnie-la-peur-de-devenir-calais_1669607
      #réfugiés_afghans #réfugiés_syriens

    • A contre-courant, #Sarajevo affiche sa solidarité

      Quelque 600 migrants parmi les 8 000 entrés dans le pays depuis le début de l’année sont actuellement en transit dans la capitale.

      La scène est devenue familière. Sur le parking de la gare de Sarajevo, ils sont environ 300 à former une longue file en cette soirée chaude de juillet. S’y garera bientôt une camionnette blanche d’où jailliront des portions des incontournables cevapcici bosniens, quelques rouleaux de viande grillée servis dans du pain rond, accompagnés d’un yaourt. Une poignée de femmes et quelques enfants se mêlent à ces jeunes hommes, venus de Syrie, d’Irak, du Pakistan ou d’Afghanistan et de passage en Bosnie sur la route vers l’Europe de l’Ouest. Environ 600 des 8 000 migrants entrés dans le pays depuis le début de l’année sont actuellement en transit dans la capitale. La majorité est bloquée dans le nord-ouest, en tentant de passer en Croatie.

      « Ici, l’accueil est différent de tous les pays par lesquels nous sommes passés. Les gens nous aident. Ils essaient de nous trouver un endroit où prendre une douche, dormir. Les flics sont corrects aussi. Ils ne nous tabassent pas », raconte un Syrien sur les routes depuis un an. Plus qu’ailleurs, dans la capitale bosnienne, les habitants tentent de redonner à ces voyageurs clandestins un peu de dignité humaine, de chaleur. « Les Sarajéviens n’ont pas oublié que certains ont été eux-mêmes des réfugiés pendant la guerre en Bosnie[1992-1995, ndlr]. Les pouvoirs publics ont mis du temps à réagir face à l’arrivée des migrants, contrairement aux habitants de Sarajevo qui ont d’emblée affiché une solidarité fantastique. Grâce à eux, une crise humanitaire a été évitée au printemps », affirme Neven Crvenkovic, porte-parole pour l’Europe du Sud-Est du Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés.

      En avril, 250 migrants avaient mis en place un campement de fortune, quelques dizaines de tentes, dans un parc du centre touristique de Sarajevo. L’Etat qui paraissait démuni face à cette situation inédite ne leur fournissait rien. « Dès que nous avons vu venir des familles, nous nous sommes organisés. Des gens ont proposé des chambres chez eux, ont payé des locations », raconte une bénévole de Pomozi.ba, la plus importante association humanitaire de Sarajevo. L’organisation, qui ne vit que des dons des particuliers en argent ou en nature, sert actuellement un millier de repas par jour dans la capitale bosnienne et distribue vêtements et couvertures. Lors du ramadan en mai, 700 dîners avaient été servis. Des nappes blanches avaient été disposées sur le bitume du parking de la gare de Sarajevo.

      Non loin de la gare, un petit restaurant de grillades, « le Broadway », est tenu par Mirsad Suceska. Bientôt la soixantaine, cet homme discret apporte souvent des repas aux migrants. Ses clients leur en offrent aussi. Il y a quelques semaines, ils étaient quelques-uns à camper devant son établissement. Un groupe d’habitués, des cadres qui travaillent dans le quartier, en sont restés sidérés. L’un d’eux a demandé à Mirsad de donner aux migrants toute la nourriture qui restait dans sa cuisine. « Quand je les vois, je pense aux nôtres qui sont passés par là et je prends soin de ne pas les heurter, les blesser en lançant une remarque maladroite ou un mauvais regard », explique Mirsad. Dans le reste du pays, la population réserve un accueil plus mitigé à ces voyageurs.

      http://www.liberation.fr/planete/2018/07/29/a-contre-courant-sarajevo-affiche-sa-solidarite_1669608

    • La région de #Bihać attend une réponse des autorités de Bosnie-Herzégovine

      10 août - 17h30 : Le Premier ministre du canton d’#Una-Sava et les représentants de communes de Bihać et #Velika_Kladuša ont fixé à ce jour un ultimatum au Conseil des ministres de Bosnie-Herzégovine, pour qu’il trouve une solution pour le logement des réfugiés qui s’entassent dans l’ouest de la Bosnie. « Nous ne pouvons plus tolérer que la situation se poursuive au-delà de vendredi. Nous avions décidé que les réfugiés qui squattent le Pensionnat devaient être relogés dans un camp de tentes à Donja Vidovska, mais rien n’a été fait », dénonce le Premier ministre cantonal Husein Rošić.

      A ce jour, 5500 migrants et réfugiés se trouveraient dans l’ouest de la Bosnie-Herzégovine, dont 4000 dans la seule commune de Bihać, et leur nombre ne cesse de croître.


      https://www.courrierdesbalkans.fr/Bosnie-police-renforts-frontieres
      #Bihac ##Velika_Kladusa

    • EASO assesses potential support to Bosnia Herzegovina on registration, access to procedure, identification of persons with special needs and reception

      Due to an increased number of mixed migration flows in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the European Commission has been in contact with #EASO and the project partners 1 of the IPA funded Regional Programme “Regional Support to Protection-Sensitive Migration Management in the Western Balkans and Turkey” on how to best support the Bosnian ‘Action Plan to Combat Illegal Migration’ 2 within the scope of the project and possibly beyond.

      Within that framework, an assessment mission with six EASO staff from the Department for Asylum Support and Operations took place from 30 July to 3 August in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The objective of the mission was to further assess the situation in the country and discuss the scope and modalities of EASO’s support, in cooperation with #Frontex, #IOM, #UNHCR and EU Delegation.
      #OIM

      After a meeting with the Bosnian authorities, UNHCR and IOM in Sarajevo, the EASO reception team travelled throughout Bosnia to visit current and future reception facilities in #Delijas and #Usivak (Sarajevo Canton), #Salakovac (Herzegovina-Neretva Canton), #Bihac and #Velika_Kladusa (Una-Sana Canton, at the country`s western border with Croatia). The aim of the visit was to assess the conditions on the ground, the feasibility of an increase of reception capacity in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the potential for dedicated support to the Bosnian authorities by EASO on the topic of reception conditions. EASO experts met with Bosnian officials, mobile teams from IOM, field coordinators from UNHCR and various NGO partners active in reception centres.

      The reception mission visited #Hotel_Sedra near Bihac, which since the end of July has started to host families with children relocated from informal settlements (an abandoned dormitory in Bihac and an open field in Velika Kladusa) within the Una-Sana Canton. It will soon reach a capacity of 400, while the overall capacity in the country is expected to reach 3500 before winter. A former military camp in Usivak (near Sarajevo) will also start to host families with children from September onward after the necessary work and rehabilitation is completed by IOM.

      The EASO reception team is currently assessing the modalities of its intervention, which will focus on expert support based on EASO standards and indicators for reception for the capacity building and operational running of the reception facilities in Bihac (Hotel Sedra) and Ušivak.

      In parallel, the EASO experts participating in the mission focusing on registration, access to asylum procedure and identification or persons with special needs visited reception facilities in Delijas and Salakovac as well as two terrain centres of the Service for Foreigners’ Affairs, namely in Sarajevo and Pale. Meetings with the Ministry of Security’s asylum sector allowed for discussions on possible upcoming actions and capacity building support. The aim would be to increase registration and build staff capacity and expertise in these areas.

      Currently, the support provided by EASO within the current IPA project is limited to participation to regional activities on asylum and the roll-out of national training module sessions on Inclusion and Interview Techniques. This assessment mission would allow EASO to deliver more operational and tailor made capacity building and technical support to Bosnia and Herzegovina in managing migration flows. These potential additional actions would have an impact on the capacity of the country for registration, reception and referral of third-country nationals crossing the border and will complement the special measure adopted by the European Commission in August 2018. The scope and modalities of the actions are now under discussions with the relevant stakeholders and will be implemented swiftly, once agreed by the Bosnian authorities and the EU Delegation.

      https://www.easo.europa.eu/easo-assessment-potential-support-bosnia-herzegovina

      Avec cette image postée sur le compte twitter de EASO :


      https://twitter.com/EASO/status/1038804225642438656