• Après les #milices qui surveillent les #frontières en #Hongrie, #Bulgarie, #République_Tchèque :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/719995

    ... voici le même type de groupes en #Slovénie...
    Vigilantes in Slovenia patrol borders to keep out migrants

    Blaz Zidar has a mission: patrol along a razor-wire fence on Slovenia’s border with Croatia, catch migrants trying to climb over, hand them to police and make sure they are swiftly sent out of the country.

    The 47-year-old former Slovenian army soldier, dressed in camouflage trousers with a long knife hanging from his belt, is one of the vigilantes who call themselves “home guards” — a mushrooming anti-migrant movement that was until recently unthinkable in the traditionally liberal Alpine state. The name of the self-styled group evokes memories of the militia that sided with fascists during World War II.

    “I would prefer to enjoy my retirement peacefully, but security reasons are preventing this,” Zidar said as he embarked on yet another of his daily foot patrols together with his wife near their home village of Radovica nestled idyllically among vineyards and lush green forested hills.

    Zidar complained that he had to act because Slovenian police aren’t doing their job of guarding the borders from the migrant flow which peaked in 2015 when hundreds of thousands of refugees from the Middle East, Africa and Asia, fleeing wars and poverty, crossed from Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia and Macedonia via Hungary or Croatia and Slovenia toward more prosperous Western European states.

    Zidar said that his six children often join them in the border monitoring mission “because they have to learn how to protect their nation from intruders.”

    Slovenia’s volunteer guards illustrate strong anti-migrant sentiments not only in the small European Union nation of 2 million people, but also across central and eastern Europe which is a doorway into Western Europe for migrants and where countries such as Hungary have faced criticism for open anti-migrant policies. Similar right-wing guards that frequently attacked migrants crossing the borders previously openly operated in Hungary and Bulgaria.

    Police in Croatia — an EU member state that is still not part of the borderless EU travel zone — routinely face accusations of pushbacks and violence against migrants trying to come in from Bosnia. In Slovenia, the authorities are putting up additional fences on the border with Croatia after Italy’s former hard-line interior minister, Matteo Salvini, threatened “physical barriers” would be built between Slovenia and Italy if the migrant flow wasn’t completely stopped.

    The fiery anti-migrant rhetoric by Salvini and Hungarian President Victor Orban, who was the first to order fences on Hungary’s border with Serbia at the start of the migrant crisis, have resonated among some in Slovenia, an exceptionally calm, nature-loving country.

    Miha Kovac, a Slovenian political analyst who is a professor at the University of Ljubljana, described the anti-migrant guards as “guys with big beer bellies who don’t have much of an education, who didn’t have much of a career, who don’t know what to do with themselves in the contemporary world.

    “They find their meaning in this kind of movement and this kind of hatred toward migrants.”

    Kovac said that in the short run, the right-wing groups represent no real danger to the tiny EU nation. But if the European migrant crisis continues “this kind of movement might become more aggressive.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zte9nDFcACY

    “Slovenia is a country of 2 million and if you would become a kind of immigrant pocket with the population of ... 20, 30, 40, 50,000 immigrants, this could cause quite significant problems,” Kovac said.

    Slovenian authorities don’t seem to mind the self-styled guards patrolling the country’s borders, as long as they don’t do anything against the law.

    “The self-organization of individuals does not in any way imply mistrust of police work,” said France Bozicnik, the head of criminal police at a police station near the border. “It’s just the opposite.”

    “People call us on the phone every day and give us information about suspicious vehicles and suspicious persons, and we sincerely thank them for this information,” he said. “They are welcome to continue with this reporting.”

    Nevertheless, the images of masked men in military uniforms that appeared about a year ago have shocked many in Slovenia, the birthplace of U.S. first lady Melania Trump. The largest volunteer group called the Stajerska Garda was filmed taking an oath to secure public order in the country.

    The group commander, Andrej Sisko, said his goal is “to train people to defend their country and help the military and police at a time of massive migrations from the African and Asian states, mostly Muslims.”


    Sisko, who spent six months in prison for his paramilitary activities, insisted that his guards don’t carry real weapons or do anything illegal.

    “People are mostly supporting us, they are stopping and congratulating us on the streets,” Sisko said in an interview with The Associated Press as four of his men in camouflage uniforms, wearing genuine-looking mock guns, stood watch at his house in the suburb of the northern Slovenian town of #Maribor.

    With the continuing migrant flow in the region, human rights groups have accused authorities in Slovenia, Serbia, Greece, Hungary and particularly Croatia of illegal and forced pushbacks from their borders.

    Witnesses cited by the Border Violence Monitoring Network described Croatian police officers at the border with Bosnia burning clothes, sleeping bags, backpacks and tents in addition to targeting other possessions such as cellphones, cash and personal documents. Croatian officials have repeatedly denied the claims.

    “The police first attacked by shooting up in the air, and then they ordered us to lay down,” said Shabbir Ahmed Mian from Pakistan, adding that after police body searches they “pushed” the group of 15 that included women, children and the elderly into a small van that dumped them back to Bosnia.

    “We couldn’t breathe, there was no oxygen,” he said.

    https://www.apnews.com/57424e6bf60046e594b4c052bac86b6c

    #Stajerska_Garda #Andrey_Sisko
    #asile #migrations #réfugiés #xénophobie #racisme #patrouilles #chasse_aux_migrants #anti-réfugiés #milices #milices_privées #extrême_droite #néo-nazis

    ping @reka @isskein @marty

    • Nouvelle reçu via le rapport « Border violence monitoring network - Balkan Region » de septembre 2019 (p. 13 et segg.) :
      https://www.borderviolence.eu/balkan-region-report-september-2019

      Extrait :

      SloveniaVigilante groups patrol the Slovenian border with CroatiaOn September 17th the Associated Press reported (https://www.apnews.com/57424e6bf60046e594b4c052bac86b6c) on the alarming activities of a Slovenian para-military group called “#Stajerska_Varda”, operating along the border with Croatia. Members of the group are reportedly taking part in vigilante activities, apprehending people-in-transit who try to cross the border, and calling the police to push them back. Until now the groups’ members have not been observed carrying out any violent actions, but their rise in numbers and presence on the border is deeply concerning. A video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2KOSTXp4fA

      ) from October 2018 shows a large number of armed people taking an oath nearMaribor, stating their intent to take border security into their own hands.

      Andrey Sisko, the leader of the far-right group, confirmed that at that time the militia had existed for longer than a year. Sisko himself was arrested and detained (https://www.total-slovenia-news.com/politics/3328-militia-leader-jailed-for-trying-to-subvert-the-constituti) for six months with the charge of “trying to subvert the constitutional order”. He was released in March. The open activities of far-right groups at the border are a telling development, not only for pressure on transit conditions, but also the growth in nationalist logic pervading Slovenia today. Stajerska Varda have stepped into the political void opened up by centre and right-wing politicians who have stoked domestic opinion against people-in-transit. While extreme right activists frame their role as a necessary defense, their actual ideology is explicitly aggressive. As shown in a report (https://eeradicalization.com/the-militarization-of-slovenian-far-right-extremism) by European Eye on radicalization, Stajerska Varda has the nationalist ideas of “Greater Slovenjia” (https://eeradicalization.com/the-militarization-of-slovenian-far-right-extremism) as a reference point, and has inserted itself in a context of growing militarization as part of Slovenia’s right.

      Yet media response to this rise in armed groups presented some worrying attitudes towards the issue. Namely the views of Miha Kovac, a political analyst interviewed by AP for their report, is dangerous in two senses. Kovac dismisses radical groups as “guys with big beer bellies [...] who don’t know what to do with themselves”, and even goes on to allege that the root cause of facism is the presence of migrants in Slovenia. Marking out people-in-transit as instigators falls into a traditional cycle of victim blaming, a route which absolves the role of fear mongering party politics in abetting radicalization.
      As shown by right wing leaders around Europe, such as Matteo Salvini and Victor Orban, open praise for and facilitation of radical groups is an explicit tactic used to build a right wing consensus on the ground. The example of vigilantes operating in Hungaryas early as 2015, suggests that the development of state borders and growth of the extra-parliamentary right go hand in hand. These two strands are evidently complicit in Slovenia, seen especially in the silence at the party and state levels in regards to a self publicized military juntaoperating on state soil. September’s revelations again highlight the liminal space between conservative migration politics and paramilitary fascism. The existence of these activities call into direct question the responsibilities of the Slovenian state, and are a concerning augmentation of the current institutional pushback framework.

      https://www.borderviolence.eu/wp-content/uploads/September-2019-Report-1.pdf

  • Using Fear of the “Other,” Orbán Reshapes Migration Policy in a Hungary Built on Cultural Diversity

    In summer 2015, more than 390,000 asylum seekers, mostly Muslim, crossed the Serbian-Hungarian border and descended on the Keleti railway station in Budapest. For Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his Fidesz party, the arrival of these asylum seekers was not a humanitarian issue but a Muslim invasion threatening the national security, social cohesion, and Christian identity of the Hungarian nation. In the four years since this episode, the fear of the “other” has resulted in a string of anti-immigrant actions and policies.

    For example, barbed wire fences were constructed to deter asylum seekers from entering Hungarian territory. Transit zones on the same Serbian-Hungarian border followed, and since the end of March 2017, anyone applying for asylum in Hungary can only do so from a transit zone and is detained there for the duration of the asylum procedure. Conditions there have been grim. The Hungarian Helsinki Committee (HHC) contends rejected asylum seekers inside the transit zones are denied food, to the point of starvation.

    Furthermore, the Orbán government is fighting anti-immigrant battles not just at the border, but also in Brussels. Under the EU burden-sharing scheme, Hungary was supposed to accept 1,294 refugees. However, the prime minister said that while Hungarians have “no problems” with the local Muslim community, any EU plan to relocate asylum seekers, including many Muslims, would destroy Hungary’s Christian identity and culture. In his attempt to quash admissions, Orbán signaled that his party may split with Europe’s main conservative group and join an anti-immigrant, nationalist bloc in the EU Parliament led by Italy’s Matteo Salvini. Finally, Hungary’s latest anti-immigrant law criminalizes assistance to unauthorized migrants by civil-society organizations and good Samaritans.

    These anti-immigrant sentiments are relatively new. Given Hungary’s geopolitical location, immigration and emigration have been a reality since the birth of the country. At times, Hungary has been quite a multicultural society: for example, during the Habsburg Empire, Hungarians coexisted with Germans, Slavs, Italians, Romanians, and Jews originating in Germany, Poland, and Russia. Later, in the aftermath of World War II, significant population movements greatly modified the ethnic map of Eastern and Central Europe, and many ethnic Hungarians ended up in neighboring countries, some of whom would return later.

    Yet, it is strange to write about multicultural Hungary in 2019. Despite population movements in the postwar and communist eras and significant refugee arrivals during the Yugoslav wars in the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, the country has only recently been grappling with the arrival of migrants and asylum seekers from beyond Europe. Now several years out from the 2015-16 European migrant and refugee crisis, the Orbán administration continues to pursue policies to limit humanitarian and other arrivals from beyond Europe, while welcoming those of Hungarian ancestry. Hungarian civil society has attempted to provide reception services for newcomers, even as the number of asylum seekers and refugees has dwindled: just 671 asylum seekers and 68 refugees were present in Hungary in 2018, down from 177,135 and 146, respectively, in 2015.

    This article examines historical and contemporary migration in Hungary, from its multicultural past to recent attempts to criminalize migration and activities of those who aim to help migrants and asylum seekers.

    Immigrants and Their Reception in Historic Hungary

    In the 11th century, the Carpathian Basin saw both organized settlement of certain peoples and a roaming population, which was in reaction to certain institutional changes in the medieval Hungarian kingdom. Historians note that newcomers came to historic Hungary searching for a better life: first across the entire Carpathian Basin and later in the Danube Valley. In the 12th century, Hungarian King Géza II invited Saxons to settle in Transylvania and later, when the Teutonic Knights were expelled from Burzenland (in modern-day Romania), they were welcomed in Brasov. The aftermath of the Tartar invasion in 1241 was followed by settlement of immigrants from Slovakia, Poland, and Russia. Ethnic minority groups fleeing Bulgaria settled between the Duna and Tisza rivers, while Romanians found new homes in Transylvania. King Bela IV erected new cities populated predominantly by German, Italian, and Jewish immigrants hailing from Central Europe and Germany.

    The 15th century saw a large settlement of Southern Slavs. The desertification of Transdanubia (the part of Hungary west of the Danube River) was remedied with a settlement of Croats and large groups of Serbians. When the medieval Kingdom of Hungary fell to the Ottoman Empire in 1526, some of the Southern Slavs moved to the parts under the Ottoman occupation voluntarily, while those who participated in the conquest were dispatched by the Ottoman rulers. At the same time, large number of ethnic Hungarians fled north and settled in the area of contemporary Slovakia.

    The next large group, of Germans, arrived in the 18th century during the Habsburg dynasty. The German settlement was part of the Habsburg population policy aimed at filling the void left by the Hungarians who perished during Ottoman rule, especially in the southern territories, around Baranya County and the Banat region. Germans also settled in Pest, Vecees, Buda, Esztergom, and the Pilis Mountains. By 1790, an estimated 70,000 ethnic Germans lived in Southern Hungary.

    While German immigrants were largely welcomed in 18th century Hungary, the same cannot be said about Romanians. During the reign of Empress Maria Theresa, Hungarian nobility voiced serious concerns about the rapid increase of the Romanian population. The nobles thought Romanians would ruin Transylvania.

    The Habsburg administration did not want to repeat the mistakes of the Ottomans and decided to control population movement along the Serbian border. A census conducted in the 13 villages of the Tisza region and 24 villages along the Maros river identified 8,000 border guards on duty. Despite these precautions, large-scale emigration from Serbia continued during the Habsburg era, with approximately 4,000 people crossing over to Hungary.

    Jews were the largest immigrant group in Hungary in the 19th century. Some came from the western territories of the Habsburg Empire—Germany, Bohemia, and Moravia—while others fled persecution in Russia. The arrival of Jews to the Hungarian territory was viewed favorably by Emperor Franz Josef I and Hungarian liberal politicians. Well-heeled Jewish families acquired noble status and rose in the aristocratic ranks, and many became patrons of the arts. At the beginning of World War I, an estimated 1 million Jews lived within the boundaries of what is present-day Hungary. However, the early appreciation of the contributions of the Jewish people did not last. Anti-Semitic sentiments flared up, culminating in the notorious Tiszaeszlár affair, in which Jews were accused of kidnapping and murdering Christian children in order to use their blood as part of religious rituals. Later, the violent repression known as the White Terror (1919-21) victimized many Jews, who were blamed by the right-wing camp for the severe sanctions placed on Hungary under the Treaty of Trianon in the aftermath of World War I.

    Refugees During and After World War II

    During World War II, Hungary was well disposed towards refugees, especially from Poland. Prime Minister Pál Teleki gave refugee status to some 70,000 Polish soldiers and nearly 40,000 civilians when Hitler invaded Poland. Ninety-one refugee camps for military personnel and 88 camps for civilians were established. A joint effort by Hungarian and international aid organizations and the Red Cross resulted in the establishment of the Committee for Hungarian-Polish Refugee Affairs. As the war escalated, most Polish officers and soldiers departed Hungary to join the Polish Home Army fighting Germany alongside Britain and France. In late 1940, a group of French refugees arrived in Hungary. By 1942, there were 600 French refugees in the country.

    The immediate post-WWII period—with its ensuing peace treaties, evictions, and forced settlements—resulted in considerable population movements, significantly modifying the ethnic map in Eastern and Central Europe. Some 200,000 ethnic Germans were evicted from Hungary, and 73,000 Slovaks left as part of what was described as a “population exchange.” Judit Juhász estimated that in the three years following the end of the war more than 100,000 people left Hungary. At the same time, 113,000 ethnic Hungarians were resettled in Hungary from Czechoslovakia, 125,000 from Transylvania, 45,500 from Yugoslavia, and 25,000 from the Soviet Union. Technically, ethnic Hungarians coming to Hungary were not considered migrants, but rather returning citizens.

    When the communist regime took over in 1947, the borders were closed and the government prohibited migration. Illegal departure from the country and failure to return from abroad became a crime. The borders opened briefly in 1956 when nearly 200,000 people fled Hungary during the uprising against the communist government. Most went to nearby Austria, but 38,000—mainly students and scientists—were airlifted to the United States, in a mobilization sponsored by the U.S. government and National Academy of Sciences. Their integration into American society was relatively easy due to their young age and high educational attainment. The Hungarian government tried to encourage the refugees to return by offering them amnesty, but only about 147 decided to return to Hungary from the United States.

    Migration in the Post-Socialist Period

    Although Hungary allowed some refugees to settle in its territory—Greeks after World War II, Chileans after the fall of the Allende government, and Kurds during the Iran-Iraq war—the country did not witness a large number of asylum seekers until the late 1980s, just months before the fall of communism in Hungary in 1989. Starting in mid-1987, ethnic Hungarians, discriminated by the Ceausescu regime, fled Romania to seek refuge in Hungary. By the beginning of 1988, some 40,000 Romanian citizens, primarily of Hungarian ancestry, arrived. By the fall of the same year, the number doubled, an exodus the author witnessed firsthand.

    For the most part, the central government left the responsibility for assisting refugees to private and municipal authorities. The Hungarian Red Cross opened a special information bureau in Budapest and mounted a national relief appeal called Help to Help. Twelve million forints (the equivalent of approximately US $250,000 at the time) were raised, including 1 million from foreign donations. Assistance programs were established in Budapest and in Debrecen, a town on the border with Romania, where most of the refugees came first. Local Red Cross chapters, municipal and county agencies, and local churches—especially the Hungarian Reformed Church—were also involved in the relief program. The assistance included cash grants, job placements, and Hungarian language training for ethnic Romanians. Clothing, blankets, dishes, and utensils were also provided. When the author visited Debrecen in 1988, most refugees were kept in school dormitories as housing in socialist Hungary was scarce.

    At the time, there was no formal procedure to separate refugees from other migrants. Many of the service providers interviewed by the author indicated that ethnic Hungarians and Baptist Romanians were persecuted and therefore were bona fide refugees, while all others were fleeing because of deteriorating economic conditions. The majority fleeing Romania were skilled workers and professionals. Very few ethnic Hungarian peasants from Transylvania migrated to Hungary, and neither did the cultural leaders of the Hungarian community in Romania. Additionally, the sudden arrival of asylum seekers and migrants from Romania was followed by a considerable return of ethnic Hungarians and ethnic Romanians to Romania.

    Refugees from the Yugoslav Wars

    In the summer of 1991, war broke out on Hungary’s southern border between Croatia and Serbia. Hungarian border guards faced large groups of civilians fleeing the fighting. Most were from the Baranyi triangle, an area of Croatia near Vukovar. More than 400,000 refugees fled to countries outside the former Yugoslavia’s borders. Germany admitted the largest number, 200,000, followed by Hungary, with 60,000. However, by late 1994 the refugee population registered in Hungary had dwindled to fewer than 8,000 people. The situation changed in 1995. New ethnic cleansing and renewed combat in Bosnia sent more refugees to Hungary in the spring and summer of 1995, and the Hungarian government reopened a refugee camp that had been long closed.

    The total number of refugees registered in Hungary between 1988 and 1995 reached more than 130,000 people and transformed the country from a refugee-producing country to a refugee-receiving country. However, up until the 2015-16 European refugee and migrant crisis, 75 percent of immigrants and refugees who entered the country post-1988 were ethnic Hungarians. This phenomenon has significantly influenced the development of Hungarian refugee law and policy.

    Refugee and Asylum Law since 1989

    The 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees constitutes the foundation of Hungarian refugee law. Hungary became a party to the Refugee Convention in early 1989—the first East bloc country to do so—and it also ratified the 1967 Protocol. Although its accession to the Refugee Convention signaled that Hungary was willing to accept the international definition of refugee, Hungary conditioned its ratification on a narrow definition of those who qualify as refugees, recognizing only those who fear persecution in Europe. According to Maryellen Fullerton, “known as the geographic reservation, this provision allows Hungary to limit its obligations under the Convention to a small (and totally European) subset of all the refugees in the world.”

    Refugees who came to Hungary in the late 1980s and in the 1990s entered a country “with an undeveloped refugee policy and a patchwork of legislation and government decrees concerning refugees and migrants,” according to Fullerton. Legal scholars indicate that the government’s attempt to establish a modern refugee system was affected by a powerful preference for protecting refugees of Hungarian ancestry. This preference has permeated both existing law and the administration of the refugee system, resulting in a de facto law of return. While there is nothing intrinsically wrong with wanting to protect fellow co-ethnics—many countries, including Israel, Germany, France, and Poland, among others, have similar laws—what seems objectionable is the desire to accomplish this goal by misusing the refugee process. Ethnic Hungarians who entered Hungary seeking refuge were not only channeled into the refugee system but were also eligible for Hungarian citizenship within one year, and all the rights that citizenship accords, while others who needed refuge were mainly provided temporary protection status. They received food, shelter, and other necessities, although in recent years these too are becoming scarce, but they lacked any substantial legal protection.

    Since joining the European Union in 2004, Hungary has broadly transposed the relevant EU asylum-related directives into national legislation. In June 2007, the Law on Asylum was adopted and the Office of Immigration and Nationality became responsible for asylum and statelessness determination procedures, the provision of reception services, and (very) limited integration services to asylum seekers and refugees, respectively. Three years later, in December 2010, amendments to the legislation relevant to asylum seekers and refugees were enacted. The maximum length of administrative detention from six to 12 months and the detention of up to 30 days of families with children were introduced. While the minimum standards of refugee protection were implemented—at least on paper in the early 2000s—xenophobic attitudes towards refugees, especially Muslims, are on the rise and the protection for asylum seekers and refugees is virtually nonexistent. At the same time, support for ethnic Hungarian refugees such as those from Venezuela, is flourishing.

    Weaponizing Xenophobia: No to Muslim Refugees

    During the 2015-16 European migrant and refugee crisis, the European Union asked Hungary to find homes for 1,294 refugees. Rather than accepting the EU decision, the Hungarian government spent approximately 28 million euros on a xenophobic anti-immigrant campaign. The government called on voters to defend Christian values and Hungarian national identity in order to stop Hungary from becoming a breeding ground for terrorism. The fear that Muslim women will bear many children and the local population will be outnumbered, somehow diluted or “discolored” by Muslims and multiculturalism was palpable in pro-government media. By the end of 2015, a total of 391,384 refugees and asylum seekers entered Hungary through its southern border, most intent on transiting the country to get elsewhere in Europe. This means that the government spent around 70 euros per refugee on a campaign of intolerance, in a country where the monthly welfare check is around the same amount. Undoubtedly this amount could have been used more effectively either to provide transitional assistance to refugees or to facilitate integration of asylum seekers who wanted to settle in Hungary. Attracting migrants to stay would been in line with Fidesz’s strategic goal to stop the long-declining Hungarian birth rate and the aging of the Hungarian society.

    Instead, Hungary decided to go a step further and in September 2015 amended its Criminal Code to make unauthorized crossing of the border closure (fence), damaging the border closure, and obstruction of the construction works related to the border closure punishable by three to ten years imprisonment. The Act on Criminal Proceedings was also amended with a new fast-track provision to bring the defendant to trial within 15 days after interrogation, or within eight days if caught in flagrante. With these new provisions, the Hungarian government declared a “state of crisis due to mass migration,” during which these criminal proceedings are conducted prior to all other cases. Between September 2015 and March 2016, 2,353 people were convicted of unauthorized border crossing. These people generally remained in immigration detention pending removal to Serbia, which Hungary deemed a safe country to which asylum seekers could return. HHC argued that Serbia could not be regarded as safe third country as it recognized virtually no asylum seekers. Applications for a stay of proceedings referring to the nonpenalization principle of the 1951 Convention were systematically dismissed on the grounds that “eligibility for international protection was not a relevant issue to criminal liability.” In order to gain the public’s support for criminalizing migration and rejecting the European Union’s request to admit a few hundred refugees, the Hungarian government organized a national referendum.

    The Referendum

    On October 2, 2016, the citizens of Hungary were asked a simple question: “Do you want the European Union to prescribe the mandatory settlement of non-Hungarian citizens in Hungary without the consent of the National Assembly?”

    Voter turnout was only 39 percent, far short of the 50 percent participation required to make the referendum valid under Hungarian law. Never one to let facts get in the way of politics, Orbán, whose eurosceptic Fidesz party has more support than all opposition parties combined, said in a televised speech:

    “The European Union’s proposal is to let the migrants in and distribute them in mandatory fashion among the Member States and for Brussels to decide about this distribution. Hungarians today considered this proposal and they rejected it. Hungarians decided that only we Hungarians can decide with whom we want to live. The question was ‘Brussels or Budapest’ and we decided this issue is exclusively the competence of Budapest.”

    Orbán decided that the 3.3 million Hungarians who voted “no” in the referendum spoke for all 10 million Hungarians. After his speech, there were fireworks over the Danube river in the colors of the Hungarian flag.

    In order to prevent the European Union from sending refugees to Hungary, Orbán proposed a constitutional amendment to reflect “the will of the people.” It was presented to the Parliament on October 10, 2016, but the bill was rejected by a narrow margin. The far-right Jobbik party, which contends that some of the new arrivals pose a national security threat, sealed the bill’s rejection by boycotting the vote. However, it held out a lifeline to Orbán by indicating that it would support the ban if Orbán scrapped a separate investor visa scheme under which foreigners could effectively buy the right to live in Hungary (and move freely within the Schengen area) in exchange for buying at least 300,000 euros in government bonds with a five-year maturity. Some 10,000 Chinese utilized this scheme, at this writing, to move to Hungary, as did smaller numbers of affluent investors from Russia and the Middle East.

    The Orbán government feared that the referendum alone would not deter potential asylum seekers from trying to enter Hungary. In order to ensure that the situation from the summer of 2015 would not be repeated, the government begun to further strengthen the borders and to close existing refugee camps.

    Border Hunters

    In 2016, the Hungarian police started recruiting 3,000 “border hunters” to join some 10,000 police and soldiers patrolling a 100-mile-long, four-meter-high, razor-wire-topped fence erected on Hungary’s southern borders with Serbia and Croatia to keep refugees out. The recruitment posts were scattered all over Budapest, including the Keleti railway station that became a de facto refugee camp for tens of thousands of people fleeing violence in the Middle East in 2015. Today, the thousands of police and border hunters deal with fewer than 200 refugees who reach Hungary’s southern border with Serbia every day.

    The border hunters must have a high school diploma and receive six months of training. They earn approximately HUF 200,000 (US $709) a month, and receive other perks: housing and clothing allowances, and discount on travel and cell phones. During a recruiting fair in early October 2016, a pack of teenagers ogled a display of machine guns, batons, and riot gear. A glossy flier included a picture of patrols in 4x4s, advanced equipment to detect body heat, night-vision goggles, and migrant-sniffing dogs.

    At a swearing-in ceremony in Budapest for border hunters in spring 2017, Orbán said Hungary had to act to defend itself. The storm has not died, it has only subsided temporarily, he said. There are still millions waiting to set out on their journey in the hope of a better life (in Europe).

    Refugee Camp Closures

    Erecting fences and recruiting border hunters to keep refugees out is one strategy; closing existing refugee camps is another. Beginning in December 2016, Orbán moved to close most refugee camps. The camp in Bicske operated as a refugee facility for more than two decades. In the little museum established by refugees on the premises of the reception center one could see artifacts, coins, and paintings from many parts of the world: several countries in Africa, the Middle East, Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan, to name a few. However, in December 2016, the camp was shut down as part of the wave of closures. When the author visited the camp a few days before it closed, 75 individuals, hailing from Cuba, Nigeria, Cameroon, Iraq, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, lived there.

    At the time of the author’s visit, Bicske, which can house as many as 460 refugees, was operating well below capacity. The number of asylum applicants also decreased dramatically. According to HHC data, in October 2016, 1,198 refugees registered for asylum in Hungary compared with 5,812 in April 2016. As of October 2016, there were 529 asylum seekers staying in Hungarian refugee reception facilities: 318 at open reception centers such as Bicske and 211 in detention centers.

    The refugees who the author spoke with, including a couple from Nigeria and a young family from Cuba among others, were no terrorists. Jose and his family fled persecution in Cuba in hopes of reuniting with his elderly mother, who had received permission to stay in Budapest a couple of years earlier. Jose is a computer programmer and said he was confident that he would have no problem finding a job. In addition to his native Spanish, he speaks English, and was also learning Hungarian. The Nigerian couple fled northern Nigeria when Boko Haram killed several members of their family. They told the author mean no harm to anybody; all they want is to live in peace.

    When the camp in Bicske closed, the refugees were relocated to Kiskunhalas, a remote camp in southern Hungary, some 2 ½ hours by train from Budapest. The Bicske camp’s location offered its residents opportunities to access a variety of educational and recreational activities that helped them adjust to life in Hungary. Some refugees commuted to Budapest to attend classes at the Central European University (CEU) as well as language courses provided by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Bicske residents often attended events and met with Hungarian mentors from groups such as Artemisszió, a multicultural foundation, and MigSzol, a migrant advocacy group. Christian refugees were bused to an American church each Sunday morning. Moving the residents to Kiskunhalas has deprived them of these opportunities. The Hungarian government offers very few resources to refugees, both to those in reception facilities awaiting decisions on their cases and those who have received asylum, so it is clear that access to the civil-society organizations helping refugees prepare for their new lives is important.

    Magyar abszurd: Assistance to Venezuelan Refugees of Hungarian Ancestry

    While third-country nationals—asylum seekers or labor migrants—receive virtually no assistance from the government, ethnic Hungarians from faraway places such as Venezuela continue to enjoy a warm welcome as well as financial assistance and access to programs aimed at integrating them speedily.

    Recently, Hungary accepted 300 refugees from Venezuela. The Hungarian Charity Service of the Order of Malta led the resettlement effort. The refugees must prove some level of Hungarian ancestry in order to qualify for the resettlement scheme. About 5,000 Hungarians emigrated to Venezuela in the 20th century, mostly after World War II and in 1956.

    By Hungarian law, everyone who can prove Hungarian ancestry is entitled to citizenship. As Edit Frenyó, a Hungarian legal scholar, said, “Of course process is key, meaning political and administrative will are needed for successful naturalization.” According to media reports, the Venezuelan refugees are receiving free airfare, residency and work permits, temporary housing, job placement, and English and Hungarian language courses.

    Apparently, the refugees have been directed not to talk about their reception, perhaps in an effort to bolster the official narrative: an ethnonational story of homecoming, in which they are presented as Hungarians, not refugees or migrants. As Gergely Gulyás, Chancellor of the Republic of Hungary, declared, “We are talking about Hungarians; Hungarians are not considered migrants.” Frenyó posits that the Hungarian government must present the refugees as Hungarians seeking to come home to avert political backlash and to make sure the controversial immigration tax law is not levied on the Malta Order.

    Anti-Refugee Policy and the Role of Civil Society: Views on the Ground

    In contradiction to the government’s anti-refugee policies of recent years, civil-society organizations and civilians offered assistance to refugees who descended on the Keleti railway station in summer 2015. As Migration Aid volunteers recount, volunteers brought toys and sweets for the refugee children and turned the station into a playground during the afternoons. However, when Migration Aid volunteers started to use chalk to draw colorful pictures on the asphalt as a creative means to help children deal with their trauma, the Hungarian police reminded the volunteers that the children could be made liable for the “violation of public order.”

    In contrast to civil society’s engagement with children, the Hungarian government tried to undermine and limit public sympathy towards refugees. Hungarian state television employees were told not to broadcast images of refugee children. Ultimately, the task of visually capturing the everyday life of refugee families and their children, as the only means to bridge the distance between the refugees and the receiving societies, was left to volunteers and Facebook activists, such as the photo blog Budapest Seen. Budapest Seen captured activities at the train station, at the Slovenian and Serbian border, and elsewhere in the country, where both NGO workers and regular citizens were providing much needed water, food, sanitary napkins for women, diapers for babies, and medical assistance.

    Volunteers came in droves also in Debrecen, among them Aida el-Seaghi, half Yemeni and half Hungarian medical doctor, and Christina, a trained psychotherapist, and several dozen others who communicated and organized assistance to needy refugees through a private Facebook page, MigAid 2015.

    There were many other volunteer and civil-society groups, both in Budapest and Debrecen, who came to aid refugees in 2015. Among them, MigSzol, a group of students at the Central European University (CEU), Menedék (Hungarian Association for Migrants), established in January 1995 at the height of the Balkan wars, HHC, Adventist Development and Relief Agency, and several others.

    At the time of writing, many of these organizations are no longer operational as a result of the “Stop Soros” bill, passed in June 2018, which criminalizes assistance to irregular migrants, among other things. However, organizations such as the HHC continue to provide legal aid to migrants and refugees. Many volunteers who worked with refugees in 2015 continue their volunteer activities, but in the absence of refugees in Hungary focused their efforts on the Roma or the homeless. In interviews the author conducted in spring 2019, they expressed that they stand ready should another group of asylum seekers arrive in Hungary.

    Acknowledgments

    This article was prepared using funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program under grant agreement No. 770330.

    Sources

    Atkinson, Mary. 2015. How a Hungarian Train Station Became a Hub for Refugees. Middle East Eye, September 6, 2015. Available online.

    Bimbi, Robert. 2011. Magyar Heat Pumping Magyar Blood: The Dynamics of Immigrant Reception in Post-Socialist Hungary. Doctoral Dissertation. Dallas, Texas: Southern Methodist University.

    Bursten, Martin A. 1958. Escape from Fear. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press.

    Frank, Tibor. 2016. Migration in Hungarian History. Part I. Hungarian Review 7 (1). Available online.

    Fullerton, Maryellen. 1996. Hungary, Refugees, and the Law of Return. International Journal of Refugee Law 8 (4): 499-531.

    Goździak, Elżbieta M. 1989. From East to East: Refugees from Rumania in Hungary. Migration World 5: 7-9.

    Goździak, Elżbieta M. and Péter Márton. 2018. Where the Wild Things Are: Fear of Islam and the Anti-Refugee Rhetoric in Hungary and in Poland. Central and Eastern European Migration Review, 7 (2): 125-51. Available online.

    Gyollai, Daniel and Anthony Amatrudo. 2019. Controlling Irregular Migration: International Human Rights Standards and the Hungarian Legal Framework. European Journal of Criminology 16 (4): 432-51.

    Hungarian Central Statistical Office. 2019. Asylum Seekers in Hungary and Persons Granted International Protection Status (2000-18). Updated March 8, 2019. Available online.

    Juhász, Judit. 2003. Hungary: Transit Country Between East and West. Migration Information Source, November 1, 2003. Available online.

    Kamm, Henry. 1992. Yugoslav Refugee Crisis Europe’s Worst Since 40s. The New York Times, July 24, 1992. Available online.

    Komócsin, Sándor. 2019. Magyar abszurd: menekülteket segít a kormány, de titkolja (Hungarian Absurd: The Government is Helping Refugees, but They Are Hiding). Napi.hu February 21, 2019. Available online.

    Ministry of Human Resources and Department of Aid and Assistance. 2015. Tájékoztató a Pénzbeli és Természetbeni Szociális Ellátásokat Érintő, 2015. Március 1-Jétől Hatályos Változásokról (Information on Changes in Cash and In-kind Social Benefits, Effective March 1, 2015). Official notice, Ministry of Human Resources and Department of Aid and Assistance. Available online.

    Pastor, Peter. 2016. The American Reception and Settlement of Hungarian Refugees in 1956-57. Hungarian Cultural Studies 9: 196-205.

    Patai, Raphael. 1996. The Jews of Hungary: History, Culture, Psychology. Detroit, Michigan: Wayne State University Press.

    Puskás, Julianna. 2000. Ties That Bind, Ties That Divide: 100 Years of Hungarian Experience in the United States. New York: Holmes and Meier.

    Simon, Zoltan. 2018. Hungary Should Repeal Immigration Tax, Rights Organizations Say. Bloomberg, December 14, 2018. Available online.

    Szakacs, Gergely. 2019. Hungary Accepts Hundreds of Refugees from Venezuela: Report. U.S. News & World Report. February 21, 2019. Available online.

    Than, Krisztina. 2018. Hungary Could Pass “Stop Soros” Law Within a Month After Re-Electing Viktor Orban’s Anti-Immigrant Government. The Independent, April 9, 2018. Available online.

    UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). 2016. Hungary as a Country of Asylum. Observations on Restrictive Legal Measures and Subsequent Practice Implemented between July 2015 and March 2016. UNHCR, Geneva, May 2016. Available online.

    Wallis, Emma. 2019. Starving in Hungary’s Transit Zones. InfoMigrants, April 23, 2019. Available online.

    Wikimedia Commons. 2009. Kingdom of Hungary, 1370-87. Accessed October 8, 2019. Available online.

    Zsoldos, Attila. 2015. Kóborlás az Árpád-kori Magyarországon (Roaming in Hungary in the Age of Árpád). In … in nostra lingua Hringe nominant. Tanulmányok Szentpéteri József 60. születésnapja tiszteletére, eds. Csilla Balogh, et al. Budapest: Kecskeméti Katona József Múzeum.

    https://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/orban-reshapes-migration-policy-hungary

    #réfugiés #asile #migrations #Hongrie #xénophobie #anti-réfugiés #islamophobie #société_civile #solidarité #zones_de_transit #nourriture #camps_de_réfugiés #peur #histoire #milices #frontières #fermeture_des_frontières

    ping @isskein

  • Chef cuisinier soixante-six heures par semaine, payées 1 700 euros. / Cuisiniers, intérimaires, femmes de ménage... Une centaine de travailleurs sans papiers en grève en Ile-de-France, Julia Pascual
    https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2019/10/01/une-centaine-de-travailleurs-sans-papiers-en-greve_6013793_3224.html


    Au KFC de la place d’Italie, à Paris, le 1er octobre. KAMIL ZIHNIOGLU POUR « LE MONDE »

    Ils travaillent pour KFC, Léon de Bruxelles ou dans le bâtiment. Plus d’une centaine de #travailleurs_sans_papiers de Paris et sa banlieue ont entamé une #grève mardi pour réclamer leur régularisation.

    Ils sont stewards chez KFC, plongeurs ou cuisiniers chez Léon de Bruxelles ou dans une brasserie chic du 16e arrondissement de Paris, femmes et hommes de ménage dans un hôtel Campanile, un cinéma UGC ou un foyer pour migrants, intérimaires dans le bâtiment…
    Ils sont plus d’une centaine et, mardi 1er octobre, ils ont entamé une grève dans douze entreprises. Leur point commun : tous sont des travailleurs sans papiers à Paris et dans sa banlieue et réclament leur #régularisation.

    Au moment où la préparation du débat parlementaire sur l’immigration – qui se tiendra lundi 7 octobre à l’Assemblée nationale – cible les risques d’abus du système de protection sociale ou de détournement de la demande d’asile, ces hommes et ces femmes, Maliens, Sénégalais et Mauritaniens, mais aussi Togolais ou Ghanéens, rappellent qu’ils « cotis[ent] et contribu[ent] au système de solidarité nationale et de Sécurité sociale ».

    « Contrairement à ce que dit la stigmatisation qui a cours, ils sont créateurs de richesse et de développement, martèle Marilyne Poulain, membre de la direction confédérale CGT et pilote du collectif immigration CGT, qui soutient le mouvement. Il faut redonner une visibilité à cette réalité-là. ». Contrats à durée déterminée (CDD) à répétition, heures supplémentaires non payées, temps de travail inférieur au minimum légal… Beaucoup de ces travailleurs en grève ont aussi des « conditions [de travail] dégradées, voire indignes du fait de leur situation administrative et de leur vulnérabilité », fait remarquer Mme Poulain.

    Payés de la main à la main
    « Ce sont les intérimaires qui déchargent les camions, constate Jean-Albert Guidou, de la CGT départementale, à propos des salariés de Haudecœur, une entreprise d’importation de produits alimentaires de La Courneuve (Seine-Saint-Denis), où une dizaine de personnes se sont mises en grève. A la fin de la journée, ils doivent avoir porté autour d’une tonne. C’est l’exemple classique d’une entreprise où on met les intérimaires, a fortiori sans-papiers, sur les postes difficiles avec des risques pour la #santé. »

    Au restaurant japonais New Sukiyaki, en plein quartier touristique et festif de la Bastille, à Paris, Abdourahmane Guiro, 27 ans, embauche six jours sur sept, à raison d’une cinquantaine d’heures par semaine. « Je suis payé 1 500 euros, explique ce Sénégalais. Mais sur le bulletin, c’est affiché 1 100 euros. » Le reste, il le touche de la main à la main. Son collègue Yacouba Dia, 27 ans lui aussi, et chef de cuisine, travaille soixante-six heures par semaine, payées 1 700 euros.

    Dans les restaurants #KFC de la place d’Italie ou de Tolbiac (13e arrondissement), de Boulogne-Billancourt (Hauts-de-Seine), de Vitry-sur-Seine ou du Kremlin-Bicêtre (Val-de-Marne), les « employés polyvalents » et sans-papiers aimeraient bien, eux, faire davantage d’heures.
    La durée minimale de travail du salarié à temps partiel est fixée à 24 heures par semaine mais Mahamadou Diakite ne travaille que vingt heures et Mamadou Niakate travaille, lui, quinze heures, tout comme son collègue Boubou Doukoure. « Parfois, on travaille plus, assure ce Malien de 34 ans. Mais on n’est pas payé. Le patron nous dit qu’on a mal compté nos heures. »

    « Les employeurs font écrire une décharge aux salariés pour qu’ils disent que c’est eux qui ne veulent pas travailler au minimum légal », ajoute Kande Traoré qui, lui, culmine à vingt-huit heures par semaine. « Les gens sont dociles alors ils en profitent, s’indigne Boubacar Doucoure, délégué CGT pour l’enseigne KFC. Il y a dix ans de cela, j’étais comme vous, dit-il en s’adressant à ses collègues. J’étais dans la peur. »

    Boubacar Doucoure est aujourd’hui manager et en situation régulière en France, après avoir fait grève en 2008. « Entre 2000 et 2008, j’ai travaillé sans papiers. J’ai cotisé, j’ai payé des impôts. Et pourtant, je n’aurai jamais de retraite », fait-il remarquer. Quand il entend le discours ambiant qui tend à assimiler les migrants à de potentiels resquilleurs, ça le « révolte ».

    « On a peur d’être virés »
    La plupart des salariés en grève ont été embauchés sous alias, c’est-à-dire en présentant des documents d’identité d’une personne en situation régulière. « Un frère m’a fait une photocopie de sa carte de séjour, de sa carte Vitale et d’une attestation d’hébergement et j’ai amené ça au patron qui m’a fait un contrat à durée indéterminée (CDI), explique Mamadou Niakate. Au travail, on m’appelle Diaby. » Son collègue Mahamadou Diakite arbore, lui, un badge au nom de Mantia.
    Quand un travailleur sans papiers veut entamer des démarches de régularisation auprès d’une préfecture, il a besoin – pour remplir les critères d’admission exceptionnelle au séjour – que son employeur établisse un #certificat_de_concordance_d’identités et, dans tous les cas, qu’il remplisse un formulaire Cerfa de demande d’autorisation d’embauche d’un salarié étranger non-européen. « On n’ose pas demander parce qu’on a peur d’être viré », confie Moussa Diakite, un Malien de 44 ans qui travaille dans la démolition via la société d’intérim Cervus, basée à Levallois-Perret (Hauts-de-Seine).

    C’est peu ou prou ce qui est arrivé à Boubou Doukoure. Pendant sept mois, il a travaillé en CDD dans un abattoir de Lorient (Morbihan). Il accrochait des poulets sur une ligne d’abattage. Lorsque son employeur a voulu lui faire un CDI et qu’il s’est rendu compte de sa situation, il l’a congédié sur le champ.

    Moussa Diakite dit avoir « plusieurs fois essayé de demander une régularisation » en déposant un dossier en préfecture. Sans succès.
    « Ces travailleurs sont soumis à un double arbitraire, patronal et préfectoral », souligne Maryline Poulain. Moussa Diakite s’est mis en grève pour la première fois de sa vie. Il craint un « durcissement des conditions » de vie des immigrés, lui qui se sent déjà « limité dans [ses] #libertés » et « réduit dans [ses] déplacements ». En seize ans de présence en France, il n’est retourné qu’une seule fois au Mali, où il a une femme et deux enfants.

    Sollicitées mardi 1er octobre, plusieurs entreprises concernées par le mouvement de grève n’avaient pas souhaité faire de déclaration au Monde. Certaines se sont rapidement engagées à accompagner leurs salariés dans leur démarche de régularisation, conduisant à la levée, mardi soir, de trois des douze piquets de grève.


    Au KFC de place d’Italie, à Paris, le 1er octobre. KAMIL ZIHNIOGLU POUR « LE MONDE »

    #intérim #travail #économie #luttes_sociales #salaire #conditions_de_travail #xénophobie_d'État #liberté_de_circulation #liberté_d'installation

  • Ce tweet, m’a donné envie de mettre ici les affiches dans lesquels le parti #UDC en #Suisse (mais pas que eux) utilise des images d’#animaux pour ses campagnes électorales...


    https://twitter.com/mathieuvonrohr/status/1178256562923692037
    En cette année 2019 c’est donc le #octopus qui est l’animal fétiche...
    #poulpe #pieuvre

    Il fut un temps il y a eu :
    des #requins...

    des #corbeaux :

    ... et évidemment des #moutons (noirs) :

    Et au #Tessin, un groupe probablement financé soit par l’UDC ou alors par la #Lega_dei_Ticinesi, avait utilisé des #rats...

    #affiche #campagne #animal #invasion #migrations #xénophobie #immigration_de_masse

    Pour celleux qui veulent en savoir un peu plus sur ce type de campagnes qui tapissent la Suisse, un article que j’avais écrit pour @visionscarto :
    En Suisse, pieds nus contre rangers


    https://visionscarto.net/en-suisse-pieds-nus-contre-rangers

  • Rollstuhlfahrer aus Libyen angegriffen

    In Chemnitz ist ein libyscher Rollstuhlfahrer attackiert und leicht verletzt worden. Der Tatverdächtige ist der Polizei wegen rechtsmotivierter Straftaten bekannt. Das Dezernat Staatsschutz ermittelt in dem Fall.

    https://www.spiegel.de/panorama/justiz/chemnitz-rollstuhlfahrer-aus-libyen-angegriffen-a-1287159.html
    #Allemagne #racisme #xénophobie #extrême_droite #attaques_racistes #réfugiés #anti-réfugiés #migrations #asile #Chemnitz
    ping @_kg_

  • Ouhhh, le coup de « ne pas être “un parti bourgeois” » sur « le sujet de l’immigration », y’en a vraiment qui osent tout, là. Y’a du pubard qu’a phosphoré…
    https://www.francetvinfo.fr/politique/emmanuel-macron/emmanuel-macron-veut-regarder-le-sujet-de-l-immigration-en-face-et-ne-p

    Emmanuel Macron veut regarder le sujet de l’immigration « en face » et demande à la majorité de ne pas être « un parti bourgeois »

    • Behind the #Johannesburg riots: How did they happen?

      The latest outbreak of mob violence and xenophobia was allegedly orchestrated by members of the All Truck Drivers Forum (ATDF), which held mass meetings that went into last weekend in different parts of Gauteng.

      The Mail & Guardian has reliably learned that intelligence agencies — which sent a briefing note last week Friday to the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security cluster (JCPS), chaired by Defence Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula — have been investigating the forum’s involvement.

      The cluster consists of the ministries of police, home affairs, state security, justice and constitutional development, as well as the National Prosecuting Authority.

      High-ranking security officials have also discussed the political motivations behind the flare-up in violence, with theories that the violence was part of a campaign to embarrass and ultimately destabilise the presidency of Cyril Ramaphosa.

      Despite the intelligence and warnings, these parts of the cluster failed to prevent the violent attacks and the burning and looting of shops in Jeppestown on Sunday night and into Monday morning.

      On Monday, the violence spread to parts of central Johannesburg and Alexandra, as well as Boksburg and Thokoza on the East Rand. Shops, cars and other buildings were set on fire. More than 400 arrests have been made since.

      In parts of KwaZulu-Natal, freight trucks were attacked and set alight.
      Drivers found to be foreign nationals were also assaulted.

      ATDF, which purports to represent only South African truck drivers, has dismissed the intelligence, saying that its organisation is anti-violence. Its spokesperson, Sipho Zungu, said on Thursday: “When this latest violence started on Monday we were in court, so there is no way this was us. ATDF has never even had a strike, let alone [engaged in] violence [and] looting. The nation is being misled here.

      “What needs to be clarified is that ATDF is fighting for all truck drivers in the country, no matter if they work or not.” He went on to add: “The reality is that South African truck drivers no longer have jobs, and we have been engaging truck owners and government that they must get rid of foreign truck drivers.”

      This kind of sentiment, and existing tensions, were worsened by political rhetoric around access to healthcare and unemployment before the elections. It reached boiling point last month, when police operations in Johannesburg to find fake goods were thwarted by shopkeepers, who pelted law-enforcement authorities with rocks, forcing a retreat.

      Public reaction to this took on a xenophobic tinge, with some South Africans blaming foreign nationals for a host of problems — from the proliferation of drugs and fake goods, to crime and filth in inner-city Johannesburg.

      Information shared with the JCPS cluster last Friday indicated that meetings to discuss strategy and co-ordinate attacks on foreign nationals were to scheduled to take place this past weekend. The meetings were to be held at venues in different parts of Gauteng, including the Mzimhlophe grounds in Soweto, Alexandra at Pan taxi rank, Randburg taxi rank, Ezibayeni in Hillbrow and Part Two, Diepsloot.

      Foreign nationals also held their own meetings over the weekend, and discussed how to protect themselves against potential attacks.

      The M&G understands that the government was concerned that foreign nationals could retaliate violently, which might escalate matters. A source in the JCPS cluster said: “If action was taken and those meetings disrupted, what happened on Sunday evening would not have happened.”

      Now, Police Minister Bheki Cele has been forced to react after the fact. He has focused on the hostels this week and has had several meetings with iinduna to try to quell the unrest.

      Cele’s office announced he would also be hosting imbizo, to be attended by residents, as well as local, provincial and national politicians, at the Jeppe hostel on Sunday.

      Cele’s spokesperson, Lirandzu Themba, said: “Izinduna who met with Minister Cele have assured the Gauteng Saps [South African Police Service] management that hostel dwellers have been urged to refrain from acts of violence leading up to the imbizo, planned for Sunday.”

      Themba also said Cele had briefed Ramaphosa on the latest situation in Johannesburg on Monday, after a visit to Jeppe hostel. “There was a Cabinet meeting where this issue was discussed and brought to the attention of all ministers, including those in the JCPS cluster.”

      “The JCPS cluster and various operational structures have been meeting and engaging continuously during the past weeks — and in some instances on a daily basis,” she said.

      News of the imbizo has not been well received by all in the hostel. Nduna Manyathela Mvelase, who met with Cele during his visit, said: “It’s almost as if they are saying ‘It’s the hostels and the Zulu people that are responsible for this.’”

      “It was unfortunate that a fire started not too far from here on Sunday and people died. At the same time, some criminals took advantage of that fire, and now it looks as if this started here,” he said. “This started in Pretoria and there are no hostels there … All our children are unemployed and on drugs.”

      The government and the presidency’s slowness to get a handle on the situation has prompted severe criticism from observers, as well as heads of state across the continent.

      Two former government officials expressed surprise that the JCPS had not met by Wednesday or made any public statements.

      One said: “By now you should have been seeing all the different ministers visible on the ground … The fact that Nigeria’s president [Muhammadu Buhari] was even tweeting disinformation [that Nigerians were killed in the violence] means there could have been no information from our government to affected embassies.

      “When government is this silent it becomes easy for the situation to escalate,” he added.

      Department of international relations and co-operation (Dirco) spokesperson Clayson Monyela said on Wednesday that the department would try and secure meetings with consulates and high commissions of affected nationalities by today.

      “Dirco has not received any official complaint or inquiry from an embassy. However, we are maintaining regular contact with the diplomatic corps to update them on government’s measures and interventions to deal with the spate of violence,” he said.

      Johan Burger, a senior research er at the Institute for Security Studies, said he was extremely disappointed that Ramaphosa had remained silent about the attacks until Wednesday.

      “I say, very reluctantly, that South Africa is at fault in terms of how it handled this issue from the top. I’m extremely disappointed that it took so long to say something,” Burger said. “He should have spoken to his security cluster ministers and asked what was happening and given instruction and direction.”

      A senior government official suggested Ramaphosa was being let down by his Cabinet, particularly in the JCPS cluster, which met for the first time on Wednesday. “Not once in the former president’s tenure would so much time pass before security cluster ministers meet and strategise. Not once.”

      The Nigerian government took a harsh tone this week, saying it would not tolerate any more attacks on its citizens, and deployed envoys to meet Ramaphosa, whose public statement condemning the attacks was issued only on Tuesday, to discuss the situation.

      On Wednesday the Nigerian presidency announced that Nigerian airline Air Peace airlines would send an aircraft today to evacuate any of its citizens who wished to leave South Africa. Yesterday, South Africa shut down its embassy in Lagos and several South African businesses in that country were attacked and looted.

      https://mg.co.za/article/2019-09-06-00-behind-the-johannesburg-riots-how-did-they-happen

    • South African Riots Over ‘Xenophobia’ Prompt Backlash Across Africa

      Pop stars have announced a #boycott. Air Tanzania has suspended flights to Johannesburg. #Madagascar and Zambia are refusing to send their soccer teams. Nigeria has recalled its ambassador and pulled out of a major economic forum.

      South Africa is facing a backlash after rioters in and around Johannesburg targeted immigrants from other African countries this week, torching their shops and leading to at least 10 deaths. Now, angry citizens and governments across the continent are lashing out at South Africa and its businesses, denouncing what they call “xenophobia.”

      Africans across the continent once rallied behind South Africans in their struggle to defeat the apartheid government, which was finally replaced in elections held 25 years ago. Now, some Africans find themselves in the unfamiliar position of protesting the actions of the same communities in South Africa that they once stood with in solidarity.

      “The only time we’ve seen this type of cooperation of African countries in terms of backlash,” said Tunde Leye, a partner at the Nigerian political research firm SBM Intelligence, “was in terms of support of the anti-apartheid movement.”
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      The current level of political solidarity on the continent, he said, was “almost unprecedented.”

      The riots, and the retaliatory measures, could not come at a more inopportune time for regional cooperation. This week, African leaders are meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, to discuss the African Continental Free Trade Area, an agreement made this year that sets the stage for the creation of the largest free-trade area in the world. It would join Africa’s more than one billion consumers into a single market.

      The conflict, while not likely to imperil the free trade agreement, could at least slow its implementation, which is expected to take years, African analysts said.

      Nigeria’s government, angry that its citizens have been victimized in the South African riots, has pulled out of the Cape Town meeting.

      Nigeria is the continent’s largest economy, and South Africa is the second-largest. Both countries were already reluctant participants in the accord, which is supposed to help knock down the many barriers to trade among African countries.

      Anti-immigrant sentiment is a longstanding issue in South Africa, where the legacies of colonialism and apartheid run deep, and a political shift has not delivered meaningful change to many poor South Africans. Immigrants from countries like Nigeria, Mozambique, Somalia and Zimbabwe are often regarded by South Africans as competitors for jobs and social services.

      In South Africa, attacks on foreigners have become common, and they surged beginning Sunday when rioters stormed neighborhoods in and around Johannesburg, lighting fires and breaking into shops.

      At least 10 people have died in the riots, President Cyril Ramaphosa said in a video address on Thursday, in which he also condemned the violence.

      “There can be no excuse for the attacks on the homes and businesses of foreign nationals,” he said. “Equally, there is no justification for the looting and destruction of businesses owned by South Africans.”

      In Gauteng, the province that includes Johannesburg, authorities have arrested at least 423 people, said Colonel Lungelo Dlamini, a police spokesman. On Thursday, he said that many shops owned by foreigners remained closed and that more shopping centers in the eastern part of the province “are being targeted.”

      Police seized guns, he said, not just from South Africans, but also from at least two foreign nationals.
      Editors’ Picks
      Life Is Imitating Stephen King’s Art, and That Scares Him
      The Gospel According to Marianne Williamson
      Bella Thorne, the Ex-Disney Star, Chillaxes With Yarn

      The rolling backlash has united broad swaths of the continent. Two popular Nigerian musicians, Burna Boy and Tiwa Savage, said they were boycotting South Africa. Burna Boy was set to headline the Afropunk festival in Johannesburg in December, alongside artists like Solange Knowles. Tiwa Savage had an appearance in South Africa scheduled for mid-September.

      On Tuesday and Wednesday, protesters rushed and sometimes looted South African-owned businesses in Nigeria and Zambia, including Shoprite supermarkets. The company closed stores. The South African telecommunications giant MTN did the same.

      On Thursday, the protests spread to the Democratic Republic of Congo, where demonstrators outside of the South African Embassy in Kinshasa held signs that read “Don’t kill our brothers” and “No xenophobia.” In Lubumbashi, they broke windows at the South African Consulate.

      Nigeria recalled its ambassador to South Africa. South Africa has shuttered its diplomatic missions in Nigeria, citing threats.

      The clashes cast a cloud over the World Economic Forum in Africa, which began in Cape Town on Wednesday. Leaders were set to discuss the free trade pact, an agreement signed by 54 countries that supporters have said could reshape economic relationships on the continent.

      The accord has the potential to bolster intra-African trade by 52 percent by 2022, according to the United Nations. Right now, intra-African trade accounts for just 16 percent of the continent’s trade volume. It can be cheaper to ship something from Nigeria to Europe, and then to Senegal, rather than directly from Nigeria to Senegal. This is a major barrier to regional development, economists say.

      Still, a host of challenges await before the pact is put in place.

      African analysts differed on whether Nigeria’s decision to skip the Cape Town meeting would have any effect in the long term.

      Gilbert Khadiagala, a Kenyan professor of international relations at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, said Nigeria’s move was little more than “grandstanding,” and that would not impede the trade agreement.

      But Mr. Leye, of SBM Intelligence in Nigeria, said that in his view, Nigeria’s boycott of the Forum “will have an impact in terms of the pace of implementation.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/05/world/africa/south-africa-xenophobia-riots.html
      #Zambie

  • France : Des enfants migrants privés de protection
    Human Rights Watch

    Le rapport de 80 pages, intitulé « ‘Ça dépend de leur humeur’ : Traitement des enfants migrants non accompagnés dans les Hautes-#Alpes », montre que les évaluateurs, dont le travail consiste à certifier la minorité d’un enfant, c’est-à-dire qu’il a moins de 18 ans, ne se conforment pas aux normes internationales. Human Rights Watch a constaté que les évaluateurs utilisent diverses justifications pour refuser d’octroyer une protection aux enfants, telles que des erreurs minimes de dates, une réticence à aborder dans le détail des expériences particulièrement traumatisantes, des objectifs de vie jugées irréalistes, ou encore le fait d’avoir travaillé dans le pays d’origine ou au cours du parcours migratoire.



    Vidéo https://www.hrw.org/fr/news/2019/09/05/france-des-enfants-migrants-prives-de-protection
    et rapport https://www.hrw.org/fr/report/2019/09/05/ca-depend-de-leur-humeur/traitement-des-enfants-migrants-non-accompagnes-dans-les
    #mineurs #MNA #frontière #refoulement #France #Italie #âge #réfugiés #asile #migrations #frontière_sud-alpine

    ping @cdb_77 @cede @isskein

    • Hautes-Alpes : HRW pointe des violations des droits des enfants migrants

      L’ONG Human Rights Watch publie ce jeudi 5 septembre un rapport sur la situation des mineurs migrants non accompagnés dans le département des #Hautes-Alpes, à la frontière franco-italienne. Basé sur une enquête auprès d’une soixantaine d’enfants et adolescents, essentiellement originaires de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, ce rapport dénonce de multiples violations aussi bien du droit français que des normes internationales de protection des #droits_des_enfants.

      Ils ont entre 15 et 18 ans. Victimes d’abus dans leurs pays d’origine, ils ont traversé la Méditerranée pour chercher refuge en Europe. Mal accueillis en Italie, ils tentent de passer en France, au risque d’être refoulés par la police aux frontières.

      « D’après ce que les enfants que nous avons interviewé nous ont raconté, quand il y a des renvois, ils sont souvent arbitraires et reposent souvent sur le bon vouloir d’un ou des agents. La conséquence, c’est que de nombreux enfants -pour éviter une interpellation- passent la frontière à travers la montagne dans des conditions extrêmement difficiles », explique Bénédicte Jeannerod de Human Rights Watch (HRW).

      Et quand ils arrivent à passer en France, ils ne sont pas au bout de leurs obstacles. La reconnaissance de la #minorité leur est souvent refusée. « Les procédures, telles qu’elles sont mises en oeuvre dans le département des Hautes-Alpes, sont extrêmement défectueuses, souligne encore Bénédicte Jeannerod. Par exemple, dans son entretien d’évaluation, l’enfant va être accusé de mentir ; ou alors il va donner beaucoup de détails sur son parcours et on va lui dire que c’est un signe de (sa) majorité... Tous les éléments donnés par l’enfant sont retournés contre lui et aboutissent à des rejets de minorité #arbitraire. »

      Human Rights Watch rappelle que la France a l’obligation de protéger tout migrant mineur et de lui assurer l’accès à l’hébergement, à l’éducation et à la santé.

      Les personnes aidant les migrants également ciblées

      HRW dénonce aussi le harcèlement policier à l’encontre des bénévoles humanitaires qui participent aux opérations de recherches et de sauvetages des migrants en montagne. « Ce ne sont pas des associations en particulier, ce sont vraiment les personnes qui mènent ce travail d’assistance et de secours en montagne et qui subissent des contrôles d’identité injustifiés, qui sont poursuivies par la justice ou alors qui vont voir leur véhicule fouillé de manière abusive », poursuit Bénédicte Jeannerod.

      Ce sont des #pratiques_policières qui dissuadent ces opérations qui peuvent être des opérations vitales et qui s’opposent à la dernière décision du Conseil constitutionnel qui considère « qu’une aide apportée à des migrants, même en situation irrégulière, ne peut pas être criminalisée ou sanctionnée tant que cette aide s’effectue dans un objectif humanitaire et qu’elle ne bénéficie pas de contrepartie. »

      Le Conseil constitutionnel a consacré l’an passé la valeur constitutionnelle du « principe de fraternité » en réponse précisément à une requête de plusieurs associations et particuliers dont Cédric Herrou, un agriculteur devenu le symbole de la défense des migrants de la vallée de la Roya (Alpes Maritimes), l’un des principaux points de passage des migrants arrivés en Europe par l’Italie.

      https://www.infomigrants.net/fr/post/19312/hautes-alpes-hrw-pointe-des-violations-des-droits-des-enfants-migrants

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVQjCoUTzPs


      #frontières #enfants #enfance #PAF #solidarité #délit_de_solidarité #maraudes_solidaires

      Le rapport en pdf:
      https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/france0919fr_web.pdf

    • Les militants promigrants dans les Hautes-Alpes harcelés par la police, selon HRW

      Contrôles d’identité, contraventions pour un prétexte fallacieux… Human Rights Watch déplore, dans un rapport, les manœuvres des forces de l’ordre pour « entraver les activités humanitaires ».

      « #Harcèlement » et « #intimidation », tels sont les outils de la police française pour « entraver les activités humanitaires » des militants venant en aide aux migrants à la frontière franco-italienne, affirme, dans un rapport publié jeudi 5 septembre, l’organisation non gouvernementale (ONG) Human Rights Watch (HRW).

      La publication, qui intervient une semaine après la condamnation de trois dirigeants de l’organisation d’extrême droite Génération identitaire pour une opération menée dans cette même région en 2018, documente également les refoulements de « mineurs non accompagnés » vers l’Italie.

      Lors de leurs maraudes, les bénévoles et militants associatifs sont régulièrement ciblés par des contrôles d’identité « abusifs », souligne le rapport, qui se focalise sur la situation dans les Hautes-Alpes.

      « Dans de nombreux cas, la police semble recourir à ces procédures de façon sélective, à des fins d’intimidation et de harcèlement ou pour entraver les activités humanitaires », poursuit l’ONG de défense des droits humains qui réclame une enquête sur ces pratiques. L’objectif, « c’est de leur mettre des bâtons dans les roues » et de « gêner leurs actions », résume pour l’Agence France-Presse (AFP) Bénédicte Jeannerod, directrice France chez HRW.
      « Le délit de solidarité continue d’être utilisé »

      « Systématiquement, lorsqu’on part en maraude à Montgenèvre [commune limitrophe de l’Italie], il y a des contrôles (…), souvent plusieurs fois dans la soirée », raconte un bénévole cité dans le rapport, qui porte sur une enquête menée entre janvier et juillet 2019.

      Contraventions pour un balai d’essuie-glace défectueux, une absence d’autocollant signalant des pneus cloutés… « Le délit de solidarité continue d’être utilisé », déplore Mme Jeannerod.

      Même si le pic de la crise migratoire est passé, en matière de flux, « la pression sur les militants continue de s’accentuer », confirme Laure Palun, codirectrice de l’Association nationale d’assistance aux frontières pour les étrangers (Anafé), qui a publié en début d’année un rapport sur la situation à la frontière franco-italienne.

      Légalement, l’aide à l’entrée, à la circulation ou au séjour irréguliers en France est passible d’une peine maximale de cinq ans d’emprisonnement et de 30 000 euros d’amende. En juillet 2018, le Conseil constitutionnel a jugé qu’un acte « humanitaire » ne pouvait pas faire l’objet de sanctions, sauf s’il est effectué dans le cadre d’une aide à l’entrée sur le territoire.

      Malgré cette décision, des poursuites continuent d’être engagées contre des personnes soutenant des migrants, déplore encore Human Rights Watch.

      https://www.lemonde.fr/societe/article/2019/09/05/les-militants-pro-migrants-dans-les-hautes-alpes-harceles-par-la-police-selo
      #mineurs_non_accompagnés

    • Il linguaggio dell’odio è stato ‘normalizzato’ e la manifestazione dell’odio è divenuta accettabile, secondo l’ultimo rapporto dell’#Ohchr

      Che la diffusione del linguaggio dell’odio sia un problema per l’Italia e dell’Italia ce lo dice l’ultimo Rapporto sulla missione dell’Alto commissario per i diritti umani delle Nazioni Unite nel nostro Paese, da poco pubblicato. Una missione incentrata proprio sulle questioni della discriminazione razziale e sull’incitamento all’odio. Il documento traccia un quadro preoccupante di un Paese, segnato nel 2018 da un forte incremento degli episodi di discriminazione e tuttora da una persistente mancanza di attenzione e di analisi del fenomeno nel suo complesso da parte delle istituzioni. A colpire è soprattutto il capitolo sull’incitamento all’odio razziale alla discriminazione e alla violenza. Nel Rapporto, l’Alto Commissariato delle Nazioni Unite evidenzia l’emergere di discorsi razzisti basati su stereotipi negativi contro i migranti, i musulmani, le persone di origine africana, le comunità rom, sinti e caminanti. E ciò avviene – si legge nel documento – soprattutto nei discorsi politici e nei media: a incoraggiare la crescita dell’intolleranza, dell’odio religioso e della xenofobia sono alcuni leader politici e talvolta gli stessi membri del Governo. Sicurezza e difesa dell’identità nazionale, sono le parole chiave di tali discorsi, che si fondano sulla criminalizzazione della migrazione e sul principio “prima gli italiani” di fronte alla crisi economica. Un modo – si legge nel Rapporto – per rendere la discriminazione razziale socialmente più accettabile. Le conseguenze sono evidenti: una escalation di «hate incidents» contro singoli o gruppi per motivi etnici, del colore della pelle, della razza o dello status di immigrato.

      Le stesse leggi, in alcuni casi – secondo il Rapporto dell’Alto Commissario ONU – contribuiscono a rafforzare tale clima, come nel caso del ‘decreto sicurezza’ che stabilisce una relazione tra immigrazione e sicurezza, «rafforzando in tale modo una percezione discriminante che stigmatizza e associa i migranti e le minoranze alla criminalità». Così come preoccupa la campagna contro le associazioni della società civile impegnate nelle operazioni di soccorso nel mare Mediterraneo, campagna che il documento definisce diffamatoria. Tutto ciò non può essere ricondotto a singoli casi. Il linguaggio dell’odio, riporta il documento, è stato ‘normalizzato’ e la manifestazione dell’odio è divenuta accettabile. Perché questo linguaggio è nello stesso tempo espressione ed elemento costruttore di culture diffuse. Ed è proprio sul piano culturale che occorre agire, restituendo significato alle parole, rimettendo al centro le persone, ognuna nella sua singolarità, ricordando che i diritti non sono mai dati una volta per tutte, ma vanno tutelati e rafforzati, va fatta memoria della sofferenza e delle battaglie che sono dietro alla loro conquista. La diffusione di una cultura dei diritti è uno dei terreni su cui si gioca la sfida della prevenzione e della tutela delle persone più vulnerabili. Un terreno su cui sono chiamati a contribuire tutti: le istituzioni pubbliche, le organizzazioni della società civile, il mondo della cultura e dei media. A cominciare dal linguaggio.

      https://www.cartadiroma.org/news/in-evidenza/lincitamento-allodio-razziale-e-un-problema-per-litalia-il-rapporto-onu
      #médias #presse

  • Violences xénophobes en Afrique du Sud : 7 (+ ?) personnes ont été tuées, des dizaines de magasins détruits et des camions brûlés. Les étrangers et leurs biens y sont (régulièrement) pris pour cible ces dernières années ; des représailles ont eu lieu au Nigéria. Des images horribles inondent les réseaux sociaux (dont certaines remontent à plusieurs années, attention aux manipulations) et il y aura sans doute un bilan plus dramatique... C’est absolument terrible.
    Plusieurs pays (Rwanda, RDC, Malawi) annulent leur participation au Forum économique mondial à Cape Town. Des stars internationales ont annulé leurs concerts en signe de boycott. Des appels tournent à manifester devant les ambassades d’Afrique du Sud un peu partout.

    Communiqué de la Ligue de Défense Noire Africaine trouvé sur twitter https://twitter.com/LDNAOFFICIEL/status/1168971327220453378

    La LDNA CONDAMNE vigoureusement les émeutes xénophobes inter-ethniques en Afrique du Sud,et dans les pays africains. Nous appelons la jeunesse africaine à des manifestations devant les ambassades d’Afrique du Sud en Afrique et dans la diaspora pour dire non à la XÉNOPHOBIE
    Ce n’est pas l’Afrique pour laquelle la LDNA lutte. Comme toute bonne chose, le fait tribal ne doit pas rendre xénophobe ; la xénophobie étant le côté mal aspecté du phénomène tribal. Et, il n’y a pas que les Bretons né à la Trinité-sur-Mer (comme JM Lepen) qui peuvent devenir xénophobes, ou ethnohiérarchistes, même des Zoulous peuvent le devenir. N’oublions pas que la XÉNOPHOBIE ne représente l’idéologie africaine donc se taire revient à cautionner. Cette fois donc en Afrique du Sud, ce n’est pas de racisme mais la xénophobie dont il s’agit, mais le problème n’est-il pas ailleurs ?Le problème n’est-il pas la pauvreté atavique des pauvres et la richesse endémique des riches ?
    Le problème n’est-il pas le résultat de 20 ans de gouvernance mutilée par le courage et la frilosité, ou mieux encore la cupidité des puissants ? Si nous ne soutenons pas le slogan des assassins d’Afrikaners : « Tuons le Boer, tuons le fermier Blanc », toutefois on ne peut appeler au pardon du crime et à la paix sociale sans qu’il y ait Justice.
    Nous la LDNA disons : « Sans équité pas de justice et donc pas de pardon » et si Mandela a été un artisan de la paix, nous considérons que son esprit travaillé par 27 ans d’enfermement a eu des conséquences sur son esprit. Certes certains diront que c’est un homme de transition qui a permis aux afrikaners de rester au pays et de préserver le pays de la guerre civile.
    Certes le PIB de l’Afrique du Sud est de $300 Milliards l’an passé.
    Certes Mandela n’a pas fait de son pays celui de Mugabe, le Zimbabwe autrefois pays le plus prospère d’Afrique, est aujourd’hui malheureusement, un des pays les plus pauvres du monde.
    Mais est-il normal que la transition soit si lente ? Est-il juste que seul quelques affairistes assoiffés de richesses comme l’actuel président-milliardaire Ramaphosa,s’accaparent les richesses du pays ?
    Peut-on se satisfaire de ces 20 ans de gouvernance capitaliste façon Mandela ?
    C’est pour marquer encore une fois notre désaccord et notre indignation que nous appelons toute la communauté à manifester : nous ne nous laisserons pas berner par l’iniquité et l’injustice au profit de quelques heureux riches qui manipulent.

  • #Fatou_Diome : « La rengaine sur la #colonisation et l’#esclavage est devenue un fonds de commerce »

    L’écrivaine franco-sénégalaise s’exprime sans filtre sur son enfance, l’immigration, le féminisme, ou la pensée « décoloniale » qui a le don de l’irriter…

    Fatou Diome écrit comme elle parle, avec fougue et sensibilité. Que ce soit dans ses romans ou dans ses prises de paroles publiques, l’auteure franco-sénégalaise use avec habileté de cette langue piquante qui frôle parfois la satire. Dans son premier roman à succès, Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (éd. Anne Carrière, 2003), elle donnait la parole à cette jeunesse sénégalaise piégée dans le désir d’Europe et ses mirages tragiques. Les œuvres de Fatou Diome offrent aussi une voix aux femmes, héroïnes du quotidien quand les maris migrent (Celles qui attendent, éd. Flammarion, 2010) ou disparaissent tragiquement, comme dans son nouveau roman, Les Veilleurs de Sangomar (éd. Albin Michel), en librairie le 22 août.

    Installée à Strasbourg depuis vingt-cinq ans, Fatou Diome observe et critique sa société d’origine et son pays d’accueil. En vingt ans de carrière, elle a publié une dizaine de romans, de nouvelles et un essai remarqué en 2017, Marianne porte plainte ! (éd. Flammarion), véritable pamphlet contre les discours identitaires, racistes, sexistes et islamophobes. Dans cet entretien, Fatou Diome s’exprime sans filtre sur son enfance aux marges, l’immigration, le féminisme, ou la pensée « décoloniale » qui a le don de l’irriter…
    D’où vient votre nom, Diome ?

    Fatou Diome Au Saloum, région située sur la côte sud du Sénégal, les Diome sont des Sérères-Niominkas, des Guelwaar. Il est dit que ce peuple était viscéralement attaché à sa liberté.
    Pourtant, écrivez-vous dans Le Ventre de l’Atlantique, votre nom suscitait la gêne à Niodior, votre village natal…

    Oui, car je suis née hors mariage d’un amour d’adolescents. A cette époque, j’étais la seule de l’île à porter ce nom car mon père est d’un autre village. Enfant, je ne comprenais pas pourquoi la simple prononciation de mon nom suscitait le mépris. J’ai compris plus tard que ce sentiment de gêne diffuse que je ressentais autour de moi venait du fait que j’étais supposée être « l’enfant du péché ».

    Cette ostracisation était d’autant plus injuste que l’idée « d’enfant illégitime » n’existait pas chez les Sérères animistes jusqu’au milieu du XIXe siècle et la domination des religions monothéistes. Jusque-là, au contraire, avoir un enfant des fiancés avant le mariage était le meilleur moyen de s’assurer que le prétendant était fertile. C’était même une tradition dans l’aristocratie sérère notamment, où la lignée était matrilinéaire. « Domou Djitlé », qui signifie « enfant illégitime », est une expression wolof, qui n’existe pas en sérère.
    Comment enfant affrontiez-vous cette marginalisation ?

    En renonçant à ceux qui me calomniaient. Cette indépendance m’est venue des conseils de mon grand-père maternel, un marin qui, dans l’Atlantique, devait sans cesse trouver des solutions. Je l’accompagnais souvent en mer. Quand le vent soufflait trop fort et que je pleurais, il me lançait : « Tu crois que tes pleurs vont nous ramener plus vite au village ? Allez, rame ! » C’est une leçon que j’ai retenue : les jérémiades ne sauvent de rien.
    A quel moment vous êtes-vous réappropriée votre nom ?

    A l’école. L’instituteur, qui était lui-même marginalisé car étranger, m’a expliqué le sens du diome : la dignité. C’était énorme ! La « bâtarde du village » était donc la seule à s’appeler dignité ! (Rires)

    Et puis un jour, j’ai rencontré mon père. C’était un homme adorable, un sculptural champion de lutte ! Ma mère avait eu de la chance d’aimer cet athlète magnifique ! Porter son nom est une fierté. Je suis le fruit d’un amour absolu, un amour souverain qui n’a demandé nulle permission aux faux dévots.
    Etre une enfant illégitime, c’était aussi risquer de ne pas survivre à la naissance…

    Oui et je dois la vie sauve à ma grand-mère maternelle, qui m’a accueillie au monde, dans tous les sens du terme. C’est elle qui a fait la sage-femme. Elle aurait pu m’étouffer à la naissance comme le voulait la tradition, mais elle a décidé de me laisser vivre et de m’élever. Elle me disait souvent que je n’étais pas illégitime mais légitimement vivante, comme tout enfant.
    Cette jeune grand-mère vous a allaitée. Quelle fut votre relation avec elle ?

    Très forte. Elle était et restera ma mamie-maman. Jusqu’à sa mort, je l’appelais Maman. Enfant, je dormais avec elle. Plus tard, j’insistais pour faire la sieste avec elle lors de mes visites. Comme un bébé, je gardais une main sur sa poitrine. Ma grand-mère, j’en suis convaincue, était la meilleure mère possible pour moi. Pardon pour l’autre dame…
    Votre mère…

    Oui. Avec elle, j’avais étrangement une relation de grande sœur. Et plus tard, je l’ai prise sous mon aile car j’étais plus combative et plus indépendante qu’elle. J’ai choisi ma vie, elle non. Et c’est pour cette raison que j’ai dit dans Le Ventre de l’Atlantique que « j’écris, pour dire et faire tout ce que ma mère n’a pas osé dire et faire ». Elle a par exemple subi la polygamie, une maladie que je n’attraperai jamais.
    Qu’aviez-vous à dire quand vous avez commencé à écrire à 13 ans ?

    Ecrire était une nécessité. Il me fallait comprendre pourquoi, par exemple, telle tante me câline devant mes grands-parents puis me traite de « bâtarde » en leur absence. L’écriture s’est imposée à l’âge de 13 ans, lorsque j’ai quitté le village pour poursuivre mes études en ville. Pour combler ma solitude, je noircissais des cahiers. Une fois, j’ai même réécrit Une si longue lettre de Mariama Bâ. Dans ma version vitaminée, les femmes n’étaient plus victimes de leur sort, mais bien plus combatives. J’aime celles qui dansent avec leur destin, sans renoncer à lui imposer leur tempo.

    Vous épousez ensuite un Alsacien et vous vous installez à Strasbourg. En France, vous découvrez une autre forme de violence, le racisme. Comment y avez-vous survécu ?

    En m’appropriant ce que je suis. J’ai appris à aimer ma peau telle qu’elle est : la couleur de l’épiderme n’est ni une tare ni une compétence. Je sais qui je suis. Donc les attaques des idiots racistes ne me blessent plus.
    Etre une auteure reconnue, cela protège-t-il du racisme ?

    Reconnue ? Non, car la réussite aussi peut déchaîner la haine. On tente parfois de m’humilier. C’est par exemple ce policier des frontières suspicieux qui me fait rater mon vol car il trouve douteux les nombreux tampons sur mon passeport, pourtant parfaitement en règle. Ou ce journaliste parisien qui me demande si j’écris seule mes livres vus leur structure qu’il trouve trop complexe pour une personne qui n’a pas le français comme langue maternelle. Ou encore cette femme qui, dans un hôtel, me demande de lui apporter une plus grande serviette et un Perrier… Le délit de faciès reste la croix des personnes non caucasiennes.
    La France que vous découvrez à votre arrivée est alors bien éloignée de celle de vos auteurs préférés, Yourcenar, Montesquieu, Voltaire…

    Cette France brillante, je l’ai bien trouvée mais on n’arrête pas de la trahir ! Il faut toujours s’y référer, la rappeler aux mémoires courtes. Cette France, elle est bien là. Seulement, les sectaires font plus de bruit. Il est temps que les beaux esprits reprennent la main !
    Qui la trahit, cette France ?

    Ceux qui lui font raconter le contraire de ce qu’elle a voulu défendre. Pour bien aimer la France, il faut se rappeler qu’elle a fait l’esclavage et la colonisation, mais qu’elle a aussi été capable de faire la révolution française, de mettre les droits de l’homme à l’honneur et de les disperser à travers le monde. Aimer la France, c’est lui rappeler son idéal humaniste. Quand elle n’agit pas pour les migrants et les exploite éhontément, je le dis. Quand des Africains se dédouanent sur elle et que des dirigeants pillent leur propre peuple, je le dis aussi. Mon cœur restera toujours attaché à la France, et ce même si cela m’est reproché par certains Africains revanchards.

    Vous vivez en France depuis 1994. Les statistiques officielles démontrent la persistance de discriminations en matière de logement ou de travail contre notamment des Français d’origine africaine dans les quartiers populaires. Que dites-vous à ces jeunes Noirs ?

    Qu’ils prennent leur place ! Vous savez, au Sénégal, un jeune né en province aura moins de chance de réussir que celui issu d’une famille aisée de la capitale. La différence, c’est qu’en France, cette inégalité se trouve aggravée par la couleur. Ici, être noir est une épreuve et cela vous condamne à l’excellence. Alors, courage et persévérance, même en réclamant plus de justice.
    Cette course à l’excellence peut être épuisante quand il faut en faire toujours plus…

    Si c’est la seule solution pour s’en sortir, il faut le faire. Partout, la dignité a son prix. On se reposera plus tard, des millénaires de sommeil nous attendent.

    Vous avez suivi une formation en lettres et philosophie à l’université de Strasbourg avec un intérêt particulier pour le XVIIIe siècle. Que pensez-vous des critiques portées par le courant de pensée « décoloniale » à l’égard de certains philosophes des Lumières ?

    Peut-on éradiquer l’apport des philosophes des Lumières dans l’histoire humaine ? Qui veut renoncer aujourd’hui à L’Esprit des lois de Montesquieu ? Personne. Les Lumières ont puisé dans la Renaissance, qui s’est elle-même nourrie des textes d’Averroès, un Arabe, un Africain. C’est donc un faux débat ! Au XVIIIe siècle, la norme était plutôt raciste. Or Kant, Montesquieu ou Voltaire étaient ouverts sur le monde. Ils poussaient déjà l’utopie des droits de l’homme. On me cite souvent Le Nègre du Surinam pour démontrer un supposé racisme de Voltaire. Quel contresens ! Ce texte est une ironie caustique. Voltaire dit à ses concitoyens : « C’est au prix de l’exploitation du nègre que vous mangez du sucre ! »

    Par ailleurs, chez tous les grands penseurs, il y a souvent des choses à jeter. Prenez l’exemple de Senghor. Sa plus grande erreur d’emphase et de poésie fut cette phrase : « L’émotion est nègre, la raison hellène. » Cheikh Anta Diop, bien qu’Africain, était un grand scientifique quand Einstein était doté d’une grande sensibilité. Cette citation est donc bête à mourir, mais devons-nous jeter Senghor aux orties ?

    On constate tout de même une domination des penseurs occidentaux dans le champ de la philosophie par exemple…

    Certaines choses sont universelles. Avec Le Vieil Homme et la mer, Hemingway m’a fait découvrir la condition humaine de mon grand-père pêcheur. Nous Africains, ne perdons pas de temps à définir quel savoir vient de chez nous ou non. Pendant ce temps, les autres n’hésitent pas à prendre chez nous ce qui les intéresse pour le transformer. Regardez les toiles de Picasso, vous y remarquerez l’influence des masques africains…
    Vous estimez donc que le mouvement de la décolonisation de la pensée et des savoirs, porté par un certain nombre d’intellectuels africains et de la diaspora, n’est pas une urgence ?

    C’est une urgence pour ceux qui ne savent pas encore qu’ils sont libres. Je ne me considère pas colonisée, donc ce baratin ne m’intéresse pas. La rengaine sur la colonisation et l’esclavage est devenue un fonds de commerce. Par ailleurs, la décolonisation de la pensée a déjà été faite par des penseurs tels que Cheikh Anta Diop, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor ou encore Frantz Fanon. Avançons, en traitant les urgences problématiques de notre époque.
    A l’échelle de la longue histoire entre l’Afrique et l’Occident, ce travail de décolonisation de la pensée, débuté il y a quelques décennies, n’est peut-être pas achevé ?

    Je pense, comme Senghor, que nous sommes à l’ère de la troisième voie. Nous, Africains, ne marchons pas seulement vers les Européens ; eux ne marchent pas que vers nous. Nous convergeons vers la même voie, la possible conciliation de nos mondes. La peur de vaciller au contact des autres ne peut vous atteindre quand vous êtes sûr de votre identité. Me concernant, ce troisième millénaire favorise la rencontre. Je sais qui je suis, je ne peux pas me perdre en Europe car, non seulement je récite mon arbre généalogique, mais je séjourne régulièrement dans mon village.

    Après tous les efforts de Senghor, Césaire, Fanon, en sommes-nous encore à nous demander comment nous libérer de l’esclavage et de la colonisation ? Pendant ce temps, où nous stagnons, les Européens envoient Philae dans l’espace… L’esclavage et la colonisation sont indéniablement des crimes contre l’humanité. Aujourd’hui, il faut pacifier les mémoires, faire la paix avec nous-mêmes et les autres, en finir avec la littérature de la réactivité comme le dit si bien l’historienne Sophie Bessis.
    Cette histoire dramatique, loin d’être un chapitre clos, continue pourtant de marquer le présent des Africains et les relations avec d’anciennes puissances coloniales…

    Pour moi, il y a plus urgent. La priorité, c’est l’économie. Faisons en sorte que la libre circulation s’applique dans les deux sens. Aujourd’hui, depuis l’Europe, on peut aller dîner à Dakar, sans visa. Le contraire est impossible ou alors le visa vous coûtera le salaire local d’un ouvrier. Pourquoi attendre une forme de réparation de l’Europe, comme un câlin de sa mère ? Pourquoi se positionner toujours en fonction de l’Occident ? Il nous faut valoriser, consommer et, surtout, transformer nos produits sur place. C’est cela l’anticolonisation qui changera la vie des Africains et non pas la complainte rance autour de propos tenus par un de Gaulle ou un Sarkozy.
    On sent que ce mouvement vous irrite…

    Je trouve qu’il y a une forme d’arrogance dans cette injonction et cette façon de s’autoproclamer décolonisateur de la pensée des autres. C’est se proclamer gourou du « nègre » qui ne saurait pas où il va. Je choisis mes combats, l’époque de la thématique unique de la négritude est bien révolue.
    Votre roman Le Ventre de l’Atlantique (2003) a été l’un des premiers à aborder le thème de la migration vers l’Europe. Que dites-vous à cette jeunesse qui continue de risquer sa vie pour rejoindre d’autres continents ?

    Je leur dirai de rester et d’étudier car, en Europe aussi, des jeunes de leur âge vivotent avec des petits boulots. Quand je suis arrivée en France, j’ai fait des ménages pour m’en sortir, après mon divorce. J’ai persévéré malgré les humiliations quotidiennes et les moqueries au pays.

    Si je suis écrivain, c’est parce que j’ai usé mes yeux et mes fesses à la bibliothèque. J’ai toujours écrit avec la même rigueur que je nettoyais les vitres. Aux jeunes, je dirai que l’école a changé ma vie, elle m’a rendue libre.
    La tentation est grande de partir vu le manque d’infrastructures dans de nombreux pays africains. Comment rester quand le système éducatif est si défaillant ?

    La responsabilité revient aux dirigeants. Ils doivent miser sur l’éducation et la formation pour garder les jeunes, leur donner un avenir. Il faudrait que les chefs d’Etat respectent plus leur peuple. Il n’y a qu’à voir le silence de l’Union africaine face au drame des migrants. Quand les dirigeants baissent la tête, le peuple rampe.
    Quel regard portez-vous sur le durcissement de la politique migratoire européenne ? Dernier acte en date, le décret antimigrants adopté par l’Italie qui criminalise les sauvetages en mer…

    L’Europe renforce sa forteresse. Mais qui ne surveillerait pas sa maison ? Les pays africains doivent sortir de leur inaction. Pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas, par exemple, de ministères de l’immigration dans nos pays ? C’est pourtant un problème majeur qui touche à l’économie, la diplomatie, la santé, la culture. Si l’Afrique ne gère pas la situation, d’autres la géreront contre elle. Elle ne peut plus se contenter de déplorer ce que l’Europe fait à ses enfants migrants.

    Vous avez écrit sur la condition féminine, le rapport au corps de la femme au Sénégal et la fétichisation dont vous avez été victime en France en tant que femme noire. Vous sentez-vous concernée par le mouvement #metoo ?

    Je comprends ce combat, mais je considère qu’Internet n’est pas un tribunal. Les femmes doivent habiter leur corps et leur vie de manière plus souveraine dans l’espace social et public. Il faut apprendre aux jeunes filles à s’armer psychologiquement face aux violences, par exemple le harcèlement de rue. Il faut cesser de se penser fragiles et porter plainte immédiatement en cas d’agression.
    La lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes revient aussi aux hommes…

    En apprenant aux femmes à habiter leur corps, à mettre des limites, on leur apprend aussi à éduquer des fils et des hommes au respect. Le féminisme, c’est aussi apprendre aux garçons qu’ils peuvent être fragiles, l’agressivité n’étant pas une preuve de virilité, bien au contraire. Me concernant, malgré la marginalisation à laquelle j’ai été confrontée, je ne me suis jamais vécue comme une femme fragile, ni otage de mon sexe, mes grands-parents m’ayant toujours traitée à égalité avec les garçons.
    Vous sentez-vous plus proche du féminisme dit universaliste ou intersectionnel ?

    Je me bats pour un humanisme intégral dont fait partie le féminisme. Mon féminisme défend les femmes où qu’elles soient. Ce qui me révolte, c’est le relativisme culturel. Il est dangereux d’accepter l’intolérable quand cela se passe ailleurs. Le cas d’une Japonaise victime de violences conjugales n’est pas différent de celui d’une habitante de Niodior ou des beaux quartiers parisiens brutalisée. Lutter pour les droits humains est plus sensé que d’essayer de trouver la nuance qui dissocie. Mais gare à la tentation d’imposer sa propre vision à toutes les femmes. L’essentiel, c’est de défendre la liberté de chacune.

    https://www.lemonde.fr/afrique/article/2019/08/25/fatou-diome-la-rengaine-sur-la-colonisation-et-l-esclavage-est-devenue-un-fo

    #interview #féminisme #racisme #approche_décoloniale #post-colonialisme #décolonialisme #pensée_décoloniale #xénophobie #migrations #émigration #discrimination #décolonisation_de_la_pensée #Afrique #Senghor #Césaire #Fanon #libre_circulation #anticolonisation #féminisme #humanisme_#intégral #relativisme_culturel #droits_humains #liberté

    • Quelques perles quand même:

      L’Europe renforce sa forteresse. Mais qui ne surveillerait pas sa maison ?

      Il faut apprendre aux jeunes filles à s’armer psychologiquement face aux violences, par exemple le harcèlement de rue. Il faut cesser de se penser fragiles et porter plainte immédiatement en cas d’agression.

      déçu...

    • @sinehebdo, j’ajouterais :

      C’est une urgence pour ceux qui ne savent pas encore qu’ils sont libres. Je ne me considère pas colonisée, donc ce baratin ne m’intéresse pas. La rengaine sur la colonisation et l’esclavage est devenue un fonds de commerce. Par ailleurs, la décolonisation de la pensée a déjà été faite par des penseurs tels que Cheikh Anta Diop, Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor ou encore Frantz Fanon. Avançons, en traitant les urgences problématiques de notre époque.

      Mais celle-ci par contre est selon moi au coeur des politiques xénophobes que l’Europe et les pays qui la composent mettent en oeuvre :

      La #peur de vaciller au contact des autres ne peut vous atteindre quand vous êtes sûr de votre #identité.

  • Grèce : le gouvernement conservateur relance la #chasse_aux_réfugiés

    À peine arrivé aux affaires, le nouveau Premier ministre conservateur Kyriakos #Mitsotakis veut renforcer les contrôles aux frontières et accélérer la déportation des réfugiés présents dans les îles grecques vers la Turquie. À #Athènes, les #contrôles_au_faciès musclés se multiplient. Les ONG sont très inquiètes.

    Les mots ont leur importance, surtout dans un pays où plus d’un million d’hommes et de femmes ont débarqué sur les îles de la mer Egée. Avant l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aléxis Tsípras, en 2015, les politiques grecs ne parlaient jamais de « réfugiés » mais systématiquement de « clandestins ». Le gouvernement Syriza a été le premier à instaurer un ministère de l’Immigration pour répondre à la problématique des quelques 60 000 réfugiés vivant en Grèce, souvent dans des conditions très difficiles.

    Dès son arrivée au pouvoir, après les élections du 7 juillet, le nouveau Premier ministre conservateur Kyriákos Mitsotákis a remis en cause cette politique d’accueil, en supprimant ce ministère et en attribuant le dossier de l’immigration au ministère de la Protection du citoyen, qui gère également l’ordre public, les questions sécuritaires et les forces de l’ordre... Dans les rangs de l’opposition de gauche mais aussi des associations de défense des droits de la personne, la décision choque. « Inclure l’immigration et la gestion des institutions pénitentiaires dans le même ministère de la Protection des citoyens m’inquiète. Cela signifie que le gouvernement considère tous ces sujets par le seul prisme de la répression », a notamment dénoncé sur Twitter l’ancien maire socialiste d’Athènes Giorgos Kaminis.

    Onze ONG et collectifs de défense des droits de la personne ont aussi tiré la sonnette d’alarme le 19 juillet dans un communiqué commun. « L’asile et les migrations ne sont pas une question d’ordre public et de sécurité mais une question relative à la protection internationale, à l’intégration social et au droit. Les réfugiés et migrants font partie de la société grecque et ne doivent pas être considérés comme une menace à l’ordre public. Les définir ainsi revient à les stigmatiser et à les exposer à des comportements violents et racistes. »

    Durant la campagne électorale, Kyriakos Mitsotakis avait promis de « renforcer les contrôles aux frontières », et de « distinguer les demandeurs d’asile qui peuvent prétendre au statut de réfugiés et rester en Grèce des autres, qui doivent être renvoyés en Turquie ». Dans le programme du nouveau Premier ministre, on ne trouve aucune mention d’une politique d’intégration. Le ministre du Travail a d’ailleurs annulé dès sa nomination un décret permettant aux réfugiés et aux immigrés d’obtenir facilement un numéro de sécurité sociale, indispensable pour avoir accès aux hôpitaux et aux écoles.

    « C’est une mesure raciste », s’est offusqué le mouvement antiraciste KEERFA. « On va limiter l’accès des personnes pauvres, des femmes, des enfants réfugiés, des handicapés aux hôpitaux, aux écoles et à tous les services publics », dénonce KEERFA, qui appelle le gouvernement à revenir sur cette décision. L’exécutif avait promis de publier un nouveau décret sur la question mais un mois plus tard, cela ne semble toujours pas d’actualité. Une autre mesure fait polémique : l’attribution d’une allocation familiale de 2000 euros pour tout enfant né en Grèce mais avec la condition que l’un des deux parents soit grec !

    Le retour des mauvais jours

    Dans le centre d’Athènes, où résident de nombreux réfugiés et immigrés, les contrôles policiers se sont renforcés depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir de Kyriakos Mitsotakis. 130 policiers d’une #brigade_spéciale appelée les #Black_Panthers mènent des #contrôles_d’identité dans le métro et dans les rues. L’ONG Human Right Watch (HRW) s’inquiète « d’un retour aux mauvais jours ». En effet, en 2012, des milliers d’immigrés étaient contrôlés, arrêtés et détenus de façon injustifiée et souvent victimes de violences dans les commissariats d’Athènes. HRW réclame un encadrement légal de ces contrôles qui ne peuvent pas être menés sur des critères discriminants. L’ONG demande aussi une formation spéciale pour les policiers de cette brigade.

    Le Haut Commissariat aux Réfugiés des Nations Unies (UNHCR) a enregistré l’entrée en Grèce de quelque 18 400 réfugiés et migrants au premier trimestre 2019, de plus en plus de personnes passant par la frontière terrestre de l’Evros avec la Turquie : 72% des arrivées ont été enregistrées à cette frontière. Les ONG s’inquiètent d’un durcissement de la politique migratoire et des consignes données aux forces de l’ordre. Début juillet, 59 réfugiés ont été victimes de pushbacks vers la Turquie : ils ont été renvoyés de force sur l’autre rive de l’Evros, note Refugee support Aegean.

    Le contexte actuel en Turquie demande pourtant de prendre des précautions particulièrement importantes avant de renvoyer des migrants dans ce pays, comme le prévoit l’accord signé en mars 2016 entre l’Union européenne et la Turquie. Le Conseil grec pour les réfugiés et 26 autres ONG rappellent que « plus de 6000 réfugiés et migrants ont été récemment arrêtés à Istanbul », pour être renvoyés à la frontière voire en Syrie même, notamment dans des zones de guerre proches d’Idlib.

    « Nous appelons l’UE et les États membres à reconnaître que la Turquie n’est pas apte à fournir la protection nécessaire aux réfugiés selon la Convention de 1951 sur le statut des réfugiés, à cesser en conséquence tout renvoi vers la Turquie et à suspendre l’accord de mars 2016 », écrivent ces organisations dans un communiqué publié début août. Les mois prochains, les ONG suivront de près et avec inquiétude la politique migratoire du gouvernement, notamment la situation tragique sur les îles de la mer Egée où des milliers de réfugiés continuent de s’entasser dans des conditions atroces.

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=Gr%C3%A8ce+%3A+le+gouvernement+conservateur+rela
    #chasse_aux_migrants #migrations #asile #réfugiés #violences_policières #racisme #xénophobie #police #contrôles_policiers

    #2019_comme_2012 —> pour rappel, article que j’avais écrit en 2012 pour @lacite et @visionscarto :
    À Athènes, (sur)vivre dans la terreur


    https://visionscarto.net/a-athenes-survivre

    • Greece: Athens Police Plan Raises Fears of Abuse

      Past Sweeps Led to Indiscriminate Crackdown on Marginalized Groups.

      The Greek government’s new policing plan for central Athens sounds like a return to the bad old days.

      It includes an operation called “Operation Net” that will see some 130 armed police officers, incongruously dubbed the “Black Panthers,” patrolling metro stations in Athens.

      Given Greece’s history of abusive police sweeps, Operation Net sounds alarm bells about a possible new wave of human rights violations by the police in the capital.

      A 2012 crackdown in Athens known as Operation Xenios Zeus led to police detaining tens of thousands of people presumed to be irregular migrants solely on the basis of their appearance, violating human rights law. People who appeared to be foreigners were subject to repeated stops, unjustified searches of their belongings, insults, and, in some cases, physical abuse.

      In research I conducted for Human Rights Watch in 2014 and 2015, I found police used identity checks as a tool to harass people they consider undesirable, such as people who use drugs, sell sex, or people who are homeless. In many cases, the police confined people in police buses and police stations for hours, even though there was no reasonable suspicion of criminal wrongdoing, and then sometimes transported them elsewhere and released them far from Athens’ center.

      Greece has a duty to improve security on the streets for everyone. But the Greek authorities also have an obligation to ensure they don’t abuse people’s rights in the process. That requires appropriately circumscribed police stop-and-search powers with clear and binding guidelines for law enforcement officers so they can be held accountable for their use. Guidence should include the permissible grounds for conducting a check and for taking a person to a police station for further verification of their documents.

      Police officers conducting these checks also need appropriate training and equipment. And the Greek government should ensure diligent investigations of allegations about police abuse and hold anyone found responsible to account.

      To make a real difference and increase the sense of security for everyone in central Athens, without discrimination, the new government should avoid invoking problematic laws and practices on stop and search likely to make the already difficult lives for vulnerable groups on the streets of Athens much harder.

      https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/08/05/greece-athens-police-plan-raises-fears-abuse

    • Athens police poised to evict refugees from squatted housing projects

      A self-governing community in central Athens which has helped house refugees is threatened by a government crackdown.
      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ee4353e3aa86a9372a631da8b45f5d2b8e0961f5/0_234_3543_2126/master/3543.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=5b7383bbb2653fe12b8e0a

      It’s just after 5am in the central Athens neighbourhood of Exarcheia. A group of Afghans and Iranians are sitting down together for breakfast in the middle of the street, with a banner that reads “No Pasaran” (“They shall not pass”) strung between the buildings above their heads. They laugh and joke as they help themselves to bread and cheese pies from the communal table.

      The public breakfast is outside Notara 26, a self-organised refugee accommodation squat. Since opening in September 2015, at the height of the refugee crisis, it has provided shelter to over 9,000 people. These ‘‘Breakfasts of Resistance” – held in the early hours when police-led evictions are most likely – have become daily events since Greece’s New Democracy government assumed office in July.

      A promise to “restore law and order” was one of the campaign themes that swept the right-wing party to power. Swiftly making good on this, on 8 August plans to evict all 23 refugee and anarchist squats in Exarcheia were announced.

      If carried out, by the end of the month they will have put an end to Athens’ experiment with autonomous urban governance and its grassroots refugee solidarity network, which currently houses over 1,000 people.

      Ringed by university buildings, Exarcheia has long been the home of Greece’s intellectual left, antiauthoritarian and anarchist movements.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/5f9bda30d3a5ee8559d52b78984e01187b598690/0_0_5760_3456/master/5760.jpg?width=860&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=a429ca443f8a22d149e39f

      Passing the squads of riot police who stand constant guard on Exarcheia’s perimeter underlines that this is not a typical neighbourhood. It is the site of regular skirmishes between teargas-wielding police and molotov-cocktail hurling youths who are eager to vent their frustration at Greece’s dire economic and political situation.

      Yet, in a country where far-right and state violence against migrants is well-documented, the lack of visible police presence inside Exarcheia and its vocal antiracist stance have created a place of relative sanctuary.

      “I am so happy here, I feel safe,” explains Sana*, a squat resident from Afghanistan. “Here we work together and have a good life.”

      Thousands of refugees arrived in Athens in summer 2015. Seeing little response from the state, the anarchist squat movement in the area (which dates back to the 1980s) resolved to open empty buildings in Exarcheia to house refugees. Notara 26 was the first, and was soon joined by others, founded on the same principles of autonomous self-organisation.

      The squats offer a viable alternative to official refugee camps, hotspots and detention centres, whose conditions have been widely condemned by international observers.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/830b3b3cf2ce79dfbdca1023466d19a53bff2da8/0_448_6720_4032/master/6720.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=7626556c6e905546489695

      “I visited the camps as a volunteer,” explains Saif*, a 31-year-old recognised refugee from Gaza who lives in a squat. “You’re not a refugee there, you feel like you are in prison – and they’re full. [The squat] is important for me because I feel more like home, I feel a little more human. We have space to sleep, neighbours and a neighbourhood around us.”

      In opposition, New Democracy attacked the Syriza administration’s handling of the refugee crisis, capitalising on security fears and frustration at Greece having to shoulder a disproportionate share of responsibility.

      In government, they have stepped up border enforcement,have for the moment revoked asylum seekers’ rights to access health and social security services, and dissolved the ministry of migration, transferring responsibility for refugees to the ministry of citizen protection, which also oversees the police.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/46cc286db6cda987f0137da84aa5c9fd75b71d7a/0_84_2500_1500/master/2500.jpg?width=860&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=9b6fadf95df3adde6ef1fa

      However, it was under Syriza that the strategy of criminalising the refugee squats began. A wave of evictions by heavily armed police occurred in early April affecting over 300 people. Most squats in Exarcheia operate under a no drugs/no alcohol policy. Yet, timed simultaneously with nearby anti-drug operations, most media reports connected the squat evictions with drug dealing.

      Promising to “clean up Exarcheia,” New Democracy’s rhetoric has conflated drug dealers, criminals, anarchists and migrants. One of the government’s first actions was the controversial repeal of the academic sanctuary law, which incoming prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis claimed made campuses crime hotspots and no-go zones for police. Critics saw the move as an attack on political liberties and Exarchia, rather than on crime.

      Drug dealers and criminal gangs have exploited the lack of visible law enforcement in Exarcheia. Local activists have made many attempts to improve the situation around the square, such as planting trees, organising screenings and concerts, and making night patrols, but many acknowledge the situation has deteriorated in recent months.

      Together with the squat evictions and anti-drug operations, authorities have announced plans that include repainting graffiti-covered areas and improving street lighting – none of which require evictions, activists argue. The Hellenic Police refused to comment on specific operations.

      Despite ongoing threats, no evictions have yet occurred this summer. However, there has been a noticeable escalation of police activity in the area, with almost daily operations on and around the square.

      Those arrested for immigration violations have been taken into detention. New Democracy have announced they will start deporting failed asylum applicants.

      https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/de046d5fed86f81881c8be0048ad9b7db3278a5f/0_0_2500_1499/master/2500.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=1d2fb0d3801c49f47d516f

      “They have used criminality, prejudice towards refugees and even accusations of terrorism to discredit the left resistance in Exarcheia,” says Panos*, an activist who helped open Notara 26 back in 2015. “Personally, I don’t think they will be successful. The political cost will be great and where are they going to relocate all the refugee children and families? The camps are full.’’
      Athens under pressure: city races to clear port’s refugee camp before tourists arrive
      Read more

      Athens has emptied for the summer. Shops are closed and it feels like a hot and sticky ghost town. But on Exarcheia Square, there is a palpable air of tension, as those gathered know another police operation could occur at any moment.

      Around the corner, the boarded-up Azadi squat, empty since the April evictions, has been covered with a mural depicting anarchists facing off against riot police and the slogan: “Exarcheia will win.” Time will tell.

      *Names of interviewees have been changed to protect their identities. Notara 26 did not agree to participate in this article.

      https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/aug/26/athens-police-poised-to-evict-refugees-from-squatted-housing-projects?C

    • #Exarcheia sous #occupation_policière !

      Ce que nous vous annoncions depuis un mois et demi vient de commencer ce matin, peu avant l’aube :

      EXARCHEIA SOUS OCCUPATION POLICIÈRE

      Le célèbre quartier rebelle et solidaire d’Athènes est complètement encerclé par d’énormes forces de police : de nombreux bus de CRS (MAT), des jeeps de la police antiterroriste (OPKE), des voltigeurs (DIAS), des membres de la police secrète (asfalitès), ainsi qu’un hélicoptère et plusieurs drones.

      Lieu unique en Europe pour sa forte concentration de squats et d’autres espaces autogérés, mais aussi pour sa résistance contre la répression et sa solidarité avec les précaires et migrants, Exarcheia était dans le collimateur du gouvernement de droite depuis son élection le 7 juillet. Le nouveau premier ministre Kyriakos Mitsotakis en avait fait une affaire personnelle, d’autant plus qu’il avait été raillé début août pour ne pas avoir réussi à atteint son objectif de « nettoyer Exarcheia en un mois » comme il l’avait annoncé en grandes pompes.

      Ce matin, 4 squats ont été évacués : Spirou Trikoupi 17, Transito, Rosa de Fon et Gare. L’offensive concerne pour l’instant la partie nord-ouest du quartier, à l’exception notable du squat Notara 26, réputé mieux gardé et très important symboliquement pour le quartier en tant que premier squat historique de la « crise des réfugiés » au centre ville d’Athènes.

      On compte pour l’instant une centaine d’arrestations, ainsi que des agressions brutales contre des personnes tentant de filmer. Seuls les médias de masse au service du pouvoir ont l’autorisation de couvrir l’événement.

      Au total, il y a 23 squats dans Exarcheia plus 26 autres autour du quartier, soit un total de 49 concentrés sur une zone assez petite. 49 squats auxquels il faut ajouter d’autres types de lieux autogérés, dont certains en location (Espace Social Libre Nosotros, magasin gratuit Skoros, etc.) ainsi que des dizaines de logements particuliers regroupant des groupes de militant.es, souvent près des terrasses pour permettre un accès au-dessus des rues.

      Sur les squats qui se trouvent précisément à l’intérieur d’Exarcheia, 12 sont des squats d’hébergement pour les réfugié.es et migrant.es et les 11 autres sont des squats de collectifs politiques anarchistes et antiautoritaires (même si la plupart des squats de réfugié.es sont aussi évidemment très politiques, à commencer par le Notara 26 et Spirou Trikoupi 17 avec des assemblées directes et beaucoup de liens avec le reste du mouvement social).

      Dans les squats de Spirou Trikoupi 17 et Transito (que les valets du pouvoir sont maintenant en train de murer), plus d’une quinzaine d’enfants ont été arrachés à une existence paisible et heureuse pour être subitement envoyés dans des camps. Ces sinistres camps sont insalubres et surpeuplés, les migrant.es y sont mal nourri.es et souffrent des variations de températures, subissent des humiliations et parfois des tortures, et Mitsotakis exige de surcroît qu’ils soient tous bien fermés et, à l’avenir, complètement coupés du reste du territoire.

      Le visage de l’Europe ne cesse de se durcir à l’instar de ce qui se passe également sur les autres continents. Cette évolution toujours plus autoritaire du capitalisme conduit à nous interroger sur ce qu’annonce l’ère actuelle : l’offensive contre les poches d’utopies couplée à l’enfermement des boucs émissaires rappelle des heures sombres de l’Histoire.

      Le monde entier devient fasciste et la Grèce en est, une fois de plus, l’un des laboratoires.

      Mais rien n’est fini. Septembre arrive bientôt. Les jobs saisonniers se terminent. Le mouvement social se rassemble et s’organise à nouveau. Des lieux comme le Notara 26 et le K*Vox sont sous haute surveillance. Des ripostes se préparent, ainsi que plusieurs grands événements mobilisateurs. L’automne sera chaud à Athènes.

      Résistance !

      Yannis Youlountas

      http://blogyy.net/2019/08/26/exarcheia-sous-occupation-policiere

      ##Exarchia

    • Message de Vicky Skoumbi, reçu via la mailing-list Migreurop, le 27.08.2019:

      143 réfugiés de deux squats de la rue #Spirou_Trikoupi furent interpellées dont 51 femmes et 35 enfants. Dans un autre squat furent interpellées et finalement arrêtées trois personnes, deux grecs et un français. Aucune trace n’a été détecté ni d’explosifs, ni d’armes, ni de drogue. La grande majorité de 143 réfugiés sont de demandeurs d’asile. 9 d’entre eux n’ayant pas de papiers, risquent d’être expulsés. Les autres après vérification de leurs papiers, ont été logés à l’hôtel, en attendant d’être transférés à un camp ou une autre structure d’accueil, déjà surpeuplée.
      M. Balaskas, représentant de la Confédération Hellénique des fonctionnaires de police, avait comparé la police grecque à un aspirateur particulièrement puissant que serait en mesure de faire disparaître toute « poubelle » du quartier d’Exarchia. En guise de rectification, il avait ajouté, que les réfugiés seraient une poussière très gênante. Ces déclarations ont provoquées un tel tollé de réactions, que la direction de police hellénique a été obligée de les transmettre au Procureur et d’ordonner l’ouverture d’une enquête interne.

    • Migrants « poussière » et squatters « ordures » : un policier grec risque des poursuites

      La police grecque a annoncé avoir saisi ce mardi le parquet d’Athènes après les déclarations du vice-président du syndicat des policiers, qui avait qualifié d’« ordures » les squatters à Exarchia, un quartier libertaire d’Athènes, et de « poussière » les migrants qui y résident.

      Un vaste #cou_de_filet a eu lieu lundi dans ce quartier, situé près du centre-ville, au cours duquel quatre squats ont été évacués et 143 migrants, dont de nombreuses familles avec enfants, ont été interpellés et conduits dans un hôtel d’Athènes. Connu pour sa mouvance anarchiste et l’occupation de nombreux bâtiments abandonnés surtout après la crise des migrants de 2015, le quartier d’Exarchia est souvent le théâtre d’affrontements entre jeunes et forces de l’ordre. Décrivant cette opération dans un entretien à la télévision Skaï lundi, Stavros Balaskas, vice-président de la Fédération panhellénique des employés de la police (Poasy), a indiqué qu’« un aspirateur électrique silencieux de nouvelle technologie a été mis en marche, c’est-à-dire la police, qui va graduellement absorber toutes les ordures d’Exarchia ».

      Après qu’un journaliste de la Skaï eut tenter de l’inciter à rectifier ses propos, Stavros Balaskas a poursuivi : « On ne veut pas dire que les ordures sont les migrants, qui sont (seulement) une poussière, qui pourrait avoir un caractère gênant ». « On veut dire les vraies ordures qui se trouvent dans dix autres squats (d’Exarchia ndrl) » qui « seront également évacués prochainement » et où « se trouvent de durs criminels, des anarchistes extrémistes et des gens d’extrême gauche », a-t-il lancé. Après une enquête administrative ordonnée au sein de la police contre lui, Stavros Balaskas est revenu sur ses propos en précisant qu’il a utilisé le terme « ordures » pour qualifier le « comportement de certaines personnes ». « Je n’aurais jamais qualifié d’"ordures" ou de "poussière" les gens », a-t-il assuré sur la télévision Star lundi soir. Il a rappelé que la police ne pouvait pas avoir d’accès dans le passé dans ces squats où la criminalité et le trafic de migrants sont fréquents.

      Répondant aux critiques de l’opposition de gauche qui accuse le nouveau gouvernement de droite de « durcissement » de la politique migratoire, le porte-parole du gouvernement Stelios Petsas a expliqué ce mardi que l’objectif de l’opération à Exarchia était « de combiner la sécurité et les conditions humaines de vie des migrants ».

      http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/migrants-poussiere-et-squatters-ordures-un-policier-grec-risque-des-poursui

  • Attacks by White Extremists Are Growing. So Are Their Connections.

    In a manifesto posted online before his attack, the gunman who killed 50 last month in a rampage at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, said he drew inspiration from white extremist terrorism attacks in Norway, the United States, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    His references to those attacks placed him in an informal global network of white extremists whose violent attacks are occurring with greater frequency in the West.

    An analysis by The New York Times of recent terrorism attacks found that at least a third of white extremist killers since 2011 were inspired by others who perpetrated similar attacks, professed a reverence for them or showed an interest in their tactics.

    The connections between the killers span continents and highlight how the internet and social media have facilitated the spread of white extremist ideology and violence.

    In one instance, a school shooter in New Mexico corresponded with a gunman who attacked a mall in Munich. Altogether, they killed 11 people.

    One object of fascination for the Christchurch killer and at least four other white extremists was Anders Behring Breivik, the far-right extremist who killed 77 in a bombing and mass shooting in Norway in 2011.

    Mr. Breivik’s lengthy manifesto offered a litany of grievances about immigration and Islam — and the attacks became a model for future ones.

    “I think that Breivik was a turning point, because he was sort of a proof of concept as to how much an individual actor could accomplish,” said J.M. Berger, author of the book “Extremism” and a research fellow with VOX-Pol, a European academic initiative to study online extremism.

    “He killed so many people at one time operating by himself, it really set a new bar for what one person can do.”

    Shortly after the Norway massacre, a prominent American white supremacist named Frazier Glenn Miller wrote on a white supremacist forum that Mr. Breivik had “inspired young Aryan men to action.” Mr. Miller opened fire on a Jewish retirement home and community center in Kansas a few years later, killing three.

    Mr. Breivik was not the only mass killer to inspire copycats. The Christchurch shooter also paid tribute to a Canadian man who opened fire inside a Quebec City mosque in 2017, writing his name on one of the guns used in his attack.

    That Canadian gunman read extensively about Dylann Roof, the American who killed nine worshipers at a black church in South Carolina in 2015.

    At least four white extremist killers made statements online praising Elliot Rodger, a racist and misogynist who targeted women in a 2014 spree, before carrying out their own attacks.

    All these attacks occurred amid a surge of white supremacist and xenophobic terrorism in the West that has frequently targeted Muslims, immigrants and other minority groups, the Times analysis found.

    The analysis was based on data from the Global Terrorism Database and identified nearly 350 white extremist terrorism attacks in Europe, North America and Australia from 2011 through 2017, the latest year of available data. We also examined preliminary data on attacks in the United States in 2018.

    The database is a project of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland. It relies on news reports and other records to capture episodes that meet its definition of terrorism: the use of violence by a non-state actor to attain a political or social goal.

    Over this period, white extremism — an umbrella term encompassing white nationalist, white supremacist, neo-Nazi, xenophobic, anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic ideologies — accounted for about 8 percent of all attacks in these regions and about a third of those in the United States.

    Erin Miller, who manages the database, said the increase in white extremist terrorism parallels a rise in hate crimes and bias episodes in the West and that deadly attacks are occurring more often.

    “There’s a common framing of far-right terrorism or domestic terrorism as being ‘terrorism lite’ and not as serious,” she said. “It’s an interesting question given that far-right attacks can be quite devastating.”

    Xenophobia Drives Violence in Europe

    In recent years, Europe has seen a surge in far-right and xenophobic violence amid an influx of migrants and refugees from conflicts in the Middle East and Africa.

    The Global Reach of White Extremism

    There were five white extremist attacks in Australia from 2011 through 2017, all of which were attacks on mosques and Islamic centers. There were no such attacks in New Zealand during that same period.

    Then the massacre of worshippers at two mosques in Christchurch on March 15 — the deadliest shooting in modern New Zealand history — helped put the global nature of white extremism into relief. The shooter was an Australian man who said he was radicalized during his travels in Europe and designed his attack to draw an American audience.

    Experts say the same broad motives are at play whether the target is a mosque in Perth or an asylum seekers’ shelter in Dresden or a synagogue in Pittsburgh. Attackers who identify as white, Christian and culturally European see an attack on their privileged position in the West by immigrants, Muslims and other religious and racial minorities.

    The difference now is that it is easier than ever for extremists to connect both domestically and across continents, according to Mr. Berger, the “Extremism” author. The entry point for radicalization is less narrow than it was during earlier waves of white supremacist action, when finding ideological fellow travelers typically required meeting in person.

    “This is a particularly strong wave,” Mr. Berger said, “and I think it’s being fueled by a lot of political developments and also by the sort of connective tissue that you get from the Internet that wasn’t there before that’s really making it easier for groups to be influenced and to coordinate, or not necessarily coordinate but synchronize over large geographical distances.”

    Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, said that given these international connections, it’s important to reconsider the nature of the threat. “We conceive of this problem as being a domestic one,” she said. “But that’s not the case.”

    The challenge for law enforcement will be to buck a sometimes myopic focus on Islamic extremism as the only driver of international terrorism.

    It may also require rethinking the legal framework for what constitutes terrorism: from violence that arises from a command and control structure to a looser definition that can account for a wider range of violent actors who share a common ideology.

    “They don’t see themselves as Americans or Canadians, very much like the Christchurch killer didn’t see himself as an Australian; he saw himself as part of a white collective,” Dr. Beirich said.

    “It has never been the case that these people didn’t think in a global way. They may have acted in ways that looked domestic but the thinking was always about building an international white movement.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/04/03/world/white-extremist-terrorism-christchurch.html?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur
    #cartographie #visualisation #connections #réseau #suprématistes_blancs #extrême_droite #attaques #terrorisme #xénophobie #racisme #extrémisme_blanc
    intéressant la #terminologie #mots #vocabulaire

    ping @visionscarto @fil

  • The Racist Origins of Computer Technology
    https://yasha.substack.com/p/the-racist-origins-of-computer-technology

    Medium’s One Zero magazine just published my big historical-investigative article about the US census and the racist origins of modern computer technology.

    It’s a forgotten history that starts in the 1880s, when the first commercial computer was invented by an American engineer named Herman Hollerith (that’s him up there on business trip in St. Petersburg). It takes you on journey through the racial politics of early 20th century America and ends up in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust, while making a brief stop at Steven Bannon and Donald Trump’s nativist palace.

    la big investigation historique en question (pas lu)
    https://onezero.medium.com/the-racist-and-high-tech-origins-of-americas-modern-census-44ba984c2

    • People forget what a totally openly fascist country America was before World War II. Adolf Hitler and the Nazis ruined it for everyone. Because until they came along and took their racist theories a little too far, everyone loved eugenics. Americans cheered human selective breeding programs, and the most respected members of society advocated for forced sterilization and the banning of immigrants deemed to be genetically unfit. It was seen as scientific progress — the wave of the future! Over thirty states passed legislation that regulated forced sterilization on genetic and social grounds. These laws were affirmed by the Supreme Court and are still on the books today.

      Et de la big investigation, super intéressante:

      The Racist Origins of America’s Tech Industry
      Yasha Levine, le 30 avril 2019
      https://onezero.medium.com/the-racist-and-high-tech-origins-of-americas-modern-census-44ba984c2

      A few years earlier, working for the U.S. Census Bureau, Hollerith had developed the world’s first functional mass-produced computer: the Hollerith tabulator. An electromechanical device about the size of large desk and dresser, it used punch cards and a clever arrangement of gears, sorters, electrical contacts, and dials to process data with blazing speed and accuracy. What had taken years by hand could be done in a matter of months. As one U.S. newspaper described it, “with [the device’s] aid some 15 young ladies can count accurately half a million of names in a day.”

      As the 19th century drew to a close, census officials had started transforming what should have been a simple head count into a system of racial surveillance.

      Immediately following the census, the states and the federal government passed a flurry of laws that heavily restricted immigration.

      IBM’s German subsidiary landed its first major contract the same year Hitler became chancellor. The 1933 Nazi census was pushed through by Hitler as an emergency genetic stock-taking of the German people. Along with numerous other data points, the census focused on collecting fertility data for German women — particularly women of good Aryan stock. Also included in the census was a special count of religiously observant Jews, or Glaubensjuden.

      By the time the U.S. officially entered the war in 1941, IBM’s German subsidiary had grown to employ 10,000 people and served 300 different German government agencies. The Nazi Party Treasury; the SS; the War Ministry; the Reichsbank; the Reichspost; the Armaments Ministry; the Navy, Army and Air Force; and the Reich Statistical Office — the list of IBM’s clients went on and on.

      #USA #racisme #xénophobie #eugénisme #histoire #ordinateurs #recensement #Allemagne #Nazis #Adolf_Hitler #Herman_Hollerith #IBM

  • Wilson, défiguré par la police en rentrant du travail - Bondy Blog
    https://www.bondyblog.fr/reportages/au-poste/wilson-defigure-par-la-police-en-rentrant-du-travail

    Par Ilyes Ramdani
    Le 26/07/2019

    Le 9 mai dernier, Wilson a été violemment interpellé par un équipage de police dans son quartier, à la limite d’Aubervilliers et de Saint-Denis. Bilan : un nez cassé, un œil gonflé et ensanglanté et le souvenir d’une violence inouïe. Ce responsable associatif reconnu à la Plaine a décidé de porter plainte à l’IGPN et de raconter ce qui lui est arrivé. Pour que cela serve à d’autres. Témoignage.

    Comme tous les jours, Wilson sort du travail, un peu après 18 heures. En bon banquier qui se respecte, il est en costard. Mais, avant d’aller retrouver sa femme et ses deux enfants, Wilson ne peut pas s’empêcher de faire un petit détour au quartier. C’est qu’il a un sacré match à débriefer avec ses potes : la veille, Tottenham a éliminé l’Ajax Amsterdam en demi-finale de la Ligue des champions grâce à un but inscrit dans les toutes dernières secondes. Sur les coups de 18h30, lorsqu’il prend la direction de la Plaine Saint-Denis, là où il a grandi, Wilson ne se doute pas qu’une heure ou deux plus tard, il serait placé en garde à vue, en train de pisser le sang, dans une cellule de dégrisement du commissariat voisin.

    #violence-Policière #brutalité_policière #brutalité_macronienne et #racisme

  • Liban : sit-in dans les camps de réfugiés palestiniens pour l’emploi
    Paul Khalifeh, RFI, le 18 juillet 2019
    http://www.rfi.fr/moyen-orient/20190718-liban-sit-in-camps-refugies-palestiniens-emploi

    La baisse du degré de violence fait suite aux contacts intensifs entrepris à plus d’un niveau pour contenir la colère des réfugiés palestiniens, dans un pays aux lois protectionnistes, où 72 métiers leur sont interdits.

    #Palestine #Liban #Réfugiés #Camps #Discriminations #Xénophobie #métiers_interdits

  • Google change son algorithme pour ne plus associer d’office les femmes non-blanches au porno
    https://www.numerama.com/politique/534655-google-change-son-algorithme-pour-ne-plus-associer-doffice-les-femm

    Les recherches Google sur des jeunes femmes noires ou asiatiques renvoyaient vers des sites pornographiques. Ce n’est désormais plus le cas. Google a enfin fait le ménage dans ses résultats de recherche. Après avoir banni les résultats pornographiques qui s’affichaient en premier lorsque l’on tapait le mot « lesbienne », le moteur de recherche a fait de même avec d’autres termes comme « jeune femme noire » et « jeune femme asiatique », a remarqué sur Twitter la développeuse Jill Royer ce vendredi 19 (...)

    #Google #GoogleSearch #algorithme #pornographie #xénophobie #discrimination

    //c0.lestechnophiles.com/www.numerama.com/content/uploads/2019/07/google-recherche-jeune-femme-noire.jpg

  • Twitter won’t hide Donald Trump’s racist tweets
    https://www.theverge.com/2019/7/15/20695188/twitter-trump-racist-tweets-moderation-public-figure-hateful-conduct

    Twitter won’t be treating President Donald Trump’s recent tweets telling congresswomen to “go back” to their supposed home countries as a violation of its hateful conduct policy, the company confirmed to The Verge. That means the tweets won’t trigger a flagging system Twitter announced last month, intended to limit the reach of banned content by public officials. On Sunday, Trump attacked a group of congresswomen — implicitly the Reps. Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), Ayanna Pressley (...)

    #Twitter #xénophobie #censure #terms #discrimination

  • Pourquoi Twitter ne censure pas les tweets racistes de Trump
    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2019/07/17/pourquoi-twitter-ne-censure-pas-les-tweets-racistes-de-trump_1740327

    Le réseau social ne considère pas les récents tweets polémiques du président américain, appelant les femmes parlementaires démocrates à « retourner » d’où elles venaient, comme racistes ou xénophobes. Sur Twitter, le président américain peut tout dire. Depuis dimanche, ses salves xénophobes contre les quatre élues du Congrès, les appelant à « rentrer chez elles » n’ont fait l’objet d’aucune sanction sur le réseau social, malgré la teneur « raciste et xénophobe » de ses propos dénoncée, entre autres, par des (...)

    #Twitter #censure #discrimination #xénophobie

  • À Istanbul, des affrontements entre Turcs et Syriens font jaillir une étincelle dangereuse | Middle East Eye édition française
    https://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/reportages/istanbul-des-affrontements-entre-turcs-et-syriens-font-jaillir-une-et

    ...le nouveau maire est accusé d’attiser les flammes

    [...]

    « Je vis dans ce quartier depuis 1989 et je connais les visages des gens qui vivent et travaillent ici », a déclaré Ramazan Olmez, un Stambouliote turc qui travaille dans le secteur de la construction.

    « Cette nuit-là, j’ai vu des visages différents. Ils avaient entre 16 et 25 ans, des jeunes qui semblaient être manipulés par la même source. Je peux dire que quelqu’un les a organisés, les a emmenés ici et les a montés contre les Syriens. Ils ne m’ont pas semblé agir comme une foule consciente. »

    #xénophobie #Turquie #Syrie

  • Nouvelle journée de #manifestations après la mort d’un Israélien d’origine éthiopienne

    Des manifestations ont eu lieu mercredi à Tel-Aviv et dans le nord d’#Israël pour la troisième journée consécutive, après le décès d’un jeune Israélien d’origine éthiopienne, tué par un policier, la communauté éthiopienne dénonçant un crime raciste.

    #Solomon_Teka, âgé de 19 ans, a été tué dimanche soir par un policier qui n’était pas en service au moment des faits, à Kiryat Haim, une ville proche du port de Haïfa, dans le nord d’Israël.

    Des dizaines de policiers ont été déployés mercredi dans la ville de Kiryat Ata, non loin de Kiryat Haim. Des manifestants tentant de bloquer une route ont été dispersés par la police.

    Malgré des appels au calme lancés par les autorités, des jeunes se sont aussi à nouveau rassemblés à Tel-Aviv. Une centaine de personnes ont défié la police en bloquant une route avant d’être dispersées.

    En trois jours, 140 personnes ont été arrêtées et 111 policiers blessés par des jets de pierres, bouteilles et bombes incendiaires lors des manifestations dans le pays, selon un nouveau bilan de la police.

    Les embouteillages et les images de voitures en feu ont fait la une des médias.

    Le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu et le président israélien Reuven Rivlin ont appelé au calme, tout en reconnaissant que les problèmes auxquels était confrontée la communauté israélo-éthiopienne devaient être traités.

    – ’Tragédie’-

    « La mort de Solomon Teka est une immense tragédie », a dit le Premier ministre. « Des leçons seront tirées. Mais une chose est claire : nous ne pouvons tolérer les violences que nous avons connues hier », a-t-il déclaré mercredi lors d’une réunion du comité ministériel sur l’intégration de la communauté éthiopienne.

    « Nous ne pouvons pas voir de routes bloquées, ni de cocktails Molotov, ni d’attaques contre des policiers, des citoyens et des propriétés privées », a-t-il ajouté.

    Le ministre de la Sécurité publique, Gilad Erdan, et le commissaire de la police, Moti Cohen, ont rencontré des représentants de la communauté israélo-éthiopienne, selon un communiqué de la police.

    La police a rapporté que le policier ayant tué le jeune homme avait tenté de s’interposer lors d’une bagarre entre jeunes. Après avoir expliqué qu’il était un agent des forces de l’ordre, des jeunes lui auraient alors lancé des pierres. L’homme aurait ouvert le feu après s’être senti menacé.

    Mais d’autres jeunes présents et un passant interrogés par les médias israéliens ont assuré que le policier n’avait pas été agressé.

    L’agent a été assigné à résidence et une enquête a été ouverte, a indiqué le porte-parole de la police.

    En janvier, des milliers de juifs éthiopiens étaient déjà descendus dans la rue à Tel-Aviv après la mort d’un jeune de leur communauté tué par un policier.

    Ils affirment vivre dans la crainte d’être la cible de la police. La communauté juive éthiopienne en Israël compte environ 140.000 personnes, dont plus de 50.000 sont nées dans le pays. Elle se plaint souvent de racisme institutionnalisé à son égard.

    https://www.courrierinternational.com/depeche/nouvelle-journee-de-manifestations-apres-la-mort-dun-israelie
    #discriminations #racisme #xénophobie #décès #violences_policières #police #éthiopiens

    • Ethiopian-Israelis Protest for 3rd Day After Fatal Police Shooting

      Ethiopian-Israelis and their supporters took to the streets across the country on Wednesday for a third day of protests in an outpouring of rage after an off-duty police officer fatally shot a black youth, and the Israeli police turned out in force to try to keep the main roads open.

      The mostly young demonstrators have blocked major roads and junctions, paralyzing traffic during the evening rush hour, with disturbances extending into the night, protesting what community activists describe as deeply ingrained racism and discrimination in Israeli society.

      Scores have been injured — among them many police officers, according to the emergency services — and dozens of protesters have been detained, most of them briefly. Israeli leaders called for calm; fewer protesters turned out on Wednesday.

      “We must stop, I repeat, stop and think together how we go on from here,” President Reuven Rivlin said on Wednesday. “None of us have blood that is thicker than anyone else’s, and the lives of our brothers and sisters will never be forfeit.”
      Sign up for The Interpreter

      Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

      On Tuesday night, rioters threw stones and firebombs at the police and overturned and set fire to cars in chaotic scenes rarely witnessed in the center of Tel Aviv and other Israeli cities.

      After initially holding back, the police fired stun grenades, tear gas and hard sponge bullets and sent in officers on horseback, prompting demonstrators to accuse them of the kind of police brutality that they had turned out to protest in the first place.

      The man who was killed, Solomon Tekah, 18, arrived from Ethiopia with his family seven years ago. On Sunday night, he was with friends in the northern port city of Haifa, outside a youth center he attended. An altercation broke out, and a police officer, who was out with his wife and children, intervened.

      The officer said that the youths had thrown stones that struck him and that he believed that he was in a life-threatening situation. He drew his gun and said he fired toward the ground, according to Micky Rosenfeld, a police spokesman.

      Mr. Tekah’s friends said that they were just trying to get away after the officer began harassing them. Whether the bullet ricocheted or was fired directly at Mr. Tekah, it hit him in the chest, killing him.

      “He was one of the favorites,” said Avshalom Zohar-Sal, 22, a youth leader at the center, Beit Yatziv, which offers educational enrichment and tries to keep underprivileged youth out of trouble. Mr. Zohar-Sal, who was not there at the time of the shooting, said that another youth leader had tried to resuscitate Mr. Tekah.

      The police officer who shot Mr. Tekah is under investigation by the Justice Ministry. His rapid release to house arrest has further inflamed passions around what Mr. Tekah’s supporters call his murder.

      In a televised statement on Tuesday as violence raged, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said that all Israel embraced the family of the dead youth and the Ethiopian community in general. But he added: “We are a nation of law; we will not tolerate the blocking of roads. I ask you, let us solve the problems together while upholding the law.”

      Many other Israelis said that while they were sympathetic to the Ethiopian-Israelis’ cause — especially after the death of Mr. Tekah — the protesters had “lost them” because of the ensuing violence and vandalism.

      Reflecting a gulf of disaffection, Ethiopian-Israeli activists said that they believed that the rest of Israeli society had never really supported them.

      “When were they with us? When?” asked Eyal Gato, 33, an Ethiopian-born activist who came to Israel in 1991 in the airlift known as Operation Solomon, which brought 14,000 Ethiopian Jews to Israel within 36 hours.

      The airlift was a cause of national celebration at the time, and many of the immigrants bent down to kiss the tarmac. But integration has since proved difficult for many, with rates of truancy, suicide, divorce and domestic violence higher than in the rest of Israeli society.

      Mr. Gato, a postgraduate student of sociology who works for an immigrant organization called Olim Beyahad, noted that the largely poor Ethiopian-Israeli community of about 150,000, which is less than 2 percent of the population, had little electoral or economic clout.

      He compared their situation to African-Americans in Chicago or Ferguson, Mo., but said that the Israeli iteration of “Black Lives Matter” had no organized movement behind it, and that the current protests had been spontaneous.

      Recalling his own experiences — such as being pulled over by the police a couple of years ago when he was driving a Toyota from work in a well-to-do part of Rehovot, in central Israel, and being asked what he was doing there in that car — Mr. Gato said he had to carry his identity card with him at all times “to prove I’m not a criminal.”

      The last Ethiopian protests broke out in 2015, after a soldier of Ethiopian descent was beaten by two Israeli police officers as he headed home in uniform in a seemingly unprovoked assault that was caught on video. At the time, Mr. Gato said, 40 percent of the inmates of Israel’s main youth detention center had an Ethiopian background. Since 1997, he said, a dozen young Ethiopian-Israelis have died in encounters with the police.

      A government committee set up after that episode to stamp out racism against Ethiopian-Israelis acknowledged the existence of institutional racism in areas such as employment, military enlistment and the police, and recommended that officers wear body cameras.

      “Ethiopians are seen as having brought their values of modesty and humility with them,” Mr. Gato said. “They expect us to continue to be nice and to demonstrate quietly.”

      But the second generation of the Ethiopian immigration has proved less passive than their parents, who were grateful for being brought to Israel.

      The grievances go back at least to the mid-1990s. Then, Ethiopian immigrants exploded in rage when reports emerged that Israel was secretly dumping the blood they donated for fear that it was contaminated with H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS.

      “The community is frustrated and in pain,” said one protester, Rachel Malada, 23, from Rehovot, who was born in Gondar Province in Ethiopia and who was brought to Israel at the age of 2 months.

      “This takes us out to the streets, because we must act up,” she said. “Our parents cannot do this, but we must.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/03/world/middleeast/ethiopia-israel-police-shooting.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytimes