#mindfulness

  • Le 20 décembre 2019, je reçois, par mail, ce message de "pub" d’une formation qui nous est proposée dans notre #université (#Université_Grenoble_Alpes) :

    L’#UGA nous informe de la mise en place à la formation #communication_assertive et bienveillante dans les relations professionnelles .

    Deux sessions au choix sont ouvertes :

    Soit les 29 & 30 juin 2020
    soit les 03 & 04 décembre 2020

    La date limite d’inscription est : j - 15 avant la date de la formation

    La formation est placée sous le thème " #efficacité professionnelle ".

    Objectifs de la formation :

    A l’issue de la formation, les participants seront capables de :

    – Décoder leur comportement et celui des autres dans les relations professionnelles

    – Communiquer avec #tact et #diplomatie

    – Etablir des #attitudes_positives au quotidien

    – Développer des relations professionnelles harmonieuses et efficaces

    Programme :

    1. Prendre conscience de son comportement

    – Identifier les raisons de ne pas de comprendre

    – Comprendre l’image que l’on renvoie à ses interlocuteurs

    – Prendre conscience de l’image de sa communication écrite

    – Identifier son comportement dans les situations relationnelles

    2. Savoir dialoguer avec tact et souplesse

    – Pratiquer l’écoute active et savoir utiliser les 5 types de questions

    – Utiliser les 3 techniques de reformulation

    – Améliorer sa communication non verbale

    – Etre congruent entre son langage verbal et non-verbal

    – Ajuster sa communication à son interlocuteur

    – Choisir son vocabulaire pour communiquer avec précision et tact à l’écrit

    3. Savoir soutenir une position claire et diplomate

    – Etre assertif : utiliser la méthode DESC

    – Exprimer son avis sans juger l’autre

    – Formuler des critiques constructives

    – Faire face aux critiques

    – Formuler un refus sans provoquer de tension

    – Faire et accepter des compliments dans le monde professionnel

    Durée : 2 jours

    Public : Toute personne souhaitant optimiser sa communication afin d’améliorer ses relations professionnelles

    –--------

    Sur ce, je réponds à une collègue, en colère :

    Plus de moyens, moins de compétition, moins de darwinisme social résoudrait la moitié des problèmes sans formations à la communication bienveillante !

    –-> je fais évidemment allusion aux propos tenus par #Antoine_Petit (à la tête du #CNRS) qui a appelé à une loi « darwinienne » pour le financement de la #recherche. « Une loi ambitieuse, inégalitaire — oui, inégalitaire, une loi vertueuse et darwinienne, qui encourage les scientifiques, équipes, laboratoires, établissements les plus performants à l’échelle internationale, une loi qui mobilise les énergies. »
    https://seenthis.net/messages/815560

    #formation #bienveillance #communication_bienveillante #travail #relations_professionnelles #inégalités #performance #compétition #attitude_positive #harmonie #hypocrisie #image #tact #souplesse #écoute_active #techniques_de_reformulation #communication #communication_non_verbale #langage_verbal #langage_non-verbal #vocabulaire #méthode_DESC #critiques_constructives

    • Et parallèlement à l’#Université d’#Amsterdam... la week of #work_stress !

      Message from the works council

      Dear all,

      The week of 11th of November is the week of work stress. It is the week where the university brings out its petting puppies, makes you bikeblend your smoothie, and has you beat a few djembe tunes to let go of your #stress. Some might argue that it is a nice gesture of the employer, but we of the FNV in the OR find it a slap in the face of the employee. It adds insult to injury.

      This waste of money again shows that the faculty is not taking work pressure seriously. We said it last year, and we said it again this year: “stop monkeying around and actually deal with the causes of work pressure”. Work pressure is not that difficult. There are either too many tasks for the number of people, or there are not enough people for the number of tasks. So the answers are also simple. If an organization is financially healthy, you hire more people. If the organization is financially unhealthy, you are stuck with reducing the tasks. There is no rocket science involved.

      Yet as you can see in this week of work stress, the faculty seems keen to responsiblize the individual for the work pressure he or she is experiencing. This leads to offers such as #time_management (we just received an email that there are two spots still available), #yoga, and #mindfulness. But these are just bandaids ("lapjes voor het bloeden" as the Dutch expression goes) that obscure the structural faults of the system. There are too many administration processes. There is too much institutional distrust that you are not doing your work correctly leading to for instance to ’#jaargesprekken' being moments where you defend yourself instead of discussing how you would like to grow as a professional. There are criteria for promotion that seem to change during the process. We have to accept budget cuts in our teaching programme while at the same time the faculty wants to start new programmes that make new claims on budget and staff.

      Recently, our support staff at EOSS was confronted with a report that was framed as research about the high work pressure they are experiencing. Yet it actually placed all the blame at the staff of EOSS and suggested their so-called inefficient work and non-conformance to instructions from management was the cause of their work pressure. Another signal that work pressure is not taking seriously by management and the individual employee is again responsibilized for his or her work’ stress’. The Works Council will keep pushing the Faculty and the UvA to make meaningful structural changes that address work pressure instead of blaming the victim. Namaste.

      XXXX (FNV Works Council Representative)

      Reçu via email d’une amie/collègue qui y travaille...

    • Et petit exemple d’#Angleterre (#UK):

      Universities have driven their workers into the ground. That’s why I’m striking

      Our eight days of action are in response to a marketised sector that has prioritised profit over the welfare of staff and students.

      Workers in higher education across the UK are on strike. One of the reasons we are striking is because of the poor conditions we face today – which were, in large part, decided by the 2010 election.

      Nearly a decade ago, the Tory and Lib Dem coalition government conspired to transform higher education, unleashing the forces of marketisation. The physical and emotional landscape of the university has fundamentally changed in the intervening years. The devastation wrought cannot be overstated. Contrary to justifications for reform by Tories and Lib Dems, the contemporary university is not sustainable, and reforms have reduced standards and entrenched inequality.

      In public discussion of the – shameful – tripling of student fees and mounting student debt, the changes to university funding that this brought about are often neglected. The 2010 coalition government replaced the old system of block grants with money paid per student per course, and lifted the cap on the number of student places available. Now, universities compete for funding by competing for students, with each other, and between their own departments.

      Most remarkably, this was done in the name of improving standards. It has left its scars on the physical landscape of universities, no longer able to fit in the number of students they have enrolled, and the springing up of new buildings, luxury accommodation and gyms all designed to attract prospective students. If the modern university has a soundtrack, it would be constant drilling for the construction of new, shiny buildings, temples to “student satisfaction”.

      Marketisation does not mean the immediate insertion of the profit motive into previously public goods. It means, at least in the first instance, making those public goods profitable. Students are in more and more debt, workers are paid less and less, while private companies and developers are given access to a potentially lucrative market.

      What does this mean for workers in higher education? They face a proliferation of perverse incentives: instead of research and teaching, lecturers are expected to take part in a perpetual recruitment drive. Instead of supporting students emotionally and academically, staff in student services, often facing cuts and “restructures”, are expected to act as the vanguard of “employability”.

      With more students, permanent staff are expected to take on more and more work. Temporary staff are expected to paper over structural gaps, providing a “flexible” workforce who are hired and fired in response to fluctuations in student numbers. Research shows that part-time staff and those on hourly rates are only paid for 55% of their work. Staff in general work, on average, the equivalent of two days unpaid per week. Given these low wages, many temporary staff are effectively paid less than the minimum wage.

      The expectations placed on staff cannot be met. It is not possible to produce the kind of work expected in the amount of time we are paid to do it. New methods of evaluation and student metrics create even more work, and overlook the key fact that asking students if they enjoyed a course reveals very little about whether that course was well-taught. Student services are stretched to breaking point, and instead of releasing the tension by, for example, increasing funding, services are instead outsourced, with trained counsellors replaced by generic “advisers” and, even, apps.

      When we say that the expectations on staff cannot be met, we mean that it is not possible to live under these conditions. There is nothing else left to squeeze. The doctrines of flexibility and precarity are in no way specific to higher education. They are paradigmatic of contemporary working practices. This means the struggle against precarity is not just a struggle for better conditions for academic workers – it is the insistence that a better life is possible for all of us. The disruption to teaching that comes from workers’ poor health, unnecessary pressure and precarity is much, much greater than the disruption caused by the cancellation of classes.

      Despite the deprivations of the picket line – early mornings, hours standing in the cold, lost pay – I have rarely seen colleagues so happy. The lifting of the neoliberal impulse to be constantly working, every interaction a chance for self-development, every minute a chance to get something done, has profound effects. Reclawing time from management’s extractive demands gives us a glimpse of how the university could be.

      The University and College Union dispute, which runs until next Wednesday, is about pay and pensions for some 43,000 members of the union, all working in academia. Even if we won on both counts, our futures, and the future of higher education, will not be secure without a fundamental rethink of the way in which universities are funded in the UK.

      We cannot afford to merely attempt to reform a marketised sector, based around fees. Almost 10 years on from the seismic higher education reforms of 2010, we face another general election. The only party now offering a rethink of fees and funding, rather than the shuffling of proverbial deckchairs, is Labour.

      We must not let students’ interests be pitted against workers. They are one and the same. So far during the strike, universities have bribed students to cross the picket line with gimmicks like free breakfast and free parking. They have attempted to ban solidarity action by students with a sustained campaign of misinformation, including the suggestion that joining picket lines is illegal and that students must cross them because they are members of NUS and not UCU. We are warned that students might feel anxious about the strike and that by picketing our workplaces we are letting them down.

      In these moments, management attempts to call upon a sense of duty we might feel towards our students. But as workers in higher education, we should not be content to merely provide a better version of the kind of education-as-commodity that management insists on.

      With our strike and the election, we have a chance to start fundamentally re-imagining the university. It’s the only thing that might save it.

      https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/28/universities-workers-strike-marketised-sector-money-staff
      #grève

  • Technologies and Startups that Hack Brain
    https://hackernoon.com/technologies-and-startups-that-hack-brain-e51ea6983edb?source=rss----3a8

    Technologies and Startups that Hack the BrainWhat they do and how machine learning fits inCover of the Brazilian edition of ‘Neuromancer’‘…physics and #neuroscience are in some ways the most fundamental subjects: one is concerned with the external world out there, and the other with the internal world in our minds’.Demis Hassabis, a co-founder of DeepMind. FT.com***The development of technologies that study and affect the ‘internal world in our minds’ is fuelled by investment activity, among other things. In the summer of 2016, CB Insights, an investment database, published a review of 17 startups that boost the brain. In just two years, in June 2018, Neuronetics, the most well-funded #startup from the list, went public. Other companies from that list raised substantial investment rounds. For (...)

    #data-science #mindfulness #ai

  • First day using my own app
    https://hackernoon.com/first-day-using-my-own-app-2a1f72a335a3?source=rss----3a8144eabfe3---4

    The results have been amazing, dare I say it myselfDisclaimer: You can jump straight to “Day 1: My experience” if you’re uninterested in the history.History: The back storyNear the end of last year, I went through an unhealthy habit of wasting a lot of time and money by indulging myself with nights out with friends. I would spend about 2–3 nights out weekly (usually Fridays and Sundays).On top of this unhealthy layer of bad decisions, I adopted an even more interesting one: About halfway through the evening, albeit incredibly dangerous, I would abandon my friend group and take a lone walk through the city.Identifying my prioritiesGoing out and, dare I say, being surrounded by an unproductive atmosphere…and being unproductive myself, would put me in an unbent state of reflection.What am I (...)

    #productivity #mindfulness #development #apps #personal-development

  • #mindfulness in Software Development
    https://hackernoon.com/mindfulness-in-software-development-21dd2d82e5d7?source=rss----3a8144eab

    I’ve been on training for mindful coaching recently, and almost a day in, I started wondering on how to apply what I learned to coding. How could a team benefit from combining the two concepts? How could mindful coding help to ease the pains of building software?For those new to the topic, mindfulness is a concept that teaches our mind to be in the present, in whatever we do right at that moment. Not thinking about the future, the laundry we have to do, neither dwelling in past mistakes we did.It’s also about not judging. Not judging others, not judging ourselves. Not feeling controlled by our feelings and learned actions on a subconscious level.Sounds easy?It is not. It is harder than you might think. But it’s worth it. And well research (New? Start here ).Now, let’s explore my thoughts (...)

    #mindful-software #software-development #software-mindfulness

  • Ask These 4 Empathetic Questions When You’re Struggling To Listen
    https://hackernoon.com/ask-these-4-empathetic-questions-when-youre-struggling-to-listen-555208a

    [Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash]Losing your patience and beginning to tune out (or line up a snide rebuttal)? Try this instead.You don’t need to be convinced that #empathy is a good thing–not just for ethical reasons but for practical ones, too. While we’re still often cautioned to “leave emotions out of it,” being able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes is a hallmark of emotionally intelligent #leadership, not to mention just being a good coworker. It can open up new lines of communication, create understanding, and help everyone achieve common goals.Of course, none of that means it’s easy. There are always going to be times when empathy is uniquely difficult to summon and sustain. When the going gets tough, your patience wears thin, and you can feel your frustration rising, it’s (...)

    #careers #management #mindfulness