• Pourquoi, grâce à l’argent des payeurs d’impôts, le Royaume-Uni (et d’autres pays civilisés bien sûr) finance-t-il les études de milliardaires (et modérés) libanais (et d’autres milliardaires de pays non civilisés bien sûr) ?

    Lina Zhaim ~ لينا sur Twitter : “I ask UK ambassador ianfcollard @ukinlebanon @JamesCleverly @TFletcher @lbBritish why would the UK spend British tax payer money on educating Lebanon’s wealthiest politicians? Is this how the UK provides support to a country where people struggle for an education?” / Twitter
    https://twitter.com/LinaZhaim/status/1428256437776617477

     “#soft_power

  • Gamasutra - The Microsoft Game Development Kit is now available for free on GitHub
    https://gamasutra.com/view/news/385556/The_Microsoft_Game_Development_Kit_is_now_available_for_free_on_GitHub.ph

    Microsoft has released its Microsoft Game Development Kit (GDK) onto GitHub for free. 

    […]

    Microsoft noted that access to publish on the Xbox ecosystem will remain private, and that anybody looking to launch a game on Xbox or Windows PC will still need to apply and qualify for the Xbox Developer Program.

    #jeu_vidéo #jeux_vidéo #développement_informatique #programmation_informatique #framework #sdk #software_development_kit #gdk #game_development_kit #moteur_de_jeu_vidéo #microsoft #xbox #microsoft_xbox #pc #ordinateur_pc #gratuit #xbox_developer_program

  • Sketchfab Community Blog - » Sketchfab is Joining the Epic Games Family
    https://sketchfab.com/blogs/community/sketchfab-is-joining-the-epic-games-family

    Sketchfab is Joining the Epic Games Family

    […]

    We will remain an independently branded service with the same mission and vision, while working closely with Epic Games. We started collaborating with Epic earlier this year through an Epic MegaGrant, and are excited to accelerate those efforts. We are also already integrated with various Epic Games products like RealityCapture and ArtStation. We will maintain and expand our integration efforts with all creation tools and 3D/VR/AR platforms, so you can easily upload to and import from Sketchfab everywhere.

    Lower fees for our Sellers
    As part of our shared goal to make Sketchfab’s offerings more profitable to creators, we are reducing Sketchfab’s store fees to 12%, effective immediately.

    Sketchfab Plus is now free
    We are also making all the Plus plan features free, which means more uploads and larger file size at no cost.

    #jeu_vidéo #jeux_vidéo #développement #outil #outil_3d #outil_modélisation_3d #modélisation #epic_games #sketchfab #acquisition #3d #saas #software_as_a_service #logiciel

  • The power of private philanthropy in international development

    In 1959, the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations pledged seven million US$ to establish the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) at Los Baños in the Philippines. They planted technologies originating in the US into the Philippines landscape, along with new institutions, infrastructures, and attitudes. Yet this intervention was far from unique, nor was it spectacular relative to other philanthropic ‘missions’ from the 20th century.

    How did philanthropic foundations come to wield such influence over how we think about and do development, despite being so far removed from the poor and their poverty in the Global South?

    In a recent paper published in the journal Economy and Society, we suggest that metaphors – bridge, leapfrog, platform, satellite, interdigitate – are useful for thinking about the machinations of philanthropic foundations. In the Philippines, for example, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations were trying to bridge what they saw as a developmental lag. In endowing new scientific institutions such as IRRI that juxtaposed spaces of modernity and underdevelopment, they saw themselves bringing so-called third world countries into present–day modernity from elsewhere by leapfrogging historical time. In so doing, they purposively bypassed actors that might otherwise have been central: such as post–colonial governments, trade unions, and peasantry, along with their respective interests and demands, while providing platforms for other – preferred – ideas, institutions, and interests to dominate.

    We offer examples, below, from three developmental epochs.

    Scientific development (1940s – 70s)

    From the 1920s, the ‘big three’ US foundations (Ford, Rockefeller, Carnegie) moved away from traditional notions of charity towards a more systematic approach to grant-making that involved diagnosing and attacking the ‘root causes’ of poverty. These foundations went on to prescribe the transfer of models of science and development that had evolved within a US context – but were nevertheless considered universally applicable – to solve problems in diverse and distant lands. In public health, for example, ‘success against hookworm in the United States helped inspire the belief that such programs could be replicated in other parts of the world, and were indeed expanded to include malaria and yellow fever, among others’. Similarly, the Tennessee Valley Authority’s model of river–basin integrated regional development was replicated in India, Laos, Vietnam, Egypt, Lebanon, Tanzania, and Brazil.

    The chosen strategy of institutional replication can be understood as the development of satellites––as new scientific institutions invested with a distinct local/regional identity remained, nonetheless, within the orbit of the ‘metropolis’. US foundations’ preference for satellite creation was exemplified by the ‘Green Revolution’—an ambitious programme of agricultural modernization in South and Southeast Asia spearheaded by the Rockefeller and Ford Foundations and implemented through international institutions for whom IRRI was the template.

    Such large-scale funding was justified as essential in the fight against communism.

    The Green Revolution offered a technocratic solution to the problem of food shortage in South and Southeast Asia—the frontier of the Cold War. Meanwhile, for developmentalist regimes that, in the Philippines as elsewhere, had superseded post-independence socialist governments, these programmes provided a welcome diversion from redistributive politics. In this context, institutions like IRRI and their ‘miracle seeds’ were showcased as investments in and symbols of modernity and development. Meanwhile, an increasingly transnational agribusiness sector expanded into new markets for seeds, agrichemicals, machinery, and, ultimately, land.

    The turn to partnerships (1970s – 2000s)

    By the 1970s, the era of large–scale investment in technical assistance to developing country governments and public bureaucracies was coming to an end. The Ford Foundation led the way in pioneering a new approach through its population programmes in South Asia. This new ‘partnership’ mode of intervention was a more arms-length form of satellite creation which emphasised the value of local experience. Rather than obstacles to progress, local communities were reimagined as ‘potential reservoirs of entrepreneurship’ that could be mobilized for economic development.

    In Bangladesh, for example, the Ford Foundation partnered with NGOs such as the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) and Concerned Women for Family Planning (CWFP) to mainstream ‘economic empowerment’ programmes that co-opted local NGOs into service provision to citizens-as-consumers. This approach was epitomised by the rise of microfinance, which merged women’s empowerment with hard-headed pragmatism that saw women as reliable borrowers and opened up new areas of social life to marketization.

    By the late-1990s private sector actors had begun to overshadow civil society organizations in the constitution of development partnerships, where state intervention was necessary to support the market if it was to deliver desirable outcomes. Foundations’ efforts were redirected towards brokering increasingly complex public-private partnerships (PPPs). This mode of philanthropy was exemplified by the Rockefeller Foundation’s role in establishing product development partnerships as the institutional blueprint for global vaccine development. Through a combination of interdigitating (embedding itself in the partnership) and platforming (ensuring its preferred model became the global standard), it enabled the Foundation to continue to wield ‘influence in the health sphere, despite its relative decline in assets’.

    Philanthrocapitalism (2000s – present)

    In the lead up to the 2015 UN Conference at which the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were agreed, a consensus formed that private development financing was both desirable and necessary if the ‘trillions’ needed to close the ‘financing gap’ were to be found. For DAC donor countries, the privatization of aid was a way to maintain commitments while implementing economic austerity at home in the wake of the global finance crisis. Philanthrocapitalism emerged to transform philanthropic giving into a ‘profit–oriented investment process’, as grant-making gave way to impact investing.

    The idea of impact investing was hardly new, however. The term had been coined as far back as 2007 at a meeting hosted by the Rockefeller Foundation at its Bellagio Centre. Since then, the mainstreaming of impact investing has occurred in stages, beginning with the aforementioned normalisation of PPPs along with their close relative, blended finance. These strategies served as transit platforms for the formation of networks shaped by financial logics. The final step came with the shift from blended finance as a strategy to impact investing ‘as an asset class’.

    A foundation that embodies the 21st c. transition to philanthrocapitalism is the Omidyar Network, created by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar in 2004. The Network is structured both as a non–profit organization and for–profit venture that ‘invests in entities with a broad social mission’. It has successfully interdigitated with ODA agencies to further align development financing with the financial sector. In 2013, for example, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) launched Global Development Innovation Ventures (GDIV), ‘a global investment platform, with Omidyar Network as a founding member’.

    Conclusion

    US foundations have achieved their power by forging development technoscapes centred in purportedly scale–neutral technologies and techniques – from vaccines to ‘miracle seeds’ to management’s ‘one best way’. They have become increasingly sophisticated in their development of ideational and institutional platforms from which to influence, not only how their assets are deployed, but how, when and where public funds are channelled and towards what ends. This is accompanied by strategies for creating dense, interdigitate connections between key actors and imaginaries of the respective epoch. In the process, foundations have been able to influence debates about development financing itself; presenting its own ‘success stories’ as evidence for preferred financing mechanisms, allocating respective roles of public and private sector actors, and representing the most cost–effective way to resource development.

    Whether US foundations maintain their hegemony or are eclipsed by models of elite philanthropy in East Asia and Latin America, remains to be seen. Indications are that emerging philanthropists in these regions may be well placed to leapfrog over transitioning philanthropic sectors in Western countries by ‘aligning their philanthropic giving with the new financialized paradigm’ from the outset.

    Using ‘simple’ metaphors, we have explored their potential and power to map, analyse, theorize, and interpret philanthropic organizations’ disproportionate influence in development. These provide us with a conceptual language that connects with earlier and emergent critiques of philanthropy working both within and somehow above the ‘field’ of development. Use of metaphors in this way is revealing not just of developmental inclusions but also its exclusions: ideascast aside, routes not pursued, and actors excluded.

    https://developingeconomics.org/2021/05/10/the-power-of-private-philanthropy-in-international-development

    #philanthropie #philanthrocapitalisme #développement #coopération_au_développement #aide_au_développement #privatisation #influence #Ford #Rockefeller #Carnegie #soft_power #charité #root_causes #causes_profondes #pauvreté #science #tranfert #technologie #ressources_pédagogiques #réplique #modernisation #fondations #guerre_froide #green_revolution #révolution_verte #développementalisme #modernité #industrie_agro-alimentaire #partnerships #micro-finance #entrepreneuriat #entreprenariat #partenariat_public-privé (#PPP) #privatisation_de_l'aide #histoire #Omidyar_Network #Pierre_Omidyar

  • #Campagnes de #dissuasion massive

    Pour contraindre à l’#immobilité les candidats à la migration, jugés indésirables, les gouvernements occidentaux ne se contentent pas depuis les années 1990 de militariser leurs frontières et de durcir leur législation. Aux stratégies répressives s’ajoutent des méthodes d’apparence plus consensuelle : les campagnes d’information multimédias avertissant des #dangers du voyage.

    « Et au lieu d’aller de l’avant, il pensa à rentrer. Par le biais d’un serment, il dit à son cousin décédé : “Si Dieu doit m’ôter la vie, que ce soit dans mon pays bien-aimé.” » Cette #chanson en espagnol raconte le périple d’un Mexicain qui, ayant vu son cousin mourir au cours du voyage vers les États-Unis, se résout à rebrousser chemin. Enregistrée en 2008 grâce à des fonds gouvernementaux américains, elle fut envoyée aux radios de plusieurs pays d’Amérique centrale par une agence de #publicité privée, laquelle se garda bien de révéler l’identité du commanditaire (1).

    Arme de découragement typiquement américaine ? Plusieurs États européens recourent eux aussi à ces méthodes de #communication_dissuasive, en particulier depuis la « crise » des réfugiés de l’été 2015. En #Hongrie comme au #Danemark, les pouvoirs publics ont financé des publicités dans des quotidiens libanais et jordaniens. « Les Hongrois sont hospitaliers, mais les sanctions les plus sévères sont prises à l’encontre de ceux qui tentent d’entrer illégalement en Hongrie », lisait-on ici. « Le Parlement danois vient d’adopter un règlement visant à réduire de 50 % les prestations sociales pour les réfugiés nouvellement arrivés », apprenait-on là (2). En 2017, plusieurs #artistes ouest-africains dansaient et chantaient dans un #clip intitulé #Bul_Sank_sa_Bakane_bi (« Ne risque pas ta vie »). « L’immigration est bonne si elle est légale », « Reste en Afrique pour la développer, il n’y a pas mieux qu’ici », « Jeunesse, ce que tu ignores, c’est qu’à l’étranger ce n’est pas aussi facile que tu le crois », clamait cette chanson financée par le gouvernement italien dans le cadre d’une opération de l’#Organisation_internationale_pour_les_migrations (#OIM) baptisée « #Migrants_conscients » (3).

    « Pourquoi risquer votre vie ? »

    Ces campagnes qui ciblent des personnes n’ayant pas encore tenté de rejoindre l’Occident, mais susceptibles de vouloir le faire, insistent sur l’inutilité de l’immigration irrégulière (ceux qui s’y essaient seront systématiquement renvoyés chez eux) et sur les rigueurs de l’« État-providence ». Elles mettent en avant les dangers du voyage, la dureté des #conditions_de_vie dans les pays de transit et de destination, les #risques de traite, de trafic, d’exploitation ou tout simplement de mort. Point commun de ces mises en scène : ne pas évoquer les politiques restrictives qui rendent l’expérience migratoire toujours plus périlleuse. Elles cherchent plutôt à agir sur les #choix_individuels.

    Déployées dans les pays de départ et de transit, elles prolongent l’#externalisation du contrôle migratoire (4) et complètent la surveillance policière des frontières par des stratégies de #persuasion. L’objectif de #contrôle_migratoire disparaît sous une terminologie doucereuse : ces campagnes sont dites d’« #information » ou de « #sensibilisation », un vocabulaire qui les associe à des actions humanitaires, destinées à protéger les aspirants au départ. Voire à protéger les populations restées au pays des mensonges de leurs proches : une vidéo financée par la #Suisse (5) à destination du Cameroun enjoint ainsi de se méfier des récits des émigrés, supposés enjoliver l’expérience migratoire (« Ne croyez pas tout ce que vous entendez »).

    Initialement appuyées sur des médias traditionnels, ces actions se développent désormais via #Facebook, #Twitter ou #YouTube. En #Australie, le gouvernement a réalisé en 2014 une série de petits films traduits dans une quinzaine de langues parlées en Asie du Sud-Est, en Afghanistan et en Indonésie : « Pas question. Vous ne ferez pas de l’Australie votre chez-vous. » Des responsables militaires en treillis exposent d’un ton martial la politique de leur pays : « Si vous voyagez par bateau sans visa, vous ne pourrez jamais faire de l’Australie votre pays. Il n’y a pas d’exception. Ne croyez pas les mensonges des passeurs » (6).

    Les concepteurs ont sollicité YouTube afin que la plate-forme diffuse les #vidéos sous la forme de publicités précédant les contenus recherchés par des internautes susceptibles d’émigrer. Le recours aux #algorithmes permet en effet de cibler les utilisateurs dont le profil indique qu’ils parlent certaines langues, comme le farsi ou le vietnamien. De même, en privilégiant des vidéos populaires chez les #jeunes, YouTube facilite le #ciblage_démographique recherché. Par la suite, ces clips ont envahi les fils d’actualités Facebook de citoyens australiens issus de l’immigration, sélectionnés par l’#algorithme car ils parlent l’une des langues visées par la campagne. En s’adressant à ces personnes nées en Australie, les autorités espéraient qu’elles inviteraient elles-mêmes les ressortissants de leur pays d’origine à rester chez eux (7).

    C’est également vers Facebook que se tourne le gouvernement de la #Norvège en 2015. Accusé de passivité face à l’arrivée de réfugiés à la frontière russe, il finance la réalisation de deux vidéos, « Pourquoi risquer votre vie ? » et « Vous risquez d’être renvoyés » (8). Les utilisateurs du réseau social avaient initialement la possibilité de réagir, par le biais des traditionnels « j’aime » ou en postant des commentaires, ce qui aurait dû permettre une circulation horizontale, voire virale, de ces vidéos. Mais l’option fut suspendue après que la page eut été inondée de commentaires haineux issus de l’extrême droite, suscitant l’embarras de l’État.

    Ici encore, Facebook offre — ou plutôt, commercialise — la possibilité de cibler des jeunes hommes originaires d’Afghanistan, d’Éthiopie et d’Érythrée, dont le gouvernement norvégien considère qu’ils ne relèvent pas du droit d’asile. L’algorithme sélectionne en particulier les personnes situées hors de leur pays d’origine qui ont fait des recherches sur Internet dénotant leur intérêt pour l’Europe et la migration. Il s’agit de toucher des migrants en transit, qui hésitent quant à leur destination, et de les dissuader de choisir la Norvège. Les Syriens ne font pas partie des nationalités visées, afin de ne pas violer le droit d’asile. De même, le message mentionne explicitement que seuls les adultes seront refoulés, afin de ne pas contester le droit des enfants à être pris en charge.

    À plusieurs reprises, depuis 2015, les autorités belges ont elles aussi utilisé Facebook pour ce type d’initiatives (9). En 2018, des photographies de centres de détention et d’un jeune migrant menotté, assorties du slogan « Non à l’immigration illégale. Ne venez pas en #Belgique » (10), furent relayées à partir d’une page Facebook créée pour l’occasion par l’Office des étrangers. Cette page n’existait toutefois qu’en anglais, ce qui a fait croire à un faux (y compris parmi les forces de l’ordre), poussant le gouvernement belge à la supprimer au profit d’un site plus classique, humblement intitulé « Faits sur la Belgique » (11).

    Si de telles initiatives prolifèrent, c’est que les États européens sont engagés dans une course à la dissuasion qui les oppose les uns aux autres. Le 30 mai 2018, en France, M. Gérard Collomb, alors ministre de l’intérieur, affirmait lors d’une audition au Sénat que les migrants faisaient du « #benchmarking » pour identifier les pays les plus accueillants. Cette opinion semble partagée par ses pairs, et les États se montrent non seulement fermes, mais soucieux de le faire savoir.

    Le recours aux plates-formes de la Silicon Valley s’impose d’autant plus aisément que les autorités connaissent l’importance de ces outils dans le parcours des migrants. Une très large majorité d’entre eux sont en effet connectés. Ils dépendent de leur #téléphone_portable pour communiquer avec leur famille, se repérer grâce au #GPS, se faire comprendre par-delà les barrières linguistiques, conserver des photographies et des témoignages des atrocités qui justifient leur demande d’asile, appeler au secours en cas de naufrage ou de danger, ou encore retrouver des connaissances et des compatriotes dispersés.

    Un doute taraudait les autorités des États occidentaux : en connectant les individus et en leur facilitant l’accès à diverses sources d’information, les #technologies_numériques ne conféraient-elles pas une plus grande #autonomie aux migrants ? Ne facilitaient-elles pas en définitive l’immigration irrégulière (12) ? Dès lors, elles s’emploieraient à faire de ces mêmes outils la solution au problème : ils renseignent sur la #localisation et les caractéristiques des migrants, fournissant un canal privilégié de communication vers des publics ciblés.

    Systématiquement financées par les États occidentaux et impliquant de plus en plus souvent les géants du numérique, ces campagnes mobilisent aussi d’autres acteurs. Adopté sous les auspices de l’Organisation des Nations unies en 2018, le pacte mondial pour des migrations sûres, ordonnées et régulières (ou pacte de Marrakech) recommande ainsi de « mener des campagnes d’information multilingues et factuelles », d’organiser des « réunions de sensibilisation dans les pays d’origine », et ce notamment pour « mettre en lumière les risques qu’il y a à entreprendre une migration irrégulière pleine de dangers ». Le Haut-Commissariat pour les réfugiés (HCR) et l’OIM jouent donc le rôle d’intermédiaires privilégiés pour faciliter le financement de ces campagnes des États occidentaux en dehors de leur territoire.

    Efficacité douteuse

    Interviennent également des entreprises privées spécialisées dans le #marketing et la #communication. Installée à Hongkong, #Seefar développe des activités de « #communication_stratégique » à destination des migrants potentiels en Afghanistan ou en Afrique de l’Ouest. La société australienne #Put_It_Out_There_Pictures réalise pour sa part des vidéos de #propagande pour le compte de gouvernements occidentaux, comme le #téléfilm #Journey, qui met en scène des demandeurs d’asile tentant d’entrer clandestinement en Australie.

    Enfin, des associations humanitaires et d’aide au développement contribuent elles aussi à ces initiatives. Créée en 2015, d’abord pour secourir des migrants naufragés en Méditerranée, l’organisation non gouvernementale (ONG) #Proactiva_Open_Arms s’est lancée dans des projets de ce type en 2019 au Sénégal (13). Au sein des pays de départ, des pans entiers de la société se rallient à ces opérations : migrants de retour, journalistes, artistes, dirigeants associatifs et religieux… En Guinée, des artistes autrefois engagés pour l’ouverture des frontières militent à présent pour l’#immobilisation de leurs jeunes compatriotes (14).

    Le #discours_humanitaire consensuel qui argue de la nécessité de protéger les migrants en les informant facilite la coopération entre États, organisations internationales, secteurs privé et associatif. La plupart de ces acteurs sont pourtant étrangers au domaine du strict contrôle des frontières. Leur implication témoigne de l’extension du domaine de la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière.

    Avec quelle #efficacité ? Il existe très peu d’évaluations de l’impact de ces campagnes. En 2019, une étude norvégienne (15) a analysé leurs effets sur des migrants en transit à Khartoum, avec des résultats peu concluants. Ils étaient peu nombreux à avoir eu connaissance des messages gouvernementaux et ils s’estimaient de toute manière suffisamment informés, y compris à propos des aspects les plus sombres de l’expérience migratoire. Compte tenu de la couverture médiatique des drames de l’immigration irrégulière, il paraît en effet vraisemblable que les migrants potentiels connaissent les risques… mais qu’ils migrent quand même.

    https://www.monde-diplomatique.fr/2021/03/PECOUD/62833
    #migrations #réfugiés #privatisation #Italie #humanitaire #soft_power

    –-

    Ajouté à la métaliste sur les #campagnes de #dissuasion à l’#émigration :
    https://seenthis.net/messages/763551

    ping @isskein @karine4 @_kg_ @rhoumour @etraces

  • “Can’t” Is No Word for #software Developers
    https://www.fluentcpp.com/2021/03/26/cant-is-no-word-for-software-developers

    When I write those words, I’ve been working 9 years in software development. Those years have taught me technical stuff, but also a few things that are not about code itself but that leads to good code, and to more. Those non-technical things aren’t taught at school or in C++ books. Nevertheless, I consider them […]

    #Attitude #can't

  • Sur l’#OIM, en quelques mots, par #Raphaël_Krafft...

    "L’OIM est créé en 1951 pour faire contre-poids au #HCR, qui est soupçonné par les américains d’être à la solde des communistes. L’OIM a pour fonction d’organiser les #migrations. Elle a notamment eu pour premier rôle de ramener depuis l’Europe beaucoup de réfugiés suite à la seconde guerre mondiale vers les Etats-Unis, vers le Canada, l’Amérique latine, etc. Et elle a été affiliée à l’ONU depuis quelques années seulement et a un rôle particulier parce que surtout elle sert les intérêts de ses principaux bailleurs : les Etats-Unis pour ce qui concerne l’Amérique centrale et l’Europe pour ce qui concerne l’Afrique. L’OIM a plusieurs fonctions, à la fois de renforcer les capacités des #frontières intra-africaines, à la fois d’organiser les #retours_volontaires... les retours dits volontaires... Beaucoup de #vols sont organisés depuis le #Maroc, depuis la #Libye principalement pour les personnes qui ont été enfermées par les autorités libyennes pour les ramener au pays : ça peut être la Guinée, le Sénégal, la Côte d’Ivoire, beaucoup le Nigeria. Et l’OIM communique sur des retours volontaires, mais c’est pas toujours le cas, c’est-à-dire que ce sont des jeunes dont on rend visite dans des prisons, on leur dit « voilà, si tu rentres en Guinée, on te donnera 50 euro, et puis un téléphone portable avec une puce pour que tu puisses voir tes parents... beaucoup de promesses d’#emploi. L’OIM travaille beaucoup sur la création d’emploi dans les pays d’origine, avec un vocabulaire très libéral, très technique, mais les emplois c’est surtout pour conduire des moto-taxi. »

    (...)

    "Il y a tout un travail de #propagande qui est organisé par l’OIM et financé par l’Union européenne pour inciter cette jeunesse à rester chez elle. Ces #campagnes de propagande sont orchestrées notamment par la cooptation du monde des #arts et de la #culture, ainsi les rappeurs les plus célèbres de #Guinée se sont vus financer des #chansons qui prônent la #sédentarité, qui alertent sur les dangers de la route. Sauf que cette même organisation qui alerte sur les dangers de la route est la principale responsable des dangers de la route, puisque l’installation de postes-frontière, la #biométrie aux postes-frontière, le #lobbying auprès des parlementaires nigériens, nigérians, ivoiriens, guinéens pour durcir les lois... peut-être que les auditeurs de France Inter ont entendu qu’il y a eu une #criminalisation des #passeurs au Niger... c’est le fait d’un lobbying de l’OIM auprès des parlementaires pour rendre plus compliqué le passage de ces frontières, des frontières qui sont millénaires...

    https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/l-humeur-vagabonde/l-humeur-vagabonde-27-fevrier-2021
    #IOM #réinsertion #art #campagne

    ping @rhoumour @karine4 @isskein @_kg_

    • Contrôle des frontières et des âmes : le #soft_power de l’OIM en Afrique

      Comment l’organisation internationale pour les migrations tente à travers toute l’Afrique d’éviter les départs en s’appuyant sur les artistes et les chanteurs. Un décryptage à retrouver dans la Revue du Crieur, dont le numéro 15 sort ce jeudi en librairies.

      Le terminal des vols domestiques de l’aéroport Gbessia de Conakry est le lieu idéal où débarquer discrètement d’un avion en Guinée. Situé à l’écart, il n’a plus de fonction commerciale depuis que la compagnie Air Guinée qui assurait les rares vols intérieurs a fait faillite en 1992. Et quand ce ne sont pas des VIP qui pénètrent dans son hall, ce sont les migrants « rapatriés volontaires » de Libye, à l’abri des regards, pour un retour au pays perçu comme honteux parce qu’il signe l’échec de leur projet migratoire. Ils sont cent onze ce soir-là à descendre de l’avion affrété par l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations ( OIM ), en provenance de l’aéroport de Mitiga à Tripoli. En file indienne sur le tarmac, ils masquent leurs visages face à la caméra de la télévision d’État guinéenne, toujours présente depuis que l’OIM rapatrie des migrants guinéens de Libye, près de douze mille en trois ans.

      Les officiers « de protection » de l’OIM les attendent dans le hall du terminal, secondés par les bénévoles de l’Organisation guinéenne de lutte contre la migration irrégulière, créée de toutes pièces par l’Union européenne et l’OIM afin d’organiser des campagnes « de sensibilisation » à moindres frais qui visent à décourager les candidats à l’émigration. Leurs membres sont tous d’anciens migrants revenus au pays après avoir échoué dans leur aventure en Libye, en Algérie ou au Maroc. Ils sillonnent le pays, les plateaux de télévision ou les studios de radio dans le but d’alerter contre les dangers du voyage et les horreurs vécues en Libye.

      Elhadj Mohamed Diallo, le président de l’organisation, harangue les « rapatriés volontaires » dès leur arrivée dans le hall : « Votre retour n’est pas un échec ! La Guinée a besoin de vous ! Tous ensemble nous allons travailler ! Regardez-moi, je suis l’un de vous, j’ai vécu ce que vous avez vécu ! Et maintenant que vous êtes rentrés, vous allez nous aider parce qu’il faut raconter votre histoire à nos jeunes pour les empêcher de partir et qu’ils vivent la même chose que nous. »

      Tous se sont assis, hagards, dans l’attente des instructions des officiers « de protection » de l’OIM. Ils sont épuisés par des semaines voire des mois d’un voyage éprouvant qui s’est terminé dans les prisons de Libye où la plupart d’entre eux ont fait l’expérience de la torture, la malnutrition, le travail forcé et la peur de mourir noyé en mer Méditerranée lors de leurs tentatives parfois multiples de passage en Europe. Certains écoutent, voire répondent au discours du président de l’association. La plupart ont la tête ailleurs.

      Lorsque nous interrogeons l’un d’entre eux, il s’offusque du qualificatif de « volontaire » utilisé dans le programme d’aide au retour volontaire et à la réintégration ( AVRR ) de l’OIM : « Mais je n’étais pas volontaire ! Je ne voulais pas rentrer ! Ce sont les Libyens du DCIM [ Directorate for Combating Illegal Immigration ] qui m’ont forcé à signer le papier ! Je n’avais pas d’autre choix que de monter dans l’avion. Dès que j’aurai rassemblé un peu d’argent, je repartirai pour encore tenter ma chance. J’essayerai par le Maroc cette fois. »

      C’est toute l’ambiguïté de ce programme : le guide du Haut-Commissariat aux réfugiés ( HCR ) qui encadre les retours dits volontaires précise que « si les droits des réfugiés ne sont pas reconnus, s’ils sont soumis à des pressions, des restrictions et confinés dans des camps, il se peut qu’ils veuillent rentrer chez eux, mais ce ne peut être considéré comme un acte de libre choix ». Ce qui est clairement le cas en Libye où les réfugiés sont approchés par les autorités consulaires de leur pays d’origine alors qu’ils se trouvent en détention dans des conditions sanitaires déplorables.

      Lorsqu’ils déclinent l’offre qui leur est faite, on les invite à réfléchir pour la fois où elles reviendront. À raison le plus souvent d’un repas par jour qui consiste en une assiette de macaronis, d’eau saumâtre pour se désaltérer et d’un accès aux soins dépendant de l’action limitée des organisations internationales, sujets aux brimades de leurs geôliers, les migrants finissent souvent par accepter un retour « volontaire » dans leur pays d’origine.

      L’OIM leur remet l’équivalent de cinquante euros en francs guinéens, parfois un téléphone avec ce qu’il faut de crédit pour appeler leur famille, et leur promet monts et merveilles quant à leur avenir au pays. C’est le volet réintégration du programme AVRR. Il entend « aider à la réintégration à court et/ou moyen terme, y compris création d’entreprise, formation professionnelle, études, assistance médicale et autre forme d’aide adaptée aux besoins particuliers des migrants de retour ».

      Plus que l’appât d’un modeste gain, ce sont l’épuisement et le désespoir qui ont poussé Maurice Koïba à se faire rapatrier de Libye. Intercepté par les gardes-côtes libyens alors qu’il tentait de gagner l’Europe dans un canot pneumatique bondé, Maurice a été vendu par ces mêmes gardes-côtes à un certain Mohammed basé à Sabratha, quatre-vingts kilomètres à l’ouest de la capitale Tripoli. Pendant un mois et demi, il est battu tous les matins avec ses parents au téléphone de façon à ce qu’ils entendent ses cris provoqués par les sévices qu’on lui inflige, afin de les convaincre de payer la rançon qui le libérera. Son père au chômage et sa mère ménagère parviendront à réunir la somme de mille euros pour le faire libérer, l’équivalent de près de dix mois du salaire minimum en Guinée. Une fois sorti de cette prison clandestine, Maurice tente de nouveau sa chance sur un bateau de fortune avant d’être une fois encore intercepté par les gardes-côtes libyens. Cette fois-ci, il est confié aux agents du DCIM qui l’incarcèrent dans un camp dont la rénovation a été financée par l’OIM via des fonds européens.

      Là, les conditions ne sont pas meilleures que dans sa prison clandestine de Sabratha : il ne mange qu’un maigre repas par jour, l’eau est toujours saumâtre et les rares soins prodigués le sont par des équipes de Médecins sans frontières qui ont un accès limité aux malades. C’est dans ces conditions que les autorités consulaires de son pays et les agents de l’OIM lui rendent visite ainsi qu’à ses compatriotes afin de les convaincre de « bénéficier » du programme de « retour volontaire » : « Lorsque les agents de l’OIM venaient dans le camp avec leurs gilets siglés, ils n’osaient jamais s’élever contre les violences et les tortures que les geôliers libyens nous faisaient subir », se souvient Maurice, et cela nonobstant le programme de formation aux droits de l’homme toujours financé par l’Union européenne et conduit par l’OIM auprès des gardiens des centres de détention pour migrants illégaux.

      « Nous avons éprouvé des sentiments mêlés et contradictoires, ajoute-t-il, lorsque les représentants consulaires de nos pays respectifs sont venus nous recenser et nous proposer de rentrer, à la fois heureux de pouvoir être extraits de cet enfer et infiniment tristes de devoir renoncer, si près du but, à nos rêves d’avenir meilleur. Sans compter la honte que nous allions devoir affronter une fois rentrés dans nos familles et dans les quartiers de nos villes. »

      Ce n’est que le jour de leur départ que Maurice et ses compatriotes d’infortune sortent du camp pour être remis à l’OIM. L’organisation prend soin de les rendre « présentables » en vue de leur retour au pays : « Pour la première fois depuis des semaines, j’ai pu me doucher, manger à ma faim et boire de l’eau potable. L’OIM nous a remis un kit d’hygiène et des vêtements propres avant de nous emmener à l’aéroport Mitiga de Tripoli », confie Maurice.

      Arrivé à Conakry, il prend la route de Nzérékoré, à l’autre bout du pays, où vit sa famille. Une fièvre typhoïde contractée en Libye se déclare le jour de son arrivée. Malgré ses multiples appels à l’aide et contrairement aux clauses du programme AVRR, l’OIM ne donne pas suite à sa demande de prise en charge de son hospitalisation, alors que la Guinée n’est pas dotée d’un système de sécurité sociale. Le voici doublement endetté : aux mille euros de sa rançon s’ajoutent maintenant les frais de l’hôpital et du traitement qu’il doit suivre s’il ne veut pas mourir.

      Comme la majorité des candidats guinéens à l’exil, Maurice est pourvu d’un diplôme universitaire et avait tenté d’émigrer dans le but de poursuivre ses études au Maroc, en Algérie ou en Europe. Il pensait que son retour en Guinée via le programme d’aide au retour volontaire aurait pu lui ouvrir la voie vers de nouvelles opportunités professionnelles ou de formation. Il voulait étudier l’anglais. En vain. Il retourne enseigner le français dans une école secondaire privée, contre un salaire de misère, avant de comprendre que l’OIM n’aide les retournés volontaires que s’ils donnent de leur temps afin de promouvoir le message selon lequel il est mal de voyager.

      Après avoir enfilé le tee-shirt siglé du slogan « Non à l’immigration clandestine, oui à une migration digne et légale » et participé ( ou avoir été « invité » à participer ) à des campagnes de sensibilisation, on lui a financé ses études d’anglais et même d’informatique. S’il n’est que bénévole, les per diem reçus lors de ses déplacements afin de porter la bonne parole de la sédentarité heureuse, ainsi que l’appartenance à un réseau, lui assurent une sécurité enviable dans un pays dont tous les indices de développement baissent inexorablement depuis plus d’une décennie.
      Le soft power de l’OIM

      Les maux de la Guinée, l’humoriste Sow Pedro les égrène dans la salle de spectacle du Centre culturel franco-guinéen ( CCFG ). Il fait se lever la salle et lui intime d’entonner un « N’y va pas ! » sonore à chaque fléau évoqué : « – Je veux aller en Europe !… – N’y va pas ! – Loyer cher je vais chez les Blancs… – N’y va pas ! – Là-bas au moins on nous met dans des camps… – N’y va pas ! – Politiciens vous mentent tous les jours – N’y va pas ! – C’est pour ça que j’irai là-bas ! » Ainsi conclut-il sur le refrain d’un des plus grands succès de Jean-Jacques Goldman, Là-bas, qu’il enchaîne, moqueur, face au tout Conakry qui s’est déplacé pour l’applaudir avant de se retrouver au bar du Centre culturel, lors de l’entracte, et d’y échanger sur ce fléau que constitue l’immigration illégale entre personnes pouvant, du moins la plupart d’entre elles, circuler librement autour de la planète.

      Le spectacle de Sow Pedro est sponsorisé par l’OIM. Afin de mener à bien l’écriture du show, l’humoriste a bénéficié de l’expertise du bureau guinéen de l’organisation internationale : « L’équipe de l’OIM m’a fourni une documentation et nous avons beaucoup échangé ensemble pour que mon spectacle colle au plus près de la réalité vécue par mes compatriotes sur les routes de l’exil. J’étais ignorant sur ce sujet et à mille lieues d’imaginer l’ampleur des horreurs que les migrants peuvent subir sur leur chemin. »

      « Ne t’en va pas », c’est encore le refrain de Fallé, le titre phare de Degg J Force 3, le groupe de rap le plus populaire de Guinée, qui clôt la soirée au Centre culturel franco-guinéen. « Ne pars pas. La mer te tuera, c’est la mort qui t’attend », exhorte la chanson. La qualité des images du clip jure avec la production habituelle d’un groupe de cette envergure en Afrique. Et pour cause, l’Union européenne l’a financé à hauteur de quinze mille dollars et a chargé l’OIM de la mise en œuvre de sa production.

      Moussa Mbaye, l’un des deux chanteurs du groupe explique la genèse de cette chanson : « Lorsqu’en 1999 Yaguine Koïta et Fodé Tounkara avaient été retrouvés morts dans le train d’atterrissage d’un avion de la [ compagnie aérienne belge ] Sabena, ça nous avait particulièrement marqués que deux jeunes puissent mourir parce qu’ils voulaient partir en Europe. C’est ce qui nous a poussés à écrire cette chanson qui n’était jamais sortie dans aucun de nos albums, elle n’avait jusqu’alors circulé que dans les “ ghettos ”. Ce n’est finalement que beaucoup plus tard, à force d’apprendre chaque semaine la mort d’un jeune de notre quartier en Libye, dans le Sahara ou au Maroc, qu’on s’est décidés à la réécrire. Comme on n’y connaissait rien sur les questions migratoires, on est allés voir l’OIM pour qu’ils nous fournissent des informations à ce sujet. »

      Moussa et les membres de son groupe sont reçus par Fatou Diallo N’Diaye, la cheffe de mission de l’OIM en Guinée, qui choisira de travailler avec eux « parce qu’ils sont connus et que nous savions que leur chanson serait écoutée par notre public cible ». Fatou Diallo N’Diaye porte la chanson Fallé dans son cœur pour avoir largement contribué à son écriture : « L’écriture du morceau Fallé a été un travail d’équipe, un véritable brainstorming. Il y a certaines paroles que j’ai écrites moi-même tandis que d’autres l’ont été par Lucas Chandellier, notre chargé de communication. Aujourd’hui, ce morceau appartient à l’Union européenne et à l’OIM. »

      Depuis le succès commercial de Fallé, Fatou Diallo N’Diaye confesse voir de plus en plus d’artistes venir frapper à sa porte pour écrire et composer des chansons sur le thème de la migration irrégulière. Les chanteurs et musiciens ne sont pas les seuls cooptés par l’institution : auteurs de bandes dessinées, humoristes, metteurs en scène de théâtre, griots, conteurs traditionnels, organisateurs de festivals, imams, radios locales, etc., sont également sollicités.

      La représentante d’un organisme de développement qui a souhaité garder l’anonymat nous a confié que l’OIM avait cependant refusé de contribuer au financement d’un film qu’elle produisait parce que l’on y voyait des migrants guinéens arrivés en Europe et que de telles images « pouvaient susciter un espoir chez les candidats au départ ». L’OIM organise aussi des formations de journalistes sur les « techniques de couverture des questions migratoires ». Depuis 2018, près de cinq cents d’entre eux, originaires d’Afrique de l’Ouest et d’Afrique centrale, ont été formés selon la vision de l’OIM sur cette question.

      Fondée en 1951 par les États-Unis pour faire contrepoids au HCR que les diplomates américains soupçonnaient d’être sous influence communiste, l’OIM a d’abord eu la fonction logistique d’organiser le transit vers l’Amérique de dizaines de milliers de personnes déplacées par la Seconde Guerre mondiale en Europe. Selon les mots du site de l’organisation : « Simple agence logistique au départ, elle a constamment élargi son champ d’action pour devenir l’organisme international chef de file œuvrant aux côtés des gouvernements et de la société civile afin de favoriser la compréhension de la problématique migratoire, d’encourager le développement économique et social par le biais de la migration et de veiller au respect de la dignité humaine et au bien-être des migrants. »

      Ce que l’OIM met moins en valeur, en revanche, ce sont les campagnes de sensibilisation et de propagande qu’elle a mises en place au début des années 1990 dans les pays d’Europe centrale et d’Europe de l’Est afin de mettre en garde les jeunes femmes contre les réseaux de traite et de prostitution. Selon le sociologue Antoine Pécoud, Youssou N’Dour, archétype du chanteur mondialisé, serait le premier artiste africain à avoir mis sa voix et sa renommée au service de la lutte contre la migration illégale en Afrique.

      Ce n’est pas l’OIM, cette fois, qui en fut à l’origine, mais le gouvernement espagnol et l’Union européenne qui, en 2007, et alors que de nombreux Sénégalais tentaient de rallier l’archipel des Canaries en pirogue, décidaient de produire et diffuser un clip afin de les dissuader de prendre la mer. Cette vidéo met en scène une mère de famille prénommée Fatou, sans nouvelles de son fils parti depuis huit mois, et se termine par un message de Youssou N’Dour : « Vous savez déjà comment [ l’histoire de Fatou ] se termine, ce sont des milliers de familles détruites. Je suis Youssou N’Dour, s’il vous plaît, ne risquez pas votre vie en vain. Vous êtes le futur de l’Afrique. »

      Depuis lors, la liste des artistes cooptés par diverses institutions internationales et européennes ne cesse de s’allonger : Coumba Gawlo, Fatou Guewel et Adiouza au Sénégal, Bétika en Côte d’Ivoire, Ousmane Bangara et Degg J Force 3 en Guinée, Jalimadi Kanuteh en Gambie, Miss Espoir au Bénin, Will B Black au Burkina Faso, Ousmane Cissé au Mali, Zara Moussa au Niger, ou encore Ewlad Leblad en Mauritanie pour ne citer qu’eux. Lors de la campagne Aware migrants lancée en 2017 par l’OIM, l’artiste malienne Rokia Traoré a composé la chanson Be aware. Dans une interview à l’émission 28 Minutes diffusée sur Arte, elle expliquait que son but à travers cette chanson n’était pas de vouloir empêcher les jeunes Africains de partir mais « qu’il était inhumain de ne pas les informer sur les dangers de la route ». Ce qu’elle ne dit pas, c’est que sa chanson et son clip avaient été sponsorisés par le ministère italien de l’Intérieur.
      Dissuader les Africains ou rassurer les Européens ?

      Sur un continent comme l’Afrique où les frontières sont historiquement poreuses et où 80 % des migrations sont internes au continent, l’Union européenne, via l’OIM notamment, s’emploie à restreindre la liberté de circulation en modernisant les postes frontières et en formant les gardes-frontières, introduisant la technologie biométrique ou faisant pression sur les gouvernements et les parlementaires africains afin de rendre toujours plus restrictive leur législation en matière de migration, comme au Niger en 2015 avec le vote d’une loi sur la criminalisation des « passeurs ».

      C’est toute la contradiction de ces campagnes de propagande sur les dangers de la route dont les auteurs sont les principaux responsables, explique le sociologue Antoine Pécoud : « S’il est louable de renseigner les candidats à l’exil sur les dangers de la route, il y a une contradiction fondamentale dans la nature même de ce danger dont on prétend avertir les migrants. Parce que ce danger est corrélé au contrôle de l’immigration. Plus on contrôle l’immigration, plus il est difficile pour les migrants de circuler légalement, plus ils vont tenter de migrer par des chemins détournés, plus ils vont prendre de risques et plus il y aura de morts. »

      Affiliée à l’ONU depuis 2016, l’OIM demeure, à l’instar des autres agences gravitant dans la galaxie de l’organisation internationale, directement et principalement financée par les pays les plus riches de l’hémisphère occidental qui lui délèguent une gestion des migrations conforme à leurs intérêts : ceux de l’Australie en Asie et en Océanie, des États-Unis en Amérique centrale et de l’Europe en Afrique pour ne citer que ces exemples. Son budget en 2018 était de 1,8 milliard d’euros. Il provient principalement de fonds liés à des projets spécifiques qui rendent l’OIM très accommodante auprès de ses donateurs et la restreint dans le développement d’une politique qui leur serait défavorable. C’est un outil parfait de contrôle à distance de la mise en œuvre de la politique d’externalisation des frontières chère à l’Union européenne. D’autant qu’au contraire du HCR, elle n’a pas à s’embarrasser des conventions internationales et notamment de celle de 1951 relative à la protection des réfugiés.

      D’après Nauja Kleist, chercheuse au Danish Institute for International Studies, c’est précisément « le manque de crédibilité des diffuseurs de ces messages qui les rend peu efficaces auprès des populations ciblées » d’autant que « les jeunes Africains qui décident de migrer sont suffisamment informés des dangers de la route – via les réseaux sociaux notamment – et que pour un certain nombre d’entre eux, mourir socialement au pays ou physiquement en Méditerranée revient au même ». Selon elle, « ces campagnes sont surtout un moyen parmi d’autres de l’Union européenne d’adresser un message à son opinion publique afin de lui montrer qu’elle ne reste pas inactive dans la lutte contre l’immigration irrégulière ».

      Selon Antoine Pécoud, « le développement de ces campagnes de propagande est d’une certaine manière le symbole de l’échec de la répression des flux migratoires. Malgré sa brutalité et les milliards investis dans les murs et les technologies de surveillance des frontières, il se trouve que de jeunes Africains continuent d’essayer de venir ».

      Promouvoir un message sédentariste et une « désirable immobilité », selon les mots d’Antoine Pécoud, c’est aussi encourager une forme de patriotisme dans le but d’inciter les jeunes à contribuer au développement de leur pays et de l’Afrique. Une fable qui ne résiste pas aux recherches en cours sur la mobilité internationale : c’est à partir d’un certain niveau de développement qu’un pays voit ses citoyens émigrer de façon significative vers des pays plus riches. Qu’importe, avec l’argent du contribuable européen, l’OIM finance aussi des artistes porteurs de ce message.

      Dans le clip de sa chanson No Place Like Home promu par l’OIM ( « On n’est nulle part aussi bien que chez soi » ), Kofi Kinaata, la star ghanéenne du fante rap, confronte le destin d’un migrant qui a échoué dans son aventure incertaine à celui d’un proche resté au pays, lequel, à force de labeur, a pu accéder aux standards de la classe moyenne européenne incarnés dans le clip par la fondation d’une famille et l’acquisition d’une voiture neuve.

      De son côté, le groupe guinéen Degg J Force 3 a composé #Guinealove qui met en scène une Guinée largement fantasmée aux rues vierges de détritus, aux infrastructures modernes, sans bidonvilles et où se succèdent des paysages majestueux et une nature vierge alors que ce pays occupe la cent quatre-vingt-deuxième place sur les cent quatre-vingt-sept que compte le classement de l’Indice de développement humain. Le groupe l’a notamment interprétée lors du lancement en grande pompe du programme Integra, le volet réintégration du programme de retours volontaires et de réintégration de l’OIM juste après le discours du Premier ministre guinéen :

      Ma Guinée ma mère ma fierté ma cité

      Ma Guinée ma belle mon soleil ma beauté

      Ma Guinée ma terre mon chez-moi

      Mon havre de paix

      Ouvrez les frontières de Tiken Jah Fakoly, sorti en 2007, est peut-être l’un des derniers tubes africains à avoir promu aussi frontalement la liberté de circulation. Douze ans plus tard, le message adressé par la star africaine du reggae est tout autre. Son dernier album, Le monde est chaud, fait la part belle aux messages prônés par l’Union européenne en Afrique : « Dans Ouvrez les frontières, je dénonçais cette injustice dont étaient et sont toujours victimes les Africains de ne pas pouvoir circuler librement. Aujourd’hui, je dis qu’effectivement cette injustice demeure, mais si on veut que nos enfants grandissent dans une autre Afrique, alors notre place n’est pas ailleurs. Donc aujourd’hui, je dis aux jeunes de rester au pays, je dis que l’Afrique a besoin de tous ses enfants. D’autant que notre race est rabaissée quand nos frères sont mis en esclavage en Libye, quand ils ont payé si cher pour se retrouver sous les ponts à Paris. Au lieu de donner leurs forces à l’Europe, pourquoi nos jeunes ne restent-ils pas ici ? » Tiken Jah Fakoly affirme n’avoir pas reçu de fonds européens pour la production de son dernier album.

      Ses compatriotes du Magic System, eux, ne s’en cachent pas et ont compris via leur fondation éponyme que le développement de l’emploi local et la lutte contre la migration irrégulière étaient des thèmes capteurs de fonds européens. Partenaire privilégiée de l’Union européenne en Côte d’Ivoire à travers une multitude de projets de développement, la fondation Magic System a signé en février dernier avec l’OIM un partenariat qui engage les deux structures « à travailler main dans la main pour promouvoir des migrations sûres et informées, et des alternatives durables à la migration irrégulière ».

      La migration sûre, c’est le parent pauvre du Fonds fiduciaire d’urgence européen pour l’Afrique, créé le 11 novembre 2015 lors du sommet européen de La Valette sur la migration, et à partir duquel sont financées les campagnes dites de sensibilisation et de propagande en prévention de la migration irrégulière. L’un des points sur lequel les pays européens se sont pourtant entendus et qui consiste à « favoriser la migration et la mobilité légales » ne s’est, pour l’heure, toujours pas concrétisé sur le terrain et ne reçoit ni publicité ni propagande dans les pays de départ. Maurice Koïba, le rapatrié de Libye, désormais tout à ses études d’anglais et d’informatique et toujours en campagne « pour une migration digne et légale », a renoncé depuis belle lurette à demander un visa à l’ambassade de France : son prix est prohibitif pour un jeune de sa condition sociale et n’est pas remboursé en cas de refus, ce qui attend l’immense majorité des demandes.

      https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/200220/controle-des-frontieres-et-des-ames-le-soft-power-de-l-oim-en-afrique?ongl

  • Only Fans, Mym : du #softporn à la #pédopornographie.

    Crazy Sally a fait un travail d’enquête sur ces nouvelles plateformes qui attirent de plus en plus d’ados appâté-e-s par l’argent facile. Elle ne fait pas l’impasse sur la facilitation et sécurisation que ça représente pour le travail du sexe, mais comme elle l’explique, son sujet est surtout l’inquiétude pour la sécurité des mineurs.
    Le relai promotionnel se fait aussi via #twitter grâce aux tags des plateformes, #OnlyFans & #MyM, mais là aussi le plus gros succès est lorsqu’ils sont additionnés aux tags #ado #teen #petiteteen ou #barelylegal... qui ne laisse aucune équivoque.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXMe-hqJPJc


    J’ajoute que ces derniers jours, un autre tag a envahi twitter et instagram, provenant d’un « défi sexy » sur #Tik-Tok.
    Elle fait aussi référence à un reportage de la BBC, « Nudes4sale » : https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p087m1nh qui estime à 40% le nombre de fourniseur-euse-s de contenu qui seraient mineurs.
    #nouvelles_économies #pornographie #modération et #educ_pop aussi <3

  • #Galène

    Galène is a #videoconferencing_server that is easy to deploy (just copy a few files and run the binary) and that requires moderate server resources. It was originally designed for lectures and conferences (where a single speaker streams audio and video to hundreds or thousands of users), but later evolved to be useful for student practicals (where users are divided into many small groups), and meetings (where a few dozen users interact with each other).

    Galène’s server side is implemented in #Go, and uses the #Pion implementation of #WebRTC. The server is regularly tested on Linux/amd64 and Linux/arm64, and has been reported to run on Windows; it should in principle be portable to other systems, including Mac OS X. The client is implemented in #Javascript, and works on recent versions of all major web browsers, both on desktop and mobile (but see below for caveats with specific browsers).

    While traffic is encrypted from sender to server and from server to client, Galène does not perform end-to-end encryption: anyone who controls the server might, in principle, be able to access the data being exchanged. For best security, you should install your own server.

    Galène’s is not the only self-hosted WebRTC server. Alternatives include Janus, Ion-SFU, and Jitsi.

    Galène is free and #open_source #software, subject to the MIT licence. Galène’s development is supported by Nexedi, who fund Alain Takoudjou’s work on the user interface.

    https://galene.org
    #alternatives #alternative #zoom #microsoft_teams #teams #vidéoconférences #visioconférences #visio-conférences #vidéo-conférences #logiciel #galene

    pas utilisé... mais peut-être utile et intéressant à tester ?

  • INSIKA® Fiskaltaxameter für Taxis - deine Taxicloud
    https://www.starksoft.de

    Schauschau, intelligente Pause heißt das bei Starksoft. Hier werden Bereitschaftszeiten, die Fahrerin oder Fahrer außerhalb des Autos verbringt, etwa um Gymnastik zu machen oder mit Kollegen zu sprechen, zu Pausenzeiten umdefiniert und erfaßt.

    INTELLIGENTE ARBEITSZEITENPRO

    Die DriverApp Pro erkennt automatisch, ob sich dein Personal im Fahrzeug oder außerhalb des Fahrzeugs befindet und sie erkennt auch, ob das Taxi des Personals fährt oder gerade steht und bietet dementsprechend intelligente Pausen vor.

    Hier wird es vollkommen absurd. Pause machen kann ein Arbeitnehmer jederzeit, soweit er nicht gegen betriebliche Vereinbarungen verstößt. Dabei muß die Pause vorhersehbar sein, eine bestimmte Mindestdauer von i.d.R. 15 Minuten haben und darf nicht durch eine Aufforderung zur Arbeit unterbrochern werden können.

    Pause machen am Taxi-Halteplatz, wo jederzeit ein Fahrauftrag erteilt oder eine Fahranfrage gestellt werden kann, ist also per definitionem unmöglich. Erkennt die Software es etwa, wenn das Taxi am Halteplatz steht, und verhindert, dass die Standzeit als Pause erfasst wird?

    In der besten aller Welten wäre das möglich. Hier ist vermutlich eher das Gegenteil der Fall, zumindest wenn man davon ausgeht, dass die schräge Denkungsart der „intelligenten Pause“ auch diese Programmfunktion prägt.

    PAUSENAUFZEICHNUNGEN

    Dein Personal kann während oder nach der Schicht nur zulässige Pausen eintragen. Dadurch kannst du nachvollziehen, ob die gesetzliche Arbeitszeit für den Dienst eingehalten wurde.

    #Taxi #Arbeit #Lohnraub #Software

  • Apple-Facebook-Streit: Die Macht der aufgeklärten Nutzer - Golem.de
    https://diasp.eu/p/11627404

    Apple-Facebook-Streit: Die Macht der aufgeklärten Nutzer - Golem.de

    Facebook warnt vor hohen Umsatzeinbußen bei Apps, wenn Apple die Trackingvorgaben ändert. Das zeigt den Einfluss informierter Einwilligung. Apple-Facebook-Streit: Die Macht der aufgeklärten Nutzer - Golem.de #Tracking #App #Facebook #GooglePlay #MarkZuckerberg #Onlinewerbung #Software #SozialesNetz #iOS7 #Apple

  • Pourquoi « Fauda » n’est pas une série réaliste
    (The Conversation, 26 mars 2020)

    Sortie sur Netflix, la troisième saison de Fauda, la série israélienne portant à l’écran le quotidien de forces spéciales de Tsahal, est louée par une partie de la presse française. Produite en 2015 par deux vétérans de cette unité, (...) elle narre les « aventures » des mista’aravim (littéralement les « arabisés »), dont la mission est d’opérer incognito derrière les lignes ennemies en se déguisant en civils palestiniens, ce qui est interdit au regard du droit international. Elle a suscité des éloges appuyés aussi bien que de virulentes critiques (...). La réponse des deux showrunners à ces critiques est ambiguë. Ces derniers arguent de leur licence fictionnelle sans craindre la contradiction avec leurs déclarations sur « l’honnêteté brutale » de leur série. Ils estiment « honorer le discours palestinien » tout en expliquant que : « Nous sommes Israéliens, nous écrivons une série israélienne, le discours est israélien, et je veux vraiment dire à tous les critiques qui nous demandent d’apporter des scénaristes palestiniens, vous savez, si les Palestiniens veulent écrire une série, qu’ils écrivent une série. » Une telle remarque ignore le fait cinéma palestinien rencontre de nombreux obstacles, notamment du fait que les permis de filmer en Cisjordanie soient délivrés par l’État d’Israël. Le film Five Broken Cameras décrit les difficultés rencontrées par les Palestiniens à filmer leur quotidien. Co-réalisé par le Palestinien Emad Burnat et l’Israélien Guy Davidi, il a pour sujet les manifestations à Bil’in, un village de Cisjordanie traversé par le mur de séparation. Au cours du tournage, cinq caméras ont été détruites par les soldats israéliens, ce qui témoigne des difficultés des Palestiniens à produire et décrire leur propre histoire.

    #asymétrie #récits #récit #appropriation_culturelle #séries #Fauda #Palestine #Israël #colonisation #colonialisme #guerre #Palestiniens #représentations #soft_power #Netflix

    https://theconversation.com/pourquoi-fauda-nest-pas-une-serie-realiste-129394

    • EU: Frontex splashes out: millions of euros for new technology and equipment (19.06.2020)

      The approval of the new #Frontex_Regulation in November 2019 implied an increase of competences, budget and capabilities for the EU’s border agency, which is now equipping itself with increased means to monitor events and developments at the borders and beyond, as well as renewing its IT systems to improve the management of the reams of data to which it will have access.

      In 2020 Frontex’s #budget grew to €420.6 million, an increase of over 34% compared to 2019. The European Commission has proposed that in the next EU budget (formally known as the Multiannual Financial Framework or MFF, covering 2021-27) €11 billion will be made available to the agency, although legal negotiations are ongoing and have hit significant stumbling blocks due to Brexit, the COVID-19 pandemic and political disagreements.

      Nevertheless, the increase for this year has clearly provided a number of opportunities for Frontex. For instance, it has already agreed contracts worth €28 million for the acquisition of dozens of vehicles equipped with thermal and day cameras, surveillance radar and sensors.

      According to the contract for the provision of Mobile Surveillance Systems, these new tools will be used “for detection, identification and recognising of objects of interest e.g. human beings and/or groups of people, vehicles moving across the border (land and sea), as well as vessels sailing within the coastal areas, and other objects identified as objects of interest”. [1]

      Frontex has also published a call for tenders for Maritime Analysis Tools, worth a total of up to €2.6 million. With this, Frontex seeks to improve access to “big data” for maritime analysis. [2] The objective of deploying these tools is to enhance Frontex’s operational support to EU border, coast guard and law enforcement authorities in “suppressing and preventing, among others, illegal migration and cross-border crime in the maritime domain”.

      Moreover, the system should be capable of delivering analysis and identification of high-risk threats following the collection and storage of “big data”. It is not clear how much human input and monitoring there will be of the identification of risks. The call for tenders says the winning bidder should have been announced in May, but there is no public information on the chosen company so far.

      As part of a 12-month pilot project to examine how maritime analysis tools could “support multipurpose operational response,” Frontex previously engaged the services of the Tel Aviv-based company Windward Ltd, which claims to fuse “maritime data and artificial intelligence… to provide the right insights, with the right context, at the right time.” [3] Windward, whose current chairman is John Browne, the former CEO of the multinational oil company BP, received €783,000 for its work. [4]

      As the agency’s gathering and processing of data increases, it also aims to improve and develop its own internal IT systems, through a two-year project worth €34 million. This will establish a set of “framework contracts”. Through these, each time the agency seeks a new IT service or system, companies selected to participate in the framework contracts will submit bids for the work. [5]

      The agency is also seeking a ’Software Solution for EBCG [European Border and Coast Guard] Team Members to Access to Schengen Information System’, through a contract worth up to €5 million. [6] The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the EU’s largest database, enabling cooperation between authorities working in the fields of police, border control and customs of all the Schengen states (26 EU member states plus Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland) and its legal bases were recently reformed to include new types of alert and categories of data. [7]

      This software will give Frontex officials direct access to certain data within the SIS. Currently, they have to request access via national border guards in the country in which they are operating. This would give complete autonomy to Frontex officials to consult the SIS whilst undertaking operations, shortening the length of the procedure. [8]

      With the legal basis for increasing Frontex’s powers in place, the process to build up its personnel, material and surveillance capacities continues, with significant financial implications.

      https://www.statewatch.org/news/2020/june/eu-frontex-splashes-out-millions-of-euros-for-new-technology-and-equipme

      #technologie #équipement #Multiannual_Financial_Framework #MFF #surveillance #Mobile_Surveillance_Systems #Maritime_Analysis_Tools #données #big_data #mer #Windward_Ltd #Israël #John_Browne #BP #complexe_militaro-industriel #Software_Solution_for_EBCG_Team_Members_to_Access_to_Schengen_Information_System #SIS #Schengen_Information_System

    • EU : Guns, guards and guidelines : reinforcement of Frontex runs into problems (26.05.2020)

      An internal report circulated by Frontex to EU government delegations highlights a series of issues in implementing the agency’s new legislation. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, the agency is urging swift action to implement the mandate and is pressing ahead with the recruitment of its new ‘standing corps’. However, there are legal problems with the acquisition, registration, storage and transport of weapons. The agency is also calling for derogations from EU rules on staff disciplinary measures in relation to the use of force; and wants an extended set of privileges and immunities. Furthermore, it is assisting with “voluntary return” despite this activity appearing to fall outside of its legal mandate.

      State-of-play report

      At the end of April 2020, Frontex circulated a report to EU government delegations in the Council outlining the state of play of the implementation of its new Regulation (“EBCG 2.0 Regulation”, in the agency and Commission’s words), especially relating to “current challenges”.[1] Presumably, this refers to the outbreak of a pandemic, though the report also acknowledges challenges created by the legal ambiguities contained in the Regulation itself, in particular with regard to the acquisition of weapons, supervisory and disciplinary mechanisms, legal privileges and immunities and involvement in “voluntary return” operations.

      The path set out in the report is that the “operational autonomy of the agency will gradually increase towards 2027” until it is a “fully-fledged and reliable partner” to EU and Schengen states. It acknowledges the impacts of unforeseen world events on the EU’s forthcoming budget (Multi-annual Financial Framework, MFF) for 2021-27, and hints at the impact this will have on Frontex’s own budget and objectives. Nevertheless, the agency is still determined to “continue increasing the capabilities” of the agency, including its acquisition of new equipment and employment of new staff for its standing corps.

      The main issues covered by the report are: Frontex’s new standing corps of staff, executive powers and the use of force, fundamental rights and data protection, and the integration into Frontex of EUROSUR, the European Border Surveillance System.

      The new standing corps

      Recruitment

      A new standing corps of 10,000 Frontex staff by 2024 is to be, in the words of the agency, its “biggest game changer”.[2] The report notes that the establishment of the standing corps has been heavily affected by the outbreak of Covid-19. According to the report, 7,238 individuals had applied to join the standing corps before the outbreak of the pandemic. 5,482 of these – over 75% – were assessed by the agency as eligible, with a final 304 passing the entire selection process to be on the “reserve lists”.[3]

      Despite interruptions to the recruitment procedure following worldwide lockdown measures, interviews for Category 1 staff – permanent Frontex staff members to be deployed on operations – were resumed via video by the end of April. 80 candidates were shortlisted for the first week, and Frontex aims to interview 1,000 people in total. Despite this adaptation, successful candidates will have to wait for Frontex’s contractor to re-open in order to carry out medical tests, an obligatory requirement for the standing corps.[4]

      In 2020, Frontex joined the European Defence Agency’s Satellite Communications (SatCom) and Communications and Information System (CIS) services in order to ensure ICT support for the standing corps in operation as of 2021.[5] The EDA describes SatCom and CIS as “fundamental for Communication, Command and Control in military operations… [enabling] EU Commanders to connect forces in remote areas with HQs and capitals and to manage the forces missions and tasks”.[6]

      Training

      The basic training programme, endorsed by the management board in October 2019, is designed for Category 1 staff. It includes specific training in interoperability and “harmonisation with member states”. The actual syllabus, content and materials for this basic training were developed by March 2020; Statewatch has made a request for access to these documents, which is currently pending with the Frontex Transparency Office. This process has also been affected by the novel coronavirus, though the report insists that “no delay is foreseen in the availability of the specialised profile related training of the standing corps”.

      Use of force

      The state-of-play-report acknowledges a number of legal ambiguities surrounding some of the more controversial powers outlined in Frontex’s 2019 Regulation, highlighting perhaps that political ambition, rather than serious consideration and assessment, propelled the legislation, overtaking adequate procedure and oversight. The incentive to enact the legislation within a short timeframe is cited as a reason that no impact assessment was carried out on the proposed recast to the agency’s mandate. This draft was rushed through negotiations and approved in an unprecedented six-month period, and the details lost in its wake are now coming to light.

      Article 82 of the 2019 Regulation refers to the use of force and carriage of weapons by Frontex staff, while a supervisory mechanism for the use of force by statutory staff is established by Article 55. This says:

      “On the basis of a proposal from the executive director, the management board shall: (a) establish an appropriate supervisory mechanism to monitor the application of the provisions on use of force by statutory staff, including rules on reporting and specific measures, such as those of a disciplinary nature, with regard to the use of force during deployments”[7]

      The agency’s management board is expected to make a decision about this supervisory mechanism, including specific measures and reporting, by the end of June 2020.

      The state-of-play report posits that the legal terms of Article 55 are inconsistent with the standard rules on administrative enquiries and disciplinary measures concerning EU staff.[8] These outline, inter alia, that a dedicated disciplinary board will be established in each institution including at least one member from outside the institution, that this board must be independent and its proceedings secret. Frontex insists that its staff will be a special case as the “first uniformed service of the EU”, and will therefore require “special arrangements or derogations to the Staff Regulations” to comply with the “totally different nature of tasks and risks associated with their deployments”.[9]

      What is particularly astounding about Frontex demanding special treatment for oversight, particularly on use of force and weapons is that, as the report acknowledges, the agency cannot yet legally store or transport any weapons it acquires.

      Regarding service weapons and “non-lethal equipment”,[10] legal analysis by “external experts and a regulatory law firm” concluded that the 2019 Regulation does not provide a legal basis for acquiring, registering, storing or transporting weapons in Poland, where the agency’s headquarters is located. Frontex has applied to the Commission for clarity on how to proceed, says the report. Frontex declined to comment on the status of this consultation and any indications of the next steps the agency will take. A Commission spokesperson stated only that it had recently received the agency’s enquiry and “is analysing the request and the applicable legal framework in the view of replying to the EBCGA”, without expanding further.

      Until Frontex has the legal basis to do so, it cannot launch a tender for firearms and “non-lethal equipment” (which includes batons, pepper spray and handcuffs). However, the report implies the agency is ready to do so as soon as it receives the green light. Technical specifications are currently being finalised for “non-lethal equipment” and Frontex still plans to complete acquisition by the end of the year.

      Privileges and immunities

      The agency is also seeking special treatment with regard to the legal privileges and immunities it and its officials enjoy. Article 96 of the 2019 Regulation outlines the privileges and immunities of Frontex officers, stating:

      “Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union annexed to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and to the TFEU shall apply to the Agency and its statutory staff.” [11]

      However, Frontex notes that the Protocol does not apply to non-EU states, nor does it “offer a full protection, or take into account a need for the inviolability of assets owned by Frontex (service vehicles, vessels, aircraft)”.[12] Frontex is increasingly involved in operations taking place on non-EU territory. For instance, the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states, primarily in the Western Balkans, concerning Frontex activities in those countries. To launch operations under these agreements, Frontex will (or, in the case of Albania, already has) agree on operational plans with each state, under which Frontex staff can use executive powers.[13] The agency therefore seeks an “EU-level status of forces agreement… to account for the partial absence of rules”.

      Law enforcement

      To implement its enhanced functions regarding cross-border crime, Frontex will continue to participate in Europol’s four-year policy cycle addressing “serious international and organised crime”.[14] The agency is also developing a pilot project, “Investigation Support Activities- Cross Border Crime” (ISA-CBC), addressing drug trafficking and terrorism.

      Fundamental rights and data protection

      The ‘EBCG 2.0 Regulation’ requires several changes to fundamental rights measures by the agency, which, aside from some vague “legal analyses” seem to be undergoing development with only internal oversight.

      Firstly, to facilitate adequate independence of the Fundamental Rights Officer (FRO), special rules have to be established. The FRO was introduced under Frontex’s 2016 Regulation, but has since then been understaffed and underfunded by the agency.[15] The 2019 Regulation obliges the agency to ensure “sufficient and adequate human and financial resources” for the office, as well as 40 fundamental rights monitors.[16] These standing corps staff members will be responsible for monitoring compliance with fundamental rights standards, providing advice and assistance on the agency’s plans and activities, and will visit and evaluate operations, including acting as forced return monitors.[17]

      During negotiations over the proposed Regulation 2.0, MEPs introduced extended powers for the Fundamental Rights Officer themselves. The FRO was previously responsible for contributing to Frontex’s fundamental rights strategy and monitoring its compliance with and promotion of fundamental rights. Now, they will be able to monitor compliance by conducting investigations; offering advice where deemed necessary or upon request of the agency; providing opinions on operational plans, pilot projects and technical assistance; and carrying out on-the-spot visits. The executive director is now obliged to respond “as to how concerns regarding possible violations of fundamental rights… have been addressed,” and the management board “shall ensure that action is taken with regard to recommendations of the fundamental rights officer.” [18] The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation.

      The state-of-play report says that “legal analyses and exchanges” are ongoing, and will inform an eventual management board decision, but no timeline for this is offered. [19] The agency will also need to adapt its much criticised individual complaints mechanism to fit the requirements of the 2019 Regulation; executive director Fabrice Leggeri’s first-draft decision on this process is currently undergoing internal consultations. Even the explicit requirement set out in the 2019 Regulation for an “independent and effective” complaints mechanism,[20] does not meet minimum standards to qualify as an effective remedy, which include institutional independence, accessibility in practice, and capacity to carry out thorough and prompt investigations.[21]

      Frontex has entered into a service level agreement (SLA) with the EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) for support in establishing and training the team of fundamental rights monitors introduced by the 2019 Regulation. These monitors are to be statutory staff of the agency and will assess fundamental rights compliance of operational activities, advising, assisting and contributing to “the promotion of fundamental rights”.[22] The scope and objectives for this team were finalised at the end of March this year, and the agency will establish the team by the end of the year. Statewatch has requested clarification as to what is to be included in the team’s scope and objectives, pending with the Frontex Transparency Office.

      Regarding data protection, the agency plans a package of implementing rules (covering issues ranging from the position of data protection officer to the restriction of rights for returnees and restrictions under administrative data processing) to be implemented throughout 2020.[23] The management board will review a first draft of the implementing rules on the data protection officer in the second quarter of 2020.

      Returns

      The European Return and Reintegration Network (ERRIN) – a network of 15 European states and the Commission facilitating cooperation over return operations “as part of the EU efforts to manage migration” – is to be handed over to Frontex. [24] A handover plan is currently under the final stage of review; it reportedly outlines the scoping of activities and details of “which groups of returnees will be eligible for Frontex assistance in the future”.[25] A request from Statewatch to Frontex for comment on what assistance will be provided by the agency to such returnees was unanswered at the time of publication.

      Since the entry into force of its new mandate, Frontex has also been providing technical assistance for so-called voluntary returns, with the first two such operations carried out on scheduled flights (as opposed to charter flights) in February 2020. A total of 28 people were returned by mid-April, despite the fact that there is no legal clarity over what the definition “voluntary return” actually refers to, as the state-of-play report also explains:

      “The terminology of voluntary return was introduced in the Regulation without providing any definition thereof. This terminology (voluntary departure vs voluntary return) is moreover not in line with the terminology used in the Return Directive (EBCG 2.0 refers to the definition of returns provided for in the Return Directive. The Return Directive, however, does not cover voluntary returns; a voluntary return is not a return within the meaning of the Return Directive). Further elaboration is needed.”[26]

      On top of requiring “further clarification”, if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate. Statewatch has launched an investigation into the agency’s activities relating to voluntary returns, to outline the number of such operations to date, their country of return and country of destination.

      Frontex is currently developing a module dedicated to voluntary returns by charter flight for its FAR (Frontex Application for Returns) platform (part of its return case management system). On top of the technical support delivered by the agency, Frontex also foresees the provision of on-the-ground support from Frontex representatives or a “return counsellor”, who will form part of the dedicated return teams planned for the standing corps from 2021.[27]

      Frontex has updated its return case management system (RECAMAS), an online platform for member state authorities and Frontex to communicate and plan return operations, to manage an increased scope. The state-of-play report implies that this includes detail on post-return activities in a new “post-return module”, indicating that Frontex is acting on commitments to expand its activity in this area. According to the agency’s roadmap on implementing the 2019 Regulation, an action plan on how the agency will provide post-return support to people (Article 48(1), 2019 Regulation) will be written by the third quarter of 2020.[28]

      In its closing paragraph, related to the budgetary impact of COVID-19 regarding return operations, the agency notes that although activities will resume once aerial transportation restrictions are eased, “the agency will not be able to provide what has been initially intended, undermining the concept of the EBCG as a whole”.[29]

      EUROSUR

      The Commission is leading progress on adopting the implementing act for the integration of EUROSUR into Frontex, which will define the implementation of new aerial surveillance,[30] expected by the end of the year.[31] Frontex is discussing new working arrangements with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL). The development by Frontex of the surveillance project’s communications network will require significant budgetary investment, as the agency plans to maintain the current system ahead of its planned replacement in 2025.[32] This investment is projected despite the agency’s recognition of the economic impact of Covid-19 on member states, and the consequent adjustments to the MFF 2021-27.

      Summary

      Drafted and published as the world responds to an unprecedented pandemic, the “current challenges” referred to in the report appear, on first read, to refer to the budgetary and staffing implications of global shut down. However, the report maintains throughout that the agency’s determination to expand, in terms of powers as well as staffing, will not be stalled despite delays and budgeting adjustments. Indeed, it is implied more than once that the “current challenges” necessitate more than ever that these powers be assumed. The true challenges, from the agency’s point of view, stem from the fact that its current mandate was rushed through negotiations in six months, leading to legal ambiguities that leave it unable to acquire or transport weapons and in a tricky relationship with the EU protocol on privileges and immunities when operating in third countries. Given the violence that so frequently accompanies border control operations in the EU, it will come as a relief to many that Frontex is having difficulties acquiring its own weaponry. However, it is far from reassuring that the introduction of new measures on fundamental rights and accountability are being carried out internally and remain unavailable for public scrutiny.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Note: this article was updated on 26 May 2020 to include the European Commission’s response to Statewatch’s enquiries.

      It was updated on 1 July with some minor corrections:

      “the Council of the EU has signed or initialled a number of Status Agreements with non-EU states... under which” replaces “the agency has entered into working agreements with Balkan states, under which”
      “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in any detail in the Regulation beyond monitoring the agency’s ’compliance with fundamental rights, including by conducting investigations’” replaces “The investigatory powers of the FRO are not, however, set out in the Regulation”
      “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it further exposes the haste with which legislation written to deny entry into the EU and facilitate expulsions was drafted” replaces “if Frontex is assisting with “voluntary returns” that are not governed by the Returns Directive, it is acting outside of its legal mandate”

      Endnotes

      [1] Frontex, ‘State of play of the implementation of the EBCG 2.0 Regulation in view of current challenges’, 27 April 2020, contained in Council document 7607/20, LIMITE, 20 April 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/may/eu-council-frontex-ECBG-state-of-play-7607-20.pdf

      [2] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [3] Section 1.1, state of play report

      [4] Jane Kilpatrick, ‘Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards’, Statewatch Analysis, March 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-355-frontex-recruitment-standing-corps.pdf

      [5] Section 7.1, state of play report

      [6] EDA, ‘EU SatCom Market’, https://www.eda.europa.eu/what-we-do/activities/activities-search/eu-satcom-market

      [7] Article 55(5)(a), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard (Frontex 2019 Regulation), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [8] Pursuant to Annex IX of the EU Staff Regulations, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:01962R0031-20140501

      [9] Chapter III, state of play report

      [10] Section 2.5, state of play report

      [11] Protocol (No 7), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.C_.2016.202.01.0001.01.ENG#d1e3363-201-1

      [12] Chapter III, state of play report

      [13] ‘Border externalisation: Agreements on Frontex operations in Serbia and Montenegro heading for parliamentary approval’, Statewatch News, 11 March 2020, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/frontex-status-agreements.htm

      [14] Europol, ‘EU policy cycle – EMPACT’, https://www.europol.europa.eu/empact

      [15] ‘NGOs, EU and international agencies sound the alarm over Frontex’s respect for fundamental rights’, Statewatch News, 5 March 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/mar/fx-consultative-forum-rep.htm; ‘Frontex condemned by its own fundamental rights body for failing to live up to obligations’, Statewatch News, 21 May 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/may/eu-frontex-fr-rep.htm

      [16] Article 110(6), Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [17] Article 110, 2019 Regulation

      [18] Article 109, 2019 Regulation

      [19] Section 8, state of play report

      [20] Article 111(1), 2019 Regulation

      [21] Sergio Carrera and Marco Stefan, ‘Complaint Mechanisms in Border Management and Expulsion Operations in Europe: Effective Remedies for Victims of Human Rights Violations?’, CEPS, 2018, https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Complaint%20Mechanisms_A4.pdf

      [22] Article 110(1), 2019 Regulation

      [23] Section 9, state of play report

      [24] ERRIN, https://returnnetwork.eu

      [25] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [26] Chapter III, state of play report

      [27] Section 3.2, state of play report

      [28] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [29] State of play report, p. 19

      [30] Matthias Monroy, ‘Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders’, Statewatch Analysis, February 2020, http://www.statewatch.org/analyses/no-354-frontex-drones.pdf

      [31] Section 4, state of play report

      [32] Section 7.2, state of play report
      Next article >

      Mediterranean: As the fiction of a Libyan search and rescue zone begins to crumble, EU states use the coronavirus pandemic to declare themselves unsafe

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/eu-guns-guards-and-guidelines-reinforcement-of-frontex-runs-into-problem

      #EBCG_2.0_Regulation #European_Defence_Agency’s_Satellite_Communications (#SatCom) #Communications_and_Information_System (#CIS) #immunité #droits_fondamentaux #droits_humains #Fundamental_Rights_Officer (#FRO) #European_Return_and_Reintegration_Network (#ERRIN) #renvois #expulsions #réintégration #Directive_Retour #FAR (#Frontex_Application_for_Returns) #RECAMAS #EUROSUR #European_Aviation_Safety_Agency (#EASA) #European_Organisation_for_the_Safety_of_Air_Navigation (#EUROCONTROL)

    • Frontex launches “game-changing” recruitment drive for standing corps of border guards

      On 4 January 2020 the Management Board of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) adopted a decision on the profiles of the staff required for the new “standing corps”, which is ultimately supposed to be staffed by 10,000 officials. [1] The decision ushers in a new wave of recruitment for the agency. Applicants will be put through six months of training before deployment, after rigorous medical testing.

      What is the standing corps?

      The European Border and Coast Guard standing corps is the new, and according to Frontex, first ever, EU uniformed service, available “at any time…to support Member States facing challenges at their external borders”.[2] Frontex’s Programming Document for the 2018-2020 period describes the standing corps as the agency’s “biggest game changer”, requiring “an unprecedented scale of staff recruitment”.[3]

      The standing corps will be made up of four categories of Frontex operational staff:

      Frontex statutory staff deployed in operational areas and staff responsible for the functioning of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) Central Unit[4];
      Long-term staff seconded from member states;
      Staff from member states who can be immediately deployed on short-term secondment to Frontex; and

      A reserve of staff from member states for rapid border interventions.

      These border guards will be “trained by the best and equipped with the latest technology has to offer”.[5] As well as wearing EU uniforms, they will be authorised to carry weapons and will have executive powers: they will be able to verify individuals’ identity and nationality and permit or refuse entry into the EU.

      The decision made this January is limited to the definition of profiles and requirements for the operational staff that are to be recruited. The Management Board (MB) will have to adopt a new decision by March this year to set out the numbers of staff needed per profile, the requirements for individuals holding those positions, and the number of staff needed for the following year based on expected operational needs. This process will be repeated annually.[6] The MB can then further specify how many staff each member state should contribute to these profiles, and establish multi-annual plans for member state contributions and recruitment for Frontex statutory staff. Projections for these contributions are made in Annexes II – IV of the 2019 Regulation, though a September Mission Statement by new European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen urges the recruitment of 10,000 border guards by 2024, indicating that member states might be meeting their contribution commitments much sooner than 2027.[7]

      The standing corps of Frontex staff will have an array of executive powers and responsibilities. As well as being able to verify identity and nationality and refuse or permit entry into the EU, they will be able to consult various EU databases to fulfil operational aims, and may also be authorised by host states to consult national databases. According to the MB Decision, “all members of the Standing Corps are to be able to identify persons in need of international protection and persons in a vulnerable situation, including unaccompanied minors, and refer them to the competent authorities”. Training on international and EU law on fundamental rights and international protection, as well as guidelines on the identification and referral of persons in need of international protection, will be mandatory for all standing corps staff members.

      The size of the standing corps

      The following table, taken from the 2019 Regulation, outlines the ambitions for growth of Frontex’s standing corps. However, as noted, the political ambition is to reach the 10,000 total by 2024.

      –-> voir le tableau sur le site de statewatch!

      Category 2 staff – those on long term secondment from member states – will join Frontex from 2021, according to the 2019 Regulation.[8] It is foreseen that Germany will contribute the most staff, with 61 expected in 2021, increasing year-by-year to 225 by 2027. Other high contributors are France and Italy (170 and 125 by 2027, respectively).

      The lowest contributors will be Iceland (expected to contribute between one and two people a year from 2021 to 2027), Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg. Liechtenstein is not contributing personnel but will contribute “through proportional financial support”.

      For short-term secondments from member states, projections follow a very similar pattern. Germany will contribute 540 staff in 2021, increasing to 827 in 2027; Italy’s contribution will increase from 300 in 2021 to 458 in 2027; and France’s from 408 in 2021 to 624 in 2027. Most states will be making less than 100 staff available for short-term secondment in 2021.

      What are the profiles?

      The MB Decision outlines 12 profiles to be made available to Frontex, ranging from Border Guard Officer and Crew Member, to Cross Border Crime Detection Officer and Return Specialist. A full list is contained in the Decision.[9] All profiles will be fulfilled by an official of the competent authority of a member state (MS) or Schengen Associated Country (SAC), or by a member of Frontex’s own statutory staff.

      Tasks to be carried out by these officials include:

      border checks and surveillance;
      interviewing, debriefing* and screening arrivals and registering fingerprints;
      supporting the collection, assessment, analysis and distribution of information with EU member and non-member states;
      verifying travel documents;
      escorting individuals being deported on Frontex return operations;
      operating data systems and platforms; and
      offering cultural mediation

      *Debriefing consists of informal interviews with migrants to collect information for risk analyses on irregular migration and other cross-border crime and the profiling of irregular migrants to identify “modus operandi and migration trends used by irregular migrants and facilitators/criminal networks”. Guidelines written by Frontex in 2012 instructed border guards to target vulnerable individuals for “debriefing”, not in order to streamline safeguarding or protection measures, but for intelligence-gathering - “such people are often more willing to talk about their experiences,” said an internal document.[10] It is unknown whether those instructions are still in place.

      Recruitment for the profiles

      Certain profiles are expected to “apply self-safety and security practice”, and to have “the capacity to work under pressure and face emotional events with composure”. Relevant profiles (e.g. crew member) are required to be able to perform search and rescue activities in distress situations at sea borders.

      Frontex published a call for tender on 27 December for the provision of medical services for pre-recruitment examinations, in line with the plan to start recruiting operational staff in early 2020. The documents accompanying the tender reveal additional criteria for officials that will be granted executive powers (Frontex category “A2”) compared to those staff stationed primarily at the agency’s Warsaw headquarters (“A1”). Those criteria come in the form of more stringent medical testing.

      The differences in medical screening for category A1 and A2 staff lie primarily in additional toxicology screening and psychiatric and psychological consultations. [11] The additional psychiatric attention allotted for operational staff “is performed to check the predisposition for people to work in arduous, hazardous conditions, exposed to stress, conflict situations, changing rapidly environment, coping with people being in dramatic, injure or death exposed situations”.[12]

      Both A1 and A2 category provisional recruits will be asked to disclose if they have ever suffered from a sexually transmitted disease or “genital organ disease”, as well as depression, nervous or mental disorders, among a long list of other ailments. As well as disclosing any medication they take, recruits must also state if they are taking oral contraceptives (though there is no question about hormonal contraceptives that are not taken orally). Women are also asked to give the date of their last period on the pre-appointment questionnaire.

      “Never touch yourself with gloves”

      Frontex training materials on forced return operations obtained by Statewatch in 2019 acknowledge the likelihood of psychological stress among staff, among other health risks. (One recommendation contained in the documents is to “never touch yourself with gloves”). Citing “dissonance within the team, long hours with no rest, group dynamic, improvisation and different languages” among factors behind psychological stress, the training materials on medical precautionary measures for deportation escort officers also refer to post-traumatic stress disorder, the lack of an area to retreat to and body clock disruption as exacerbating risks. The document suggests a high likelihood that Frontex return escorts will witness poverty, “agony”, “chaos”, violence, boredom, and will have to deal with vulnerable persons.[13]

      For fundamental rights monitors (officials deployed to monitor fundamental rights compliance during deportations, who can be either Frontex staff or national officials), the training materials obtained by Statewatch focus on the self-control of emotions, rather than emotional care. Strategies recommended include talking to somebody, seeking professional help, and “informing yourself of any other option offered”. The documents suggest that it is an individual’s responsibility to prevent emotional responses to stressful situations having an impact on operations, and to organise their own supervision and professional help. There is no obvious focus on how traumatic responses of Frontex staff could affect those coming into contact with them at an external border or during a deportation. [14]

      The materials obtained by Statewatch also give some indication of the fundamental rights training imparted to those acting as deportation ‘escorts’ and fundamental rights monitors. The intended outcomes for a training session in Athens that took place in March 2019 included “adapt FR [fundamental rights] in a readmission operation (explain it with examples)” and “should be able to describe Non Refoulement principle” (in the document, ‘Session Fundamental rights’ is followed by ‘Session Velcro handcuffs’).[15] The content of the fundamental rights training that will be offered to Frontex’s new recruits is currently unknown.

      Fit for service?

      The agency anticipates that most staff will be recruited from March to June 2020, involving the medical examination of up to 700 applicants in this period. According to Frontex’s website, the agency has already received over 7,000 applications for the 700 new European Border Guard Officer positions.[16] Successful candidates will undergo six months of training before deployment in 2021. Apparently then, the posts are a popular career option, despite the seemingly invasive medical tests (especially for sexually active women). Why, for instance, is it important to Frontex to know about oral hormonal contraception, or about sexually transmitted infections?

      When asked by Statewatch if Frontex provides in-house psychological and emotional support, an agency press officer stated: “When it comes to psychological and emotional support, Frontex is increasing awareness and personal resilience of the officers taking part in our operations through education and training activities.” A ‘Frontex Mental Health Strategy’ from 2018 proposed the establishment of “a network of experts-psychologists” to act as an advisory body, as well as creating “online self-care tools”, a “psychological hot-line”, and a space for peer support with participation of psychologists (according to risk assessment) during operations.[17]

      One year later, Frontex, EASO and Europol jointly produced a brochure for staff deployed on operations, entitled ‘Occupational Health and Safety – Deployment Information’, which offers a series of recommendations to staff, placing the responsibility to “come to the deployment in good mental shape” and “learn how to manage stress and how to deal with anger” more firmly on the individual than the agency.[18] According to this document, officers who need additional support must disclose this by requesting it from their supervisor, while “a helpline or psychologist on-site may be available, depending on location”.

      Frontex anticipates this recruitment drive to be “game changing”. Indeed, the Commission is relying upon it to reach its ambitions for the agency’s independence and efficiency. The inclusion of mandatory training in fundamental rights in the six-month introductory education is obviously a welcome step. Whether lessons learned in a classroom will be the first thing that comes to the minds of officials deployed on border control or deportation operations remains to be seen.

      Unmanaged responses to emotional stress can include burnout, compassion-fatigue and indirect trauma, which can in turn decrease a person’s ability to cope with adverse circumstance, and increase the risk of violence.[19] Therefore, aside from the agency’s responsibility as an employer to safeguard the health of its staff, its approach to internal psychological care will affect not only the border guards themselves, but the people that they routinely come into contact with at borders and during return operations, many of whom themselves will have experienced trauma.

      Jane Kilpatrick

      Endnotes

      [1] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [2] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [3] Frontex, ‘Programming Document 2018-20’, 10 December 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/feb/frontex-programming-document-2018-20.pdf

      [4] The ETIAS Central Unit will be responsible for processing the majority of applications for ‘travel authorisations’ received when the European Travel Information and Authorisation System comes into use, in theory in late 2022. Citizens who do not require a visa to travel to the Schengen area will have to apply for authorisation to travel to the Schengen area.

      [5] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [6] Article 54(4), Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [7] ‘European Commission 2020 Work Programme: An ambitious roadmap for a Union that strives for more’, 29 January 2020, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/IP_20_124; “Mission letter” from Ursula von der Leyen to Ylva Johnsson, 10 September 2019, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/mission-letter-ylva-johansson_en.pdf

      [8] Annex II, 2019 Regulation

      [9] Management Board Decision 1/2020 of 4 January 2020 on adopting the profiles to be made available to the European Border and Coast Guard Standing Corps, https://frontex.europa.eu/assets/Key_Documents/MB_Decision/2020/MB_Decision_1_2020_adopting_the_profiles_to_be_made_available_to_the_

      [10] ‘Press release: EU border agency targeted “isolated or mistreated” individuals for questioning’, Statewatch News, 16 February 2017, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2017/feb/eu-frontex-op-hera-debriefing-pr.htm

      [11] ‘Provision of Medical Services – Pre-Recruitment Examination’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-documents.html?cftId=5841

      [12] ‘Provision of medical services – pre-recruitment examination, Terms of Reference - Annex II to invitation to tender no Frontex/OP/1491/2019/KM’, https://etendering.ted.europa.eu/cft/cft-document.html?docId=65398

      [13] Frontex training presentation, ‘Medical precautionary measures for escort officers’, undated, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-presentation-medical-precautionary-measures-deportation-escor

      [14] Ibid.

      [15] Frontex, document listing course learning outcomes from deportation escorts’ training, http://statewatch.org/news/2020/mar/eu-frontex-deportation-escorts-training-course-learning-outcomes.pdf

      [16] Frontex, ‘Careers’, https://frontex.europa.eu/about-frontex/careers/frontex-border-guard-recruitment

      [17] Frontex, ‘Frontex mental health strategy’, 20 February 2018, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/89c168fe-e14b-11e7-9749-01aa75ed71a1/language-en

      [18] EASO, Europol and Frontex, ‘Occupational health and safety’, 12 August 2019, https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/17cc07e0-bd88-11e9-9d01-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-103142015

      [19] Trauma Treatment International, ‘A different approach for victims of trauma’, https://www.tt-intl.org/#our-work-section

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/frontex-launches-game-changing-recruitment-drive-for-standing-corps-of-b
      #gardes_frontières #staff #corps_des_gardes-frontières

    • Drones for Frontex: unmanned migration control at Europe’s borders (27.02.2020)

      Instead of providing sea rescue capabilities in the Mediterranean, the EU is expanding air surveillance. Refugees are observed with drones developed for the military. In addition to numerous EU states, countries such as Libya could also use the information obtained.

      It is not easy to obtain majorities for legislation in the European Union in the area of migration - unless it is a matter of upgrading the EU’s external borders. While the reform of a common EU asylum system has been on hold for years, the European Commission, Parliament and Council agreed to reshape the border agency Frontex with unusual haste shortly before last year’s parliamentary elections. A new Regulation has been in force since December 2019,[1] under which Frontex intends to build up a “standing corps” of 10,000 uniformed officials by 2027. They can be deployed not just at the EU’s external borders, but in ‘third countries’ as well.

      In this way, Frontex will become a “European border police force” with powers that were previously reserved for the member states alone. The core of the new Regulation includes the procurement of the agency’s own equipment. The Multiannual Financial Framework, in which the EU determines the distribution of its financial resources from 2021 until 2027, has not yet been decided. According to current plans, however, at least €6 billion are reserved for Frontex in the seven-year budget. The intention is for Frontex to spend a large part of the money, over €2 billion, on aircraft, ships and vehicles.[2]

      Frontex seeks company for drone flights

      The upgrade plans include the stationing of large drones in the central and eastern Mediterranean. For this purpose, Frontex is looking for a private partner to operate flights off Malta, Italy or Greece. A corresponding tender ended in December[3] and the selection process is currently underway. The unmanned missions could then begin already in spring. Frontex estimates the total cost of these missions at €50 million. The contract has a term of two years and can be extended twice for one year at a time.

      Frontex wants drones of the so-called MALE (Medium Altitude Long Endurance) class. Their flight duration should be at least 20 hours. The requirements include the ability to fly in all weather conditions and at day and night. It is also planned to operate in airspace where civil aircraft are in service. For surveillance missions, the drones should carry electro-optical cameras, thermal imaging cameras and so-called “daylight spotter” systems that independently detect moving targets and keep them in focus. Other equipment includes systems for locating mobile and satellite telephones. The drones will also be able to receive signals from emergency call transmitters sewn into modern life jackets.

      However, the Frontex drones will not be used primarily for sea rescue operations, but to improve capacities against unwanted migration. This assumption is also confirmed by the German non-governmental organisation Sea-Watch, which has been providing assistance in the central Mediterranean with various ships since 2015. “Frontex is not concerned with saving lives,” says Ruben Neugebauer of Sea-Watch. “While air surveillance is being expanded with aircraft and drones, ships urgently needed for rescue operations have been withdrawn”. Sea-Watch demands that situation pictures of EU drones are also made available to private organisations for sea rescue.

      Aircraft from arms companies

      Frontex has very specific ideas for its own drones, which is why there are only a few suppliers worldwide that can be called into question. The Israel Aerospace Industries Heron 1, which Frontex tested for several months on the Greek island of Crete[4] and which is also flown by the German Bundeswehr, is one of them. As set out by Frontex in its invitation to tender, the Heron 1, with a payload of around 250 kilograms, can carry all the surveillance equipment that the agency intends to deploy over the Mediterranean. Also amongst those likely to be interested in the Frontex contract is the US company General Atomics, which has been building drones of the Predator series for 20 years. Recently, it presented a new Predator model in Greece under the name SeaGuardian, for maritime observation.[5] It is equipped with a maritime surveillance radar and a system for receiving position data from larger ships, thus fulfilling one of Frontex’s essential requirements.

      General Atomics may have a competitive advantage, as its Predator drones have several years’ operational experience in the Mediterranean. In addition to Frontex, the European Union has been active in the central Mediterranean with EUNAVFOR MED Operation Sophia. In March 2019, Italy’s then-interior minister Matteo Salvini pushed through the decision to operate the EU mission from the air alone. Since then, two unarmed Predator drones operated by the Italian military have been flying for EUNAVFOR MED for 60 hours per month. Officially, the drones are to observe from the air whether the training of the Libyan coast guard has been successful and whether these navy personnel use their knowledge accordingly. Presumably, however, the Predators are primarily pursuing the mission’s goal to “combat human smuggling” by spying on the Libyan coast. It is likely that the new Operation EU Active Surveillance, which will use military assets from EU member states to try to enforce the UN arms embargo placed on Libya,[6] will continue to patrol with Italian drones off the coast in North Africa.

      Three EU maritime surveillance agencies

      In addition to Frontex, the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) are also investing in maritime surveillance using drones. Together, the three agencies coordinate some 300 civil and military authorities in EU member states.[7] Their tasks include border, fisheries and customs control, law enforcement and environmental protection.

      In 2017, Frontex and EMSA signed an agreement to benefit from joint reconnaissance capabilities, with EFCA also involved.[8] At the time, EMSA conducted tests with drones of various sizes, but now the drones’ flights are part of its regular services. The offer is not only open to EU Member States, as Iceland was the first to take advantage of it. Since summer 2019, a long-range Hermes 900 drone built by the Israeli company Elbit Systems has been flying from Iceland’s Egilsstaðir airport. The flights are intended to cover more than half of the island state’s exclusive economic zone and to detect “suspicious activities and potential hazards”.[9]

      The Hermes 900 was also developed for the military; the Israeli army first deployed it in the Gaza Strip in 2014. The Times of Israel puts the cost of the operating contract with EMSA at €59 million,[10] with a term of two years, which can be extended for another two years. The agency did not conclude the contract directly with the Israeli arms company, but through the Portuguese firm CeiiA. The contract covers the stationing, control and mission control of the drones.

      New interested parties for drone flights

      At the request of the German MEP Özlem Demirel (from the party Die Linke), the European Commission has published a list of countries that also want to use EMSA drones.[11] According to this list, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal and also Greece have requested unmanned flights for pollution monitoring this year, while Bulgaria and Spain want to use them for general maritime surveillance. Until Frontex has its own drones, EMSA is flying its drones for the border agency on Crete. As in Iceland, this is the long-range drone Hermes 900, but according to Greek media reports it crashed on 8 January during take-off.[12] Possible causes are a malfunction of the propulsion system or human error. The aircraft is said to have been considerably damaged.

      Authorities from France and Great Britain have also ordered unmanned maritime surveillance from EMSA. Nothing is yet known about the exact intended location, but it is presumably the English Channel. There, the British coast guard is already observing border traffic with larger drones built by the Tekever arms company from Portugal.[13] The government in London wants to prevent migrants from crossing the Channel. The drones take off from the airport in the small town of Lydd and monitor the approximately 50-kilometre-long and 30-kilometre-wide Strait of Dover. Great Britain has also delivered several quadcopters to France to try to detect potential migrants in French territorial waters. According to the prefecture of Pas-de-Calais, eight gendarmes have been trained to control the small drones[14].

      Information to non-EU countries

      The images taken by EMSA drones are evaluated by the competent national coastguards. A livestream also sends them to Frontex headquarters in Warsaw.[15] There they are fed into the EUROSUR border surveillance system. This is operated by Frontex and networks the surveillance installations of all EU member states that have an external border. The data from EUROSUR and the national border control centres form the ‘Common Pre-frontier Intelligence Picture’,[16] referring to the area of interest of Frontex, which extends far into the African continent. Surveillance data is used to detect and prevent migration movements at an early stage.

      Once the providing company has been selected, the new Frontex drones are also to fly for EUROSUR. According to the invitation to tender, they are to operate in the eastern and central Mediterranean within a radius of up to 250 nautical miles (463 kilometres). This would enable them to carry out reconnaissance in the “pre-frontier” area off Tunisia, Libya and Egypt. Within the framework of EUROSUR, Frontex shares the recorded data with other European users via a ‘Remote Information Portal’, as the call for tender explains. The border agency has long been able to cooperate with third countries and the information collected can therefore also be made available to authorities in North Africa. However, in order to share general information on surveillance of the Mediterranean Sea with a non-EU state, Frontex must first conclude a working agreement with the corresponding government.[17]

      It is already possible, however, to provide countries such as Libya with the coordinates of refugee boats. For example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea stipulates that the nearest Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) must be informed of actual or suspected emergencies. With EU funding, Italy has been building such a centre in Tripoli for the last two years.[18] It is operated by the military coast guard, but so far has no significant equipment of its own.

      The EU military mission “EUNAVFOR MED” was cooperating more extensively with the Libyan coast guard. For communication with European naval authorities, Libya is the first third country to be connected to European surveillance systems via the “Seahorse Mediterranean” network[19]. Information handed over to the Libyan authorities might also include information that was collected with the Italian military ‘Predator’ drones.

      Reconnaissance generated with unmanned aerial surveillance is also given to the MRCC in Turkey. This was seen in a pilot project last summer, when the border agency tested an unmanned aerostat with the Greek coast guard off the island of Samos.[20] Attached to a 1,000 metre-long cable, the airship was used in the Frontex operation ‘Poseidon’ in the eastern Mediterranean. The 35-meter-long zeppelin comes from the French manufacturer A-NSE.[21] The company specializes in civil and military aerial observation. According to the Greek Marine Ministry, the equipment included a radar, a thermal imaging camera and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) for the tracking of larger ships. The recorded videos were received and evaluated by a situation centre supplied by the Portuguese National Guard. If a detected refugee boat was still in Turkish territorial waters, the Greek coast guard informed the Turkish authorities. This pilot project in the Aegean Sea was the first use of an airship by Frontex. The participants deployed comparatively large numbers of personnel for the short mission. Pictures taken by the Greek coastguard show more than 40 people.

      Drones enable ‘pull-backs’

      Human rights organisations accuse EUNAVFOR MED and Frontex of passing on information to neighbouring countries leading to rejections (so-called ‘push-backs’) in violation of international law. People must not be returned to states where they are at risk of torture or other serious human rights violations. Frontex does not itself return refugees in distress who were discovered at sea via aerial surveillance, but leaves the task to the Libyan or Turkish authorities. Regarding Libya, the Agency since 2017 provided notice of at least 42 vessels in distress to Libyan authorities.[22]

      Private rescue organisations therefore speak of so-called ‘pull-backs’, but these are also prohibited, as the Israeli human rights lawyer Omer Shatz argues: “Communicating the location of civilians fleeing war to a consortium of militias and instructing them to intercept and forcibly transfer them back to the place they fled from, trigger both state responsibility of all EU members and individual criminal liability of hundreds involved.” Together with his colleague Juan Branco, Shatz is suing those responsible for the European Union and its agencies before the International Criminal Court in The Hague. Soon they intend to publish individual cases and the names of the people accused.

      Matthias Monroy

      An earlier version of this article first appeared in the German edition of Le Monde Diplomatique: ‘Drohnen für Frontex Statt sich auf die Rettung von Bootsflüchtlingen im Mittelmeer zu konzentrieren, baut die EU die Luftüberwachung’.

      Note: this article was corrected on 6 March to clarify a point regarding cooperation between Frontex and non-EU states.

      Endnotes

      [1] Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European Border and Coast Guard, https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/PE-33-2019-INIT/en/pdf

      [2] European Commission, ‘A strengthened and fully equipped European Border and Coast Guard’, 12 September 2018, https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta-political/files/soteu2018-factsheet-coast-guard_en.pdf

      [3] ‘Poland-Warsaw: Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) for Medium Altitude Long Endurance Maritime Aerial Surveillance’, https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:490010-2019:TEXT:EN:HTML&tabId=1

      [4] IAI, ‘IAI AND AIRBUS MARITIME HERON UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM (UAS) SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED 200 FLIGHT HOURS IN CIVILIAN EUROPEAN AIRSPACE FOR FRONTEX’, 24 October 2018, https://www.iai.co.il/iai-and-airbus-maritime-heron-unmanned-aerial-system-uas-successfully-complet

      [5] ‘ European Maritime Flight Demonstrations’, General Atomics, http://www.ga-asi.com/european-maritime-demo

      [6] ‘EU agrees to deploy warships to enforce Libya arms embargo’, The Guardian, 17 February 2020, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/17/eu-agrees-deploy-warships-enforce-libya-arms-embargo

      [7] EMSA, ‘Heads of EMSA and Frontex meet to discuss cooperation on European coast guard functions’, 3 April 2019, http://www.emsa.europa.eu/news-a-press-centre/external-news/item/3499-heads-of-emsa-and-frontex-meet-to-discuss-cooperation-on-european-c

      [8] Frontex, ‘Frontex, EMSA and EFCA strengthen cooperation on coast guard functions’, 23 March 2017, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-emsa-and-efca-strengthen-cooperation-on-coast-guard-functions

      [9] Elbit Systems, ‘Elbit Systems Commenced the Operation of the Maritime UAS Patrol Service to European Union Countries’, 18 June 2019, https://elbitsystems.com/pr-new/elbit-systems-commenced-the-operation-of-the-maritime-uas-patrol-servi

      [10] ‘Elbit wins drone contract for up to $68m to help monitor Europe coast’, The Times of Israel, 1 November 2018, https://www.timesofisrael.com/elbit-wins-drone-contract-for-up-to-68m-to-help-monitor-europe-coast

      [11] ‘Answer given by Ms Bulc on behalf of the European Commission’, https://netzpolitik.org/wp-upload/2019/12/E-2946_191_Finalised_reply_Annex1_EN_V1.pdf

      [12] ‘Το drone της FRONTEX έπεσε, οι μετανάστες έρχονται’, Proto Thema, 27 January 2020, https://www.protothema.gr/greece/article/968869/to-drone-tis-frontex-epese-oi-metanastes-erhodai

      [13] Morgan Meaker, ‘Here’s proof the UK is using drones to patrol the English Channel’, Wired, 10 January 2020, https://www.wired.co.uk/article/uk-drones-migrants-english-channel

      [14] ‘Littoral: Les drones pour lutter contre les traversées de migrants sont opérationnels’, La Voix du Nord, 26 March 2019, https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/557951/article/2019-03-26/les-drones-pour-lutter-contre-les-traversees-de-migrants-sont-operation

      [15] ‘Frontex report on the functioning of Eurosur – Part I’, Council document 6215/18, 15 February 2018, http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-6215-2018-INIT/en/pdf

      [16] European Commission, ‘Eurosur’, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/border-crossing/eurosur_en

      [17] Legal reforms have also given Frontex the power to operate on the territory of non-EU states, subject to the conclusion of a status agreement between the EU and the country in question. The 2016 Frontex Regulation allowed such cooperation with states that share a border with the EU; the 2019 Frontex Regulation extends this to any non-EU state.

      [18] ‘Helping the Libyan Coast Guard to establish a Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre’, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-8-2018-000547_EN.html

      [19] Matthias Monroy, ‘EU funds the sacking of rescue ships in the Mediterranean’, 7 July 2018, https://digit.site36.net/2018/07/03/eu-funds-the-sacking-of-rescue-ships-in-the-mediterranean

      [20] Frontex, ‘Frontex begins testing use of aerostat for border surveillance’, 31 July 2019, https://frontex.europa.eu/media-centre/news-release/frontex-begins-testing-use-of-aerostat-for-border-surveillance-ur33N8

      [21] ‘Answer given by Ms Johansson on behalf of the European Commission’, 7 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002529-ASW_EN.html

      [22] ‘Answer given by Vice-President Borrell on behalf of the European Commission’, 8 January 2020, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/E-9-2019-002654-ASW_EN.html

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2020/drones-for-frontex-unmanned-migration-control-at-europe-s-borders

      #drones

    • Monitoring “secondary movements” and “hotspots”: Frontex is now an internal surveillance agency (16.12.2019)

      The EU’s border agency, Frontex, now has powers to gather data on “secondary movements” and the “hotspots” within the EU. The intention is to ensure “situational awareness” and produce risk analyses on the migratory situation within the EU, in order to inform possible operational action by national authorities. This brings with it increased risks for the fundamental rights of both non-EU nationals and ethnic minority EU citizens.

      The establishment of a new ’standing corps’ of 10,000 border guards to be commanded by EU border agency Frontex has generated significant public and press attention in recent months. However, the new rules governing Frontex[1] include a number of other significant developments - including a mandate for the surveillance of migratory movements and migration “hotspots” within the EU.

      Previously, the agency’s surveillance role has been restricted to the external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or “selected third-country ports.”[2] New legal provisions mean it will now be able to gather data on the movement of people within the EU. While this is only supposed to deal with “trends, volumes and routes,” rather than personal data, it is intended to inform operational activity within the EU.

      This may mean an increase in operations against ‘unauthorised’ migrants, bringing with it risks for fundamental rights such as the possibility of racial profiling, detention, violence and the denial of access to asylum procedures. At the same time, in a context where internal borders have been reintroduced by numerous Schengen states over the last five years due to increased migration, it may be that he agency’s new role contributes to a further prolongation of internal border controls.

      From external to internal surveillance

      Frontex was initially established with the primary goals of assisting in the surveillance and control of the external borders of the EU. Over the years it has obtained increasing powers to conduct surveillance of those borders in order to identify potential ’threats’.

      The European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR) has a key role in this task, taking data from a variety of sources, including satellites, sensors, drones, ships, vehicles and other means operated both by national authorities and the agency itself. EUROSUR was formally established by legislation approved in 2013, although the system was developed and in use long before it was subject to a legal framework.[3]

      The new Frontex Regulation incorporates and updates the provisions of the 2013 EUROSUR Regulation. It maintains existing requirements for the agency to establish a “situational picture” of the EU’s external borders and the “pre-frontier area” – for example, the high seas or the ports of non-EU states – which is then distributed to the EU’s member states in order to inform operational activities.[4]

      The new rules also provide a mandate for reporting on “unauthorised secondary movements” and goings-on in the “hotspots”. The Commission’s proposal for the new Frontex Regulation was not accompanied by an impact assessment, which would have set out the reasoning and justifications for these new powers. The proposal merely pointed out that the new rules would “evolve” the scope of EUROSUR, to make it possible to “prevent secondary movements”.[5] As the European Data Protection Supervisor remarked, the lack of an impact assessment made it impossible: “to fully assess and verify its attended benefits and impact, notably on fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to privacy and to the protection of personal data.”[6]

      The term “secondary movements” is not defined in the Regulation, but is generally used to refer to journeys between EU member states undertaken without permission, in particular by undocumented migrants and applicants for internal protection. Regarding the “hotspots” – established and operated by EU and national authorities in Italy and Greece – the Regulation provides a definition,[7] but little clarity on precisely what information will be gathered.

      Legal provisions

      A quick glance at Section 3 of the new Regulation, dealing with EUROSUR, gives little indication that the system will now be used for internal surveillance. The formal scope of EUROSUR is concerned with the external borders and border crossing points:

      “EUROSUR shall be used for border checks at authorised border crossing points and for external land, sea and air border surveillance, including the monitoring, detection, identification, tracking, prevention and interception of unauthorised border crossings for the purpose of detecting, preventing and combating illegal immigration and cross-border crime and contributing to ensuring the protection and saving the lives of migrants.”

      However, the subsequent section of the Regulation (on ‘situational awareness’) makes clear the agency’s new internal role. Article 24 sets out the components of the “situational pictures” that will be visible in EUROSUR. There are three types – national situational pictures, the European situational picture and specific situational pictures. All of these should consist of an events layer, an operational layer and an analysis layer. The first of these layers should contain (emphasis added in all quotes):

      “…events and incidents related to unauthorised border crossings and cross-border crime and, where available, information on unauthorised secondary movements, for the purpose of understanding migratory trends, volume and routes.”

      Article 26, dealing with the European situational picture, states:

      “The Agency shall establish and maintain a European situational picture in order to provide the national coordination centres and the Commission with effective, accurate and timely information and analysis, covering the external borders, the pre-frontier area and unauthorised secondary movements.”

      The events layer of that picture should include “information relating to… incidents in the operational area of a joint operation or rapid intervention coordinated by the Agency, or in a hotspot.”[8] In a similar vein:

      “The operational layer of the European situational picture shall contain information on the joint operations and rapid interventions coordinated by the Agency and on hotspots, and shall include the mission statements, locations, status, duration, information on the Member States and other actors involved, daily and weekly situational reports, statistical data and information packages for the media.”[9]

      Article 28, dealing with ‘EUROSUR Fusion Services’, says that Frontex will provide national authorities with information on the external borders and pre-frontier area that may be derived from, amongst other things, the monitoring of “migratory flows towards and within the Union in terms of trends, volume and routes.”

      Sources of data

      The “situational pictures” compiled by Frontex and distributed via EUROSUR are made up of data gathered from a host of different sources. For the national situational picture, these are:

      national border surveillance systems;
      stationary and mobile sensors operated by national border agencies;
      border surveillance patrols and “other monitoring missions”;
      local, regional and other coordination centres;
      other national authorities and systems, such as immigration liaison officers, operational centres and contact points;
      border checks;
      Frontex;
      other member states’ national coordination centres;
      third countries’ authorities;
      ship reporting systems;
      other relevant European and international organisations; and
      other sources.[10]

      For the European situational picture, the sources of data are:

      national coordination centres;
      national situational pictures;
      immigration liaison officers;
      Frontex, including reports form its liaison officers;
      Union delegations and EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) missions;
      other relevant Union bodies, offices and agencies and international organisations; and
      third countries’ authorities.[11]

      The EUROSUR handbook – which will presumably be redrafted to take into account the new legislation – provides more detail about what each of these categories may include.[12]

      Exactly how this melange of different data will be used to report on secondary movements is currently unknown. However, in accordance with Article 24 of the new Regulation:

      “The Commission shall adopt an implementing act laying down the details of the information layers of the situational pictures and the rules for the establishment of specific situational pictures. The implementing act shall specify the type of information to be provided, the entities responsible for collecting, processing, archiving and transmitting specific information, the maximum time limits for reporting, the data security and data protection rules and related quality control mechanisms.” [13]

      This implementing act will specify precisely how EUROSUR will report on “secondary movements”.[14] According to a ‘roadmap’ setting out plans for the implementation of the new Regulation, this implementing act should have been drawn up in the last quarter of 2020 by a newly-established European Border and Coast Guard Committee sitting within the Commission. However, that Committee does not yet appear to have held any meetings.[15]

      Operational activities at the internal borders

      Boosting Frontex’s operational role is one of the major purposes of the new Regulation, although it makes clear that the internal surveillance role “should not lead to operational activities of the Agency at the internal borders of the Member States.” Rather, internal surveillance should “contribute to the monitoring by the Agency of migratory flows towards and within the Union for the purpose of risk analysis and situational awareness.” The purpose is to inform operational activity by national authorities.

      In recent years Schengen member states have reintroduced border controls for significant periods in the name of ensuring internal security and combating irregular migration. An article in Deutsche Welle recently highlighted:

      “When increasing numbers of refugees started arriving in the European Union in 2015, Austria, Germany, Slovenia and Hungary quickly reintroduced controls, citing a “continuous big influx of persons seeking international protection.” This was the first time that migration had been mentioned as a reason for reintroducing border controls.

      Soon after, six Schengen members reintroduced controls for extended periods. Austria, Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway cited migration as a reason. France, as the sixth country, first introduced border checks after the November 2015 attacks in Paris, citing terrorist threats. Now, four years later, all six countries still have controls in place. On November 12, they are scheduled to extend them for another six months.”[16]

      These long-term extensions of internal border controls are illegal (the upper limit is supposed to be two years; discussions on changes to the rules governing the reintroduction of internal border controls in the Schengen area are ongoing).[17] A European Parliament resolution from May 2018 stated that “many of the prolongations are not in line with the existing rules as to their extensions, necessity or proportionality and are therefore unlawful.”[18] Yves Pascou, a researcher for the European Policy Centre, told Deutsche Welle that: “"We are in an entirely political situation now, not a legal one, and not one grounded in facts.”

      A European Parliament study published in 2016 highlighted that:

      “there has been a noticeable lack of detail and evidence given by the concerned EU Member States [those which reintroduced internal border controls]. For example, there have been no statistics on the numbers of people crossing borders and seeking asylum, or assessment of the extent to which reintroducing border checks complies with the principles of proportionality and necessity.”[19]

      One purpose of Frontex’s new internal surveillance powers is to provide such evidence (albeit in the ideologically-skewed form of ‘risk analysis’) on the situation within the EU. Whether the information provided will be of interest to national authorities is another question. Nevertheless, it would be a significant irony if the provision of that information were to contribute to the further maintenance of internal borders in the Schengen area.

      At the same time, there is a more pressing concern related to these new powers. Many discussions on the reintroduction of internal borders revolve around the fact that it is contrary to the idea, spirit (and in these cases, the law) of the Schengen area. What appears to have been totally overlooked is the effect the reintroduction of internal borders may have on non-EU nationals or ethnic minority citizens of the EU. One does not have to cross an internal Schengen frontier too many times to notice patterns in the appearance of the people who are hauled off trains and buses by border guards, but personal anecdotes are not the same thing as empirical investigation. If Frontex’s new powers are intended to inform operational activity by the member states at the internal borders of the EU, then the potential effects on fundamental rights must be taken into consideration and should be the subject of investigation by journalists, officials, politicians and researchers.

      Chris Jones

      Endnotes

      [1] The new Regulation was published in the Official Journal of the EU in mid-November: Regulation (EU) 2019/1896 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2019 on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Regulations (EU) No 1052/2013 and (EU) 2016/1624, https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32019R1896

      [2] Article 12, ‘Common application of surveillance tools’, Regulation (EU) No 1052/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2013 establishing the European Border Surveillance System (Eurosur), https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32013R1052

      [3] According to Frontex, the Eurosur Network first came into use in December 2011 and in March 2012 was first used to “exchange operational information”. The Regulation governing the system came into force in October 2013 (see footnote 2). See: Charles Heller and Chris Jones, ‘Eurosur: saving lives or reinforcing deadly borders?’, Statewatch Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4, February 2014, http://database.statewatch.org/article.asp?aid=33156

      [4] Recital 34, 2019 Regulation: “EUROSUR should provide an exhaustive situational picture not only at the external borders but also within the Schengen area and in the pre-frontier area. It should cover land, sea and air border surveillance and border checks.”

      [5] European Commission, ‘Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard and repealing Council Joint Action no 98/700/JHA, Regulation (EU) no 1052/2013 and Regulation (EU) no 2016/1624’, COM(2018) 631 final, 12 September 2018, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/sep/eu-com-frontex-proposal-regulation-com-18-631.pdf

      [6] EDPS, ‘Formal comments on the Proposal for a Regulation on the European Border and Coast Guard’, 30 November 2018, p. p.2, https://edps.europa.eu/sites/edp/files/publication/18-11-30_comments_proposal_regulation_european_border_coast_guard_en.pdf

      [7] Article 2(23): “‘hotspot area’ means an area created at the request of the host Member State in which the host Member State, the Commission, relevant Union agencies and participating Member States cooperate, with the aim of managing an existing or potential disproportionate migratory challenge characterised by a significant increase in the number of migrants arriving at the external borders”

      [8] Article 26(3)(c), 2019 Regulation

      [9] Article 26(4), 2019 Regulation

      [10] Article 25, 2019 Regulation

      [11] Article 26, 2019 Regulation

      [12] European Commission, ‘Commission Recommendation adopting the Practical Handbook for implementing and managing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR)’, C(2015) 9206 final, 15 December 2015, https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/securing-eu-borders/legal-documents/docs/eurosur_handbook_annex_en.pdf

      [13] Article 24(3), 2019 Regulation

      [14] ‘’Roadmap’ for implementing new Frontex Regulation: full steam ahead’, Statewatch News, 25 November 2019, http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/nov/eu-frontex-roadmap.htm

      [15] Documents related to meetings of committees operating under the auspices of the European Commission can be found in the Comitology Register: https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regcomitology/index.cfm?do=Search.Search&NewSearch=1

      [16] Kira Schacht, ‘Border checks in EU countries challenge Schengen Agreement’, DW, 12 November 2019, https://www.dw.com/en/border-checks-in-eu-countries-challenge-schengen-agreement/a-51033603

      [17] European Parliament, ‘Temporary reintroduction of border control at internal borders’, https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/ficheprocedure.do?reference=2017/0245(COD)&l=en

      [18] ‘Report on the annual report on the functioning of the Schengen area’, 3 May 2018, para.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-8-2018-0160_EN.html

      [19] Elpseth Guild et al, ‘Internal border controls in the Schengen area: is Schengen crisis-proof?’, European Parliament, June 2016, p.9, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2016/571356/IPOL_STU(2016)571356_EN.pdf

      https://www.statewatch.org/analyses/2019/monitoring-secondary-movements-and-hotspots-frontex-is-now-an-internal-s

      #mouvements_secondaires #hotspot #hotspots

  • #Souffrance_au_travail à #Campus_France : le coût social du « #soft_power »

    Plusieurs salariés de l’agence Campus France dénoncent un management agressif dans un contexte de réduction des effectifs, alors que la structure chargée de la promotion de l’#enseignement_supérieur français à l’étranger fait face à de multiples #procédures_judiciaires. La direction parle de litiges isolés.

    Pour se rencontrer, cela n’a pas été simple. Ces salariés ou ancien salariés de Campus France réunis ce jour de printemps autour d’une table sont tous hospitalisés en psychiatrie après des #dépressions sévères et doivent presque chaque jour se faire soigner pour ne pas vaciller davantage. « J’ai deux enfants, c’est dur pour eux de me voir comme ça », glisse Laura Foka, ancienne cadre du service communication. Ils dénoncent tous un #management_toxique qui les rend malades.

    Campus France est un établissement public industriel ou commercial (#Epic) chargé de la #promotion de l’enseignement supérieur français à l’étranger ainsi que de l’accueil des étudiants et des chercheurs étrangers en France, sous la double tutelle du ministère des affaires étrangères et du ministère de l’enseignement supérieur. Ces Epic, qui ont fleuri ces dernières décennies en marge de l’#administration_française, tirent leur financement de la puissance publique mais appliquent à leurs salariés les règles du #droit_privé.

    En mai 2018, neuf salariés de Campus France, constitués en collectif, alertent leur direction ainsi que toutes leurs tutelles dans un courrier sévère sur ce qu’ils considèrent comme une surexposition délétère aux #risques_psychosociaux : « Aujourd’hui, de nombreux salariés sont touchés par un management qui repose sur une #désorganisation_du_travail, une absence d’objectifs clairs, une extrême #violence des échanges entre la direction et certains collaborateurs. » Quelques mois après, l’un d’entre eux fait une tentative de #suicide.

    « J’étais en #dépression à cause du travail depuis deux ans, explique Ronel Tossa, salarié du service comptabilité, sous le coup d’une procédure de licenciement notamment pour « #abus_de_liberté_d’expression », qu’il conteste aux prud’hommes (ce motif a été utilisé dans d’autres procédures de #licenciement chez Campus France). J’accompagnais beaucoup de gens qui n’allaient pas bien… C’est moi qui ai fini par passer à l’acte. » Après que le Samu l’eut trouvé à son domicile, Ronel Tossa a passé deux jours dans le coma, puis est resté quatre mois hospitalisé en psychiatrie. Il continue aujourd’hui d’aller à l’hôpital trois jours et demi par semaine. Son geste ainsi que sa maladie ont été reconnus en accident et maladie professionnelle.

    La situation, cependant, n’évolue guère. En novembre 2019, Ronel Tossa, Laura Foka et deux autres salariés couchent à nouveau par écrit leurs vives inquiétudes : « Qu’attendez-vous donc pour réagir ? » Là encore, aucune réponse des tutelles ou des membres du conseil d’administration de Campus France, pourtant en copie.

    Abdelhafid Ramdani, l’un des signataires, a lui cessé d’attendre. Il entend porter plainte au pénal, notamment pour #harcèlement_moral_systémique_et_institutionnel, notion entrée dans la jurisprudence à la suite du procès France Télécom. Plusieurs autres salariés devraient, si la plainte est instruite, se constituer parties civiles.

    « J’adorais mon métier, explique Abdelhafid Ramdani, responsable informatique, en poste depuis 1997. Pendant vingt ans, et auprès de quatre chefs différents, pas toujours simples, je n’ai eu que des bons retours. Puis un nouveau manager, proche de la nouvelle direction, est arrivé et à partir de là, la situation s’est dégradée. »

    Il est en arrêt de travail depuis 2017, sa dépression a également été reconnue comme #maladie_professionnelle et sa situation a fait l’objet d’un rappel à l’ordre de l’#inspection_du_travail : « Le #risque_suicidaire qu’il avance et repris par le médecin du travail est avéré […]. Une fois de plus la direction relativise et écarte même d’un revers de main ce risque. » Avant de conclure : « Je n’omets pas que le dossier de M. Ramdani est à replacer dans un contexte plus large et qui concerne l’ensemble de l’organisation du travail de votre entreprise notamment sur les relations tendues et pathogènes existant entre la direction et un certain nombre de salariés. » Abdelhafid Ramdani a depuis porté #plainte devant les prud’hommes pour harcèlement et pour contester une #sanction_disciplinaire à son encontre et déposé une première plainte au pénal, classée sans suite en mai 2020.

    Au total, sur un effectif de 220 salariés, Campus France a dû faire face, ces dernières années, à au moins une douzaine de procédures prud’homales. Pour la direction de Campus France, interrogée par Mediapart sur ces alertes, « ces litiges isolés ne reflètent en rien une détérioration générale du climat social » au sein de l’établissement. Elle vante de son côté le faible nombre de démissions depuis la création de l’établissement en 2012 (8 sur les 190 salariés présents à l’époque), ainsi que son « souci de préserver le bien-être au travail des salariés », y compris dans la période récente liée au Covid-19. Selon nos informations, plusieurs dizaines de salariés en CDD ont néanmoins vu leur contrat s’achever brutalement à l’issue de la crise sanitaire, ce qui a fragilisé les équipes.

    Campus France rappelle également que « seules deux situations conflictuelles ont été tranchées par la juridiction prud’homale. Dans les deux cas, les salariés ont été déboutés de l’intégralité de leurs demandes, y compris celles qui portaient sur l’éventualité d’un harcèlement moral ». Contactés par Mediapart, les deux représentants des salariés au conseil d’administration ainsi que la nouvelle secrétaire du comité économique et social (CSE), qui a pris ses fonctions au printemps, abondent dans une réponse identique par courriel, estimant avoir « fait le vœu d’une construction collective plutôt que d’une opposition portant constamment sur les mêmes cas isolés et non représentatifs de l’ambiance actuelle positive de Campus France et du traitement des salariés, que ce soit pour les conditions de travail ou salariales ».

    Nombre de dossiers sont cependant en procédure. L’agence a été condamnée en mars 2019 pour #discrimination_syndicale, puis en appel, en décembre de la même année, pour licenciement sans cause réelle et sérieuse. Par ailleurs, elle fait face à plusieurs contentieux devant le tribunal administratif, soit pour contester des reconnaissances de maladie professionnelle ou d’accident du travail, portant tous sur la #santé_mentale, soit pour contester un refus de licenciement de salarié protégé. Enfin, à Montpellier, où Campus France possède une délégation, une main courante a été déposée par un salarié contre un collègue, résultat de tensions laissées en jachère pendant plusieurs années.

    Lors de l’avant-dernier conseil d’administration (CA) de l’agence le 25 novembre 2019, le représentant du ministère des finances a d’ailleurs pointé, à l’occasion d’une « cartographie des risques », le recours à au moins cinq avocats – un nombre significatif pour une structure de cette taille –, le coût financier des procédures juridiques engagées et la multiplication de ces procédures. « Ce qui veut dire que même les tutelles, alors même qu’il n’y a pas plus mauvais employeur que l’État, ont remarqué cette dérive », ironise l’un des participants, qui souhaite rester anonyme.

    « Au cours de ce CA de novembre, on m’a présenté un accord d’entreprise, signé par la direction comme les syndicats, c’est un signe clair d’apaisement, tempère Frédéric Petit, député MoDem des Français de l’étranger et membre depuis 2017 du conseil d’administration de Campus France. Que dans un effort de restructuration administrative il y ait des tensions, c’est plutôt normal. Je sais qu’il y avait des salariés isolément qui n’étaient pas bien, j’en étais conscient et cela a été exprimé au cours des conseils d’administration, surtout entre 2017 et 2018. »

    « C’est comme si le petit avait mangé le gros »

    Le collectif de salariés n’est cependant pas le seul à avoir sonné l’alarme sur le #climat_social. D’après plusieurs documents et témoignages recueillis par Mediapart, de nombreux élus du personnel, membres du comité hygiène, de sécurité et des conditions de travail (CHSCT), puis le CSE se sont inquiétés des tensions existantes, presque sans relâche depuis la création de Campus France, tout comme les deux inspecteurs du travail successivement en poste jusqu’en 2018.

    L’un de ces élus, bien au fait des dossiers, résume la situation ainsi : « Campus France, c’est un bateau ivre. Le management y est devenu agressif, sans imagination, et il se contente d’enterrer les dossiers ou de pousser à la faute. »

    L’histoire de Campus France explique en partie ces problèmes. L’établissement a fusionné en 2012 plusieurs organismes en une seule et unique agence : l’association #Egide, opérateur à l’époque pour la gestion des bourses et des séjours des étudiants étrangers ; le groupement d’intérêt public #EduFrance, renommé Campus France, chargé de la promotion de l’enseignement du français à l’étranger, et les activités internationales du #Centre_national_des œuvres_universitaires_et_scolaires (#Cnous). Au sein de la toute nouvelle agence Campus France, les cultures professionnelles s’entrechoquent presque immédiatement.

    Pensée pour gagner en #efficacité, l’agence agglomère différents statuts, salaires, fonctions, et des personnes issues d’organismes ayant déjà subi des réorganisations, parfois douloureuses. Dans un rapport commandé par le CHSCT de Campus France en 2016, les experts tentent de résumer la situation : celle d’une petite structure, Campus France, comparée à une start-up d’intellos faiblement hiérarchisée, d’une quarantaine de salariés, jeunes et presque tous cadres, qui a avalé une grosse association, Egide, et une partie du Cnous, où travaillaient majoritairement des employés, parfois vieillissants.

    « On a de manière intelligente et novatrice réorganisé l’administration d’État sur des objectifs, se félicite Fréderic Petit, membre, en tant que député, du conseil d’administration de plusieurs structures de ce type. On a enfin une gestion des deniers de l’État par projet, et non plus par structure, ce qui était quand même hallucinant. »

    « C’est comme si le petit avait mangé le gros », souligne pourtant, rétrospectivement, Laura Foka, dans une structure où va régner des années durant un « #mépris_réciproque » raconte également un ancien cadre dirigeant, entre « manants » et « jeunes flambeurs ».

    À l’époque, c’est donc en partie à ces #réorganisations successives que la plupart des salariés attribuent, selon ce même rapport, leurs difficultés, qui confinent aux risques psychosociaux. L’arrivée d’une nouvelle directrice à la tête de Campus France, en juillet 2015, semble avoir jeté de l’huile sur le feu.

    #Béatrice_Khaiat a passé une bonne partie de sa carrière dans les cabinets ministériels, notamment celui de l’éducation et de la culture. Proche des milieux socialistes, elle entre en 2012 dans celui du premier ministre Jean-Marc Ayrault, après avoir été directrice déléguée de Campus France, avant la fusion. En 2015, elle devient directrice générale de l’établissement, par décret du président de la République, un mandat renouvelé pour trois ans le 7 mars 2019, malgré les différentes alertes.

    Plusieurs membres de la direction quittent d’ailleurs le navire peu de temps avant sa nomination, à coup de transactions financières. D’après des courriels que nous avons pu consulter, on s’y inquiète déjà de « #harcèlement_caractérisé », d’une volonté de « faire la peau » à d’anciens membres d’Egide, de la persistance de « clans et de factions ». L’un d’entre eux a même, selon nos informations, porté #plainte contre sa directrice auprès de la police, après des propos tenus en réunion. Une plainte classée sans suite.

    Dès le départ, ses manières très directes étonnent : « Lors de la première réunion avec le personnel, Béatrice Khaiat nous a dit qu’à Campus France, on ne vendait pas “des putes ou de la coke”, une manière de souligner que notre matière était noble, se souvient un salarié, qui souhaite rester anonyme. Nous étions dirigés jusque-là par un ambassadeur, tout en retenue… Disons que c’était rafraîchissant. Mais ce mode d’expression a donné le ton sur la suite. J’ai des dizaines de témoignages d’#humiliation de salariés, de feuilles jetées à la figure… »

    Laura Foka en a fait l’expérience. À son retour de congé maternité en 2016, après avoir donné naissance à un deuxième enfant, elle participe à une réunion de service où Béatrice Khaiat plaisante sur son cas. « Au troisième enfant, je licencie », lâche la directrice. Lors d’un point d’actualité, rebelote : « Après deux enfants, il faut se remettre au travail », déclare Béatrice Khaiat devant le personnel réuni. Laura Foka se recroqueville au fond de la salle, et fond en larmes.

    « Mère de famille elle aussi, madame Khaiat a plaisanté avec l’une de ses collègues sur une expérience vécue par toutes les deux, celle d’une jeune mère devant assumer tout à la fois ses obligations professionnelles et familiales, explique aujourd’hui la direction, qui rappelle une #féminisation à 62 % de l’encadrement de Campus France ainsi qu’un score « presque parfait » à l’index de l’égalité homme-femme. Ces propos ont été repris de manière déformée. » Ils ont pourtant été confirmés par plusieurs témoignages et jugés suffisamment sérieux pour avoir fait l’objet d’un courrier de l’inspecteur du travail, qui rappelait à Campus France le risque de « #harcèlement_discriminatoire ».

    Très fragilisée par ces propos, Laura Foka se sent depuis un moment déjà sur la sellette. Dans son service communication, presse et études, c’est l’hécatombe depuis l’arrivée d’un nouveau manager. Les salariés serrent les dents, préviennent en vain les ressources humaines, attendent près d’un an et demi avant d’alerter les syndicats en 2017. Nombre d’entre eux ont des #pensées_suicidaires. Une enquête du CHSCT est déclenchée pour danger grave et imminent.

    Dans l’intervalle, cinq salariés du service, soit presque la totalité du département, quittent Campus France, « à l’américaine, leurs cartons sous le bras », raconte Laura Foka. Cette dernière pour inaptitude, qu’elle finit par accepter, de guerre lasse, face à l’inquiétude de son médecin, et deux pour faute grave ; les derniers dans le cadre de #rupture_conventionnelle, plus ou moins contrainte.

    L’une d’entre eux écrit ainsi ceci, un an plus tard, dans un courrier officiel à la DIRECCTE : « J’en suis arrivée au point de demander une rupture conventionnelle en septembre 2017 pour fuir des conditions de travail intenables et une situation devenue insupportable. » Contredisant les déclarations de la direction qui affirme que « l’intégralité des ruptures conventionnelles depuis la création de l’établissement en 2012 ont été faites à la demande des salariés qui souhaitaient partir et ont été approuvées par les administrateurs salariés ».

    Pour Zoubir Messaoudi, salarié du service informatique, la descente aux enfers professionnelle coïncide également avec l’arrivée de Béatrice Khaiat aux manettes et d’un nouveau manager au service informatique : « Mon ancien chef avait jeté l’éponge, mon N+1 était mis sur la touche. J’arrivais le premier au bureau et repartait le dernier, et pourtant, je recevais des mails où l’on me reprochait tout et n’importe quoi, comme si la direction essayait de constituer un dossier… Je viens du domaine de la prestation de service, où nous sommes clairement de la chair à canon, mais même là-bas, j’étais traité avec plus de respect. »

    Après un premier avertissement pour avoir quitté les locaux à 16 heures un jour de grève des transports (avertissement contesté aux prud’hommes, qui a tranché en sa faveur en 2018), Zoubir Messaoudi est convoqué pour licenciement en juin 2019. Sous le choc, il s’évanouit, ce qui nécessite l’intervention des pompiers et son hospitalisation en psychiatrie. Placé en arrêt de travail, il sera licencié quelques mois après pour faute grave, alors que l’arrêt court toujours, accusé de mauvaise foi vis-à-vis de son supérieur, de dénigrement de sa hiérarchie et de négligence professionnelle.

    « Durant un arrêt de travail et sous certaines conditions, l’employeur peut licencier un salarié, argumente Campus France. En l’occurrence, nous avons estimé, au vu de la gravité des faits commis par le salarié, que ces conditions étaient réunies. » Zoubir Messaoudi se souvient, lui, d’avoir passé « un sale été » l’an passé : « J’avais envie de me jeter par la fenêtre tellement j’avais mal. J’ai négligé ma femme, ma fille. » Il conteste aujourd’hui son licenciement aux prud’hommes.

    Se développer tous azimuts, trouver des recettes propres, répondre à l’ambition politique

    À quand remontent les alertes collectives ? Campus France les a-t-il ignorées ? Le premier rapport sur les risques psychosociaux, rédigé par le cabinet Orseu, agréé par le ministère du travail, est immédiatement contesté par la direction, qui remet en cause le professionnalisme des experts mandatés. Il concluait néanmoins en avril 2016 à un « risque psychosocial majeur ».

    Le deuxième rapport sur la qualité de vie au travail, rédigé par le cabinet (non agréé) Empreinte humaine un an plus tard est bien moins sévère, mais ne dément pas que l’organisation du travail puisse être améliorée. Il s’est ensuivi de séances menées par des psychologues du travail, pour que les salariés aient le moyen de s’exprimer. « Ces séances ont été l’occasion de larmes, de colère, d’insultes, rapporte un élu. Et il a fallu attendre un an et demi pour avoir un retour. Malgré nos demandes, la direction n’en a strictement rien fait. »

    Le 27 mars 2018, le CHSCT se félicite qu’une formation en droit social, de plusieurs dizaines de milliers d’euros, ait finalement été organisée à destination des managers, avant de regretter qu’elle ait été essentiellement « dédiée au processus de licenciement, à l’éventail des sanctions disciplinaires, au recueil des preuves, etc. » avant de s’interroger benoîtement pour savoir si ces formations « ne visent pas à étayer une politique de réduction de l‘effectif ». Une formation, s’insurgeaient les élus, qui abordait aussi la question « du licenciement des salariés protégés ».

    Deux autres enquêtes, à la suite d’alertes pour danger grave et imminent, ont donné lieu à des passes d’armes. La première, lancée par le CHSCT (où sont représentés direction et élus du personnel) au sujet de Ronel Tossa, aboutit à deux rapports divergents, l’un de la direction et l’autre des élus. C’est pourtant le premier que transmettra Campus France au juge en charge de trancher sur la légalité de son licenciement, le présentant comme le rapport du CHSCT, ce que ne manqueront pas de contester les élus de l’époque ainsi que le salarié concerné.

    Le ministère du travail lui-même, sollicité sur le licenciement de Ronel Tossa, mandaté par la CFDT comme délégué du personnel, a débouté l’établissement public en février 2019, reprenant les mots de l’inspecteur pour justifier sa position. Dans un mémoire auquel nous avons eu accès, il parle d’une « organisation pathogène volontaire » où le cas de ce salarié est à « replacer dans le contexte global de cette société, une hiérarchie qui dénie tout droit à ses salariés et qui a organisé un système de #souffrance_au_travail ».

    Campus France a fait appel de cette décision et assure avoir « contesté ces propos dans le cadre d’un recours hiérarchique mettant en cause l’impartialité de l’inspecteur du travail ». L’agence a manifestement eu gain de cause, car cet inspecteur a depuis été remplacé, au grand dam de plusieurs salariés. La direction enfonce d’ailleurs le clou : « Aucune situation correspondant à du harcèlement moral n’a été retenue et aucune mesure en conséquence n’a été prise par l’inspection du travail. »

    Elle se félicite également qu’aucune alerte pour danger grave et imminent n’ait été déclenchée depuis 2018. Même son de cloche auprès des salariés du conseil d’administration et de la secrétaire du CSE : « Le personnel Campus France a tourné la page depuis longtemps – sachant que la grande majorité ignorait ces #conflits_sociaux – afin de poursuivre la construction d’une véritable #culture_d’entreprise qui a pu être en défaut lors de la création de l’EPIC par la fusion en 2012 de deux entités distinctes et avec des fonctionnement différents. »

    Or pour cet ancien élu, très au fait de tous ces dossiers, la direction n’a pas cessé de vouloir au fil des ans « casser le thermomètre ». Lors d’une réunion du CHSCT, où sont évoquées la situation d’Abdelhafid Ramdani et la nécessité de déclencher une nouvelle #alerte pour #danger_grave_et_imminent (la médecin du travail évoquant le risque suicidaire), le directeur des ressources humaines explique ainsi à l’assemblée sidérée que « tout le monde meurt un jour ». « Après plusieurs tergiversations, on a quand même obtenu une enquête, élargie à toute la direction informatique », poursuit l’élu présent ce jour-là, sans trop y croire. « Les gens savaient que ceux qui étaient en conflit avec la direction étaient virés ou au placard, et donc ils se sont tus. » De fait, ce deuxième rapport ne conclut pas à un quelconque harcèlement.

    La médecin du travail elle-même, ont raconté à plusieurs reprises les salariés, se contente souvent de renvoyer la souffrance dos à dos, et évoque le décès, en 2015, d’Elsa Khaiat (parfois orthographié Cayat), la sœur de Béatrice Khaiat, lors de l’attentat de Charlie Hebdo, pour expliquer une forme d’emportement de la directrice générale. Le service de presse de Campus France fera d’ailleurs de même, en préambule de ses réponses à nos questions, pour nous décrire une « femme entière », issue d’une « famille engagée ».

    Plus profondément, ce que redoutent certains élus et salariés, c’est une forme de dégraissage déguisé des #effectifs, alors qu’une première vague de départs a déjà eu lieu lors de la fusion, en 2012. Cinq ans plus tard, en 2017, l’expert du comité d’entreprise s’inquiète d’une hausse des ruptures conventionnelles et d’une enveloppe dédiée à ces départs de 150 000 euros.

    « Un #abus_de_droit », soutien ce même expert, qui rappelle la mise sur pied par le gouvernement d’un « nouveau dispositif de rupture conventionnelle collective pour éviter des dérives ». Ce même expert, en septembre 2019, revient à la charge : « La première cause des départs sont les ruptures conventionnelles, qui représenteraient 30 % des départs sur les quatre dernières années », soit 31 postes en CDI. Tous ont été « homologués par l’inspection du travail », se défend Campus France, qui parle de « faits erronés », sans plus de précisions et assure que son équipe a maintenu les effectifs à flot, depuis la fusion.

    Mais à plusieurs reprises, le message envoyé aux salariés est clair : « La porte est grande ouverte », dira même un représentant de la direction lors d’une réunion avec les délégués du personnel, en mars 2017. Lors d’un pot de départ d’une salariée à l’occasion d’une rupture conventionnelle, à l’extérieur des locaux de Campus France, Béatrice Khaiat prend la parole, et incite, selon des témoins de la scène, les salariés à faire de même : « Faites comme elle, d’ailleurs, c’est magnifique ! », s’enthousiasme la responsable.

    « La direction, en CHSCT, devant l’inspecteur du travail et au cours de points d’information, a fait savoir, à de multiples reprises, que la porte était “grande ouverte”. Cela n’a jamais été un incident isolé, mais des propos récurrents », témoigne Ambroise Dieterle, secrétaire du CSE jusqu’en mai 2020, aujourd’hui en reconversion professionnelle.

    La question financière n’est pas étrangère à cette tendance. Un an après son arrivée, la directrice générale l’annonce aux élus : la #masse_salariale est trop importante au vu du #budget dont elle dispose, et devra être amputée d’un million d’euros. Les départs auront lieu, au fil de l’eau, alors même que l’agence doit se développer tous azimuts, trouver des recettes propres, et répondre à l’ambition politique. Derniers en date, le « #Make_our_planet_great_again », d’Emmanuel Macron, initiative qui a fortement mobilisé Campus France, ou encore le récent programme #Al-Ula, accord de coopération entre la France et l’Arabie saoudite.

    « C’est une question de dosage dans sa mission d’intérêt public, rappelle un ancien haut dirigeant de Campus France. Un Epic comme Campus France doit faire des recettes mais reste soumis à un agent comptable public. On a toutes les contraintes du droit privé, très contraignant, et celles de la comptabilité publique, extraordinairement lourdes. »

    Pour un ancien salarié œuvrant dans la gestion des bourses étudiantes, qui vient de quitter Campus France avec pas mal d’amertume, le problème réside plutôt dans ce que tout le monde « vienne prendre commande » chez Campus France, ministères, université, grandes écoles. Or l’arbitre à la toute fin, « c’est Bercy [le ministère des finances – ndlr] ». Quitte à une perte de sens dans les missions, poursuit-il : « Nous étions des fluidificateurs pour les étudiants, nous sommes devenus des auxiliaires de police, des collectionneurs de pièces. Notre image auprès d’eux, et des ambassades, se dégrade considérablement. »

    La critique n’est pas neuve. En 2012, un article du Monde racontait les débuts chaotiques de l’agence Campus France, ses tarifs devenus élevés, et ces étudiants étrangers, livrés à eux-mêmes à leur descente de l’avion. Quelques jours plus tard, le président du conseil d’administration Christian Demuynck (membre des Républicains) présentait même sa démission, critiquant une « gestion sans stratégie ni ambition de l’établissement par quelques fonctionnaires des tutelles nuisant gravement tant à son indépendance qu’à la qualité de son travail ».

    Dans la même lettre, que nous avons pu consulter, il rajoutait ceci : « J’espère que ma démission sera l’occasion pour l’État de mener un examen nécessaire des établissements publics qui sont nombreux, comme Campus France, à subir un tel mode de gestion. » Tout comme leurs salariés, sommés de suivre, parfois dans la douleur.

    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/080720/souffrance-au-travail-campus-france-le-cout-social-du-soft-power?onglet=fu
    #travail #conditions_de_travail

  • Man makes money buying his own pizza on DoorDash app
    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-52724062

    The owner of a pizza restaurant in the US has discovered the DoorDash delivery app has been selling his food cheaper than he does - while still paying him full price for orders. A pizza for which he charged $24 (£20) was being advertised for $16 on DoorDash - and when he secretly ordered it himself, the app paid his restaurant the full $24 while charging him $16. He had not asked to be put on the app. He later found out it was part of a trial to gauge customer demand. Content strategist (...)

    #Softbank #DoorDash #algorithme #technologisme #FoodTech #marketing #bug

  • Banjo CEO Damien Patton Was Once Tied to KKK and Neo-Nazis | OneZero
    https://onezero.medium.com/ceo-of-surveillance-firm-banjo-once-helped-kkk-leader-shoot-up-synag

    Documents reveal Damien Patton, CEO of SoftBank-backed Banjo, admitted to being a Neo-Nazi skinhead in his youth In magazine profiles and on conference stages, Damien Patton, the 47-year-old co-founder and CEO of the surveillance startup Banjo, often recounts a colorful autobiography. He describes how he ran away from a broken home near Los Angeles around age 15 and joined the U.S. Navy before working as a NASCAR mechanic. He says he became a self-taught crime scene investigator and then (...)

    #surveillance #extrême-droite #vidéo-surveillance #sexisme #racisme #antisémitisme #CCTV #algorithme #KKK #Softbank (...)

    ##Banjo

  • La CIA a-t-elle vraiment écrit l’une des chansons les plus célèbres de Scorpions ? - Urban Fusions
    https://www.urban-fusions.fr/2020/04/27/la-cia-a-t-elle-vraiment-ecrit-lune-des-chansons-les-plus-celebres-de-

    Un nouveau podcast se penchera sur la question de savoir si le succès de Scorpions en 1990 « Wind of Change » a été écrit par la CIA comme un morceau de propagande de la guerre froide. Le chanteur du groupe, Klaus Meine, est officiellement reconnu comme l’auteur de la chanson.

    Produite par Crooked Media et Pineapple Street Studios, la série de podcasts en huit parties, intitulée Wind of Change, sera présentée en première sur Spotify le 11 mai, animée par le journaliste d’investigation du New Yorker Patrick Radden Keefe.

    « C’est une histoire qui s’étend à travers les genres musicaux, et à travers les frontières et les périodes de l’histoire », a déclaré Keefe à Deadline. « Donc, il était important pour moi que vous entendiez la musique, les accents et les voix, et jugiez par vous-même qui pourrait mentir et qui dit la vérité. Je me suis tellement amusé à poursuivre cette histoire folle au cours d’une année, à explorer les voies sombres de l’histoire de la guerre froide et à faire près d’une centaine d’interviews dans quatre pays avec des rockers et des espions. J’ai hâte de le partager avec le monde. « 

    Tommy Vietor, le cofondateur de Crooked Media, a ajouté : « Nous savons que la CIA a secrètement parrainé des événements culturels dans les années 50 et 60. Ils ont payé pour filmer George Orwell en 1984 et Animal Farm. Ils ont parrainé une tournée européenne pour le Boston Symphony Orchestra. Pourquoi ne pas aider un groupe de rock allemand à écrire une ballade puissante pour déchiqueter le rideau de fer ? Et tandis que la CIA garde ses secrets de près, Patrick est l’un des meilleurs journalistes d’investigation et écrivains de sa génération, et personne n’est mieux placé pour découvrir la vérité. »

    #Patrick_Radden_Keefe #Hard_rock #Guerre_froide #Podcast

  • What can HCI research do for COVID-19? Max Van Kleek
    https://hip.cat/stuff/NORTHlab-HCI-Covid-19.pdf

    bad actors are benefitting massively from the lockdown during a global crisis

    app and platforms designers exploiting those who are being forced into using new tools for work (e.g. slack, zoom), socially pressured by friends (e.g. houseparty)

    the digital ad delivery and auction business seeing huge torrents of new data from smart home IoT devices and apps

    to less ethical app, game, and content designers creating shell adware, DLC-ware, clickbait

    and cybercriminals looking to exploit the vulnerable at a time when people are particularly susceptible

    some of these systems hold no pretences about not caringabout user privacy (slack, houseparty)

    others provide lipservice anduse deceptive tactics (zoom)